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Sample records for acalculous biliary pain

  1. Diagnostic yield of secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the investigation of patients with acalculous biliary pain

    PubMed Central

    Dronamraju, Shridhar; Scott, John; Oppong, Kofi; Nayar, Manu

    2016-01-01

    Background Secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (S-MRCP) facilitates better visualization of the pancreaticobiliary ductal system but its role in patients with acalculous biliary pain (ABP) is yet to be established. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic yield and the role of S-MRCP in the investigation of ABP patients. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients who had S-MRCP to investigate ABP over a 5-year period from June 2008 to May 2013. The findings and diagnosis as reported in the S-MRCP were compared with the findings on MRCP. The primary endpoint was the diagnostic yield of S-MRCP in ABP patients. Results A total of 117 patients with ABP [28 (24%) male] had S-MRCP during the study period. The most common abnormality identified was obstruction at the level of ampulla or in the proximal pancreatic duct. S-MRCP was able to identify significant pathological findings in 8 of 34 (22%) patients in whom MRCP did not detect any abnormality. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was performed in 67% of patients. S-MRCP identified abnormalities in 21 of 41 (54%) patients who had a normal EUS. Conclusions We conclude that the diagnostic yield of S-MRCP for recognizing anatomical variants of the pancreatic ductal system, in particular ampullary or proximal pancreatic duct stricture, is better than MRCP and EUS. These findings reflect the dynamic nature of S-MRCP and its complementary role alongside MRCP, EUS and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in ABP patients. PMID:27366040

  2. Cholecystokinin (CCK) functional cholescintigraphy (FC) in patients suspected of acalculous biliary disease (ABD)

    SciTech Connect

    Fink-Bennett, D.; De Ridder, P.; Kolozsi, W.; Gordon, R.; Rapp, J.

    1984-01-01

    To determine if CCK FC can aid in the diagnosis (Dx.) of ABD, the authors retrospectively analyzed the max. gallbladder (GB) ejection fraction response (EFR) to CCK in 240 patients (pts.) with persistent symptoms of biliary colic, a normal GB Ultrasound exam and/or OCG. Each pt. (NPO after 12 A.M.) received 5 mCi of technetium (Tc)-99 Hepatolite. After max GB filling, .02 ..mu..g/kg CCK was administered (1-3 minutes) I.V. Background corrected GB EFs were determined q.5 min x4 by ratioing the pre-CCK GB cts. minus post-CCK GB cts. to pre-CCK GB cts. In 131/240 pts. the max. GBEFR was <35%; 76 had a cholecystectomy (Cx.), 2 an exploratory lap., 53 medical Rx. Of the 76 post-Cx. pts., 74 had chronic cholecystitis (CC) (67 acalculous, 7 calculous), 2 were normal. Exploratory lap. pts, had no GB disease. Clinically 69/70 (4 no followup, 1 no change) post-op CC pts. are improved. One normal GB pt. has persistent pain, the other a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia. Of the 53 medical Rx. pts. 23 are lost to followup, and 2 died. Twenty-four are clinically felt to have ABD, 4 are not. In 109/240 pts. the max GBEFR was >35%. Eleven underwent surgery, 98 medical Rx. 4/11 Cx. apts had CAC, 7 were normal. Of the 98 medical Rx. pts. 21 lack followup, 71 are clinically felt not to have ABD; 6 are felt to have ABD. CCK FC appears to be a useful test for the detection of ABD. Its predictive value (GBEF <35%) in Cx. pts. is 97%; in all pts. (assuming medical Rx. correct), 94% (sensitivity - 91%, specificity - 93%).

  3. Chronic biliary colic associated with ketamine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nowfal, Ahmed; Al-Abed, Yahya A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Biliary colic is a common clinical presentation, with the majority of cases being related to gallstone disease. However, rarely, patients may present with biliary symptoms without evidence of gallbladder stones – referred to as acalculous gallstone disease. This case report details a rare case of chronic biliary colic associated with ketamine abuse. Case presentation A 24-year-old Caucasian female presented to the emergency department with a history of intermittent right upper quadrant pain associated with nausea and malaise. She had experienced bouts of similar symptoms three times a year for the past 4 years. Various investigations had been conducted during her multiple admissions, which showed possible dilatation of the common bile duct, with no evidence of gallstones. Conclusion Patients can present with a dilated common bile duct and an acalculous cholecystitis. This requires considerable investigation, with an emphasis on drug history, especially with the current rise of recreational hallucinogenic drug abuse. PMID:27330331

  4. My patient has got abdominal pain: identifying biliary problems

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark; Loubani, Osama; Bowra, Justin; Atkinson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Right upper quadrant and epigastric abdominal pain are common presenting complaints in the emergency department. With increasing access to point-of-care ultrasound, emergency physicians now have an added tool to help identify biliary problems as a cause of a patient’s right upper quadrant pain. Point-of-care ultrasound has a sensitivity of 89.8% (95% CI 86.4–92.5%) and specificity of 88.0% (83.7–91.4%) for cholelithiasis, very similar to radiology-performed ultrasonography. In addition to assessment for cholelithiasis and cholecystitis, point-of-care ultrasound can help emergency physicians to determine whether the biliary system is the source of infection in patients with suspected sepsis. Use of point-of-care ultrasound for the assessment of the biliary system has resulted in more rapid diagnosis, decreasing costs, and shorter emergency department length of stay.

  5. Acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.S.; Wilk, P.J.; Weissmann, H.S.; Freeman, L.M.; Gliedman, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    Sixty-eight patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were reviewed. The results of history and physical examinations were usually nondiagnostic. IDA cholescintigraphy (93 per cent accuracy rate) was the only reliable diagnostic modality. The results of oral cholecystography, intravenous cholangiography and ultrasonography were considerably less reliable. One-half of the patients had gangrenous cholecystitis. Cholecystectomy was the preferred operation with an over-all mortality of 9 per cent. IDA cholescintigraphy is an important new modality for the diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis which, in the past, has often been difficult to diagnose.

  6. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960

  7. Parasitic Infection of the Gallbladder: Cystoisospora belli Infection as a Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain and Acalculous Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Matthew G; Lee, Johnathan Y

    2016-06-01

    Herein we describe two cases of Cystoisospora belli infection of the gallbladder in patients with chronic abdominal pain and review the published literature to date. C. belli is an intracellular protozoan parasite that typically infects the small bowel of immunocompromised hosts. Little is known of the significance of C. belli infection of the gallbladder at this point as only four cases have been reported as yet, only one of which occurred in an immunocompetent patient. It is often treatable with antibiotics, and the patient's immune status, including HIV testing, should be investigated. Neither of the patients at our institution was found to be immunocompromised, and HIV-1/2 antibody testing was non-reactive in both. PMID:27526491

  8. Acalculous cholecystitis associated with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, J B

    2015-10-01

    Hantaviruses are responsible for various types of hemorrhagic fevers depending on the involved subtype. In Europe, Puumala virus is responsible for an epidemic nephropathy. This infection can be complicated by severe abdominal pain. A rarely reported cause of this presenting symptom is acalculous cholecystitis, which must be integrated in the clinicobiological spectrum and should not lead to a surgical sanction. Its presence seems to be correlated with the severity of the disease, whose main pathophysiological phenomenon is plasma leakage induced by a microvascular endothelial dysfunction. We report the case of a young male patient who presented with severe hantavirus infection complicated by acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:25982259

  9. Cholescintigraphy in acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanna, L.; Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Berman, D.S.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-08-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a relatively rare but potentially lethal condition if not treated promptly. Since stones are not present, diagnostic procedures such as ultrasound or other radiological procedures are frequently not helpful. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid scan results were analyzed in 11 proven cases of acute acalculous cholecystitis. All had positive tests with nonvisualization of the gallbladder giving a sensitivity of 100%. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy is a highly reliable test and is easily performed even in acutely ill patients and should be the test of choice in all patients predisposed to and suspected of acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  10. Paravertebral Block: An Improved Method of Pain Control in Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. McCowan, Timothy C.; DeValdenebro, Miguel; Wright, Lonnie B.; Workman, James L.; Culp, William C.

    2006-12-15

    Background and Purpose. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage remains a painful procedure in many cases despite the routine use of large amounts of intravenous sedation. We present a feasibility study of thoracic paravertebral blocks in an effort to reduce pain during and following the procedure and reduce requirements for intravenous sedation. Methods. Ten consecutive patients undergoing biliary drainage procedures received fluoroscopically guided paravertebral blocks and then had supplemental intravenous sedation as required to maintain patient comfort. Levels T8-T9 and T9-T10 on the right were targeted with 10-20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sedation requirements and pain levels were recorded. Results. Ten biliary drainage procedures in 8 patients were performed for malignancy in 8 cases and for stones in 2. The mean midazolam use was 1.13 mg IV, and the mean fentanyl requirement was 60.0 {mu}g IV in the block patients. Two episodes of hypotension, which responded promptly to volume replacement, may have been related to the block. No serious complications were encountered. The mean pain score when traversing the chest wall, liver capsule, and upon entering the bile ducts was 0.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, with 1 patient reporting a pain level of 1 and 9 reporting 0. The mean peak pain score, encountered when manipulating at the common bile duct level or when addressing stones there, was 5.4 and ranged from 0 to 10. Conclusions. Thoracic paravertebral block with intravenous sedation supplementation appears to be a feasible method of pain control during biliary interventions.

  11. A Case Report of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Beyazal Polat, Hatice; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi are a rare condition. A 24-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with abdominal pain, nausea, fever, headache, urinary burning, and bloody urine. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiological evaluations, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for two weeks. After the treatment, the patient's clinical and laboratory findings improved. Acute acalculous cholecystitis due to Salmonella Typhi concomitant with acute hemorrhagic cystitis is very rare and might be difficult to diagnose. Infectious agents such as Salmonella Typhi should be considered when acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis are detected in adult patients with no underlying diseases. PMID:25161668

  12. Evaluation and management of functional biliary pain in patients with an intact gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Dibaise, John K

    2009-06-01

    The diagnosis and management of suspected functional biliary pain in patients with an intact gallbladder remains contentious. Major issues include the lack of a clear definition of what constitutes biliary pain, a poor understanding of its natural history and pathophysiology, and the all too common scenario of the patient who has persistent pain despite surgical removal of the gallbladder. As a consequence, symptoms alone have generally been considered to be unreliable in the diagnosis of gallbladder dysfunction, and this has led to a search for a reliable test to help confirm a clinical suspicion of gallbladder dysfunction prior to the definitive treatment, cholecystectomy. At present, cholecystokinin-cholescintigraphy with a calculation of the gallbladder ejection fraction is the most commonly used test; however, its utility in predicting symptom outcome after cholecystectomy has been questioned. The use of cholecystokinin-cholescintigraphy to determine the appropriateness for cholecystectomy appears to be most useful when performed using a slow infusion of cholecystokinin in a well-selected patient population. However, for reasons explained herein, consideration of cholecystectomy on the basis of high clinical suspicion after adequate follow-up with trials of pharmacological therapies and exclusion of other disease entities, together with counseling the patient on postoperative expectations, may be a reasonable alternative. PMID:19485811

  13. Acute acalculous cholecystitis caused by Hepatitis C: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Ahmed; Osman, Medhet; Bonnet, Gerard; Ghamri, Nafiz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is rarely encountered in clinical practice and has a high morbidity and mortality. AAC caused by viral hepatitis, with hepatitis A, B and EBV infections are rare, but well documented in the literature. Hepatitis C virus has not been reported as cause of AAC. This case report documents the first case of AAC associated with Acute Hepatitis C. Presenting concerns We present a 40 years old female with abdominal pain. She has a history of previous HCV infection. Her liver function tests were markedly deranged with elevated inflammatory markers. USS scan showed rather a very unusual appearance of an inflamed gallbladder with no gallstones and associated acute hepatitis, confirmed by an abdominal CT scan. HCV RNA PCR confirms flair up of the virus. The patient was managed conservatively in the hospital with follow up USS scan and Liver function tests showed complete recovery. Follow up HCV RNA PCR also returned to an undetectable level. The patient recovered completely with no adverse outcomes. Conclusion This case report is to the first to document the association between acute HCV and AAC. Despite being uncommon in western countries, viral hepatitis should be suspected as a causative agent of AAC, particularly when there is abnormal liver function test and no biliary obstruction. PMID:26722714

  14. Abnormal gallbladder nuclear ejection fraction predicts success of cholecystectomy in patients with biliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, M K; Fancher, S; Lang, N P; Eidt, J F; Broadwater, J R

    1993-12-01

    The management of patients with symptoms consistent with biliary tract disease who do not have gallstones is difficult. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 18 patients who underwent cholecystokinin cholescintigraphy at our institution to determine if this procedure was reliable in identifying patients who would benefit from cholecystectomy. All patients underwent biliary screening, and a gallbladder ejection fraction of less than or equal to 35% was considered abnormal. None of the patients had evidence of gallstones by ultrasound. There were 11 patients with abnormal ejection fractions. All 11 patients (100%) had "classic" biliary colic and underwent cholecystectomy. The pathologic diagnosis was chronic cholecystitis in every patient. All patients had complete relief of their symptoms postoperatively with a mean follow-up of 10 months. There were six patients with normal ejection fractions. Only one patient in this group had "classic" biliary colic. This patient had a gallbladder ejection fraction of 38% and endoscopic evidence of gastritis. This patient remains symptomatic despite H2 blockade. The remaining five patients had nonspecific right upper quadrant or epigastric pain. These patients had endoscopic evidence of gastritis, and symptoms were relieved with H2 blockade. The remaining patient had an indeterminate scan due to radioactivity in the duodenum overlying the gallbladder and was excluded from this analysis. Cholecystokinin cholescintigraphy is a useful test in identifying those patients with biliary dyskinesia or acalculous cholecystitis who will benefit from cholecystectomy. PMID:8273847

  15. Do We Really Need Additional Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Computed Tomography for Differential Diagnosis in Triage of Middle-Aged Subjects With Suspected Biliary Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In Kyeom; Lee, Yoon Suk; Kim, Jaihwan; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Enhanced computed tomography (CT) is widely used for evaluating acute biliary pain in the emergency department (ED). However, concern about radiation exposure from CT has also increased. We investigated the usefulness of pre-contrast CT for differential diagnosis in middle-aged subjects with suspected biliary pain. A total of 183 subjects, who visited the ED for suspected biliary pain from January 2011 to December 2012, were included. Retrospectively, pre-contrast phase and multiphase CT findings were reviewed and the detection rate of findings suggesting disease requiring significant treatment by noncontrast CT (NCCT) was compared with cases detected by multiphase CT. Approximately 70% of total subjects had a significant condition, including 1 case of gallbladder cancer and 126 (68.8%) cases requiring intervention (122 biliary stone-related diseases, 3 liver abscesses, and 1 liver hemangioma). The rate of overlooking malignancy without contrast enhancement was calculated to be 0% to 1.5%. Biliary stones and liver space-occupying lesions were found equally on NCCT and multiphase CT. Calculated probable rates of overlooking acute cholecystitis and biliary obstruction were maximally 6.8% and 4.2% respectively. Incidental significant finding unrelated with pain consisted of 1 case of adrenal incidentaloma, which was also observed in NCCT. NCCT might be sufficient to detect life-threatening or significant disease requiring early treatment in young adults with biliary pain. PMID:25700321

  16. The role of 99mtechnetium-labelled hepato imino diacetic acid (HIDA) scan in the management of biliary pain

    PubMed Central

    Riyad, K.; Chalmers, C.R.; Aldouri, A.; Fraser, S.; Menon, K.; Robinson, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To assess the outcome of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the basis of an abnormal provocative 99mtechnetium-labelled hepato imino diacetic acid (HIDA) scan for patients with typical biliary pain and normal trans-abdominal ultrasound (TUS) scan. Patients and methods. Prospective data were collected for 1201 consecutive patients with typical biliary symptoms. Patients who were found to have a normal TUS and upper GI endoscopy subsequently underwent cholescintigraphy (HIDA scan). Patients with an abnormal HIDA scan, i.e.<40% ejection fraction with Sincalide® (cholecystokinin octapeptide) – were offered cholecystectomy. Symptoms and histology were reviewed postoperatively. Results. In all, 48/1201 (4%) patients with typical biliary symptoms had a normal ultrasound and endoscopy; 35/48 patients had an abnormal provocative HIDA scan and all underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Histology in all cases revealed chronic cholecystitis and 18 patients had sludge or microlithiasis within the gallbladder. At 6-week follow-up, 31 of the 35 patients were completely asymptomatic or improved. Furthermore, 79% of patients remained symptom-free or improved at a median follow-up of 28.5 months (range 4–70). Conclusions. HIDA scan is a useful clinical tool as an adjunct to the diagnosis and management of patients who present with typical biliary pain and a normal TUS scan. PMID:18333226

  17. [A Case of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis During Infectious Mononucleosis Caused by the Epstein-Barr Virus in a Young Woman].

    PubMed

    Ono, Shiro; Kobayashi, Tadanao; Nishio, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common disease and is mainly asymptomatic during childhood, whereas infectious mononucleosis with clinical signs such as fever, pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly often occurs in adolescents and adults with primary infection. Acalculous cholecystitis has been reported as a rare complication. We report herein a case of acalculous cholecystitis accompanied by infectious mononucleosis by EBV, which was treated successfully by medical treatment. A 33-year-old woman who had been admitted by fever, pharyngitis and lymphadenopathy developed a right upper quadrant pain, that was diagnosed as acalculous cholecystitis based on an imaging study. Antibiotic treatment did not resolve the symptoms, and surgical intervention was considered. We diagnosed her as having infectious mononucleosis based on a typical physical presentation and seropositivity for the EBV viral capsid antigen, suggesting that the acalculous cholecystatis might have been a complication of the EBV infection. After the administration of glucocorticoid and acyclovir, the patient became afebrile and the abdominal pain disappeared. Though acalculous cholecystitis rarely accompanies infectious mononucleosis caused by EBV, clinicians should be aware of this complication to avoid unnecessary cholecystectomy. PMID:27529970

  18. Acute acalculous cholecystitis: sensitivity in detection using technetium-99m iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C.

    1986-07-01

    Forty-one proved cases of acute acalculous cholecystitis imaged with technetium-99m iminodiacetic acid (IDA) cholescintigraphy were retrospectively analyzed. After the exclusion of one indeterminate scan (showing poor initial hepatic uptake and excretion), the study yielded a 92.5% (37 of 40) sensitivity for the detection of cystic or common bile duct obstruction. Each of the three patients with false-negative scintigrams had other abnormal scintigraphic findings suggestive of biliary tract disease. Of the 20 patients (48.8%) with focal or diffuse gangrenous cholecystitis or perforation, seven (35%) exhibited either free peritoneal spill or increased pericholecystic activity to indicate the presence of advanced disease.

  19. Henoch-Schönlein purpura complicated by acalculous cholecystitis and intussusception, and following recurrence with appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Güler, Ekrem; Çetinkaya, Ahmet; Karakaya, Ali Erdal; Göksügür, Yalçın; Katı, Ömer; Güler, Ahmet Gökhan; Davutoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is the most common childhood systemic vasculitis. Gastro-intestinal involvement occurs in two-thirds of patients. The characteristic skin lesions generally precede abdominal symptoms or present concurrently. A 7-year-old boy presented with intussusception and acalculous cholecystitis and had a cholecystectomy. Two weeks later he was re-admitted with features typical of HSP which responded to corticosteroids. Eleven months later he presented with abdominal pain and recurrence of HSP and, at laparotomy, there was acute appendicitis. This is the first case of a child presenting with HSP complicated by acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:27077617

  20. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Alexandra T; Clayton, Steven B; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  1. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Steven B.; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  2. Acalculous cholecystitis: a case with variable cholescintigram

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, P.B.

    1984-01-01

    A 62-yr-old man with acalculous cholecystitis is presented. At different stages of his disease his cholescintigram was abnormal and then normal. The case demonstrates the variations of the cholescintigram that may occur during the disease and illstrates the difficulties that may be encountered in making the diagnosis.

  3. Low sensitivity of sonography and cholescintigraphy in acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, W.P.; Rogers, J.V.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.; Plumley, T.; Larson, E.B.

    1984-03-01

    Acalculous cholecystitis is difficult to diagnose by clinical means or contrast radiography. Because sonography and cholescintigraphy have both been shown to do well in the diagnosis of calculous cholecystitis, the sensitivity of these newer imaging methods was assessed retrospectively in 33 proven cases of acalculous cholecystitis. The sensitivities to acalculous cholecystitis for sonography (67%) and for cholescintigraphy (68%) were not as high as has been reported for these tests in calculous cholecystitis. Reasons for the lower sensitivity with each test and the pathogenesis of acalculous cholecystitis are discussed.

  4. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acalculous cholecystitis in a neutropenic patient after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ejduk, Anna; Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Szczepanik, Andrzej B.

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) is most frequently reported in critically ill patients following sepsis, extensive injury or surgery. It is rather uncommon as a chemotherapy-induced complication, which is usually life-threatening in neutropenic patients subjected to myelosuppressive therapy. A 23-year-old patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was subjected to myelosuppressive chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, pegaspargase). After the first chemotherapy cycle the patient was neutropenic and feverish; she presented with vomiting and pain in the right epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder with wall thickening up to 14 mm. The ACC was diagnosed. Medical therapy included a broad spectrum antibiotic regimen and granulocyte-colony stimulating factors. On the second day after ACC diagnosis the patient's general condition worsened. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. The resected gallbladder showed no signs of bacterial or leukemic infiltrates. The postoperative course was uneventful. In the management of neutropenic patients with ACC surgical treatment is as important as pharmacological therapy. PMID:25337176

  5. Gallbladder melanoma mimicking acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    De Simone, P; Mainente, P; Bedin, N

    2000-06-01

    Gallbladder (GB) melanoma is a rare entity with a dismal prognosis. Its primary or secondary status is difficult to establish in the absence of an overt cutaneous localization. We report herein the case of a misdiagnosed GB melanoma mimicking acute acalculous cholecystitis that was treated by means of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). A 54-year-old man was referred to our institution for acute cholecystitis. Apart from the ablation of some nevocytic nevi 7 years before admission, the patient's medical history was unremarkable. The ultrasound (US) examination showed a slightly enlarged acalculous gallbladder with thickened walls and a well-circumscribed polypoid mass in the fundus. The patient was treated medically and referred to LC. At surgery, some satellite nodules were visualized in the GB hepatic bed. The GB was removed, and two hepatic nodules were excised. Histology showed a pT3 melanoma. The patient underwent an open hepatic wedge resection 3 weeks after laparoscopy. No recurrence was observed at 6-month follow-up. To date, only one case of melanoma of the gallbladder treated with LC has been reported. GB melanoma is a diagnostic challenge when there is no evidence of a primary lesion. However, the occurrence of acalculous cholecystitis and a GB polyp in patients with a positive history of mole ablation should alert surgeons to the possibility of a melanoma. PMID:11265063

  6. Biliary cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, P D

    1975-01-01

    This review brings the total number of biliary cysts reported in the world literature to 955. Eighty-one per cent of patients are females and 61% were discovered before age ten. The classical triad of right upper quadrant pain, right upper quandrant mass, and juandice is present in 38% of cases. The duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis ranged from less than one week to more than 40 years. The etiology is multifaceted and evidence of the existence of both acquired and congenital cysts is presented. The most useful diagnostic tool is fiberoptic endoscopy with retrograde contrast injection of the common bile duct and pancreatic duct. The incidence of biliary carcinoma in patients with biliary cysts is found to be 2.5%; 24 cases have been reported. Considerable controversy has existed concerning the best operative procedure for biliary cysts; no treatment or medical treatment yielding a 97% mortality rate. In an analysis of 235 patients presented since 1968 with an average followup of 5.2 years, the best procedure appears to be excision with either choledochocholedocostomy or Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The operative mortality for all procedures is now 3 to 4%. PMID:1103760

  7. Haemobilia causing cholangitis in a patient on dual anti-platelet treatment suffering from acute acalculous cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Andreas; Buter, Anton; Abela, Jo-Etienne

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Haemobilia is a rare cause of upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage which can be difficult to diagnose. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a patient who suffered from acute acalculous cholecystitis while on dual anti-platelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. We describe the diagnostic and treatment challenges arising from the patient's complicated past history and the steps leading to the diagnosis of haemobilia causing biliary obstruction and cholangitis. Our patient did not, at any point, manifest anaemia or evidence of haemorrhage. DISCUSSION Haemobilia has a varied aetiology. To our knowledge there is no association with dual anti-platelet treatment in the literature to date. Diagnosis is difficult and relies on multiple modalities. In our patient the final diagnosis was only made in the course of open bile duct exploration. CONCLUSION In acute biliary obstruction we recommend the consideration of haemobilia in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients with a bleeding tendency. PMID:23466686

  8. Biliary ascariasis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sarihan, H; Gürkök, S; Sari, A

    1995-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a worldwide intestinal infestation that may cause various complications. Biliary ascariasis, however, is a rare condition. We describe a child with biliary ascariasis. The patient's clinical symptoms were pain, vomiting and abdominal tenderness, and she was thought to have acute appendicitis. However, laboratory examination revealed high serum alkaline phosphatase and amylase levels, and ultrasonography and percutaneous cholangiography demonstrated biliary ascariasis. The patient was successfully treated with mebendazole and antispasmolytic drugs. PMID:8560608

  9. Evaluation of the role of prostaglandins E and F in acalculous gallbladder disease

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Y.G.; Kaminski, D.L.; Thomas, L.

    1986-03-01

    Prostaglandins have been shown to play a role in gallbladder disease. This study was performed to evaluate prostaglandin E and F production by human gallbladder mucosal cells and muscle tissue from patients undergoing cholecystectomy for acalculous gallbladder disease. These results were compared to values produced by gall bladders removed from patients with no known gallbladder disease. Five patient underwent cholecystectomy for acute and five for chronic acalculous cholecystitis. Gallbladder mucosal cells were separated from muscle wall by submucosal injection of EDTA and shaking in tissue culture media. Prostaglandin levels were measured in mucosal cell and muscle tissue homogenate by radioimmunoassay (ng/mg homogenate protein). Homogenate prostaglandin E concentrations were significantly increased in mucosa and muscle tissue in gall bladders from patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Chronic acalculous gallbladder disease was not associated with changes in prostaglandin formation when compared to values produced by gall bladders from asymptomatic patients. Acute acalculous cholecystitis may be a prostaglandin mediated disorder.

  10. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare initial manifestation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Valdano; Pedro, Gertrudes Maria; Cordeiro, Lemuel Bornelli; de Miranda, Sandra Maria da Rocha Neto

    2016-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a very rare gastrointestinal manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus and becomes rarer as an initial manifestation. There are only two cases reported. The authors report a 20-year-old black woman that presented acute acalculous cholecystitis revealed by abdominal computed tomography. During hospitalization, she was diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus. Conservative treatment with antibiotics was performed with complete remission of the symptoms. Corticosteroid was started in ambulatory. Cholecystectomy has been the treatment of choice in acute acalculous cholecystitis as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient responded well to conservative treatment, and surgery was not required. This case is unique in the way that corticosteroid was started in ambulatory care. We should not forget that the acute acalculous cholecystitis can be the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus although its occurrence is very rare. Conservative treatment should be considered. Abdominal computed tomography was a determinant exam for better assessment of acute acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:27267533

  11. Biliary stricture

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a gallstone in the bile duct Pancreatitis Primary sclerosing cholangitis Risk factors include: Gallstones Injury to ... Inflammation and narrowing of the biliary duct may return in some ... remain for a long period can lead to liver damage ( cirrhosis ).

  12. Biliary stricture

    MedlinePlus

    ... help reveal a problem with the biliary system . Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is higher than normal. Bilirubin level ... the small intestine. In some cases, a tiny metal or plastic mesh tube ( stent ) is placed across ...

  13. Biliary Cystadenoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeyasingh, Suresh Durai; Kalyanaraman, Shantaraman

    2016-01-01

    Biliary cystadenoma is a rare cystic neoplasms of liver that usually occurs in middle-aged women characterized by multiloculated cysts with internal septae and mural nodules. Unilocular biliary cystadenomas are rare and are difficult to differentiate from other cysts by radiology. Biliary cystadenomas are slow growing benign lesions that are easily resectable with a reported recurrence rate of 90% when the resection is incomplete. We present a case of 65-year-old male with unilocular biliary cystadenoma with mesenchymal stroma who presented with abdominal pain and distension. Laparotomy followed by cystectomy was done and postoperative period was uneventful with no abnormal biochemical, heamatological or imaging findings. Preoperative radio-imaging techniques may not always be helpful in arriving at a specific diagnosis in such cases. Hence thorough sampling and a careful histopathological examination is considered gold standard for specific diagnosis. PMID:27042478

  14. Acute acalculous cholecystitis: a rare complication of snake bite.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Subramanian; Menezes, Ritesh G; Pant, Sadip; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, Ponniah

    2013-09-01

    Snake bite is an environmental and occupational hazard in many tropical and subtropical countries. It demands a high level of knowledge and skill in managing the envenomation syndrome. Herein, we describe a rare case of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) that developed in a 36-year-old man after an Indian cobra (Naja naja) bite in the absence of any other predisposing factors for AAC. The probable mechanisms for the occurrence of AAC have been highlighted. Recognizing the possibility of such a complication after envenomation will definitely aid in early diagnosis and, subsequently, a better outcome. PMID:23473791

  15. [Toxocarosis and acalculous acute cholecystitis: Consequence or coincidence?].

    PubMed

    Strickler, Alexis; Vásquez, Natalia; Maggi, Leonardo; Hernández, Juvenal; Hidalgo, Ximena

    2016-06-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic larval parasitosis listed as one of the five most important neglected diseases by the CDC. The larvae can spread systemically and migrate to different tissues including liver and gallbladder. Acalculous acute cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare disease in children. The diagnosis is based on clinical parameters and imaging criteria. It has been reported in relation to sepsis, shock, trauma, burns, severe systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, infections and also in healthy children. We report a pediatric case of toxocarosis, with clinical symptoms and imaging criteria compatible with AAC treated medically, and discuss the relationship between toxocarosis and AAC based on published evidence. PMID:27598288

  16. Cholecystokinin cholecystography, sonography, and scintigraphy: detection of chronic acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.B.; Berk, R.N.; Sheible, F.W.; Witztum, K.F.; Gilmore, I.T.; Strong, R.M.; Hofmann, A.F.

    1982-12-01

    Because the efficacy of cholecystokinin cholecystography in the detection of chronic acalculous cholecystitis remains in doubt, the procedure is rarely used in clinical practice. However, the ability to observe gallbladder contraction with sonography and /sup 99m/Tc-para-isopropylacetanilido-iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy (PIPIDA) offers a possibility to improve the sensitivity of the test. To determine if the degree of gallbladder contraction after cholecystokinin is the same as measured by the three techniques and if it differs in symptomatic patients compared to the normal population, cholecystokinin cholecystography, cholecystokinin sonography, and cholecystokinin PIPIDA were performed in 10 symptomatic patients and 10 normal volunteers. The mean maximum contraction of the gallbladder during the three studies was 63%, 61%, and 68%, respectively, for the volunteers, and 72%, 63%, and 73%, respectively, for the patients. The mean maximum gallbladder contraction during all three procedues was 64% +/- 26% SD in the volunteers and 74% +/- 17% SD in the patients. The differences were not statistically significant. Although there was good correlation in the degree of maximum gallbladder contraction among cholecystokinin PIPIDA, marked variation in both the volunteers and the patients makes it unlikely that the degree of contraction as observed by any of these techniques can be used to indicate the presence of chronic acalculous cholecystitis.

  17. Cholecystokinin cholecystography, sonography, and scintigraphy: detection of chronic acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.B.; Berk, R.N.; Scheible, F.W.; Witztum, K.F.; Gilmore, I.T.; Strong, R.M.; Hofmann, A.F.

    1982-12-01

    Because the efficacy of cholecystokinin cholecystography in the detection of chronic acalculous cholecystitis remains in doubt, the procedure is rarely used in clinical practice. However, the ability to observe gallbladder contraction with sonography and /sup 99m/Tc-para-isopropylacetanilido-iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy (PIPIDA) offers a possibility to improve the sensitivity of the test. To determine if the degree of gallbladder contraction after cholecystokinin is the same as measured by the three techniques and if it differs in symptomatic patients compared to the normal population, cholecystokinin cholecystography, cholecystokinin sonography, and cholecystokinin PIPIDA were performed in 10 symptomatic patients and 10 normal volunteers. The mean maximum contraction of the gallbladder during the three studies was 63%, 61%, and 68%, respectively, for the volunteers, and 72%, 63%, and 73%, respectively, for the patients. The mean maximum gallbladder contraction during all three procedures was 64% +/- 26% SD in the volunteers and 74% +/- 17% SD in the patients. The differences were not statistically significant. Although there was good correlation in the degree of maximum gallbladder contraction among cholecystokinin cholecystography, cholecystokinin sonography, and cholecystokinin PIPIDA, marked variation in both the volunteers and the patients makes it unlikely that the degree of contraction as observed by any of these techniques can be used to indicate the presence of chronic acalculous cholecystitis.

  18. Acalculous Acute Cholecystitis in Previously Healthy Children: General Overview and Analysis of Pediatric Infectious Cases

    PubMed Central

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Tresoldi, Matteo; Licari, Amelia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is an inflammation of the gallbladder, which does not appear to be associated with the presence of gallstones. AAC is estimated to represent more than 50% of cases of acute cholecystitis in the pediatric population. Although this pathology was initially described in critically ill patients, actually most pediatric cases have been observed during several infectious diseases. Particularly, here we reviewed pediatric infectious acute acalculous cholecystitis and analyzed the pathophysiological and clinical aspects of bacterial and viral forms. PMID:26640715

  19. Biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Chardot, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease characterised by a biliary obstruction of unknown origin that presents in the neonatal period. It is the most frequent surgical cause of cholestatic jaundice in this age group. BA occurs in approximately 1/18,000 live births in Western Europe. In the world, the reported incidence varies from 5/100,000 to 32/100,000 live births, and is highest in Asia and the Pacific region. Females are affected slightly more often than males. The common histopathological picture is one of inflammatory damage to the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts with sclerosis and narrowing or even obliteration of the biliary tree. Untreated, this condition leads to cirrhosis and death within the first years of life. BA is not known to be a hereditary condition. No primary medical treatment is relevant for the management of BA. Once BA suspected, surgical intervention (Kasai portoenterostomy) should be performed as soon as possible as operations performed early in life is more likely to be successful. Liver transplantation may be needed later if the Kasai operation fails to restore the biliary flow or if cirrhotic complications occur. At present, approximately 90% of BA patients survive and the majority have normal quality of life. PMID:16872500

  20. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in a Lebanese girl with primary Epstein-Barr viral infection.

    PubMed

    Majdalani, Marianne; Milad, Nadine; Sahli, Zeyad; Rizk, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) constitutes 5-10% of all cases of cholecystitis in adults, and is even less common in children. The recent literature has described an association between primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and AAC, however, it still remains an uncommon presentation of the infection. Most authors advise that the management of AAC in patients with primary EBV infection should be supportive, since the use of antibiotics does not seem to alter the severity or prognosis of the illness. Furthermore, surgical intervention has not been described as necessary or indicated in the management of uncomplicated AAC associated with EBV infection. We report a case of a 16-year-old Lebanese girl with AAC associated with primary EBV infection. She presented to the emergency department, with high-grade fever, fatigue, vomiting and abdominal pain. Liver enzymes were elevated with a cholestatic pattern, and imaging confirmed the diagnosis of AAC. She was admitted to the regular floor, and initial management was conservative. Owing to persistence of fever, antibiotics were initiated on day 3 of admission. She had a smooth clinical course and was discharged home after a total of 9 days, with no complications. PMID:27090538

  1. An unusual cause of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass: Case report of a penetrating fish bone causing adhesions at the biliary-digestive junction resulting in partial obstruction and chronic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Vincent; Hendrickx, Leo; Valk, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGP) is complex and challenging. Foreign body intestinal perforation including that caused by fish bones has previously been reported in the literature and if clinically unrecognized, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Fish bone perforation as a cause of chronic abdominal pain after LRYGP has rarely been reported. Summary The unusual case of a 54 year old female presenting with recurrent episodes of postprandial pain 2 years after LRYGP is reported. Previous radiological and endoscopic investigations did not reveal any abnormality and after the most recent clinical presentation, a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A protruding fish bone at the biliary-digestive junction was discovered intra-operatively and successfully extracted. Dense adhesions between the involved intestinal loops were lysed in an attempt to improve intestinal transit and subsequently relieve post-prandial pain. Conclusion This case highlights the possibility of a missed fish bone perforation causing chronic postprandial abdominal pain and discomfort in a patient with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy. Foreign body perforation is a rare cause of abdominal pain after gastric bypass that should be considered when evaluating chronic abdominal pain symptoms after LRYGP. PMID:27107305

  2. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePlus

    Cytology analysis - biliary tract; Biliary tract biopsy ... A sample for a biliary tract biopsy can be obtained in different ways. A needle biopsy can be done if you have a well-defined tumor. The biopsy site ...

  3. [New approaches to diagnosing and treating hyperkinetic biliary dyskinesia associated with chronic acalculous cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Bartosh, L F; Balakina, I V; Gridneva, L M

    2004-01-01

    Ninety patients aged 21 to 56 years who had chronic non-calculous cholecystitis (CNCC) concurrent with hyperkinetic dyskinesia (HKD) detectable by a stepwise duodenal probing and sonography, by using a choleretic breakfast and by determining the relaxation coefficient (RC) that was equal to the ratio of the volume of the gallbladder (GB) after the use of a spasmolytic to the baseline GB volume. The patients were divided into 3 groups. The authors used as a spasmolytic agent pinaverium bromide (dicetel) in a dose of 50 mg (1 tablet) in Group 1), octylonium bromide (spasmomen) in a dose of 40 mg (1 dragee) in Group 2, and drotaverine (no-spa) in a dose of 40 mg (1 tablet). There was a more significant sonographic increase in the size of GB in Groups 1 and 2 as compared with Group 3. In the acute drug test and during long-term treatment as well, the highest spasmolytic effect was noted in patients receiving dicetel (Group 1) and spasmomen (Group 2) as compared with that in Group 3 patients taking drotaverine. With this, RC was 1.25 +/- 0.2, 1.6 +/- 0.15, and 1.08 +/- 0.1, respectively. No adverse reactions occurred in the patients having selective calcium blockers (SCBs) whereas the patients receiving no-spa were found to have the following side effects: dry mouth (n = 3), transient constipation (n = 1), and numb tongue (n = 1). Thus, the study has provided evidence for the fact that SCBs have some advantage over myotropic spasmolytic agents in the treatment of CNCC with the signs of HKD. PMID:15540426

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection with Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ahlee; Moon, Jin Soo; Chang, Ju Young; Ko, Jae Sung

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is an inflammation of the gallbladder in the absence of demonstrated stones. AAC is frequently associated with severe systemic inflammation. However, the exact etiology and pathogenesis of AAC still remain unclear. Acute infection with Epstein Barr virus (EBV) in childhood is usually aymptomatic, whereas it often presents as typical infectious mononucleosis symptoms such as fever, cervical lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. AAC may occur during the course of acute EBV infection, which is rarely encountered in the pediatric population. AAC complicating the course of a primary EBV infection is usually associated with a favorable outcome. Most of the patients recover without any surgical treatment. Therefore, the detection of EBV in AAC would be important for prediction of better prognosis. We describe the case of a 10-year-old child who presented with AAC during the course of primary EBV infection, the first in Korea, and review the relevant literature. PMID:24749090

  5. Epstein-barr virus infection with acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ahlee; Yang, Hye Ran; Moon, Jin Soo; Chang, Ju Young; Ko, Jae Sung

    2014-03-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is an inflammation of the gallbladder in the absence of demonstrated stones. AAC is frequently associated with severe systemic inflammation. However, the exact etiology and pathogenesis of AAC still remain unclear. Acute infection with Epstein Barr virus (EBV) in childhood is usually aymptomatic, whereas it often presents as typical infectious mononucleosis symptoms such as fever, cervical lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. AAC may occur during the course of acute EBV infection, which is rarely encountered in the pediatric population. AAC complicating the course of a primary EBV infection is usually associated with a favorable outcome. Most of the patients recover without any surgical treatment. Therefore, the detection of EBV in AAC would be important for prediction of better prognosis. We describe the case of a 10-year-old child who presented with AAC during the course of primary EBV infection, the first in Korea, and review the relevant literature. PMID:24749090

  6. Biliary ascariasis: radiological clue to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Bansal, Satish; Kumar, Naveen; Sharma, Navneet

    2015-03-01

    Ascariasis is caused by Ascaris lumbricoides. It is the most common helminthic infection seen worldwide. Ascariasis is an endemic disease in our country. This is due to the prevailing poor sanitary conditions and low level of education. Biliary ascariasis is an uncommon cause of obstructive jaundice. We report a case of biliary ascariasis in a young labourer who presented with acute abdominal pain. PMID:26634136

  7. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain ... Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain ...

  8. First detection of acalculous cholecystitis associated with Sarcocystis infection in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Agholi, Mahmoud; Heidarian, Hamid Reza; Moghadami, Mohsen; Hatam, Gholam Reza

    2014-06-01

    Acalculous cholecystitis and cholangitis are increasingly being recognized as complications of AIDS. The opportunistic parasites that have been most commonly associated with these disorders are Cryptosporidium species, Isospora belli, Cyclospora cayetanensis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. The authors performed a parasitological survey on the gallbladder tissue sections of patients underwent cholecystectomy due to chronic acalculous cholecystitis at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Light microscopic investigation in more than three hundred archived histopathological slides revealed the presence of sexual stages (i.e., mature sporocysts) of a coccidial protozoan in a patient with AIDS who developed acalculous cholecystitis as confirmed by histological, parasitological and molecular tests in which Sarcocystis species was the only identifiable pathogen in gallbladder sections. In the best of our knowledge it's the first documented case of chronic non-calculous cholecystitis due to Sarcocystis parasite in an Iranian AIDS patient from worldwide. PMID:24827104

  9. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the bile ducts of the liver. This blocks the flow ... ducts in the liver is not known. However, primary biliary cirrhosis is an autoimmune disorder. That means your body's ...

  10. Irradiation of biliary carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Herskovic, A.; Heaston, D.; Engler, M.J.; Fishburn, R.I.; Jones, R.S.; Noell, K.T.

    1981-04-01

    External and interstitial irradiation have effected the disappearance of biliary lesions. The use of indwelling catheters in the biliary tract makes the technique more appealing. Iridium 192 implants were used.

  11. Biliary fascioliasis--an uncommon cause of recurrent biliary colics: report of a case and brief review.

    PubMed

    Al Qurashi, Hesham; Masoodi, Ibrahim; Al Sofiyani, Mohammad; Al Musharaf, Hisham; Shaqhan, Mohammed; All, Gamal Nasr Ahmed Abdel

    2012-01-01

    Biliary parasitosis is one of the important causes of biliary obstruction in endemic areas, however due to migration and travel the disease is known to occur in non endemic zones as well. The spectrum of biliary fascioliasis ranges from recurrent biliary colics to acute cholangitis. The long term complications are gall stones, sclerosing cholangitis and biliary cirrhosis. We describe fascioliasis as a cause of recurrent biliary colics in a young male necessitating multiple hospitalizations over a period of four years. Investigative profile had been non-contributory every time he was hospitalized for his abdominal pain prior to the current presentation. He never had cholangitis due to the worm in the common bile duct. It was only at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) biliary fascioliasis was discovered to be the cause of his recurrent biliary colics. After removal of the live Fasciola hepatica from the common bile duct he became symptom free and is attending our clinic for last 11 months now. Clinical spectrum of biliary fascioliasis is discussed in this report. PMID:22566787

  12. Pediatric Biliary Interventions.

    PubMed

    Atchie, Benjamin; Kalva, Sanjeeva; Josephs, Shellie

    2015-12-01

    An interventional radiologist is frequently called to evaluate and treat biliary diseases in children; a tailored approach specific to this population is required. Imaging with an emphasis on minimizing ionizing radiation is used not only in the initial workup but also to guide interventions. The most common form of intervention generally consists of transhepatic biliary drainage to treat either biliary obstruction or bile leakage, a scenario frequently encountered after pediatric liver transplantation. Other pathologies referred for evaluation and management include biliary atresia and, rarely, symptomatic choledochal cysts. Biliary complications caused by an underlying malignancy are not a frequently encountered problem in the pediatric population. The initial evaluation, role of preprocedural imaging, and interventional management with an emphasis on technique are discussed regarding these common biliary pathologies in children. PMID:26615168

  13. The role of technetium-99m iminodiacetic acid (IDA) cholescintigraphy in acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmann, H.S.; Berkowitz, D.; Fox, M.S.; Gliedman, M.L.; Rosenblatt, R.; Sugarman, L.A.; Freeman, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Technetium-99m iminodiacetic acid (IDA) cholescintigraphy was performed in 15 patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Fourteen of the 15 patients with acute disease had positive findings, indicating the presence of cystic duct or common duct obstruction. One case in which the gallbladder was visualized failed to respond to sincalide stimulation; this was classified as a suggestive finding of disease. The diagnostic accuracy of /sup 99m/Tc-IDA cholescintigraphy was far superior to the other imaging studies used (8 sonograms, 1 intravenous cholangiogram, 3 oral cholecystograms, 1 percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram). The /sup 99m/Tc-IDA study is recommended as the imaging procedure of choice for examining patients with suspected acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  14. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis: a comparison of sonography, scintigraphy, and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mirvis, S.E.; Vainright, J.R.; Nelson, A.W.; Johnston, G.S.; Shorr, R.; Rodriguez, A.; Whitley, N.O.

    1986-12-01

    The clinical and laboratory diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is difficult, and the reliability of various diagnostic imaging techniques has not been established. The results of several imaging procedures performed over a 6-year period on 56 patients with clinically suspected acute acalculous cholecystitis were evaluated retrospectively. Sonography and CT were both highly sensitive (92% and 100%, respectively) and specific (96% and 100%, respectively). Hepatobiliary scintigraphy was compromised by frequent false-positives; the result was a specificity of only 38%. Percutaneous bile aspiration was insufficiently sensitive (33%) for diagnosis. Sonography was as sensitive as hepatobiliary scintigraphy and was more specific in establishing the diagnosis. Because sonography is relatively inexpensive and can be performed at the bedside, it should be regarded as a satisfactory screening procedure. However, CT is a good alternative in an easily transported patient when other intraabdominal disease is suspected.

  15. The role of technetium-99m iminodiacetic acid (IDA) cholescintigraphy in acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmann, H.S.; Berkowitz, D.; Fox, M.S.; Gliedman, M.L.; Rosenblatt, R.; Sugarman, L.A.; Freeman, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    Technetium-99m iminodiacetic acid (IDA) cholescintigraphy was performed in 15 patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Fourteen of the 15 patients with acute disease had positive findings, indicating the presence of cystic duct or common duct obstruction. One case in which the gallbladder was visualized failed to respond to sincalide stimulation; this was classified as a suggestive finding of disease. The diagnostic accuracy of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-IDA cholescintigraphy was far superior to the other imaging studies used (8 sonograms, 1 intravenous cholangiogram, 3 oral cholecystograms, 1 percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram). The /sup 99//sup m/Tc-IDA study is recommended as the imaging procedure of choice for examining patients with suspected acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  16. Retroperitoneal abscess and acute acalculous cholecystitis after iatrogenic colon injury: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chengwei; Wang, Yuxu; Hu, Sanyuan; Du, Futian; Ding, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis has a high mortality rate due to the difficulties in early diagnosis and high rate of complications like empyema, gangrene and perforation. We report a case of 20-year-old male with acute severe pancreatitis, acute renal failure and acute peripancreatic fluid collection who was transferred to our department after blood filtration treatment in ICU. After percutaneous catheter drainage for 20 hours, the patient got a high fever. Computed tomography revealed retroperitoneal colon injury. In this case, percutaneous catheter drainage was performed again and the pus cavity was flushed regularly, after which the patient’s state gradually improved. Unpredictably, septic shock appeared on the 51st day. Repeated computed tomography revealed acute acalculous cholecystitis and abscess formation. After percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder catheterization and drainage, the patient got better gradually. Three months later the retroperitoneal catheter was removed. Four months later, ultrasound examination showed normal gallbladder and the catheter was removed. PMID:26131252

  17. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sung Jin; Min, Jae Ki; Kwon, So Young; Kim, Jun Hyun; Moon, Sun Young; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Hee Sun

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures. PMID:27044769

  18. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  19. Preoperative biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Payal; Kumbhari, Vivek; Zein, Mohamad E L; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    The role of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with distal or proximal biliary obstruction secondary to resectable tumors has been a matter for debate. A review of the literature using Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases was undertaken for studies evaluating routes of drainage (endoscopic or percutaneous) and stent types (plastic or metal) in patients with resectable disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is indicated for relief of symptomatic jaundice, cholangitis, patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy or those patients where surgery may be delayed. Endoscopic methods are preferred over percutaneous methods because of lower complication rates. In patients with proximal biliary obstruction, PBD should be guided by imaging studies to aid in selective biliary cannulation for unilateral drainage in order to reduce the risk of cholangitis in undrained liver segments. PMID:25293587

  20. History of biliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Spirou, Yannos; Yannos, Spirou; Petrou, Athanasios; Athanasios, Petrou; Christoforides, Christos; Christos, Christoforides; Felekouras, Evangelos; Evangelos, Felekouras

    2013-05-01

    Since ancient times biliary surgery has been one of the major interests of doctors and other scientists around the world. From the ancient Greeks and Egyptians to the greatest scientists of modern times biliary surgery has advanced remarkably. Especially during the last century huge progress has been made in this field. Minimally invasive surgical techniques have been developed and combined with general anesthesia and antisepsis that have made biliary surgery particularly safe for every patient and have made cholecystectomy one of the most common operations in the world today. PMID:23430002

  1. Congenital biliary tract malformation resembling biliary cystadenoma in a captive juvenile African lion (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Valentina; Bull, Andrew C J; Stidworthy, Mark F

    2012-12-01

    A captive 3-mo-old white African lion (Panthera leo) presented with clinical signs of acute pain and a distended abdomen. Despite emergency treatment, the lion died a few hours after presentation. Postmortem examination revealed gross changes in the liver, spleen, and lungs and an anomalous cystic structure in the bile duct. Histologic examination identified severe generalized multifocal to coalescent necrotizing and neutrophilic hepatitis, neutrophilic splenitis, and mild interstitial pneumonia, consistent with bacterial septicemia. The abnormal biliary structures resembled biliary cystadenoma. However, due to the age of the animal, they were presumed to be congenital in origin. Biliary tract anomalies and cystadenomas have been reported previously in adult lions, and this case suggests that at least some of these examples may have a congenital basis. It is unclear whether the lesion was an underlying factor in the development of hepatitis. PMID:23272363

  2. Idiopathic perforation of acalculous gallbladder after insertion of a transpapillary pancreatic stent

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Tomoko; Irisawa, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Hiroto; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tomoda, Hiroyuki; Saito, Ryo; Kinuta, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic retrograde pancreatocholangiography (ERCP) is associated with many types of adverse events (AEs) but idiopathic perforation of the gallbladder (IPGB) is very rare. Pancreatobiliary reflux is one of the factors involved with occurrence of IPGB 1. Here we present a case of acalculous gallbladder perforation as an AE following the insertion of an indwelling endoscopic nasal pancreatic drainage (ENPD) tube (a pancreatic stent) to obtain pancreatic fluid. In this case, acute pancreatobiliary reflux might have been caused by the insertion of the ENPD-tube. PMID:27540570

  3. Stenting in Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Almadi, Majid A; Barkun, Jeffrey S; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-10-01

    Decompression of the biliary system in patients with malignant biliary obstruction has been widely accepted and implemented as part of the care. Despite a wealth of literature, there remains a significant amount of uncertainty as to which approach would be most appropriate in different clinical settings. This review covers stenting of the biliary system in cases of resectable or palliative malignant biliary obstruction, potential candidates for biliary drainage, technical aspects of the procedure, as well as management of biliary stent dysfunction. Furthermore, periprocedural considerations including proper mapping of the location of obstruction and the use of antibiotics are addressed. PMID:26431598

  4. A Fatal Complication: Intestinal Perforation Secondary to Migration of a Biliary Stent

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Gülay; Okur, Nazan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Stent insertion is widely performed to restore biliary drainage in hepatic, biliary, and pancreatic obstructive conditions. Intestinal perforation due to the migration of these stents is an extremely rare late-term complication that is associated with a high rate of mortality. The current report aimed at presenting the radiological findings of a case of extraluminal biliary stent migration into the pelvic region that caused intestinal perforation. Case Report We report a case of an 85-year-old male with a history of previous stent insertion who presented with a sudden – onset severe abdominal pain. An abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) revealed a tubular foreign body density, compatible with intestinal perforation due to migration of the biliary stent. Conclusions Biliary stent insertion becomes a more common procedure. This serious complication must always be remembered in patients presenting with abdominal pain after stent insertion. PMID:27141238

  5. [Malignant biliary obstruction].

    PubMed

    Hucl, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma are the most common causes of malignant biliary obstruction. They are diseases of increasing incidence and unfavorable prognosis. Only patients with localized disease indicated for surgery have a chance of long-term survival. These patients represent less than 20 % of all patients, despite the progress in our diagnostic abilities.Locally advanced and metastatic tumors are treated with palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy; the results of such treatments are unsatisfactory. The average survival of patients with unresectable disease is 6 months and only 5-10 % of patients survive 5 years.Biliary drainage is an integral part of palliative treatment. Endoscopically or percutaneosly placed stents improve quality of life, decrease cholestasis and pruritus, but do not significantly improve survival. Biliary stents get occluded over time, possibly resulting in acute cholangitis and require repeated replacement.Photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation, locally active endoscopic methods, have been increasingly used in recent years in palliative treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. In photodynamic therapy, photosensitizer accumulates in tumor tissue and is activated 48 hours later by light of a specific wave length. Application of low voltage high frequency current during radiofrequency ablation results in tissue destruction by heat. Local ablation techniques can have a significant impact in a large group of patients with malignant biliary obstruction, leading to improved prognosis, quality of life and stent patency. PMID:26898789

  6. [The biliary intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Demetrashvili, Z M; Asatiani, G A; Nemsadze, G Sh; Kenchadze, G Z

    2012-01-01

    The successful experience of treatment of 3 patients with biliary intestinal obstruction is depicted. The most informative means of diagnostics was the multispiral computed tomography. Authors state, that the volume of the operation should include only the liquidation of the intestinal obstruction. The simultaneous biliodigestive fistulae closure should be performed only in rare situations. PMID:22678540

  7. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver cancer every 6 to 12 months. Health care providers use blood tests, ultrasound, or both to check for signs of ... the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis. A health care provider uses the test selectively when he or she is concerned that ...

  8. Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis by Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Maria; Couto, Cristiana; Coelho, Maria D.; Laranjeira, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare complication of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection, with only a few cases reported among pediatric population. This clinical condition is frequently associated with a favorable outcome and, usually, a surgical intervention is not required. We report a 16-year-old girl who presented with AAC following primary EBV infection. The diagnosis of AAC was documented by clinical and ultrasonographic examination, whereas EBV infection was confirmed serologically. A conservative treatment was performed, with a careful monitoring and serial ultrasonographic examinations, which led to the clinical improvement of the patient. Pediatricians should be aware of the possible association between EBV and AAC, in order to offer the patients an appropriate management strategy. PMID:26753086

  9. A case of biliary Fascioliasis by Fasciola gigantica in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vedat; Senturk, Senem; Mete, Omer; Cicek, Mutallib; Ebik, Berat; Kaya, Beşir

    2011-03-01

    A case of Fasciola gigantica-induced biliary obstruction and cholestasis is reported in Turkey. The patient was a 37- year-old woman, and suffered from icterus, ascites, and pain in her right upper abdominal region. A total of 7 living adult flukes were recovered during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). A single dose of triclabendazole was administered to treat possible remaining worms. She was living in a village of southeast of Anatolia region and had sheeps and cows. She had the history of eating lettuce, mallow, dill, and parsley without washing. This is the first case of fascioliasis which was treated via endoscopic biliary extraction during ERCP in Turkey. PMID:21461271

  10. The role of prostanoids in the production of acute acalculous cholecystitis by platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, D L; Andrus, C H; German, D; Deshpande, Y G

    1990-01-01

    Gallbladder tissue from patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis contains increased amounts of prostanoids when compared to normal gallbladder tissue. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus of eicosanoid formation. It has been implicated as a mediator of acute inflammatory processes and systemic responses to shock. In this study the role of PAF in acute acalculous cholecystitis was evaluated. Anesthetized cats underwent gallbladder perfusion with a physiologic buffer solution containing [14C]polyethylene glycol as a nonabsorbable tracer to quantitate mucosal water absorption. Platelet-activating factor was infused into the hepatic artery for 2 hours. Control experiments were performed when vehicle alone was infused. Experiments also were performed when indomethacin was administered intravenously and when indomethacin and PAF were administered. Gallbladder mucosal absorption/secretion and perfusate and tissue prostaglandin E (PGE) and 6 keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto PGF1 alpha) levels were evaluated. Gallbladder inflammation was evaluated by beta-glucuronidase and myeloperoxidase tissue concentrations and by a histologic scoring system. Platelet-activating factor eliminated gallbladder absorption and produced net fluid secretion associated with dose-related increases in perfusate PGE concentrations and gallbladder tissue PGE and 6 keto PGF1 alpha levels when compared to control values. Platelet-activating factor produced significant inflammation in the gallbladder with increases in the histologic score of inflammation and tissue lysosomal enzyme activities. Indomethacin significantly decreased the fluid secretion, prostanoid levels, and inflammation produced by PAF. The results suggest that PAF may induce acute gallbladder inflammation associated with systemic stress through a prostanoid-mediated mechanism. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2171443

  11. Biliary Ascariasis Mimicking Colonic Tumor Infiltration of the Biliary System.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Mittal, Gyanendra; Kumar, Sushil; Manjunath, Suraj; Sharma, Navneet; Gupta, Mahesh

    2015-09-01

    Ascariasis is a common problem in developing countries with poor hygiene and sanitation. It is endemic in India and usually seen in the northern states. Biliary ascariasis is an uncommon cause of obstructive jaundice. We present a case of carcinoma of hepatic flexure of colon in which the patient developed biliary ascariasis and posed a diagnostic challenge as it mimicked tumor infiltration of the biliary system. PMID:27217679

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage of hilar biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, Do Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Only 20-30% of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) are candidates for potentially curative resection. However, even after curative (R0) resection, these patients have a disease recurrence rate of up to 76%. The prognosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is limited by tumor spread along the biliary tree leading to obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, and liver failure. Therefore, palliative biliary drainage may be a major goal for patients with hilar CC. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is an established method for palliation of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, there are patients for whom endoscopic stent placement is not possible because of failed biliary cannulation or tumor infiltration that limits transpapillary access. In this situation, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an alternative method. However, PTBD has a relatively high rate of complications and is frequently associated with patient discomfort related to external drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage has therefore been introduced as an alternative to PTBD in cases of biliary obstruction when ERCP is unsuccessful. In this review, the indications, technical tips, outcomes, and the future role of EUS-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage, such as hepaticogastrostomy or hepaticoduodenostomy, for hilar biliary obstruction will be summarized. PMID:26178753

  13. Rare biliary cystic tumors: a case series of biliary cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhirup; Shah, Sudeep R; Singh, Abhiyutthan; Joshi, Anand; Desai, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the liver are common and a major proportion is formed by parasitic cysts and simple cysts. Biliary cystic tumors (BCTs), namely biliary cystadenoma (BCA) and biliary cystadenocarcinoma (BCAC), are rare tumors which usually arise from the intrahepatic biliary tree. BCAs have malignant potential and are difficult to differentiate from BCAC pre-operatively on radiological imaging. Here we have presented 4 patients with BCTs and reviewed the literature pertaining to them.The data of four patients with BCA/BCAC diagnosed and treated at our institute were retrieved from our database and records were reviewed for age, sex, history, imaging, surgery, pathology and follow-up. Mean age of the patients was 53.5 years (range 30-71 years). Two male and two female patients presented with abdominal pain, of which one male patient had pancreatitis at diagnosis. Characteristic features were seen on pre-operative imaging (cystic lesions with internal septations) and biliary communication was identified in the patient with pancreatitis. Three patients were diagnosed with a BCA on final histology, while one patient had a BCAC. Following surgical resection, all the patients are asymptomatic and disease free with a mean follow-up of 24 months (range 10-40 months). In conclusion, BCTs should be suspected in the presence of a well-encapsulated, cystic hepatic lesion with internal septations. Although pre-operative distinction between BCA and BCAC is difficult, the lesion, whenever possible, should be completely resected as long-term outcomes are good, especially with BCA. PMID:27049501

  14. Future developments in biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  15. Anaesthesia for biliary atresia and hepatectomy in paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this article precludes an ‘in depth’ description of all liver problems and I will limit this review to anaesthesia for biliary atresia — a common hepatic problem in the very young — and partial hepatectomy in older children. I will not be discussing the problems of anaesthetising children with hepatitis, cirrhosis, congenital storage diseases or liver failure. Extrahepatic biliary obstruction is an obliterative cholangiopathy of infancy which is fatal if untreated. Diagnosis involves exclusion of other causes of neonatal jaundice and treatment involves a hepatico portoenterostomy carried out at the earliest. This is a review of current concepts in anaesthesia and postoperative management of neonates with extrahepatic biliary atresia. Anaesthesia for hepatic resection has seen great changes in recent times with the improvement in surgical techniques, technology and a better understanding of the underlying physiology. These are reviewed along with the problems of postoperative pain management. PMID:23293387

  16. Biliary Mucosal Barrier and Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Julien; Luedde, Tom; Sellge, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Background The biliary system is in continuous contact with the complex microbiota of the intestine. Microbial products have recently been proposed as potential triggers for biliary diseases. Methods The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the current knowledge regarding the role of the biliary and intestinal microbiome in biliary inflammatory diseases. Results Previously, it was suggested that the healthy biliary system is a sterile organ, while acute cholangitis and cholecystitis may occur from ascending infections. Although non-inflammatory biliary colonization by certain bacteria such as Salmonella spp. has been already recognized since several decades, human and animal studies indicated only very recently that the gallbladder harbors a complex microbiota also under non-pathologic conditions. Novel findings suggested that – similar to the situation in the intestine – the biliary mucosa features a chemical, mechanical, and immunological barrier, ensuring immunological tolerance against commensals. However, microbial triggers might influence acute and chronic inflammatory disease of the biliary system and the whole liver. Conclusion Although yet undefined, dysbiosis of the biliary or intestinal microbiota rather than a single microorganism may influence disease progression. PMID:26468308

  17. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  18. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  19. Surgical Management of Benign Biliary Stricture in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Ghatak, Supriyo; Das, Khaunish; Dasgupta, Jayanta; Ray, Sujay; Khamrui, Sujan; Sonar, Pankaj Kumar; Das, Somak

    2015-12-01

    Biliary stricture in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is not uncommon. Previously, all cases were managed by surgery. Nowadays, three important modes of treatment in these patients are observation, endoscopic therapy, and surgery. In the modern era, surgery is recommended only in a subset of patients who develop biliary symptoms or those who have asymptomatic biliary stricture and require surgery for intractable abdominal pain. We want to report on our experience regarding surgical management of CP-induced benign biliary stricture. Over a period of 5 years, we have managed 340 cases of CP at our institution. Bile duct stricture was found in 62 patients. But, surgical intervention was required in 44 patients, and the remaining 18 patients were managed conservatively. Demographic data, operative procedures, postoperative complications, and follow-up parameters of these patients were collected from our prospective database. A total 44 patients were operated for biliary obstruction in the background of CP. Three patients were excluded, so the final analysis was based on 41 patients. The indication for surgery was symptomatic biliary stricture in 27 patients and asymptomatic biliary stricture with intractable abdominal pain in 14 patients. The most commonly performed operation was Frey's procedure. There was no inhospital mortality. Thirty-five patients were well at a mean follow-up of 24.4 months (range 3 to 54 months). Surgery is still the best option for CP-induced benign biliary stricture, and Frey's procedure is a versatile operation unless you suspect malignancy as the cause of biliary obstruction. PMID:26730073

  20. Tight junction proteins in gallbladder epithelium: different expression in acute acalculous and calculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Jouko J; Karttunen, Tuomo; Koivukangas, Vesa; Laurila, Päivi A; Syrjälä, Hannu; Saarnio, Juha; Soini, Ylermi; Ala-Kokko, Tero I

    2007-06-01

    There is a paucity of information of tight junction (TJ) proteins in gallbladder epithelium, and disturbances in the structure of these proteins may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) and acute calculous cholecystitis (ACC). Using immunohistochemistry, we investigated the expression of TJ proteins claudin-1, -2, -3, and -4, occludin, zonula occludens (ZO-1), and E-cadherin in 9 normal gallbladders, 30 gallbladders with AAC, and 21 gallbladders with ACC. The number of positive epithelial and endothelial cells and the intensity of the immunoreaction were determined. Membrane-bound and cytoplasmic immunoreactivities were separately assessed. We found that TJ proteins were uniformly expressed in normal gallbladder epithelium, with the exception of claudin-2, which was present in less than half of the cells. In AAC, expression of cytoplasmic occludin and claudin-1 were decreased, as compared with normal gallbladder. In ACC, expression of claudin-2 was increased, and expression of claudin-1, -3, and -4, occludin, and ZO-1 were decreased, as compared with normal gallbladder or AAC. We conclude that there are significant differences in expression of TJ proteins in AAC and ACC, supporting the idea that AAC represents a manifestation of systemic inflammatory disease, whereas ACC is a local inflammatory and often infectious disease. PMID:17283368

  1. Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kasper S.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease and the leading indication for pediatric liver transplantation. Affected infants exhibit evidence of biliary obstruction within the first few weeks after birth. Early diagnosis and successful surgical drainage of bile are associated with greater survival with the child’s native liver. Unfortunately, because noncholestatic jaundice is extremely common in early infancy, it is difficult to identify the rare infant with cholestatic jaundice who has biliary atresia. Hence, the need for timely diagnosis of this disease warrants a discussion of the feasibility of screening for biliary atresia to improve outcomes. Herein, newborn screening for biliary atresia in the United States is assessed by using criteria established by the Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children. Published analyses indicate that newborn screening for biliary atresia by using serum bilirubin concentrations or stool color cards is potentially life-saving and cost-effective. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and costs of potential screening strategies for early identification of biliary atresia in the United States. PMID:26620065

  2. Long-term effects of forgotten biliary stents: a case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Arslan, Cem; Akbulut, Sami; Abuoglu, Haci Hasan; Ozkan, Erkan; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Gunay, Emre; Tekesin, Kemal; Muftuoglu, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    There are many studies about the biliary stents, however there is a little information about the long-term stayed forgotten biliary stents except a few case reports. We have reported the results of a number of cases with biliary stents that were forgotten or omitted by the patient and the endoscopist. During February 2010 to May 2013, five patients were referred to the general surgery clinic of Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul Turkey. Past history and medical documents submitted by the patient did not indicate a replacement of the biliary stent in 3 patients. Two patients knew that they had biliary stents. We also conducted a literature review via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases of English language studies published until March 2014 on forgotten biliary stent. There were 3 men and 2 women ranging in age from 22 to 68 years (mean age 41.6 years). Patients presented with pain in the upper abdomen, jaundice, fever, abnormal liver function tests or dilatation of the biliary tract alone or in combination. Patients' demographic findings are presented in Table 1. A review of three cases reported in the English medical literature also discussed. The mean duration of the patency of the stent is about 12 months. The biliary stenting is performed either with plastic or metal stents, studies recommending their replacement after 3-6 months. Patients with long stayed forgotten biliary stents are inevitably treated with surgical intervention. We recommend for all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography units provide a stent registry system that the stents placed for various therapeutic procedures are not forgotten both by the patient as well as the physician. There should be a deadline for biliary stents in the registry system for each patient. PMID:25232385

  3. Long-term effects of forgotten biliary stents: a case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Arslan, Cem; Akbulut, Sami; Abuoglu, Haci Hasan; Ozkan, Erkan; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Gunay, Emre; Tekesin, Kemal; Muftuoglu, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    There are many studies about the biliary stents, however there is a little information about the long-term stayed forgotten biliary stents except a few case reports. We have reported the results of a number of cases with biliary stents that were forgotten or omitted by the patient and the endoscopist. During February 2010 to May 2013, five patients were referred to the general surgery clinic of Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul Turkey. Past history and medical documents submitted by the patient did not indicate a replacement of the biliary stent in 3 patients. Two patients knew that they had biliary stents. We also conducted a literature review via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases of English language studies published until March 2014 on forgotten biliary stent. There were 3 men and 2 women ranging in age from 22 to 68 years (mean age 41.6 years). Patients presented with pain in the upper abdomen, jaundice, fever, abnormal liver function tests or dilatation of the biliary tract alone or in combination. Patients’ demographic findings are presented in Table 1. A review of three cases reported in the English medical literature also discussed. The mean duration of the patency of the stent is about 12 months. The biliary stenting is performed either with plastic or metal stents, studies recommending their replacement after 3-6 months. Patients with long stayed forgotten biliary stents are inevitably treated with surgical intervention. We recommend for all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography units provide a stent registry system that the stents placed for various therapeutic procedures are not forgotten both by the patient as well as the physician. There should be a deadline for biliary stents in the registry system for each patient. PMID:25232385

  4. Percutaneous Embolization of Transhepatic Tracks for Biliary Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Stuart M.; Terhaar, Olaf; Given, Mark F.; O'Dwyer, Helena M.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2006-12-15

    Significant pain can occur after removing transhepatic catheters from biliary access tracks, after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) or stenting. We undertook a randomized prospective study to ascertain whether track embolization decreases the amount of pain or analgesic requirement after PBD. Fifty consecutive patients (M:F, 22:28; age range:29-85 years; mean age: 66.3 years) undergoing PBD were randomized to receive track embolization or no track embolization after removal of biliary drainage catheters. A combination of Lipoidol and n-butyl cyanoacrylate were used to embolize transhepatic tracks using an 8F dilator. The patients who did not have track embolization performed had biliary drainage catheters removed over a guide wire. A visual analog scoring (VAS) system was used to grade pain associated with catheter removal, 24 h afterward. A required analgesic score (RAS) was devised to tabulate the analgesia required. No analgesia had a score of 0, oral or rectal nonopiate analgesics had a score of 1, oral opiates had a score of 2, and parenteral opiates had a score of 3. The average VAS and RAS for both groups were calculated and compared.Seven patients were excluded for various reasons, leaving 43 patients in the study group. Twenty-one patients comprised the embolization group and 22 patients comprised the nonembolization group. The mean biliary catheter dwell time was not significantly different (p > 0.05) between the embolization group and nonembolization (mean: 5.4 days vs 6.9 days, respectively). In the nonembolization group, the mean VAS was 3.4. Eight patients required parenteral opiates, three patients required oral opiates, and five patients required oral or rectal analgesics, yielding a mean RAS of 1.6. In the embolization group, the mean VAS was 0.9. No patient required parenteral opiates, six patients required oral opiates, and two patients had oral analgesia. The average RAS was 0.6. Both the VAS and the RAS were significantly lower in the

  5. [Atypical biliary stenting in patient with obstructive biliary jaundice].

    PubMed

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Kurcz, Jacek; Guziński, Maciej; Janczak, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive biliary jaundice is a common complication in patients with malignancies which infiltrate biliary ducts. If untreated efficiently the jaundice is fatal a short period of time. We present a case of 60-year-old male patient who had undergone Whipple procedure in the past and presented with local recurrence treated successfully by percutaneous stenting of obstructed biliary duct. When passing through the obstruction we observed a contrast-bile leakage at the level of occluded segment and instability of implanted stent which was a complication that extorted atypical approach. We applied a covered stent in association with oversized nitinol stent which allowed to form a funnel-like construction efficiently decompressing biliary tree. Thanks to this management we also avoided further complications. PMID:23276050

  6. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dae Yong; Chang, Eun Jae; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  7. Biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, E K; Vauthey, J N

    2001-09-01

    Advances in cellular and molecular biology of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder adenocarcinoma are providing innovative means for the diagnosis and treatment of biliary tract cancer. Similarly, refinements in noninvasive studies--including helical computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasonography--are enabling more accurate diagnosis, staging, and treatment planning for these tumors. Complete resection remains the only means for cure, and recent reports from major hepatobiliary centers support aggressive wide resection for bile duct and gallbladder cancer. Palliation of malignant strictures has improved with advanced endoscopic techniques, newer polyurethane-covered stents, endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy, and radiofrequency intraluminal endohyperthermia. The preliminary data on such minimally invasive techniques suggest an improvement in quality of life and survival for selected patients. PMID:17031200

  8. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2010-10-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an idiopathic chronic autoimmune liver disease that primarily affects women. It is believed that the aetiology for PBC is a combination between environmental triggers in genetically vulnerable persons. The diagnosis for PBC is made when two of the three criteria are fulfilled and they are: (1) biochemical evidence of cholestatic liver disease for at least 6 month's duration; (2) anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) positivity; and (3) histologic features of PBC on liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only FDA-approved medical treatment for PBC and should be administered at a recommended dose of 13-15 mg/kg/day. Unfortunately despite adequate dosing of UDCA, approximately one-third of patients does not respond adequately and may require liver transplantation. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the role of environmental exposures and overall genetic impact not only in the development of PBC, but on disease progression and variable clinical response to therapy. PMID:20955967

  9. Biliary tract perforation following percutaneous endobiliary radiofrequency ablation: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, CHUANGUO; WEI, BAOJIE; GAO, KUN; ZHAI, RENYOU

    2016-01-01

    Endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has recently been recognized as a beneficial treatment option for malignant biliary obstruction using percutaneous or endoscopic approaches. The feasibility and safety of this method has been demonstrated in clinical studies, with pain, cholangitis and asymptomatic biochemical pancreatitis reported as relatively common complications. By contrast, hepatic coma, newly diagnosed left bundle branch block and partial liver infarction have been reported as uncommon complications. Biliary tract perforation is a serious potential complication of percutaneous intraductal RFA, which may result in severe infection, peritonitis or even mortality, and which has not been previously reported in clinical research. The current study presents the first reports of biliary tract perforation in two patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction following percutaneous intraductal RFA. Although the patient in case 1 succumbed 12 days after RFA, the minor biliary tract perforation in case 2 was successfully treated by the deployment of a self-expanding metal stent. This study demonstrates that biliary tract perforation should be recognized as a serious potential complication of endobiliary RFA, and that metal stent deployment should be considered as a treatment option for minor biliary tract perforation. PMID:27313699

  10. A sign of symptomatic chronic cholecystitis on biliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sheikh, W.; Hourani, M.; Barkin, J.S.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.; Serafini, A.N.

    1983-02-01

    Five hundred patients with acute right-upper-quadrant pain underwent biliary scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc paraisopropyliminodiacetic acid. One hundred and thirty-four studies were reported normal (both gallbladder and activity in bowel are noted in 1 hr). Of the 134 studies reported as normal, 32 showed intestinal activity before gallbladder visualization during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography revealed that 24 patients had gallstones, and eight patients had no demonstrable pathology in the biliary system. Of the 134 studies, 102 showed visualization of the gallbladder before intestinal activity during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography showed that 73 patients had normal biliary system. The remaining 29 patients had gallstones. The overall sensitivity of this finding is 45%, the specificity is 90%, and the accuracy is 73%. In this group of symptomatic patients, the appearance of intestinal activity before gallbladder activity on biliary scintigraphy warrants further evaluation of these patients by sonography and/or oral cholecystography.

  11. Value of early cholescintigraphy in detection of biliary complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Kulber, D A; Berci, G; Paz-Partlow, M; Ashok, G; Hiatt, J R

    1994-03-01

    Cholescintigraphy using technetium-99m disofenin tracer is accepted as a routine component of preoperative evaluation of the biliary tract in selected patients but is not used regularly in postoperative management. This is a retrospective analysis of the utility of the nuclide scan in 27 patients after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Most patients had vague postoperative symptoms such as nausea, pain, and low grade fever. Two patients developed jaundice. Seven of the 27 patients had biliary leaks, and two had common bile duct obstructions. We conclude that cholescintigraphy is a sensitive noninvasive test for the evaluation of biliary complications after LC and is a pivotal component of an algorithmic approach to postoperative complications. Because of the subtle clinical findings and the potential for delayed diagnosis of biliary complications after LC, early performance of this test will minimize patient morbidity. PMID:8116979

  12. Respiratory failure and acalculous cholecystitis in a patient with AIDS and disseminated tuberculosis: masking effect of fluoroquinolone monotherapy and immune restoration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Lin; Lee, Hsin-Chun; Shan, Yan-Shen; Ko, Nai-Ying; Lee, Nan-Yao; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wu, Chi-Jung; Lee, Ching-Chi; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2009-07-01

    The clinical presentation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection varies in patients with AIDS. We report a case of disseminated tuberculosis in an AIDS patient. The initial manifestation was masked by fluoroquinolone monotherapy, and subsequently complicated by acalculous cholecystitis and immune restoration syndrome after antiretroviral therapy. PMID:19008140

  13. Intraoperative air leak test was useful for the detection of a small biliary fistula: A rare case of non-parasitic hepatic cysts with biliary communication

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Atsushi; Hata, Shojiro; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Teruya, Masanori; Kaminishi, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Symptomatic non-parasitic hepatic cysts with biliary communication are rare and no standard treatment has been established yet. Careful attention should be paid to avoidance of postoperative bile leakage during surgical treatment. Presentation of case We report the case of a 74-year-old man who visited our department complaining of right upper abdominal pain and elevated serum levels of the liver enzymes. Computed tomography revealed hepatic cysts including a large one measuring 16 cm in diameter in Segments IV and VIII. Percutaneous drainage of the cyst revealed bile-staining of the cyst fluid. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography demonstrated the presence of a cyst–biliary communication. We performed open deroofing of the cyst. During the operation, the biliary fistula was invisible, however, air injection into the bile duct through the stump of the cystic duct caused release of air bubbles from the cyst cavity, which allowed us to detect the small biliary orifice and repair it successfully by suture. Discussion We utilized the intraoperative air leak test, which has previously been reported to be effective for preventing postoperative bile leakage in patients undergoing hepatectomy to detect of a small cyst–biliary communication in a case undergoing non-parasitic hepatic cyst surgery. Conclusion An intraoperative air leak test may be a useful test during surgical treatment of non-parasitic hepatic cysts with biliary communication. PMID:26398333

  14. Hepatic and Biliary Ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anup K

    2014-01-01

    Ascariasis mainly contributes to the global helminthic burden by infesting a large number of children in the tropical countries. Hepato-biliary ascariasis (HBA) is becoming a common entity now than in the past owing to the frequent usage of ultrasonograms and endoscopic diagnostic procedures in the clinical practice. There are a variety of manifestations in HBA and diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion in endemic areas coupled with subsequent confirmation by sonographic or endoscopic demonstration of the worm. Most of them present with acute abdomen and jaundice. Oriental or recurrent pyogenic cholangiopathy is possibly the result of HBA, commonly encountered in South-East Asian countries. Conservative treatment with anthelminthic agents is used in the majority. Failure to respond to medical therapy usually indicates the need for endoscopic or surgical interventions. Overall, mortality is low and prognosis is good, but many epidemiological and immunological aspects of Ascaris infection are unclear, meaning our understanding the disease and infection still remains incomplete. Therefore, it is difficult to definitely put down a fixed modality of treatment for HBA. This underscores the need for further studies as ascariasis has the potential to adversely affect the national socio-economy by compromising the health of children and adults alike with its sheer number. PMID:24926166

  15. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Douglas L.; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an idiopathic chronic autoimmune liver disease that primarily affects women. It is believed that the etiology for PBC is a combination between environmental triggers in genetically vulnerable persons. The diagnosis for PBC is made when two of the three criteria are fulfilled and they are: (1) biochemical evidence of cholestatic liver disease for at least 6 month’s duration; (2) anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) positivity; and (3) histologic features of PBC on liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only FDA-approved medical treatment for PBC and should be administered at a recommended dose of 13-15mg/kg/day. Unfortunately despite adequate dosing of UDCA, approximately one-third of patients does not respond adequately and may require liver transplantation. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the role of environmental exposures and overall genetic impact not only in the development of PBC, but on disease progression and variable clinical response to therapy. PMID:20955967

  16. Evaluation of biliary disease by scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, M.D.; Hagihara, P.F.; Kim, E.E.; Coupal, J.; Griffen, W.O.

    1981-01-01

    The value of biliary scintigraphy was studied in 180 patients with suspected biliary tract disease. Most of the patients were investigated additionally by conventional techniques such as cholecystography, cholangiography and ultrasonography. It is concluded that biliary scintigraphy is a simple and safe technique for visualization of the biliary tract. It is particularly useful in the evaluation of acute cholecystitis, in patients with iodine sensitivity obstructive from nonobstructive jaundice.

  17. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  18. Biliary scintigraphy: comparison with other modern techniques for evaluation of biliary tract disease

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.

    1982-10-01

    The recent availability of iminodiacetic acid analogues labeled with technetium Tc 99m provides a safe and accurate noninvasive test of biliary function. Biliary scintigraphy is a simple and rapid method of detecting acute cholecystitis in particular but also of distinguishing acute biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis, of evaluating the patency of the common duct in early obstruction, of assessing possible postcholecystectomy syndrome, of evaluating the patency of a biliary enteric bypass, and of detecting postoperative biliary leaks.

  19. [Biliary pathology. Key aspects of the problem].

    PubMed

    Il'chenko, A A

    2011-01-01

    Based on the clinical experience gained in the Department of Pathology biliary tract, Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology, were reviewed key aspects of biliary pathology on the issues of classification, diagnosis, treatment, and tactics for management of patients with various diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:21560643

  20. Biliary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S; Keogan, M; Casey, M; Duffy, G; McErlean, D; Fitzgerald, M X; Hegarty, J E

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and four adult patients with cystic fibrosis were evaluated for the presence of liver disease as defined by abnormal liver function tests of six months' duration, histological evidence of fibrosis or cirrhosis, or the presence of portal hypertension, or both. Twenty patients fulfilled these criteria and were evaluated further for the presence of biliary tract abnormalities with biliary scintigraphy using 99Tc diisopropylphenyl-carboxymethyl iminodiacetic acid (DISIDA) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Clearance of 99Tc DISIDA from the liver and biliary tree was diminished at 45 (E45) and 60 (E60) minutes in the patients with liver disease compared with those without liver disease; E45 = 37.8% and 65.8%, p less than 0.01; E60 = 48.2% and 77.5%, p less than 0.01 respectively. Serial analogue images of the extrahepatic biliary tree were consistent with common bile duct obstruction with retention of DISIDA and tapering of the common bile duct in seven of 18 patients with and two of 10 patients without liver disease. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed changes consistent with sclerosing cholangitis, with beading and stricturing of the intrahepatic ducts in 12 of the 14 patients. In all 14 patients, including those in whom biliary scintigraphy had suggested obstruction, no abnormality of the common bile duct was identified. These results indicate that abnormalities of the bile ducts in patients with cystic fibrosis related liver disease are confined to the intrahepatic biliary tree and that common bile duct strictures do not contribute to either the progression or development of liver disease in these patients. Images Figure 2 PMID:1568661

  1. [Endoscopic management of biliary stones].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementería, R

    1990-07-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy is one of the more effective therapeutic procedures for the management of some biliary tree abnormalities. In choledocolitiasis, a 90% succesfull rate has been obtained. Complications include bleeding, perforation, cholangitis, and pancreatitis. Mortality rates between 1.0 to 1.3% are informed. Contraindications are the same as for panendoscopy as well as the presence of stones greater than 2.5 cms. In giant stones, some other endoscopic approaches can be used, including mechanical lithotripsy, chemical treatment, electrohydraulic shockwaves, laser and biliary stent application. Endoscopic sphincterotomy is also indicated as an adjuvant therapy previous to extracorporeal lithotripsy. PMID:19256137

  2. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Visrodia, Kavel H; Tabibian, James H; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic management of biliary obstruction has evolved tremendously since the introduction of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. For the last several decades, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become established as the mainstay for definitively diagnosing and relieving biliary obstruction. In addition, and more recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has gained increasing favor as an auxiliary diagnostic and therapeutic modality in facilitating decompression of the biliary tree. Here, we provide a review of the current and continually evolving role of gastrointestinal endoscopy, including both ERCP and EUS, in the management of biliary obstruction with a focus on benign biliary strictures. PMID:26322153

  3. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-12-15

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  4. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fuqiang; Shen, Hongzhang; Li, Zhen; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Yang, Jianfeng; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Ni, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus) and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities. PMID:26930491

  5. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  6. 17 CFR 402.2a - Appendix A-Calculation of market risk haircut for purposes of § 402.2(g)(2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Appendix A-Calculation of market risk haircut for purposes of § 402.2(g)(2). 402.2a Section 402.2a Commodity and Securities Exchanges DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REGULATIONS UNDER SECTION 15C OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY § 402.2a...

  7. Pseudo-obstruction of the biliary tract associated with a traumatic biliary fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Kidder, R.E.; Doherty, P.W.

    1984-05-01

    Documentation of a biliary fistula as a complication of hepatic trauma may be made simply and noninvasively using radionuclide (technetium) cholescintigraphy. This report describes the utility of this approach in the evaluation of the pathophysiology underlying apparent biliary obstruction in a patient with a large traumatic biliary fistula.

  8. Radiological interventions in malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction is commonly caused by gall bladder carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic nodes. Percutaneous interventions play an important role in managing these patients. Biliary drainage, which forms the major bulk of radiological interventions, can be palliative in inoperable patients or pre-operative to improve liver function prior to surgery. Other interventions include cholecystostomy and radiofrequency ablation. We present here the indications, contraindications, technique and complications of the radiological interventions performed in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27247718

  9. Radiological interventions in malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-05-28

    Malignant biliary obstruction is commonly caused by gall bladder carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic nodes. Percutaneous interventions play an important role in managing these patients. Biliary drainage, which forms the major bulk of radiological interventions, can be palliative in inoperable patients or pre-operative to improve liver function prior to surgery. Other interventions include cholecystostomy and radiofrequency ablation. We present here the indications, contraindications, technique and complications of the radiological interventions performed in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27247718

  10. Successive breaks in biliary stents.

    PubMed

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; Guerra, María

    2016-04-01

    A 64 year-old male, was diagnosed with obstructive jaundice due to a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with liver metastases. The patient underwent endoscopic placement of covered self-expanding biliary stent (10x60 mm, Hanaro) by ERCP. He was admitted with cholangitis one year later. The following ERCP revealed a fractured stent with loss of the distal end (duodenal) and partial migration of the remaining stent to the common bile duct. The fragmented stent was removed from the common bile duct and a new, similar one was inserted. Four months later the patient was admitted with cholangitis. A new ERCP was done and biliary stent was also fragmented. It was removed and an uncovered stent (Wallflex) was inserted. PMID:27065248

  11. Biliary atresia: the animal models.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Claus

    2012-08-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive fibrosing process of the neonatal biliary tree and liver, of unknown origin, and an as-yet unexplained pathologic mechanism. The crucial point is to elucidate the origin of this rare disease to change palliative surgery to etiology-related procedures. Patient-based research can only begin at the time of the Kasai procedure and does not allow retracing of the pathology back to its origin. Basic research has focused on similar diseases in the veterinary literature and started to simulate BA in animal models. Unfortunately, even after 50 years of research, no knowledge has been gained from such models, which has led to a single clinical application. This article reviews BA in the context of the animal models available and discusses whether future studies are promising or futile. PMID:22800971

  12. Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Synchronous Kartagener Syndrome and Biliary Atresia.

    PubMed

    Kendigelen, Pınar; Tütüncü, Ayşe Çiğdem; Erbabacan, Şafak Emre; Kaya, Güner; Altındaş, Fatiş

    2015-06-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary ciliary dyskinesia accompanied by sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and situs inversus. Synchronous extrahepatic biliary atresia and Kartagener syndrome are very rare. During the preoperative preparation of patients with Kartagener syndrome, special attention is required for the respiratory and cardiovascular system. It is important to provide suitable anaesthetic management to avoid problems because of ciliary dysfunction in the perioperative period. Further, maintaining an effective pain control with regional anaesthetic methods reduces the risk of pulmonary complications. Infants with biliary atresia operated earlier have a higher chance of survival. Hepatic dysfunction and decrease in plasma proteins are important for the kinetics of drugs. In this presentation, the anaesthetic management of patients with synchronous Kartagener syndrome and biliary atresia, both of which are rare diseases, is evaluated. PMID:27366497

  13. Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Synchronous Kartagener Syndrome and Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Kendigelen, Pınar; Tütüncü, Ayşe Çiğdem; Erbabacan, Şafak Emre; Kaya, Güner; Altındaş, Fatiş

    2015-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary ciliary dyskinesia accompanied by sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and situs inversus. Synchronous extrahepatic biliary atresia and Kartagener syndrome are very rare. During the preoperative preparation of patients with Kartagener syndrome, special attention is required for the respiratory and cardiovascular system. It is important to provide suitable anaesthetic management to avoid problems because of ciliary dysfunction in the perioperative period. Further, maintaining an effective pain control with regional anaesthetic methods reduces the risk of pulmonary complications. Infants with biliary atresia operated earlier have a higher chance of survival. Hepatic dysfunction and decrease in plasma proteins are important for the kinetics of drugs. In this presentation, the anaesthetic management of patients with synchronous Kartagener syndrome and biliary atresia, both of which are rare diseases, is evaluated. PMID:27366497

  14. A refractory duodenal ulcer with a biliary-duodenal fistula following the administration of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Yohei; Adachi, Seiji; Okuno, Mitsuru; Ohno, Tomohiko; Goto, Naoe; Iwama, Midori; Yamauchi, Osamu; Saito, Koshiro; Yasuda, Ichiro; Shimizu, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    A 65-year-old woman with recurrent breast cancer was repeatedly treated with bevacizumab, an anti-VEGF antibody. In addition, she was also frequently prescribed a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for abdominal pain. Melena was revealed 2 months after the final treatment with bevacizumab, and an endoscopic study revealed a duodenal ulcer (DU) that was resistant to anti-ulcer therapy. A cholangiography identified a biliary-duodenal fistula with bile juice leaking from the ulcer base. Therefore, a biliary stent was placed into the common bile duct for 3 months until the DU healed. This is the first case of a refractory DU with a biliary-duodenal fistula in a patient treated with bevacizumab. PMID:27383109

  15. Gallbladder disease in children.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, David H; Harmon, Carroll M

    2016-08-01

    Biliary disease in children has changed over the past few decades, with a marked rise in incidence-perhaps most related to the parallel rise in pediatric obesity-as well as a rise in cholecystectomy rates. In addition to stone disease (cholelithiasis), acalculous causes of gallbladder pain such as biliary dyskinesia, also appear to be on the rise and present diagnostic and treatment conundrums to surgeons. PMID:27521713

  16. Strategy for the use of biliary scintigraphy in non-iatrogenic biliary trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Lee, C.H.; Stahl, R.; Viscomi, G.N.; Baker, C.; Cahow, C.E.; Dobbins, J.; Neumann, R.; Burrell, M.I.

    1984-06-01

    Biliary scintigraphy was used to examine 21 patients who had suspected non-iatrogenic biliary trauma. Seven patients (33%) had scintigraphic evidence of biliary leakage. Ultimately, surgical biliary repair was required for only three of these patients. Visualization of the gallbladder did not occur in eight trauma patients, but only one patient was shown to have cholecystitis. In this series, 16 patients had Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans that offered no significant advantage over cholescintigraphy in the detection of hepatic parenchymal defects. Biliary scintigraphy provides clinically useful information in cases both of blunt and penetrating trauma.

  17. Strategy for use of biliary scintigraphy in non-iatrogenic biliary trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Lee, C.H.; Stahl, R.; Viscomi, G.N.; Baker, C.; Cahow, C.E.; Dobbins, J.; Neumann, R.; Burrell, M.I.

    1984-06-01

    Biliary scintigraphy was used to examine 21 patients who had suspected non-iatrogenic biliary trauma. Seven patients (33%) had scintigraphic evidence of biliary leakage. Ultimately, surgical biliary repair was required for only three of these patients. Visualization of the gallbladder did not occur in eight trauma patients, but only one patient was shown to have cholecystitis. In this series, 16 patients had Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans that offered no significant advantage over cholescintigraphy in the detection of hepatic parenchymal defects. Biliary scintigraphy provides clinically useful information in cases both of blunt and penetrating trauma.

  18. Biliary Adenofibroma with Invasive Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Godambe, Anjali; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Fulling, Keith H; Reza Kermanshahi, Taher

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of biliary adenofibroma with an invasive carcinoma in a 71-year-old female who presented with bilateral upper abdominal pain. Imaging revealed a 6.3 cm heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left lateral segment of the liver. Histologically, the adenofibroma showed the characteristic components as previously described of biliary adenofibromata, namely, cystic and tubular structures lined by cuboidal to low columnar biliary type epithelium and a dense fibrous stroma composed of spindled cells. Intimately admixed with the adenofibroma was a distinct tumor composed of malignant clear cells which demonstrated stromal and vascular invasion. Although mitotic figures were inconspicuous, Ki67 was brisk and p53 demonstrated 25-50% positivity. Sections also showed a von Meyenberg complex located adjacent to the tumor. This case expands the understanding of this rare tumor and proves two important assertions from previous case reports. First, the presence of an associated von Meyenberg complex with similar morphology and immunohistochemical staining pattern suggests that biliary adenofibromata and von Meyenberg complexes may share related histogenesis. Second, biliary adenofibromata harbor malignant potential and may show malignant transformation. Furthermore, this case highlights the need for these rare tumors to be followed aggressively, as their biological behavior is poorly understood. PMID:26885426

  19. Biliary Adenofibroma with Invasive Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Godambe, Anjali; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Fulling, Keith H.; Reza Kermanshahi, Taher

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of biliary adenofibroma with an invasive carcinoma in a 71-year-old female who presented with bilateral upper abdominal pain. Imaging revealed a 6.3 cm heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left lateral segment of the liver. Histologically, the adenofibroma showed the characteristic components as previously described of biliary adenofibromata, namely, cystic and tubular structures lined by cuboidal to low columnar biliary type epithelium and a dense fibrous stroma composed of spindled cells. Intimately admixed with the adenofibroma was a distinct tumor composed of malignant clear cells which demonstrated stromal and vascular invasion. Although mitotic figures were inconspicuous, Ki67 was brisk and p53 demonstrated 25–50% positivity. Sections also showed a von Meyenberg complex located adjacent to the tumor. This case expands the understanding of this rare tumor and proves two important assertions from previous case reports. First, the presence of an associated von Meyenberg complex with similar morphology and immunohistochemical staining pattern suggests that biliary adenofibromata and von Meyenberg complexes may share related histogenesis. Second, biliary adenofibromata harbor malignant potential and may show malignant transformation. Furthermore, this case highlights the need for these rare tumors to be followed aggressively, as their biological behavior is poorly understood. PMID:26885426

  20. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tree

    SciTech Connect

    Stadalnik, R.C.; Matolo, N.M.

    1981-08-01

    The new 99mTc biliary scintigraphy agents are highly sensitive and specific in detecting biliary tract disease and use of them is the initial procedure of choice in evaluating patients with suspected acute cholecystitis. Other clinically useful indications are evaluation of biliary kinetics; evaluation of patients with suspected traumatic bile leakage, gallbladder perforation, or postsurgical biliary tract complications; and evaluation of patients with suspected biliary obstruction. In 99mTc we have a simple radiopharmaceutical of low radiation for evaluating congenital abnormalities and neonatal jaundice. In the Orient 99mTc cholescintigraphy is extremely important in evaluating patients with suspected intrahepatic stones. The overall advantages of this technique include availability, safety, simplicity, and accuracy. In addition, it may be performed in those patients who are allergic to iodinated contrast agents.

  1. Current Status of Biliary Metal Stents.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-03-01

    Many advances have been achieved in biliary stenting over the past 30 years. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary management therapy to relieve obstruction in patients with benign or malignant biliary tract diseases. Compared with plastic stents, a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has been used for management in patients with malignant strictures because of a larger lumen and longer stent patency. Recently, SEMS has been used for various benign biliary strictures and leaks. In this article, we briefly review the characteristics of SEMS as well as complications of stent placement. We review the current guidelines for managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions. Recent developments in biliary stenting are also discussed. PMID:26911896

  2. Current Status of Biliary Metal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Many advances have been achieved in biliary stenting over the past 30 years. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary management therapy to relieve obstruction in patients with benign or malignant biliary tract diseases. Compared with plastic stents, a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has been used for management in patients with malignant strictures because of a larger lumen and longer stent patency. Recently, SEMS has been used for various benign biliary strictures and leaks. In this article, we briefly review the characteristics of SEMS as well as complications of stent placement. We review the current guidelines for managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions. Recent developments in biliary stenting are also discussed. PMID:26911896

  3. [Echographic signs of biliary atresia].

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, B A; Iaremenko, V V; Babko, S A; Klimenko, E F; Medvedenko, G F

    2004-10-01

    The assessment of echographic features of biliary atresia was conducted in 65 newborn children ageing up to 3 mo. Their characteristic variants were revealed: the absence or reduction in size of gall-bladder, the presence of hyperechogenic triangular formation in V. portae bifurcation (the symptom of "triangular cicatrix"); the thickening of anterior wall of V. portae right branch. The timely and correct establishment of the diagnosis permits a child to survive and serve the hepatic fibrosis prophylaxis. Echohepatography is a sufficiently trustful method of investigation. PMID:15628232

  4. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis-sonographic pictorial essay on four pediatric cases with acute biliary colic.

    PubMed

    Lynser, Donboklang; Marbaniang, Evarisalin

    2016-04-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis occur due to migration of the round worm ascaris lumbricoides through the bile duct orifice finally reaching the common bile duct, main pancreatic duct, intrahepatic ducts or gallbladder. These resulted in acute epigastric and right hypochondriac region colicky pain. Ultrasound is the investigation of choice in hepatobiliary ascariasis. We present here sonographic images on four pediatric patients with acute biliary colic. PMID:26690772

  5. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.E.; Daly, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cholescintigraphy with technetium-labeled biliary agents has great value in evaluation of the patient with suspected acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gall bladder virtually excludes acute cholecystitis and obstruction of the cystic duct. Nonvisualization of the gall bladder, however, is not specific for acute cholecystitis and may also occur in some patients with chronic cholecystitis or pancreatitis. Interpretation of gall bladder nonvisualization, therefore, must be correlated with the clinical presentation. Biliary tract imaging is also useful in evaluation of some focal abnormalities within the liver, neonatal jaundice, detection of bile leaks or bile reflux, and biliary-enteric shunts. The role of technetium-labeled biliary agents in the evaluation of patients with jaundice is less clear. Excretion of tracer into the gut excludes complete biliary tract obstruction, but the test may be nonconclusive at higher serum bilirubin levels. If persistent common bile duct activity is observed with delayed excretion into the gut, the diagnosis of partial obstruction may be made, but this procedure will be inconclusive if the common bile duct is not visualized and/or significant hepatocellular disease is present. Ultrasonography and abdominal CT are the preferred tools for the diagnosis of biliary tract obstruction at present, but newer biliary tract agents which achieve better hepatic extraction and greater bile concentration at high serum bilirubin levels may improve the diagnostic efficacy of cholescintigraphy.

  6. An Unusual Cause of Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Sern Wei

    2012-01-01

    Portal biliary ductopathy (PBD) is a condition in which biliary and pancreatic ducts are extrinsically compressed by collateral branches of the portal venous system, which in turn have become dilated and varicosed due to portal hypertension. While the majority of patients with PBD are asymptomatic, a minority can present with symptoms of biliary obstruction and cholangitis with the potential of developing secondary chronic liver disease. This paper reports the case of a 29 year old male presenting with acute cholangitis, in whom PBD was diagnosed radiologically. A brief review of current literature regarding the diagnosis and management of this condition will also be presented. PMID:22844197

  7. Endoscopic palliation of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Sanjay M; Gaidhane, Monica; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary strictures often present late after the window for curative resection has elapsed. In such patients, the goal of therapy is typically focused on palliation. While historically, palliative measures were performed surgically, the advent of endoscopic intervention offers minimally invasive options to provide relief of symptoms, improve quality of life, and in some cases, increase survival of these patients. Some of these therapies, such as endoscopic biliary decompression, have become mainstays of treatment for decades, whereas newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, and photodynamic therapy offer additional options for patients with incurable biliary malignancies. PMID:26989459

  8. [Association of biliary calculosis and portal cavernomatosis].

    PubMed

    Crespi, C; De Giorgio, A M

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports the case of a woman, who underwent surgery because of cholelithiasis, with intraoperative finding of prehepatic portal hypertension from portal vein thrombosis ("portal cavernoma") with healthy liver, later confirmed by angiographic studies. This rare pathologic association carries a higher risk of major operative complications; therefore the Authors agree with the general belief that, for these cases, biliary tract surgery should be as simple and safe as possible. In the case of preoperative diagnosis of biliary disease associated with portal cavernoma, should a surgical approach on the biliary tract be required, we agree on the advisability of performing a shunting procedure before any kind of biliary surgery. In case of variceal bleeding endoscopic sclerotherapy will be the first choice; surgical procedures (shunting) should be seen as a second choice in case of rebleeding after sclerotherapy. PMID:1407632

  9. Endoscopic management of biliary hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Akkiz, Hikmet; Akinoglu, Alper; Çolakoglu, Salih; Demiryürek, Haluk; Yagmur, Özgür

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of endoscopic sphincterotomy in the management of biliary hydatid disease. Design A case study between January 1992 and December 1994. Setting A university-affiliated hospital in Adana, Turkey. Patients Five patients with biliary hydatid disease, in which the cyst had ruptured into the biliary tree. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months. Intervention Endoscopic sphincterotomy. Main Outcome Measures Morbidity, mortality and recurrence of the disease. Results All patients underwent successful endoscopic sphincterotomy, including removal of daughter cysts. During the follow-up period, ultrasonography and laboratory investigations showed complete cure in all patients. There were no complications due to endoscopic sphincterotomy. Conclusion Endoscopic sphincterotomy is the treatment of choice for the management of hydatid cysts that have ruptured into the biliary tract causing obstructive jaundice. PMID:8697318

  10. Benign Biliary Strictures: Diagnostic Evaluation and Approaches to Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted to help identify and treat biliary strictures that can result from a variety of benign etiologies. Mainstays of noninvasive imaging for benign biliary strictures include ultrasound, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and computed tomography cholangiography. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the invasive diagnostic procedure of choice, allowing both localization of a stricture and treatment. Percutaneous biliary interventions are reserved for patients who are not candidates for endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (eg, history of distal gastrectomy and biliary-enteric anastomosis to a jejunal roux limb). This review discusses the roles of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary drainage in the diagnosis of benign biliary strictures. The methodology for crossing benign biliary strictures, approaches to balloon dilation, management of recalcitrant strictures (ie, large-bore biliary catheters and retrievable covered stents), and the expected outcomes and complications of percutaneous treatment of benign biliary strictures are also addressed. PMID:26615161

  11. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage Complicated by Bilothorax.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stephanie H; Zangan, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is a well-established and safe technique for the management of biliary obstructions and leaks. While approach is variable based on operator preference, patient anatomy, and indications; PTBD is commonly performed via a right-sided intercostal route. With a right-sided approach, pleural complications may be encountered. The authors describe a case of a right PTBD complicated by a leak into the pleural space, with the subsequent development of bilothorax. PMID:27053829

  12. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  13. Molecular Identification of Biliary Isospora Belli: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chiu, King-Wah; Chiou, Shue-Shian; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Eng, Hock-Liew

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the novel sampling of bile from the biliary endoscopic intervention for the molecular identification of parasite infection.A 63-year-old Vietnamese man underwent travel health examination in our hospital. Physical examination showed that his height was 159 cm and weight was 41 kg. He had a 15-year history of intermittent abdominal pain and frequent episodes of diarrhea. Laboratory tests revealed raised eosinophil count (23%, normal range [NR] 0-5), absolute eosinophil count (1899/μL, NR 50-350), and levels of serum immunoglobulin E (3770 IU/mL, NR < 100), aspartate transaminase (270 U/L, NR 0-37), alanine transaminase (210 U/L, NR 0-40), and total bilirubin (1.8 mg/dL, NR 0.2-1.4); however, the serum alkaline phosphatase level was normal (65 U/L, NR 28-94) and non-reactive result for serum human insufficiency virus antibody.Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed diffuse dilatation of the biliary tree; the common hepatic and pancreatic duct diameters increased to 1.86 cm and 0.61 cm, respectively.Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed and a 10-Fr model plastic biliary stent was inserted and flushed with 20 cc normal saline; thereafter, the bile was collected and sent for DNA sequencing. Isospora belli (IB) infection was identified by a polymerase chain reaction.Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole 800 mg q6h was administered for 1 month. Liver enzyme levels normalized and negative for concentration method of ova study. The patient was doing well and weighed 51 kg at the outpatient clinic visit 3 months later.This bile sampling with molecular identification has not been described in the literature. We believe that an acute IB infection through fecal-oral transmission may progress to chronic infection of the hepatobiliary system, leading to biliary obstruction and jaundice. PMID:26962840

  14. Outcome following Resection of Biliary Cystadenoma: A Single Centre Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Pitchaimuthu, M.; Aidoo-Micah, G.; Coldham, C.; Sutcliffe, R.; Roberts, J. K.; Muiesan, P.; Isaac, J.; Mirza, D.; Marudanayagam, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Biliary cystadenomas (BCAs) are rare, benign, potentially malignant cystic lesions of the liver, accounting for less than 5% of cystic liver tumours. We report the outcome following resection of biliary cystadenoma from a single tertiary centre. Methods. Data of patients who had resection of BCA between January 1993 and July 2014 were obtained from liver surgical database. Patient demographics, clinicopathological characteristics, operative data, and postoperative outcome were analysed. Results. 29 patients had surgery for BCA. Male : female ratio was 1 : 28. Clinical presentation was abdominal pain (74%), jaundice (20%), abdominal mass (14%), and deranged liver function tests (3%). Cyst characteristics included septations (48%), wall thickening (31%), wall irregularity (38%), papillary projections (10%), and mural nodule (3%). Surgical procedures included atypical liver resection (52%), left hemihepatectomy (34%), right hemihepatectomy (10%), and left lateral segmentectomy (3%). Median length of stay was 7 (IQ 6.5–8.5) days. Two patients developed postoperative bile leak. No patients had malignancy on final histology. Median follow-up was 13 (IQ 6.5–15.7) years. One patient developed delayed biliary stricture and one died of cholangiocarcinoma 11 years later. Conclusion. Biliary cystadenomas can be resected safely with significantly low morbidity. Malignant transformation and recurrence are rare. Complete surgical resection provides a cure. PMID:26839708

  15. [The 452th case: rash, hypotension, abdominal pain and headache].

    PubMed

    Bian, S N; Yang, H H; Wang, Q; Xu, D; Zhao, Y

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized with multiple organ involvements. Acute acalculous cholecystitis(AAC) is an extremely rare manifestation of digestive system involvement in SLE. We reported a case of 32-year-old woman who complained skin rashes for two weeks and stomachache and oliguria for one day. She had rashes at onset, and developed fever, stomachache, hypotension and headache. Physical examination at admission indicated blood pressure 76/47 mmHg(1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), heart rate 107 beats/min, warm acra. Murphy's sign was positive. Ultrasound suggested the enlarged gallbladder with surrounding hypoecho band yet no biliary calculi were found. A diagnosis of SLE was made, characteristic with distributive shock at the onset and AAC, complicated with neuropsychiatric lupus and lupus nephritis. She had an acute and severe course of disease, which had been relieved after treatment of high dose glucocorticoid and immunosuppressants. This case arouses clinicians to pay more attention to AAC as a rare form of disease flare in SLE. Early diagnosis of AAC is crucial to a favorable prognosis and in avoid of abdominal surgery. PMID:27586989

  16. Contribution of Mature Hepatocytes to Biliary Regeneration in Rats with Acute and Chronic Biliary Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Hui; Chen, Hui-Ling; Chien, Chin-Sung; Wu, Shang-Hsin; Ho, Yi-Tian; Yu, Chun-Hsien; Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2015-01-01

    Whether hepatocytes can convert into biliary epithelial cells (BECs) during biliary injury is much debated. To test this concept, we traced the fate of genetically labeled [dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV)-positive] hepatocytes in hepatocyte transplantation model following acute hepato-biliary injury induced by 4,4’-methylene-dianiline (DAPM) and D-galactosamine (DAPM+D-gal) and in DPPIV-chimeric liver model subjected to acute (DAPM+D-gal) or chronic biliary injury caused by DAPM and bile duct ligation (DAPM+BDL). In both models before biliary injury, BECs are uniformly DPPIV-deficient and proliferation of DPPIV-deficient hepatocytes is restricted by retrorsine. We found that mature hepatocytes underwent a stepwise conversion into BECs after biliary injury. In the hepatocyte transplantation model, DPPIV-positive hepatocytes entrapped periportally proliferated, and formed two-layered plates along portal veins. Within the two-layered plates, the hepatocytes gradually lost their hepatocytic identity, proceeded through an intermediate state, acquired a biliary phenotype, and subsequently formed bile ducts along the hilum-to-periphery axis. In DPPIV-chimeric liver model, periportal hepatocytes expressing hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β) were exclusively DPPIV-positive and were in continuity to DPPIV-positives bile ducts. Inhibition of hepatocyte proliferation by additional doses of retrorsine in DPPIV-chimeric livers prevented the appearance of DPPIV-positive BECs after biliary injury. Moreover, enriched DPPIV-positive BEC/hepatic oval cell transplantation produced DPPIV-positive BECs or bile ducts in unexpectedly low frequency and in mid-lobular regions. These results together suggest that mature hepatocytes but not contaminating BECs/hepatic oval cells are the sources of periportal DPPIV-positive BECs. We conclude that mature hepatocytes contribute to biliary regeneration in the environment of acute and chronic biliary injury through a ductal plate

  17. GWAS in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Gulamhusein, Aliya F.; Juran, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have been a significant technological advance in our ability to evaluate the genetic architecture of complex diseases such as Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC). To date, six large-scale studies have been performed which identified 27 non-HLA risk loci associated with PBC. The identified risk variants emphasize important disease concepts; namely, that disturbances in immunoregulatory pathways are important in the pathogenesis of PBC and that such perturbations are shared among a diverse number of autoimmune diseases – suggesting the risk architecture may confer a generalized propensity to autoimmunity not necessarily specific to PBC. Furthermore, the impact of non-HLA risk variants, particularly in genes involved with IL-12 signaling, and ethnic variation in conferring susceptibility to PBC have been highlighted. While GWAS have been a critical stepping-stone in understanding common genetic variation contributing to PBC, limitations pertaining to power, sample availability, and strong linkage disequilibrium across genes have left us with an incomplete understanding of the genetic underpinnings of disease pathogenesis. Future efforts to gain insight into this missing heritability, the genetic variation that contributes to important disease outcomes and the functional consequences of associated variants will be critical if practical clinical translation is to be realized. PMID:26676814

  18. Angiographic Findings in Biliary Atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Uflacker, Renan Pariente, Daniele M.

    2004-09-15

    We present the angiographic findings of 46 patients with biliary atresia (BA). There were 25 males and 21 females, with a mean age of 22.5 months (range - 1.5 to 141 months). Hepatic and mesenteric angiography were obtained as part of a liver transplantation work-up or as part of the treatment of clinical events. All patients had a histological diagnosis of BA. The portal vein was patent in 43 patients, with a mean size of 4.1 mm, using the arterial catheter as comparison. Portal hepatopetal flow was observed in 20 patient and hepatofugal flow was observed in 21 patients. Presence of gastroesophageal varices was observed in 41 patients. The hepatic artery was enlarged in all patients. In all 46 patients studied, the intrahepatic peripheral hepatic artery branches presented with irregularities in contour, including encasement, strictures, dilatation and angulation, and images suggestive of peripheral occlusion. Angiographic vascular 'tuft-like' blush surrounding the irregular or occluded peripheral arterial segments was observed in 40 patients. The injection of Microfil (registered) in one case showed a marked vascular proliferation within the portal tract, apparently derived from arterial and portal connections, filling the entire portal space. We conclude that the presence of angiographically demonstrable perivascular arterial tufts in the periphery of the hepatic arterial circulation is a common finding in cases of BA, and may be a characteristic diagnostic angiographic finding.

  19. Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphy in segmental biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Gold, J.A.; Gluck, L.; Caride, V.J.; Burrell, M.; Hoffer, P.B.

    1981-05-01

    Segmental biliary obstruction as a result of primary or secondary hepatic malignancy has been reported with increasing frequency. For two representative patients, the clinical and Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphic findings in segmental biliary obstruction are described. The presence of photon-deficient dilated bile ducts in one segment of the biliary tree is highly suggestive of localized biliary obstruction and should be considered in the patient with suspected or proven hepatic malignancy despite the absence of jaundice.

  20. Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphy in segmental biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Gold, J.A.; Gluck, L.; Caride, V.J.; Burrell, M.; Hoffer, P.B.

    1981-05-01

    Segmental biliary obstruction as a result of primary or secondary hepatic malignancy has been reported with increasing frequency. For two representative patients, the clinical and Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphic findings in segmetal biliary obstruction are described. The presence of photon-deficient dilated bile ducts in one segment of the biliary tree is highly suggestive of localized biliary obstruction and should be considered in the patient with suspected or proven hepatic malignancy despite the absence of jaundice.

  1. Management of Biliary Strictures After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nicolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Strictures of the bile duct are a well-recognized complication of liver transplant and account for more than 50% of all biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplant and living donor liver transplant. Biliary strictures that develop after transplant are classified as anastomotic strictures or nonanastomotic strictures, depending on their location in the bile duct. The incidence, etiology, natural history, and response to therapy of the 2 types vary greatly, so their distinction is clinically important. The imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of biliary strictures is magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography because of its high rate of diagnostic accuracy and limited risk of complications. Biliary strictures that develop after liver transplant may be managed with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), or surgical revision, including retransplant. The initial treatment of choice for these strictures is ERC with progressive balloon dilation and the placement of increasing numbers of plastic stents. PTC and surgery are generally reserved for failures of endoscopic therapy or for anatomic variants that are not suitable for ERC. In this article, we discuss the classification of biliary strictures, their diagnosis, and the therapeutic strategies that can be used to manage these common complications of liver transplant. PMID:27482175

  2. Ketamine-induced biliary dilatation: from Hong Kong to New York.

    PubMed

    Gutkin, Ellen; Hussain, Syed A; Kim, Sang H

    2012-03-01

    Ketamine is a popular drug of abuse in China, especially for young adults between the 18 and 30 years. It produces desirable short-term sensations of excitement, dream-like states, hallucinations, and vivid imagery, but is also responsible for untoward effects of the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts. Abusers often present with severe abdominal pain and dysuria. In addition to its excretion in urine, ketamine is also excreted in bile and can lead to biliary dilatation. Sixteen reports of this phenomenon have been described in the literature, mostly in China. To date, this phenomenon has not been described in the United States. We present 2 cases of ketamine-induced biliary dilatation in young adult Asian patients. It is a new entity in the United States but should be recognized early, as it may prevent unnecessary investigation with blood work, imaging, therapeutic endoscopy, or even surgery. PMID:22124288

  3. Positional biliary stasis: scintigraphic findings following biliary-enteric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Lucas, M H; Elgazzar, A H; Cummings, D D

    1995-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy has proven to be a reliable noninvasive imaging modality to evaluate postoperative biliary obstruction, which is a frequent complication following biliary enteric bypass surgery. We present a case of a patient who had biliary enteric bypass surgery with a scintigraphic pattern simulating partial obstruction on a 99mTc hepatobiliary study performed with the patient in a supine position. The biliary stasis seen in the supine images disappeared almost completely when the images were repeated after 30 min in an upright position. Progressive accumulation of activity initially seen in the region of the biliary enteric anastomosis was not present 3 days later on a repeat study with the patient in an upright position, confirming that biliary stasis in this patient was due to a positional phenomenon. This case illustrates that biliary stasis may be positional in nature. Position related stasis should be a consideration when interpreting hepatobiliary scintigraphic studies in postoperative patients and when suspected, patients should be imaged in the upright position. PMID:7799060

  4. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  5. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... your pain. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ... If your doctor recommends an over-the-counter pain reliever, read and follow the instructions on the box. ...

  6. Transpapillary biliary stenting is a risk factor for pancreatic stones in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kishida, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Tomohiro; Murai, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Masao; Imai, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Kikuyama, Masataka; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: Pancreatic stones occasionally develop in autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), often worsen endocrine and exocrine functions, and occasionally cause pain attacks. However, the risks of pancreatic stones in AIP have been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors associated with pancreatic stone formation in cases of AIP. Patients and methods: In total, 50 patients with AIP (39 males, 11 females; mean age 64.0 years), followed up for at least a year, were analyzed for their demographic and clinical findings and pancreatic stone occurrence. Results: In total, 50 patients were followed up for an average of 59.7 (12 – 120) months, with steroid treatment in 44 patients (88 %); pancreatic stones occurred in 14 (28 %) patients after the diagnosis of AIP and endoscopic treatment was needed in one patient with pain attack. The pancreatic stones appeared only in patients with long follow-up period (P < 0.001, 83.9 months vs. 49.6 months), biliary stenting (odds ratio [OR]: 8.40, P = 0.010), relapse (OR: 6.20, P = 0.023), jaundice (OR: 5.40, P = 0.019), and swelling of the duodenal major papilla (OR: 4.67, P = 0.040). Biliary stenting was placed for an average of 9.9 months in 27 patients. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant association only with biliary stenting (P = 0.011). The stones appeared relatively earlier in patients with stones in the main pancreatic duct or Santorini duct (22.1 months) than in patients where pancreatic stones developed elsewhere (53.4 months) (P = 0.018). Conclusions: The risk of pancreatic stone development should be taken into account when a biliary stent is placed in patients with AIP. PMID:27540582

  7. Burdick's Technique for Biliary Access Revisited.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Rai, Vijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The precut sphincterotomy is used to facilitate selective biliary access in cases of difficult biliary cannulation. Needle-knife precut papillotomy is the standard of care but is associated with a high rate of complications such as pancreatitis, duodenal perforation, bleeding, etc. Sometimes during bowing of the sphincterotome/cannula and the use of guide wire to facilitate biliary cannulation, inadvertent formation of a false passage occurs in the 10 to 11 o'clock direction. Use of this step to access the bile duct by the intramucosal incision technique was first described by Burdick et al., and since then two more studies have also substantiated the safety and efficacy of this non-needle type of precut sphincterotomy. In this review, we discuss this non-needle technique of precut sphincterotomy and also share our experience using this "Burdick's technique." PMID:25674522

  8. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  9. Broncho-biliary fistula secondary to biliary obstruction and lung abscess in a patient with pancreatic neuro-endocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Panda, Dipanjan; Aggarwal, Mayank; Yadav, Vikas; Kumar, Sachin; Mukund, Amar; Baghmar, Saphalta

    2016-06-01

    We present a case report of broncho-biliary fistula that developed due to the blockage of biliary stent placed during the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET); diagnosed on high clinical suspicion, percutaneous cholangiogram and contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT); and successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). PMID:26994644

  10. External biliary drainage following major liver resection for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma: impact on development of liver failure and biliary leakage

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, Pim B.; Coelen, Robert J.S.; Wiggers, Jimme K.; Besselink, Marc G.H.; Busch, Olivier R.C.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Preoperative biliary drainage is considered essential in perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (PHC) requiring major hepatectomy with biliary-enteric reconstruction. However, evidence for postoperative biliary drainage as to protect the anastomosis is currently lacking. This study investigated the impact of postoperative external biliary drainage on the development of post-hepatectomy biliary leakage and liver failure (PHLF). Methods All patients who underwent major liver resection for suspected PHC between 2000 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Biliary leakage and PHLF was defined as grade B or higher according to the International Study Group of Liver Surgery (ISGLS) criteria. Results Eighty-nine out of 125 (71%) patients had postoperative external biliary drainage. PHLF was more prevalent in the drain group (29% versus 6%; P = 0.004). There was no difference in the incidence of biliary leakage (32% versus 36%). On multivariable analysis, postoperative external biliary drainage was identified as an independent risk factor for PHLF (Odds-ratio 10.3, 95% confidence interval 2.1–50.4; P = 0.004). Conclusions External biliary drainage following major hepatectomy for PHC was associated with an increased incidence of PHLF. It is therefore not recommended to routinely use postoperative external biliary drainage, especially as there is no evidence that this decreases the risk of biliary anastomotic leakage. PMID:27037204

  11. A prospective study of radionuclide biliary scanning in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Neoptolemos, J. P.; Fossard, D. P.; Berry, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Early surgery for biliary pancreatitis has resulted in a need for an accurate method of gallstone detection in acute pancreatitis. Fifty patients with acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively to assess the diagnostic value of Radionuclide Biliary Scanning (RBS) performed within 72 hours of an attack. To assess the general accuracy of RBS a further 154 patients with suspected acute cholecystitis or biliary colic were similarly studied. There were 34 patients with biliary pancreatitis and 18 (53%) had a positive scan (no gallbladder seen). There were 16 patients with non-biliary pancreatitis and 5 (31%) had a positive scan. All 51 patients with acute cholecystitis had a positive scan, as did 82% of the 51 patients with biliary colic. There were 52 patients with no biliary or pancreatic disease and none of these had a positive scan. RBS is highly accurate in confirming a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis or biliary colic. However, it cannot be relied on to differentiate between biliary and non-biliary pancreatitis and should certainly not be used as the basis for biliary surgery in these patients. PMID:6859781

  12. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain March 2015 Handout on Health: Back Pain This publication is for people who have back ... to discuss them with your doctor. What Is Back Pain? Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem ...

  13. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  14. [Congenital dilatation of the biliary system in adult: about three clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Ungania, Silvio; Barletta, Nives

    2011-01-01

    The authors refer to three cases of congenital dilatation of the biliary system in an adult, an extremely rare pathology in the West, with no specific symptomatology, and therefore often discovered accidentally and unexpectedly The first patient had suffered from unexplained periods of fever since childhood, the second had only complained of vague abdominal pains a years before diagnosis; for the third, a Romanian woman, it was the first time she complained of a biliary colic. All the patients had an Ultrasound, a CT scan and a MRCP (magnetic resonance cholangiopancretography). Based on the Todani classification, the first and the third case belongs to type IV A, while the second is a type I. In all three patients the pathology was resolved due to an operation entailing disconnection of the biliary-pancreatic tract, with complete surgical removal of the dilated bile ducts followed by a Roux-en-Y hepatico-jejunostomy. Nevertheless the procedures undertaken are not immune to criticism: in the first and second case the diagnostic imagery had not immediately produced a clear interpretation, leading to a delay in the diagnosis and the execution in the first of a not anodyne ERCP; in the third case a colecistectomy was performed as it were as an intermediary measure; finally there was probably omitted a thorough explanation to the patient with regard to a pathology deserving of a careful follow-up for the possible recidivist of the infectious phenomena and above all the onset of the dangerous degeneration carcinomatosa. PMID:22229240

  15. British Society of Interventional Radiology: Biliary Drainage and Stenting Registry (BDSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, R. Das, N.; Moss, J.; Robertson, I.

    2012-02-15

    Objectives: This study was designed to audit current practice in percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting in the United Kingdom. Methods: In 2006, the British Society of Interventional Radiology set up the first web-based Biliary Drainage and Stenting Registry (BDSR). This consisted of a series of tick sheets, which were completed online. Data collection included technical and clinical success of the procedures and outcomes at discharge with a separate form for any follow-up visits. Two months before data analysis, all contributors were asked via email to complete any outstanding data. This paper reports on data collected between November 1, 2006 and August 18, 2009. Results: A total of 833 procedures were recorded and were entered by 62 operators from 44 institutions within the United Kingdom. There were 455 men and 378 women with a median age of 69 (range 20-101) years.The majority of procedures were performed by a consultant. Successful drainage of the biliary tree was achieved in 98.7%. Partial or complete relief of symptoms was seen in 65% of patients. Minor complications, predominantly pain (14.3%), were seen in 26% and major complications, predominantly sepsis (3.5%), were seen in 7.9% of patients. Conclusions: These figures provide an essential benchmark for both audit and patient information. Identifying areas of good practice and those that require improvement will ultimately result in better patient care.

  16. Biliary pancreatitis. Deadly threat to the elderly. Is it a real threat?

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Arshad Mehmood

    2015-01-01

    Objective/Introduction Gallstone pancreatitis is a deadly disease and especially so in the elderly. This study highlights the incidence, pattern and management of acute biliary pancreatitis in the elderly patients to find out the outcome of management. Methods All patients of acute abdomen regardless of the age and gender of the patients were admitted in our unit at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences and different private hospitals in Hyderabad during 3 years commencing from June 2009 to June 2011. The data was collected on a proforma by the author as soon as the patients were received from the emergency. After admission the patients with the diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis on initial workup were inducted in this study. The variables studied included the incidence, severity and management outcome in patients 55 years and above compared to younger patients below 55 years. Results A total number of 650 patients regardless of gender with acute severe abdominal pain were brought to the emergency of which 131(20.15%) were diagnosed as acute biliary pancreatitis after initial work up. Out of the total patients diagnosed as acute pancreatitis, 63(48.09%) patients were <55 years of age and remaining 68(51.90%) patients were >55 years of age. The overall mortality in this study was 20.63 %( n=13) in elderly patients (> 55 years of age) in both the sexes despite all possible treatment measures. Conclusion Elderly people respond poorly to the acute insult to pancreatitis. PMID:25901131

  17. Biliary complications following orthotopic liver transplantation: a 10-year audit

    PubMed Central

    Gunawansa, Nalaka; McCall, John L; Holden, Andrew; Plank, Lindsay; Munn, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    Background Biliary complications following liver transplantation result in major morbidity. We undertook a 10-year audit of the incidence, management and outcomes of post-transplant biliary complications at the New Zealand Liver Transplant Unit. Methods Prospectively collected data on 348 consecutive liver transplants performed between February 1998 and October 2008 were reviewed. The minimum follow-up was 6 months. Results A total of 309 adult and 39 paediatric transplants were performed over the study period. Of these, 296 (85%) were whole liver grafts and 52 (15%) were partial liver grafts (24 split-liver, eight reduced-size and 20 live-donor grafts). There were 80 biliary complications, which included 63 (18%) strictures and 17 (5%) bile leaks. Partial graft, a paediatric recipient and a Roux-en-Y biliary anastomosis were independent predictors of biliary strictures. Twenty-five (40%) strictures were successfully managed non-operatively and 38 (60%) required surgery (31 biliary reconstructions, three segmental resections and four retransplants). Seven (41%) bile leaks required surgical revision and 10 (59%) were managed non-operatively. There was no mortality related directly to biliary complications. Conclusions Biliary complications affected one in five transplant recipients. Paediatric status, partial graft and Roux-en-Y anastomosis were independently associated with the occurrence of biliary strictures. Over half of the affected patients required surgical revision, but no mortality resulted from biliary complications. PMID:21609371

  18. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... BACK PAIN? There are many possible causes of low back pain, including stretched (strained) muscles, torn or stretched (sprained) ... appear to be at an increased risk for low back pain in comparison to the general population (estimates range ...

  19. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Pain - neck; Neck stiffness; Cervicalgia; Whiplash Images Neck pain Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References ... pubmed/19272509 . Read More Diskectomy Foraminotomy Laminectomy Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 3/ ...

  20. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  1. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  2. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  3. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  4. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  5. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  6. A Comparison of Preoperative Biliary Drainage Methods for Perihilar Cholangiocarcinoma: Endoscopic versus Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Min; Park, Ji Won; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kwang Hyuck; Lee, Kyu Taek; Shim, Sang Goon

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Controversy remains over the optimal approach to preoperative biliary drainage in patients with resectable perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. We compared the clinical outcomes of endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) with those of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) in patients undergoing preoperative biliary drainage for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods A total of 106 consecutive patients who underwent biliary drainage before surgical treatment were divided into two groups: the PTBD group (n=62) and the EBD group (n=44). Results Successful drainage on the first attempt was achieved in 36 of 62 patients (58.1%) with PTBD, and in 25 of 44 patients (56.8%) with EBD. There were no significant differences in predrainage patient demographics and decompression periods between the two groups. Procedure-related complications, especially cholangitis and pancreatitis, were significantly more frequent in the EBD group than the PTBD group (PTBD vs EBD: 22.6% vs 54.5%, p<0.001). Two patients (3.8%) in the PTBD group experienced catheter tract implantation metastasis after curative resection during the follow-up period. Conclusions EBD was associated with a higher risk of procedure-related complications than PTBD. These complications were managed properly without severe morbidity; however, in the PTBD group, there were two cases of cancer dissemination along the catheter tract. PMID:26087784

  7. Biliary ascariasis after Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Braga, L H; Tatsuo, E S; Guimarães, J T; Miranda, M E; Paixão, R M; Teixeira, C R; Piçarro, C; Lanna, J C

    2000-09-01

    The authors report on a 6-year-old girl with biliary ascariasis after surgical treatment of a choledochal cyst and biliary-digestive tract reconstruction by Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. A precise diagnosis can be obtained by ultrasonography. Surgical treatment is required when clinical and endoscopic treatments fail. In countries in which this disease is endemic, biliary ascariasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cholangitis after surgery for hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:10999711

  8. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  9. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures are a common indication for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Endoscopic management has evolved over the last 2 decades as the current standard of care. The most common etiologies of strictures encountered are following surgery and those related to chronic pancreatitis. High-quality cross-sectional imaging provides a road map for endoscopic management. Currently, sequential placement of multiple plastic biliary stents represents the preferred approach. There is an increasing role for the treatment of these strictures using covered metal stents, but due to conflicting reports of efficacies as well as cost and complications, this approach should only be entertained following careful consideration. Optimal management of strictures is best achieved using a team approach with the surgeon and interventional radiologist playing an important role. PMID:25613176

  10. Proposed therapies in primary biliary cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Floreani, Annarosa; Sun, Ying; Zou, Zheng Sheng; Li, Baosen; Cazzagon, Nora; Bowlus, Christopher L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-03-01

    ABSTARCT Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary cirrhosis, is a model autoimmune disease with chronic cholestasis characterized by the hallmark of anti-mitochondrial antibodies and treated with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). However, approximately 20-40% of patients incompletely respond to UDCA and have an increased risk of disease progression. Although there have been significant advances in the immunobiology of PBC, these have yet to be translated into newer therapeutic modalities. Current approaches to controlling the immune response include broad immunosuppression with corticosteroids as well as targeted therapies directed against T and B cells. In contrast, ameliorating cholestasis is the focus of other therapies in development, including obeticholic acid. In this article the authors will discuss ongoing clinical trials and, in particular, the rationale for choosing agents that may effectively target the aberrant immune response. PMID:26577047

  11. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-07-10

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  12. [Digestive endoscopy: biliary tract and pancreas].

    PubMed

    Costamagna, Guido

    2016-06-01

    New technological developments in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound, both for diagnosis and treatment of biliary and pancreatic diseases, have opened up new scenarios in the recent years. For instance, removal of large bile duct stones with endoscopic sphincterotomy followed by large balloon dilation has been proven to be a safe and effective technique. Also cholangioscopy evolved in terms of better imaging, tissue acquisition and stones management. Self-expandable metal stents are used mostly for malignant diseases, but their role in benign diseases has also been deeply investigated in the last years. The rapid evolution in the field of radiofrequency brought new devices for safer ablation and palliation of biliary tumours. Self-expandable metal stents are also used for ultrasound-guided drainage of walled off pancreatic necrosis and for choledocoduodenostomy and cholecystogastrostomy. PMID:27362720

  13. Recent advances of biliary stent management.

    PubMed

    Kida, Mitsuhiro; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Ikeda, Hiroko; Takezawa, Miyoko; Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Watanabe, Maya; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in chemotherapy has prolonged the survival of patients with malignant biliary strictures, leading to increased rates of stent occlusion. Even we employed metallic stents which contributed to higher rates and longer durations of patency, and occlusion of covered metallic stents now occurs in about half of all patients during their survival. We investigated the complication and patency rate for the removal of covered metallic stents, and found that the durations were similar for initial stent placement and re-intervention. In order to preserve patient quality of life, we currently recommend the use of covered metallic stents for patients with malignant biliary obstruction because of their removability and longest patency duration, even though uncovered metallic stents have similar patency durations. PMID:22563289

  14. Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation for malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    WANG, FEI; LI, QUANPENG; ZHANG, XIUHUA; JIANG, GUOBING; GE, XIANXIU; YU, HONG; NIE, JUNJIE; JI, GUOZHONG; MIAO, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a novel palliation therapy for malignant biliary stricture; however, its feasibility and safety has not yet been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic RFA for the treatment of malignant biliary strictures. A total of 12 patients treated by endoscopic RFA between December 2011 and October 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Adverse events within 30 days post-intervention, stricture diameters prior to and following RFA, stent patency and survival time were investigated. A total of 12 patients underwent 20 RFA procedures as a treatment for malignant biliary strictures. Two patients required repeated elective RFA (4 and 6 times, respectively). All 20 RFA procedures were successfully performed without technical problems. During a 30 day period following each RFA procedure, two patients experienced fever (38.2 and 38.9°C, respectively) and another patient exhibited post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. The 30- and 90-day mortality rates were 0 and 8.3%, respectively. Mean stricture diameter prior to RFA was 5.3 mm (standard deviation (SD), 0.9 mm; range, 5–8 mm), and the mean diameter following RFA was 12.6 mm (SD, 3.1 mm; range, 8–15 mm). There was a significant increase of 7.3 mm in the bile duct diameter following RFA in comparison with prior to RFA (t=8.6; P≤0.001). Of the 11 patients with stents inserted following RFA, the median stent patency was 125.0 days [95% confidence interval (CI), 94.7–155.3 days]. Extrapolated median survival following the first RFA was 232 days (95% CI, 94.3–369.7 days). In conclusion, RFA appears to be an efficient and safe treatment strategy for the palliation of unresectable malignant biliary strictures. PMID:27284336

  15. Biliary atresia: From Australia to the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Mark

    2016-02-01

    This review is based upon an invited lecture for the 52nd Annual Meeting of the British Association of Paediatric Surgeons, July 2015. The aetiology of biliary atresia (BA) is at best obscure, but it is probable that a number of causes or pathophysiological mechanisms may be involved leading to the final common phenotype we recognise clinically. By way of illustration, similar conditions to human BA are described, including biliary agenesis, which is the normal state and peculiar final pattern of bile duct development in the jawless fish, the lamprey. Furthermore, there have been remarkable outbreaks in the Australian outback of BA in newborn lambs whose mothers were exposed to and grazed upon a particular plant species (Dysphania glomulifera) during gestation. More recent work using a zebrafish model has isolated a toxic isoflavonoid, now named Biliatresone, thought to be responsible for these outbreaks. Normal development of the bile ducts is reviewed and parallels drawn with two clinical variants thought to definitively have their origins in intrauterine life: Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation syndrome (BASM) and Cystic Biliary Atresia (CBA). For both variants there is sufficient clinical evidence, including associated anomalies and antenatal detection, respectively, to warrant their aetiological attribution as developmental BA. CMV IgM +ve associated BA is a further variant that appears separate with distinct clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical features. In these it seems possible that this involves perinatal obliteration of a normally formed duct system. Although still circumstantial, this evidence appears convincing enough to perhaps warrant a different treatment strategy. This then still leaves the most common (more than 60% in Western series) variant, now termed Isolated BA, whereby origins can only be alluded to. PMID:26653951

  16. Microcatheter use for difficult percutaneous biliary procedures.

    PubMed

    Brountzos, Elias N; Kelekis, Alexis D; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Kotsioumba, Ioanna; Misiakos, Evangelos; Perros, George; Gouliamos, Athanasios D

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous biliary drainage procedures in patients with nondilated ducts are demanding, resulting in lower success rates than in patients with bile duct dilatation. Pertinent clinical settings include patients with iatrogenic bile leaks, diffuse cholangiocarcinomas, and sclerosing cholangitis. We describe a method to facilitate these procedures with the combined use of a 2.7-Fr microcatheter and a 0.018-in. hydrophilic wire. PMID:18320271

  17. Management of biliary complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; Piardi, Tullio; Sangiuolo, Federico; Sommacale, Daniele; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) currently represent a major source of morbidity after liver transplantation. Although refinements in surgical technique and medical therapy have had a positive influence on the reduction of postoperative morbidity, BC affect 5% to 25% of transplanted patients. Bile leak and anastomotic strictures represent the most common complications. Nowadays, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage such complications in order to prevent liver failure and retransplantation. PMID:26689137

  18. Photodynamic therapy for occluded biliary metal stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Joseph V. E.; Krasner, Neville; Sturgess, R.

    1999-02-01

    In this abstract we describe the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to recanalize occluded biliary metal stents. In patients with jaundice secondary to obstructed metal stents PDT was carried out 72 hours after the administration of m THPC. Red laser light at 652 nm was delivered endoscopically at an energy intensity of 50 J/cm. A week later endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram showed complete recanalization of the metal stent.

  19. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  20. Eosinophilic Cholangitis—A Challenging Diagnosis of Benign Biliary Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Fragulidis, Georgios Panagiotis; Vezakis, Antonios I.; Kontis, Elissaios A.; Pantiora, Eirini V.; Stefanidis, Gerasimos G.; Politi, Aikaterini N.; Koutoulidis, Vasilios K.; Mela, Maria K.; Polydorou, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract When confronting a biliary stricture, both benign and malignant etiologies must be carefully considered as a variety of benign biliary strictures can masquerade as hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Therefore, patients could undergo a major surgery despite the possibility of a benign biliary disease. Approximately 15% to 24% of patients undergoing surgical resection for suspected biliary malignancy will have benign pathology. Eosinophilic cholangitis (EC) is a rare benign disorder of the biliary tract, which can cause obstructive jaundice and can pose a difficult diagnostic task. We present a rare case of a young woman who was referred to our hospital with obstructive painless jaundice due to a biliary stricture at the confluence of the hepatic bile ducts, with a provisional diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Though, during her work up she was found to have EC, an extremely rare benign cause of biliary stricture, which is characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltration of the biliary tree causing stricturing, fibrosis, and obstruction and which is reversible with short-term high-dose steroids. Despite its rarity, EC should be taken into consideration when imaging modalities demonstrate a biliary stricture, especially if preoperative diagnosis of malignancy cannot be made, in the setting of peripheral eosinophilia and the absence of cardinal symptoms of malignancy. PMID:26735539

  1. Bilothorax as a complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Sano, Atsushi; Yotsumoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of bilothorax that occurred as a complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. In an 86-year-old woman who had undergone percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice, bilothorax occurred after accidental removal of the tube. She recovered with chest drainage only. An 83-year-old man who had undergone percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for cholecystitis developed bilothorax with infection. He recovered with thoracoscopic curettage. Although bilothorax is a rare complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, appropriate diagnosis and prompt treatment is important, especially when bilothorax is accompanied by infection. PMID:26294694

  2. Biliary Atresia: 50 Years after the First Kasai

    PubMed Central

    Wildhaber, Barbara E.

    2012-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a rare neonatal disease of unknown etiology, where obstruction of the biliary tree causes severe cholestasis, leading to biliary cirrhosis and death in the first years of life, if the condition is left untreated. Biliary atresia is the most frequent surgical cause of cholestatic jaundice in neonates and should be evoked whenever this clinical sign is associated with pale stools and hepatomegaly. The treatment of biliary atresia is surgical and currently recommended as a sequence of, eventually, two interventions. During the first months of life a hepatoportoenterostomy (a “Kasai,” modifications of which are discussed in this paper) should be performed, in order to restore the biliary flow to the intestine and lessen further damage to the liver. If this fails and/or the disease progresses towards biliary cirrhosis and life-threatening complications, then liver transplantation is indicated, for which biliary atresia represents the most frequent pediatric indication. Of importance, the earlier the Kasai is performed, the later a liver transplantation is usually needed. This warrants a great degree of awareness of biliary atresia, and the implementation of systematic screening for this life-threatening pathology. PMID:23304557

  3. Septic Shock Due to Biliary Stones in a Postcholecystectomy Patient.

    PubMed

    Azfar, Mohammad Feroz; Khan, Muhammad Faisal; Khursheed, Moazzum

    2015-10-01

    Septic shock leading to multi-organ failure is not uncommon. Early diagnosis to confirm the source is the distinctive attribute of sepsis management guidelines. Cholangitis as the source of sepsis can become a diagnostic dilemma in patients who have had cholecystectomy in the past. CT abdomen should be the investigation of choice in this group of patients. This report describes two postcholecystectomy patients who presented with septic shock secondary to biliary stones. The source of septic shock in both patients were biliary stones was confirmed with abdominal CT. Ultrasound abdomen failed to report biliary stones in these patients. Both improved on percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. PMID:26522207

  4. Biliary tract cancer and occupation in Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Malker, H S; McLaughlin, J K; Malker, B K; Stone, B J; Weiner, J A; Ericsson, J L; Blot, W J

    1986-01-01

    Using the Cancer-Environment Registry, which links the incidence of cancer (1961-79) and the 1960 census data on industry and occupation for all employed individuals in Sweden, the occurrence of biliary tract cancer (ICD 7th rev 155.1-.9) was systematically assessed according to occupational and industrial classifications. Data are presented separately for cancer of the gall bladder (ICD 155.1) and other cancers of the biliary tract (ICD 155.2-.9) including cancers of the extrahepatic bile ducts, ampulla of Vater, and unspecified bile passages. Statistically significant increased risks for cancer of the gall bladder were observed for men employed in petroleum refining, papermills, chemical processing, shoemaking, and repairing, and for both men and women employed in textile work. A significant increase in the incidence of other cancers of the biliary tract (mostly cancers of the bile duct) was found for such asbestos related employment as shipbuilding and in the wholesale construction materials industry and among insulation workers. These findings should be considered only as clues to aetiological factors, although several are consistent with earlier observations from other countries. PMID:3964574

  5. Adenocarcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary tree.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. B.; Cooper, M. J.; Williamson, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Increasing survival rates for carcinoma of the biliary tree could reflect the selection of patients for referral to a specialist centre as well as modern improvements in diagnosis and treatment. To determine the true incidence and outcome of biliary cancer, the records of 243 unselected Bristol patients were reviewed retrospectively over a 15-year period. Mean age was 64 years. Gallstones were associated in 38% of cases. Sixty-nine of 87 patients with gallbladder carcinoma were submitted to laparotomy. The operative (30-day) mortality rate was 56% and the one-year survival rate was 7%; one patient with an unexpected carcinoma is alive 7 years after cholecystectomy (1% five-year survival rate). Among 31 patients with carcinoma of the ampulla the operative mortality rate was 27%; one-year and five-year survival rates were 46% and 15%. Bile duct cancers (n = 125) arose proximal to the entry of the cystic duct (n = 63), distal to that point (n = 46) or diffusely (n = 16). For proximal cholangiocarcinoma the operative mortality rate was 38% and 1-year survival rate 17%; no patient lived for 2 years. For distal cholangiocarcinoma the operative mortality rate was 45% and one-year survival rate 26%; no patient lived for 3 years. Only palliative procedures were undertaken for diffuse cholangiocarcinoma; 2 patients survived 1 year (13%). Overall 5 patients with carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary tree appear to have been cured (2%). PMID:2988399

  6. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Singh, Rajvinder; Loong, Cheong Kuan; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach). This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS) has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS). In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS-) guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized. PMID:26981114

  7. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Singh, Rajvinder; Loong, Cheong Kuan; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach). This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS) has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS). In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS-) guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized. PMID:26981114

  8. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-10-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  9. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  10. Excretion of biliary compounds during intrauterine life

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Rocio IR; Marin, Jose JG; Serrano, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    In adults, the hepatobiliary system, together with the kidney, constitute the main routes for the elimination of several endogenous and xenobiotic compounds into bile and urine, respectively. However, during intrauterine life the biliary route of excretion for cholephilic compounds, such as bile acids and biliary pigments, is very poor. Although very early in pregnancy the fetal liver produces bile acids, bilirubin and biliverdin, these compounds cannot be efficiently eliminated by the fetal hepatobiliary system, owing to the immaturity of the excretory machinery in the fetal liver. Therefore, the potentially harmful accumulation of cholephilic compounds in the fetus is prevented by their elimination across the placenta. Owing to the presence of detoxifying enzymes and specific transport systems at different locations of the placental barrier, such as the endothelial cells of chorionic vessels and trophoblast cells, this organ plays an important role in the hepatobiliary-like function during intrauterine life. The relevance of this excretory function in normal fetal physiology is evident in situations where high concentrations of biliary compounds are accumulated in the mother. This may result in oxidative stress and apoptosis, mainly in the placenta and fetal liver, which might affect normal fetal development and challenge the fate of the pregnancy. The present article reviews current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the hepatobiliary function of the fetal-placental unit and the repercussions of several pathological conditions on this tandem. PMID:19230042

  11. Multicenter study of endoscopic preoperative biliary drainage for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sasahira, Naoki; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Togawa, Osamu; Yamamoto, Ryuichi; Iwai, Tomohisa; Tamada, Kiichi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Kenji; Koike, Takero; Yoshida, Yu; Sugimori, Kazuya; Ryozawa, Shomei; Kakimoto, Toshiharu; Nishikawa, Ko; Kitamura, Katsuya; Imamura, Tsunao; Mizuide, Masafumi; Toda, Nobuo; Maetani, Iruru; Sakai, Yuji; Itoi, Takao; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the optimal method of endoscopic preoperative biliary drainage for malignant distal biliary obstruction. METHODS: Multicenter retrospective study was conducted in patients who underwent plastic stent (PS) or nasobiliary catheter (NBC) placement for resectable malignant distal biliary obstruction followed by surgery between January 2010 and March 2012. Procedure-related adverse events, stent/catheter dysfunction (occlusion or migration of PS/NBC, development of cholangitis, or other conditions that required repeat endoscopic biliary intervention), and jaundice resolution (bilirubin level < 3.0 mg/dL) were evaluated. Cumulative incidence of jaundice resolution and dysfunction of PS/NBC were estimated using competing risk analysis. Patient characteristics and preoperative biliary drainage were also evaluated for association with the time to jaundice resolution and PS/NBC dysfunction using competing risk regression analysis. RESULTS: In total, 419 patients were included in the study (PS, 253 and NBC, 166). Primary cancers included pancreatic cancer in 194 patients (46%), bile duct cancer in 172 (41%), gallbladder cancer in three (1%), and ampullary cancer in 50 (12%). The median serum total bilirubin was 7.8 mg/dL and 324 patients (77%) had ≥ 3.0 mg/dL. During the median time to surgery of 29 d [interquartile range (IQR), 30-39 d]. PS/NBC dysfunction rate was 35% for PS and 18% for NBC [Subdistribution hazard ratio (SHR) = 4.76; 95%CI: 2.44-10.0, P < 0.001]; the pig-tailed tip was a risk factor for PS dysfunction. Jaundice resolution was achieved in 85% of patients and did not depend on the drainage method (PS or NBC). CONCLUSION: PS has insufficient patency for preoperative biliary drainage. Given the drawbacks of external drainage via NBC, an alternative method of internal drainage should be explored. PMID:27076764

  12. Role of CD56-expressing immature biliary epithelial cells in biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Zhong; Yu, Jia-Kang; Peng, Jiao; Wang, Feng-Hua; Liu, Hai-Ying; Lui, Vincent CH; Nicholls, John M; Tam, Paul KH; Lamb, Jonathan R; Chen, Yan; Xia, Hui-Min

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and pathological parameters and expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule (CD56) in patients with biliary atresia (BA). METHODS: Established clinical laboratory markers of hepatic function, including enzyme activity, protein synthesis, and bilirubin metabolism, were evaluated in patients with BA and compared with those in patients with choledochal cysts and neonatal hepatitis. Pathological changes in tissue morphology and fibrosis were examined by histological and tissue collagen staining. Immunohistochemical staining for the biliary epithelial cell markers CD56 and CK19 together with the Notch signaling related molecules Notch1 and Notch2 was performed in the context of alterations in the structure of intrahepatic biliary ducts. RESULTS: Differences in some clinical laboratory parameters among the three diseases examined were observed, but they did not correlate with the pathological classification of fibrosis in BA. Immunohistochemical staining showed the presence of CD56-positive immature bile ducts in most patients (74.5%) with BA but not in patients with choledochal cysts or neonatal hepatitis. The number of CD56-expressing cells correlated with disease severity, with more positive cells present in the later stages of liver damage (81.8% vs 18.2%). Furthermore, bile plugs were mainly found in CD56-positive immature biliary ducts. Notch signaling was a key regulatory pathway in biliary duct formation and played a role in tissue fibrosis. Notch1 was co-expressed in CD56-positive cells, whereas Notch2 was found exclusively in blood vessels in the portal area of patients with BA. CONCLUSION: The maturation of biliary epithelial cells and the expression of Notch may play a role in the pathogenesis of BA. PMID:26937142

  13. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Back Pain Information Page Condensed from Low Back Pain Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Back Pain? Acute or short-term low back pain generally ...

  14. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  15. Use of 99mTc-DISIDA biliary scanning with morphine provocation for the detection of elevated sphincter of Oddi basal pressure

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P; Turner, J; Dobbs, B; Burt, M; Chapman, B

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Endoscopic biliary manometry is useful in the assessment of patients with types II and III sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, but it is time consuming and invasive.
AIM—To investigate the role of 99mTc-DISIDA scanning, with and without morphine provocation, as a non-invasive investigation in these patients compared with endoscopic biliary manometry.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—A total of 34 patients with a clinical diagnosis of type II (n=21) or III (n=13) sphincter of Oddi dysfunction were studied. Biliary scintigraphy with 100 MBq of 99mTc-DISIDA was carried out with and without morphine provocation (0.04 mg/kg intravenously) and time/activity curves were compared with the results of subsequent endoscopic biliary manometry.
RESULTS—Eighteen (nine type II, nine type III) of the 34 (53%) patients had sphincter of Oddi basal pressures above the upper limit of normal (40 mm Hg). In the standard DISIDA scan without morphine, no significant differences were observed in time to maximal activity (Tmax) or percentage excretion at 45 or 60 minutes between those with normal and those with abnormal biliary manometry. However, following morphine provocation, median percentage excretion at 60 minutes was 4.9% in those with abnormal manometry and 28.2% in the normal manometry group (p=0.002). Using a cut off value of 15% excretion at 60 minutes, the sensitivity for detecting elevated sphincter of Oddi basal pressure by the morphine augmented DISIDA scan was 83% and specificity was 81%. Also, 14 of the 18 patients with abnormal manometry complained of biliary-type pain after morphine infusion compared with only two of 16 patients in the normal manometry group (p=0.001).
CONCLUSIONS—99mTc-DISIDA with morphine provocation is a useful non-invasive investigation for types II and III sphincter of Oddi dysfunction to detect those with elevated sphincter basal pressures who may respond to endoscopic sphincterotomy.


Keywords: sphincter of Oddi

  16. Finding of Biliary Fascioliasis by Endoscopic Ultrasonography in a Patient with Eosinophilic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Catherine; Lahmi, Farhad; Iranshahi, Majid; Alizadeh, Amir Houshang Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Fascioliasis is an endemic zoonotic disease in Iran. It occurs mainly in sheep-rearing areas of temperate climates, but sporadic cases have been reported from many other parts of the world. The usual definitive host is the sheep. Humans are accidental hosts in the life cycle of Fasciola. Typical symptoms may be associated with fascioliasis, but in some cases diagnosis and treatment may be preceded by a long period of abdominal pain and vague gastrointestinal symptoms. We report a case with epigastric and upper quadrant abdominal pain for the last 6 months, with imaging suggesting liver abscess and normal biliary ducts. The patient had no eosinophilia with negative stool examinations, so she was initially treated with antibiotics for liver abscess. Her clinical condition as well as follow-up imagings showed appropriate response after antibiotic therapy. Finally, endoscopic ultrasonography revealed Fasciola hepatica, which was then extracted with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:25473389

  17. [Pain and jaundice secondary to hemobilia resolved by ERCP and endoscopic sphincterectomy].

    PubMed

    Defarges, V; Loscos, J M; Meroño, E; Fernández Madrid, J; Carda, P

    1996-06-01

    We report the case of a patient with hemobilia resulting from a liver biopsy where the performance of the endoscopic sphincterectomy solved the jaundice and the pain of the patient. ERCP has been used previously in the diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic tumors that manifested themselves as an hemobilia. The therapeutic utilization of endoscopic sphincterotomy had been described rarely in this type of bleedings. We recommend endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and sphincterotomy in the cases of hemobilia with severe abdominal pain resulting from the accumulation of clots inside the biliary tract. PMID:8755328

  18. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage With Postoperative Outcome Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Karpeh, Martin S.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Pancreaticoduodenectomy is accompanied by a considerable rate of postoperative complications and potential death. Controversy exists regarding the impact of preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage on morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods Two hundred forty consecutive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed between January 1994 and January 1997 were analyzed. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were examined. Pearson chi square analysis or Fisher’s exact test, when appropriate, was used for univariate comparison of all variables. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results One hundred seventy-five patients (73%) underwent preoperative biliary instrumentation (endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical instrumentation). One hundred twenty-six patients (53%) underwent preoperative biliary drainage (endoscopic stents, percutaneous drains/stents, or surgical drainage). The overall postoperative morbidity rate after pancreaticoduodenectomy was 48% (114/240). Infectious complications occurred in 34% (81/240) of patients. Intraabdominal abscess occurred in 14% (33/240) of patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 5% (12/240). Preoperative biliary drainage was determined to be the only statistically significant variable associated with complications (p = 0.025), infectious complications (p = 0.014), intraabdominal abscess (p = 0.022), and postoperative death (p = 0.037). Preoperative biliary instrumentation alone was not associated with complications, infectious complications, intraabdominal abscess, or postoperative death. Conclusions Preoperative biliary drainage, but not preoperative biliary instrumentation alone, is associated with increased

  19. 21 CFR 876.5010 - Biliary catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biliary catheter and accessories. 876.5010 Section 876.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5010 Biliary...

  20. Indocyanine-green-loaded microballoons for biliary imaging in cholecystectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Kinshuk; Melvin, James; Chang, Shufang; Park, Kyoungjin; Yilmaz, Alper; Melvin, Scott; Xu, Ronald X.

    2012-11-01

    We encapsulate indocyanine green (ICG) in poly[(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-co-PEG] diblock (PLGA-PEG) microballoons for real-time fluorescence and hyperspectral imaging of biliary anatomy. ICG-loaded microballoons show superior fluorescence characteristics and slower degradation in comparison with pure ICG. The use of ICG-loaded microballoons in biliary imaging is demonstrated in both biliary-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo tissue model. The biliary-simulating phantoms are prepared by embedding ICG-loaded microballoons in agar gel and imaged by a fluorescence imaging module in a Da Vinci surgical robot. The ex vivo model consists of liver, gallbladder, common bile duct, and part of the duodenum freshly dissected from a domestic swine. After ICG-loaded microballoons are injected into the gallbladder, the biliary structure is imaged by both hyperspectral and fluorescence imaging modalities. Advanced spectral analysis and image processing algorithms are developed to classify the tissue types and identify the biliary anatomy. While fluorescence imaging provides dynamic information of movement and flow in the surgical region of interest, data from hyperspectral imaging allow for rapid identification of the bile duct and safe exclusion of any contaminant fluorescence from tissue not part of the biliary anatomy. Our experiments demonstrate the technical feasibility of using ICG-loaded microballoons for biliary imaging in cholecystectomy.

  1. 21 CFR 876.5010 - Biliary catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Biliary catheter and accessories. 876.5010 Section 876.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5010 Biliary...

  2. Biliary atresia: an update on our understanding of the disorder.

    PubMed

    Narkewicz, M R

    2001-10-01

    Biliary atresia is the leading cause of cholestasis in infants younger than 3 months. It is also the leading indication for liver transplantation in children. This review focuses on recent advances in the etiology, diagnosis, and management of biliary atresia. PMID:11801889

  3. Biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy: Optimization of endoscopic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Bišćanin, Alen; Pavić, Tajana; Nikolić, Marko; Budimir, Ivan; Mijić, August; Đuzel, Ana

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the results of endoscopic treatment of postoperative biliary leakage occurring after urgent cholecystectomy with a long-term follow-up. METHODS: This is an observational database study conducted in a tertiary care center. All consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) for presumed postoperative biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy in the period between April 2008 and April 2013 were considered for this study. Patients with bile duct transection and biliary strictures were excluded. Biliary leakage was suspected in the case of bile appearance from either percutaneous drainage of abdominal collection or abdominal drain placed at the time of cholecystectomy. Procedural and main clinical characteristics of all consecutive patients with postoperative biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy, such as indication for cholecystectomy, etiology and type of leakage, ERC findings and post-ERC complications, were collected from our electronic database. All patients in whom the leakage was successfully treated endoscopically were followed-up after they were discharged from the hospital and the main clinical characteristics, laboratory data and common bile duct diameter were electronically recorded. RESULTS: During a five-year period, biliary leakage was recognized in 2.2% of patients who underwent urgent cholecystectomy. The median time from cholecystectomy to ERC was 6 d (interquartile range, 4-11 d). Endoscopic interventions to manage biliary leakage included biliary stent insertion with or without biliary sphincterotomy. In 23 (77%) patients after first endoscopic treatment bile flow through existing surgical drain ceased within 11 d following biliary therapeutic endoscopy (median, 4 d; interquartile range, 2-8 d). In those patients repeat ERC was not performed and the biliary stent was removed on gastroscopy. In seven (23%) patients repeat ERC was done within one to fourth week after their first ERC

  4. CD8 T cells mediate direct biliary ductule damage in NOD autoimmune biliary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guo-Xiang; Wu, Yuehong; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Leung, Patrick S.; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Rainbow, Daniel B.; Hunter, Kara M.; Morris, Gerard A.; Lyons, Paul A.; Peterson, Laurence B.; Wicker, Linda S.; Gershwin, M.E.; Ridgway, William M.

    2016-01-01

    We previously described the NOD.c3c4 mouse, which is protected from type 1 diabetes (T1D) due to protective alleles at multiple insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) genes, but develops autoimmune biliary disease (ABD) resembling primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Here we characterize the NOD.ABD strain, which is genetically-related to the NOD.c3c4 strain but develops both ABD and T1D. Histologically, NOD.ABD biliary disease is indistinguishable from that in NOD.c3c4 mice. The frequency of effector memory (CD44+CD62L-) and central memory (CD44+CD62L+) CD8 T cells is significantly increased in the intrahepatic lymphocyte fraction of NOD.ABD mice, and NOD.ABD CD8 T cells produce more IFN-γ and TNF-α, compared to controls. NOD.ABD splenocytes can transfer ABD and T1D to NOD.c3c4 scid mice, but only T1D to NOD scid mice, suggesting that the genetic origin of the target organ and/or its innate immune cells is critical to disease pathogenesis. The disease transfer model, importantly, shows that biliary duct damage (characteristic of PBC) and inflammation precede biliary epithelial cell proliferation. Unlike T1D where both CD4 and CD8 T cells are required for disease transfer, purified NOD.ABD CD8 T cells can transfer liver inflammation into NOD.c3c4 scid recipients, and disease transfer is ameliorated by co-transferring T regulatory cells. Unlike NOD.c3c4 mice, NOD.ABD mice do not develop antinuclear or anti-Smith autoantibodies; however, NOD.ABD mice do develop the anti-pyruvate dehydrogenase antibodies typical of human PBC. The NOD.ABD strain is a model of immune dysregulation affecting two organ systems, most likely by mechanisms that do not completely coincide. PMID:21169553

  5. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  6. Successful endoscopic ultrasound-guided overstenting biliary drainage through a pre-existing proximal migrated metal biliary stent.

    PubMed

    Artifon, E L A; Takada, J; Okawa, L; Ferreira, F; Santos, M; Moura, E G H; Otoch, J P; Sakai, P

    2011-01-01

    Biliary endoscopic drainage using metallic self-expanded stents has become a well-established method for palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. However, its occlusion, mainly by tumor overgrowth, is still the main complication without a standard treatment. We here describe a new method of treatment for biliary metallic stent occlusion, through the echo guided biliary drainage. We present a 68-year-old patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer previously treated for jaundice with ERCP and self-expandable metallic stent insertion. Four weeks later, the patient developed jaundice and symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction. A new ERCP confirmed obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum, due to diffuse tumor growth. EUS was performed, and the previous metal biliary stent was seen occluded at the distal portion in the common bile duct. A EUS-guided choledocododenostomy was performed and then, an overlapping self-expanding metal enteral stent was placed through the malignant obstruction. There were no early complications and the procedure was also clinically effective in relieving jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction symptoms. If ERCP fails in the management of occluded biliary metallic stents, EUS biliary drain can provide effective biliary decompression and should be considered an alternative to other endoscopic techniques. PMID:22041320

  7. Novel Therapies on Primary Biliary Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Czul, Frank; Levy, Cynthia

    2016-02-01

    All patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and abnormal liver biochemistry should be considered for specific therapy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only FDA-approved drug for treating PBC. Approximately 40% of patients with PBC respond incompletely to treatment with UDCA, thus having increased risk of death or need for liver transplantation. No second-line therapies for patients with inadequate response to UDCA therapy have been approved. This review provides a current perspective on potential new approaches to treatment in PBC, and highlights some of the challenges we face in evaluating and effectively implementing those treatments. PMID:26593294

  8. Metabolic Bone Disease in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Glass, Lisa M; Su, Grace Li-Chun

    2016-06-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a liver-specific autoimmune disease that primarily affects women (female-to-male ratio, 10:1) between 40 and 60 years of age. Metabolic bone disease is a common complication of PBC, affecting 14% to 52% of patients, depending on the duration and severity of liver disease. The osteoporosis seen in PBC seems mainly due to low bone formation, although increased bone resorption may contribute. Treatment of osteoporosis consists primarily of antiresorptive agents. Additional large prospective, long-term studies in patients with PBC are needed to determine efficacy in improving bone density as well as reducing fracture risk. PMID:27261902

  9. Genetics and genomics of primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2008-05-01

    The etiologic and pathogenic factors contributing to primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) development, progression, response to treatment, and outcome remain a mystery. Recognition of the genomic regions harboring risk factors is hindered by the rarity and late onset of PBC. Recent advancements in genomics hold promise for understanding, prevention, and therapy of PBC. Large registries and biospecimen repositories of patients who have PBC, their family members, and controls are needed. Haplotype mapping-based association studies are necessary for defining genetic predisposition. Experimental data will provide the means for fine mapping studies, resequencing efforts, functional experimentation, and elucidation of gene-environment and gene-gene interaction. PMID:18456185

  10. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  11. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  12. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain played a role in producing the perception of pain. In the 19th century, physician-scientists ... they are experiencing. Discoveries of differences in pain perceptions and responses to treatment by gender has have ...

  13. Penis pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain. If penis pain is caused by a sexually transmitted disease, it is important for your sexual partner to ... Are you at risk for exposure to any sexually transmitted diseases? What other symptoms do you have? The physical ...

  14. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  15. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or bone changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain ...

  16. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is ... injure the tendons on the outside of the elbow. This condition is commonly called tennis elbow . Golfers ...

  17. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  18. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... water or other clear fluids. You may have sports drinks in small amounts. People with diabetes must ... pain occur? For example, after meals or during menstruation? What makes the pain worse? For example, eating, ...

  19. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  20. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of the pain, and the nature of other medical and psychiatric problems, should be ... information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of ...

  1. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  2. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, including your heart, lungs, esophagus, muscles, ribs, tendons, or nerves. Pain may also spread to ... often occurs with fast breathing Inflammation where the ribs join the breast bone or sternum ( costochondritis ) Shingles , ...

  3. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  4. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    Face pain may be dull and throbbing or an intense, stabbing discomfort in the face or forehead. It can occur in one or ... Pain that starts in the face may be caused by a nerve problem, injury, or infection. Face pain may also begin in other places in the body. ...

  5. EUS-guided biliary drainage with placement of a new partially covered biliary stent for palliation of malignant biliary obstruction: a case series.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, C; Luigiano, C; Fuccio, L; Polifemo, A M; Ferrara, F; Ghersi, S; Bassi, M; Billi, P; Maimone, A; Cennamo, V; Masetti, M; Jovine, E; D'Imperio, N

    2011-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has been developed as an alternative drainage technique in patients with obstructive jaundice where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has failed. Between July 2008 and December 2009, 16 patients (9 men; median age 79 years) with biliopancreatic malignancy, who were candidates for alternative techniques of biliary decompression because ERCP had been unsuccessful, underwent EUS-BD with placement of a transmural or transpapillary partially covered nitinol self-expandable metal stent (SEMS). EUS-assisted cholangiography was successful in all patients, with definition of the relevant anatomy, but biliary drainage was successfully performed in only 12 (75 %) of the 16 patients (9 choledochoduodenostomies with SEMS placement and 3 biliary rendezvous procedures with papillary SEMS placement), with regression of the cholestasis. No major complications and no procedure-related deaths occurred. There was one case of pneumoperitoneum which was managed conservatively. The median follow-up was 170 days. During the follow-up, eight patients of the 12 patients in whom biliary draining was successful died; four are currently alive. None of the patients required endoscopic reintervention. This series demonstrated that EUS-BD with a partially covered SEMS has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates, and could represent an alternative choice for biliary decompression. PMID:21271507

  6. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  7. Endoscopic stenting for malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, E C; Lo, C M; Liu, C L

    2001-10-01

    Use of endoscopic stents to manage patients with malignant obstructive jaundice is a well accepted measure. Interpretation of the results of endoscopic stenting must be made with reference to the level of the bile duct obstruction. Results were generally unsatisfactory for hilar lesions, especially when the intrahepatic ducts were segregated into multiple isolated systems. After deployment, stent dysfunction due to clogging by biliary sludge is apparently an inevitable process for the conventional plastic stent. Considerable efforts had been made to prolong the stent patency by changing its physical configuration, coating the inner lumen, and the choice of material but with little success. The development of a self-expandable metal stent is a major advance, but the benefits derived from a larger stent lumen are compromised by the initial expense and the tumor ingrowth through the wires for all models available commercially. Current data failed to substantiate the value of routine preoperative biliary decompression, as there is no reduction in the morbidity and mortality rates after surgery. Although biased patient selection may have resulted in the negative observations made, repeated clinical trials should probably focus on patients with distal bile duct tumors who are preparing for a major pancreatic resection. As a definitive palliative measure, endoscopic stenting is a more cost-effective option than surgery for patients with limited life expectancy based on data regarding plastic stents. The recommendations are evolving however, as there is progressive refinement of laparoscopic surgery techniques and designs of endoscopic stents. PMID:11596892

  8. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment.

    PubMed

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-06-15

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  9. [Appropriate Biliary Drainage Methods for Unresectable Cholangiocarcinomas].

    PubMed

    Oishi, Tatsurou; Kanemoto, Yoshiaki; Yoshioka, Yuuta; Sawada, Ryuuichirou; Sekine, Sachi; Miyanaga, Hiroto; Sakahira, Hideki; Takahashi, Hironori; Miyamoto, Katsufumi; Koyama, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the efficacy of different biliary drainage methods for the treatment of unresectable cholangiocarcinomas. We performed a retrospective study of 28 patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinomas who underwent biliary drainage at our hospital between January 2008 and June 2014 to compare the incidence of post-drainage stent dysfunction (SD) and reintervention (RI) for SD according to primary drainage method, lesion site, and complication status (the presence or absence of cholangitis). The duration of stent patency was compared between the different stent types. No significant differences in the incidence of SD and RI were found according to primary drainage methods, lesion site, or the presence or absence of cholangitis. The mean durations of stent patency for plastic and metal stents were 2.7 months and 7.4 months, respectively, suggesting that metal stents should be selected when the estimated prognosis is ≥2 months. Furthermore, metal stent placement, rather than the additional placement of plastic stents, should be considered a feasible option in cases of SD. PMID:26805093

  10. Temporomandibular pain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  11. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  12. Interferon-Gamma Directly Mediates Developmental Biliary Defects

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuang; EauClaire, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Biliary atresia (BA) is the most common identifiable hepatobiliary disease affecting infants, in which there are defects in intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts and progressive fibrosis. Activation of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) appears to be critical in both patients with BA and in rodent models of BA. We have recently reported a zebrafish model of biliary disease that shares features with BA, in which inhibition of DNA methylation leads to intrahepatic biliary defects and activation of IFNγ target genes. Here we report that ifng genes are hypomethylated and upregulated in zebrafish larvae treated with azacytidine (azaC), an inhibitor of DNA methylation. Injection of IFNγ protein into developing zebrafish larvae leads to biliary defects, suggesting that activation of the IFNγ pathway is sufficient to cause developmental biliary defects. These defects are associated with decreased cholangiocyte proliferation and with a decrease in the expression of vhnf1 (hnf1b, tcf2), which encodes a homeodomain protein with previously reported roles in biliary development in multiple models. These results support an importance of IFNγ in mediating biliary defects, and also demonstrate the feasibility of direct injection of intact protein into developing zebrafish larvae. PMID:23448251

  13. "Biliary Diseases with Pancreatic Counterparts": Cross-sectional Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Flaherty, Erin M; Dasyam, Anil K; Menias, Christine O; Riddle, Nicole D; Lath, Narayan; Kozaka, Kazuto; Matsui, Osamu; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of the similarities in the histopathologic findings and the clinical-biologic behaviors of select biliary and pancreatic conditions, a new disease concept, "biliary diseases with pancreatic counterparts," has been proposed. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic pathologic conditions of the biliary tract have their counterparts in the pancreas. Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing cholangitis is the biliary manifestation of IgG4-related sclerosing disease, and type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is its pancreatic counterpart. People with chronic alcoholism can develop peribiliary cysts and fibrosis as well as pancreatic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis simultaneously. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and mucinous cystic neoplasm are considered pancreatic counterparts for the biliary neoplasms of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, intraductal papillary neoplasm of the biliary tract, and hepatic mucinous cystic neoplasm, respectively. The anatomic proximity of the biliary tract and the pancreas, the nearly simultaneous development of both organs from the endoderm of the foregut, and the presence of pancreatic exocrine acini within the peribiliary glands surrounding the extrahepatic bile ducts are suggested as causative factors for these similarities. Interestingly, these diseases show "nearly" identical findings at cross-sectional imaging, an observation that further supports this new disease concept. New information obtained with regard to biliary diseases can be used for evaluation of pancreatic abnormalities, and vice versa. In addition, combined genetic and molecular studies may be performed to develop novel therapeutic targets. For both biliary and pancreatic diseases, imaging plays a pivotal role in initial diagnosis, evaluation of treatment response, efficacy testing of novel drugs, and long-term surveillance. PMID:26824512

  14. Risk and Surveillance of Cancers in Primary Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hrad, Valery; Abebe, Yoftahe; Ali, Syed Haris; Velgersdyk, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary diseases have been associated in several studies with various malignancies. Understanding the risk and optimizing surveillance strategy of these malignancies in this specific subset of patients are an important facet of clinical care. For instance, primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with an increased risk for cholangiocarcinoma (which is very challenging to diagnose) and when IBD is present for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, primary biliary cirrhosis patients with cirrhosis or not responding to 12 months of ursodeoxycholic acid therapy are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review we will discuss in detail the risks and optimal surveillance strategies for patients with primary biliary diseases. PMID:27413366

  15. Spectrum of biliary complications following live donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Simoes, Priya; Kesar, Varun; Ahmad, Jawad

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with advanced liver disease, including decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and acute liver failure. Organ shortage is the main determinant of death on the waiting list and hence living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) assumes importance. Biliary complications are the most common post operative morbidity after LDLT and occur due to anatomical and technical reasons. They include biliary leaks, strictures and cast formation and occur in the recipient as well as the donor. The types of biliary complications after LDLT along with their etiology, presenting features, diagnosis and endoscopic and surgical management are discussed. PMID:26207167

  16. Management of benign biliary strictures: current status and perspective.

    PubMed

    Kaffes, Arthur J

    2015-09-01

    Benign biliary strictures are common and occur either from hepato-biliary surgery or from diseases including chronic pancreatitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, among others. The treatment of many such strictures is endoscopic with evolving new approaches especially with fully covered metal stents. The only classification system available is for postoperative strictures with the intention to guide surgical correction. There is no useful classification system to guide both assessment and management of benign biliary strictures. This proposed classification is relevant to patient care in assisting diagnosis and endoscopic management. PMID:26147976

  17. Biliary pressure: manometric and perfusion studies at percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and percutaneous biliary drainage

    SciTech Connect

    vanSonnenberg, E.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Neff, C.C.; Mueller, P.R.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.

    1983-07-01

    Manometric pressure recordings were attempted during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) in 203 cases. Successful readings were achieved at PTC in 85% (104/122) of patients. Pressure measurements were also obtained through 56 biliary drainage catheters, and controlled perfusion challenges were performed in 12 patients (on 18 occasions). Documentation of the occasionally poor correlation between the caliber of ducts and the degree of obstruction (i.e., pressure) was shown, and it was suggested that very high pressures may be predictive of a bile leak after PTC. Adequacy of percutaneous drainage and stricture dilatation were further assessed with these manometric techniques. Pressure and perfusion data aided in detecting and determining the significance of the nondilated obstructed duct, the dilated nonobstructed ductal system, and subtle distal ductal strictures. The knowledge obtained from percutaneous pressure recordings may help to determine appropriate therapy.

  18. Morphologic factors of biliary trees are associated with gallstone-related biliary events

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Lee, Don Haeng; Lim, Jun Hyeok; Jeong, Seok; Jeon, Young Sun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the risk factors for gallstone-related biliary events. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study evaluated magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography images from 141 symptomatic and 39 asymptomatic gallstone patients who presented at a single tertiary hospital between January 2005 and December 2012. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed significant differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with gallstones in relation to the number of gallstones, the angle between the long axis of the gallbladder and the cystic duct, and the cystic duct diameter. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of gallstones (OR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.03-1.57; P = 0.026), the angle between the long axis of the gallbladder and the cystic duct (OR = 1.02, 95%CI: 1.00-1.03; P = 0.015), and the diameter of the cystic duct (OR = 0.819, 95%CI: 0.69-0.97; P = 0.018) were significantly associated with biliary events. The incidence of biliary events was significantly elevated in patients who had the presence of more than two gallstones, an angle of > 92° between the gallbladder and the cystic duct, and a cystic duct diameter < 6 mm. CONCLUSION: These findings will help guide the treatment of patients with asymptomatic gallstones. Clinicians should closely monitor patients with asymptomatic gallstones who exhibit these characteristics. PMID:25574102

  19. Palliative treatment for advanced biliary adenocarcinomas with combination dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate infusion and S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Tran, Hung Q; Vu, Ut V; Pham, Quynh T; Shaw, D Graeme

    2014-09-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder and cholangiocarcinoma account for 4% and 3%, respectively, of all gastrointestinal cancers. Advanced biliary tract carcinoma has a very poor prognosis with all current available modalities of treatment. In this pilot open-label study, the authors investigated the efficacy and safety of a combination of dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate (DMSO-SB) infusion and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (ademetionine) oral supplementation as palliative pharmacotherapy in nine patients with advanced nonresectable biliary tract carcinomas (ABTCs). Patients with evidence of biliary obstruction with a total serum bilirubin ≤300 μmol/L were allowed to join the study. The results of this 6-month study and follow-up of all nine patients with ABTC indicated that the investigated combination treatment improved pain control, blood biochemical parameters, and quality of life for the patients. Moreover, this method of treatment has led to a 6-month progression-free survival for all investigated patients. The treatment was well tolerated for all patients without major adverse reactions. Given that ABTC is a highly fatal malignancy with poor response to chemotherapy and targeted drugs, the authors consider that the combination of DMSO-SB and ademetionine deserves further research and application as a palliative care and survival-enhancing treatment for this group of patients. PMID:25102038

  20. BIODEGRADABLE BILIARY STENTS: A NEW APPROACH FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEPATICOJEJUNOSTOMY STRICTURES FOLLOWING BILE DUCT INJURY. PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    GIMÉNEZ, Mariano E.; PALERMO, Mariano; HOUGHTON, Eduardo; ACQUAFRESCA, Pablo; FINGER, Caetano; VERDE, Juan M.; CÚNEO, Jorge Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Once a biliary injury has occurred, repair is done by a hepaticojejunostomy. The most common procedure is to perform a dilatation with balloon with a success of 70 %. Success rates range using biodegradable stents is from 85% to 95%. Biodegradable biliary stents should change the treatment of this complication. Aim: To investigate the use of biodegradable stents in a group of patients with hepaticojejunonostomy strictures. Methods: In a prospective study 16 biodegradable stents were placed in 13 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures secondary to bile duct repair of a biliary surgical injury. Average age was 38.7 years (23-67), nine were female and four male. All cases had a percutaneous drainage before at the time of biodegradable stent placement. Results: In one case, temporary haemobilia was present requiring blood transfusion. In another, pain after stent placement required intravenous medication. In the other 11 patients, hospital discharge was the next morning following stent placement. During the patient´s follow-up, none presented symptoms during the first nine months. One patient presented significant alkaline phosphatase elevation and stricture recurrence was confirmed. One case had recurrence of cholangitis 11 months after the stent placement. 84.6% continued asymptomatic with a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusion: The placement of biodegradable stents is a safe and feasible technique. Was not observed strictures caused by the stent or its degradation. It could substitute balloon dilation in strictures of hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:27438039

  1. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain, bone pain from spread of cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome Neurologic: "Phantom limb" pain after amputation, nerve pain from diabetes Read More "Chronic Pain" Articles Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and ...

  2. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  3. Autoantibody pain.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    As autoantibodies bind to target tissues, Fc-region dependent inflammation can induce pain via mediators exciting nociceptors. But recently another possibility has emerged, where autoantibody binding to nociceptors can directly cause pain, without inflammation. This is thought to occur as a result of Fab-region mediated modification of nerve transduction, transmission, or neuropeptide release. In three conditions, complex regional pain syndrome, anti-voltage gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity, and chronic fatigue syndrome, all associated with no or only little inflammation, initial laboratory-, and clinical trial-results have suggested a potential role for autoantibody-mediated mechanisms. More research assessing the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies in these and other chronic pain conditions is required. The concept of autoantibody-mediated pain offers hope for the development of novel therapies for currently intractable pains. PMID:26883460

  4. Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Scholz, Joachim; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is triggered by lesions to the somatosensory nervous system that alter its structure and function so that pain occurs spontaneously and responses to noxious and innocuous stimuli are pathologically amplified. The pain is an expression of maladaptive plasticity within the nociceptive system, a series of changes that constitute a neural disease state. Multiple alterations distributed widely across the nervous system contribute to complex pain phenotypes. These alterations include ectopic generation of action potentials, facilitation and disinhibition of synaptic transmission, loss of synaptic connectivity and formation of new synaptic circuits, and neuroimmune interactions. Although neural lesions are necessary, they are not sufficient to generate neuropathic pain; genetic polymorphisms, gender, and age all influence the risk of developing persistent pain. Treatment needs to move from merely suppressing symptoms to a disease-modifying strategy aimed at both preventing maladaptive plasticity and reducing intrinsic risk. PMID:19400724

  5. Advances in biomarkers of biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Yin, Baobing

    2016-07-01

    Tumor biomarkers can be applied for early diagnosis or precise treatment, thereby leading to personalized treatment and better outcomes. Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of cancers that occurs in different locations and have different clinical or genetic properties. Though the incidence of BTCs is rare, BTCs are among the most lethal cancers in the world and all have very low 5-year survivals. Lack of efficient early diagnostic approaches or adjuvant therapies for BTCs are main reasons. These urge us to broaden the researches into BTC biomarkers. Although few progresses of diagnostic biomarkers for BTCs have been achieved, there are still some advances in prognostic, predictive and therapeutic areas. In this review, we will focus on these achievements. PMID:27261586

  6. Toward precision medicine in primary biliary cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marco; Ronca, Vincenzo; Bruno, Savino; Invernizzi, Pietro; Mells, George F

    2016-08-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis is a chronic, cholestatic liver disease characterized by a heterogeneous presentation, symptomatology, disease progression and response to therapy. In contrast, clinical management and treatment of PBC is homogeneous with a 'one size fits all' approach. The evolving research landscape, with the emergence of the -omics field and the availability of large patient cohorts are creating a unique opportunity of translational epidemiology. Furthermore, several novel disease and symptom-modifying agents for PBC are currently in development. The time is therefore ripe for precision medicine in PBC. In this manuscript we describe the concept of precision medicine; review current approaches to risk-stratification in PBC, and speculate how precision medicine in PBC might develop in the near future. PMID:27324985

  7. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Beyond Ursodeoxycholic Acid.

    PubMed

    Corpechot, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Although ursodeoxycholic acid remains the only approved pharmacotherapy for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, the better characterization of factors responsible for the poor response to this drug and the emergence of several new putative therapeutic targets now offer significant opportunities to improve the management of patients and our capacity to treat them more efficiently. The availability of novel treatment options, such as fibrates, budesonide, and obeticholic acid, all capable of improving prognostic markers, invites us to reconsider our management and treatment strategies. Early identification of high-risk patients should remain a priority to deliver adjunctive therapies to appropriately selected populations and increase their chances of success. Given the absence of comparative trials, the choice between second-line treatments should be dictated by the biochemical, histological, and expected tolerance profiles. Here the author presents a brief overview of what should be known in this field and proposes a practical approach to facilitate decision making. PMID:26870929

  8. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis: Environmental Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dronamraju, Deepti; Odin, Joseph; Bach, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an autoimmune disease of unclear etiology. It is a chronic, progressive condition that causes intrahepatic ductal destruction ultimately leading to symptoms of cholestasis, cirrhosis and liver failure. The disease predominantly affects middle aged Caucasian women. It has a predilection to certain regions and is found in higher incidences in North America and Northern Europe. It also has a genetic predisposition with a concordance rate of 60% among monozygotic twins. Combinations of genetic and environmental factors are proposed in the pathogenesis of this disease with a compelling body of evidence that suggests a role for both these factors. This review will elucidate data on the proposed environmental agents involved the disease's pathogenesis including xenobiotic and microbial exposure and present some of the supporting epidemiologic data. PMID:21297251

  9. Bile acid signaling and biliary functions

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hannah; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on various components of bile acid signaling in relation to cholangiocytes. Their roles as targets for potential therapies for cholangiopathies are also explored. While many factors are involved in these complex signaling pathways, this review emphasizes the roles of transmembrane G protein coupled receptor (TGR5), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and the bicarbonate umbrella. Following a general background on cholangiocytes and bile acids, we will expand the review and include sections that are most recently known (within 5–7 years) regarding the field of bile acid signaling and cholangiocyte function. These findings all demonstrate that bile acids influence biliary functions which can, in turn, regulate the cholangiocyte response during pathological events. PMID:26579437

  10. Targeted therapy for biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Faris, Jason E; Zhu, Andrew X

    2012-07-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies, with a historically poor prognosis as a whole. Until recently, the development of effective therapeutics was hampered by the relatively low incidence, heterogeneity in patients and tumors, and correspondingly poor clinical trial enrollments. With the publication of the landmark phase III ABC-02 trial demonstrating the superiority of gemcitabine and cisplatin combination chemotherapy, the landscape changed for the development of new agents. Despite this progress, there are currently no approved targeted agents for BTC. This review will focus on recent developments in targeted therapeutics, directed against several key signaling pathways in BTC, including epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Data from recent phase I and II trials will be discussed, along with a preview of upcoming trials involving targeted therapies. PMID:22318523

  11. Environmental Factors in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of the autoimmune liver disease primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) remains largely unresolved, owing in large part to the complexity of interaction between environmental and genetic contributors underlying disease development. Observations of disease clustering, differences in geographical prevalence, and seasonality of diagnosis rates suggest the environmental component to PBC is strong, and epidemiological studies have consistently found cigarette smoking and history of urinary tract infection to be associated with PBC. Current evidence implicates molecular mimicry as a primary mechanism driving loss of tolerance and subsequent autoimmunity in PBC, yet other environmentally influenced disease processes are likely to be involved in pathogenesis. In this review, the authors provide an overview of current findings and touch on potential mechanisms behind the environmental component of PBC. PMID:25057950

  12. Environmental factors in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2014-08-01

    The etiology of the autoimmune liver disease primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) remains largely unresolved, owing in large part to the complexity of interaction between environmental and genetic contributors underlying disease development. Observations of disease clustering, differences in geographical prevalence, and seasonality of diagnosis rates suggest the environmental component to PBC is strong, and epidemiological studies have consistently found cigarette smoking and history of urinary tract infection to be associated with PBC. Current evidence implicates molecular mimicry as a primary mechanism driving loss of tolerance and subsequent autoimmunity in PBC, yet other environmentally influenced disease processes are likely to be involved in pathogenesis. In this review, the authors provide an overview of current findings and touch on potential mechanisms behind the environmental component of PBC. PMID:25057950

  13. Mitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Berg, P. A.; Roitt, I. M.; Doniach, D.; Cooper, H. M.

    1969-01-01

    The effect on the mitochondrial antigen of different agents known to influence the integrity and structure of membranes has been studied using quantitative complement fixation with autoantibodies from the serum of a patient with primary biliary cirrhosis. The susceptibility to proteolytic enzymes suggests that the antigen is a protein. Activity depends upon an association with phospholipids. Addition of phospholipids prevents loss of antigen during artificial ageing of mitochondria at 37°. Activity is lost after treatment with phospholipases or solvents which extract phospholipids. Antigen is also destroyed by surface active agents which dissociate the link with phospholipid but those which weaken bonds between phospholipids and hydrophobic molecules yield fragments of antigen-containing membrane structures which, nonetheless, still react with the mitochondrial autoantibody. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 4 PMID:5804537

  14. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  15. Facial pain.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B

    2009-07-01

    Facial pain is a debilitating disorder if left untreated. Too often, patients are labeled as having psychopathology when face pain etiology is unclear. These patients are categorized as "atypical," "idiopathic," or "psychogenic." Cases of facial pain involving neuropathic, neurovascular, musculoskeletal, as well as intracranial and extracranial systems will be reviewed. Peripheral and central mechanisms associated with these disorders are used to provide an update of these frequently seen clinical issues. PMID:19590376

  16. Imaging Pain.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Katherine T; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    The challenges and understanding of acute and chronic pain have been illuminated through the advancement of central neuroimaging. Through neuroimaging research, new technology and findings have allowed us to identify and understand the neural mechanisms contributing to chronic pain. Several regions of the brain are known to be of particular importance for the maintenance and amplification of chronic pain, and this knowledge provides novel targets for future research and treatment. This article reviews neuroimaging for the study of chronic pain, and in particular, the rapidly advancing and popular research tools of structural and functional MRI. PMID:27208709

  17. [Fissures in biliary calculi. Personal contribution (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nano, M; Potenzoni, F; Camandona, M; Casalegno, P A

    1979-04-01

    In a series of 70 patients suffering from biliary lithiasis, the roentgenologic findings of fissures in the calculi was observed in 5 cases examined by means of cholecystography and in 7 cases who underwent cholangiocholecystography. Fissures were demonstrated 11 times in calculi after surgery. The "Mercedes-Benz" sign was never observed at the abdominal examination without contrast medium. The presence of fissures may be an additional sign in the radiologic diagnosis of biliary calculi, but its value is not determinant. PMID:550199

  18. Updated Management of Malignant Biliary Tract Tumors: An Illustrative Review.

    PubMed

    Cannavale, Alessandro; Santoni, Mariangela; Gazzetti, Marianna; Maher, Ben; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Catalano, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    The management of malignant biliary tumors (MBTs) is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Guidelines and methods of staging for biliary tumors have recently been released by main international societies, altering the clinical and radiologic approach to this pathologic condition. The aim of the present review is to detail the updated role of imaging in preoperative staging and follow-up and to illustrate clinical/therapeutic pathways. In addition, future perspectives on imaging and targeted/embolization therapies are outlined. PMID:27107982

  19. Imaging of malignancies of the biliary tract- an update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malignancies of the biliary tract include cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancers and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Biliary tract adenocarcinomas are the second most common primary hepatobiliary cancer. Due to their slow growing nature, non-specific and late symptomatology, these malignancies are often diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis. Apart from incidental discovery of gall bladder carcinoma upon cholecystectomy, early stage biliary tract cancers are now detected with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Accurate characterization and staging of these indolent cancers will determine outcome as majority of the patients’ are inoperable at the time of presentation. Ultrasound is useful for initial evaluation of the biliary tract and gallbladder masses and in determining the next suitable modality for further evaluation. Multimodality imaging plays an integral role in the management of the biliary tract malignancies. The imaging techniques most useful are MRI with MRCP, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review we will discuss epidemiology and the role of imaging in detection, characterization and management of the biliary tract malignancies under the three broad categories of cholangiocarcinomas (intra- and extrahepatic), gallbladder cancers and ampullary carcinomas. PMID:25608662

  20. Management issues in post living donor liver transplant biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Manav; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-04-01

    Biliary complications are common after living donor liver transplant (LDLT) although with advancements in surgical understanding and techniques, the incidence is decreasing. Biliary strictures are more common than leaks. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first line modality of treatment of post LDLT biliary strictures with a technical success rate of 75%-80%. Most of ERCP failures are successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and rendezvous technique. A minority of patients may require surgical correction. ERCP for these strictures is technically more challenging than routine as well post deceased donor strictures. Biliary strictures may increase the morbidity of a liver transplant recipient, but the mortality is similar to those with or without strictures. Post transplant strictures are short segment and soft, requiring only a few session of ERCP before complete dilatation. Long-term outcome of patients with biliary stricture is similar to those without stricture. With the introduction of new generation cholangioscopes, ERCP success rate may increase, obviating the need for PTBD and surgery in these patients. PMID:27057304

  1. Biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in idiopathic hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hultcrantz, R.; Angelin, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.E.; Ewerth, S.; Einarsson, K.

    1989-06-01

    The role of biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in iron overload was studied and evaluated. Ten patients with idiopathic hemochromatosis and two groups of controls (14 gallstone patients and 16 healthy subjects) were included. Liver tissue (obtained by percutaneous or operative biopsy) was investigated with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in combination with x-ray microanalysis. Fasting bile samples were obtained through duodenal aspiration or at cholecystectomy. Iron was determined in liver tissue and bile using atomic absorption spectroscopy, and ferritin was determined in serum and bile with a radioimmunoassay technique. All patients with hemochromatosis had iron-positive staining as seen in light microscopy. Electron microscopy showed iron-containing proteins in the lysosomes and cytosol of liver parenchymal cells, and this observation was supported by x-ray microanalysis. Hepatic iron concentration was increased about eightfold in the patients with hemochromatosis (p less than 0.001). Biliary iron concentration, expressed per millimole of bile acid, was increased about twofold (p less than 0.05) and biliary ferritin concentration about fivefold (p less than 0.001) in hemochromatosis. Four of the patients with hemochromatosis were reexamined after completed treatment with venesection; this resulted in normalized biliary concentrations of iron and ferritin. We conclude that biliary secretion of ferritin occurs in humans and that both iron and ferritin excretion are enhanced in hepatic iron overload. The apparently limited capacity of biliary iron excretion may be of importance for the hepatic iron accumulation in hemochromatosis.

  2. Diagnosis and Treatment of Biliary Fistulas in the Laparoscopic Era

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, M.; Montecamozzo, G.; Foschi, D.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary fistulas are rare complications of gallstone. They can affect either the biliary or the gastrointestinal tract and are usually classified as primary or secondary. The primary fistulas are related to the biliary lithiasis, while the secondary ones are related to surgical complications. Laparoscopic surgery is a therapeutic option for the treatment of primary biliary fistulas. However, it could be the first responsible for the development of secondary biliary fistulas. An accurate preoperative diagnosis together with an experienced surgeon on the hepatobiliary surgery is necessary to deal with biliary fistulas. Cholecystectomy with a choledocoplasty is the most frequent treatment of primary fistulas, whereas the bile duct drainage or the endoscopic stenting is the best choice in case of minor iatrogenic bile duct injuries. Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy is the extreme therapeutic option for both conditions. The sepsis, the level of the bile duct damage, and the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract increase the complexity of the operation and affect early and late results. PMID:26819608

  3. Management issues in post living donor liver transplant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Wadhawan, Manav; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Biliary complications are common after living donor liver transplant (LDLT) although with advancements in surgical understanding and techniques, the incidence is decreasing. Biliary strictures are more common than leaks. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first line modality of treatment of post LDLT biliary strictures with a technical success rate of 75%-80%. Most of ERCP failures are successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and rendezvous technique. A minority of patients may require surgical correction. ERCP for these strictures is technically more challenging than routine as well post deceased donor strictures. Biliary strictures may increase the morbidity of a liver transplant recipient, but the mortality is similar to those with or without strictures. Post transplant strictures are short segment and soft, requiring only a few session of ERCP before complete dilatation. Long-term outcome of patients with biliary stricture is similar to those without stricture. With the introduction of new generation cholangioscopes, ERCP success rate may increase, obviating the need for PTBD and surgery in these patients. PMID:27057304

  4. Hepatic portocholecystostomy for biliary atresia: a 25-year follow-up and review.

    PubMed

    Schecter, Samuel C; Courtier, Jesse; Cho, Soo-Jin; Saadai, Payam; Hirose, Shinjiro; Mackenzie, Tippi C; Miniati, Doug

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful salvage of a patient's native liver 25 years after hepatic portocholecystostomy for biliary atresia. Our case demonstrates the effectiveness of biliary specific, high-resolution CT imaging in the diagnosis of, and operative planning for complex cases of biliary obstruction. We also report the longest-term pathologic follow-up of biliary atresia after hepatic portocholecystostomy. Life-long follow-up of patients with biliary atresia is important to prevent life-threatening complications of biliary stasis/obstruction. PMID:23331828

  5. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage in the Management of Postsurgical Biliary Leaks in Patients with Nondilated Intrahepatic Bile Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, Guido Severini, Aldo; Civelli, Enrico; Milella, Marco; Pulvirenti, Andrea; Salvetti, Monica; Romito, Raffaele; Suman, Laura; Chiaraviglio, Francesca; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2006-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks in patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts, its efficacy in restoring the integrity of bile ducts, and technical procedures to reduce morbidity. Methods. Seventeen patients out of 936 undergoing PTBD over a 20-year period had a noncholestatic liver and were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent surgery for cancer and suffered a postsurgical biliary leak of 345 ml/day on average; 71% were in poor condition and required permanent nutritional support. An endoscopic approach failed or was excluded due to inaccessibility of the bile ducts. Results. Established biliary leaks and site of origin were diagnosed an average of 21 days (range 1-90 days) after surgery. In all cases percutaneous access to the biliary tree was achieved. An external (preleakage) drain was applied in 7 cases, 9 patients had an external-internal fistula bridging catheter, and 1 patient had a percutaneous hepatogastrostomy. Fistulas healed in an average of 31 days (range 3-118 days ) in 15 of 17 patients (88%) following PTBD. No major complications occurred after drainage. Post-PTBD cholangitis was observed in 6 of 17 patients (35%) and was related to biliary sludge formation occurring mostly when drainage lasted >30 days and was of the external-internal type. Median patient survival was 17.7 months and in all cases the repaired biliary leaks remained healed. Conclusions. PTBD is a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks. It is therefore a reliable alternative to surgical repair, which entails longer hospitalization and higher costs.

  6. Pain channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Cregg, Roman; Momin, Aliakmal; Rugiero, Francois; Wood, John N; Zhao, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Pain remains a major clinical challenge, severely afflicting around 6% of the population at any one time. Channelopathies that underlie monogenic human pain syndromes are of great clinical relevance, as cell surface ion channels are tractable drug targets. The recent discovery that loss-of-function mutations in the sodium channel Nav1.7 underlie a recessive pain-free state in otherwise normal people is particularly significant. Deletion of channel-encoding genes in mice has also provided insights into mammalian pain mechanisms. Ion channels expressed by immune system cells (e.g. P2X7) have been shown to play a pivotal role in changing pain thresholds, whilst channels involved in sensory transduction (e.g. TRPV1), the regulation of neuronal excitability (potassium channels), action potential propagation (sodium channels) and neurotransmitter release (calcium channels) have all been shown to be potentially selective analgesic drug targets in some animal pain models. Migraine and visceral pain have also been associated with voltage-gated ion channel mutations. Insights into such channelopathies thus provide us with a number of potential targets to control pain. PMID:20142270

  7. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability. PMID:25533261

  8. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  9. Pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain

    PubMed Central

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Zachariae, Robert; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Kasch, Helge; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S.; Vase, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain frequency has been shown to influence sensitization, psychological distress, and pain modulation. The present study examined if pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain. Method: A non-clinical (247 students) and a clinical (223 pain patients) sample completed the Danish versions of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Beck Depression Inventory, and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and rated pain intensity, unpleasantness and frequency. Results: In both samples, high pain frequency was found to moderate the association between pain catastrophizing and pain intensity, whereas low pain frequency did not. The psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Danish version of the PCS were confirmed. Conclusions: This is the first study to validate the Danish version of the PCS and to show that pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and reported pain in both non-clinical and clinical populations. PMID:25646089

  10. [Spiritual pain].

    PubMed

    Sato, Satoru

    2011-09-01

    We defined a spiritual pain as feelings of failure and regret at end-of-life, followed by hopelessness and worthlessness in patient's own life. In Japanese, spiritual pain should be assessed in patient's dignity, psycho-social factor, and prognostic stage, not only in religious context. And patient's spirituality should be supported with providing pain and symptom relief based on human relationships. "Sterbebegleitung" is a German proverb, introduced by Alfons Deeken, and seemed to be a suggestive word for such hope-recovering relationships. PMID:21950035

  11. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  12. Prevent Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Print This Topic En español Prevent Back Pain Browse Sections The Basics Overview Am I at ... Health: Back Pain . There are different types of back pain. Back pain can be acute or chronic. It ...

  13. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  14. Sex Differences Associated with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S.; Rigopoulou, Eirini I.; Pares, Albert; Billinis, Charalambos; Burroughs, Andrew K.; Muratori, Luigi; Invernizzi, Pietro; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune origin, characterised by the destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts. The disease has an unpredictable clinical course but may progress to fibrosis and cirrhosis. The diagnostic hallmark of PBC is the presence of disease-specific antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA), which are pathognomonic for the development of PBC. The disease overwhelmingly affects females, with some cases of male PBC being reported. The reasons underlying the low incidence of males with PBC are largely unknown. Epidemiological studies estimate that approximately 7–11% of PBC patients are males. There does not appear to be any histological, serological, or biochemical differences between male and female PBC, although the symptomatology may differ, with males being at higher risk of life-threatening complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding and hepatoma. Studies on X chromosome and sex hormones are of interest when studying the low preponderance of PBC in males; however, these studies are far from conclusive. This paper will critically analyze the literature surrounding PBC in males. PMID:22693524

  15. Autotaxin, Pruritus and Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC).

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Zhang, Weici; Evans, Jilly F; Floreani, Annarosa; Zou, Zhengsheng; Nishio, Yukiko; Qi, Ruizhao; Leung, Patrick S C; Bowlus, Christopher L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-08-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a 125-kD type II ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (ENPP2 or NPP2) originally discovered as an unknown "autocrine motility factor" in human melanoma cells. In addition to its pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase activities ATX has lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, catalyzing the conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX is the only ENPP family member with lysoPLD activity and it produces most of the LPA in circulation. In support of this, ATX heterozygous mice have 50% of normal LPA plasma levels. The ATX-LPA signaling axis plays an important role in both normal physiology and disease pathogenesis and recently has been linked to pruritus in chronic cholestatic liver diseases, including primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). Several lines of evidence have suggested that a circulating puritogen is responsible, but the identification of the molecule has yet to be definitively identified. In contrast, plasma ATX activity is strongly associated with pruritus in PBC, suggesting a targetable molecule for treatment. We review herein the biochemistry of ATX and the rationale for its role in pruritus. PMID:27019050

  16. Primary cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.; Deutsch, M.; Iwatsuki, S.

    1985-04-01

    The records of 22 patients with cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages (EHBP) were analyzed to understand their natural histories and patterns of failure and to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments. None of the preoperative investigations consistently defined the entire extent of tumor. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) was the most helpful (100%) in accurately defining the site of ductal obstruction. Computed tomography was helpful in diagnosing liver metastases in 53% and primary tumor mass in 23% of patients. The most common sites of tumor failure or persistence were: liver (67%), tumor bed (56%), peritoneum (22%), porta hepatis and lymph nodes (17%). The median survival for the entire group was 6.8 months. Surgery plays an important role in managing these tumors and in defining tumor extent for subsequent adjuvant irradiation. Patients receiving radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF had a longer median survival (11 months) than patients receiving less than 70 TDF (4.4 months). All three patients, who were alive and free of disease greater than 1 year, received radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF. From the data, it is difficult to comment on the effectiveness of chemotherapy. The authors have made suggestions regarding radiation volume and doses to various structures. The need for entering these patients into multi-institutional clinical trials is stressed.

  17. Primary cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages.

    PubMed

    Mittal, B; Deutsch, M; Iwatsuki, S

    1985-04-01

    We analyzed the records of 22 patients with cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages (EHBP) to understand their natural histories and patterns of failure and to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments. None of the preoperative investigations consistently defined the entire extent of tumor. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) was the most helpful (100%) in accurately defining the site of ductal obstruction. Computed tomography was helpful in diagnosing liver metastases in 53% and primary tumor mass in 23% of patients. The most common sites of tumor failure or persistence were: liver (67%), tumor bed (56%), peritoneum (22%), porta hepatis and lymph nodes (17%). The median survival for the entire group was 6.8 months. Surgery plays an important role in managing these tumors and in defining tumor extent for subsequent adjuvant irradiation. Patients receiving radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF had a longer median survival (11 months) than patients receiving less than 70 TDF (4.4 months). All three patients, who were alive and free of disease greater than 1 year, received radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF. From our data, it is difficult to comment on the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We have made suggestions regarding radiation volume and doses to various structures. The need for entering these patients into multi-institutional clinical trials is stressed. PMID:3980281

  18. Primary biliary cirrhosis: From bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Kouroumalis, Elias; Notas, George

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic non-suppurative destructive intrahepatic cholangitis leading to cirrhosis after a protractive non cirrhotic stage. The etiology and pathogenesis are largely unknown and autoimmne mechanisms have been implicated to explain the pathological lesions. Many epitopes and autoantigens have been reported as crucial in the pathophysiology of the disease and T and B cells abnormalities have been described, the exact pathways leading to the destruction of small intrahepatic ductules are mostly speculative. In this review we examined the various epidemiologal and geoepidemiological data as well as the complex pathogenetic aspects of this disease, focusing on recent in vivo and in vitro studies in this field. Initiation and progression of PBC is believed to be a multifactorial process with strong infuences from the patient’s genetic background and by various environmental factors. The role of innate and adaptive immunity, including cytokines, chemokines, macrophages and the involvement of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species are outlined in detailed. The current pathogenetic aspects are presented and a novel pathogenetic theory unifying the accumulated clinical information with in vitro and in vivo data is formulated. A review of clinical manifestations and immunological and pathological diagnosis was presented. Treatment modalities, including the multiple mechanisms of action of ursodeoxycholate were finally discussed. PMID:26261733

  19. Pain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... have tried to find relief from cancer pain. ■■ Physical Therapy. Exercises or methods used to help restore strength, ... that you see a licensed expert when trying physical therapy, massage, hypnosis, or acupuncture. 25 To learn more ...

  20. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. Signs that may indicate a headache of dental origin include: ; Pain behind the eyes Sore jaw muscles or "tired" ... t Sleep? Check Your Bite What Causes a Toothache? Your Posture May Be the Cause of Jaw ...

  1. Penis pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - penis ... Bites, either human or insect Cancer of the penis Erection that does not go away (priapism) Genital herpes Infected hair follicles Infected prosthesis of the penis Infection under the foreskin of uncircumcised men ( balanitis ) ...

  2. Feeling pain

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... protective mechanism, alerting it to potential or actual damage to the body’s tissues. In the example of ... the pain receptors in the skin detect tissue damage from the bee sting. Then, the peripheral nerves ...

  3. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the front of your knee around the kneecap Torn ligament. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, or ... into your knee, swelling, or an unstable knee. Torn cartilage (a meniscus tear ). Pain felt on the ...

  4. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Update Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  5. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bones or cartilage of your hip, including: Hip fractures – can cause sudden hip pain. These injuries can be serious and lead to major problems. Hip fractures are more common as people get older because ...

  6. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... 37.7°C), and recent illness. Other Causes Gout : This occurs when your body produces too much ...

  7. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... The shoulder is the most movable joint in the human body. A group of 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or ...

  8. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: gout (especially ...

  9. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  10. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gets worse when you bend forward) Tic douloureux Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome Sometimes the reason for the face pain ... is persistent, unexplained, or accompanied by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider. What to Expect at ...

  11. Contrast-free endoscopic stent insertion in malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Lombardi, Giovanni; Rega, Maria; Simeoli, Immacolata; Masone, Stefania; Siciliano, Saverio; Maione, Francesco; Salvatori, Francesca; Balzano, Antonio; Persico, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To present a case series of MRCP-guided endoscopic biliary stent placement, performed entirely without contrast injection. METHODS: Contrast-free endoscopic biliary drainage was attempted in 20 patients with malignant obstruction, unsuitable for resection on the basis of tumor extent or medical illness. MRCP images were used to confirm the diagnosis of tumor, to exclude other biliary diseases and to demonstrate the stenoses as well as dilation of proximal liver segments. The procedure was carried out under conscious sedation. Patients were placed in the left lateral decubitus position. The endoscope was inserted, the papilla identified and cannulated by a papillotome. A guide wire was inserted and guided deeply into the biliary tree, above the stenosis, by fluoroscopy. A papillotomy approximately 1 cm. long was performed and the papillotome was exchanged with a guiding-catheter. A 10 Fr, Amsterdam-type plastic stent, 7 to 15 cm long, was finally inserted over the guide wire/guiding catheter by a pusher tube system. RESULTS: Successful stent insertion was achieved in all patients. There were no major complications. Successful drainage, with substantial reduction in bilirubin levels, was achieved in all patients. CONCLUSION: This new method of contrast-free endoscopic stenting in malignant biliary obstruction is a safe and effective method of palliation. However, a larger, randomized study comparing this new approach with the standard procedure is needed to confirm the findings of the present study. PMID:17663512

  12. Biliary lipid secretion in chronic cholestatic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kesäniemi, Y A; Salaspuro, M P; Vuoristo, M; Miettinen, T A

    1982-01-01

    Biliary lipid secretion rates, faecal steroids, and serum lipids were studied in patients with chronic cholestatic liver disease mainly primary biliary cirrhosis. The biliary secretion of cholesterol, bile acids, and phospholipids was markedly decreased as compared with those in the control group and in general correlated negatively with the serum cholesterol and triglyceride values. The molar percentage of cholesterol was increased in the hepatic bile. This suggests that, in cholestatic liver disease, in contrast with the normal state, the hapatic bile may be supersaturated postprandially. Faecal bile acids and neutral sterols of cholesterol origin were decreased proportionately to the corresponding biliary lipid secretion rates. In fact, both biliary and faecal steroid outputs were only about a half or less than those in the controls, indicating that the fractional absorption was not changed but absolute absorption and faecal steroid excretion were low in patients with chronic cholestatic liver disease. Thus, despite low cholesterol and bile acid absorption, cholesterol and bile acid synthesis is low. A negative correlation between faecal steroids and serum cholesterol suggests that the high serum cholesterol level contributed to regulation of cholesterol synthesis. PMID:7129204

  13. Itch in primary biliary cirrhosis: a patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Rishe, Eric; Azarm, Ali; Bergasa, Nora V

    2008-01-01

    The perception of itch in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is not characterized. Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis who were members of the PBCers Organization were invited to participate in an on-line survey addressing certain characteristics of their itch. Patients used their own words in the questions that asked for descriptions. A total of 238 subjects responded to the survey; of these, 231 were women, and 165 (69%) reported itch. One hundred and twenty-four patients from the 165 (75%) reported that itch preceded the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis. A total of 58 from 164 (35%) respondents described their itch as "bugs crawling". Fifty-seven of 88 (64.7%) subjects reported that something cool relieved their itch, and 69 of 112 (61.6%) reported that heat worsened it. One hundred and seven of 164 (65.2%) respondents reported that the itch was worse at night. The most commonly prescribed medications were antihistamines and cholestyramine, and the most common type of medication reported as being associated with relief was antihistamine drugs. There was no systematic approach to the evaluation and treatment of itch in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Education on the subject of itch in primary biliary cirrhosis is warranted. PMID:18176748

  14. Choledochoduodenostomy for benign and malignant biliary tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Birkenfeld, S; Serour, F; Levi, S; Abulafia, A; Balassiano, M; Krispin, M

    1988-04-01

    Although nonsurgical alternative treatments for primary or retained common bile duct stones--such as dissolution of gallstones with deoxycholic acids and, especially endoscopic papillotomy--have become available, choledochoduodenostomy (CDS) has been used with increasing frequency over the past decade, with extension of the indications for its use. We report our experience with side-to-side CDS in 116 patients with benign (65 patients) and malignant (46 patients) biliary diseases. Even though the mean age of our patients with benign disease--patients who underwent urgent operations because of obstructive jaundice (74%), liver damage (approximately 60%), and other biliary complications--was 66.8 years, the perioperative mortality was 3.07% and the long-term follow-up results were excellent with no biliary complications. In regard to the controversy about the use of CDS in malignant biliary obstructions, our experience shows that none of the 42 patients had any complication due to malignant invasion of the stoma, and only one patient had ascending cholangitis; the perioperative mortality in this group was 8.6%. In our opinion, CDS is a relatively safe, definitive procedure for treatment of benign and malignant biliary diseases, with good long-term results in high-risk, aged patients. PMID:3353854

  15. Early biliary complications following pancreaticoduodenectomy: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Malgras, Brice; Duron, Sandrine; Gaujoux, Sébastien; Dokmak, Safi; Aussilhou, Béatrice; Rebours, Vinciane; Palazzo, Maxime; Belghiti, Jacques; Sauvanet, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background Early biliary complications (EBC) following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are poorly known. This study aimed to assess incidence, predictive factors, and treatment of EBC including bilio-enteric stricture, transient jaundice, biliary leak, and cholangitis. Method From 2007 to 2011, 352 patients underwent PD. Statistical analysis including logistic regression was performed to determine EBC predictive factors. Results 49 patients (14%) developed 51 EBC, including 7(2%) bilio-enteric strictures, 15(4%) transient jaundices, 9(3%) biliary leaks, and 20(6%) cholangitis with no mortality and a 18% reoperation rate. In multivariate analysis, male gender, benign disease, malignancy with preoperative chemoradiation, and common bile duct (CBD) diameter ≤5 mm were predictive of EBC. Of the 7 strictures, all were associated with CBD ≤5 mm and 5(71%) required reoperation. Transient jaundice resolved spontaneously in all 15 cases. Among 8 patients with serum bilirubin level >50 μmol/L (3 mg/dL) at POD3, 7(88%) developed bilio-enteric stricture. Biliary leak resolved spontaneously in 5(56%); otherwise, it required reoperation. Cholangitis recurred after antibiotics discontinuation in 5(25%). Conclusions EBC following PD do not increase mortality. EBC are more frequent with male gender, benign disease, malignancy with preoperative chemoradiation, and CBD ≤5 mm. Transient jaundice or cholangitis has a favorable outcome, whereas bilio-enteric stricture or biliary leak can require reintervention. PMID:27037207

  16. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  17. Effects of biliary obstruction on hepatic clearance of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.O.; Wilton, P.B.; Barke, R.A.; Gerding, D.N.; Forstrom, L.A.; Shafer, R.B.; Vennes, J.A. )

    1989-08-01

    High surgical mortality in patients with obstructive jaundice and sepsis have been attributed to reticuloendothelial system (RES) depression. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of mechanical biliary obstruction on RES clearance of pathogenic bacteria by comparing the phagocytic index (K) with the directly measured hepatic uptake of indium 111-labeled bacteria injected into the portal vein of normal dogs and dogs with partial (PBO) or complete biliary obstruction (CBO). No significant difference was observed between the K in normal dogs (0.19 +/- 0.08; n = 6) and that in dogs with PBO (0.24 +/- 0.06; n = 5) or CBO (0.21 +/- 0.03; n = 4). There was no significant difference in uptake of radiolabel by the liver among the three groups of dogs. In our model, biliary obstruction had no effect on hepatic RES function and may not represent a significant determinant of mortality in patients with obstructive jaundice.

  18. Malignant biliary obstruction: the current role of interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Tsetis, Dimitrios; Krokidis, Μiltiadis; Negru, Dragos; Prassopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic head cancer are still linked with extremely high 5-year mortality in the western world. The management of such patients is complex and typically requires a multidisciplinary approach in a tertiary care center. Interventional radiology offers minimally invasive, image-guided treatment for a variety of diseases and conditions. Regarding patients with malignant biliary obstruction, IR options are considered for more than two decades as a valid management tool for both operable and non-operable cases. The options include placement of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drains, preoperative embolization of the portal vein and deployment of covered and uncovered biliary stents. The purpose of this review is to describe the current evidence in this continuously evolving field. PMID:26752947

  19. Malignant biliary obstruction: the current role of interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Tsetis, Dimitrios; Krokidis, Μiltiadis; Negru, Dragos; Prassopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic head cancer are still linked with extremely high 5-year mortality in the western world. The management of such patients is complex and typically requires a multidisciplinary approach in a tertiary care center. Interventional radiology offers minimally invasive, image-guided treatment for a variety of diseases and conditions. Regarding patients with malignant biliary obstruction, IR options are considered for more than two decades as a valid management tool for both operable and non-operable cases. The options include placement of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drains, preoperative embolization of the portal vein and deployment of covered and uncovered biliary stents. The purpose of this review is to describe the current evidence in this continuously evolving field. PMID:26752947

  20. Drug-eluting stent in malignant biliary obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Ki; Jang, Sung Ill

    2012-10-01

    Endoscopic stent insertion is the treatment of choice for patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, conventional stents enable only mechanical palliation of the obstruction, without any anti-tumor effects. Drugeluting stent (DES), which was first introduced in coronary artery disease, are currently under investigation for sustaining stent patency and prolonging patient survival by inhibiting tumor ingrowth in malignant biliary obstruction. Many factors affecting efficient drug delivery have been studied to determine how drugs with antitumor effects suppress tumor ingrowth, including the specific drugs incorporated, means of incorporating the drugs, mode of drug release, and stent structure. Advances have resulted in the construction of more effective non-vascular DES and ongoing clinical research. Non-vascular DES is expected to play a vital role in prolonging the survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.

  1. Palliation double stenting for malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LIANG; XU, HAITAO; ZHANG, YUBAO

    2016-01-01

    The surgical management of patients with malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction is complex. Tumor excision is no longer possible in the majority of patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and duodenal obstruction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intraluminal dual stent placement in malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction. In total, 20 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and duodenal obstruction, including 6 with pancreatic carcinoma, 11 with cholangiocarcinoma, 1 with duodenal carcinoma and 2 with abdominal lymph node metastasis, were treated with intraluminal stent placement. Bile duct obstruction with late occurrence of duodenal obstruction was observed in 16 cases, and duodenal obstruction followed by a late occurrence of bile duct obstruction was observed in 3 cases, while, in 1 case, bile duct obstruction and duodenal obstruction occurred simultaneously. After X-ray fluoroscopy revealed obstruction in the bile duct and duodenum, stents were placed into the respective lumens. Percutaneous transhepatic placement was employed for the biliary stent, while the duodenal stent was placed perioraly. The clinical outcomes, including complications associated with the procedures and patency of the stents, were evaluated. The biliary and duodenal stents were successfully implanted in 18 patients and the technical success rate was 90% (18/20). A total of 39 stents were implanted in 20 patients. In 2 cases, duodenal stent placement failed following biliary stent placement. Duodenal obstruction remitted in 15 patients, and 1 patient succumbed to aspiration pneumonia 5 days after the procedure. No severe complications were observed in any other patient. The survival time of the 18 patients was 5–21 months (median, 9.6 months), and 6 of those patients survived for >12 months. The present study suggests that X-ray fluoroscopy-guided intraluminal stent implantation is an effective procedure for the treatment of malignant

  2. [Congenital broncho-biliary fistula: a case report].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cinthia G; Reusmann, Aixa

    2016-10-01

    Congenital tracheo-or-bronchobiliary fistula or congenital he-patopulmonary fistula is a rare malformation with high morbidity and mortality if the diagnosis is not made early. The tracheo-or-bronchobiliary fistula is a communication between the respiratory (trachea or bronchus) and biliary tract. To date, only 35 cases have been published worldwide. We report a case of a neonate with right pneumonia and bilious fluid in the endotracheal tube. Diagnosis was made using bronchoscopy with fluoroscopy. Videothoracoscopy was used to remove the bronchobiliary fistula. Subsequently, a left he-patectomy with Roux-en-Y biliary-digestive anastomosis was performed as bile ductus hypoplasia was present. PMID:27606661

  3. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  4. Extrahepatic biliary tract in chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger, Molina).

    PubMed

    Nowak, E; Kuchinka, J; Szczurkowski, A; Kuder, T

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was the macromorphological analysis of extrahepatic biliary tract in chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger Molina). Bile ducts, the gall bladder and portal vein were injected with coloured latex. Using the technique of dissection, bile ducts were isolated from the liver lobes. It was found that the cystic duct in this species is rarely single. Hepatic ducts form a system of multiple anastomosing structures running in the hepatoduodenal ligament. Many bile duct openings were observed in the duodenal papilla. The results confirm wide variations of the biliary tract in mammals and may be important for comparative analysis of the morphological differentiation of these structures in small mammals. PMID:25091180

  5. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-03-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  6. A Rare Anomaly of Biliary System: MRCP Evidence of a Cystic Duct Cyst.

    PubMed

    Goya, Cemil; Arslan, Mehmet Serif; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Hamidi, Cihad; Kuday, Suzan; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; Aydogdu, Bahattin

    2014-01-01

    Cystic duct cysts are a rare congenital anomaly. While the other bile duct cysts (choledochus and the intrahepatic bile ducts) are classified according to the classification described by Tadoni, there is no classification method described by the cystic duct cysts, although it is claimed that the cystic duct cysts may constitute a new "Type 6" category. Only a limited number of patients with cystic duct cysts have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis is usually made in the neonatal period or during childhood. The clinical symptoms are nonspecific and usually include pain in the right upper quadrant and jaundice. The condition may also present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholelithiasis, or pancreatitis. In our case, the abdominal ultrasonography (US) performed on a 6-year-old female patient who presented with pain in the right upper quadrant pointed out an anechoic cyst at the neck of the gall bladder. Based on the magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) results, a cystic dilatation was diagnosed in the cystic duct. The aim of this case-report presentation was to discuss the US and MRCP findings of the cystic dilatation of cystic duct, which is an extremely rare condition, in the light of the literature information. PMID:24987540

  7. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of chronic pain usually involves medicines and therapy. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ...

  8. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation Combined with Biliary Stent Placement for Nonresectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction Improves Stent Patency but not Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zhao, Lizhen; Zhou, Chuanguo; Gao, Kun; Huang, Qiang; Wei, Baojie; Gao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although radiofrequency (RF) ablation has been accepted as a curative treatment modality for solid organ tumors, intraductal RF ablation for malignant biliary obstruction has not been widely described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy (in terms of stent patency and survival) of intraductal RF ablation combined with biliary stent placement for nonresectable malignant biliary obstruction. A search of the nonresectable malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction database (179 patients) identified 18 consecutive patients who were treated with biliary intraluminal RF ablation during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage and inner stent placement (RF ablation group) and 18 patients who underwent inner stent placement without biliary intraluminal RF ablation (control group). The patients were matched for tumor type, location of obstruction, tumor stage, and Child–Pugh class status. Primary endpoints included safety, stent patency time, and survival rates. The secondary endpoint was effectiveness of the technique. The RF ablation and control groups were closely matched in terms of age, diagnosis, presence of metastases, presence of locally advanced tumor, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, and chemotherapy regimen (all P > 0.05). The technical success rate for both groups was 100%. The median time of stent patency in the RF ablation and control groups were 5.8 (2.8–11.5) months and 4.5 (2.4–8.0) months, respectively (Kaplan–Meier analysis: P = 0.03). The median survival times in the RF ablation and control groups were 6.1 (4.8–15.2) months and 5.8 (4.2–16.5) months, with no significant difference according to Kaplan–Meier analysis (P = 0.45). In univariate and multivariate analyses, poorer overall survival was associated with advanced age and presence of metastases (P < 0.05). Intraductal RF ablation combined with biliary stent placement for nonresectable malignant

  9. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Health Statistics survey indicated that low back pain was the most common (27%), followed by severe ...

  10. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Having a pain in your chest can be scary. It does not always mean that you are having a heart attack. There can be many other causes, ... embolism Costochondritis - an inflammation of joints in your chest Some of these problems can be serious. Get ...

  11. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  12. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is sudden and sharp You also have pain in your chest, neck or shoulder You're vomiting blood or have blood in your stool Your abdomen is stiff, hard and tender to touch You can't move your bowels, especially if you're also vomiting

  13. Cotinine effects on bile flow and biliary NNK elimination.

    PubMed

    Meiser, H; Atawodi, S E; Richter, E

    2000-06-20

    Nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine inhibit alpha-hydroxylation of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) suggesting that an alternative pathway of NNK metabolism and elimination, biliary excretion of the O-glucuronide of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL-Gluc) may be enhanced. To verify the possible role of cotinine on biliary elimination of NNK and its metabolites, bile duct cannulated rats were administered a single i.p. dose of 50 mg/kg [56sup;-3 H]-NNK with or without i.p. co-administration of 5 mg/kg cotinine or nicotine. Cotinine significantly reduced cumulative bile flow and biliary elimination of NNK-derived radioactivity within six hours to 42 and 27 percent, respectively. The pattern of NNK metabolites in bile was unchanged. Nicotine had a similar inhibitory effect on bile flow. This result constitutes the first experimental evidence that cotinine inhibits bile flow. In rats, biliary elimination of NNK is reduced accordingly which may lead to an increased carcinogen burden in the body. In humans, inhibition of bile flow by tobacco alkaloids may contribute to the appetite suppressing effect of tobacco products. PMID:10882639

  14. Biliary phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylcholine profiles in sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, Annika; Ehehalt, Robert; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Erben, Gerhard; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Yvonne; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Stiehl, Adolf; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Sauer, Peter; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyze phospholipid profiles in intrahepatic bile from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and secondary sclerosing cholangitis (SSC). METHODS: Intrahepatic bile specimens collected via endoscopic retrograde cholangiography from 41 patients were analyzed. Fourteen of these patients were diagnosed with PSC, 10 with SSC, 11 with choledocholithiasis or no identifiable biliary disease, and 6 with cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC). Bile acid, cholesterol, protein, and bilirubin contents as well as pancreas lipase activity in bile were determined by biochemical methods. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) species were quantified using nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Bile from all the examined patient groups showed a remarkably similar PC and LPC species composition, with only minor statistical differences. Total biliary PC concentrations were highest in controls (8030 ± 1843 μmol/L) and lowest in patients with CCC (1969 ± 981 μmol/L) (P = 0.005, controls vs SSC and CCC, respectively, P < 0.05). LPC contents in bile were overall low (4.2% ± 1.8%). Biliary LPC/PC ratios and ratios of biliary PC to bilirubin, PC to cholesterol, PC to protein, and PC to bile acids showed no intergroup differences. CONCLUSION: PC and LPC profiles being similar in patients with or without sclerosing cholangitis, these phospholipids are likely not of major pathogenetic importance in this disease group. PMID:24023488

  15. Current status of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sakai, Yuji; Mikata, Rintaro; Yasui, Shin; Watanabe, Yuto; Sakamoto, Dai; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Senoo, Jun-Ichi; Kusakabe, Yuko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-08-28

    Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) was developed to improve obstructive jaundice, which affects a number of organs and physiological mechanisms in patients waiting for surgery. However, its role in patients who will undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy for biliary obstruction remains controversial. This article aims to review the current status of the use of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction. Relevant articles published from 1980 to 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed using the keywords "PBD", "pancreaticoduodenectomy", and "obstructive jaundice". Additional papers were identified by a manual search of the references from key articles. Current studies have demonstrated that PBD should not be routinely performed because of the postoperative complications. PBD should only be considered in carefully selected patients, particularly in cases where surgery had to be delayed. PBD may be needed in patients with severe jaundice, concomitant cholangitis, or severe malnutrition. The optimal method of biliary drainage has yet to be confirmed. PBD should be performed by endoscopic routes rather than by percutaneous routes to avoid metastatic tumor seeding. Endoscopic stenting or nasobiliary drainage can be selected. Although more expensive, the use of metallic stents remains a viable option to achieve effective drainage without cholangitis and reintervention. PMID:26328029

  16. Absorption of biliary cobalamin in baboons following total gastrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.; Jacobsen, D.W.; Van Tonder, S.V.; Kew, M.C.; Metz, J.

    1982-11-01

    Absorption of radiolabeled cobalamin in baboons was assessed by whole body counting. Retention of biliary cobalamin and an aqueous solution of cyanocobalamin was measured in normal baboons and in baboons after total gastrectomy by using /sup 57/Co-labeled biliary cobalamin and /sup 58/C0-cyanocobalamin, with and without baboon gastric juice containing intrinsic factor. Radiolabeled biliary cobalamin was obtained by intravenous injection of /sup 57/Co-cyanocobalamin in baboons and collection of bile through a cannula placed in the common bile duct. Cobalamin absorption was not completely abolished by gastrectomy and biliary cobalamin was better retained than cyanocobalamin; intrinsic factor enhanced absorption of both forms. After gastrectomy there was steady depletion of liver and serum cobalamin levels, which ceased after a new equilibrium was reached between a progressively diminishing cobalamin loss and the impaired but significant residual level of absorption. These studies in the nonhuman primate provide further information concerning the enterohepatic circulation of cobalamin and suggest that the form of cobalamin in bile may be more readily absorbed than is cyanocobalamin or that bile itself may have an enhancing effect on cobalamin absorption. The data also suggest that physiologically significant amounts of cobalamin may be absorbed in the absence of a gastric source of intrinsic factor.

  17. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  18. Identification of a plant isoflavonoid that causes biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Lorent, Kristin; Gong, Weilong; Koo, Kyung A; Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Karjoo, Sara; Zhao, Xiao; Sealy, Ian; Kettleborough, Ross N; Stemple, Derek L; Windsor, Peter A; Whittaker, Stephen J; Porter, John R; Wells, Rebecca G; Pack, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rapidly progressive and destructive fibrotic disorder of unknown etiology affecting the extrahepatic biliary tree of neonates. Epidemiological studies suggest that an environmental factor, such as a virus or toxin, is the cause of the disease, although none have been definitively established. Several naturally occurring outbreaks of BA in Australian livestock have been associated with the ingestion of unusual plants by pregnant animals during drought conditions. We used a biliary secretion assay in zebrafish to isolate a previously undescribed isoflavonoid, biliatresone, from Dysphania species implicated in a recent BA outbreak. This compound caused selective destruction of the extrahepatic, but not intrahepatic, biliary system of larval zebrafish. A mutation that enhanced biliatresone toxicity mapped to a region of the zebrafish genome that has conserved synteny with an established human BA susceptibility locus. The toxin also caused loss of cilia in neonatal mouse extrahepatic cholangiocytes in culture and disrupted cell polarity and monolayer integrity in cholangiocyte spheroids. Together, these findings provide direct evidence that BA could be initiated by perinatal exposure to an environmental toxin. PMID:25947162

  19. Long-term results of choledochoduodenostomy in benign biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajaz A; Rather, Shiraz A; Bari, Shams UL; Wani, Khursheed Alam

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the long-term results of choledochodudenostomy in patients with benign billiary obstruction. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted at Sheri Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences Srinagar Kashmir, India over a period of 10 years from January 1997 to December 2007. The total number of patients who underwent choledochoduodenostomy during this period was 270. On the basis of etiology of biliary tract obstruction, patients were divided into a calculus group, an oriental cholangiohepatitis group, a benign biliary stricture group and others. Patients were followed for a variable period of 13 mo to 15 years. RESULTS: Choledochoduodenostomy (CDD) with duo-denotomy was performend in four patients. CDD with removal of T- tube, CDD with left hepatic lobectomy and CDD with removal of intra biliary ruptured hydatid was performed in three patients each. In the remaining patients only CDD was performed. Immediate post operative complications were seen in 63 (23%) patients, while long-term complications were seen in 28 (11%) patients, which were statistically significant. Three patients died during hospitalization while four patients died in the late post-operative period. CONCLUSION: Our conclusion is that CDD is safe and produces good long term results when a permanent biliary drainage procedure is required. PMID:22408717

  20. Per oral cholangiopancreatoscopy in pancreatico biliary diseases - Expert consensus statements

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandani, Mohan; Reddy, Duvvur Nageshwar; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Tandan, Manu; Maydeo, Amit; Chandrashekhar, Thoguluva Seshadri; Kumar, Ajay; Sud, Randhir; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Makmun, Dadang; Khor, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide consensus statements on the use of per-oral cholangiopancreatoscopy (POCPS). METHODS: A workgroup of experts in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endosonography, and POCPS generated consensus statements summarizing the utility of POCPS in pancreaticobiliary disease. Recommendation grades used validated evidence ratings of publications from an extensive literature review. RESULTS: Six consensus statements were generated: (1) POCPS is now an important additional tool during ERCP; (2) in patients with indeterminate biliary strictures, POCS and POCS-guided targeted biopsy are useful for establishing a definitive diagnosis; (3) POCS and POCS-guided lithotripsy are recommended for treatment of difficult common bile duct stones when standard techniques fail; (4) in patients with main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) POPS may be used to assess extent of tumor to assist surgical resection; (5) in difficult pancreatic ductal stones, POPS-guided lithotripsy may be useful in fragmentation and extraction of stones; and (6) additional indications for POCPS include selective guidewire placement, unexplained hemobilia, assessing intraductal biliary ablation therapy, and extracting migrated stents. CONCLUSION: POCPS is important in association with ERCP, particularly for diagnosis of indeterminate biliary strictures and for intra-ductal lithotripsy when other techniques failed, and may be useful for pre-operative assessment of extent of main duct IPMN, for extraction of difficult pancreatic stones, and for unusual indications involving selective guidewire placement, assessing unexplained hemobilia or intraductal biliary ablation therapy, and extracting migrated stents. PMID:25914484

  1. Current status of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sakai, Yuji; Mikata, Rintaro; Yasui, Shin; Watanabe, Yuto; Sakamoto, Dai; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Senoo, Jun-ichi; Kusakabe, Yuko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) was developed to improve obstructive jaundice, which affects a number of organs and physiological mechanisms in patients waiting for surgery. However, its role in patients who will undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy for biliary obstruction remains controversial. This article aims to review the current status of the use of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction. Relevant articles published from 1980 to 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed using the keywords “PBD”, “pancreaticoduodenectomy”, and “obstructive jaundice”. Additional papers were identified by a manual search of the references from key articles. Current studies have demonstrated that PBD should not be routinely performed because of the postoperative complications. PBD should only be considered in carefully selected patients, particularly in cases where surgery had to be delayed. PBD may be needed in patients with severe jaundice, concomitant cholangitis, or severe malnutrition. The optimal method of biliary drainage has yet to be confirmed. PBD should be performed by endoscopic routes rather than by percutaneous routes to avoid metastatic tumor seeding. Endoscopic stenting or nasobiliary drainage can be selected. Although more expensive, the use of metallic stents remains a viable option to achieve effective drainage without cholangitis and reintervention. PMID:26328029

  2. Regional Differences in Hospitalizations and Cholecystectomies for Biliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Published studies suggest that socioeconomic factors contribute to increasing cholecystectomy rates for biliary dyskinesia (BD). The aim of this study was to identify factors driving admissions and operations for BD by examining regional variability in hospitalizations and cholecystectomies for this disorder. Methods Annual hospitalizations and cholecystectomy rates for biliary diseases were assessed using the State Inpatient Databases of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality based on diagnosis codes for biliary dyskinesia, cholecystolithiasis and cholecystitis. Results Annual admissions for BD varied nearly sevenfold among different states within the United States. Hospitalizations for gallstone disease and its complication showed less variability, differing 2-fold between states. Nearly 70% of admissions for BD and about 85% of admissions for gallstone disease resulted in cholecystectomies. Higher admission rates for BD were best predicted by high overall hospitalization rates, admission rate for gallstone disease and the physician workforce within a state. Cholecystectomy rates for BD were higher in states with low population density and high rates of cholecystectomy for gallstone disease. Conclusions These data suggest that established medical practice patterns significantly contribute to the variability in admissions and operations for biliary dyskinesia. The findings also indicate that lower thresholds for operative interventions are an important determinant in the approach to this disorder. Considering the benign course of functional illnesses, the bar for surgical interventions should be raised rather than lowered; in addition active conservative treatment options should be developed for these patients. PMID:23875106

  3. Osteopontin Deficiency Alters Biliary Homeostasis and Protects against Gallstone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Shao, Wei-qing; Chen, Zong-you; Zhu, Wen-wei; Lu, Lu; Cai, Duan; Qin, Lun-xiu; Jia, Hu-liang; Lu, Ming; Chen, Jin-hong

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation of excess biliary cholesterol as solid crystals is a prerequisite for cholesterol gallstone formation, which occurs due to disturbed biliary homeostasis. Biliary homeostasis is regulated by an elaborate network of genes in hepatocytes. If unmanaged, the cholesterol crystals will aggregate, fuse and form gallstones. We have previously observed that the levels of osteopontin (OPN) in bile and gallbladder were reduced in gallstone patients. However, the role and mechanism for hepatic OPN in cholesterol gallstone formation is undetermined. In this study, we found that the expression of hepatic OPN was increased in gallstone patients compared with gallstone-free counterparts. Then, we observed that OPN-deficient mice were less vulnerable to cholesterol gallstone formation than wild type mice. Further mechanistic studies revealed that this protective effect was associated with alterations of bile composition and was caused by the increased hepatic CYP7A1 expression and the reduced expression of hepatic SHP, ATP8B1, SR-B1 and SREBP-2. Finally, the correlations between the expression of hepatic OPN and the expression of these hepatic genes were validated in gallstone patients. Taken together, our findings reveal that hepatic OPN contributes to cholesterol gallstone formation by regulating biliary metabolism and might be developed as a therapeutic target for gallstone treatments. PMID:27484115

  4. Questionnaire Based Assessment of Risk Factors for Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Craig; Nguyen, Douglas L.; Juran, Brian D.; Schlicht, Erik; Larson, Joseph J.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary Biliary Cirrhosis is a cholestatic liver disease characterized by immune-mediated destruction of bile ducts. Its pathogenesis is largely unknown, although complex interactions between environment and genetic predisposition are proposed. Aims Identify disease risk factors using a detailed patient questionnaire and compare study findings to 3 published reports. Methods Questionnaire data were prospectively collected from 522 cases and 616 controls of the Mayo Clinic Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Genetic Epidemiology Registry. Case and control responses were compared using logistic regression, adjusting for recruitment age, sex, and education level. Results Cases reported ever regularly smoking cigarettes more frequently than controls (P < 0.001). History of urinary tract infection (UTI) was similar between groups; however, cases reported multiple UTIs more commonly than controls (P < 0.001). Frequency of other autoimmune disease was higher in cases than controls (P < 0.001). As well, prevalence of primary biliary cirrhosis among first-degree relatives was higher in case families than control families (P < 0.001). Conclusions Our study confirms prior reported risk factors associated with disease risk. Given the potential importance of gene and environment interactions, further examination of environmental risk factors considering genetic background may provide new insight into primary biliary cirrhosis pathogenesis. PMID:23490343

  5. Identification of a plant isoflavonoid that causes biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Lorent, Kristin; Gong, Weilong; Koo, Kyung A.; Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Karjoo, Sara; Zhao, Xiao; Sealy, Ian; Kettleborough, Ross N.; Stemple, Derek L.; Windsor, Peter A.; Whittaker, Stephen J.; Porter, John R.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rapidly progressive and destructive fibrotic disorder of unknown etiology affecting the extrahepatic biliary tree of neonates. Epidemiological studies suggest that an environmental factor, such as a virus or toxin, is the cause of the disease, although none have been definitively established. Several naturally occurring outbreaks of BA in Australian livestock have been associated with the ingestion of unusual plants by pregnant animals during drought conditions. We used a biliary secretion assay in zebrafish to isolate a previously undescribed isoflavonoid, biliatresone, from Dysphania species implicated in a recent BA outbreak. This compound caused selective destruction of the extrahepatic, but not intrahepatic, biliary system of larval zebrafish. A mutation that enhanced biliatresone toxicity mapped to a region of the zebrafish genome that has conserved synteny with an established human BA susceptibility locus. The toxin also caused loss of cilia in neonatal mouse extrahepatic cholangiocytes in culture and disrupted cell polarity and monolayer integrity in cholangiocyte spheroids. Together, these findings provide direct evidence that BA could be initiated by perinatal exposure to an environmental toxin. PMID:25947162

  6. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... related activities for a few days during each menstrual cycle. Painful menstruation is the leading cause of lost ... when did the pain begin? When in your menstrual cycle do you experience the pain? Is the pain ...

  7. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... Pain During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  8. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  9. American Pain Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Award Recipients Strong Evidence Still Lacking on Medical Marijuana for Pain Fibromyalgia Has Central Nervous System Origins ... Mayday Fund American Pain Society Offers Guidance on Medical Marijuana for Pain Study Shows Pain Often Improves in ...

  10. What Is Chronic Pain?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  11. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture - pain relief; Hypnosis - pain relief; Guided imagery - pain relief ... you repeat a positive statement over and over. Hypnosis may help relieve pain for: After surgery or labor Arthritis Cancer Fibromyalgia ...

  12. American Chronic Pain Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACPA Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  13. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  14. Interval Biliary Stent Placement Via Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Cholecystostomy: Another Approach to Palliative Treatment in Malignant Biliary Tract Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, James Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-12-15

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  15. Analgesic effect of paracetamol combined with low-dose morphine versus morphine alone on patients with biliary colic: a double blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Farnia, Mohammad Reza; Babaei, Rasoul; Shirani, Farzaneh; Momeni, Mehdi; Hajimaghsoudi, Majid; Vahidi, Elnaz; Saeedi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous drugs have been proposed to alleviate pain in patients with biliary colic, especially opioids, but still there is a tendency to use less narcotics because of their side effects and the unwillingness of some patients. The present study aimed to compare the analgesic effect of paracetamol combined with low-dose morphine versus morphine alone in patients with biliary colic. METHODS: A randomized double-blind controlled trial was performed in 98 patients with biliary colic, recruited from two emergency departments from August 2012 to August 2013. Eleven patients were excluded and the remaining were randomized into two groups: group A received 0.05 mg/kg morphine+1 000 mg paracetamol in 100 mL normal saline and group B received 0.1 mg/kg morphine+normal saline (100 mL) as placebo. Pain scores were recorded using visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline and 15 and 30 minutes after drug administration. Adverse effects and the need for rescue medication (0.75 µg/kg intravenous fentanyl) were also reported within 60 minutes of drug administration. RESULTS: Before the infusion, the mean±SD VAS scores were 8.73±1.57 in group A and 8.53±1.99 in group B. At 15 minutes after drug administration, the mean±SD VAS scores were 2.16±1.90 in group A vs. 2.51±1.86 in group B; mean difference was –0.35, and 95%CI –1.15 to 0.45 (P=0.38). At 30 minutes the mean±SD VAS scores were 1.66±1.59 in group A vs. 2.14±1.79 in group B; mean difference was –0.48, and 95%CI –1.20 to 0.24 (P=0.19). The mean pain scores in the two groups at 15 and 30 minutes demonstrated no significant difference. CONCLUSION: Paracetamol combined with low-dose morphine may be effective for pain management in patients with biliary colic. PMID:27006734

  16. Understanding pain, part 2: pain management.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Helen

    This article is the second in a two-part series which explores pain and its management from a physiological perspective. Nurses play an important role in assessing and managing pain. Effective pain management by nurses requires them to have an understanding of the biological basis of the pain interventions which may be used to control pain. This article emphasizes the importance of pain assessment as a precursor for effective pain management and explores the biological basis of pain interventions which contribute to pain control. The role of non-pharmacological approaches in alleviating pain and their actions which contribute to pain relief are explored. The three main types of pharmaceutical agents used, non-opioids, opioids and adjuvant drugs, are introduced and their mechanisms of actions discussed. PMID:16224328

  17. Health Related Quality of Life in Patients with Biliary Atresia Surviving with their Native Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Shikha S.; Alonso, Estella M.; Haber, Barbara; Magee, John C.; Fredericks, Emily; Kamath, Binita; Kerkar, Nanda; Rosenthal, Philip; Shepherd, Ross; Limbers, Christine; Varni, James W.; Robuck, Patricia; Sokol, Ronald J.; Liver, Childhood

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To quantify health related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with biliary atresia with their native livers and compare them with healthy children and patients with biliary atresia post-liver transplant (LT) and to examine the relationship between HRQOL and medical variables. Study design A cross-sectional HRQOL study of patients with biliary atresia with their native livers (ages 2-25 years) was conducted and compared with healthy and post-LT biliary atresia samples using PedsQL™ 4.0 child self and parent proxy reports, a validated measure of physical/psychosocial functioning. Results 221 patients with biliary atresia with native livers (54% female, 67% white) were studied. patient self and parent proxy reports showed significantly poorer HRQOL than healthy children across all domains (p < 0.001), particularly in emotional and psychosocial functioning. Child self and parent proxy HRQOL scores from patients with biliary atresia with their native livers and post-LT biliary atresia were similar across all domains (p=NS). Child self and parent proxy reports showed moderate agreement across all scales, except social functioning (poor to fair agreement). On multivariate regression analysis, black race and elevated total bilirubin were associated with lower Total and Psychosocial HRQOL summary scores. Conclusions HRQOL in patients with biliary atresia with their native livers is significantly poorer than healthy and similar to post-LT biliary atresia children. These findings identify significant opportunities to optimize the overall health of patients with biliary atresia. PMID:23746866

  18. Regulation of intrahepatic biliary duct morphogenesis by Claudin 15-like b

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Isla D.; Bagnat, Michel; Ma, Taylur P.; Datta, Anirban; Evason, Kimberley; Moore, John C.; Lawson, Nathan; Mostov, Keith E.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2011-01-01

    The intrahepatic biliary ducts transport bile produced by the hepatocytes out of the liver. Defects in biliary cell differentiation and biliary duct remodeling cause a variety of congenital diseases including Alagille Syndrome and polycystic liver disease. While the molecular pathways regulating biliary cell differentiation have received increasing attention (Lemaigre, 2010), less is known about the cellular behavior underlying biliary duct remodeling. Here, we have identified a novel gene, claudin 15-like b (cldn15lb), which exhibits a unique and dynamic expression pattern in the hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells in zebrafish. Claudins are tight junction proteins that have been implicated in maintaining epithelial polarity, regulating paracellular transport, and providing barrier function. In zebrafish cldn15lb mutant livers, tight junctions are observed between hepatocytes, but these cells show polarization defects as well as canalicular malformations. Furthermore, cldn15lb mutants show abnormalities in biliary duct morphogenesis whereby biliary epithelial cells remain clustered together and form a disorganized network. Our data suggest that Cldn15lb plays an important role in the remodeling process during biliary duct morphogenesis. Thus, cldn15lb mutants provide a novel in vivo model to study the role of tight junction proteins in the remodeling of the biliary network and hereditary cholestasis. PMID:22020048

  19. Histochemical Analyses of Biliary Development During Metamorphosis of Xenopus laevis Tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tomoya; Ishihara, Akinori; Yagi, Shinomi; Koike, Toru; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian liver development, intrahepatic biliary morphogenesis takes place in periportal, but not in pericentral, regions. Liver progenitor cells transiently form epithelial plate structures and then intrahepatic bile ducts around the portal veins under the influence of the mesenchyme. The present study was undertaken to histochemically examine normal biliary development and its dependence on the action of the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. In these tadpoles, the development of hepatic ducts and intrahepatic biliary ducts commenced along the portal veins at NF stages 48-50 and stages 50-52, respectively, when the blood concentration of thyroid hormone may be still low. Some periportal hepatocytes expressed carbamoylphosphate synthase I and SOX9, which are hepatocyte and biliary cell markers, respectively, suggesting that periportal hepatocytes give rise to biliary epithelial cells. Periportal biliary cells did not form ductal plates, nor was the periportal mesenchyme well developed as seen in fetal mouse livers. jag1 mRNA was moderately expressed in cells of portal veins and biliary epithelial cells, and notch1 and notch2 mRNAs were weakly detectable in biliary epithelial cells during metamorphosis as seen in developing mammalian livers. These results suggest that Notch signaling plays a decisive role in biliary cell differentiation and morphogenesis of Xenopus tadpoles. Anti-thyroid agent treatment of the tadpoles resulted in delayed biliary morphogenesis, suggesting that biliary development may depend on T3. However, T3 treatment of the tadpoles did not enhance biliary development. Thus, T3 may act positively on biliary development at a very low concentration. PMID:25660701

  20. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  1. The Role of ARF6 in Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Glessner, Joseph; Ashokkumar, Chethan; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Min, Jun; Higgs, Brandon W.; Sun, Qing; Haberman, Kimberly; Schmitt, Lori; Vilarinho, Silvia; Mistry, Pramod K.; Vockley, Gerard; Dhawan, Anil; Gittes, George K.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Jaffe, Ronald; Subramaniam, Shankar; Shin, Donghun; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Altered extrahepatic bile ducts, gut, and cardiovascular anomalies constitute the variable phenotype of biliary atresia (BA). Methods To identify potential susceptibility loci, Caucasian children, normal (controls) and with BA (cases) at two US centers were compared at >550000 SNP loci. Systems biology analysis was carried out on the data. In order to validate a key gene identified in the analysis, biliary morphogenesis was evaluated in 2-5-day post-fertilization zebrafish embryos after morpholino-antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of the candidate gene ADP ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6, Mo-arf6). Results Among 39 and 24 cases at centers 1 and 2, respectively, and 1907 controls, which clustered together on principal component analysis, the SNPs rs3126184 and rs10140366 in a 3’ flanking enhancer region for ARF6 demonstrated higher minor allele frequencies (MAF) in each cohort, and 63 combined cases, compared with controls (0.286 vs. 0.131, P = 5.94x10-7, OR 2.66; 0.286 vs. 0.13, P = 5.57x10-7, OR 2.66). Significance was enhanced in 77 total cases, which included 14 additional BA genotyped at rs3126184 only (p = 1.58x10-2, OR = 2.66). Pathway analysis of the 1000 top-ranked SNPs in CHP cases revealed enrichment of genes for EGF regulators (p<1 x10-7), ERK/MAPK and CREB canonical pathways (p<1 x10-34), and functional networks for cellular development and proliferation (p<1 x10-45), further supporting the role of EGFR-ARF6 signaling in BA. In zebrafish embryos, Mo-arf6 injection resulted in a sparse intrahepatic biliary network, several biliary epithelial cell defects, and poor bile excretion to the gall bladder compared with uninjected embryos. Biliary defects were reproduced with the EGFR-blocker AG1478 alone or with Mo-arf6 at lower doses of each agent and rescued with arf6 mRNA. Conclusions The BA-associated SNPs identify a chromosome 14q21.3 susceptibility locus encompassing the ARF6 gene. arf6 knockdown in zebrafish implicates early biliary

  2. Serial insertion of bilateral uncovered metal stents for malignant hilar obstruction using an 8 Fr biliary system: a case series of 17 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jennifer; Thosani, Amar; Grunwald, Matthew; Nagula, Satish; Bucobo, Juan Carlos; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2015-10-01

    Controversy exists over the need for unilateral versus bilateral stent placement in patients with malignant obstruction at the biliary hilum. Placement of bilateral uncovered self-expanding metal stent (UCSEMS) at this location is technically challenging, and generally associated with lower rates of procedural success. Serial insertion of side-by-side UCSEMS may be especially difficult when simultaneous deployment is not possible using larger stent delivery catheters. In this single-center, retrospective case series of all patients who underwent bilateral placement of uncovered Wallflex(TM) biliary stents between July 2008 and July 2014, we evaluate the feasibility, technical success, and safety of patients undergoing serial insertion of bilateral UCSEMS using the 8 Fr Wallflex(TM) biliary system for malignant hilar obstruction. A total of 17 patients were included. Primary cholangiocarcinoma, Bismuth IV, was the most common diagnosis. Mean procedure time was 54.4 minutes. Overall procedural technical success was achieved in 17/17 patients. Stricture dilation was necessary prior to Wallflex(TM) insertion in 8/17 patients (47.1%). Transpapillary extension of two stents was performed in all patients. There were no cases of stent deployment malfunction, or inability to insert or deploy the 2(nd) stent. Nine of 17 patients (52.9%) required inpatient hospitalization following ERCP; the most common indications were abdominal pain and need for IV antibiotics. There was one case of ERCP-related cholangitis otherwise; there were no other major complications. Bilateral, serial insertion of UCSEMS using the 8 Fr Wallflex(TM) biliary system in malignant hilar obstruction is feasible with an excellent technical success profile. Using this device for side-by-side deployment of UCSEMS appears to be safe in the majority of patients. PMID:26605283

  3. Prospective study of outcomes after percutaneous biliary drainage for malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Robson, P. C.; Heffernan, N.; Gonen, M.; Thornton, R.; Brody, L. A.; Holmes, R.; Brown, K. T.; Covey, A. M.; Fleischer, D.; Getrajdman, G. I.; Jarnagin, W.; Sofocleous, C.; Blumgart, L.; D’Angelica, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) is used to relieve malignant bile duct obstruction (MBO) when endoscopic drainage is not feasible. Little is known about the effects of PBD on the quality of life (QoL) in patients with MBO. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in QoL and pruritus after PBD and to explore the variables that impact these changes. Patients and Methods Eligible patients reported their QoL and pruritus before and after PBD using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – Hepatobiliary instrument (FACT-HS) and the Visual Analog Scale for Pruritus (VASP). Instruments were completed pre-procedure and at one and four weeks following PBD. Results One hundred and nine (60 male/49 female) patients enrolled, 102 (94%) had unresectable disease. PBD was technically successful (hepatic ducts cannulated at the conclusion of procedure) in all patients. There were two procedure-related deaths. All-cause mortality was 10% (N=11) at 4 weeks and 28% (N=31) at 8 weeks post PBD with a median survival of 4.74 months. The mean FACT-HS scores declined significantly (P<.01) over time (101.3, 94.8, 94.7 at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, respectively). The VASP scores showed significant improvement at 1 week with continued improvement at 4 weeks (P<.01). Conclusion PBD improves pruritus but not QoL in patients with MBO and advanced malignancy. There is high early mortality in this population. PMID:20358300

  4. Development of a Swine Benign Biliary Stricture Model Using Endoscopic Biliary Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Jeong, Seok; Kim, Joon Mee; Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Don Haeng

    2016-09-01

    The large animal model with benign biliary stricture (BBS) is essential to undergo experiment on developing new devices and endoscopic treatment. This study conducted to establish a clinically relevant porcine BBS model by means of endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was performed on 12 swine. The animals were allocated to three groups (60, 80, and 100 W) according to the electrical power level of RFA electrode. Endobiliary RFA was applied to the common bile duct for 60 seconds using an RFA catheter that was endoscopically inserted. ERC was repeated two and four weeks, respectively, after the RFA to identify BBS. After the strictures were identified, histologic evaluations were performed. On the follow-up ERC two weeks after the procedure, a segmental bile duct stricture was observed in all animals. On microscopic examination, severe periductal fibrosis and luminal obliteration with transmural inflammation were demonstrated. Bile duct perforations occurred in two pigs (100 W, n = 1; 80 W, n = 1) but there were no major complications in the 60 W group. The application of endobiliary RFA with 60 W electrical power resulted in a safe and reproducible swine model of BBS. PMID:27510388

  5. Recognition of Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens on Cultured Human Biliary Epithelial Cells by Alloreactive Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saidman, Susan L.; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Zeevi, Adriana; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Demetris, A. Jake

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system to study the interactions between biliary epithelium and lymphocytes using cultured human biliary epithelial cells. No class II antigens were detected by immunoperoxidase staining of the normal biliary epithelial cells, but alloactivated lymphocyte culture supernatants were able to induce class II expression. The activity of the supernatants was blocked with an anti-γ-interferon monoclonal antibody. In addition, recombinant human γ-interferon alone induced the expression of class II antigens and increased the intensity of class I staining of cultured biliary epithelial cells. Biliary epithelial cell–induced proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex molecules carry functional lymphocyte-activating determinants. The recognition of major histocompatibility complex determinants was confirmed by monoclonal antibody–blocking studies and by stimulation of an alloreactive T-cell clone. However, the biliary epithelial cells were much less potent stimulators than arterial endothelial cells tested in the same assay system. PMID:1704868

  6. Imaging the pregnant patient with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Graham W; Davis, Melissa A; Semelka, Richard C; Fielding, Julia R

    2012-10-01

    Imaging of pregnant patients with non-obstetric abdominal pain is reviewed, with an accompanying pictorial essay of cases with concentration on magnetic resonance imaging. Non-obstetric causes of abdominal pain during pregnancy are similar to those of non-pregnant patients. The most common causes are appendicitis and cholecystitis. Other causes are myriad and include biliary, gastrointestinal, infectious, inflammatory, and malignant etiologies, among others. The approach to imaging in pregnant patient is unique, as it is imperative to minimize potentially harmful radiation exposures to the fetus. Ultrasound and MRI are the primary modalities for evaluation of the pregnant patient with abdominal pain. The use of intravenous contrast is discouraged, except in highly-selected patients where there is no other way to obtain vital diagnostic information. CT is still used as the mainstay of evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma and is commonly used for diagnosis of small bowel obstruction, stone disease, and work-up of malignancy during pregnancy. A discussion of test selection and underlying rationale is presented. PMID:22160283

  7. Risk factors of biliary intervention by imaging after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Kyu; Choi, Jong Young; Yeo, Dong Myung; Lee, Young Joon; Yoon, Seung Kew; Bae, Si Hyun; Jang, Jeong Won; Kim, Hee Yeon; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the risk factors of biliary intervention using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). METHODS: We retrospectively enrolled 196 patients who underwent right lobe LDLT between 2006 and 2010 at a single liver transplantation center. Direct duct-to-duct biliary anastomosis was performed in all 196 patients. MRCP images routinely taken 1 mo after LDLT were analyzed to identify risk factors for biliary intervention during follow-up, such as retrograde cholangiopancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Two experienced radiologists evaluated the MRCP findings, including the anastomosis site angle on three-dimensional images, the length of the filling defect on maximum intensity projection, bile duct dilatation, biliary stricture, and leakage. RESULTS: Eighty-nine patients underwent biliary intervention during follow-up. The anastomosis site angle [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.48; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.30-0.75, P < 0.001], a filling defect in the anastomosis site (HR = 2.18, 95%CI: 1.41-3.38, P = 0.001), and biliary leakage (HR = 2.52, 95%CI: 1.02-6.20, P = 0.048) on MRCP were identified in the multivariate analysis as significant risk factors for biliary intervention during follow-up. Moreover, a narrower anastomosis site angle (i.e., below the median angle of 113.3°) was associated with earlier biliary intervention (38.5 ± 4.2 mo vs 62. 1 ± 4.1 mo, P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis comparing biliary intervention-free survival according to the anastomosis site angle revealed that lower survival was associated with a narrower anastomosis site angle (36.3% vs 62.0%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The biliary anastomosis site angle in MRCP after LDLT may be associated with the need for biliary intervention. PMID:26900296

  8. Combined radiologic and endoscopic treatment (using the "rendezvous technique") of a biliary fistula following left hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Gracient, Aurélien; Rebibo, Lionel; Delcenserie, Richard; Yzet, Thierry; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-14

    Despite the ongoing decrease in the frequency of complications after hepatectomy, biliary fistulas still occur and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Here, we report on an unusual technique for managing biliary fistula following left hepatectomy in a patient in whom the right posterior segmental duct joined the left hepatic duct. The biliary fistula was treated with a combined radiologic and endoscopic procedure based on the "rendezvous technique". The clinical outcome was good, and reoperation was not required. PMID:27570431

  9. Portal vein occlusion after biliary metal stent placement in hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jin Bae; Chang, Yoon Jung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Baek, Il Hyun; Ko, Jin Seok; Woo, Ji Young; Kim, Hong Dae; Lee, Myung Seok

    2008-06-01

    Acute symptomatic portal vein obstruction related to biliary stenting is an extremely rare but life-threatening complication. This usually occurs in patients with either tumor invasion into the portal vein or pre-existing portal vein thrombus. Therefore, the portal vein should be carefully evaluated before placing a biliary metallic stent in such patients. We describe a case of acute portal vein obstruction after placing metallic biliary stents in a patient with a periductal-infiltrating type of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:20485610

  10. Acceptable Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors Adjacent to the Central Biliary System

    SciTech Connect

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate biliary toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Among 297 consecutive patients with liver tumors treated with SBRT of 35 to 50 Gy in 5 fractions, patients who were irradiated with >20 Gy to the central biliary system (CBS), including the gallbladder, and had follow-up times >6 months were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicity profiles, such as clinical symptoms and laboratory and radiologic data especially for obstructive jaundice and biliary infection, were investigated in relation to the dose volume and length relationship for each biliary organ. Results: Fifty patients with 55 tumors were irradiated with >20 Gy to the CBS. The median follow-up period was 18.2 months (range, 6.0-80.5 months). In the dose length analysis, 39, 34, 14, and 2 patients were irradiated with >20 Gy, >30 Gy, >40 Gy, and >50 Gy, respectively, to >1 cm of the biliary tract. Seven patients were irradiated with >20 Gy to >20% of the gallbladder. Only 2 patients experienced asymptomatic bile duct stenosis. One patient, metachronously treated twice with SBRT for tumors adjacent to each other, had a transient increase in hepatic and biliary enzymes 12 months after the second treatment. The high-dose area >80 Gy corresponded to the biliary stenosis region. The other patient experienced biliary stenosis 5 months after SBRT and had no laboratory changes. The biliary tract irradiated with >20 Gy was 7 mm and did not correspond to the bile duct stenosis region. No obstructive jaundice or biliary infection was found in any patient. Conclusions: SBRT for liver tumors adjacent to the CBS was feasible with minimal biliary toxicity. Only 1 patient had exceptional radiation-induced bile duct stenosis. For liver tumors adjacent to the CBS without other effective treatment options, SBRT at a dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions is a safe treatment with regard to biliary toxicity.

  11. In vitro biliary clearance of angiotensin II receptor blockers and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes: comparison with in vivo biliary clearance.

    PubMed

    Abe, Koji; Bridges, Arlene S; Yue, Wei; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2008-09-01

    Previous reports have indicated that in vitro biliary clearance (Cl(biliary)) determined in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes correlates well with in vivo Cl(biliary) for limited sets of compounds. This study was designed to estimate the in vitro Cl(biliary) in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRHs) of angiotensin II receptor blockers and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that undergo limited metabolism, to compare the estimated Cl(biliary) values with published in vivo Cl(biliary) data in rats, and to characterize the mechanism(s) of basolateral uptake and canalicular excretion of these drugs in rats. The average biliary excretion index (BEI) and in vitro Cl(biliary) values of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and pitavastatin were 15, 19, 43, 45, and 20%, respectively, and 1.7, 3.2, 4.4, 46.1, and 34.6 ml/min/kg, respectively. Cl(biliary) predicted from SCRHs, accounting for plasma unbound fraction, correlated with reported in vivo Cl(biliary) for these drugs. The rank order of Cl(biliary) values predicted from SCRHs was consistent with in vivo Cl(biliary) values. Bromosulfophthalein inhibited the uptake of all drugs. BEI and Cl(biliary) values of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin, known multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp) 2 substrates, were reduced in SCRHs from Mrp2-deficient (TR(-)) compared with wild-type (WT) rats. Although Mrp2 plays a minor role in pitavastatin biliary excretion, pitavastatin BEI and Cl(biliary) were reduced in TR(-) compared with WT SCRHs; Bcrp expression in SCRHs from TR(-) rats was decreased. In conclusion, in vitro Cl(biliary) determined in SCRHs can be used to estimate and compare in vivo Cl(biliary) of compounds in rats and to characterize transport proteins responsible for their hepatic uptake and excretion. PMID:18574002

  12. Biliary lipids support serum-free growth of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed Central

    Gillin, F D; Gault, M J; Hofmann, A F; Gurantz, D; Sauch, J F

    1986-01-01

    Giardia lamblia has been grown in vitro only in media containing serum or serum fractions. How this pathogen can grow in the human small intestinal lumen without serum is not known. We found that samples of human hepatic or gall bladder bile maintained G. lamblia survival for 24 to 48 h in medium without serum but did not support growth. By contrast, an artificial biliary lipid dispersion containing six bile salts, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and cholesterol, in the ratios characteristic of human bile, supported parasite growth in medium without serum or serum fractions. To define the requirements, we showed that 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-PC or 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PC (which predominate in human bile) satisfied the requirement for PC. Moreover, either glycocholate or glycodeoxycholate could be substituted for the bile salt mixture. The finding that biliary lipids can support serum-free growth of G. lamblia may help explain why this parasite colonizes the upper small intestine. PMID:3744557

  13. Post-biliary sphincterotomy bleeding despite covered metallic stent deployment

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Gianfranco; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Dhumane, Parag; Tuszynski, Thierry; Vergeau, Bertrand Marie; Meduri, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Several endoscopic techniques have been proposed for the management of post-sphincterotomy bleeding. Lately, self-expandable metal stents deployment has gained popularity especially as a rescue therapy when other endoscopic techniques fail. Methods-results: We report the case report of a massive post-sphincterotomy bleeding in a patient with a self-expandable metal stent in the biliary tree. Despite the presence of a correctly positioned self-expandable metal stent, a new endoscopic session was required to control the bleeding. Conclusions: Self-expandable metal stent may be useful to manage post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. However, up to now there is no specifically designed self-expandable metal stent for such complication. Large new designed self-expandable metal stent may be a useful tool for biliary endoscopist. PMID:27489716

  14. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Is a Generalized Autoimmune Epithelitis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Bingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic progressive autoimmune cholestatic liver disease characterized by highly specific antimitochondrial antibodies (AMAs) and the specific immune-mediated injury of small intrahepatic bile ducts. Unique apoptotic feature of biliary epithelial cells (BECs) may contribute to apotope presentation to the immune system, causing unique tissue damage in PBC. Perpetuation of inflammation may result in senescence of BECs, contributing to irreversible loss of bile duct. In addition to the classic liver manifestations, focal inflammation and tissue damage are also seen in salivary glands and urinary tract in a significant proportion of PBC patients. These findings provide potent support to the idea that molecular mimicry may be involved in the breakdown of autoimmune tolerance and mucosal immunity may lead to a systematic epithelitis in PBC patients. Thus, PBC is considered a generalized epithelitis in clinical practice. PMID:25803105

  15. Reliability of pre- and intraoperative tests for biliary lithiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Escallon, A. Jr.; Rosales, W.; Aldrete, J.S.

    1985-05-01

    The records of 242 patients, operated consecutively for biliary lithiasis, were analyzed to determine the reliability of oral cholecystography (OCG), ultrasonography (US), and HIDA in detecting biliary calculi. Preoperative interpretations were correlated to operative findings. OCG obtained in 138 patients was accurate in 92%. US obtained in 150 was correct in 89%. The accuracy of HIDA was 92% in acute and 78% in chronic cholecystitis. Intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) done in 173 patients indicated the need for exploratory choledochotomy in 24; 21 had choledocholithiasis. These observations suggest that OCG and US are very accurate, but not infallible, in detecting cholelithiasis. US should be done first; when doubt persists, the addition of OCG allows the preoperative diagnosis of gallstones in 97% of the cases. HIDA is highly accurate but not infallible in detecting acute calculous cholecystitis. IOC is very reliable in detecting choledocholithiasis; thus, its routine is justifiable.

  16. Ultrasound of Biliary Cast Syndrome and Its Mimics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Horrow, Mindy M

    2016-09-01

    Biliary cast syndrome (BCS) consists of mass-like hardened collections of inspissated bile and sloughed biliary mucosa filling the intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic bile ducts, which show an alternating pattern of dilatation and stricture. It is a rare but serious complication of liver transplantation frequently necessitating repeated percutaneous, endoscopic or surgical stent placements, and cast retrieval. Although not typically considered as the modality of choice for BCS compared with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, ultrasound can be quite useful for this diagnosis. This article reviews the sonographic appearance of BCS in postliver transplant patients and correlates with other imaging modalities including computed tomography, MRCP, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Also reviewed are other intrahepatic pathologies that mimic the appearance of BCS on ultrasound. PMID:26561220

  17. Reliability of pre- and intraoperative tests for biliary lithiasis.

    PubMed

    Escallon, A; Rosales, W; Aldrete, J S

    1985-05-01

    The records of 242 patients, operated consecutively for biliary lithiasis, were analyzed to determine the reliability of oral cholecystography (OCG), ultrasonography (US), and HIDA in detecting biliary calculi. Preoperative interpretations were correlated to operative findings. OCG obtained in 138 patients was accurate in 92%. US obtained in 150 was correct in 89%. The accuracy of HIDA was 92% in acute and 78% in chronic cholecystitis. Intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) done in 173 patients indicated the need for exploratory choledochotomy in 24; 21 had choledocholithiasis. These observations suggest that OCG and US are very accurate, but not infallible, in detecting cholelithiasis. US should be done first; when doubt persists, the addition of OCG allows the preoperative diagnosis of gallstones in 97% of the cases. HIDA is highly accurate but not infallible in detecting acute calculous cholecystitis. IOC is very reliable in detecting choledocholithiasis; thus, its routine is justifiable. PMID:3888131

  18. Laparoscopic T-Tube Choledochotomy for Biliary Lithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Alejandro Weber; López Acosta, María Elena

    2008-01-01

    T-tube choledochotomy has been an established practice in common bile duct exploration for many years. Although bile leaks, biliary peritonitis, and long-term postoperative strictures have been reported and are directly associated with the placement or removal of the T-tube, the severity of these complications may often be underestimated by surgeons. We present the case of a 31-year-old male patient who developed biliary peritonitis and septic shock after removal of a T-tube and illustrate one of the catastrophic events that may follow such procedures. Literature shows that these complications may occur more frequently and have higher morbidity and mortality than other less invasive procedures. This article reviews the advances in laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques, which provide alternative therapeutic approaches to choledocholithiasis and allow the surgeon to avoid having to perform a choledochotomy with T-tube drainage. PMID:18765064

  19. Spontaneous Biliary Perforations: An Uncommon yet Important Entity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Prabudh; Jain, Vishesh; Manchanda, Vivek; Sengar, Mamta; Gupta, Chhabi Ranu; Mohta, Anup

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous or idiopathic biliary perforations are an infrequently encountered but an important cause of surgical jaundice in paediatric patients and one of the most common causes of surgical jaundice in infancy. A pre-operative diagnosis with a clinical history and physical findings may not be possible in most of the cases. The exact cause of the perforation remains unclear and the diagnosis is made at the time of laparotomy for an acute abdomen. An early, efficient and an effective surgical management is associated with a good prognosis; however, a delay in the correct diagnosis or an inappropriate management may result in bacterial contamination of the biliary ascites, with an unfavourable outcome. The relative rarity of this condition is reflected by the very few case reports, limited case studies and scarcity of published literature. PMID:23905142

  20. Improved biliary detection and diagnosis through intelligent machine analysis.

    PubMed

    Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports on work undertaken to improve automated detection of bile ducts in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) images, with the objective of conducting preliminary classification of the images for diagnosis. The proposed I-BDeDIMA (Improved Biliary Detection and Diagnosis through Intelligent Machine Analysis) scheme is a multi-stage framework consisting of successive phases of image normalization, denoising, structure identification, object labeling, feature selection and disease classification. A combination of multiresolution wavelet, dynamic intensity thresholding, segment-based region growing, region elimination, statistical analysis and neural networks, is used in this framework to achieve good structure detection and preliminary diagnosis. Tests conducted on over 200 clinical images with known diagnosis have shown promising results of over 90% accuracy. The scheme outperforms related work in the literature, making it a viable framework for computer-aided diagnosis of biliary diseases. PMID:21194781

  1. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  2. [Acute pancreas necrosis with biliary peritonitis in cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Zoldos, L; Hincová, M

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a hemorrhagic pancreatitis with non-perforating biliary peritonitis. The abdomen symptomatology was hidden by the beginning contractions and due to the dystocia the delivery was finished by caesarean section. The presence of choleperitoneum required a surgical revision of the abdominal cavity which enabled to make the right diagnosis. This thesis deals with aetiology and mechanism of choleperitoneum inception during hemorrhagic pancreatitis. PMID:3788337

  3. Transjugular Insertion of Biliary Stents (TIBS) in Two Patients with Malignant Obstruction, Ascites, and Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Amygdalos, Michael A.; Haskal, Ziv J.; Cope, Constantin; Kadish, Steven L.; Long, William B.

    1996-03-15

    Two patients with pancreatic malignancies presented with biliary obstruction which could not be treated from an endoscopic approach. Standard transhepatic biliary drainage was relatively contraindicated because of moderate ascites and coagulopathy related to underlying liver disease. In one patient, a transjugular, transvenous approach was used to deliver a Wallstent endoprosthesis across the distal common bile duct obstruction in a single step procedure. In the second case, a previously placed biliary Wallstent was revised with an additional stent from a similar approach. Transjugular biliary catheterization offers a valuable alternative approach for primary stent placement or revision in patients with contraindication to standard transhepatic drainage.

  4. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  5. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-08-14

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  6. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  7. Descending pain modulation and chronification of pain

    PubMed Central

    Ossipov, Michael H.; Morimura, Kozo; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic pain is an important public health problem that negatively impacts quality of life of affected individuals and exacts an enormous socio-economic cost. Currently available therapeutics provide inadequate management of pain in many patients. Acute pain states generally resolve in most patients. However, for reasons that are poorly understood, in some individuals, acute pain can transform to a chronic state. Our understanding of the risk factors that underlie the development of chronic pain is limited. Recent studies have suggested an important contribution of dysfunction in descending pain modulatory circuits to pain ‘chronification’. Human studies provide insights into possible endogenous and exogenous factors that may promote the conversion of pain into a chronic condition. Recent findings Descending pain modulatory systems have been studied and characterized in animal models. Human brain imaging techniques, deep brain stimulation and the mechanisms of action of drugs that are effective in the treatment of pain confirm the clinical relevance of top-down pain modulatory circuits. Growing evidence supports the concept that chronic pain is associated with a dysregulation in descending pain modulation. Disruption of the balance of descending modulatory circuits to favour facilitation may promote and maintain chronic pain. Recent findings suggest that diminished descending inhibition is likely to be an important element in determining whether pain may become chronic. This view is consistent with the clinical success of drugs that enhance spinal noradrenergic activity, such as serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), in the treatment of chronic pain states. Consistent with this concept, a robust descending inhibitory system may be normally engaged to protect against the development of chronic pain. Imaging studies show that higher cortical and subcortical centres that govern emotional, motivational and cognitive processes

  8. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resected Extrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) for patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer treated with curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 168 patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer undergoing curative resection between August 2001 and April 2009. Of the 168 patients, 115 received adjuvant CRT (CRT group) and 53 did not (no-CRT group). Gender, age, tumor size, histologic differentiation, pre- and postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level, resection margin, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, T stage, N stage, overall stage, and the use of adjuvant CRT were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors associated with LRC, DFS, and OS. Results: For all patients, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rate was 54.8%, 30.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rates in the CRT group were significantly better than those in the no-CRT group (58.5% vs. 44.4%, p = .007; 32.1% vs. 26.1%, p = .041; 36.5% vs. 28.2%, p = .049, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant CRT was a significant independent prognostic factor for LRC, DFS, and OS (p < .05). Conclusion: Our results have suggested that adjuvant CRT helps achieve LRC and, consequently, improves DFS and OS in patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer.

  9. Current status of peroral cholangioscopy in biliary tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ghersi, Stefania; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Bassi, Marco; Fabbri, Carlo; Cennamo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Peroral cholangioscopy (POC) is an important tool for the management of a selected group of biliary diseases. Because of its direct visualization, POC allows targeted diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. POC can be performed using a dedicated cholangioscope that is advanced through the accessory channel of a duodenoscope or via the insertion of a small-diameter endoscope directly into the bile duct. POC was first described in the 1970s, but the use of earlier generation devices was substantially limited by the cumbersome equipment setup and high repair costs. For nearly ten years, several technical improvements, including the single-operator system, high-quality images, the development of dedicated accessories and the increased size of the working channel, have led to increased diagnostic accuracy, thus assisting in the differentiation of benign and malignant intraductal lesions, targeting biopsies and the precise delineation of intraductal tumor spread before surgery. Furthermore, lithotripsy of difficult bile duct stones, ablative therapies for biliary malignancies and direct biliary drainage can be performed under POC control. Recent developments of new types of conventional POCs allow feasible, safe and effective procedures at reasonable costs. In the current review, we provide an updated overview of POC, focusing our attention on the main current clinical applications and on areas for future research. PMID:25992189

  10. Pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis: A unifying model

    PubMed Central

    Kouroumalis, Elias; Notas, George

    2006-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a disease of unknown etiology leading to progressive destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts and eventually to liver cirrhosis and failure. It is characterised by female predominance and serum auto-antibodies to mitochondrial antigens targeting the E2 components of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex. Although they are associated with disease pathogenesis, no concrete evidence has been presented so far. Epidemiological data indicate that a geographical clustering of cases and possible environmental factors are implicated in pathogenesis. A number of genetic factors play a role in determining disease susceptibility or progression, although no definitive conclusion has been reached so far. A key factor to immune pathogenesis is considered to be the breakdown of immune tolerance, either through molecular mimicry or through the so called determinant density model. In this review, the available data regarding the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis are described and discussed. A new unifying hypothesis based on early endothelin overproduction in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is presented and discussed. PMID:16688819

  11. Radiation Therapy for Primary Carcinoma of the Extrahepatic Biliary System

    PubMed Central

    Flickinger, John C.; Epstein, Alan H.; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Carr, Brian I.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    From 1976 to 1988, 63 patients received radiation therapy for primary cancers of the extrahepatic biliary system (eight gallbladder and 55 extrahepatic biliary duct). Twelve patients underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. Chemotherapy was administered to 13 patients. Three patients underwent intraluminal brachytherapy alone (range, 28 to 55 Gy). Sixty patients received megavoltage external-beam radiation therapy (range, 5.4 to 61.6 Gy; median, 45 Gy), of whom nine received additional intraluminal brachytherapy (range, 14 to 45 Gy; median, 30 Gy). The median survival of all patients was 7 months. Sixty patients died, all within 39 months of radiation therapy. One patient is alive 11 months after irradiation without surgical resection, and two are alive 50 months after liver transplantation and irradiation. Symptomatic duodenal ulcers developed after radiation therapy in seven patients but were not significantly related to any clinical variable tested. Extrahepatic biliary duct cancers, the absence of metastases, increasing calendar year of treatment, and liver transplantation with postoperative radiation therapy were factors significantly associated with improved survival. PMID:2070327

  12. Scintiscanning in the evaluation of biliary enteric anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Tidmore, H; Ram, M D

    1985-03-01

    The evaluation of symptomatic patients who have undergone biliary enteric anastomoses, particularly when the diversion was into the jejunum, is difficult. Conventional techniques for evaluation, such as oral cholecystography (OCG), intravenous cholangiography (IVC), ultrasonography (US), computer-assisted tomography scanning (CT scanning), or endoscopy are not adequate to provide definitive information on the patency of the anastomoses. Hepatobiliary scintiscanning using 99mTc-HIDA and BIDA (iminodiacetic acid derivatives) was performed on 12 patients. The patients were from 11 to 72 years of age and included ten men and two women. The scan results were correlated with US, CT scan, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), operative findings, and final diagnosis. Scanning was highly accurate in this group and could be performed successfully even in jaundiced patients (total serum bilirubin level up to 20.0 mg/dl). In patients in whom dilated bile ducts were demonstrated (by US, CT scan, or scintiscan), only the scintiscan revealed the true patency of the anastomoses. The advantages of the technique are that it is simple and noninvasive. Delayed transit of bile (scanning agent) to bowel is a very reliable indication of partial or complete obstruction. Scintiscanning is the only technique that demonstrated the functional state of biliary secretion and excretion into bowel in patients with previous biliary enteric anastomoses. PMID:3883866

  13. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  14. Pathogenesis of biliary atresia: defining biology to understand clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Akihiro; Miethke, Alexander; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a severe cholangiopathy of early infancy that destroys extrahepatic bile ducts and disrupts bile flow. With a poorly defined disease pathogenesis, treatment consists of the surgical removal of duct remnants followed by hepatoportoenterostomy. Although this approach can improve the short-term outcome, the liver disease progresses to end-stage cirrhosis in most children. Further improvement in outcome will require a greater understanding of the mechanisms of biliary injury and fibrosis. Here, we review progress in the field, which has been fuelled by collaborative studies in larger patient cohorts and the development of cell culture and animal model systems to directly test hypotheses. Advances include the identification of phenotypic subgroups and stages of disease based on clinical, pathological and molecular features. Stronger evidence exists for viruses, toxins and gene sequence variations in the aetiology of biliary atresia, triggering a proinflammatory response that injures the duct epithelium and produces a rapidly progressive cholangiopathy. The immune response also activates the expression of type 2 cytokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production by nonparenchymal cells. These advances provide insight into phenotype variability and might be relevant to the design of personalized trials to block progression of liver disease. PMID:26008129

  15. Species differences in biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, E.H.; Bevan, D.R.

    1986-05-01

    Biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) was investigated in rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs following intratracheal administration. (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P, in amounts of approximately 150 ng or 350 ..mu..g, was instilled into lungs and amounts of radioactivity excreted in bile were monitored for six hrs following administration. Differences in biliary excretion of (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P and/or metabolites among species were observed at low doses but not at high doses. Six hours after instillation of a low dose of B(a)P, 70, 54, and 62% of the dose was excreted in bile of rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs, respectively. Upon administration of the higher dose of B(a)P, approximately 50% of the dose was excreted in bile in six hrs by all species. Thus, rats and guinea pigs exhibit differences in biliary excretion of low and high doses of B(a)P whereas hamsters do not. Profiles of phase II metabolites in rats and hamsters were similar at both low and high doses, with the majority of metabolites being glucuronides and thioether conjugates. However, differences in relative amounts of these conjugates were observed between the two doses, with a shift towards a greater proportion of glucuronides at the higher dose. Metabolites in bile from guinea pigs were primarily thioether conjugates, which accounted for 88% of metabolites at the low dose and 95% at the high dose.

  16. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low Back Pain Overview What is low back pain? Low back pain is a common problem for many people. It can be caused by many ... lift and exercise correctly. Symptoms When is low back pain serious? Call your family doctor if: Pain goes ...

  17. Regional soft tissue pains: alias myofascial pain?

    PubMed

    Tunks, E; Crook, J

    1999-06-01

    This chapter deals with four main questions: what is the evidence that 'myofascial pain' syndromes exist?; what is the evidence that the myofascial pain concept is clinically useful?; what is the evidence that managing patients in terms of the myofascial pain diagnosis confers benefits?; and what is the evidence-based management of myofascial pain? The purpose of a diagnosis is to provide boundaries around subgroups of illness in a population since each subgroup presumably has a different mechanism, natural history, prognosis, course and response to treatment. The current literature is divided in its conceptual approach to the problem of regional musculoskeletal pain. Some authors regard myofascial pain as being distinct from regional musculoskeletal pain while others regard these as synonymous. A postulated theory of the pathophysiology of myofascial pain is discussed. This contrasts with a view that regional myofascial pain represents a non-specific localized pain arising from multiple regional, systemic and psychosocial factors. In order to consider myofascial pain as a distinct diagnosis, it would be necessary to resolve reliability issues in the identification of its critical diagnostic features. Beyond reliability issues, there are also problems of sensitivity and specificity--i.e. of the patient population that it identifies--which must be resolved if controlled trials are to be conducted. The clinical usefulness of the myofascial pain diagnosis is considered with regard to what is believed about the course of healing, the determinants of disability, the course of regional versus widespread musculoskeletal pain, the relationship of musculoskeletal injury to pain, and the evidence-based management of musculoskeletal pain. An epidemiological perspective is proposed with regard to regional musculoskeletal pain. This allows for the identification of operationally defined strata of regional musculoskeletal pain and permits studies in course, prognosis and

  18. Conservative management of cholestasis with and without fever in acute biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, José Sebastião; Kemp, Rafael; Ardengh, José Celso; Jr, Jorge Elias

    2012-01-01

    The presence of cholestasis in both mild and severe forms of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) does not justify, of itself, early endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) or endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES). Clinical support treatment of acute pancreatitis for one to two weeks is usually accompanied by regression of pancreatic edema, of cholestasis and by stone migration to the duodenum in 60%-88% of cases. On the other hand, in cases with both cholestasis and fever, a condition usually characterized as ABP associated with cholangitis, early ES is normally indicated. However, in daily clinical practice, it is practically impossible to guarantee the coexistence of cholangitis and mild or severe acute pancreatitis. Pain, fever and cholestasis, as well as mental confusion and hypotension, may be attributed to inflammatory and necrotic events related to ABP. Under these circumstances, evaluation of the bile duct by endo-ultrasonography (EUS) or magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) before performing ERC and ES seems reasonable. Thus, it is necessary to assess the effects of the association between early and opportune access to the treatment of local and systemic inflammatory/infectious effects of ABP with cholestasis and fever, and to characterize the possible scenarios and the subsequent approaches to the common bile duct, directed by less invasive examinations such as MRC or EUS. PMID:22530079

  19. Incipient primary biliary cirrhosis/autoimmune hepatitis overlap or hepatitic form of primary biliary cirrhosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Minz, Ranjana W; Chhabra, Seema; Aggarwal, Ritu; Das, Ashim; Saikia, Biman; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2009-01-01

    A 42 year old asymptomatic female detected as incipient Primary Biliary Cirrhosis/Autoimmune Hepatitis overlap during routine checkup. The biochemical profile showed evolution from a mildly deranged liver function test in 2004 along with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate to a 4 times elevation of alkaline phosphatase in 2006 with mildly deranged alanine transaminase. Autoimmune markers demonstrable were Anti mitochondrial antibody M(2) and sp100. Histopathology showed dual features, dominant findings were of autoimmune heptatitis. Features consistent with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis were minimal with an occasional portal tract showing paucity of bile ducts and occasional bile duct proliferation. Human leucocyte antigen DR/DQ genotype was as follows: DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DQB1*02, DQB1*04. PMID:19829977

  20. Incipient primary biliary cirrhosis/autoimmune hepatitis overlap or hepatitic form of primary biliary cirrhosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Minz, Ranjana W; Aggarwal, Ritu; Das, Ashim; Saikia, Biman; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2009-01-01

    A 42 year old asymptomatic female detected as incipient Primary Biliary Cirrhosis/Autoimmune Hepatitis overlap during routine checkup. The biochemical profile showed evolution from a mildly deranged liver function test in 2004 along with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate to a 4 times elevation of alkaline phosphatase in 2006 with mildly deranged alanine transaminase. Autoimmune markers demonstrable were Anti mitochondrial antibody M2 and sp100. Histopathology showed dual features, dominant findings were of autoimmune heptatitis. Features consistent with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis were minimal with an occasional portal tract showing paucity of bile ducts and occasional bile duct proliferation. Human leucocyte antigen DR/DQ genotype was as follows: DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DQB1*02, DQB1*04. PMID:19829977

  1. Concurrent biliary drainage and portal vein embolization in preparation for extended hepatectomy in patients with biliary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Jan; Eriksson, Sam; Nørgaard Larsen, Peter; Keussen, Inger; Christiansen Frevert, Susanne; Lindell, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with perihilar cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer extending into the hilum often present with jaundice and a small future liver remnant (FLR). If resectable, preoperative biliary drainage and portal vein embolization (PVE) are indicated. Classically, these measures have been performed sequentially, separated by 4–6 weeks. Purpose To report on a new regime where percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and PVE are performed simultaneously, shortening the preoperative process. Material and Methods Six patients were treated with concurrent PTBD and PVE under general anesthesia. Results Surgical exploration followed the combined procedure after 35 days (range, 28–51 days). The FLR ratio increased from 22% to 32%. Three patients developed cholangitis after the procedure. Conclusion The combined approach of PTBD and PVE seems feasible, but more studies on morbidity are warranted. PMID:25992300

  2. Biliary bile acids in primary biliary cirrhosis: effect of ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Combes, B; Carithers, R L; Maddrey, W C; Munoz, S; Garcia-Tsao, G; Bonner, G F; Boyer, J L; Luketic, V A; Shiffman, M L; Peters, M G; White, H; Zetterman, R K; Risser, R; Rossi, S S; Hofmann, A F

    1999-06-01

    Bile acid composition in fasting duodenal bile was assessed at entry and at 2 years in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) (10-12 mg/kg/d) taken as a single bedtime dose. Specimens were analyzed by a high-pressure liquid chromatography method that had been validated against gas chromatography. Percent composition in bile (mean +/- SD) for 98 patients at entry for cholic (CA), chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), deoxycholic (DCA), lithocholic (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) acids, respectively, were 57.4 +/- 18.6, 31.5 +/- 15.5, 8.0 +/- 9.3, 0.3 +/- 1.0, and 0.6 +/- 0.9. Values for CA were increased, whereas those for CDCA, DCA, LCA, and UDCA were decreased when compared with values in normal persons. Bile acid composition of the major bile acids did not change after 2 years on placebo medication. By contrast, in patients receiving UDCA for 2 years, bile became enriched with UDCA on average to 40.1%, and significant decreases were noted for CA (to 32.2%) and CDCA (to 19.5%). No change in percent composition was observed for DCA and LCA. Percent composition at entry and changes in composition after 2 years on UDCA were similar in patients with varying severity of PBC. In patients whose bile was not enriched in UDCA (entry and placebo-treated specimens), CA, CDCA, DCA, and the small amount of UDCA found in some of these specimens were conjugated to a greater extent with glycine (52%-64%) than with taurine (36%-48%). Treatment with UDCA caused the proportion of all endogenous bile acids conjugated with glycine to increase to 69% to 78%, while the proportion conjugated with taurine (22%-31%) fell (P <.05). Administered UDCA was also conjugated predominantly with glycine (87%). PMID:10347103

  3. Mononuclear cell complement receptor blockade in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aghbar, M N; Neuberger, J; Williams, R; Eddleston, A L

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood monocyte and lymphocyte receptors for Fc and C3b fragments were examined in vitro in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases using sheep red blood cells coated with anti-SRBC IgG1 (to detect Fc receptors) and with anti-SRBC IgM and complement (to detect C3b receptors). The number of C3b receptors detected on 100 monocytes was significantly lower in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (23.0 +/- 12.0, mean +/- 1 SD) compared with normal controls (57.4 +/- 16.9) and other chronic liver disease (HBsAg negative chronic active hepatitis 62.0 +/- 17.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 50.9 +/- 4.0), while the number of Fc receptors detected on 100 monocytes was not significantly different in all the groups (primary biliary cirrhosis 72.8 +/- 28.6, chronic active hepatitis 74.7 +/- 14.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 58.0 +/- 13.5 and normal controls 69.6 +/- 19.9). When mononuclear cells isolated from normal individuals were pre-incubated with serum from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis before testing their receptor function there was a significant reduction in the number of C3b receptors detected per 100 monocytes (27.6 +/- 10.8) compared with pre-incubation with normal serum (72.0 +/- 18.0). This reduction in C3b-receptor function was again observed when the serum used for pre-incubation was depleted of circulating immune complexes; but when complement was further depleted from these sera, the number of C3b-receptors detected after pre-incubation was similar to normal values (64.0 +/- 11.8). Lymphocyte receptors showed a similar pattern of results. This implies a specific C3b receptor blockade on monocytes and lymphocytes from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis which appears to be because of blocking by serum factor(s) including complement fragments. PMID:3155513

  4. What Is Back Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain PDF Version Size: 127 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 12.5 MB November 2014 What Is Back Pain? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  5. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerable bursts of sharp pain similar to the pain caused by a dental probe on an exposed nerve. Individuals may have numbness in the areas affected by the pain. The burning and loss of touch sensations are ...

  6. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... focuses on their pain as well as their perception of its severity. Pain that becomes chronic also ... that stimulating the nervous system can modify the perception of pain. Early studies of TENS suggested that ...

  7. Pain: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... illness, our very lives. Pain is a complex perception that differs enormously among individual patients, even those ... that the two peptides are involved in the perception of pain sensations, especially moderate-to-severe pain. ...

  8. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that can affect any area of the ... Bailey A, Audette JF. Complex regional pain syndrome. In: Frontera ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  9. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with your back pain. OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS Over-the-counter means you can buy them ... and tell your provider. If you are taking pain relievers for more than a week, tell your provider. ...

  10. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and end of life care. Nurs Clin North Am . 2010;45:271-327. Mercadente S. Challenging pain problems. In: ...

  11. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    Painkillers; Drugs for pain; Analgesics; Opioids ... Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are used only for pain that is severe and is not helped by other types of painkillers. When used ...

  12. Leakage tests reduce the frequency of biliary fistulas following hydatid liver cyst surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Aydin, Cemalettin; Olmez, Aydemir; Isik, Sevil; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Biliary fistulas are the most common morbidity (8.2-26%) following hydatid liver surgery. The aim of our study was to reduce the incidence of postoperative biliary fistulas after the suturing of cystobiliary communications by applying a bile leakage test. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 133 hydatid liver cysts from 93 patients were divided into two groups, according to whether the test was performed. Tests were performed on 56 cysts from 34 patients, and the remaining 77 cysts from 59 patients were treated without the test. In both groups, all visible biliary orifices in the cysts were suture ligated, and drains were placed in all cysts. The visibility of the biliary orifices and postoperative biliary drainage through the drains were recorded. Patients in both groups were also compared with respect to the number of days living with the drains, the length of the hospital stay, and secondary interventions related to biliary complications. RESULTS: Biliary orifices were more visible in the tested cysts (13% vs. 48%; P <0.001). Fewer biliary complications occurred in the tested patients (8.8% vs. 27.7%, P = 0.033). The mean drain removal time (4.1±3.3 days vs. 6.8±8.9 days, P<0.05) and the length of the hospital stay (6.7±2.7 days vs. 9.7±6.3 days, P<0.01) were shorter for the tested patients. None of the patients in the test group required postoperative Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) or nasobiliary drainage (0.0% vs. 8.4%, P  =  0.09). There were no long-term biliary complications for either group after three years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of biliary orifices with a bile leakage test and the suturing of cystobiliary communications significantly reduced postoperative biliary complications following hydatid liver surgery. PMID:21552666

  13. Regulation of biliary cholesterol secretion in the rat. Role of hepatic cholesterol esterification.

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, F; Bronfman, M; Allalón, W; Depiereux, E; Del Pozo, R

    1984-01-01

    Although the significance of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in the solubilization and biliary excretion of cholesterol is well established, little is known about the intrahepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol output. Studies were undertaken to elucidate some of these determinants in the rat. Feeding 1% diosgenin for 1 wk increased biliary cholesterol output and saturation by 400%. Bile flow, biliary bile salt, phospholipid and protein outputs remained in the normal range. When ethynyl estradiol (EE) was injected into these animals, biliary cholesterol output decreased to almost normal levels under circumstances of minor changes in the rates of biliary bile salt and phospholipid outputs. Similarly, when chylomicron cholesterol was intravenously injected into diosgenin-fed animals, biliary cholesterol output significantly decreased as a function of the dose of chylomicron cholesterol administered. Relative rates of hepatic cholesterol synthesis and esterification were measured in isolated hepatocytes. Although hepatic cholesterogenesis increased 300% in diosgenin-fed animals, the contribution of newly synthesized cholesterol to total biliary cholesterol output was only 19 +/- 9%, compared with 12 +/- 6% in control and 15 +/- 5% in diosgenin-fed and EE-injected rats. The rate of oleate incorporation into hepatocytic cholesterol esters was 30% inhibited in diosgenin-fed rats. When EE was injected into these animals, the rate of cholesterol esterification increased to almost 300%. To investigate further the interrelationship between hepatic cholesterol esterification and biliary cholesterol output, we studied 21 diosgenin-fed rats. Six of them received in addition EE and 10 received chylomicron cholesterol. The relationships between biliary cholesterol output as a function of both microsomal acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity and hepatic cholesterol ester concentration were significantly correlated in a reciprocal manner. From these

  14. 'Hip' pain.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Josef; Gursche, Angelika

    2003-02-01

    'Hip' pain is usually located in the groin, upper thigh or buttock and is a common complaint. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis, avascular femoral head necrosis and apophyseal avulsion are the most common diagnoses in childhood and adolescents. Strains and fractures are common in sport-active adults. Osteoarthritis occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Trauma may result in femoral head fracture or typical muscle and tendon sprains and bursitis. Septic or inflammatory arthritis can occur at every age. Septic arthritis, fractures and acute epiphyseal slipping are real emergency cases. Congenital dysplasia of the hip joint may lead to labral tears and early osteoarthritis. The most important hip problems in children, adolescents, adult and older people are discussed; these problems originate from intra-articular disorders and the surrounding extra-articular soft tissues. Medical history, clinical examination and additional tests, including imaging, will be demonstrated. Principles of treatment are given for specific disorders. PMID:12659822

  15. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  16. Orofacial pain: a primer.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S

    2013-07-01

    Orofacial pain refers to pain associated with the soft and hard tissues of the head, face, and neck. It is a common experience in the population that has profound sociologic effects and impact on quality of life. New scientific evidence is constantly providing insight into the cause and pathophysiology of orofacial pain including temporomandibular disorders, cranial neuralgias, persistent idiopathic facial pains, headache, and dental pain. An evidence-based approach to the management of orofacial pain is imperative for the general clinician. This article reviews the basics of pain epidemiology and neurophysiology and sets the stage for in-depth discussions of various painful conditions of the head and neck. PMID:23809298

  17. A novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles prolongs the unobstructed period and survival via anti-bacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fuchun; Ren, Zhigang; Chai, Qinming; Cui, Guangying; Jiang, Li; Chen, Hanjian; Feng, Zhiying; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Jian; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic biliary stricture causes life-threatening complications, such as jaundice, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) are gaining acceptance for treatments of benign biliary stricture and palliative management of malignant biliary obstructions. However, the high rate of FCSEMS obstruction limits their clinic use. In this study, we developed a novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and investigated its efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. We first identified properties of the AgNP complex using ultraviolet detection. The AgNP complex was stable without AgNP agglomeration, and Ag abundance was correspondingly increased with an increased bilayer number. The AgNP biliary stent demonstrated good performance in the spin-assembly method based on topographic observation. The AgNP biliary stent also exhibited a long-term anti-coagulation effect and a slow process of Ag+ release. In vitro anti-bacteria experiments indicated that the AgNP biliary stent exhibited high-efficiency anti-bacterial activity for both short- and long-term periods. Importantly, application of the AgNP biliary stent significantly prolonged the unobstructed period of the biliary system and improved survival in preclinical studies as a result of its anti-microbial activity and decreased granular tissue formation on the surface of the anastomotic biliary, providing a novel and effective treatment strategy for symptomatic biliary strictures. PMID:26883081

  18. A novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles prolongs the unobstructed period and survival via anti-bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuchun; Ren, Zhigang; Chai, Qinming; Cui, Guangying; Jiang, Li; Chen, Hanjian; Feng, Zhiying; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Jian; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic biliary stricture causes life-threatening complications, such as jaundice, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) are gaining acceptance for treatments of benign biliary stricture and palliative management of malignant biliary obstructions. However, the high rate of FCSEMS obstruction limits their clinic use. In this study, we developed a novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and investigated its efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. We first identified properties of the AgNP complex using ultraviolet detection. The AgNP complex was stable without AgNP agglomeration, and Ag abundance was correspondingly increased with an increased bilayer number. The AgNP biliary stent demonstrated good performance in the spin-assembly method based on topographic observation. The AgNP biliary stent also exhibited a long-term anti-coagulation effect and a slow process of Ag(+) release. In vitro anti-bacteria experiments indicated that the AgNP biliary stent exhibited high-efficiency anti-bacterial activity for both short- and long-term periods. Importantly, application of the AgNP biliary stent significantly prolonged the unobstructed period of the biliary system and improved survival in preclinical studies as a result of its anti-microbial activity and decreased granular tissue formation on the surface of the anastomotic biliary, providing a novel and effective treatment strategy for symptomatic biliary strictures. PMID:26883081

  19. A surprising cause of acute right upper quadrant pain

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Rodger Scott; Greenwood, Robert; Laczek, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    A 42 year-old African-American woman was admitted for severe acute right upper quadrant pain. Her liver function tests showed a cholestatic pattern of hepatitis. She had no known history of liver disease or sarcoidosis. Imaging of her liver and biliary tree did not reveal any apparent cause for her right upper quadrant pain. A liver biopsy was performed which showed granulomatous disease. This prompted a CT chest that showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the mediastinal lymphnode revealed non-caseating granulomas. Despite having no pulmonary symptoms or history of pulmonary sarcoidosis, she was diagnosed with systemic pulmonary sarcoidosis. She was treated with corticosteroids and had complete resolution of symptoms over the next several weeks. PMID:25103316

  20. Sonographic features of intestinal and biliary ascariasis in childhood: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Koumanidou, Chris; Manoli, Eleni; Anagnostara, Athina; Polyviou, Petros; Vakaki, Marina

    2004-12-01

    Despite the fact that Ascaris lumbricoides is one of the commonest intestinal infections in developing countries, there are very few reports in the literature about the sonographic findings of intestinal and biliary ascariasis in childhood. The clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures and imaging appearance of intestinal and biliary ascariasis in two patients are discussed with a brief review of the literature. PMID:15720890

  1. Prolonged exposure of cholestatic rats to complete dark inhibits biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuyan; Onori, Paolo; Meng, Fanyin; DeMorrow, Sharon; Venter, Julie; Francis, Heather; Franchitto, Antonio; Ray, Debolina; Kennedy, Lindsey; Greene, John; Renzi, Anastasia; Mancinelli, Romina; Gaudio, Eugenio; Glaser, Shannon; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2014-11-01

    Biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis are common features in cholestatic liver disease. Melatonin is synthesized by the pineal gland as well as the liver. Melatonin inhibits biliary hyperplasia of bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats. Since melatonin synthesis (by the enzyme serotonin N-acetyltransferase, AANAT) from the pineal gland increases after dark exposure, we hypothesized that biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis are diminished by continuous darkness via increased melatonin synthesis from the pineal gland. Normal or BDL rats (immediately after surgery) were housed with light-dark cycles or complete dark for 1 wk before evaluation of 1) the expression of AANAT in the pineal gland and melatonin levels in pineal gland tissue supernatants and serum; 2) biliary proliferation and intrahepatic bile duct mass, liver histology, and serum chemistry; 3) secretin-stimulated ductal secretion (functional index of biliary growth); 4) collagen deposition, liver fibrosis markers in liver sections, total liver, and cholangiocytes; and 5) expression of clock genes in cholangiocytes. In BDL rats exposed to dark there was 1) enhanced AANAT expression/melatonin secretion in pineal gland and melatonin serum levels; 2) improved liver morphology, serum chemistry and decreased biliary proliferation and secretin-stimulated choleresis; and 4) decreased fibrosis and expression of fibrosis markers in liver sections, total liver and cholangiocytes and reduced biliary expression of the clock genes PER1, BMAL1, CLOCK, and Cry1. Thus prolonged dark exposure may be a beneficial noninvasive therapeutic approach for the management of biliary disorders. PMID:25214401

  2. Congenital duplex gallbladder and biliary mucocele associated with partial hepatic cholestasis and cholelithiasis in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Katharine S.; Brisson, Brigitte A.; Defarges, Alice M.N.; Oblak, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    A 6-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was presented for acute onset of vomiting. Exploratory laparotomy identified a duplex gallbladder and left cholecystectomy was performed. Histopathology confirmed biliary mucocele and hepatic cholestasis. While rare, biliary mucoceles should be considered as a differential diagnosis for feline extrahepatic bile duct obstruction. PMID:22942442

  3. Interventional Endoscopy Database for Pancreatico-biliary, Gastrointestinal and Esophageal Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Ampullary Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Bile Duct Disorders; Gallstones; Obstructive Jaundice; Pancreatic Disorders (Noncancerous); Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Barrett's Esophagus; Gastric Malignancies; Pancreatic Cancer; Pediatric Gastroenterology; Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Pseudocysts; Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis; Recurrent Pancreatitis; Cholangitis; Bile Leak; Biliary Strictures; Pancreatic Divisum; Biliary and Pancreatic Stones; Choledocholithiasis

  4. Double Sigmoid colon perforation due to migration of a biliary stent.

    PubMed

    Malgras, B; Pierret, C; Tourtier, J-P; Olagui, G; Nizou, C; Duverger, V

    2011-10-01

    Migration of pancreatico-biliary stents is a rare event, usually benign, but which can lead to severe complications such as digestive tube perforation. We report the case of a patient with double sigmoid perforation due to distal migration of a biliary stent placed to decompress a pancreatic head carcinoma. PMID:22075561

  5. Endoscopic Extraction of Biliary Fascioliasis Diagnosed Using Intraductal Ultrasonography in a Patient with Acute Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji Su; Choi, Hyun Jong; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Yun Nah; Tae, Jae Woong; Choi, Moon Han; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection may result in biliary obstruction with or without cholangitis in the chronic biliary phase. Because clinical symptoms and signs of F. hepatica are similar to other biliary diseases that cause bile duct obstruction, such as stones or bile duct malignancies, that are, in fact, more common, this condition may not be suspected and diagnosis may be overlooked and delayed. Patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography for the evaluation of bile duct obstruction may be incidentally detected with the worm, and diagnosis can be confirmed by extraction of the leaf-like trematode from the bile duct. Intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) can provide high-resolution cross-sectional images of the bile duct, and is useful in evaluating indeterminate biliary diseases. We present a case of biliary fascioliasis that was diagnosed using IDUS and managed endoscopically in a patient with acute cholangitis. PMID:26668810

  6. Heterogeneity and stochastic growth regulation of biliary epithelial cells dictate dynamic epithelial tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kamimoto, Kenji; Kaneko, Kota; Kok, Cindy Yuet-Yin; Okada, Hajime; Miyajima, Atsushi; Itoh, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the intrahepatic biliary epithelial tissue plays key roles in liver regeneration, yet the cellular basis for this process remains unclear. We took an unbiased approach based on in vivo clonal labeling and tracking of biliary epithelial cells in the three-dimensional landscape, in combination with mathematical simulation, to understand their mode of proliferation in a mouse liver injury model where the nascent biliary structure formed in a tissue-intrinsic manner. An apparent heterogeneity among biliary epithelial cells was observed: whereas most of the responders that entered the cell cycle upon injury exhibited a limited and tapering growth potential, a select population continued to proliferate, making a major contribution in sustaining the biliary expansion. Our study has highlighted a unique mode of epithelial tissue dynamics, which depends not on a hierarchical system driven by fixated stem cells, but rather, on a stochastically maintained progenitor population with persistent proliferative activity. PMID:27431614

  7. Endoscopic Extraction of Biliary Fascioliasis Diagnosed Using Intraductal Ultrasonography in a Patient with Acute Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ji Su; Choi, Hyun Jong; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Yun Nah; Tae, Jae Woong; Choi, Moon Han; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection may result in biliary obstruction with or without cholangitis in the chronic biliary phase. Because clinical symptoms and signs of F. hepatica are similar to other biliary diseases that cause bile duct obstruction, such as stones or bile duct malignancies, that are, in fact, more common, this condition may not be suspected and diagnosis may be overlooked and delayed. Patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography for the evaluation of bile duct obstruction may be incidentally detected with the worm, and diagnosis can be confirmed by extraction of the leaf-like trematode from the bile duct. Intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) can provide high-resolution cross-sectional images of the bile duct, and is useful in evaluating indeterminate biliary diseases. We present a case of biliary fascioliasis that was diagnosed using IDUS and managed endoscopically in a patient with acute cholangitis. PMID:26668810

  8. Role of endoscopy in the conservative management of biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lisotti, Andrea; Fusaroli, Pietro; Caletti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients receiving liver transplantation could be significantly affected by biliary complications, including strictures, leaks, stones and bilomas; early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions lead to markedly reduction in morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic gold standard is represented by conservative approaches, both endoscopic and percutaneous, based on the type of biliary reconstruction, the local availability of the procedures and specific expertise. In patients with previous transplantation, the difficult biliary access and the possible presence of concomitant complications (mainly strictures) further restrict the efficacy of the endoscopic and percutaneous treatments; on the other hand, surgery should generally be avoided because of the even increased morbidity and mortality due to technical and clinical issues. Here we review the most common biliary complications occurring after liver transplantation and discuss available treatment options including future perspectives such as endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary access in patients with Roux-en-Y choledocho-jejunostomy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for difficult stones. PMID:26730271

  9. Current diagnosis and treatment of benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Inseok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Han, Sok Won

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) remain a significant biliary complication and play an important role in graft and patient survival. Benign biliary strictures after transplantation are classified into anastomotic or non-anastomotic strictures. These two types differ in presentation, outcome, and response to therapy. The leading causes of biliary strictures include impaired blood supply, technical errors during surgery, and biliary anomalies. Because patients usually have non-specific symptoms, a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Magnetic resonance cholangiography has gained widespread acceptance as a reliable noninvasive tool for detecting biliary complications. Endoscopy has played an increasingly prominent role in the diagnosis and treatment of biliary strictures after LDLT. Endoscopic management in LDLT recipients may be more challenging than in deceased donor liver transplantation patients because of the complex nature of the duct-to-duct reconstruction. Repeated aggressive endoscopic treatment with dilation and the placement of multiple plastic stents is considered the first-line treatment for biliary strictures. Percutaneous and surgical treatments are now reserved for patients for whom endoscopic management fails and for those with multiple, inaccessible intrahepatic strictures or Roux-en-Y anastomoses. Recent advances in enteroscopy enable treatment, even in these latter cases. Direct cholangioscopy, another advanced form of endoscopy, allows direct visualization of the inner wall of the biliary tree and is expected to facilitate stenting or stone extraction. Rendezvous techniques can be a good option when the endoscopic approach to the biliary stricture is unfeasible. These developments have resulted in almost all patients being managed by the endoscopic approach. PMID:26819525

  10. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy for acute neonatal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Helin, Radley; Bhat, Rama; Rao, Bhaskara

    2007-01-01

    Use of a percutaneously-inserted cholecystostomy drainage tube is an effective therapeutic option for acute hyperbilirubinemia in severely-ill adult patients, but to our knowledge has not been previously reported in infants. We describe an infant who developed acute extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction with marked conjugated (direct) hyperbilirubinemia, and who was determined to be an unsuitable surgical candidate. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy was performed and resulted in prompt, significant, and sustained decline in serum bilirubin levels. Potential risks and benefits, as well as suggested indications for the procedure are discussed. PMID:17568158

  11. Multidisciplinary approach to tumors of the pancreas and biliary tree.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kimberly M

    2009-02-01

    Tumors of the pancreas and biliary tree remain formidable challenges to patients and clinicians. These tumors elude early detection, rapidly spread locally and systemically, and frequently recur despite apparently complete resection. Cystic tumors of the pancreas, however, may represent a subset of patients who do not uniformly require aggressive resection, and a thoughtful, evidence-based approach to work-up allows for the rational application of surgical therapy. Increasing evidence supports treating patients who have pancreaticobiliary disease in a multidisciplinary setting. PMID:19186234

  12. Impacted and Fractured Biliary Basket: A Second Basket Rescue Technique.

    PubMed

    Benatta, Mohammed Amine; Desjeux, Ariane; Barthet, Marc; Grimaud, Jean Charles; Gasmi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman was treated with ERCP, ES, and biliary plastic stent, for large and multiple common bile duct stones. During a second ERCP basket extraction was impacted with a round entrapped stone. The basket handle was cut off; a metal sheath of extraendoscopic lithotriptor was advanced over the basket. The mechanical lithotripsy was complicated with basket traction wires fracturing, without breakage of the stone. A rescue standard basket was pushed until it caught the basket/stone complex. Using this method disengagement of the whole fractured basket/stone complex was achieved without need of surgery. It is the third case reported in the English literature. PMID:27293442

  13. Aetiology of biliary atresia: what is actually known?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease of unknown etiology and unpredictable outcome, even when there has been timely diagnosis and exemplary surgery. It has been the commonest indication for liver transplantation during childhood for the past 20 years. Hence much clinical and basic research has been directed at elucidating the origin and pathology of BA. This review summarizes the current clinical variations of BA in humans, its occasional appearance in animals and its various manifestations in the laboratory as an experimental model. PMID:23987231

  14. Impacted and Fractured Biliary Basket: A Second Basket Rescue Technique

    PubMed Central

    Benatta, Mohammed Amine; Desjeux, Ariane; Barthet, Marc; Grimaud, Jean Charles; Gasmi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman was treated with ERCP, ES, and biliary plastic stent, for large and multiple common bile duct stones. During a second ERCP basket extraction was impacted with a round entrapped stone. The basket handle was cut off; a metal sheath of extraendoscopic lithotriptor was advanced over the basket. The mechanical lithotripsy was complicated with basket traction wires fracturing, without breakage of the stone. A rescue standard basket was pushed until it caught the basket/stone complex. Using this method disengagement of the whole fractured basket/stone complex was achieved without need of surgery. It is the third case reported in the English literature. PMID:27293442

  15. A case of biliary stones and anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplant treated with the rendez - vous technique and electrokinetic lithotritor

    PubMed Central

    Pisa, Marta Di; Traina, Mario; Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Volpes, Riccardo; Piazza, Salvatore; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The paper studies the combined radiologic and endoscopic approach (rendez vous technique) to the treatment of the biliary complications following liver transplant. The “rendez-vous” technique was used with an electrokinetic lithotripter, in the treatment of a biliary anastomotic stricture with multiple biliary stones in a patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplant. In this patient, endoscopic or percutaneous transhepatic management of the biliary complication failed. The combined approach, percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic treatment (rendez-vous technique) with the use of an electrokinetic lithotritor, was used to solve the biliary stenosis and to remove the stones. Technical success, defined as disappearance of the biliary stenosis and stone removal, was obtained in just one session, which definitively solved the complications. The combined approach of percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic (rendez-vous technique) treatment, in association with an electrokinetic lithotritor, is a safe and feasible alternative treatment, especially after the failure of endoscopic and/or percutaneous trans-hepatic isolated procedures. PMID:18473423

  16. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Back pain often goes away on its own over several weeks. In some people, back pain persists. It may not go away completely or ... at times. Medicines can also help with your back pain. OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS Over-the-counter ...

  17. Thai perspectives on pain.

    PubMed

    Mongkhonthawornchai, Siriporn; Sangchart, Bumpenchit; Sornboon, Ariya; Chantarasiri, Jongkolnee

    2013-09-01

    This qualitative research aimed to study the meaning, the characteristics, and the dimensions of pain from a Thai point of view. It was conducted under the research project on the development of the quality of pain management for people in the hospital. The subjects were 62 patients, experiencing pain and receiving treatment in 4 hospitals in northeast Thailand. Data were analyzed through content analysis. The findings included: 1) concept from experience of pain, perceived pain as suffering physically and psychologically, 2) different characteristics between acute and chronic pain, 3) four levels of pain intensity: mild, moderate, high and severe, 4) pain effects on four dimensions: physical, psychological, behavioral and societal (family-social-economy), 5) two factors related to pain: alleviating factor and predisposing factor, and 6) pain management relies on beliefs, culture and religion i.e. good deeds in Buddhism affected six dimensions: physical, psychological, social, spiritual, treatment seeking and asking health personnel for help. The results of the present study revealed the influence of culture beliefs on the meaning of pain, pain characteristics, and the effects of pain as well as pain management in terms of cultural contexts. The findings may be implemented for the development of pain assessment and the model development of pain management more appropriately according to cultural contexts. PMID:24386747

  18. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. PMID:27475512

  19. Pain, emotion, headache.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Gennaro; Grazzi, Licia; Panerai, Alberto E

    2012-10-01

    Pain has been considered as part of a defensive strategy whose specific role is to signal an immediate active danger to the organism. This definition fits well for acute pain. It does not work well, however, for chronic pain that is maintained even in absence of an ongoing, active threat. Currently, acute and chronic pain are considered to be separate conditions. What follows is a review of the different theories about pain and its history. Different hypotheses regarding pain mechanisms are illustrated. New data emerging from scientific research on chronic pain (migraine in particular) involving innovative imaging techniques are reported and discussed. PMID:23030540

  20. The Brain in Pain

    PubMed Central

    AHMAD, Asma Hayati; ABDUL AZIZ, Che Badariah

    2014-01-01

    Pain, while salient, is highly subjective. A sensation perceived as painful by one person may be perceived as uncomfortable, not painful or even pleasant to others. Within the same person, pain may also be modulated according to its threat value and the context in which it is presented. Imaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, have identified a distributed network in the brain, the pain-relevant brain regions, that encode the sensory-discriminative aspect of pain, as well as its cognitive and affective/emotional factors. Current knowledge also implicates the prefrontal cortex as the modulatory area for pain, with its subdivisions forming the cortico-cortical pathway, an alternative pain modulatory pathway distinct from the descending modulatory pathway of pain. These findings from neuroimaging in human subjects have paved the way for the molecular mechanisms of pain modulation to be explored in animal studies. PMID:25941463

  1. Pain assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Leith, B A

    1999-09-01

    Little research is currently available related to pain management by neuroscience nurses. However, due to concerns about the potential for altering neurological status, some neurosurgery patients may not receive optimal pain management. This paper describes findings from a pain related survey which was distributed during the Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses June 1998 national conference. The survey was intended to assess Canadian neuroscience nurses pain management knowledge and to explore pain management techniques after intracranial surgery. While 60% of respondents answered four pain assessment and management case study related questions correctly, some respondents rated pain differently when it was expressed by a smiling or grimacing patient. The most common methods for pain control after intracranial surgery included intermittent codeine and/or morphine, often by intramuscular injection. Findings from this study suggest that some neuroscience nurses require further education about pain management and that many patients do not receive optimal pain management after intracranial surgery. PMID:10732518

  2. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endobiliary Drainage of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst with Rupture into the Biliary System: An Unusual Route for Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Inal, Mehmet; Soyupak, Suereyya; Akguel, Erol; Ezici, Hueseyin

    2002-10-15

    The most common and serious complication of hydatid cyst of the liver is rupture into the biliary tract causing obstructive jaundice, cholangitis and abscess. The traditional treatment of biliary-cystic fistula is surgery and recently endoscopic sphincterotomy. We report a case of complex heterogeneous cyst rupture into the biliary tract causing biliary obstruction in which the obstruction and cyst were treated successfully by percutaneous transhepatic endobiliary drainage. Our case is the second report of percutaneous transbiliary internal drainage of hydatid cyst with rupture into the biliary duct in which the puncture and drainage were not performed through the cyst cavity.

  3. Increased MMP-7 expression in biliary epithelium and serum underpins native liver fibrosis after successful portoenterostomy in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Kerola, Anna; Lampela, Hanna; Lohi, Jouko; Heikkilä, Päivi; Mutanen, Annika; Hagström, Jaana; Tervahartiala, Taina; Sorsa, Timo; Haglund, Caj; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying progressive liver fibrosis following surgical treatment of biliary atresia (BA) remain unclear. Our aim was to address hepatic gene and protein expression and serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) after successful portoenterostomy (PE), and relate them to histological signs of liver injury, clinical follow-up data and biochemical markers of hepatic function. LIver biopsies and serum samples were obtained from 25 children after successful PE at median age of 3.3 years. Serum MMP concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. Hepatic gene expression of MMPs and TIMPs was analyzed using real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Liver expression of MMP-7 and cytokeratin-7 was studied using immunohistochemistry. Despite effective clearance of biochemical and histological cholestasis following PE, BA patients showed increased hepatic gene expression of MMP-7 (29-fold, p < 0.001), MMP-2 (3.1-fold, p < 0.001), MMP-14 (1.7-fold, p = 0.007), and TIMP-1 (1.8-fold, p < 0.001), when compared to controls. Similar to a biliary epithelial marker cytokeratin-7, expression of MMP-7 localized in biliary epithelium of bile ducts and ductal proliferations and periportal hepatocytes and was increased (p < 0.001) in relation to controls. BA patients had 6-fold higher serum levels of MMP-7 (p < 0.001), which correlated positively with hepatic MMP-7 gene (r = 0.548, p = 0.007) and protein (r = 0.532, p = 0.007) expression. Patients showed a positive correlation between biliary MMP-7 expression and Metavir fibrosis stage (r = 0.605, p = 0.001) and portal fibrosis grade (r = 0.606, p = 0.001). Neither similarly increased MMP-7 expression nor correlation with liver fibrosis was observed in patients with intestinal failure-associated liver disease and comparable Metavir stage. In conclusion, our findings support an unique role of altered

  4. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-09-15

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  5. The Sea Lamprey as an Etiological Model for Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive, inflammatory, and fibrosclerosing cholangiopathy in infants that results in obstruction of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts. It is the most common cause for pediatric liver transplantation. In contrast, the sea lamprey undergoes developmental BA with transient cholestasis and fibrosis during metamorphosis, but emerges as a fecund adult with steatohepatitis and fibrosis in the liver. In this paper, we present new histological evidence and compare the sea lamprey to existing animal models to highlight the advantages and possible limitations of using the sea lamprey to study the etiology and compensatory mechanisms of BA and other liver diseases. Understanding the signaling factors and genetic networks underlying lamprey BA can provide insights into BA etiology and possible targets to prevent biliary degeneration and to clear fibrosis. In addition, information from lamprey BA can be used to develop adjunct treatments for patients awaiting or receiving surgical treatments. Furthermore, the cholestatic adult lamprey has unique adaptive mechanisms that can be used to explore potential treatments for cholestasis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). PMID:26101777

  6. [Morphological study of bile in the diagnosis of biliary diseases].

    PubMed

    Potekhina, Iu P

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study principles of bile structurization in healthy people and patients with various biliary diseases. 160 patients with different biliary diseases and other diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone were examined. Samples of gallbladder bile were taken from corpses of young men, who did not have any diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone. Their diagnoses were confirmed by an ultrasound morphological study. Bile was studied by the cuneate dehydration and viscosimetric methods. The structure of facies of gallbladder bile under conditions of absence of diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone was shown. The facies have a wide convex peripheral zone (a cushion) without any well-defined border. The central part of the facies is amorphous or fine-grained, sometimes with occasional inclusions of larger crystals. Markers of exacerbation of chronic cholecystitis (dendrites in the central zone of bile facies) as well as signs of the presence of a malignant neoplasm touching the bile (large diamond-shaped crystals in the central zone of bile facies where dendrites begin) were discovered. PMID:14556555

  7. Biliary and renal excretions of cefpiramide in Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, I; Hasegawa, T; Nadai, M; Wang, L; Haghgoo, S; Tagaya, O; Nabeshima, T

    1995-01-01

    Eisai hyperbilirubinemic mutant rats (EHBRs) with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia were recently derived from Sprague-Dawley rats (SDRs). The pharmacokinetic characteristics of the beta-lactam antibiotic cefpiramide (CPM), which is mainly excreted into bile, were investigated in 10- and 20-week-old EHBRs and were compared with those in 20-week-old healthy SDRs. The pharmacokinetic parameters of CPM after an intravenous administration of 20 mg/kg of body weight were estimated for each rat by noncompartmental methods. When compared with age-matched healthy SDRs, significant decreases (by approximately 30%) in the systemic clearance of CPM were observed in 20-week-old EHBRs. The biliary clearance of CPM in 20-week-old EHBRs markedly decreased to less than 10% of that in age-matched healthy SDRs, while total urinary recovery of unchanged CPM increased to threefold and renal clearance doubled. However, no significant differences in any of the pharmacokinetic parameters of CPM were observed between the two groups of EHBRs. There were no significant differences among the three groups in the steady-state volume of distribution of CPM. The present study indicates that hyperbilirubinemia induces an increase in the urinary excretion ability of CPM in return for a reduction in the biliary excretion. PMID:7695332

  8. Laparoscopic cystojejunostomy for type I cystic biliary atresia in children

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Alice; Hery, Géraldine; Colavolpe, Nathalie; Bevilacqua, Clemence; Guys, Jean-Michel; De Lagausie, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The use of laparoscopy in the treatment of biliary atresia (BA) is still debated. We report our strategy using laparoscopy in type I cystic BA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the records of patients treated for BA from 2002-2013. When the diagnosis was suspected, an ultrasound was performed. If it showed a cyst > 5 mm in the hilum with no patent gallbladder, we performed an initial explorative laparoscopy. In the case of a patent biliary tree above the cyst, a laparoscopic cystojejunostomy was performed. In cases of absent communication (type III), conversion and portoenterostomy were performed. Pre and postoperative data and overall survival rate with the native liver were reviewed. RESULTS: Forty-four children were treated for BA. Six presented with a cystic form diagnosed by US. Three children had type I BA; three had type III BA. No postoperative complications were noted. Median follow-up was 62.2 months (22.7-93.5). One patient died of a cardiac malformation. The five remaining patients are alive with their native liver. Of the 38 treated for noncystic BA, 16 were transplanted. CONCLUSION: We confirmed the prognosis of cystic BA, which is less severe than noncystic BA. Our strategy using laparoscopy allowed for the confirmation and qualification of the type of BA. In type I, complete treatment by laparoscopy has been performed safely. PMID:26622117

  9. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery for biliary tract disease

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Shu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), or laparoendoscopic single-site surgery, has been employed in various fields to minimize traumatic effects over the last two decades. Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) has been the most frequently studied SILS to date. Hundreds of studies on SILC have failed to present conclusive results. Most randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been small in scale and have been conducted under ideal operative conditions. The role of SILC in complicated scenarios remains uncertain. As common bile duct exploration (CBDE) methods have been used for more than one hundred years, laparoscopic CBDE (LCBDE) has emerged as an effective, demanding, and infrequent technique employed during the laparoscopic era. Likewise, laparoscopic biliary-enteric anastomosis is difficult to carry out, with only a few studies have been published on the approach. The application of SILS to CBDE and biliary-enteric anastomosis is extremely rare, and such innovative procedures are only carried out by a number of specialized groups across the globe. Herein we present a thorough and detailed analysis of SILC in terms of operative techniques, training and learning curves, safety and efficacy levels, recovery trends, and costs by reviewing RCTs conducted over the past three years and two recently updated meta-analyses. All existing literature on single-incision LCBDE and single-incision laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy has been reviewed to describe these two demanding techniques. PMID:26811621

  10. Autocrine regulation of biliary pathology by activated cholangiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kendal; Marzioni, Marco; Munshi, Kamruzzaman; Afroze, Syeda

    2012-01-01

    The bile duct system of the liver is lined by epithelial cells (i.e., cholangiocytes) that respond to a large number of neuroendocrine factors through alterations in their proliferative activities and the subsequent modification of the microenvironment. As such, activation of biliary proliferation compensates for the loss of cholangiocytes due to apoptosis and slows the progression of toxic injury and cholestasis. Over the course of the last three decades, much progress has been made in identifying the factors that trigger the biliary epithelium to remodel and grow. Because a large number of autocrine factors have recently been identified as relevant clinical targets, a compiled review of their contributions and function in cholestatic liver diseases would be beneficial. In this context, it is important to define the specific processes triggered by autocrine factors that promote cholangiocytes to proliferate, activate neighboring cells, and ultimately lead to extracellular matrix deposition. In this review, we discuss the role of each of the known autocrine factors with particular emphasis on proliferation and fibrogenesis. Because many of these molecules interact with one another throughout the progression of liver fibrosis, a model speculating their involvement in the progression of cholestatic liver disease is also presented. PMID:22194419

  11. Infectious Agents in the Pathogenesis of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Hernandez, Oscar-Danilo; Levin, Nancy-Agmon; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease which is characterized by the breakdown of self-tolerance to the highly conserved pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, specially the pyruvate dehydrogenase E2 complex (PDC-E2). The breakdown of the tolerance to such antigens leads to an autoimmune process characterized by portal inflammation and immune-mediated destruction of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Epidemiological studies have suggested that infections agents can trigger or even exacerbate the disease. Among other gram negative bacteria, Escherichia Coli, and Nosphingobium aromaticivorans are the most associated agents reported hitherto. Epidemiological and molecular evidence points towards molecular mimicry between some components of these microorganisms and specific amino-acid sequences that are present in proteins on normal cells of the biliary tract. In this review, we revisit all reports suggesting that infectious agents might be associated with the autoimmune pathogenesis of PBC. We also retrieve the immune molecular mimicry mechanisms that are likely involved with the autoimmune process in PBC. PMID:21297247

  12. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H.; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G.; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20–22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  13. Biliary Microbiota, Gallstone Disease and Infection with Opisthorchis felineus

    PubMed Central

    Saltykova, Irina V.; Petrov, Vjacheslav A.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Ivanova, Polina G.; Merzlikin, Nikolay V.; Sazonov, Alexey E.; Ogorodova, Ludmila M.; Brindley, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the microbiome of the hepatobiliary system. This study investigated the influence of infection with the fish-borne liver fluke, Opisthorchis felineus on the biliary microbiome of residents of the Tomsk region of western Siberia. Methodology/Principal Findings Samples of bile were provided by 56 study participants, half of who were infected with O. felineus, and all of who were diagnosed with gallstone disease. The microbiota of the bile was investigated using high throughput, Illumina-based sequencing targeting the prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene. About 2,797, discrete phylotypes of prokaryotes were detected. At the level of phylum, bile from participants with opisthorchiasis showed greater numbers of Synergistetes, Spirochaetes, Planctomycetes, TM7 and Verrucomicrobia. Numbers of > 20 phylotypes differed in bile of the O. felineus-infected compared to non-infected participants, including presence of species of the genera Mycoplana, Cellulosimicrobium, Microlunatus and Phycicoccus, and the Archaeans genus, Halogeometricum, and increased numbers of Selenomonas, Bacteroides, Rothia, Leptotrichia, Lactobacillus, Treponema and Klebsiella. Conclusions/Significance Overall, infection with the liver fluke O. felineus modified the biliary microbiome, increasing abundance of bacterial and archaeal phylotypes. PMID:27447938

  14. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers.

    PubMed

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20-22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  15. A New Clarification Method to Visualize Biliary Degeneration During Liver Metamorphosis in Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Davidson, Peter J.; Scott, Anne M.; Walaszczyk, Erin J.; Brant, Cory O.; Buchinger, Tyler; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a rare disease of infancy, with an estimated 1 in 15,000 frequency in the southeast United States, but more common in East Asian countries, with a reported frequency of 1 in 5,000 in Taiwan. Although much is known about the management of biliary atresia, its pathogenesis is still elusive. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanism and progression of biliary degeneration. Sea lamprey develop through three distinct life stages: larval, parasitic, and adult. During the transition from larvae to parasitic juvenile, sea lamprey undergo metamorphosis with dramatic reorganization and remodeling in external morphology and internal organs. In the liver, the entire biliary system is lost, including the gall bladder and the biliary tree. A newly-developed method called “CLARITY” was modified to clarify the entire liver and the junction with the intestine in metamorphic sea lamprey. The process of biliary degeneration was visualized and discerned during sea lamprey metamorphosis by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. This method provides a powerful tool to study biliary atresia in a unique animal model. PMID:24962075

  16. A new clarification method to visualize biliary degeneration during liver metamorphosis in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Davidson, Peter J.; Scott, Anne M.; Walaszczyk, Erin J.; Brant, Cory O.; Buchinger, Tyler; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a rare disease of infancy, with an estimated 1 in 15,000 frequency in the southeast United States, but more common in East Asian countries, with a reported frequency of 1 in 5,000 in Taiwan. Although much is known about the management of biliary atresia, its pathogenesis is still elusive. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanism and progression of biliary degeneration. Sea lamprey develop through three distinct life stages: larval, parasitic, and adult. During the transition from larvae to parasitic juvenile, sea lamprey undergo metamorphosis with dramatic reorganization and remodeling in external morphology and internal organs. In the liver, the entire biliary system is lost, including the gall bladder and the biliary tree. A newly-developed method called “CLARITY” was modified to clarify the entire liver and the junction with the intestine in metamorphic sea lamprey. The process of biliary degeneration was visualized and discerned during sea lamprey metamorphosis by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. This method provides a powerful tool to study biliary atresia in a unique animal model.

  17. The Effect of Biliary Decompression on Bacterial Translocation in Jaundiced Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jin Wen; Soltesz, Vasile; Willén, Roger; Loft, Steffen; Poulsen, Henrik E.; Pärsson, Håkan; Olsson, Kjell; Bengmark, Stig

    1993-01-01

    Patients with obstructive jaundice are prone to septic complications after biliary tract operations. Restoring bile flow to the intestine may help to decrease the complication rate. The present study is aimed at evaluating the effect of biliary decompression on bacterial translocation in jaundiced rats. Sixty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to six groups subjected to common bile duct ligation (CBDL) and transection (groups 2–6) or sham operation (group 1). In groups and 2 the incidence of enteric bacterial translocation was determined 2 weeks after sham operation or CBDL. In groups 3–6, biliary decompression was achieved by performing a choledochoduodenostomy after 2 weeks of biliary decompression. Bacterial translocation was then studied 1,2,3 and 5 weeks following biliary decompression. The rate of bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes in obstructive jaundice was significantly higher as compared with controls, and decreased with time to nil three weeks following biliary decompression. The incidence of bacterial translocation was closely correlated (r = 0.844; p = 0.034) with serum alkaline phosphatase activity and seemed to fit with the morphological changes noted in the small intestine. The decrease in bacterial translocation, however, lags behind the recovery of liver function as measured by routine liver function tests and antipyrine clearance. Obstructive jaundice thus promotes bacterial translocation in the rat. Biliary decompression gradually decreases the rate of bacterial translocation. PMID:8268113

  18. Biliary repair and carcinogenesis are mediated by IL-33–dependent cholangiocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Razumilava, Nataliya; Gores, Gregory J.; Walters, Stephanie; Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Mourya, Reena; Bessho, Kazuhiko; Wang, Yui-Hsi; Glaser, Shannon S.; Shivakumar, Pranavkumar; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Injury to the biliary epithelium triggers inflammation and fibrosis, which can result in severe liver diseases and may progress to malignancy. Development of a type 1 immune response has been linked to biliary injury pathogenesis; however, a subset of patients with biliary atresia, the most common childhood cholangiopathy, exhibit increased levels of Th2-promoting cytokines. The relationship among different inflammatory drivers, epithelial repair, and carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here, we determined that the Th2-activating cytokine IL-33 is elevated in biliary atresia patient serum and in the livers and bile ducts of mice with experimental biliary atresia. Administration of IL-33 to WT mice markedly increased cholangiocyte proliferation and promoted sustained cell growth, resulting in dramatic and rapid enlargement of extrahepatic bile ducts. The IL-33–dependent proliferative response was mediated by an increase in the number of type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), which released high levels of IL-13 that in turn promoted cholangiocyte hyperplasia. Induction of the IL-33/ILC2/IL-13 circuit in a murine biliary injury model promoted epithelial repair; however, induction of this circuit in mice with constitutive activation of AKT and YAP in bile ducts induced cholangiocarcinoma with liver metastases. These findings reveal that IL-33 mediates epithelial proliferation and suggest that activation of IL-33/ILC2/IL-13 may improve biliary repair and disruption of the circuit may block progression of carcinogenesis. PMID:24892809

  19. Iatrogenic Biliary Injuries: Multidisciplinary Management in a Major Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Ibrahim Abdelkader; Shoreem, Hany Abdelmeged; Saleh, Sherif Mohamed; Hegazy, Osama; Housseni, Mohamed; Abbasy, Mohamed; Badra, Gamal; Ibrahim, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Background. Iatrogenic biliary injuries are considered as the most serious complications during cholecystectomy. Better outcomes of such injuries have been shown in cases managed in a specialized center. Objective. To evaluate biliary injuries management in major referral hepatobiliary center. Patients & Methods. Four hundred seventy-two consecutive patients with postcholecystectomy biliary injuries were managed with multidisciplinary team (hepatobiliary surgeon, gastroenterologist, and radiologist) at major Hepatobiliary Center in Egypt over 10-year period using endoscopy in 232 patients, percutaneous techniques in 42 patients, and surgery in 198 patients. Results. Endoscopy was very successful initial treatment of 232 patients (49%) with mild/moderate biliary leakage (68%) and biliary stricture (47%) with increased success by addition of percutaneous (Rendezvous technique) in 18 patients (3.8%). However, surgery was needed in 198 patients (42%) for major duct transection, ligation, major leakage, and massive stricture. Surgery was urgent in 62 patients and elective in 136 patients. Hepaticojejunostomy was done in most of cases with transanastomotic stents. There was one mortality after surgery due to biliary sepsis and postoperative stricture in 3 cases (1.5%) treated with percutaneous dilation and stenting. Conclusion. Management of biliary injuries was much better with multidisciplinary care team with initial minimal invasive technique to major surgery in major complex injury encouraging early referral to highly specialized hepatobiliary center. PMID:25435672

  20. Endoscopic removal of a spontaneously fractured biliary uncovered self-expandable metal stent.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Tsujino, Takeshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Sasahira, Naoki; Kogure, Hirofumi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Nagano, Rie; Miyabayashi, Kouji; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Mohri, Dai; Sasaki, Takashi; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are widely used for the palliative treatment of unresectable malignant biliary obstruction. However, the long-term durability of SEMSs in biliary strictures is not clear. We describe a case of endoscopic removal of spontaneously fractured uncovered biliary SEMS. A 59-year-old woman presented to our institution with a 1-year history of recurrent cholangitis. Her medical history included a proctectomy for rectal cancer and right hemihepatectomy for liver metastasis 10 years earlier. Five years after these operations, she developed a benign hilar stricture and had an uncovered SEMS placed in another hospital. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated that the SEMS was torn in half and the distal part of the stent was floating in the dilated common bile duct. The papillary orifice was dilated by endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation (EPLBD) using a 15-mm wire-guided balloon catheter. Subsequently, we inserted biopsy forceps into the bile duct and grasped the distal end of the broken SEMS under fluoroscopy. We successfully removed the fragment of the SEMS from the bile duct, along with the endoscope. The patient was discharged without complications. Placement of an uncovered biliary SEMS is not the preferred treatment for benign biliary strictures. Spontaneous fracture of an uncovered biliary SEMS is an extremely rare complication. We should be aware that stent fracture can occur when placing uncovered biliary SEMSs in patients with a long life expectancy. EPLBD is very useful for retrieving the fractured fragment of SEMS. PMID:22507093

  1. History of pain theories.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun

    2011-10-01

    The concept of pain has remained a topic of long debate since its emergence in ancient times. The initial ideas of pain were formulated in both the East and the West before 1800. Since 1800, due to the development of experimental sciences, different theories of pain have emerged and become central topics of debate. However, the existing theories of pain may be appropriate for the interpretation of some aspects of pain, but are not yet comprehensive. The history of pain problems is as long as that of human beings; however, the understanding of pain mechanisms is still far from sufficient. Thus, intensive research is required. This historical review mainly focuses on the development of pain theories and the fundamental discoveries in this field. Other historical events associated with pain therapies and remedies are beyond the scope of this review. PMID:21934730

  2. The problem of pain.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Keith; Martelli, Michael F

    2004-01-01

    Pain problems, especially posttraumatic headache, are very common following head trauma. Pain may be the most significant problem, more disabling than any brain or other injuries, and interfering with aspects of cognition or other function. However, posttraumatic headache and most other chronic posttraumatic pain problems remain poorly understood. This article reviews fundamental issues that should be considered in understanding the nature of chronic pain including the distinction between acute and chronic pain; neurobiological distinctions between the lateral and medial pain system; nociceptive versus neuropathic or other central pain; sensitization effects; the widely accepted view of chronic pain as a multidimensional subjective experience involving sensory, motivational-affective and cognitive-behavioral components; the problem of mind-body dualism; the role of psychosocial factors in the onset, maintenance, exacerbation or severity of pain; plus issues of response bias and malingering. PMID:14732827

  3. Pain and the ethics of pain management.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B

    1984-01-01

    In this article I clarify the concepts of 'pain', 'suffering', 'pains of body', 'pains of soul'. I explore the relevance of an ethic to the clinical setting which gives patients a strong prima facie right to freedom from unnecessary and unwanted pain and which places upon medical professionals two concomitant moral obligations to patients. First, there is the duty not to inflict pain and suffering beyond what is necessary for effective diagnosis, treatment and research. Next, there is the duty to do all that can be done to relieve all the pain and suffering which can be alleviated. I develop in some detail that individuality of pain sensitivity must be taken into account in fulfilling these obligations. I explore the issue of the relevance of informed consent and the right to refuse treatment to the matter of pain relief. And I raise the question of what conditions, if any, should override the right to refuse treatment where pain relief is of paramount concern. PMID:6710192

  4. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.B. Jr.; Myers, B.M.; Kost, L.J.; Kuntz, S.M.; LaRusso, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided biliary drainage: Summary of consortium meeting, May 7th, 2011, Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Kahaleh, Michel; Artifon, Everson LA; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Gupta, Kapil; Itoi, Takao; Binmoeller, Kenneth F; Giovannini, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become the preferred procedure for biliary or pancreatic drainage in various pancreatico-biliary disorders. With a success rate of more than 90%, ERCP may not achieve biliary or pancreatic drainage in cases with altered anatomy or with tumors obstructing access to the duodenum. In the past those failures were typically managed exclusively by percutaneous approaches by interventional radiologists or surgical intervention. The morbidity associated was significant especially in those patients with advanced malignancy, seeking minimally invasive interventions and improved quality of life. With the advent of biliary drainage via endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance, EUS guided biliary drainage has been used more frequently within the last decade in different countries. As with any novel advanced endoscopic procedure that encompasses various approaches, advanced endoscopists all over the world have innovated and adopted diverse EUS guided biliary and pancreatic drainage techniques. This diversity has resulted in variations and improvements in EUS Guided biliary and pancreatic drainage; and over the years has led to an extensive nomenclature. The diversity of techniques, nomenclature and recent progress in our intrumentation has led to a dedicated meeting on May 7th, 2011 during Digestive Disease Week 2011. More than 40 advanced endoscopists from United States, Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia, Italy, France, Austria, Germany, Spain, Japan, China, South Korea and India attended this pivotal meeting. The meeting covered improved EUS guided biliary access and drainage procedures, terminology, nomenclature, training and credentialing; as well as emerging devices for EUS guided biliary drainage. This paper summarizes the meeting’s agenda and the conclusions generated by the creation of this consortium group. PMID:23538784

  6. Drug eluting biliary stents to decrease stent failure rates: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shatzel, Joseph; Kim, Jisoo; Sampath, Kartik; Syed, Sharjeel; Saad, Jennifer; Hussain, Zilla H; Mody, Kabir; Pipas, J Marc; Gordon, Stuart; Gardner, Timothy; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting is clinically effective in relieving both malignant and non-malignant obstructions. However, there are high failure rates associated with tumor ingrowth and epithelial overgrowth as well as internally from biofilm development and subsequent clogging. Within the last decade, the use of prophylactic drug eluting stents as a means to reduce stent failure has been investigated. In this review we provide an overview of the current research on drug eluting biliary stents. While there is limited human trial data regarding the clinical benefit of drug eluting biliary stents in preventing stent obstruction, recent research suggests promise regarding their safety and potential efficacy. PMID:26839648

  7. Biliary cystadenoma with mesenchymal stroma: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Manouras, Andreas; Markogiannakis, Haridimos; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel; Katergiannakis, Vangelogiannis

    2006-01-01

    Biliary cystadenomas are rare, cystic neoplasms of the biliary ductal system that usually occur in middle-aged women. They cannot be safely differentiated from cystadenocarcinomas before operation and should always be considered for resection. Cystadenomas have a strong tendency to recur, particularly following incomplete excision, and a potential of malignant transformation. Therefore, complete resection is the therapy of choice and thorough histopathologic evaluation is imperative. A case of benign biliary cystadenoma with mesenchymal stroma is presented along with a review of the relative literature addressing the clinical presentation, histology, histogenesis, differential diagnosis, imaging features, treatment and prognosis of this interesting and rare entity. PMID:17009411

  8. Utility of Stent-Grafts in Treatment of Porto-Biliary Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-12-15

    A porto-biliary fistula causing hemobilia is a known complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). We present two patients with hemobilia secondary to porto-biliary fistula, treated successfully by percutaneous placement of stent-grafts. In one case, the stent-graft was placed in the bile duct, and in the other case, it was placed in the intrahepatic portal vein branch. Hemobilia stopped and there were no complications except a small area of hepatic infarction, distal to the stent-graft in the portal vein.

  9. Drug eluting biliary stents to decrease stent failure rates: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shatzel, Joseph; Kim, Jisoo; Sampath, Kartik; Syed, Sharjeel; Saad, Jennifer; Hussain, Zilla H; Mody, Kabir; Pipas, J Marc; Gordon, Stuart; Gardner, Timothy; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-01-25

    Biliary stenting is clinically effective in relieving both malignant and non-malignant obstructions. However, there are high failure rates associated with tumor ingrowth and epithelial overgrowth as well as internally from biofilm development and subsequent clogging. Within the last decade, the use of prophylactic drug eluting stents as a means to reduce stent failure has been investigated. In this review we provide an overview of the current research on drug eluting biliary stents. While there is limited human trial data regarding the clinical benefit of drug eluting biliary stents in preventing stent obstruction, recent research suggests promise regarding their safety and potential efficacy. PMID:26839648

  10. [Muscle-skeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Vygonskaya, M V; Filatova, E G

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the most complicated aspects of low back pain. The differences between specific and nonspecific low back pain using the "red flags" system is highlighted. The authors consider the causes of pain chronification (the "yellow flags" system) and the necessity of using a biopsychosocial model. Main pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic muscle/skeletal pain are considered and the possible involvement of several mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic pain as well as the use of complex therapy is discussed. The high efficacy and safety of ketorolac in treatment of nonspecific muscle/skeletal pain is demonstrated. PMID:27042717

  11. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated. PMID:9037997

  12. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  13. Managing your chronic back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  14. Chiropractic care for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  15. Complaining about chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kugelmann, R

    1999-12-01

    This paper examines how a group of working class people describes and experiences chronic pain. This hermeneutical-phenomenological study concentrates on the lived body of pain from three perspectives, drawing on interviews with 14 people who were attending a pain management program. First I consider the terms in which pain is circumscribed in the narratives, stories told in the context of learning to manage pain. These terms are polarities, ways of specifying and legitimating pain in relation to "mind" and "body." Pain, in the discursive polarities that define it, is the private property of an individual, who must in some fashion prove that pain exists in an objective manner. The speaker, in this discourse, stands as the one responsible for the production of pain. In the second part, the analysis turns to what this discourse reveals about pain as a lived body phenomenon. Here the analysis centers upon the torment of having to inhabit the intolerable, upon how pain unmakes the lifeworld of the sufferer, and how, simultaneously, people make pain. The place of pain is the body, as body-in-place. The place of pain is at the boundaries of human dwelling, a kind of non-place, expressed metaphorically as "prison" or "homelessness." Finally, after these considerations of how pain is described, in part three, I turn to the act of "saying" pain, that is, to the narratives as addressed to someone else. The participants were not simply dispensing information; they were saying something to me. The narratives had the form of complaints. The form of the narratives, in the context of the pain program, was a quasi-legal call to rectify wrongs. PMID:10574237

  16. [Pain from AIDS (adult)].

    PubMed

    Bouhassira, D

    1997-10-01

    Pain, a major handicapping factor for HIV patients, has been underestimated and insufficiently treated. The pain may have various origins, including the virus itself, antiviral or anticancer treatments, secondary infections or their treatments, or unrelated intercurrent infection. Just as in the general population, three types of pain may be distinguished: nociceptive, neuropathic, and idiopathic. The lesions capable of producing nociceptive pain are numerous in HIV patients. The most common etiologies are oropharyngeal, gastrointestinal, and rheumatic. Neurological complications are among the most frequently encountered in the course of HIV infection, and some may cause typical neuropathic pain. Such pain may be secondary to a central lesion, as in cerebral toxoplasmosis, but usually is related to a peripheral effect. The principal etiologies of peripheral neuropathic pain are HIV neuropathies, postherpetic neuralgia, toxic neuropathies secondary to antiviral treatment, and diabetic neuropathies. Pain management should be part of the treatment of HIV complications. In the absence of a validated protocol for treatment of HIV-related pain, the guidelines for cancer pain management developed by the World Health Organization can be used as a starting point for nociceptive pain. Dosage and administration should be individually adjusted. Treatment of neuropathic pain is based primarily on tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Nonpharmaceutical interventions such as transcutaneous electric stimulation, hypnosis, and acupuncture may also be useful. Evaluation and management of psychological factors should be an integral part of treatment, as in all patients with chronic pain. PMID:12348806

  17. [Management of adult abdominal pain in the Emergency Room].

    PubMed

    Chiche, L; Roupie, E; Delassus, P

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a commonplace reason for surgical consultation in the emergency department and is the the most common symptom which the digestive surgeon on-call must evaluate. He must understand the pathophysiologic basis of visceral pain and referred pain in order to appreciate its diverse manifestations. Abdominal pain can stem from many causes intestinal and non-intestinal, medical and surgical. Evaluation and management in the emergency department must be rapid and pragmatic; clinical history and physical examination should define the gravity of the case, direct the first diagnostic procedures and complementary examinations, and guide the therapeutic direction. Ultrasonography is a quick and effective diagnostic procedure in the diagnosis of biliary, urologic, and gynecologic pathologies; it can be useful for other digestive problems as well. The new generation spiral CT scanner gives excellent definition of digestive and vascular pathologies. The initial evaluation and management of the acute abdomen may determine the prognosis of the patient; it should lead to prompt symptomatic relief and to a well-directed treatment appropriate to the diagnosis. PMID:16609646

  18. Back pain and sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000519.htm Back pain and sports To use the sharing features on ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Back Injuries Back Pain Sports Injuries Sports Safety Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  19. Eldercare at Home: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, and may be best treated with physical therapy without taking any medicine at all. Pain can ... medicine and non-medicine strategies. Treatments such as physical therapy, massage, heat and/or cold packs, exercise, and ...

  20. Painful periods (dysmenorrhea) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be caused by abnormal conditions such as endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Unless one of these potentially serious conditions is present, the treatment for painful periods is pain relief. If a ...

  1. Rib cage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply) Home ...

  2. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for increased overall health care costs. A person’s perception of pain can be affected by emotional factors. ... medications such as levodopa can affect a person’s perception of pain. People with Parkinson’s who are in ...

  3. NIH Pain Consortium

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Search: header Home About PC Symposia & Meetings NIH Pain Programs Funding Opportunities Conferences & Seminars Federal Pain Activities News & Health Info Recent News Congratulations to 2016 Mitchell Max Awardee, Dr. Ditre Asst. ...

  4. Lower Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor. Get plenty of rest and use an anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve pain. If your pain is ... or a HERNIATED DISK. Apply heat, use an anti-inflammatory medicine and get rest. If you don't ...

  5. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007489.htm Pain medications - narcotics To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are ...

  6. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  7. Managing pain during labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is good to prepare yourself for natural childbirth. Natural Childbirth The pain felt during childbirth is different for every woman. Some women choose natural childbirth, or giving birth without medicine for pain. ...

  8. Phytotherapy for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Zareba, Grazyna

    2009-06-01

    Pain is considered the third most common healthcare problem disabling more individuals than heart disease and cancer together. Although pharmacological pain management offers a significant relief in several pain-related diseases, many patients turn to its supplementation with complementary and alternative medicine. Botanicals used in pain therapy can contribute to restoring the quality of life to a patient and may effect and enhance conventional pain management. Herbal analgesic use in several pain-related diseases such as rheumatologic diseases, back pain, cancer, diabetic peripheral neuropathy and migraine will be discussed. In addition, this review describes botanicals with known analgesic activity for which randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials assessing their efficacy in different pain-related diseases have been published and which have been recently evaluated in many systematic reviews with well-described methodology. PMID:19649334

  9. Pain in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients’ quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available. PMID:26516548

  10. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... as ice, mild painkillers, physical therapy, and proper exercises. Most of the time, back pain will get ... prevent getting back pain again. Stretching and strengthening exercises are important. But, starting these exercises too soon ...

  11. Neuropathic pain in cancer.

    PubMed

    Urch, C E; Dickenson, A H

    2008-05-01

    Neuropathic pain in cancer arises following injury to peripheral or central neurons, in a similar manner to such pain arising from a non-cancer injury. Much of our knowledge of neuropathic pain is based on peripheral originating events with little known about central neuropathic pain. This article explores some of the similarities and differences between cancer and non-cancer-related neuropathic pain. The neural pathways, ion channels, receptors and neurotransmitters that potentially can be altered in both neuropathies are the same; however the nature of the injury, the timing, repeated injuries and the co-existence of simultaneous non-neuropathic pain states lead to potential unique constellations of neuroreceptor and neurotransmitter expression in the context of cancer pain. This in turn may lead to different clinical presentation of pain sensations and potentially lead to specific treatment options. PMID:18492553

  12. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... block. This is an injection of an anesthetic (pain reliever) into certain nerves to block the pain signals. If the injection works, it may be repeated. Physical therapy and psychological counseling are also helpful. However, a ...

  13. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... related, condition. Chronic Pain and the Americans with Disabilities Act Is chronic pain a disability under the ADA? The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of ...

  14. Posttonsillectomy pain in children.

    PubMed

    Sutters, Kimberly A; Isaacson, Glenn

    2014-02-01

    Tonsillectomy, used to treat a variety of pediatric disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea, peritonsillar cellulitis or abscesses, and very frequent throat infection, is known to produce nausea, vomiting, and prolonged, moderate-to-severe pain. The authors review the causes of posttonsillectomy pain, current findings on the efficacy of various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions in pain management, recommendations for patient and family teaching regarding pain management, and best practices for improving medication adherence. PMID:24445532

  15. New genomic landscapes and therapeutic targets for biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Simbolo, Michele; Fassan, Matteo; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms characterized by a dismal prognosis. At variance with most solid tumors, no effective molecular targeted agent has been currently approved for BTCs treatment and their molecular landscape has only been recently investigated. Comprehensive mutational profiling studies identified IDH1/2 and BAP1 as characteristic of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, while extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder carcinomas were characterized by frequent KRAS and TP53 alterations. Moreover, targeted next-generation sequencing has uncovered alterations in several key cellular pathways. BTC-specific alterations include disorders of major regulators of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling processes, as well as deregulation of the mTOR-, TGF-beta/Smad- and receptor tyrosine kinases signaling. The next step will be the correlation of these findings with clinical trials to identify predictive biomarkers for the development of personalized therapies. This will permit early access for BTC patients to innovative drugs. PMID:26709801

  16. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-05-16

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  17. [Treatment of malignant biliary obstructions via the percutaneous approach].

    PubMed

    Radeleff, B A; López-Benítez, R; Hallscheidt, P; Grenacher, L; Libicher, M; Richter, G M; Kauffmann, G W

    2005-11-01

    This paper gives an overview of experience and success of percutaneous transhepatic interventions in malignant biliary obstruction. Even after exhaustion of surgical and endoscopic therapy options, the percutaneously inserted stents provide effective palliation. The palliative treatment of malignant jaundice using a stent is an established procedure in clinical practice, particularly whenever the endoscopic, transpapillary approach is not possible due to high obstructions or previous surgery. The technical success rate is very high (about 95-100%), and the complication rate is about 10-30%. Since the patency rate of stents is higher than that of plastic endoprostheses, their primary use is justified despite higher costs, provided the patients are adequately selected. PMID:16240139

  18. Computed tomographic evaluation of gallstone calcification for biliary lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Caslowitz, P L; Fishman, E K; Kafonek, D R; Lillemoe, K D; Mitchell, S; Widlus, D M; Saba, G P

    1991-04-01

    As the Food and Drug Administration trials for biliary lithotripsy in the United States near completion, future criteria for patient eligibility remain to be defined. Gallstone calcification greater than 3-mm partial rim on plain film (KUB) or oral cholecystogram (OCG) has excluded patients thus far, since early results of gallstone clearance (lithotripsy plus chemodissolution) were suboptimal with calcified stones. To evaluate the usefulness of these criteria for gallstone fragmentation, computed tomographic (CT) scans were performed on 20 patients immediately prior to lithotripsy to evaluate gallstone density and 24 hours after lithotripsy to observe the CT appearance of fragmentation. The adequacy of fragmentation was determined by pre- and post-lithotripsy sonography. This report constitutes the results of these investigations. PMID:10149158

  19. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications

    PubMed Central

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  20. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rerknimitr, Rungsun Naprasert, Pisit; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2007-06-15

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration.

  1. Delayed Severe Hemobilia after Endoscopic Biliary Plastic Stent Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hak; Hong, Seung Goun; Lee, Kyoung yong; Park, Pyung Kang; Kim, Sung Du; Lee, Mahn; Yu, Dong Wook; Hong, Man Yong

    2016-01-01

    Hemobilia is a rare gastrointestinal bleeding, usually caused by injury to the bile duct. Hemobilia after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is generally self-limiting and patients will spontaneously recover, but some severe and fatal hemorrhages have been reported. ERCP-related bowel or bile duct perforation should be managed promptly, according to the type of injury and the status of the patient. We recently experienced a case of late-onset severe hemobilia in which the patient recovered after endoscopic biliary stent insertion. The problem was attributable to ERCP-related bile duct perforation during stone removal, approximately 5 weeks prior to the hemorrhagic episode. The removal of the stent was performed 10 days before the onset of hemobilia. The bleeding was successfully treated by two sessions of transarterial coil embolization. PMID:27012288

  2. Obeticholic acid for the treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Palak J; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is characterized by progressive nonsuppurative destruction of small bile ducts, resulting in intrahepatic cholestasis, fibrosis and ultimately end-stage liver disease. Timely intervention with ursodeoxycholic acid is associated with excellent survival, although approximately one-third of all patients fail to achieve biochemical response, signifying a critical need for additional therapeutic strategies. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a potent ligand of the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Activation of FXR inhibits bile acid synthesis and protects against toxic accumulation in models of cholestasis and facilitates hepatic regeneration in preclinical studies. Data from recent Phase II and III controlled trials suggest a therapeutic impact of OCA in PBC biochemical nonresponders, as evidenced by change in proven laboratory surrogates of long-term outcome. Dose-dependent pruritus is a common adverse effect, but may be overcome through dose-titration. Longer term studies are needed with focus on safety and long-term clinical efficacy. PMID:26549695

  3. Pain assessment: the cornerstone to optimal pain management

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Pain assessment is critical to optimal pain management interventions. While pain is a highly subjective experience, its management necessitates objective standards of care. The WILDA approach to pain assessment—focusing on words to describe pain, intensity, location, duration, and aggravating or alleviating factors—offers a concise template for assessment in patients with acute and chronic pain. PMID:16389388

  4. Back Pain Facts and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pain and Depression Preventing Travel Aches and Strains Back Pain Facts and Statistics Although doctors of chiropractic (DCs) ... time. 1 A few interesting facts about back pain: Low back pain is the single leading cause of disability ...

  5. Definitions and Types of Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Pain Defining Pain Pain is a perception that signals the individual that tissue damage has ... in the body that are involved in the perception of pain are called "nociception." Basic and clinical ...

  6. Taking narcotics for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lumbar pain - chronic - narcotics; Pain - back - chronic - narcotics; Chronic back pain - low - narcotics ... Opioids compared to placebo or other treatments for chronic low-back pain: an update of the Cochrane Review. Spine . 2014;( ...

  7. Imaging of biliary complications in recipients of right-lobe living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Park, So Hyun; Kim, Kyoung Won; Kim, Bohyun; Lee, So Jung; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Jeong, Woo Kyoung

    2016-04-01

    Right-lobe living donor liver transplantation (RL-LDLT) is a common method devised in order to fulfill the demands of donor organ shortage in adult patients with end-stage liver diseases. However, biliary complications remain as the "Achilles' heel" of RL-LDLT, with wide variety of incidence among transplantation centers. Patients with biliary complications after RL-LDLT may have similar clinical presentations to those with other causes of graft dysfunction. Therefore, radiological evaluation plays a key role for differential diagnosis of such complications. In this article, we discuss the various methods of biliary reconstruction and imaging findings of common and uncommon biliary complications in recipients of RL-LDLT. PMID:25972371

  8. Biliary reconstruction in living donor liver transplantation with dye injection leakage test and without stent use.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, T; Nishizaki, T; Kishikawa, K; Nomoto, K; Uchiyama, H; Ohta, R; Hiroshige, S; Sugimachi, K

    2001-01-01

    Biliary complication remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in living donor liver transplantation. From October 1996 to December 1999, 34 patients underwent 35 living donor liver transplantations at Kyushu University Hospital. In the initial twenty cases, anastomotic internal stents were placed. In the most recent fifteen cases, no internal stent was inserted and routine postreconstruction dye injection leakage tests were administered. In recipient biliary reconstruction, hepaticojejunostomy was performed using interrupted sutures without an anastomotic stent. After an intestinal clamp was applied at the anal side of the hepaticojejunostomy, leakage test was done using diluted indigocarmine solution injected into the jejunal loop lumen. Two (13%) of the fifteen recent patients suffered from biliary complications, whereas eight patients (40%) from the former twenty patients suffered from biliary complications. We conclude that the use of the stent was not useful, but the application of the dye injection leakage test was useful. PMID:11813578

  9. Intrahepatic versus extrahepatic cholestasis. Discrimination with biliary scintigraphy combined with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, D.A.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.

    1986-03-01

    Biliary scintigraphy and ultrasound imaging were performed in 52 patients with suspected biliary tract pathology. Results were correlated with the findings of direct cholangiography. Several new innovations in scintigraphic technique were used. The combination of ultrasound imaging and scintigraphy correctly identified biliary tract obstruction in 17 of 19 patients, 12 of whom had dilated bile ducts on ultrasonography. Intrahepatic cholestasis was correctly diagnosed in 11 of 13 patients. Accurate discrimination between intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis was achieved in 28 of 32 patients (88%) with the combined studies. Scintigraphy also provided a correct diagnosis of acute cholecystitis in all 9 patients with surgically confirmed disease. Eleven additional patients with gallbladder or pancreatic disease had normal bile ducts at scintigraphy, which was confirmed with cholangiography. When combined with ultrasound imaging, modern biliary scintigraphy can (a) provide excellent discrimination between intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis and (b) help determine the need for subsequent invasive diagnostic studies in selected patients.

  10. Chest pain in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, A. K.; Robson, W. L.; Cho, H.

    1996-01-01

    Chest pain is usually a benign symptom in children. The most common identifiable causes are musculoskeletal. Often, no cause can be identified. Cardiac disorders are uncommon causes of chest pain children. Most causes can be diagnosed from history and physical examination. Treatment should be directed at the underlying cause. For idiopathic chest pain, reassurance and regular follow-up examinations are important. PMID:8704491

  11. Growing Pains (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Joints affected by more serious diseases are swollen, red, tender, or warm — the joints of kids having growing pains look normal. Although growing pains often strike in late afternoon or early evening before bed, pain can sometimes wake a sleeping child. The ...

  12. Pediatric Procedural Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Ronald L.; Piira, Tiina; Cohen, Lindsey L.; Cheng, Patricia S.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the various settings in which infants, children, and adolescents experience pain during acute medical procedures and issues related to referral of children to pain management teams. In addition, self-report, reports by others, physiological monitoring, and direct observation methods of assessment of pain and related constructs…

  13. [Chronic pain and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Berker, Ender; Dinçer, Nilay

    2005-04-01

    The perception and interpretation of pain is the end point of an interaction of cognitive, cultural, and environmental factors and this complex interaction effects the pain response and quality of life of each person which shows that pain perception and the verbal and behavioral response shows variations and is specific for each patient. Chronic pain can be due to Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and Neuropathic Pain (NP) where the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are being revealed or it can be chronic low back pain (CLBP) where pain persists in spite of healing of tissue and no underlying pathologic mechanism can be defected. Central sensitization, inhibition of descending pain inhibitory systems, functional changes in autonomic nervous system amd neurotransmitter as well as changes in stress response system are factors contributing to the initiation and maintenance of pain and cognitive, behavioral factors are also important contributors in chronic pain. Biopsychosocial and biomedical mechanisms should be assessed in the rehabilitation interventions. The aims of rehabilitation in chronic pain are to increase activity tolerance, functional capacity and to decrease socio-economic loads. The targets of activity should be physical, functional and social. Psychologic based programs as cognitive-behavioral techniques and operant conditioning are also valid procedures in rehabilitation of chronic pain patients. Rehabilitation should be multidisciplinary and of long-term targeted to valid out-come for success. PMID:15977088

  14. The extended Kasai portoenterostomy for biliary atresia: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Priya; Safwan, Mohamed; Srinivas, Sankaranarayanan; Shanmugam, Naresh; Vij, Mukul; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In 1955, Professor Morio Kasai first performed a hepatic portoenterostomy. Since then, the procedure has changed the lives of children with biliary atresia (BA). We report our initial experience in performing “extended” Kasai portoenterostomy (KPE), a modification of the original procedure. Materials and Methods: Since 2013, we have used the technique of “extended KPE” and prospectively recorded data on all children undergoing this operation. Data on demographics, clinical features, liver function tests, and perioperative cholangiogram findings were collected. Outcome of KPE was measured by Jaundice Disappearance Rate (JDR) and Native Liver Survival Rate (NLSR). We present our preliminary results from a 30-month period (February 2013 to May 2015). Results: Thirty-one children underwent KPE during this period (19 males) and only 1 child had biliary atresia splenic malformation (BASM). The mean age at KPE was 73 ± 24 days. Five (16.1%) children were more than 90 days old at the time of KPE. Fourteen children cleared jaundice (JDR 45.2%). Eleven (35.5%) children developed episodes of cholangitis, of whom 8 had early cholangitis (within 3 months of the operation). The proportion of children who survived with their own liver 6 months after KPE (NLSR) was 84.2%. Of those children older than 90 days, 2 cleared jaundice and have survived with their native livers for more than 16 months. Conclusion: In our preliminary report of 31 children, we conclude that the extended KPE leads to increased jaundice clearance and improved NLSR in children with BA. PMID:27046977

  15. Upregulation of mir-506 Leads to Decreased AE2 Expression in Biliary Epithelium of Patients with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Banales, Jesús M.; Sáez, Elena; Úriz, Miriam; Sarvide, Sarai; Urribarri, Aura D.; Splinter, Patrick; Tietz Bogert, Pamela S.; Bujanda, Luis; Prieto, Jesús; Medina, Juan F.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2012-01-01

    Cl−/HCO3−anion exchanger 2 (AE2) participates in intracellular pH homeostasis and secretin-stimulated biliary bicarbonate secretion. AE2/SLC4A2 gene expression is reduced in liver and blood mononuclear cells from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Our previous findings of hepatic and immunological features mimicking PBC in Ae2-deficient mice strongly suggest that decreased AE2 expression might be involved in the pathogenesis of PBC. Here we tested the potential role of hsa-microRNA 506 (miR-506) – predicted as candidate to target AE2 mRNA – for the decreased expression of AE2 in PBC. Real-time qPCR showed that miR-506 expression is increased in PBC livers versus normal liver specimens. In situ hybridization in liver sections confirmed that miR-506 is upregulated in the intrahepatic bile ducts of PBC livers compared with normal and primary-sclerosing-cholangitis livers. Precursor-mediated overexpression of miR-506 in SV40-immortalized normal human cholangiocytes (H69 cells) led to decreased AE2 protein expression and activity, as indicated by immunoblotting and microfluorimetry, respectively. Moreover, miR-506 overexpression in 3D-cultured H69 cholangiocytes blocked the secretin-stimulated expansion of cystic structures developed under the three-dimensional conditions. Luciferase assays and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that miR-506 specifically may bind the 3’UTR region of AE2 mRNA and prevent protein translation. Finally, cultured PBC cholangiocytes showed decreased AE2 activity together with miR-506 overexpression compared to normal human cholangiocytes, and, transfection of PBC cholangiocytes with anti-miR-506 was able to improve their AE2 activity. Conclusion miR-506 is upregulated in cholangiocytes from PBC patients, binds the 3’UTR region of AE2 mRNA and prevents protein translation, leading to diminished AE2 activity and impaired biliary secretory functions. In view of the putative pathogenic role of decreased AE2 in PBC, mi

  16. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Associated with HLA, IL12A, and IL12RB2 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Liu, Xiangdong; Xu, Chun; Lu, Yue; Xie, Gang; Lu, Yan; Gu, Xiangjun; Walker, Erin J.; Jing, Kaiyan; Juran, Brian D.; Mason, Andrew L.; Myers, Robert P.; Peltekian, Kevork M.; Ghent, Cameron N.; Coltescu, Catalina; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Heathcote, E. Jenny; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic granulomatous cholangitis, characteristically associated with antimitochondrial antibodies. Twin and family aggregation data suggest that there is a significant genetic predisposition to primary biliary cirrhosis, but the susceptibility loci are unknown. METHODS To identify genetic loci conferring a risk for primary biliary cirrhosis, we carried out a genomewide association analysis in which DNA samples from 2072 Canadian and U.S. subjects (536 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and 1536 controls) were genotyped for more than 300,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Sixteen of the SNPs most strongly associated with primary biliary cirrhosis were genotyped in two independent replication sets. We carried out fine-mapping studies across three loci associated with primary biliary cirrhosis. RESULTS We found significant associations between primary biliary cirrhosis and 13 loci across the HLA class II region; the HLA-DQB1 locus (encoding the major histocompatibility complex class II, DQ β chain 1) had the strongest association (P = 1.78×10−19; odds ratio for patients vs. controls, 1.75). Primary biliary cirrhosis was also significantly and reproducibly associated with two SNPs at the IL12A locus (encoding interleukin-12α), rs6441286 (P = 2.42×10−14; odds ratio, 1.54) and rs574808 (P = 1.88×10−13; odds ratio, 1.54), and one SNP at the IL12RB2 locus (encoding interleukin-12 receptor β2), rs3790567 (P = 2.76×10−11; odds ratio, 1.51). Fine-mapping analysis showed that a five-allele haplotype in the 3′ flank of IL12A was significantly associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (P = 1.15×10−34). We found a modest genomewide association (P<5.0×10−5) with the risk of disease for SNPs at the STAT4 locus (encoding signal transducer and activator of transcription 4) and the CTLA4 locus (encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated protein 4) and 10 other loci. CONCLUSIONS Our data show significant

  17. Identification of Novel Cellular Targets in Biliary Tract Cancers Using Global Gene Expression Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Donna E.; Rahman, Ayman; Hidalgo, Manuel; Thuluvath, Paul J.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Shulick, Richard; Ku, Ja-Lok; Park, Jae-Gahb; Miyazaki, Kohje; Ashfaq, Raheela; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Varma, Ram; Hawthorne, Lesleyann; Geradts, Joseph; Argani, Pedram; Maitra, Anirban

    2003-01-01

    Biliary tract carcinoma carries a poor prognosis, and difficulties with clinical management in patients with advanced disease are often due to frequent late-stage diagnosis, lack of serum markers, and limited information regarding biliary tumor pathogenesis. RNA-based global analyses of gene expression have led to the identification of a large number of up-regulated genes in several cancer types. We have used the recently developed Affymetrix U133A gene expression microarrays containing nearly 22,000 unique transcripts to obtain global gene expression profiles from normal biliary epithelial scrapings (n = 5), surgically resected biliary carcinomas (n = 11), and biliary cancer cell lines (n = 9). Microarray hybridization data were normalized using dCHIP (http://www.dCHIP.org) to identify differentially up-regulated genes in primary biliary cancers and biliary cancer cell lines and their expression profiles was compared to that of normal epithelial scrapings using the dCHIP software as well as Significance Analysis of Microarrays or SAM (http://www-stat.stanford.edu/∼tibs/SAM/). Comparison of the dCHIP and SAM datasets revealed an overlapping list of 282 genes expressed at greater than threefold levels in the cancers compared to normal epithelium (t-test P <0.1 in dCHIP, and median false discovery rate <10 in SAM). Several pathways integral to tumorigenesis were up-regulated in the biliary cancers, including proliferation and cell cycle antigens (eg, cyclins D2 and E2, cdc2/p34, and geminin), transcription factors (eg, homeobox B7 and islet-1), growth factors and growth factor receptors (eg, hepatocyte growth factor, amphiregulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor), and enzymes modulating sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents (eg, cystathionine β synthase, dCMP deaminase, and CTP synthase). In addition, we identified several “pathway” genes that are rapidly emerging as novel therapeutic targets in cancer (eg, cytosolic phospholipase A2, an upstream

  18. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (p<0.05, small volume correction). The expression of analgesia was associated with reduction in signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus in three brainstem regions: the caudalis subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, i.e., the primary synapse, the region of the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis and in the

  19. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in an infant with obstructive jaundice caused by neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Saettini, Francesco; Agazzi, Roberto; Giraldi, Eugenia; Foglia, Carlo; Cavalleri, Laura; Morali, Laura; Fasolini, Giorgio; Spotti, Angelica; Provenzi, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Neuroblastoma presenting with obstructive jaundice is a rare event. Management of this condition includes surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, temporary cholecystostomy tube, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and internal biliary drainage (IBD). We herein describe our experience with one infant affected by neuroblastoma presenting with jaundice, who successfully underwent percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). This report introduces PTBD as a viable treatment option for neuroblastoma and obstructive jaundice and provides a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:25551550

  20. Partial Internal Biliary Diversion: A Solution for Intractable Pruritus in Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Ramaswamy; Suresh, Natarajan; Sathiyasekeran, Malathi; Ramachandran, Priya

    2011-01-01

    Biliary diversion offers a potential option for intractable pruritus in children with chronic cholestatic disorders. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is an inherited disorder of impaired bile acid transport and excretion, which presents with jaundice and pruritus in the first few months of life and progresses to cirrhosis by infancy or adolescence. We report a child with PFIC type 1 who underwent internal biliary diversion for intractable pruritus and was relieved of his symptoms. PMID:21546727