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Sample records for acalculous biliary pain

  1. Cholecystokinin (CCK) functional cholescintigraphy (FC) in patients suspected of acalculous biliary disease (ABD)

    SciTech Connect

    Fink-Bennett, D.; De Ridder, P.; Kolozsi, W.; Gordon, R.; Rapp, J.

    1984-01-01

    To determine if CCK FC can aid in the diagnosis (Dx.) of ABD, the authors retrospectively analyzed the max. gallbladder (GB) ejection fraction response (EFR) to CCK in 240 patients (pts.) with persistent symptoms of biliary colic, a normal GB Ultrasound exam and/or OCG. Each pt. (NPO after 12 A.M.) received 5 mCi of technetium (Tc)-99 Hepatolite. After max GB filling, .02 ..mu..g/kg CCK was administered (1-3 minutes) I.V. Background corrected GB EFs were determined q.5 min x4 by ratioing the pre-CCK GB cts. minus post-CCK GB cts. to pre-CCK GB cts. In 131/240 pts. the max. GBEFR was <35%; 76 had a cholecystectomy (Cx.), 2 an exploratory lap., 53 medical Rx. Of the 76 post-Cx. pts., 74 had chronic cholecystitis (CC) (67 acalculous, 7 calculous), 2 were normal. Exploratory lap. pts, had no GB disease. Clinically 69/70 (4 no followup, 1 no change) post-op CC pts. are improved. One normal GB pt. has persistent pain, the other a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia. Of the 53 medical Rx. pts. 23 are lost to followup, and 2 died. Twenty-four are clinically felt to have ABD, 4 are not. In 109/240 pts. the max GBEFR was >35%. Eleven underwent surgery, 98 medical Rx. 4/11 Cx. apts had CAC, 7 were normal. Of the 98 medical Rx. pts. 21 lack followup, 71 are clinically felt not to have ABD; 6 are felt to have ABD. CCK FC appears to be a useful test for the detection of ABD. Its predictive value (GBEF <35%) in Cx. pts. is 97%; in all pts. (assuming medical Rx. correct), 94% (sensitivity - 91%, specificity - 93%).

  2. [A case of chronic acalculous cholecystitis diagnosed by delayed contrast emptying in gallbladder].

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Jong Min; Coh, Jane; Jung, In Sung; Kang, Ki Man; Jung, Shin Hong; Lee, Gye Sung; Kim, Anna; Kwak, Seung Soo; Lee, Mi Sun

    2004-05-01

    Chronic acalculous cholecystitis is a diagnosis of exclusion in patients complaining acalculous biliary pain. The possible causes of acalculous biliary pain are chronic gallbladder (GB) inflammation, GB dysfunction, cholesterolosis, cystic duct stenosis or microlithiasis. Recently, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the choice of treatment for acalculous biliary pain. We experienced a 32-year-old woman whose initial symptoms were right upper quadrant pain and nausea only. The abdominal computed tomography, DISIDA scan, and upper and lower endoscopic examinations were nonspecific. Up to 48 hours after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, contrast emptying of GB was delayed, implying dysfunctional GB. As the patient's right upper quadrant pain and tenderness became aggravated, the laparoscopic cholecystectomy was done and the final diagnosis of chronic acalculous cholecystitis was confirmed. PMID:15156120

  3. Biliary pain in postcholecystectomy patients without biliary obstruction. A prospective radionuclide study.

    PubMed

    Grimon, G; Buffet, C; André, L; Etienne, J P; Desgrez, A

    1991-03-01

    Biliary pain without obvious biliary obstruction is common in postcholecystectomy patients. We studied 20 symptomatic patients with episodes of biliary-type pain after cholecystectomy (all having undergone endoscopic retrograde cholangiography), and in 18 asymptomatic postcholecystectomy controls. We performed quantitative hepatobiliary radionuclide analysis with dimethyl-imidodiacetic acid. From a series of 90 dynamic images at 1-min intervals using a gamma camera coupled to a computer, time-activity curves were produced in regions of interest in the liver, intrahepatic biliary tree, common duct, and heart, from which quantitative biliary excretion indexes were obtained. The results demonstrate a biliary kinetic dysfunction in patients with postcholecystectomy pain without morphological abnormalities. PMID:1995268

  4. Chronic biliary colic associated with ketamine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nowfal, Ahmed; Al-Abed, Yahya A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Biliary colic is a common clinical presentation, with the majority of cases being related to gallstone disease. However, rarely, patients may present with biliary symptoms without evidence of gallbladder stones – referred to as acalculous gallstone disease. This case report details a rare case of chronic biliary colic associated with ketamine abuse. Case presentation A 24-year-old Caucasian female presented to the emergency department with a history of intermittent right upper quadrant pain associated with nausea and malaise. She had experienced bouts of similar symptoms three times a year for the past 4 years. Various investigations had been conducted during her multiple admissions, which showed possible dilatation of the common bile duct, with no evidence of gallstones. Conclusion Patients can present with a dilated common bile duct and an acalculous cholecystitis. This requires considerable investigation, with an emphasis on drug history, especially with the current rise of recreational hallucinogenic drug abuse. PMID:27330331

  5. Fatty meal ultrasonography in chronic acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Donen, Anna; Kantor, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acalculous cholecystits typically presents with biliary symptoms, normal blood tests and unremarkable ultrasound, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. However, cholescintigraphy may show reduced gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF). There are no reports on using ultrasound to measure GBEF in adults. Twenty-eight patients with the above presentation underwent ultrasound before and after ingestion of a standardized fatty meal. Consequently, GBEF was calculated. Seven patients had reduced GBEFs (<38%). Two of these patients underwent cholecystectomy and both were found to have chronic gallbladder inflammation. Three patients with normal GBEFs underwent cholecystectomy and were also found to have chronic gallbladder inflammation. There may be a role for fatty meal ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic acalculous cholecystitis, but it should be used more widely in this patient cohort for its role to be established. It ideally needs to performed alongside cholescintigraphy for the comparison of accuracy. PMID:25409675

  6. Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis: an unusual location of uremic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chun; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2009-09-01

    Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis is a rare but potentially fatal disease. An increased bleeding tendency is present in both acute and chronic renal failure with impaired platelet function. We herein present a case of hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis in a hemodialysis patient who suffered from acute abdomen and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The pathogenesis may have been associated with ischemia and reperfusion injury, eventually leading to necrosis of the gallbladder wall. Abdominal ultrasound can aid in diagnosis. Biliary colic, jaundice, and melena are the typical symptoms of hemorrhagic cholecystitis, particularly in a patient with unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19762317

  7. Parasitic Infection of the Gallbladder: Cystoisospora belli Infection as a Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain and Acalculous Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Matthew G; Lee, Johnathan Y

    2016-06-01

    Herein we describe two cases of Cystoisospora belli infection of the gallbladder in patients with chronic abdominal pain and review the published literature to date. C. belli is an intracellular protozoan parasite that typically infects the small bowel of immunocompromised hosts. Little is known of the significance of C. belli infection of the gallbladder at this point as only four cases have been reported as yet, only one of which occurred in an immunocompetent patient. It is often treatable with antibiotics, and the patient's immune status, including HIV testing, should be investigated. Neither of the patients at our institution was found to be immunocompromised, and HIV-1/2 antibody testing was non-reactive in both. PMID:27526491

  8. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2010-06-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) can develop with or without gallstones after surgery and in critically ill or injured patients. Diabetes mellitus, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, shock, and cardiac arrest also have been associated with AAC. The pathogenesis of AAC is complex and multifactorial. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is most accurate for the diagnosis of AAC in the critically ill patient. CT is probably of comparable accuracy, but carries both advantages and disadvantages. Rapid improvement may be expected when AAC is diagnosed correctly and cholecystostomy is performed timely. PMID:20478490

  9. Paravertebral Block: An Improved Method of Pain Control in Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. McCowan, Timothy C.; DeValdenebro, Miguel; Wright, Lonnie B.; Workman, James L.; Culp, William C.

    2006-12-15

    Background and Purpose. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage remains a painful procedure in many cases despite the routine use of large amounts of intravenous sedation. We present a feasibility study of thoracic paravertebral blocks in an effort to reduce pain during and following the procedure and reduce requirements for intravenous sedation. Methods. Ten consecutive patients undergoing biliary drainage procedures received fluoroscopically guided paravertebral blocks and then had supplemental intravenous sedation as required to maintain patient comfort. Levels T8-T9 and T9-T10 on the right were targeted with 10-20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sedation requirements and pain levels were recorded. Results. Ten biliary drainage procedures in 8 patients were performed for malignancy in 8 cases and for stones in 2. The mean midazolam use was 1.13 mg IV, and the mean fentanyl requirement was 60.0 {mu}g IV in the block patients. Two episodes of hypotension, which responded promptly to volume replacement, may have been related to the block. No serious complications were encountered. The mean pain score when traversing the chest wall, liver capsule, and upon entering the bile ducts was 0.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, with 1 patient reporting a pain level of 1 and 9 reporting 0. The mean peak pain score, encountered when manipulating at the common bile duct level or when addressing stones there, was 5.4 and ranged from 0 to 10. Conclusions. Thoracic paravertebral block with intravenous sedation supplementation appears to be a feasible method of pain control during biliary interventions.

  10. Biliary ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Arcilla, C A; Varilla, A

    1978-01-01

    The presenting clinical features of a series of cases of biliary tract ascariasis are described, in particular the characteristic colicky pain which occurs. The term 'ascaritic biliary pain' is introduced for the symptom diagnostic of live Ascaris adult worms inside the biliary passages. Methods of diagnosis before, and in the course of, operation are discussed and seem adequate. The management of worms discovered in the bile ducts, and those in the proximal small bowel, is described.

  11. A Case Report of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Beyazal Polat, Hatice; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi are a rare condition. A 24-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with abdominal pain, nausea, fever, headache, urinary burning, and bloody urine. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiological evaluations, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for two weeks. After the treatment, the patient's clinical and laboratory findings improved. Acute acalculous cholecystitis due to Salmonella Typhi concomitant with acute hemorrhagic cystitis is very rare and might be difficult to diagnose. Infectious agents such as Salmonella Typhi should be considered when acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis are detected in adult patients with no underlying diseases. PMID:25161668

  12. Dengue fever with acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Keng-Liang; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Eng, Hock-Liew; Kuo, Chung-Huang

    2003-06-01

    Dengue fever (DF) with acute acalculous cholecystitis is rarely reported. To investigate the incidence, treatment, and prognosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis in DF patients, we retrospectively studied 10 patients with DF and acute acalculous cholecystitis. From October 2001 to July 2002, 131 patients were diagnosed with DF. Ten of 131 DF patients (7.63%) had complications of acute acalculous cholecystitis. Two patients underwent cholecystectomy and one underwent percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage due to poor resolution of acute acalculous cholecystitis. We found acute acalculous cholecystitis in a small proportion of patients with DF. In our experience, closely monitoring vital signs to avoid shock and correct thrombocytopenia to avoid bleeding could be adequate for most patients. In some cases, surgical treatment may be needed for DF fever patients with complications of diffuse peritonitis.

  13. Acute acalculous cholecystitis caused by Hepatitis C: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Ahmed; Osman, Medhet; Bonnet, Gerard; Ghamri, Nafiz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is rarely encountered in clinical practice and has a high morbidity and mortality. AAC caused by viral hepatitis, with hepatitis A, B and EBV infections are rare, but well documented in the literature. Hepatitis C virus has not been reported as cause of AAC. This case report documents the first case of AAC associated with Acute Hepatitis C. Presenting concerns We present a 40 years old female with abdominal pain. She has a history of previous HCV infection. Her liver function tests were markedly deranged with elevated inflammatory markers. USS scan showed rather a very unusual appearance of an inflamed gallbladder with no gallstones and associated acute hepatitis, confirmed by an abdominal CT scan. HCV RNA PCR confirms flair up of the virus. The patient was managed conservatively in the hospital with follow up USS scan and Liver function tests showed complete recovery. Follow up HCV RNA PCR also returned to an undetectable level. The patient recovered completely with no adverse outcomes. Conclusion This case report is to the first to document the association between acute HCV and AAC. Despite being uncommon in western countries, viral hepatitis should be suspected as a causative agent of AAC, particularly when there is abnormal liver function test and no biliary obstruction. PMID:26722714

  14. Spontaneous acalculous gallbladder perforation

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, David; Qazi, Almas; Lisa, Selina; Vashisht, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    An 86-year-old woman, 4 days post-operative following a right-sided Austin-Moore arthroplasty, reported abdominal pain around a known umbilical hernia and became increasingly confused. A diagnosis of incarcerated umbilical hernia was made. At surgery, on entering the peritoneal cavity, bile was immediately noted. The operation was converted to a laparotomy and a perforation was noted in the gallbladder. An open cholecystectomy was performed. Macroscopically the gallbladder was perforated in multiple places, was thin walled and did not contain gallstones. This case demonstrates the difficulty in diagnosing an apparently spontaneous gallbladder perforation in a cognitively frail patient. PMID:25293685

  15. Spontaneous acalculous gallbladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, David; Qazi, Almas; Lisa, Selina; Vashisht, Rajiv

    2014-10-07

    An 86-year-old woman, 4 days post-operative following a right-sided Austin-Moore arthroplasty, reported abdominal pain around a known umbilical hernia and became increasingly confused. A diagnosis of incarcerated umbilical hernia was made. At surgery, on entering the peritoneal cavity, bile was immediately noted. The operation was converted to a laparotomy and a perforation was noted in the gallbladder. An open cholecystectomy was performed. Macroscopically the gallbladder was perforated in multiple places, was thin walled and did not contain gallstones. This case demonstrates the difficulty in diagnosing an apparently spontaneous gallbladder perforation in a cognitively frail patient.

  16. Acute acalculous cholecystitis simulating Mirizzi syndrome: a very rare condition.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, Sushil K

    2009-02-01

    Mirizzi syndrome, a rare complication of chronic cholelithiasis, is caused by an impacted stone in the cystic duct or the neck of the gallbladder. Patients present with abdominal pain, fever, and obstructive jaundice. The cholangiographic finding is a smooth stricture caused by lateral compression of the common hepatic duct. A similar appearance on cholangiogram can result from carcinoma of the gallbladder, carcinoma of the cystic duct, or hilar adenopathy. Acute acalculous cholecystitis simulating Mirizzi syndrome is extremely rare. This is the report of such a case in which marked inflammatory changes around the neck of the gallbladder likely caused significant mechanical obstruction of the common hepatic duct. PMID:19139716

  17. Do We Really Need Additional Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Computed Tomography for Differential Diagnosis in Triage of Middle-Aged Subjects With Suspected Biliary Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In Kyeom; Lee, Yoon Suk; Kim, Jaihwan; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Enhanced computed tomography (CT) is widely used for evaluating acute biliary pain in the emergency department (ED). However, concern about radiation exposure from CT has also increased. We investigated the usefulness of pre-contrast CT for differential diagnosis in middle-aged subjects with suspected biliary pain. A total of 183 subjects, who visited the ED for suspected biliary pain from January 2011 to December 2012, were included. Retrospectively, pre-contrast phase and multiphase CT findings were reviewed and the detection rate of findings suggesting disease requiring significant treatment by noncontrast CT (NCCT) was compared with cases detected by multiphase CT. Approximately 70% of total subjects had a significant condition, including 1 case of gallbladder cancer and 126 (68.8%) cases requiring intervention (122 biliary stone-related diseases, 3 liver abscesses, and 1 liver hemangioma). The rate of overlooking malignancy without contrast enhancement was calculated to be 0% to 1.5%. Biliary stones and liver space-occupying lesions were found equally on NCCT and multiphase CT. Calculated probable rates of overlooking acute cholecystitis and biliary obstruction were maximally 6.8% and 4.2% respectively. Incidental significant finding unrelated with pain consisted of 1 case of adrenal incidentaloma, which was also observed in NCCT. NCCT might be sufficient to detect life-threatening or significant disease requiring early treatment in young adults with biliary pain. PMID:25700321

  18. Conservation of pancreatic tissue by combined gastric, biliary, and pancreatic duct drainage for pain from chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L

    1985-04-01

    In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the sclerosing process of the pancreas may constrict not only the pancreatic duct for also the bile duct and duodenum. This study analyzes the prevalence of these obstructive lesions in 58 consecutive patients with chronic pancreatitis requiring surgery for either pain (57 patients) or for painless jaundice (1 patient). There was significant biliary obstruction in 21, 4 of whom also had symptomatic duodenal obstruction. All 21 patients with biliary and duodenal obstruction were among the 38 with a dilated pancreatic duct suitable for pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure). None of the 20 patients with small duct pancreatitis had biliary or duodenal obstruction. Pseudocysts were distributed evenly between the two groups (9 of 38 patients with a dilated duct versus 4 of 20 patients with small duct pancreatitis). Pancreaticojejunostomy combined with choledochoenterostomy and gastrojejunostomy in appropriately selected patients provided good to excellent long-term (mean 3.6 years) relief of pain in 30 of 36 patients (83 percent). There was no correlation between successful relief of pain and development of pancreatic exocrine or endocrine insufficiency or calcification. Stenosis of the bile duct developed some years subsequent to pancreaticojejunostomy in four patients and required a second operation for choledochoenterostomy in three. Three other patients required secondary pancreatic resections due to failure of the pancreaticojejunostomy to relieve pain. It is often possible to effect excellent relief of symptoms with maximal conservation of remaining pancreatic functions despite sclerotic obstruction of multiple organ systems.

  19. [A Case of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis During Infectious Mononucleosis Caused by the Epstein-Barr Virus in a Young Woman].

    PubMed

    Ono, Shiro; Kobayashi, Tadanao; Nishio, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common disease and is mainly asymptomatic during childhood, whereas infectious mononucleosis with clinical signs such as fever, pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly often occurs in adolescents and adults with primary infection. Acalculous cholecystitis has been reported as a rare complication. We report herein a case of acalculous cholecystitis accompanied by infectious mononucleosis by EBV, which was treated successfully by medical treatment. A 33-year-old woman who had been admitted by fever, pharyngitis and lymphadenopathy developed a right upper quadrant pain, that was diagnosed as acalculous cholecystitis based on an imaging study. Antibiotic treatment did not resolve the symptoms, and surgical intervention was considered. We diagnosed her as having infectious mononucleosis based on a typical physical presentation and seropositivity for the EBV viral capsid antigen, suggesting that the acalculous cholecystatis might have been a complication of the EBV infection. After the administration of glucocorticoid and acyclovir, the patient became afebrile and the abdominal pain disappeared. Though acalculous cholecystitis rarely accompanies infectious mononucleosis caused by EBV, clinicians should be aware of this complication to avoid unnecessary cholecystectomy. PMID:27529970

  20. Henoch-Schönlein purpura complicated by acalculous cholecystitis and intussusception, and following recurrence with appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Güler, Ekrem; Çetinkaya, Ahmet; Karakaya, Ali Erdal; Göksügür, Yalçın; Katı, Ömer; Güler, Ahmet Gökhan; Davutoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is the most common childhood systemic vasculitis. Gastro-intestinal involvement occurs in two-thirds of patients. The characteristic skin lesions generally precede abdominal symptoms or present concurrently. A 7-year-old boy presented with intussusception and acalculous cholecystitis and had a cholecystectomy. Two weeks later he was re-admitted with features typical of HSP which responded to corticosteroids. Eleven months later he presented with abdominal pain and recurrence of HSP and, at laparotomy, there was acute appendicitis. This is the first case of a child presenting with HSP complicated by acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:27077617

  1. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Steven B.; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  2. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in a patient with juvenile dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Bruno Fernandes; Martins, Teresa; Santos, Maria José; Azeredo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare autoimmune disease, characterised by a systemic capillary vasculopathy that typically affects skin and muscle. Gastrointestinal involvement is relatively rare. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl admitted for investigation of skin rash, progressive symmetric proximal muscle weakness, dysphagia and weight loss. The diagnosis of JDM was confirmed and during hospitalisation the patient developed abrupt and intense right hypocondrium pain associated with nausea and vomiting. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a thick gallbladder wall (8 mm) with pericholecystic fluid and no evidence of gallstones. An acute acalculous cholecystitis was assumed and the patient was started on intravenous fluids, prednisolone and analgaesic therapy. Clinical resolution was verified after 48 h. We hypothesised that the vasculitic process of JDM could have been the basis for this complication as described in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25239990

  3. [Asymptomatic celiac disease in patient with chronic acalculous cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Dolgasheva, G M; Krums, L M; Bystrovskaia, E V; Sabel'nikova, E A; Gudkova, R B; Vorob'eva, N N; Lishchinskaia, A A

    2011-01-01

    We described a patient 40 years old, admitted to the clinic with periodic attacks of pain in the right upper quadrant. With ultrasound it was confirmed chronic acalculous cholecystitis, and at endoscopy and multiple biopsies revealed atrophy of the mucosa of the duodenum (DM), corresponding to celiac disease (stage III in the Marsh classification). Titer of antibodies to gliadin (AGA) and tissue transglutaminase (AtTG) were higher: 60 and 110 units/ml, respectively, at a rate of 10 units/ml. The patient was assigned a lifetime adherence to a gluten-free diet, serologic test and a control endoscopy with biopsy at 6 months. The important role of the doctor-endoscopist in the diagnosis of latent forms of celiac disease. The significance of DM atrophy in the pathogenesis of patients with chronic cholecystitis. PMID:21695960

  4. Mechanisms of impaired gallbladder contractile response in chronic acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Merg, Anders R; Kalinowski, Scott E; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Mitros, Frank A; Ephgrave, Kimberly S; Cullen, Joseph J

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the impaired gallbladder contractile response in chronic acalculous cholecystitis are unknown. To determine the mechanisms that may lead to impaired gallbladder emptying in chronic acalculous cholecystitis, gallbladder specimens removed during hepatic resection (controls) and after cholecystectomy for chronic acalculous cholecystitis were attached to force transducers and placed in tissue baths with oxygenated Krebs solution. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) (1 to 10 Hz, 0.1 msec, 70 V) or the contractile agonists, CCK-8 (10(-9) to 10(-5)) or K(+) (80 mmol/L), were placed separately in the tissue baths and changes in tension were determined. Patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis had a mean gallbladder ejection fraction of 12% +/- 4%. Pathologic examination of all gallbladders removed for chronic acalculous cholecystitis revealed chronic cholecystitis. Spontaneous contractile activity was present in gallbladder strips in 83% of control specimens but only 29% of gallbladder strips from patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis (P < 0.05 vs. controls). CCK-8 contractions were decreased by 54% and EFS-stimulated contractions were decreased by 50% in the presence of chronic acalculous cholecystitis (P < 0.05 vs. controls). K(+)-induced contractions were similar between control and chronic acalculous cholecystitis gallbladder strips. The impaired gallbladder emptying in chronic acalculous cholecystitis appears to be due to diminished spontaneous contractile activity and decreased contractile responsiveness to both CCK and EFS.

  5. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acalculous cholecystitis in a neutropenic patient after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ejduk, Anna; Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Szczepanik, Andrzej B.

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) is most frequently reported in critically ill patients following sepsis, extensive injury or surgery. It is rather uncommon as a chemotherapy-induced complication, which is usually life-threatening in neutropenic patients subjected to myelosuppressive therapy. A 23-year-old patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was subjected to myelosuppressive chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, pegaspargase). After the first chemotherapy cycle the patient was neutropenic and feverish; she presented with vomiting and pain in the right epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder with wall thickening up to 14 mm. The ACC was diagnosed. Medical therapy included a broad spectrum antibiotic regimen and granulocyte-colony stimulating factors. On the second day after ACC diagnosis the patient's general condition worsened. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. The resected gallbladder showed no signs of bacterial or leukemic infiltrates. The postoperative course was uneventful. In the management of neutropenic patients with ACC surgical treatment is as important as pharmacological therapy. PMID:25337176

  6. Choledocholithiasis in African American and Hispanic patients: a comparison between painless presentation and classical biliary pain with regards to clinical manifestations and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Abbasi J; Akhtar, Aslam A; Padda, Manmeet S

    2014-06-01

    Choledocholithiasis (CDL) usually presents with biliary pain. Painless CDL is also known to occur, especially in the elderly. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the mode of presentation (painful vs. painless) influences the clinical course and outcomes of CDL in African American and Hispanic patients. Ten years of admission and discharge records (January 1998-December 2007) were reviewed retrospectively, yielding 527 community hospital patients, aged 23-97 years, with the final diagnosis of CDL. Patients with painless presentation had higher odds of having comorbidities compared to patients presenting with pain. However, patients who presented with biliary pain were predominantly younger (mean age 34 years), and 59% were Hispanic females (p = 0.001). In our study painless CDL was associated with higher morbidity and mortality.

  7. Acute and chronic acalculous cholecystitis associated with aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fuyuki F; Hara, Yoshiaki; Kamei, Masako; Tanaka, Michio; Yasuno, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    Acalculous cholecystitis is a rare but life-threatening disease, but its pathogenesis is not fully revealed yet. We experienced two acalculous cholecystitis cases associated with aortic dissection. In Case 1, acalculous cholecystitis occurred just after the exacerbation of the aortic dissection. Laparotomy showed necrotized cholecystitis with fresh thrombi formation. Case 2 developed acalculous cholecystitis on the 65th hospital day of aortic dissection. Laparotomy revealed the perforation of the gallbladder. Histological study revealed fibrosis and hemosiderosis in the subserosal layer. The histological findings of these two patients are quite different: Case 1 is acute ischemic and Case 2 is chronic ischemic. While a few cases of acute ischemic cholecystitis have been reported previously, chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC) has not been documented. History of aortic dissection could be a risk factor of acute and CAC due to relatively decreased splanchnic blood flow. PMID:26232599

  8. Utility of point-of-care biliary ultrasound in the evaluation of emergency patients with isolated acute non-traumatic epigastric pain.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Srikar; Morrison, Daniel; Lyon, Matthew; Zeger, Wes; Krueger, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    To determine the utility of emergency physician-performed point-of-care biliary ultrasound in the evaluation of emergency department (ED) patients with isolated acute non-traumatic epigastric pain. This was a multi-center prospective observational study of adult patients presenting to the ED with isolated acute non-traumatic epigastric pain. Patients with abdominal tenderness at any site other than the epigastric region, or with a history of gall stones, cholecystectomy, gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic abdominal pain, trauma, or altered mental status were excluded. Emergency physician investigators performed point-of-care biliary ultrasound after clinical assessment. Demographic information, history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, additional diagnostic tests, and disposition data were collected. A total of 51 patients (39 women, 12 men) were enrolled. The mean age of the patients was 36.4 years ± 13.6 (SD). All subjects had isolated epigastric tenderness. Gallstones were found in 20/51 (39%, 95% CI 26-52%) on point-of-care biliary ultrasound. Of the 20 patients who had gallstones, eight had sonographic signs of chloecystitis. The treating emergency physicians' initial evaluation did not plan to include an ultrasound in 17/20 patients with gallstones. 19/20 patients were initially given a GI cocktail by the treating emergency physicians. Point-of-care biliary ultrasound detected gall stones in more than one-third of ED patients with isolated acute non-traumatic epigastric pain. All patients presenting to the ED with non-traumatic epigastric pain should be evaluated for biliary disease with an ultrasound imaging study. Bedside ultrasound can avoid misdiagnosis and expedite management in these patients.

  9. [The effectiveness of sulfate magnesium-calcium mineral water for the treatment of the patients presenting with chronic acalculous cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Tudakova, V G; Vladimirskiĭ, E V; Kunstman, T G

    2013-01-01

    This paper was designed to report the results of investigations into the therapeutic effectiveness of "Kluchi" sulfate magnesiumcalcium mineral water used to treat 194 patients presenting with chronic acalculous cholecystitis and different types of biliary tract dysfunction. The control group was comprised of 92 patients who took a diet. It was shown, that mineral water "Kluchi" exerted well apparent beneficial action on the motor function of the gallbladder and the sphincter apparatus. Moreover, drinking the mineral water improved colloidal stability of bile. It is concluded that the therapeutic application of "Kluchi" sulfate magnesium-calcium mineral water results in the reduction of bile lihogenicity, produces anti-inflammatory and choleretic effects, and promotes normalization of the motor and tonic condition of the biliary tract. PMID:23819416

  10. [Biochemical features of gallbladder bile in biliary tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, E Iu; Aleksandrova, A Iu; Beloborodova, E I; Didlovslaia, N A

    2007-06-01

    Sixty-two and 58 patients with hypo- and hypermotor biliary tract dysfunction (BTD), respectively, as well as 59 patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC) and 63 with opisthorchiasis-complicated CAC were examined. A control group comprised 33 patients of the same sex and age. All the patients underwent fractional duodenal intubation, followed by clinical, biochemical, and serological bile studies. All the examinees were found to increased gallbladder bile lithogenicity, minor changes being observed in biliary tract dysfunction and more pronounced ones being in opisthorchiasis. A biochemical study of gallbladder bile, followed by its lithogenicity correction, is recommended in the treatment of different forms of BTD. PMID:17682480

  11. [Current concepts of lithogenetic mechanism in the gallbladder and the role of biliary sludge in this process].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S

    2010-01-01

    A review of current data on cholelithiasis is presented. The concept of staged development of the pathological process in the biliary system is considered starting from dysfunction of gallbladder and sphincter apparatus of extrahepatic biliary ducts via chronic acalculous cholecystitis to chronic calculous cholecystitis. Other issues discussed include biliary acid metabolism; varieties, composition and formation of calculi in the gallbladder; biliary sludge and its role in cholelithogenesis. Debatable questions of sludge nature and composition as well as certain terminological problems are considered. PMID:21089450

  12. Biliary ascariasis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sarihan, H; Gürkök, S; Sari, A

    1995-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a worldwide intestinal infestation that may cause various complications. Biliary ascariasis, however, is a rare condition. We describe a child with biliary ascariasis. The patient's clinical symptoms were pain, vomiting and abdominal tenderness, and she was thought to have acute appendicitis. However, laboratory examination revealed high serum alkaline phosphatase and amylase levels, and ultrasonography and percutaneous cholangiography demonstrated biliary ascariasis. The patient was successfully treated with mebendazole and antispasmolytic drugs.

  13. [Laser therapy in complex treatment of chronic acalculous cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Burduli, N M; Raniuk, L G

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of various laser techniques in patients with exacerbation of chronic acalculous cholecystitis was studied. The subjects were 62 patients, in whom the diagnosis was made using clinical and instrumental tests. The patients were divided into three groups. Group I received conventional pharmacotherapy; group II received a course of intravenous laser therapy in addition to it; group III received a course of laseropuncture and low-intensive laser irradiation of the hepatic area in addition to pharmacotherapy. The best results according to clinical and instrumental data were achieved in group III. Thus, the study demonstrates advantages provided by laser therapy in complex treatment of exacerbation of chronic acalculous cholecystitis PMID:16924800

  14. Biliary sequelae of endoscopic sphincterotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, C.; Cleland, P.; Dick, R.; Masters, S.; Summerfield, J. A.; Sherlock, S.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty five patients were reviewed a mean of 36 months after successful endoscopic sphincterotomy for the removal of bile duct stones. All the patients had improved symptomatically but 20% had episodes of mild abdominal pain and a similar number had elevated serum gamma glutamyltranspeptidase activities (up to 3 times normal). In 12 patients (50%) biliary gas was demonstrated indicating reflux of duodenal contents. Clinical cholangitis did not occur. Aspiration liver biopsy revealed mild portal tract fibrosis and inflammation in patients with biliary reflux. Biliary reflux was significantly associated with mild upper abdominal pain (P less than 0.05). This study has shown that mild abnormalities of biliary function persist after endoscopic sphincterotomy. The long term consequence of these changes is unclear. PMID:2858846

  15. Biliary sludge.

    PubMed

    Ko, C W; Sekijima, J H; Lee, S P

    1999-02-16

    Biliary sludge was first described with the advent of ultrasonography in the 1970s. It is defined as a mixture of particulate matter and bile that occurs when solutes in bile precipitate. Its composition varies, but cholesterol monohydrate crystals, calcium bilirubinate, and other calcium salts are the most common components. The clinical course of biliary sludge varies, and complete resolution, a waxing and waning course, and progression to gallstones are all possible outcomes. Biliary sludge may cause complications, including biliary colic, acute pancreatitis, and acute cholecystitis. Clinical conditions and events associated with the formation of biliary sludge include rapid weight loss, pregnancy, ceftriaxone therapy, octreotide therapy, and bone marrow or solid organ transplantation. Sludge may be diagnosed on ultrasonography or bile microscopy, and the optimal diagnostic method depends on the clinical setting. This paper proposes a protocol for the microscopic diagnosis of sludge. There are no proven methods for the prevention of sludge formation, even in high-risk patients, and patients should not be routinely monitored for the development of sludge. Asymptomatic patients with sludge can be managed expectantly. If patients with sludge develop symptoms or complications, cholecystectomy should be considered as the definitive therapy. Further studies of the pathogenesis, natural history, and clinical associations of biliary sludge will be essential to our understanding of gallstones and other biliary tract abnormalities.

  16. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare initial manifestation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Valdano; Pedro, Gertrudes Maria; Cordeiro, Lemuel Bornelli; de Miranda, Sandra Maria da Rocha Neto

    2016-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a very rare gastrointestinal manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus and becomes rarer as an initial manifestation. There are only two cases reported. The authors report a 20-year-old black woman that presented acute acalculous cholecystitis revealed by abdominal computed tomography. During hospitalization, she was diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus. Conservative treatment with antibiotics was performed with complete remission of the symptoms. Corticosteroid was started in ambulatory. Cholecystectomy has been the treatment of choice in acute acalculous cholecystitis as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient responded well to conservative treatment, and surgery was not required. This case is unique in the way that corticosteroid was started in ambulatory care. We should not forget that the acute acalculous cholecystitis can be the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus although its occurrence is very rare. Conservative treatment should be considered. Abdominal computed tomography was a determinant exam for better assessment of acute acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:27267533

  17. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare initial manifestation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Valdano; Pedro, Gertrudes Maria; Cordeiro, Lemuel Bornelli; de Miranda, Sandra Maria da Rocha Neto

    2016-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a very rare gastrointestinal manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus and becomes rarer as an initial manifestation. There are only two cases reported. The authors report a 20-year-old black woman that presented acute acalculous cholecystitis revealed by abdominal computed tomography. During hospitalization, she was diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus. Conservative treatment with antibiotics was performed with complete remission of the symptoms. Corticosteroid was started in ambulatory. Cholecystectomy has been the treatment of choice in acute acalculous cholecystitis as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient responded well to conservative treatment, and surgery was not required. This case is unique in the way that corticosteroid was started in ambulatory care. We should not forget that the acute acalculous cholecystitis can be the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus although its occurrence is very rare. Conservative treatment should be considered. Abdominal computed tomography was a determinant exam for better assessment of acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  18. Evaluation of the role of prostaglandins E and F in acalculous gallbladder disease

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Y.G.; Kaminski, D.L.; Thomas, L.

    1986-03-01

    Prostaglandins have been shown to play a role in gallbladder disease. This study was performed to evaluate prostaglandin E and F production by human gallbladder mucosal cells and muscle tissue from patients undergoing cholecystectomy for acalculous gallbladder disease. These results were compared to values produced by gall bladders removed from patients with no known gallbladder disease. Five patient underwent cholecystectomy for acute and five for chronic acalculous cholecystitis. Gallbladder mucosal cells were separated from muscle wall by submucosal injection of EDTA and shaking in tissue culture media. Prostaglandin levels were measured in mucosal cell and muscle tissue homogenate by radioimmunoassay (ng/mg homogenate protein). Homogenate prostaglandin E concentrations were significantly increased in mucosa and muscle tissue in gall bladders from patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Chronic acalculous gallbladder disease was not associated with changes in prostaglandin formation when compared to values produced by gall bladders from asymptomatic patients. Acute acalculous cholecystitis may be a prostaglandin mediated disorder.

  19. [Inflammatory diseases of the gall bladder and biliary system. I. Imaging--cholelithasis--inflammation of the gall bladder].

    PubMed

    Helmberger, H; Kammer, B

    2005-05-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common affliction of the gallbladder and biliary tract. Including its complications, gallstone disease represents the basis for cholecystitis and cholangitis in the majority of cases. Inflammatory diseases of the biliary system are divided into acute and chronic forms originating from the gallbladder as well as from the biliary tract. Although acute calculous cholecystitis is the most common form, gangrenous, and emphysematous inflammation of the gallbladder as well as gallbladder empyema are included in this group of diseases. In the chronic forms, calculous and acalculous inflammation is also differentiated. Recent developments in cross-sectional imaging in sonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging offer numerous tools for depicting the biliary system with high diagnostic accuracy. Invasive imaging modalities of the biliary system are mainly used for therapeutic aspects. PMID:15875153

  20. [Toxocarosis and acalculous acute cholecystitis: Consequence or coincidence?].

    PubMed

    Strickler, Alexis; Vásquez, Natalia; Maggi, Leonardo; Hernández, Juvenal; Hidalgo, Ximena

    2016-06-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic larval parasitosis listed as one of the five most important neglected diseases by the CDC. The larvae can spread systemically and migrate to different tissues including liver and gallbladder. Acalculous acute cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare disease in children. The diagnosis is based on clinical parameters and imaging criteria. It has been reported in relation to sepsis, shock, trauma, burns, severe systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, infections and also in healthy children. We report a pediatric case of toxocarosis, with clinical symptoms and imaging criteria compatible with AAC treated medically, and discuss the relationship between toxocarosis and AAC based on published evidence.

  1. [Toxocarosis and acalculous acute cholecystitis: Consequence or coincidence?].

    PubMed

    Strickler, Alexis; Vásquez, Natalia; Maggi, Leonardo; Hernández, Juvenal; Hidalgo, Ximena

    2016-06-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic larval parasitosis listed as one of the five most important neglected diseases by the CDC. The larvae can spread systemically and migrate to different tissues including liver and gallbladder. Acalculous acute cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare disease in children. The diagnosis is based on clinical parameters and imaging criteria. It has been reported in relation to sepsis, shock, trauma, burns, severe systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, infections and also in healthy children. We report a pediatric case of toxocarosis, with clinical symptoms and imaging criteria compatible with AAC treated medically, and discuss the relationship between toxocarosis and AAC based on published evidence. PMID:27598288

  2. Cholecystokinin cholecystography, sonography, and scintigraphy: detection of chronic acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.B.; Berk, R.N.; Sheible, F.W.; Witztum, K.F.; Gilmore, I.T.; Strong, R.M.; Hofmann, A.F.

    1982-12-01

    Because the efficacy of cholecystokinin cholecystography in the detection of chronic acalculous cholecystitis remains in doubt, the procedure is rarely used in clinical practice. However, the ability to observe gallbladder contraction with sonography and /sup 99m/Tc-para-isopropylacetanilido-iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy (PIPIDA) offers a possibility to improve the sensitivity of the test. To determine if the degree of gallbladder contraction after cholecystokinin is the same as measured by the three techniques and if it differs in symptomatic patients compared to the normal population, cholecystokinin cholecystography, cholecystokinin sonography, and cholecystokinin PIPIDA were performed in 10 symptomatic patients and 10 normal volunteers. The mean maximum contraction of the gallbladder during the three studies was 63%, 61%, and 68%, respectively, for the volunteers, and 72%, 63%, and 73%, respectively, for the patients. The mean maximum gallbladder contraction during all three procedues was 64% +/- 26% SD in the volunteers and 74% +/- 17% SD in the patients. The differences were not statistically significant. Although there was good correlation in the degree of maximum gallbladder contraction among cholecystokinin PIPIDA, marked variation in both the volunteers and the patients makes it unlikely that the degree of contraction as observed by any of these techniques can be used to indicate the presence of chronic acalculous cholecystitis.

  3. Cholecystokinin cholecystography, sonography, and scintigraphy: detection of chronic acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.B.; Berk, R.N.; Scheible, F.W.; Witztum, K.F.; Gilmore, I.T.; Strong, R.M.; Hofmann, A.F.

    1982-12-01

    Because the efficacy of cholecystokinin cholecystography in the detection of chronic acalculous cholecystitis remains in doubt, the procedure is rarely used in clinical practice. However, the ability to observe gallbladder contraction with sonography and /sup 99m/Tc-para-isopropylacetanilido-iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy (PIPIDA) offers a possibility to improve the sensitivity of the test. To determine if the degree of gallbladder contraction after cholecystokinin is the same as measured by the three techniques and if it differs in symptomatic patients compared to the normal population, cholecystokinin cholecystography, cholecystokinin sonography, and cholecystokinin PIPIDA were performed in 10 symptomatic patients and 10 normal volunteers. The mean maximum contraction of the gallbladder during the three studies was 63%, 61%, and 68%, respectively, for the volunteers, and 72%, 63%, and 73%, respectively, for the patients. The mean maximum gallbladder contraction during all three procedures was 64% +/- 26% SD in the volunteers and 74% +/- 17% SD in the patients. The differences were not statistically significant. Although there was good correlation in the degree of maximum gallbladder contraction among cholecystokinin cholecystography, cholecystokinin sonography, and cholecystokinin PIPIDA, marked variation in both the volunteers and the patients makes it unlikely that the degree of contraction as observed by any of these techniques can be used to indicate the presence of chronic acalculous cholecystitis.

  4. [New approaches to diagnosing and treating hyperkinetic biliary dyskinesia associated with chronic acalculous cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Bartosh, L F; Balakina, I V; Gridneva, L M

    2004-01-01

    Ninety patients aged 21 to 56 years who had chronic non-calculous cholecystitis (CNCC) concurrent with hyperkinetic dyskinesia (HKD) detectable by a stepwise duodenal probing and sonography, by using a choleretic breakfast and by determining the relaxation coefficient (RC) that was equal to the ratio of the volume of the gallbladder (GB) after the use of a spasmolytic to the baseline GB volume. The patients were divided into 3 groups. The authors used as a spasmolytic agent pinaverium bromide (dicetel) in a dose of 50 mg (1 tablet) in Group 1), octylonium bromide (spasmomen) in a dose of 40 mg (1 dragee) in Group 2, and drotaverine (no-spa) in a dose of 40 mg (1 tablet). There was a more significant sonographic increase in the size of GB in Groups 1 and 2 as compared with Group 3. In the acute drug test and during long-term treatment as well, the highest spasmolytic effect was noted in patients receiving dicetel (Group 1) and spasmomen (Group 2) as compared with that in Group 3 patients taking drotaverine. With this, RC was 1.25 +/- 0.2, 1.6 +/- 0.15, and 1.08 +/- 0.1, respectively. No adverse reactions occurred in the patients having selective calcium blockers (SCBs) whereas the patients receiving no-spa were found to have the following side effects: dry mouth (n = 3), transient constipation (n = 1), and numb tongue (n = 1). Thus, the study has provided evidence for the fact that SCBs have some advantage over myotropic spasmolytic agents in the treatment of CNCC with the signs of HKD. PMID:15540426

  5. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePlus

    Cytology analysis - biliary tract; Biliary tract biopsy ... A sample for a biliary tract biopsy can be obtained in different ways. A needle biopsy can be done if you have a well-defined tumor. The biopsy site ...

  6. An unusual cause of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass: Case report of a penetrating fish bone causing adhesions at the biliary-digestive junction resulting in partial obstruction and chronic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Vincent; Hendrickx, Leo; Valk, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGP) is complex and challenging. Foreign body intestinal perforation including that caused by fish bones has previously been reported in the literature and if clinically unrecognized, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Fish bone perforation as a cause of chronic abdominal pain after LRYGP has rarely been reported. Summary The unusual case of a 54 year old female presenting with recurrent episodes of postprandial pain 2 years after LRYGP is reported. Previous radiological and endoscopic investigations did not reveal any abnormality and after the most recent clinical presentation, a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A protruding fish bone at the biliary-digestive junction was discovered intra-operatively and successfully extracted. Dense adhesions between the involved intestinal loops were lysed in an attempt to improve intestinal transit and subsequently relieve post-prandial pain. Conclusion This case highlights the possibility of a missed fish bone perforation causing chronic postprandial abdominal pain and discomfort in a patient with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy. Foreign body perforation is a rare cause of abdominal pain after gastric bypass that should be considered when evaluating chronic abdominal pain symptoms after LRYGP. PMID:27107305

  7. Biliary ascariasis: radiological clue to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Bansal, Satish; Kumar, Naveen; Sharma, Navneet

    2015-03-01

    Ascariasis is caused by Ascaris lumbricoides. It is the most common helminthic infection seen worldwide. Ascariasis is an endemic disease in our country. This is due to the prevailing poor sanitary conditions and low level of education. Biliary ascariasis is an uncommon cause of obstructive jaundice. We report a case of biliary ascariasis in a young labourer who presented with acute abdominal pain. PMID:26634136

  8. Is this phantom pain?

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Nabajit; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Hagjer, Sumitra

    2012-12-01

    Right upper quadrant abdominal pain may be due to many causes, and at times may give rise to diagnostic dilemma. We present here a young lady with biliary type of pain who was eventually found to have gall bladder agenesis with aerobilia, in the absence of prior biliary intervention. PMID:24293906

  9. First detection of acalculous cholecystitis associated with Sarcocystis infection in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Agholi, Mahmoud; Heidarian, Hamid Reza; Moghadami, Mohsen; Hatam, Gholam Reza

    2014-06-01

    Acalculous cholecystitis and cholangitis are increasingly being recognized as complications of AIDS. The opportunistic parasites that have been most commonly associated with these disorders are Cryptosporidium species, Isospora belli, Cyclospora cayetanensis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. The authors performed a parasitological survey on the gallbladder tissue sections of patients underwent cholecystectomy due to chronic acalculous cholecystitis at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Light microscopic investigation in more than three hundred archived histopathological slides revealed the presence of sexual stages (i.e., mature sporocysts) of a coccidial protozoan in a patient with AIDS who developed acalculous cholecystitis as confirmed by histological, parasitological and molecular tests in which Sarcocystis species was the only identifiable pathogen in gallbladder sections. In the best of our knowledge it's the first documented case of chronic non-calculous cholecystitis due to Sarcocystis parasite in an Iranian AIDS patient from worldwide. PMID:24827104

  10. Acute acalculous cholecystitis and cardiovascular disease: a land of confusion.

    PubMed

    Tana, Marco; Tana, Claudio; Cocco, Giulio; Iannetti, Giovanni; Romano, Marcello; Schiavone, Cosima

    2015-12-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) can be defined as acute inflammatory disease of the gallbladder without evidence of gallstones. The first case was reported in 1844 by Duncan et al.; however, some cases may have been missed previously in view of the complexity of the diagnosis. Several risk factors have been identified, and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in view of its multiple mechanisms of action, seems to play a key role. Atypical clinical onset, paucity of symptoms, overlap with comorbidities, and lack of robust, controlled trials result often in under or misdiagnosed cases. Moreover, laboratory results may be negative or not specific in the late stage of the disease, when a surgical treatment cannot be longer helpful if complications arise. A rapid diagnosis is therefore essential to achieve a prompt treatment and to avoid further clinical deterioration. In this short review, we would present the current evidence regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of the complex relation between AAC and CVD. Then, we fully emphasize the role of ultrasound to achieve an early diagnosis and an appropriate treatment in suspected cases, reducing mortality and complications rates.

  11. [The effectiveness of spasmolytic therapy in chronic acalculous cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Shaĭkhutdinova, O V; Galiakberova, A R; Gur'ev, D A; Ionova, S I; Volevach, L V

    2009-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of duspatalin was evaluated in 69 patients with chronic cholecystitis and dyskinesia of the biliary tract (BT). Supplementation of duspatalin to the combined therapy in the patients with chronic cholecystitis shown to exert a pronounced therapeutic effect. This caused positive changes in clinical symptoms and BT function and quality of life, diminished the lithogenic properties of bile. PMID:19552029

  12. Acalculous cholecystitis: an unusual presentation of acute Q fever masquerading as infectious endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ergas, David; Abdul-Hai, Ali; Sthoeger, Zev Moshe

    2008-10-01

    We report here a patient with acute Q fever-related acalculous cholecystitis, who presented with prolonged fever, valvular abnormalities, and positive serology for Q fever phase 1 antigens, features suggesting chronic Q fever endocarditis. The pathogenesis of this rare presentation of Q fever is discussed. PMID:18854682

  13. [Pathogenesis of chronic acalculous cholecystitis in inhabitants of the Republic of Chuvashia].

    PubMed

    Tarasova, L V; Khokhlova, E A; Arkhipova, A V

    2009-01-01

    The study of Serum content of Selenium, Zinc, Manganese in inhabitants of the Republic of Chuvashia and also in chronic acalculous cholecystitis patients. Possibility of correction motor dysfunction of gallbladder with the use of natural mineral water "Syvlah-Zdorovie". PMID:19938285

  14. Pediatric Biliary Interventions.

    PubMed

    Atchie, Benjamin; Kalva, Sanjeeva; Josephs, Shellie

    2015-12-01

    An interventional radiologist is frequently called to evaluate and treat biliary diseases in children; a tailored approach specific to this population is required. Imaging with an emphasis on minimizing ionizing radiation is used not only in the initial workup but also to guide interventions. The most common form of intervention generally consists of transhepatic biliary drainage to treat either biliary obstruction or bile leakage, a scenario frequently encountered after pediatric liver transplantation. Other pathologies referred for evaluation and management include biliary atresia and, rarely, symptomatic choledochal cysts. Biliary complications caused by an underlying malignancy are not a frequently encountered problem in the pediatric population. The initial evaluation, role of preprocedural imaging, and interventional management with an emphasis on technique are discussed regarding these common biliary pathologies in children. PMID:26615168

  15. The role of sonography in imaging of the biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Foley, W Dennis; Quiroz, Francisco A

    2007-06-01

    Sonography is the recommended initial imaging test in the evaluation of patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain or jaundice. Dependent upon clinical circumstances, the differential diagnosis includes choledocholithiasis, biliary stricture, or tumor. Sonography is very sensitive in detection of mechanical biliary obstruction and stone disease, although less sensitive for detection of obstructing tumors, including pancreatic carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. In patients with sonographically documented cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis, laparoscopic cholecystectomy with operative clearance of the biliary stone disease is usually performed. In patients with clinically suspected biliary stone disease, without initial sonographic documentation of choledocholithiasis, endoscopic ultrasound or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is the next logical imaging step. Endoscopic ultrasound documentation of choledocholithiasis in a postcholecystectomy patient should lead to retrograde cholangiography, sphincterotomy, and clearance of the ductal calculi by endoscopic catheter techniques. In patients with clinical and sonographic findings suggestive of malignant biliary obstruction, a multipass contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examination to detect and stage possible pancreatic carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, or periductal neoplasm is usually recommended. Assessment of tumor resectability and staging can be performed by CT or a combination of CT and endoscopic ultrasound, the latter often combined with fine needle aspiration biopsy of suspected periductal tumor. In patients whose CT scan suggests hepatic hilar or central intrahepatic biliary tumor, percutaneous cholangiography and transhepatic biliary stent placement is usually followed by brushing or fluoroscopically directed fine needle aspiration biopsy for tissue diagnosis. Sonography is the imaging procedure of choice for biliary tract intervention, including cholecystostomy, guidance for

  16. Biliary lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hişmioğullari, Adnan Adil; Bozdayi, A Mithat; Rahman, Khalid

    2007-06-01

    The liver has many biochemical functions, of which one of the most important is bile formation. Bile is both a secretory and an excretory fluid and two of its most important functions are the delivery to the intestinal tract of: (i) bile acids to assist in fat digestion and absorption; and (ii) liver-derived metabolites of potentially toxic materials prior to their elimination from the body in the feces. Bile contains numerous solutes, including bile acids, phospholipids and cholesterol. Biliary lipids mainly consist of cholesterol and phospholipids and their secretion into bile is affected by the secretion of bile acids. Phospholipids and cholesterol are synthesized in the hepatocytes and are thought to be transferred via vesicle- and non-vesicle-mediated mechanisms into the bile canaliculus. Hepatocytes acquire biliary lipid by three pathways, which are biosynthesis, lipoproteins and existing molecules drawn from intracellular membranes, with the newly synthesized biliary lipid accounting for less than 20% of the total lipids. The hepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol elimination are not limited to total cholesterol homeostasis, but also concern biliary disease conditions, since excess biliary cholesterol secretion is involved in cholesterol gallstone formation, as well as being a major risk factor for gallbladder cancer. The purpose of this review was to highlight some of the major mechanisms involved in biliary lipid secretion.

  17. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Ali, Ahmad H; Lindor, Keith D

    2015-10-17

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterised by destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and potential cirrhosis through resulting complications. The serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis is the antimitochondrial antibody, a highly disease-specific antibody identified in about 95% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. These patients usually have fatigue and pruritus, both of which occur independently of disease severity. The typical course of primary biliary cirrhosis has changed substantially with the introduöction of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Several randomised placebo-controlled studies have shown that UDCA improves transplant-free survival in primary biliary cirrhosis. However, about 40% of patients do not have a biochemical response to UDCA and would benefit from new therapies. Liver transplantation is a life-saving surgery with excellent outcomes for those with decompensated cirrhosis. Meanwhile, research on nuclear receptor hormones has led to the development of exciting new potential treatments. This Seminar will review the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis, discuss management of the disease and its sequelae, and introduce research on new therapeutic options. PMID:26364546

  18. Idiopathic perforation of acalculous gallbladder after insertion of a transpapillary pancreatic stent

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Tomoko; Irisawa, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Hiroto; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tomoda, Hiroyuki; Saito, Ryo; Kinuta, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic retrograde pancreatocholangiography (ERCP) is associated with many types of adverse events (AEs) but idiopathic perforation of the gallbladder (IPGB) is very rare. Pancreatobiliary reflux is one of the factors involved with occurrence of IPGB 1. Here we present a case of acalculous gallbladder perforation as an AE following the insertion of an indwelling endoscopic nasal pancreatic drainage (ENPD) tube (a pancreatic stent) to obtain pancreatic fluid. In this case, acute pancreatobiliary reflux might have been caused by the insertion of the ENPD-tube. PMID:27540570

  19. Stenting in Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Almadi, Majid A; Barkun, Jeffrey S; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-10-01

    Decompression of the biliary system in patients with malignant biliary obstruction has been widely accepted and implemented as part of the care. Despite a wealth of literature, there remains a significant amount of uncertainty as to which approach would be most appropriate in different clinical settings. This review covers stenting of the biliary system in cases of resectable or palliative malignant biliary obstruction, potential candidates for biliary drainage, technical aspects of the procedure, as well as management of biliary stent dysfunction. Furthermore, periprocedural considerations including proper mapping of the location of obstruction and the use of antibiotics are addressed.

  20. Primary biliary carcinoma: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, M.K.; Quiroz, F.; Lawson, T.L.; Smith, D.F.; Foley, W.D.; Steward, E.T.

    1984-08-01

    Fifty-three patients with documented primary biliary carcinoma were studied with computed tomography. Twenty-six patients had gallbladder carcinoma and 27 patients had carcinoma of the biliary ductal system. Ninety percent of patients with gallbladder cancer had an intraluminal mass. Local invasion into the liver was common. The majority of patients with biliary ductal carcinoma had dilated bile ducts, while only 50% of patients with gallbladder cancer had biliary ductal dilatation. The most common location of tumor involving the extrahepatic biliary ductal system was the distal common bile duct. This occurred in eight patients out of 27, or 30% of the cases.

  1. Biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Burhenne, H J

    1990-01-01

    Biliary extracorporeal lithotripsy has been considered one of the alternatives to surgery for the treatment of gallstones in the bile ducts and in the gallbladder. Although this technique can fragment almost all gallstones, the clinical effectiveness of this new treatment modality must be measured by successful elimination of all fragments. Some physical principles, stone targeting, patient protocol, complications, and clinical results are presented.

  2. Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis by Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Maria; Couto, Cristiana; Coelho, Maria D.; Laranjeira, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare complication of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection, with only a few cases reported among pediatric population. This clinical condition is frequently associated with a favorable outcome and, usually, a surgical intervention is not required. We report a 16-year-old girl who presented with AAC following primary EBV infection. The diagnosis of AAC was documented by clinical and ultrasonographic examination, whereas EBV infection was confirmed serologically. A conservative treatment was performed, with a careful monitoring and serial ultrasonographic examinations, which led to the clinical improvement of the patient. Pediatricians should be aware of the possible association between EBV and AAC, in order to offer the patients an appropriate management strategy. PMID:26753086

  3. Acute acalculous cholecystitis immediately after gastric operation: Case report and literatures review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Lin; Li, He; Wang, Xue-Fei; Shen, Kun-Tang; Shen, Zhen-Bin; Sun, Yi-Hong; Qin, Xin-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare complication of gastric surgery. The most commonly accepted concepts regarding its pathogenesis are bile stasis, sepsis and ischemia, but it has not been well described how to identify and manage this disease in the early stage. We report three cases of AAC in elderly patients immediately after gastric surgery, which were treated with three different strategies. One patient died 42 d after emergency cholecystectomy, and the other two finally recovered through timely cholecystostomy and percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage, respectively. These cases informed us of the value of early diagnosis and proper treatment for perioperative AAC after gastric surgery. We further reviewed reported cases of AAC immediately after gastric operation, which may expand our knowledge of this disease. PMID:25132787

  4. A case of biliary Fascioliasis by Fasciola gigantica in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vedat; Senturk, Senem; Mete, Omer; Cicek, Mutallib; Ebik, Berat; Kaya, Beşir

    2011-03-01

    A case of Fasciola gigantica-induced biliary obstruction and cholestasis is reported in Turkey. The patient was a 37- year-old woman, and suffered from icterus, ascites, and pain in her right upper abdominal region. A total of 7 living adult flukes were recovered during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). A single dose of triclabendazole was administered to treat possible remaining worms. She was living in a village of southeast of Anatolia region and had sheeps and cows. She had the history of eating lettuce, mallow, dill, and parsley without washing. This is the first case of fascioliasis which was treated via endoscopic biliary extraction during ERCP in Turkey. PMID:21461271

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage of hilar biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, Do Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Only 20-30% of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) are candidates for potentially curative resection. However, even after curative (R0) resection, these patients have a disease recurrence rate of up to 76%. The prognosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is limited by tumor spread along the biliary tree leading to obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, and liver failure. Therefore, palliative biliary drainage may be a major goal for patients with hilar CC. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is an established method for palliation of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, there are patients for whom endoscopic stent placement is not possible because of failed biliary cannulation or tumor infiltration that limits transpapillary access. In this situation, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an alternative method. However, PTBD has a relatively high rate of complications and is frequently associated with patient discomfort related to external drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage has therefore been introduced as an alternative to PTBD in cases of biliary obstruction when ERCP is unsuccessful. In this review, the indications, technical tips, outcomes, and the future role of EUS-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage, such as hepaticogastrostomy or hepaticoduodenostomy, for hilar biliary obstruction will be summarized.

  6. Intraluminal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, N D; Davenport, M; Howard, E R

    1991-01-01

    Jaundice caused by intraluminal bile duct obstruction in infancy is rare but may occur in association with biliary sludge, inspissated bile plugs, or gall stones. Nine boys (aged 2 weeks-6 months) with obstruction caused by inspissated bile (n = 7) or gall stones (n = 2) are presented. Haemolysis was not a factor in the patients' histories but an abnormal entry of the common bile duct into the third part of the duodenum was demonstrated in two and one had an asymptomatic haemangioma. Ultrasonography was the most useful investigation. Surgical removal of the bile duct obstruction was necessary in eight cases and included biliary tract drainage in six and cholecystectomy for changes of cholecystitis in four. Obstruction resolved spontaneously in one infant after percutaneous cholangiography. There were no postoperative complications. Images p1396-a PMID:1776884

  7. Rare biliary cystic tumors: a case series of biliary cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhirup; Shah, Sudeep R; Singh, Abhiyutthan; Joshi, Anand; Desai, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the liver are common and a major proportion is formed by parasitic cysts and simple cysts. Biliary cystic tumors (BCTs), namely biliary cystadenoma (BCA) and biliary cystadenocarcinoma (BCAC), are rare tumors which usually arise from the intrahepatic biliary tree. BCAs have malignant potential and are difficult to differentiate from BCAC pre-operatively on radiological imaging. Here we have presented 4 patients with BCTs and reviewed the literature pertaining to them.The data of four patients with BCA/BCAC diagnosed and treated at our institute were retrieved from our database and records were reviewed for age, sex, history, imaging, surgery, pathology and follow-up. Mean age of the patients was 53.5 years (range 30-71 years). Two male and two female patients presented with abdominal pain, of which one male patient had pancreatitis at diagnosis. Characteristic features were seen on pre-operative imaging (cystic lesions with internal septations) and biliary communication was identified in the patient with pancreatitis. Three patients were diagnosed with a BCA on final histology, while one patient had a BCAC. Following surgical resection, all the patients are asymptomatic and disease free with a mean follow-up of 24 months (range 10-40 months). In conclusion, BCTs should be suspected in the presence of a well-encapsulated, cystic hepatic lesion with internal septations. Although pre-operative distinction between BCA and BCAC is difficult, the lesion, whenever possible, should be completely resected as long-term outcomes are good, especially with BCA. PMID:27049501

  8. Anaesthesia for biliary atresia and hepatectomy in paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this article precludes an ‘in depth’ description of all liver problems and I will limit this review to anaesthesia for biliary atresia — a common hepatic problem in the very young — and partial hepatectomy in older children. I will not be discussing the problems of anaesthetising children with hepatitis, cirrhosis, congenital storage diseases or liver failure. Extrahepatic biliary obstruction is an obliterative cholangiopathy of infancy which is fatal if untreated. Diagnosis involves exclusion of other causes of neonatal jaundice and treatment involves a hepatico portoenterostomy carried out at the earliest. This is a review of current concepts in anaesthesia and postoperative management of neonates with extrahepatic biliary atresia. Anaesthesia for hepatic resection has seen great changes in recent times with the improvement in surgical techniques, technology and a better understanding of the underlying physiology. These are reviewed along with the problems of postoperative pain management. PMID:23293387

  9. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  10. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  11. Biliary Complications After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Sanjay; Kalloo, Anthony N.

    2002-04-01

    The incidence of biliary complications after liver transplant is estimated to be 8% to 20%. Post-liver transplant biliary complications may lead to acute and chronic liver injury. The early recognition and prompt treatment of such complications improves the long-term survival of the patient and graft. An understanding of the type of biliary reconstruction, the rationale for creating a particular anastomosis, and the technical difficulties in reconstructing the biliary tract are important in assessing and managing complications after liver transplant. Because the clinical presentation of these patients may be subtle, the physician must be aggressive and thoughtful in ordering and interpreting the diagnostic tests. Important points to remember are 1) that noninvasive examinations may fail to detect small obstructions or leaks, 2) a liver biopsy often is performed prior to cholangiography to exclude rejection and ischemia, and 3) the liver biopsy can miss an extrahepatic obstruction by misinterpreting portal inflammation as rejection. Biliary leaks and strictures are the most common biliary complications following liver transplant. Less common complications include ampullary dysfunction and stone/sludge formation. The effective management of biliary complications following a liver transplant depends on understanding the natural history, the prognosis, and the available therapeutic options for each type of complication.

  12. Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kasper S.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease and the leading indication for pediatric liver transplantation. Affected infants exhibit evidence of biliary obstruction within the first few weeks after birth. Early diagnosis and successful surgical drainage of bile are associated with greater survival with the child’s native liver. Unfortunately, because noncholestatic jaundice is extremely common in early infancy, it is difficult to identify the rare infant with cholestatic jaundice who has biliary atresia. Hence, the need for timely diagnosis of this disease warrants a discussion of the feasibility of screening for biliary atresia to improve outcomes. Herein, newborn screening for biliary atresia in the United States is assessed by using criteria established by the Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children. Published analyses indicate that newborn screening for biliary atresia by using serum bilirubin concentrations or stool color cards is potentially life-saving and cost-effective. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and costs of potential screening strategies for early identification of biliary atresia in the United States. PMID:26620065

  13. Surgical Management of Benign Biliary Stricture in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Ghatak, Supriyo; Das, Khaunish; Dasgupta, Jayanta; Ray, Sujay; Khamrui, Sujan; Sonar, Pankaj Kumar; Das, Somak

    2015-12-01

    Biliary stricture in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is not uncommon. Previously, all cases were managed by surgery. Nowadays, three important modes of treatment in these patients are observation, endoscopic therapy, and surgery. In the modern era, surgery is recommended only in a subset of patients who develop biliary symptoms or those who have asymptomatic biliary stricture and require surgery for intractable abdominal pain. We want to report on our experience regarding surgical management of CP-induced benign biliary stricture. Over a period of 5 years, we have managed 340 cases of CP at our institution. Bile duct stricture was found in 62 patients. But, surgical intervention was required in 44 patients, and the remaining 18 patients were managed conservatively. Demographic data, operative procedures, postoperative complications, and follow-up parameters of these patients were collected from our prospective database. A total 44 patients were operated for biliary obstruction in the background of CP. Three patients were excluded, so the final analysis was based on 41 patients. The indication for surgery was symptomatic biliary stricture in 27 patients and asymptomatic biliary stricture with intractable abdominal pain in 14 patients. The most commonly performed operation was Frey's procedure. There was no inhospital mortality. Thirty-five patients were well at a mean follow-up of 24.4 months (range 3 to 54 months). Surgery is still the best option for CP-induced benign biliary stricture, and Frey's procedure is a versatile operation unless you suspect malignancy as the cause of biliary obstruction. PMID:26730073

  14. Surgical Management of Benign Biliary Stricture in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Ghatak, Supriyo; Das, Khaunish; Dasgupta, Jayanta; Ray, Sujay; Khamrui, Sujan; Sonar, Pankaj Kumar; Das, Somak

    2015-12-01

    Biliary stricture in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is not uncommon. Previously, all cases were managed by surgery. Nowadays, three important modes of treatment in these patients are observation, endoscopic therapy, and surgery. In the modern era, surgery is recommended only in a subset of patients who develop biliary symptoms or those who have asymptomatic biliary stricture and require surgery for intractable abdominal pain. We want to report on our experience regarding surgical management of CP-induced benign biliary stricture. Over a period of 5 years, we have managed 340 cases of CP at our institution. Bile duct stricture was found in 62 patients. But, surgical intervention was required in 44 patients, and the remaining 18 patients were managed conservatively. Demographic data, operative procedures, postoperative complications, and follow-up parameters of these patients were collected from our prospective database. A total 44 patients were operated for biliary obstruction in the background of CP. Three patients were excluded, so the final analysis was based on 41 patients. The indication for surgery was symptomatic biliary stricture in 27 patients and asymptomatic biliary stricture with intractable abdominal pain in 14 patients. The most commonly performed operation was Frey's procedure. There was no inhospital mortality. Thirty-five patients were well at a mean follow-up of 24.4 months (range 3 to 54 months). Surgery is still the best option for CP-induced benign biliary stricture, and Frey's procedure is a versatile operation unless you suspect malignancy as the cause of biliary obstruction.

  15. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  16. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dae Yong; Chang, Eun Jae; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  17. Long-term effects of forgotten biliary stents: a case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Arslan, Cem; Akbulut, Sami; Abuoglu, Haci Hasan; Ozkan, Erkan; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Gunay, Emre; Tekesin, Kemal; Muftuoglu, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    There are many studies about the biliary stents, however there is a little information about the long-term stayed forgotten biliary stents except a few case reports. We have reported the results of a number of cases with biliary stents that were forgotten or omitted by the patient and the endoscopist. During February 2010 to May 2013, five patients were referred to the general surgery clinic of Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul Turkey. Past history and medical documents submitted by the patient did not indicate a replacement of the biliary stent in 3 patients. Two patients knew that they had biliary stents. We also conducted a literature review via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases of English language studies published until March 2014 on forgotten biliary stent. There were 3 men and 2 women ranging in age from 22 to 68 years (mean age 41.6 years). Patients presented with pain in the upper abdomen, jaundice, fever, abnormal liver function tests or dilatation of the biliary tract alone or in combination. Patients’ demographic findings are presented in Table 1. A review of three cases reported in the English medical literature also discussed. The mean duration of the patency of the stent is about 12 months. The biliary stenting is performed either with plastic or metal stents, studies recommending their replacement after 3-6 months. Patients with long stayed forgotten biliary stents are inevitably treated with surgical intervention. We recommend for all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography units provide a stent registry system that the stents placed for various therapeutic procedures are not forgotten both by the patient as well as the physician. There should be a deadline for biliary stents in the registry system for each patient. PMID:25232385

  18. Percutaneous Embolization of Transhepatic Tracks for Biliary Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Stuart M.; Terhaar, Olaf; Given, Mark F.; O'Dwyer, Helena M.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2006-12-15

    Significant pain can occur after removing transhepatic catheters from biliary access tracks, after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) or stenting. We undertook a randomized prospective study to ascertain whether track embolization decreases the amount of pain or analgesic requirement after PBD. Fifty consecutive patients (M:F, 22:28; age range:29-85 years; mean age: 66.3 years) undergoing PBD were randomized to receive track embolization or no track embolization after removal of biliary drainage catheters. A combination of Lipoidol and n-butyl cyanoacrylate were used to embolize transhepatic tracks using an 8F dilator. The patients who did not have track embolization performed had biliary drainage catheters removed over a guide wire. A visual analog scoring (VAS) system was used to grade pain associated with catheter removal, 24 h afterward. A required analgesic score (RAS) was devised to tabulate the analgesia required. No analgesia had a score of 0, oral or rectal nonopiate analgesics had a score of 1, oral opiates had a score of 2, and parenteral opiates had a score of 3. The average VAS and RAS for both groups were calculated and compared.Seven patients were excluded for various reasons, leaving 43 patients in the study group. Twenty-one patients comprised the embolization group and 22 patients comprised the nonembolization group. The mean biliary catheter dwell time was not significantly different (p > 0.05) between the embolization group and nonembolization (mean: 5.4 days vs 6.9 days, respectively). In the nonembolization group, the mean VAS was 3.4. Eight patients required parenteral opiates, three patients required oral opiates, and five patients required oral or rectal analgesics, yielding a mean RAS of 1.6. In the embolization group, the mean VAS was 0.9. No patient required parenteral opiates, six patients required oral opiates, and two patients had oral analgesia. The average RAS was 0.6. Both the VAS and the RAS were significantly lower in the

  19. Spontaneous biliary peritonitis in children.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Supreethi; Singhal, Anu; Arora, Anita; Singhal, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric Spontaneous Bile duct perforation is a rare clinical condition with only around 150 cases reported worldwide. Early management gives excellent prognosis but the condition often presents a diagnostic dilemma. Hepato-biliary Technetium-99m-iminodiacetic acid scintiscan is the diagnostic investigation of choice but its availability in third world countries is limited. We present two cases of spontaneous biliary peritonitis in children, which were diagnosed without scintiscanning. The first case was a one-and -a half-year-old child, who was diagnosed with biliary peritonitis without pneumoperitoneum by a combination of Ultrasound (USG), Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT), and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The child underwent USG-guided drainage and subsequent cholecystectomy with hepatico-jejunostomy. The second child also had biliary peritonitis without pneumoperitoneum, which was initially suspected on USG. CECT revealed dilated gall bladder and fluid collection in sub-hepatic space and pelvis. Abdominal paracentesis revealed presence of bile. The child responded to conservative therapy. Both are doing well on two-year follow-up. In a patient with jaundice, biliary tract abnormalities and/or free fluid, either generalized or localized to peri-cholecystic/sub-hepatic space on USG/CT/MRI, in the absence of pneumoperitoneum, suggest a diagnosis of biliary perforation even in the absence of scintiscanning.

  20. Spontaneous Biliary Peritonitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Supreethi; Singhal, Anu; Arora, Anita; Singhal, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric Spontaneous Bile duct perforation is a rare clinical condition with only around 150 cases reported worldwide. Early management gives excellent prognosis but the condition often presents a diagnostic dilemma. Hepato-biliary Technetium-99m-iminodiacetic acid scintiscan is the diagnostic investigation of choice but its availability in third world countries is limited. We present two cases of spontaneous biliary peritonitis in children, which were diagnosed without scintiscanning. The first case was a one-and -a half-year-old child, who was diagnosed with biliary peritonitis without pneumoperitoneum by a combination of Ultrasound (USG), Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT), and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The child underwent USG-guided drainage and subsequent cholecystectomy with hepatico-jejunostomy. The second child also had biliary peritonitis without pneumoperitoneum, which was initially suspected on USG. CECT revealed dilated gall bladder and fluid collection in sub-hepatic space and pelvis. Abdominal paracentesis revealed presence of bile. The child responded to conservative therapy. Both are doing well on two-year follow-up. In a patient with jaundice, biliary tract abnormalities and/or free fluid, either generalized or localized to peri-cholecystic/sub-hepatic space on USG/CT/MRI, in the absence of pneumoperitoneum, suggest a diagnosis of biliary perforation even in the absence of scintiscanning. PMID:24083062

  1. Melatonin regulation of biliary functions

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Shannon; Han, Yuyan; Francis, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The intrahepatic biliary epithelium is a three-dimensional tubular system lined by cholangiocytes, epithelial cells that in addition to modify ductal bile are also the targets of vanishing bile duct syndromes (i.e., cholangiopathies) such as primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) that are characterized by the damage/proliferation of cholangiocytes. Cholangiocyte proliferation is critical for the maintenance of the biliary mass and secretory function during the pathogenesis of cholangiopathies. Proliferating cholangiocytes serve as a neuroendocrine compartment during the progression of cholangiopathies, and as such secrete and respond to hormones, neurotransmitters and neuropeptides contributing to the autocrine and paracrine pathways that regulate biliary homeostasis. The focus of this review is to summarize the recent findings related to the role of melatonin in the modulation of biliary functions and liver damage in response to a number of insults. We first provide a general background on the general function of cholangiocytes including their anatomic characteristics, their innervation and vascularization as well the role of these cells on secretory and proliferation events. After a background on the synthesis and regulation of melatonin and its role on the maintenance of circadian rhythm, we will describe the specific effects of melatonin on biliary functions and liver damage. After a summary of the topics discussed, we provide a paragraph on the future perspectives related to melatonin and liver functions. PMID:24696836

  2. Biliary tract perforation following percutaneous endobiliary radiofrequency ablation: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, CHUANGUO; WEI, BAOJIE; GAO, KUN; ZHAI, RENYOU

    2016-01-01

    Endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has recently been recognized as a beneficial treatment option for malignant biliary obstruction using percutaneous or endoscopic approaches. The feasibility and safety of this method has been demonstrated in clinical studies, with pain, cholangitis and asymptomatic biochemical pancreatitis reported as relatively common complications. By contrast, hepatic coma, newly diagnosed left bundle branch block and partial liver infarction have been reported as uncommon complications. Biliary tract perforation is a serious potential complication of percutaneous intraductal RFA, which may result in severe infection, peritonitis or even mortality, and which has not been previously reported in clinical research. The current study presents the first reports of biliary tract perforation in two patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction following percutaneous intraductal RFA. Although the patient in case 1 succumbed 12 days after RFA, the minor biliary tract perforation in case 2 was successfully treated by the deployment of a self-expanding metal stent. This study demonstrates that biliary tract perforation should be recognized as a serious potential complication of endobiliary RFA, and that metal stent deployment should be considered as a treatment option for minor biliary tract perforation. PMID:27313699

  3. A sign of symptomatic chronic cholecystitis on biliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sheikh, W.; Hourani, M.; Barkin, J.S.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.; Serafini, A.N.

    1983-02-01

    Five hundred patients with acute right-upper-quadrant pain underwent biliary scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc paraisopropyliminodiacetic acid. One hundred and thirty-four studies were reported normal (both gallbladder and activity in bowel are noted in 1 hr). Of the 134 studies reported as normal, 32 showed intestinal activity before gallbladder visualization during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography revealed that 24 patients had gallstones, and eight patients had no demonstrable pathology in the biliary system. Of the 134 studies, 102 showed visualization of the gallbladder before intestinal activity during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography showed that 73 patients had normal biliary system. The remaining 29 patients had gallstones. The overall sensitivity of this finding is 45%, the specificity is 90%, and the accuracy is 73%. In this group of symptomatic patients, the appearance of intestinal activity before gallbladder activity on biliary scintigraphy warrants further evaluation of these patients by sonography and/or oral cholecystography.

  4. [Biliary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the liver].

    PubMed

    Colović, R; Perisić-Savić, M; Havelka, M

    1990-01-01

    Biliary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is an extremely rare tumour. Less than 50 cases have been reported. It is usually a multilocular cystic tumour covered with mucous producing epithelium, with papillary excrescences containing mucinous mass arising from bile ducts. The size of the tumour varies from 3.5 to 25 cm in diameter. It is more frequent in women. The majority of patients belong to the middle age population. We present a 63-year-old man who had been suffering from an epigastric and right subcostal pain of unknown aetiology for over 35 years. During the last 10 years he suffered from multiple attacks of cholangitis with high temperature, rigor, chills, pain and obstructive jaundice. Five years ago he had the attack of pancreatitis with retroperitoneal fatty necrosis for which he was operated on in another institution and cholecystectomy and pancreatic necrectomy were carried out. The attacks of cholangitis continued they were more serious and more frequent until June 1987, when the "cyst" in the left lobe of the liver, dilated bile ducts and "polyps" in the common bile duct were diagnosed by ultrasonography. During the operation advanced biliary cirrhosis, portal hypertension, splenomegaly, very dilated common bile duct full of jelly and the "cyst" in the liver filled with jelly, were found. The removal of the jelly and choledochojejunostomy resulted in temporary relief. Two months later he was reoperated for recurrent obstructive jaundice during which left lobectomy, partial excision of the cyst and cystojejunostomy between the rest of the cyst and another Roux-en-Y jejunal limb, were carried out.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Value of early cholescintigraphy in detection of biliary complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Kulber, D A; Berci, G; Paz-Partlow, M; Ashok, G; Hiatt, J R

    1994-03-01

    Cholescintigraphy using technetium-99m disofenin tracer is accepted as a routine component of preoperative evaluation of the biliary tract in selected patients but is not used regularly in postoperative management. This is a retrospective analysis of the utility of the nuclide scan in 27 patients after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Most patients had vague postoperative symptoms such as nausea, pain, and low grade fever. Two patients developed jaundice. Seven of the 27 patients had biliary leaks, and two had common bile duct obstructions. We conclude that cholescintigraphy is a sensitive noninvasive test for the evaluation of biliary complications after LC and is a pivotal component of an algorithmic approach to postoperative complications. Because of the subtle clinical findings and the potential for delayed diagnosis of biliary complications after LC, early performance of this test will minimize patient morbidity. PMID:8116979

  6. Transplantation for Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    ESQUIVEL, CARLOS O.; VAN THIEL, DAVID H.; DEMETRIS, ANTHONY J.; BERNARDOS, ANGEL; IWATSUKI, SHUNZABURO; MARKUS, BERND; GORDON, ROBERT D.; MARSH, J. WALLIS; MAKOWKA, LEONARD; TZAKIS, ANDREAS G.; TODO, SATORU; GAVALER, JUDITH S.; STARZL, THOMAS E.

    2011-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a frequent indication for liver transplantation. The purpose of this report is to present our experience with liver transplantation for primary biliary cirrhosis. Attention is given to the causes of hepatic dysfunction seen in allografts. In addition, we review the postoperative problems encountered and the quality of life at time of last follow-up in patients with transplants for primary biliary cirrhosis. A total of 97 orthotopic liver transplant procedures were performed in 76 patients with advanced primary biliary cirrhosis at the University of Pittsburgh from March 1980 through September 1985. The transplant operation was relatively easy to perform. The most common technical complications experienced were fragmentation and intramural dissection of the recipient hepatic artery, which required an arterial graft in 20% of the cases. Most of the postoperative mortality occurred in the first 6 mo after transplantation, with an essentially flat actuarial life survival curve from that time point to a projected 5-yr survival of 66%. Common causes of death included rejection and primary graft nonfunction. Thirteen of the 76 patients had some hepatic dysfunction at the time of the last follow-up, although none were jaundiced. Recurrence of primary biliary cirrhosis could not be demonstrated in any of the patients. Antimitochondrial antibody was detected in the serum of almost all of the patients studied postoperatively for it. Most important, almost all of the 52 surviving patients have been rehabilitated socially and vocationally. PMID:3280389

  7. Biliary calcium and gallstone formation.

    PubMed

    Moore, E W

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief overview of the current status of the field of biliary calcium and the role of calcium in the formation and maturation of gallstones. The study of free Ca+(+) ions in bile by electrochemical potentiometric measurements using Ca+(+)-selective ion-exchange electrodes is a relatively new field, but much progress has been made in the past few years. Using this powerful analytical tool, new concepts and findings have arisen in almost every aspect of biliary calcium. Although the current symposium is targeted primarily toward cholesterol gallstones, there are several areas in which understanding of biliary calcium may significantly contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of cholesterol, as well as "pigment" (calcium salt), gallstones. Five broad areas are considered in relation to biliary calcium: (a) physiology (calcium entry into bile), (b) biophysics (the regulation of biliary free [Ca+(+)] as related to Gibbs-Donnan equilibria, (c) physical chemistry (the physicochemical state of calcium in bile, (d) thermodynamics (calcium solubility in bile), and (e) kinetics (pronucleating and antinucleating factors and metastable states). With more specific reference to cholesterol stones, consideration is also made of (a) the calcium salt "seed" hypothesis in cholesterol stone pathogenesis; (b) the interactions of Ca+(+) with phospholipid-cholesterol vesicles, with consideration of possible structural requirements and (c) thermodynamic and kinetic factors as related to peripheral or "eggshell" calcification of existing cholesterol stones. PMID:2210651

  8. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    PubMed Central

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  9. Biliary sludge: the sluggish gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Pazzi, P; Gamberini, S; Buldrini, P; Gullini, S

    2003-07-01

    Biliary sludge is a mixture of particulate matter which has precipitated from bile. It generally consists of cholesterol monohydrate crystals, calcium bilirubinate or other calcium salts. In a clinical setting, biliary sludge is almost always an ultrasonographic diagnosis. Although it is less clinically applicable, direct microscopic examination of gallbladder bile is far more sensitive than ultrasonography into sludge detection, and has to be regarded as the diagnostic gold standard. The overall prevalence of sludge in the general population is relatively low. However, several clinical conditions are associated with a particularly high prevalence of biliary sludge, including pregnancy, rapid weight loss, total parenteral nutrition, octreotide therapy, bone marrow or solid organ transplantation. The clinical course of biliary sludge varies, and complete resolution, a waxing and waning course, and progression to gallstones are all possible outcomes. It may cause complications usually associated with gallstones, such as biliary colic, acute cholecystitis, and acute pancreatitis. The main pathogenic mechanism involved in sludge formation is probably gallbladder dismotility, and in selected patients measures aimed to maintain adequate gallbladder contractions has been shown to effectively prevent sludge development.

  10. Biliary scintigraphy: comparison with other modern techniques for evaluation of biliary tract disease

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.

    1982-10-01

    The recent availability of iminodiacetic acid analogues labeled with technetium Tc 99m provides a safe and accurate noninvasive test of biliary function. Biliary scintigraphy is a simple and rapid method of detecting acute cholecystitis in particular but also of distinguishing acute biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis, of evaluating the patency of the common duct in early obstruction, of assessing possible postcholecystectomy syndrome, of evaluating the patency of a biliary enteric bypass, and of detecting postoperative biliary leaks.

  11. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumagi, Teru; Heathcote, E Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology characterized by injury of the intrahepatic bile ducts that may eventually lead to liver failure. Affected individuals are usually in their fifth to seventh decades of life at time of diagnosis, and 90% are women. Annual incidence is estimated between 0.7 and 49 cases per million-population and prevalence between 6.7 and 940 cases per million-population (depending on age and sex). The majority of patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis, however, some patients present with symptoms of fatigue and/or pruritus. Patients may even present with ascites, hepatic encephalopathy and/or esophageal variceal hemorrhage. PBC is associated with other autoimmune diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, Raynaud's phenomenon and CREST syndrome and is regarded as an organ specific autoimmune disease. Genetic susceptibility as a predisposing factor for PBC has been suggested. Environmental factors may have potential causative role (infection, chemicals, smoking). Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical features, abnormal liver biochemical pattern in a cholestatic picture persisting for more than six months and presence of detectable antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) in serum. All AMA negative patients with cholestatic liver disease should be carefully evaluated with cholangiography and liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only currently known medication that can slow the disease progression. Patients, particularly those who start UDCA treatment at early-stage disease and who respond in terms of improvement of the liver biochemistry, have a good prognosis. Liver transplantation is usually an option for patients with liver failure and the outcome is 70% survival at 7 years. Recently, animal models have been discovered that may provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of this disease and facilitate appreciation for novel treatment in PBC

  12. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Visrodia, Kavel H; Tabibian, James H; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic management of biliary obstruction has evolved tremendously since the introduction of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. For the last several decades, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become established as the mainstay for definitively diagnosing and relieving biliary obstruction. In addition, and more recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has gained increasing favor as an auxiliary diagnostic and therapeutic modality in facilitating decompression of the biliary tree. Here, we provide a review of the current and continually evolving role of gastrointestinal endoscopy, including both ERCP and EUS, in the management of biliary obstruction with a focus on benign biliary strictures. PMID:26322153

  13. Palliative therapy for pancreatic/biliary cancer.

    PubMed

    House, Michael G; Choti, Michael A

    2005-04-01

    Palliative treatment for unresectable periampullary cancer is directed at three major symptoms: obstructive jaundice, duodenal obstruction, and cancer-related pain. In most cases, the pattern of symptoms at the time of diagnosis in the context of the patient's medical condition and projected survival influence the decision to perform an operative versus a non operative palliative procedure. Despite improvements in preoperative imaging and laparoscopic staging of patients with periampullary cancer and hilar cholangiocarcinoma, surgical exploration is the only modality that can definitively rule out resectability and the potential for curative resection in some patients with nonmetastatic cancer. Furthermore, only surgical management achieves successful palliation of obstructive symptoms and cancer-related pain as a single procedure during exploration. To take advantage of the long-term advantages afforded by surgical palliation,operative procedures must be performed with acceptable morbidity. The average postoperative length of hospital stay for patients who undergo surgical palliation is less than 15 days, even in those who develop minor complications. The average survival of patients who receive surgical palliation alone for nonmetastatic, unresectable pancreatic cancer is approximately 8 months. As with all treatment planning, palliative therapy for pancreatic and biliary cancer should be planned using a multidisciplinary approach, including input from the surgeon, gastroenterologist, radiologist,and medical and radiation oncologist. In this way, quality of life can be optimized in most patients with these diseases.

  14. Percutaneous transhepatic management of complex biliary problems.

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, G D; Cameron, J L; Sitzmann, J V; Kadir, S; Smith, G W; Kaufman, S L; White, R I

    1983-01-01

    A series of 27 patients with complex biliary problems secondary to previous biliary operations is presented. The patients are divided into two groups: (1) patients with acute perioperative biliary problems; all had biliary leak with abscess, biliary cutaneous fistula, and/or stricture following cholecystectomy or common duct exploration and (2) patients with chronic postoperative biliary problems; all had previous repair of biliary stricture or injuries with late stricture formation. Early management of all patients included placement of a percutaneous biliary stent. Abscesses were drained operatively, and biliary leaks or fistulas were allowed to close spontaneously. Jaundice and cholangitis were allowed to resolve. Following stabilization, management of stricture, if present, was addressed. Eight acute patients had strictures, of which four were partial and three were dilated percutaneously. Four were complete and required operative repair. All 12 chronic patients had strictures, of which six were partial and successfully managed with percutaneous dilatation. Four patients also had common duct stones which were successfully crushed percutaneously. The authors conclude that percutaneous transhepatic drainage offers significant advantages in the early stabilization and treatment of patients with complex biliary problems, and that partial strictures of the biliary tree may be managed successfully by percutaneous dilatation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. PMID:6847278

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Human-Pathogenic Lactococcus garvieae LG-ilsanpaik-gs201105 That Caused Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Kang, Do-Hyung; Park, Se Chang

    2015-06-04

    Lactococcus garvieae, which is generally known as a marine and freshwater fish pathogen, is now considered to be an emerging zoonotic pathogen in both human and veterinary medicine. In recent years, we have reported the infection of L. garvieae LG-ilsanpaik-gs201105 in the gallbladder of an old fisherman. In this study, we present the draft genome sequence of L. garvieae LG-ilsanpaik-gs201105, with a total genome size of 1,960,261 bp in 53 contigs and a 38.1% average G+C content. Interestingly, the capsule gene cluster, which was known as one of the crucial virulence factors in L. garvieae, was not detected in our isolate. This is the first genome sequence of human-pathogenic L. garvieae, which caused acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  16. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-12-15

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  17. [Biliary atresia and polysplenia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kerkeni, Yosra; Ksia, Amine; Zitouni, Hayet; Belghith, Mohsen; Lassad, Sahnoun; Krichene, Imed; Mekki, Mongi; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare malformation characterized by the association of multiple rates and other congenital anomalies dominated by cardiac, vascular, intestinal and bile malformations. We report the observation of a patient operated in the neonatal period (3 days) for an upper intestinal obstruction with situs inversus. Surgical exploration noted the presence of multiple rates, a preduodenal vein, a biliary atresia and a duodenal atresia. The surgical procedures performed were a latero-lateral duodeno-duodenostomy and hepatoportoenterostomy of KASAI with simple immediate and delayed outcomes. The follow up was of 23 years. We recall the epidemiological characteristics of this malformative association and we discuss the role played by the prognosis of polysplenia syndrome in the evolution of biliary atresia. The diagnosis and treatment of biliary atresia are always urgent to increase the chances of success of the Kasai, and the chances of prolonged survival with native liver. However, almost all long-term survivors (even anicteric) have biliary cirrhosis, which requires lifelong follow up. PMID:26815511

  18. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fuqiang; Shen, Hongzhang; Li, Zhen; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Yang, Jianfeng; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Ni, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus) and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities.

  19. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fuqiang; Shen, Hongzhang; Li, Zhen; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Yang, Jianfeng; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Ni, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus) and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities. PMID:26930491

  20. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Graham, L D; Burrus, R G; Burns, R P; Chandler, K E; Barker, D E

    1994-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has emerged as the treatment of choice for uncomplicated cholelithiasis. Despite early concerns, many surgeons have applied this new technique to more complicated biliary tract disease states, including biliary pancreatitis. To evaluate the safety of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in this setting, we retrospectively reviewed 29 patients with clinical and laboratory evidence of biliary pancreatitis who underwent this procedure between March 1990 and December 1992. The severity of pancreatitis was determined by Ranson's criteria. Two patients had a Ranson's score of 6, one of 5, one of 4, five scored 3, nine scored 2, nine also scored 1, and two patients scored 0. The mean serum amylase level on admission was 1,610 (range 148 to 7680). All patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy during the same hospital admission for biliary pancreatitis, with the mean time of operation being 5.5 days from admission. Operative time averaged 123 minutes (range 60-220 minutes). Intraoperative cholangiography was obtained in 76 per cent of patients. Three patients had choledocholithiasis on intraoperative cholangiography and were treated with choledochoscopy, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration, and saline flushing of the duct. The mean length of hospital stay was 11 days (range 5-32 days). There were seven postoperative complications requiring prolonged hospitalization with all but one treated non-operatively. One patient with a preoperative Ranson score of 6 developed necrotizing pancreatitis and subsequently required operative pancreatic debridement and drainage. There were no deaths in this series and no postoperative wound infections. The average recovery period for return to work was 2 weeks. These statistics compare favorably with literature reports for open cholecystectomy in biliary pancreatitis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Hepatic Tuberculosis Mimicking Biliary Cystadenoma: A Radiological Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajaram; Dey, Amit Kumar; Mittal, Kartik; Udmale, Prasad; Singh, Udai; Mitkar, Sumit; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Primary involvement of liver in tuberculosis is a rare entity. It is difficult to diagnose in absence of previous history of tuberculosis or concurrent pulmonary involvement. It is usually misdiagnosed as neoplastic liver lesion, which misdirects the treatment protocol and delays proper treatment. Here we are presenting a case of 36-year-old male patient with vague right upper quadrant abdominal pain. All the laboratory values were within normal limits. Radiological investigations were in favor of biliary cystadenoma but final diagnosis was primary focal involvement of liver in tuberculosis which was histopathologically proven to be tuberculous granulomas on biopsy of the resected mass. PMID:26504607

  2. Biliary Epithelial Apoptosis, Autophagy, and Senescence in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Motoko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized serologically by the high prevalence of anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies (AMAs) and histologically by the cholangitis of small bile ducts, eventually followed by extensive loss of the small bile duct. An autoimmune pathogenesis is suggested by clinical and experimental studies, but there remain issues regarding the etiology, the significance of AMAs in the pathogenesis of bile duct lesions, and so on. The unique properties of apoptosis in biliary epithelial cells (BECs), in which there is exposure of autoantigen to the effectors of the immune system, are proposed to be a cause of bile duct lesions in PBC. Recent progress disclosed that cellular senescence and autophagy are involved in bile duct lesions in PBC. Senescent BECs may modulate the periductal microenvironment by expressing senescence-associated secretory phenotypes, including various chemokines, and contribute to the pathogenesis of bile duct lesions in PBC. PMID:21152179

  3. Radiological interventions in malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction is commonly caused by gall bladder carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic nodes. Percutaneous interventions play an important role in managing these patients. Biliary drainage, which forms the major bulk of radiological interventions, can be palliative in inoperable patients or pre-operative to improve liver function prior to surgery. Other interventions include cholecystostomy and radiofrequency ablation. We present here the indications, contraindications, technique and complications of the radiological interventions performed in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27247718

  4. Radiological interventions in malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-05-28

    Malignant biliary obstruction is commonly caused by gall bladder carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic nodes. Percutaneous interventions play an important role in managing these patients. Biliary drainage, which forms the major bulk of radiological interventions, can be palliative in inoperable patients or pre-operative to improve liver function prior to surgery. Other interventions include cholecystostomy and radiofrequency ablation. We present here the indications, contraindications, technique and complications of the radiological interventions performed in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27247718

  5. Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Synchronous Kartagener Syndrome and Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Kendigelen, Pınar; Tütüncü, Ayşe Çiğdem; Erbabacan, Şafak Emre; Kaya, Güner; Altındaş, Fatiş

    2015-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary ciliary dyskinesia accompanied by sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and situs inversus. Synchronous extrahepatic biliary atresia and Kartagener syndrome are very rare. During the preoperative preparation of patients with Kartagener syndrome, special attention is required for the respiratory and cardiovascular system. It is important to provide suitable anaesthetic management to avoid problems because of ciliary dysfunction in the perioperative period. Further, maintaining an effective pain control with regional anaesthetic methods reduces the risk of pulmonary complications. Infants with biliary atresia operated earlier have a higher chance of survival. Hepatic dysfunction and decrease in plasma proteins are important for the kinetics of drugs. In this presentation, the anaesthetic management of patients with synchronous Kartagener syndrome and biliary atresia, both of which are rare diseases, is evaluated. PMID:27366497

  6. Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Synchronous Kartagener Syndrome and Biliary Atresia.

    PubMed

    Kendigelen, Pınar; Tütüncü, Ayşe Çiğdem; Erbabacan, Şafak Emre; Kaya, Güner; Altındaş, Fatiş

    2015-06-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary ciliary dyskinesia accompanied by sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and situs inversus. Synchronous extrahepatic biliary atresia and Kartagener syndrome are very rare. During the preoperative preparation of patients with Kartagener syndrome, special attention is required for the respiratory and cardiovascular system. It is important to provide suitable anaesthetic management to avoid problems because of ciliary dysfunction in the perioperative period. Further, maintaining an effective pain control with regional anaesthetic methods reduces the risk of pulmonary complications. Infants with biliary atresia operated earlier have a higher chance of survival. Hepatic dysfunction and decrease in plasma proteins are important for the kinetics of drugs. In this presentation, the anaesthetic management of patients with synchronous Kartagener syndrome and biliary atresia, both of which are rare diseases, is evaluated. PMID:27366497

  7. Palliative transhepatic biliary drainage and enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Lerch, M M; Moser, C; Stallmach, A; von Blohn, G; Zeitz, M

    1999-12-01

    Simultaneous intestinal and biliary obstruction is a rare but agonizing complication of metastatic abdominal cancer. Although endoscopic procedures exist that relieve jaundice or restore enteral nutrition, they can be impossible to perform for technical or anatomical reasons. We propose a palliative approach for these patients that includes transcutaneous common bile duct drainage, progressive dilation of the transhepatic channel over 1 wk, and, finally, insertion of a permanent silicon catheter that drains bile into the duodenum and is combined with an enteral feeding line. We report three patients whose metastatic abdominal tumors had led to simultaneous jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction, neither of which could be treated endoscopically. In all patients, the transcutaneous bile drainage catheter combined with the enteral feeding line was inserted and tumor symptoms resolved rapidly. As a result, the patients chose to return to home care with enteral nutrition and pain medication. The creation of a transhepatic access for simultaneous enteral bile drainage and nutrition is a technically simple procedure that causes little discomfort to a terminally ill patient. It relieves the symptoms of tumor obstruction, and the option of enteral nutrition and medication can obviate the need for intravenous infusions.

  8. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Acute Intrahepatic Fluid Collections With Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Antonio; Fersini, Alberto; Tartaglia, Nicola; Valentino, Tiziano Pio

    2009-01-01

    Background: Peripancreatic fluid collection suggests the anatomical-clinical scenario of necrotizing acute pancreatitis. However, intrahepatic fluid collection is a rare occurrence with fewer than 30 cases being reported in the medical literature. We describe 2 cases of intrahepatic fluid collection in 2 patients with acute biliary pancreatitis and discuss the therapeutic possibilities. Case Reports: The first case report is that of a 68-year-old female with a diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis with several necrotizing fluid collections and a large infected intrahepatic collection in the left lobe. The patient was successfully treated by percutaneous US/CT guided drainage. The second case report is that of a 72-year-old female with a diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis with several peripancreatic fluid collections and a voluminous intrahepatic fluid collection in the left lobe that caused epigastric pain. This patient was also successfully treated with percutaneous US/CT guided drainage. Conclusion: Intrahepatic fluid collection in the course of acute biliary pancreatitis is a rare occurrence. The therapeutic approach is the same as that for pancreatic and peripancreatic fluid collections. In case of infection, the patient undergoes percutaneous US/CT guided drainage. This therapeutic procedure can be added to the therapeutic program for necrotizing acute biliary pancreatitis together with ERCP/ES and videolaparocholecystectomy (VLC). PMID:19660231

  9. Biliary Adenofibroma with Invasive Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Godambe, Anjali; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Fulling, Keith H.; Reza Kermanshahi, Taher

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of biliary adenofibroma with an invasive carcinoma in a 71-year-old female who presented with bilateral upper abdominal pain. Imaging revealed a 6.3 cm heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left lateral segment of the liver. Histologically, the adenofibroma showed the characteristic components as previously described of biliary adenofibromata, namely, cystic and tubular structures lined by cuboidal to low columnar biliary type epithelium and a dense fibrous stroma composed of spindled cells. Intimately admixed with the adenofibroma was a distinct tumor composed of malignant clear cells which demonstrated stromal and vascular invasion. Although mitotic figures were inconspicuous, Ki67 was brisk and p53 demonstrated 25–50% positivity. Sections also showed a von Meyenberg complex located adjacent to the tumor. This case expands the understanding of this rare tumor and proves two important assertions from previous case reports. First, the presence of an associated von Meyenberg complex with similar morphology and immunohistochemical staining pattern suggests that biliary adenofibromata and von Meyenberg complexes may share related histogenesis. Second, biliary adenofibromata harbor malignant potential and may show malignant transformation. Furthermore, this case highlights the need for these rare tumors to be followed aggressively, as their biological behavior is poorly understood. PMID:26885426

  10. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  11. Post-liver Transplant Biliary Complications.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Tegpal; Pastrana, Mariel; Sandhu, Bimaljit

    2012-03-01

    Biliary tract complications remain a common source of morbidity and mortality in liver transplant (LT) recipients with an estimated incidence of 5-30% after orthotopic LT and a mortality rate of up to 10%. Biliary complications after LT may be related to various factors including hepatic artery thrombosis or stenosis, ischemia reperfusion injury, immunologic injury, infections, donor pool, and technical issues which include imperfect anastomosis and T-tube-related complications. Management of the detected biliary complications includes nonsurgical and surgical methods. A majority of these post transplant biliary complications can be treated with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. If unsuccessful, a percutaneous intervention or surgery may be required. In this article, we review the incidence, clinical presentation, and management of the main types of biliary complications.

  12. Gallbladder disease in children.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, David H; Harmon, Carroll M

    2016-08-01

    Biliary disease in children has changed over the past few decades, with a marked rise in incidence-perhaps most related to the parallel rise in pediatric obesity-as well as a rise in cholecystectomy rates. In addition to stone disease (cholelithiasis), acalculous causes of gallbladder pain such as biliary dyskinesia, also appear to be on the rise and present diagnostic and treatment conundrums to surgeons. PMID:27521713

  13. Women and primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Haapanen, Krista; Li, Baosen; Zhang, Weici; Van de Water, Judy; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-06-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis occurs more frequently in women, and previous studies indicated that the average age of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) onset makes pregnancy in PBC patients uncommon. However, more recently, improved diagnostic testing has enabled detection of PBC in younger women, including those of childbearing age. This has led investigators to become increasingly interested in the relationship between the ontogeny of PBC and pregnancy. Published cases indicate that the typical age for pregnant women to be diagnosed with PBC is in the early 30s, and that during gestation, pruritus and jaundice are the most common symptoms. During gestation, susceptible women may experience onset of PBC resulting from the drastic changes in female hormones; this would include not only the mitochondrial damage due to accumulation of bile acids but also changes in the immune response during the different stages of pregnancy that might play an important role in the breakdown of self-tolerance. The mechanisms underlying the potential relationship between PBC and pregnancy warrant further investigation. For women first diagnosed with PBC during gestation, or those for whom first appearance of a flare up occurs during and postpartum, investigation of the immune response throughout gestation could provide new avenues for immunologic therapeutic intervention and the discovery of new treatment strategies for PBC.

  14. Biliary amylase and congenital choledochal dilatation.

    PubMed

    Davenport, M; Stringer, M D; Howard, E R

    1995-03-01

    The relationship between levels of biliary amylase measured at operation and clinical features was studied in a series of 55 children with congenital biliary dilatation (choledochal cyst) who presented between 1976 and 1993. There were 36 cystic and 19 fusiforms dilatations in the series. The most common modes of presentation were painless jaundice (n = 23) and pancreatitis (n = 22). Five infants presented with abnormal antenatal ultrasound examinations. Children with pancreatitis were older than those with painless jaundice (4.2 versus 1.5 years; P = .005), and a higher proportion had raised levels of biliary amylase (100% versus 44%; P < .0001). There was no difference in the age at presentation (P = .32), clinical mode of presentation (P = .3), or the level of biliary amylase (P = .25) between cystic and fusiform dilatations. A correlation was found between age at surgery and biliary amylase in the cystic (rs = 0.55; P = .001) but not in the fusiform group (P = .22). All infants with antenatal diagnoses were cystic dilatations. Choledochal cystic dilatations that were diagnosed antenatally did not have significant amylase reflux, suggesting that the aetiology of this subgroup is truly congenital. Children who present at a later age with pancreatitis invariably have high levels of biliary amylase, which is presumed to occur because of a common channel and reflux of biliary and pancreatic secretions.

  15. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.E.; Daly, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cholescintigraphy with technetium-labeled biliary agents has great value in evaluation of the patient with suspected acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gall bladder virtually excludes acute cholecystitis and obstruction of the cystic duct. Nonvisualization of the gall bladder, however, is not specific for acute cholecystitis and may also occur in some patients with chronic cholecystitis or pancreatitis. Interpretation of gall bladder nonvisualization, therefore, must be correlated with the clinical presentation. Biliary tract imaging is also useful in evaluation of some focal abnormalities within the liver, neonatal jaundice, detection of bile leaks or bile reflux, and biliary-enteric shunts. The role of technetium-labeled biliary agents in the evaluation of patients with jaundice is less clear. Excretion of tracer into the gut excludes complete biliary tract obstruction, but the test may be nonconclusive at higher serum bilirubin levels. If persistent common bile duct activity is observed with delayed excretion into the gut, the diagnosis of partial obstruction may be made, but this procedure will be inconclusive if the common bile duct is not visualized and/or significant hepatocellular disease is present. Ultrasonography and abdominal CT are the preferred tools for the diagnosis of biliary tract obstruction at present, but newer biliary tract agents which achieve better hepatic extraction and greater bile concentration at high serum bilirubin levels may improve the diagnostic efficacy of cholescintigraphy.

  16. The Canadian Biliary Atresia Registry: Improving the care of Canadian infants with biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Alison E; Schreiber, Richard A; Yanchar, Natalie; Emil, Sherif; Laberge, Jean-Martin

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of end-stage liver disease and liver cirrhosis in children, and the leading indication for liver transplantation in the paediatric population. There is no cure for biliary atresia; however, timely diagnosis and early infant age at surgical intervention using the Kasai portoenterostomy optimize the prognosis. Late referral is a significant problem in Canada and elsewhere. There is also a lack of standardized care practices among treating centres in this country. Biliary atresia registries currently exist across Europe, Asia and the United States. They have provided important evidence-based information to initiate changes to biliary atresia care in their countries with improvements in outcome. The Canadian Biliary Atresia Registry was initiated in 2013 for the purpose of identifying best standards of care, enhancing public education, facilitating knowledge translation and advocating for novel national public health policy programs to improve the outcomes of Canadian infants with biliary atresia. PMID:27398049

  17. Biliary complications after liver transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Verdonk, Robert C; Buis, Carlijn I; Porte, Robert J; Haagsma, Elizabeth B

    2006-01-01

    After liver transplantation, the prevalence of complications related to the biliary system is 6-35%. In recent years, the diagnosis and treatment of biliary problems has changed markedly. The two standard methods of biliary reconstruction in liver transplant recipients are the duct-to-duct choledochocholedochostomy and the Roux-en-Y-hepaticojejunostomy. Biliary leakage occurs in approximately 5-7% of transplant cases. Leakage from the site of anastomosis, the T-tube exit site and donor or recipient remnant cystic duct is well described. Symptomatic bile leakage should be treated by stenting of the duct by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTCD). Biliary strictures can occur at the site of the anastomosis (anastomotic stricture; AS) or at other locations in the biliary tree (non-anastomotic strictures; NAS). AS occur in 5-10% of cases and are due to fibrotic healing. Treatment by ERCP or PTCD with dilatation and progressive stenting is successful in the majority of cases. NAS can occur in the context of a hepatic artery thrombosis, or with an open hepatic artery (ischaemic type biliary lesions or ITBL). The incidence is 5-10%. NAS has been associated with various types of injury, e.g. macrovascular, microvascular, immunological and cytotoxic injury by bile salts. Treatment can be attempted with multiple sessions of dilatation and stenting of stenotic areas by ERCP or PTCD. In cases of localized diseased and good graft function, biliary reconstructive surgery is useful. However, a significant number of patients will need a re-transplant. When biliary strictures or ischaemia of the graft are present, stones, casts and sludge can develop. PMID:16782628

  18. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis-sonographic pictorial essay on four pediatric cases with acute biliary colic.

    PubMed

    Lynser, Donboklang; Marbaniang, Evarisalin

    2016-04-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis occur due to migration of the round worm ascaris lumbricoides through the bile duct orifice finally reaching the common bile duct, main pancreatic duct, intrahepatic ducts or gallbladder. These resulted in acute epigastric and right hypochondriac region colicky pain. Ultrasound is the investigation of choice in hepatobiliary ascariasis. We present here sonographic images on four pediatric patients with acute biliary colic. PMID:26690772

  19. Endoscopic palliation of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Sanjay M; Gaidhane, Monica; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary strictures often present late after the window for curative resection has elapsed. In such patients, the goal of therapy is typically focused on palliation. While historically, palliative measures were performed surgically, the advent of endoscopic intervention offers minimally invasive options to provide relief of symptoms, improve quality of life, and in some cases, increase survival of these patients. Some of these therapies, such as endoscopic biliary decompression, have become mainstays of treatment for decades, whereas newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, and photodynamic therapy offer additional options for patients with incurable biliary malignancies. PMID:26989459

  20. Spontaneous biliary peritonitis with common bile duct stones: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Hamura, Ryoga; Haruki, Koichiro; Tsutsumi, Jun; Takayama, Sumio; Shiba, Hiroaki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Spontaneous biliary peritonitis is rare in adults. We herein report a case of spontaneous biliary peritonitis. An 84-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain for 5 days. He developed fever, jaundice, and abdominal rigidity. Computed tomography (CT) revealed massive ascites in the omental bursa and around the liver. The ascites obtained by diagnostic paracentesis was dark yellow-green in color, which implied bile leakage. With a diagnosis of bile peritonitis, the patient underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy. There was massive biliary ascites in the abdominal cavity, especially in the omental bursa. Because exploration failed to demonstrate the perforation site in the gallbladder and biliary duct, we performed abdominal lavage alone. Postoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed stones in the common bile duct, and there was no evidence of biliary leakage. Endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage was performed using a plastic stent to reduce the pressure of the common bile duct. After the operation, the patient showed satisfactory recovery and started oral intake on postoperative day 8. However, the patient developed heart failure due to renal dysfunction with nephrotic syndrome at 1 month after the operation. With a diagnosis of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to immune complex, the patient received steroid treatment for nephritis, diuretics, and carperitide for heart failure. Although heart failure and renal dysfunction improved by these treatment, the patients developed toxic epidermal necrolysis which was refractory to intensive treatments including steroid pulse and immunoglobulin, and the patient died 76 days after the operation. PMID:27679466

  1. Cholescintigraphy in extrahepatic biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Klingensmith, W.C.; Kuni, C.C.; Fritzberg, A.R.

    1982-07-01

    The effect of etiology on findings in cholescintigraphy in patients with extrahepatic obstruction was retrospectively evaluated in 29 patients. Of 11 patients with obstruction secondary to cancer, seven (78%) of nine had complete obstruction (delayed images were not obtained in two) and nine (82%) of 11 had a moderate to severe decreases in hepatocyte clearance. Of 12 patients with obstruction secondary to cholelithiasis, only four (36%) had complete obstruction (delayed images were not obtained in one) (p less than 0.05) and all 11 had normal or only midly decreased hepatocyte clearance (p less than 0.05). All five patients with obstruction secondary to pancreatitis had mild partial obstruction and normal or mildly decreased hepatocyte clearance. One patient had partial obstruction secondary to an abscess adjacent to the common bile duct; hepatocyte clearance was mildly decreased. Cancerous and noncancerous causes of biliary tract obstruction produce significantly different findings in hepatobiliary imaging.

  2. Patency of the Santorini duct and acute biliary pancreatitis. A prospective ERCP study.

    PubMed

    Nowak, A; Nowakowska-Dutawa, E; Rybicka, J

    1990-05-01

    Disturbance of outflow of the pancreatic juice is considered to be a pathogenic factor in the development of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP). In the years 1984-1988 sixty-seven patients admitted with ABP were prospectively allocated to urgent ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy. Diagnostic criteria of acute biliary pancreatitis were as follows: epigastric pain, an elevated serum amylase concentration, biochemical prediction of gallstones, positive pattern of pancreatitis in US and CT-scan and ERCP performed within 24 h of admission. At ERCP the anatomy of the pancreatic duct was evaluated and special attention was paid to the patency of the accessory (Santorini) duct as a potential outflow route of the pancreatic juice. The control group comprised 100 consecutive patients in whom a pancreatogram was obtained during ERCP performed because of expected biliary pathology. Patency of the Santorini duct was found merely in 17% patients with ABP. In contrast, this duct was patent in 69% of the patients in the control group (p less than 0.001). The absence of this additional possibility of draining pancreatic juice might be an important pathogenic factor in acute biliary pancreatitis.

  3. [Biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Preliminary communication].

    PubMed

    Garnica, E

    1989-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has been successfully used in the treatment of urinary stones. Since 1985, it has also been applied in the management of gallbladder and biliary duct stones. The preliminary experience in Venezuela with the shock wave technology for the treatment of biliary stone disease is presented. The facilities of the Unit for the Treatment of Lithiasis. UNILIT of Venezuela, in Caracas were used. This unit is equipped with a Siemens Lithostar, that operates with an electromagnetic shock wave generator guided by a very accurate computerized biplane fluoroscopic system. Symptomatic gallstones with functioning gallbladder and radiolucid stones smaller than 3 cm, were the most important inclusion criteria. For duct stones, all cases that could not be managed by endoscopy were included. Fifteen cases have been treated from April 1988. Ten with gallstones and 5 with biliary duct stones. Success rate for gallstones, clarifications of gallbladder within a 12 month follow-up, was achieved in 40%. In the cases of biliary duct lithiasis, the aim was to reduce the stone to smaller fragments that could pass spontaneously or be retrieved by endoscopic maneuvers. In all the five cases treated, the stones could be crushed into small fragments and in four, they were easily withdrawn by endoscopic ballooning. Preliminary results and published data suggest that shockwave lithotripsy is a valuable method of treatment for selected cases of gallbladder stones and it is specially useful in the management of biliary duct stones where the endoscopic maneuvers have failed.

  4. Extrahepatic biliary obstruction by metastatic colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Welch, J P

    1978-11-01

    Extrahepatic biliary obstruction can be caused by cancer metastatic from the colon to the lymph nodes adjacent to the bile duct. This report details our experience with eight such cases treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital in the last seven years. The interval between resection of the primary tumor and appearance of jaundice averaged 13 months. The location of the obstruction, preferably defined preoperatively by cholangiography, was low on the common duct in three cases and high in the porta hepatis in five. Relief of biliary obstruction was accomplished by biliary-enteric bypass (four cases), internal biliary stenting by permanent indwelling tube (two cases), or by portal irradiation (two cases). In addition to palliating the symptoms of obstructive jaundice, the period of comfortable survival appears to have been extended: the bypassed patients lived 13-38 months. Erosion of tumor into the duodenum, with resulting gastrointestinal hemorrhage, was an additional problem in three patients. Our overall experience illustrates the value of distinguishing this subgroup of patients from the larger number whose jaundice results from extensive liver metastases, and of treating aggressively those with extrahepatic biliary obstruction.

  5. [SURGICAL TACTICS IN CHRONIC PANCREATITIS WITH SIGNS OF BILIARY HYPERTENSION].

    PubMed

    Usenko, O Yu; Kopchak, V M; Pylypchuk, V I; Kopchak, K V; Andronik, S V

    2015-08-01

    The results of treatment of 84 patients for chronic pancreatitis with the biliary hypertension signs were depicted. In 83 patients operative interventions were performed, and in 1--positive results were achieved after pancreatic cyst puncture under ultrasonographic control. In 51 patients the conduction of Frey operation have permitted to achieve a lower pressure inside biliary system, in 25--the additional procedures were applied for a biliary hypertension elimination. In 20 patients a method of pressure measurement in biliary system was used.

  6. Aztreonam biliary excretion in bile duct ligated jaundiced rats.

    PubMed

    Rulli, F; Muzi, M; Zanella, E; Cipriani, P; Magni, A; Giordano, A; Filadoro, F

    1991-04-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to assess aztreonam biliary concentrations in bile duct ligated jaundiced rats. The study proved that aztreonam biliary concentrations are sufficient to inhibit Gram-negative bacteria within the first and the second hour after antibiotic administration. The experimental model suggests that clinical conditions such as lithiasis or neoplasms of the biliary tree should not totally inhibit the antibiotic excretion.

  7. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  8. Percutaneous Management of Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Christopher M; Ryu, Robert K

    2015-12-01

    Malignancy resulting in impaired biliary drainage includes a number of diagnoses familiar to the interventional radiologist. Adequate drainage of such a system can significantly improve patient quality of life, and can facilitate the further treatment options and care of such patients. In the setting of prior instrumentation, cholangitis can present as an urgent indication for drainage. Current initial interventional management of malignant biliary duct obstruction frequently includes endoscopic or percutaneous intervention, with local practices and preprocedural imaging guiding interventional approaches and subsequent management. This article addresses the indications for percutaneous drainage, technical considerations in performing such drainage, and specific techniques useful in attempting to achieve clinical end points in patients with malignant biliary duct obstruction.

  9. Involvement of cholangiocyte proliferation in biliary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Priester, Sally; Wise, Candace; Glaser, Shannon S

    2010-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are the epithelial cells that line the biliary tree. In the adult liver, they are a mitotically dormant cell population, unless ductular reaction is triggered by injury. The ability of cholangiocytes to proliferate is important in many different human pathological liver conditions that target this cell type, which are termed cholangiopathies (i.e. primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and biliary atresia). In our article, we provide background information on the morphological and functional heterogeneity of cholangiocytes, summarize what is currently known about their proliferative processes, and briefly describe the diseases that target these cells. In addition, we address recent findings that suggest cholangiocyte involvement in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation and liver fibrosis, and propose directions for future studies. PMID:21607140

  10. Burdick's Technique for Biliary Access Revisited.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Rai, Vijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The precut sphincterotomy is used to facilitate selective biliary access in cases of difficult biliary cannulation. Needle-knife precut papillotomy is the standard of care but is associated with a high rate of complications such as pancreatitis, duodenal perforation, bleeding, etc. Sometimes during bowing of the sphincterotome/cannula and the use of guide wire to facilitate biliary cannulation, inadvertent formation of a false passage occurs in the 10 to 11 o'clock direction. Use of this step to access the bile duct by the intramucosal incision technique was first described by Burdick et al., and since then two more studies have also substantiated the safety and efficacy of this non-needle type of precut sphincterotomy. In this review, we discuss this non-needle technique of precut sphincterotomy and also share our experience using this "Burdick's technique." PMID:25674522

  11. Prospective evaluation of endoscopic ultrasonography in the diagnosis of biliary microlithiasis in patients with normal transabdominal ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Nasiri, Jafar; Vahid, Ahad Atef; Ghadimi, Ramin; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2005-01-01

    Prior investigators have proposed microlithiasis as a causative factor for occult gallbladder diseases. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is potentially far more sensitive than transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS) in visualizing small stones. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in the diagnosis of microlithiasis in patients with upper abdominal pain and normal TUS. Thirty-five patients with biliary-type abdominal pain and normal TUS results were prospectively studied. All patients underwent radial EUS by means of a GF UM-20 echoendoscope (Olympus Optical, Tokyo, Japan). Of 35 patients, 33 were revealed to have gallbladder sludge or small stones, and 21 had CBD sludge or microlithiasis. Nine patients were not available for follow-up; of the remaining patients, 13 underwent combined endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and cholecystectomy, 10 underwent cholecystectomy, and 3 underwent biliary sphincterotomy alone. In a postoperative follow-up at 9.2 months, 25 patients (96.2%) were symptom free. EUS is an important diagnostic tool in patients with unexplained biliary colic. Cholecystectomy with or without EUS is an effective treatment modality in these settings.

  12. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  13. [Pancreato-biliary maljunctions and congenital cystic dilatation of the bile ducts in adults].

    PubMed

    Kianmanesh, R; Régimbeau, J M; Belghiti, J

    2001-08-01

    Pancreato-biliary maljunctions (PBM) in adults are defined by the presence of an abnormally long common pancreato-biliary duct (more than 15 mm long) formed outside the duodenal wall and/or by high amylase level in the bile. The high amylase level in the bile is the functional expression of a chronic toxic reflux of pancreatic juices into the biliary tree. The presence of the PBM have two basic consequences: (i) formation of congenital cystic dilatations of the bile duct (CCBD) during embryogenesis and (ii) cancerous degeneration of extrahepatic bile ducts including the gall bladder. CCBD are commonly found in Southeast of Asia and in Japan where more than two-thirds of the worldwide cases are reported. Women are more frequently touched. The main manifestations are pain, cholangitis and acute pancreatitis. Cancerous degeneration mainly due to chronic pancreatico-biliary reflux consecutive to the presence of PBM is the most serious complication of CCBD. Its global incidence is about 16% and increases by age and after cysto-digestive derivations widely performed in the past. In 80% of the cases a cholangiocarcinoma involving the extrahepatic portion of the biliary tree including dilated segments such as the gall bladder and/or cystic wall is found. The treatment of choice of most common types of CCBD with PMD is complete excision of most of the sites where cancer may arise and should interrupt the pancreato-biliary reflux. This treatment significantly reduces the incidence of bile duct cancer to 0.7%. However, despite the absence of mortality, the overall morbidity rates reach from 20% to 40%. In the complete excision, the entire common bile duct from porta hepatis to the intrapancreatic portion of the choledochus and the gall bladder are resected. The bile continuity is assured by a hepatico-jejunal Y anastomosis. When there is no CCBD, the high risk of gall bladder cancer in the presence of a PBM justifies by itself a preventive cholecystectomy even if no biliary

  14. Transpapillary biliary stenting is a risk factor for pancreatic stones in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kishida, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Tomohiro; Murai, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Masao; Imai, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Kikuyama, Masataka; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: Pancreatic stones occasionally develop in autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), often worsen endocrine and exocrine functions, and occasionally cause pain attacks. However, the risks of pancreatic stones in AIP have been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors associated with pancreatic stone formation in cases of AIP. Patients and methods: In total, 50 patients with AIP (39 males, 11 females; mean age 64.0 years), followed up for at least a year, were analyzed for their demographic and clinical findings and pancreatic stone occurrence. Results: In total, 50 patients were followed up for an average of 59.7 (12 – 120) months, with steroid treatment in 44 patients (88 %); pancreatic stones occurred in 14 (28 %) patients after the diagnosis of AIP and endoscopic treatment was needed in one patient with pain attack. The pancreatic stones appeared only in patients with long follow-up period (P < 0.001, 83.9 months vs. 49.6 months), biliary stenting (odds ratio [OR]: 8.40, P = 0.010), relapse (OR: 6.20, P = 0.023), jaundice (OR: 5.40, P = 0.019), and swelling of the duodenal major papilla (OR: 4.67, P = 0.040). Biliary stenting was placed for an average of 9.9 months in 27 patients. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant association only with biliary stenting (P = 0.011). The stones appeared relatively earlier in patients with stones in the main pancreatic duct or Santorini duct (22.1 months) than in patients where pancreatic stones developed elsewhere (53.4 months) (P = 0.018). Conclusions: The risk of pancreatic stone development should be taken into account when a biliary stent is placed in patients with AIP. PMID:27540582

  15. [The 452th case: rash, hypotension, abdominal pain and headache].

    PubMed

    Bian, S N; Yang, H H; Wang, Q; Xu, D; Zhao, Y

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized with multiple organ involvements. Acute acalculous cholecystitis(AAC) is an extremely rare manifestation of digestive system involvement in SLE. We reported a case of 32-year-old woman who complained skin rashes for two weeks and stomachache and oliguria for one day. She had rashes at onset, and developed fever, stomachache, hypotension and headache. Physical examination at admission indicated blood pressure 76/47 mmHg(1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), heart rate 107 beats/min, warm acra. Murphy's sign was positive. Ultrasound suggested the enlarged gallbladder with surrounding hypoecho band yet no biliary calculi were found. A diagnosis of SLE was made, characteristic with distributive shock at the onset and AAC, complicated with neuropsychiatric lupus and lupus nephritis. She had an acute and severe course of disease, which had been relieved after treatment of high dose glucocorticoid and immunosuppressants. This case arouses clinicians to pay more attention to AAC as a rare form of disease flare in SLE. Early diagnosis of AAC is crucial to a favorable prognosis and in avoid of abdominal surgery. PMID:27586989

  16. A prospective study of radionuclide biliary scanning in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Neoptolemos, J. P.; Fossard, D. P.; Berry, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Early surgery for biliary pancreatitis has resulted in a need for an accurate method of gallstone detection in acute pancreatitis. Fifty patients with acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively to assess the diagnostic value of Radionuclide Biliary Scanning (RBS) performed within 72 hours of an attack. To assess the general accuracy of RBS a further 154 patients with suspected acute cholecystitis or biliary colic were similarly studied. There were 34 patients with biliary pancreatitis and 18 (53%) had a positive scan (no gallbladder seen). There were 16 patients with non-biliary pancreatitis and 5 (31%) had a positive scan. All 51 patients with acute cholecystitis had a positive scan, as did 82% of the 51 patients with biliary colic. There were 52 patients with no biliary or pancreatic disease and none of these had a positive scan. RBS is highly accurate in confirming a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis or biliary colic. However, it cannot be relied on to differentiate between biliary and non-biliary pancreatitis and should certainly not be used as the basis for biliary surgery in these patients. PMID:6859781

  17. Biliary casts after liver transplantation: Morphology and biochemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Long; Zhang, Cheng; Lin, Mei-Ju; Shi, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Yu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathogenesis of biliary casts after liver transplantation relative to their morphology and biochemical markers. METHODS: The microstructure of biliary casts was assessed using scanning electron microscopy and Hematoxylin and eosin staining assessed their histology. The expression levels of CD3, CD5, CD34, CD68 and CD79a in these biliary casts were evaluated immunohistochemically. RESULTS: Biliary casts differed widely in their microstructure, with some containing blood vessels positive for CD34 and collagen fibers with positive Masson staining. Large numbers of neutrophils and other inflammatory cells were present, but only on the edge of the biliary casts; although the boundaries were clear without crossover. None of the biliary casts contained T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, macrophages and other inflammatory cells. CONCLUSION: The microcostructure of biliary casts differed. Bacteria and acute rejection are not clearly related to their formation. PMID:24282366

  18. Osteopathic manipulative treatment in the management of biliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Heineman, Katherine

    2014-02-01

    Biliary dyskinesia is a functional gastrointestinal disorder of the gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi. Diagnosis is made on the basis of symptoms of biliary colic in the absence of cholelithiasis and gallbladder inflammation. Palpatory findings of tissue texture changes at midthoracic levels (T6-T9) may correspond to visceral dysfunction related to the biliary system. Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) of the T6-T9 segments can remove the feedback related to the somatic component, thereby affecting nociceptive facilitation at the spinal level and allowing the body to restore autonomic balance. Few reports in the current literature provide examples of treatment for patients with biliary dyskinesia using OMT. The author describes the case of a 51-year-old woman who presented with symptoms consistent with biliary dyskinesia. Her biliary colic completely resolved after OMT. Osteopathic evaluation and OMT should be considered a safe and effective option for conservative management of biliary dyskinesia.

  19. Biliary tract infections caused by Aeromonas species.

    PubMed

    Chao, C M; Lai, C C; Tang, H J; Ko, W C; Hsueh, P-R

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract. Patients with bile cultures positive for Aeromonas species during the period July 2004 to December 2011 were identified from a computerized database of a hospital in Taiwan. Patients with Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract were further identified. During the study period, a total of 1,142 isolates of Aeromonas species were obtained from 750 patients. Of those patients, 91 (12.1 %) had Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract. The annual incidence (episodes per 10,000 patient-days) of biliary tract infections caused by all Aeromonas species was 0.31 in 2007, 0.12 in 2010, and 0.27 in 2011. A. hydrophila was the most common species isolated (n = 41, 45.1 %), followed by A. caviae (n = 30, 33.0 %), A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 15, 16.5 %), and A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 5, 5.5 %). The majority of patients (n = 77, 84.6 %) had polymicrobial infections. Hepatobiliary stones (n = 50, 54.9 %) and hepatobiliary cancer (n = 38, 41.8 %) were the most common underlying diseases, followed by diabetes mellitus (n = 29, 31.9 %) and liver cirrhosis (n = 7, 7.7 %). The in-hospital mortality rate was 8.8 %. Infection-related mortality was associated with underlying immunocompromised condition (p = 0.044) and use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.004), but was not associated with inappropriate antibiotic usage or concomitant bacteremia (n = 8, 8.8 %). In conclusion, biliary tract infections caused by Aeromonas species are not uncommon and can develop in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients; however, patients with underlying hepatobiliary diseases are particularly susceptible to these infections.

  20. Is biliary lithiasis associated with pancreatographic changes?

    PubMed Central

    Barthet, M; Affriat, C; Bernard, J P; Berthezene, P; Dagorn, J C; Sahel, J

    1995-01-01

    The aetiological role of biliary lithiasis for chronic pancreatitis remains controversial. Previous studies based on pancreatographic studies reported changes in the pancreatic duct system caused by biliary lithiasis. This study analysed retrospectively the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of 165 patients presenting with biliary lithiasis and of 53 controls. Among the 165 patients, 113 had choledochal stones (53 with gall bladder stones, 50 had had a cholecystectomy, 10 with a normal gall bladder), 35 had gall bladder stones without choledochal stones, 17 had cholecystectomy for gall bladder stones. Pancreatograms were analysed by measuring the diameter of the pancreatic duct in the head, the body, and the tail of the pancreas, and evaluating the regularity of the main pancreatic duct and the presence of stenosis, the regularity or the dilatation of secondary ducts, and the presence of cysts. In addition, we established a score, based on the above parameters, by which pancreatograms were classified as normal or with mild, intermediate, moderate or severe abnormalities. A multivariate analysis (stepwise multiple discriminant analysis) was performed for age, sex, presence of gall stones, presence of choledochal stones. Patients were comparable with controls for sex, alcohol consumption but were younger (55 v 68 years, p < 0.01). In patients and in controls, the frequency of pancreatographic abnormalities increased significantly with age. The pancreatographic features of patients and controls were not significantly different. In the multivariate analysis, age was the only factor with significant predicting value for pancreatographic abnormalities. In conclusion, biliary lithiasis in itself is not an aetiological factor for chronic pancreatitis, older age being responsible for the abnormalities seen by pancreatography of patients with biliary lithiasis. PMID:7797128

  1. [Multi-technical management of biliary fistula].

    PubMed

    Vargas, F; Barrios, R; Palao, R; Garnica, E

    1991-01-01

    Biliary fistula is an occasional complication of cholecystectomy and are usually associated to retained biliary stones, surgical trauma of the biliary ducts and local infection. They were mainly treated by surgical methods up to the acquisition of the new endoscopic and percutaneous techniques used together with parenteral and enteral nutrition and new antibiotics. A total of seven patients with diagnosis of biliary fistula were seen between 1984 and 1990 at the "Unidad de Gastroenterología y Cirugía Digestiva" of the Clínica Sanatrix en Caracas. Average age was 50 with ranged between 31 and 76, 4 were male and 3 female. The fistulas were in 1 due to necrotizing pancreatitis, in 3 to lost of the ligation of the cystic duct, 2 were due to accidental injury of the common duct and the last case was a partial dehiscence of a choledoco-jejunostomy after the resection of a common duct cyst. Four of the cases were choledoco-cutaneous fistula, one hepatocutaneous, two hepatoduodenal. All the seven patients had subhepatic collections, one had a retroperitoneal collection, two had subdiaphragmatic collections and one had multiple hepatic abscesses. The abdominal collections were treated by percutaneous drainage using mainly the Ring-McLean and Van Sonnenberg tubes. The fistula was occluded with biliary prosthesis in four cases, using either endoscopic, percutaneous or mixed technique to place the stent. Patency of the stents ranged between 2 weeks and 24 months. Control time was from 2 to 40 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  3. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  4. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  5. Biliary pancreatitis. Deadly threat to the elderly. Is it a real threat?

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Arshad Mehmood

    2015-01-01

    Objective/Introduction Gallstone pancreatitis is a deadly disease and especially so in the elderly. This study highlights the incidence, pattern and management of acute biliary pancreatitis in the elderly patients to find out the outcome of management. Methods All patients of acute abdomen regardless of the age and gender of the patients were admitted in our unit at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences and different private hospitals in Hyderabad during 3 years commencing from June 2009 to June 2011. The data was collected on a proforma by the author as soon as the patients were received from the emergency. After admission the patients with the diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis on initial workup were inducted in this study. The variables studied included the incidence, severity and management outcome in patients 55 years and above compared to younger patients below 55 years. Results A total number of 650 patients regardless of gender with acute severe abdominal pain were brought to the emergency of which 131(20.15%) were diagnosed as acute biliary pancreatitis after initial work up. Out of the total patients diagnosed as acute pancreatitis, 63(48.09%) patients were <55 years of age and remaining 68(51.90%) patients were >55 years of age. The overall mortality in this study was 20.63 %( n=13) in elderly patients (> 55 years of age) in both the sexes despite all possible treatment measures. Conclusion Elderly people respond poorly to the acute insult to pancreatitis. PMID:25901131

  6. British Society of Interventional Radiology: Biliary Drainage and Stenting Registry (BDSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, R. Das, N.; Moss, J.; Robertson, I.

    2012-02-15

    Objectives: This study was designed to audit current practice in percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting in the United Kingdom. Methods: In 2006, the British Society of Interventional Radiology set up the first web-based Biliary Drainage and Stenting Registry (BDSR). This consisted of a series of tick sheets, which were completed online. Data collection included technical and clinical success of the procedures and outcomes at discharge with a separate form for any follow-up visits. Two months before data analysis, all contributors were asked via email to complete any outstanding data. This paper reports on data collected between November 1, 2006 and August 18, 2009. Results: A total of 833 procedures were recorded and were entered by 62 operators from 44 institutions within the United Kingdom. There were 455 men and 378 women with a median age of 69 (range 20-101) years.The majority of procedures were performed by a consultant. Successful drainage of the biliary tree was achieved in 98.7%. Partial or complete relief of symptoms was seen in 65% of patients. Minor complications, predominantly pain (14.3%), were seen in 26% and major complications, predominantly sepsis (3.5%), were seen in 7.9% of patients. Conclusions: These figures provide an essential benchmark for both audit and patient information. Identifying areas of good practice and those that require improvement will ultimately result in better patient care.

  7. Development of the intrahepatic biliary tree.

    PubMed

    Crawford, James M

    2002-08-01

    The liver develops from two anlages: the hepatic diverticulum, which buds off the ventral side of the foregut, and the septum transversum, which is the mesenchymal plate that partially separates the embryonic thoracic and abdominal cavities. The endodermal cells of the hepatic diverticulum invade the septum transversum, forming sheets and cords of hepatoblasts arrayed along the sinusoidal vascular channels derived from the vitelline veins emanating from the yolk sac. The vitelline veins fuse to form the portal vein, which ramifies as tributaries within the liver along mesenchymal channels termed portal tracts. Those hepatoblasts immediately adjacent to the mesenchyme of the portal tracts differentiate into a ductal plate, a single circumferential layer of biliary epithelial cells. Mesenchymal cells interpose between the ductal plate and the remaining parenchymal hepatoblasts, which differentiate into hepatocytes. By week 7 the ductal plate begins to reduplicate, forming a double layer of cells around the portal tract. Lumena form between the two cell layers of the ductal plate, forming peripheral biliary tubular structures. These peripheral tubules remodel and, with continued proliferation of the mesenchyme, by the 11th week begin to become more centrally located within portal tracts as terminal bile ducts with a circular cross-section. The remaining ductal plate resorbs, leaving behind only tethers of bile ductules connecting the terminal bile ducts to the parenchyma. Abutting and within the parenchyma are the canals of Hering, ductular structures half-lined by hepatocytes and half-lined by biliary epithelial cells. Maturation of the intrahepatic biliary tree to the mature tubular treelike architecture occurs from the hilum of the liver outward, beginning around the 11th week of gestation and continuing past birth for several months. The architecture of maturation is the same regardless of gestational age or radial location in the liver. Importantly, the immature

  8. Surgery or EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy for malignant distal biliary obstruction after ERCP failure

    PubMed Central

    Artifon, Everson L.A.; Loureiro, Jarbas F.; Baron, Todd H.; Fernandes, Kaie; Kahaleh, Michel; Marson, Fernando P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the method of choice for drainage in patients with distal malignant biliary obstruction, but it fails in up to 10% of cases. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and surgical bypass are the traditional drainage alternatives. This study aimed to compare technical and clinical success, quality of life, and survival of surgical biliary bypass or hepaticojejunostomy (HJT) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided choledochoduodenostomy (CDT) in patients with distal malignant bile duct obstruction and failed ERCP. Patients and Methods: A prospective, randomized trial was conducted. From March 2011 to September 2013, 32 patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction and failed ERCP were studied. The HJT group consisted of 15 patients and the CDT group consisted of 14 patients. Technical and clinical success, quality of life, and survival were assessed prospectively. Results: Technical success was 94% (15/16) in the HJT group and 88% (14/16) in the CDT group (P = 0.598). Clinical success occurred in 14 (93%) patients in the HJT group and in 10 (71%) patients in the CDT group (P = 0.169). During follow-up, a statistically significant difference was seen in mean functional capacity scores, physical health, pain, social functioning, and emotional and mental health aspects in both techniques (P < 0.05). The median survival time in both groups was the same (82 days). Conclusion: Data relating to technical and clinical success, quality of life, and survival were similar in patients who underwent HJT and CDT drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction. PMID:26374583

  9. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures are a common indication for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Endoscopic management has evolved over the last 2 decades as the current standard of care. The most common etiologies of strictures encountered are following surgery and those related to chronic pancreatitis. High-quality cross-sectional imaging provides a road map for endoscopic management. Currently, sequential placement of multiple plastic biliary stents represents the preferred approach. There is an increasing role for the treatment of these strictures using covered metal stents, but due to conflicting reports of efficacies as well as cost and complications, this approach should only be entertained following careful consideration. Optimal management of strictures is best achieved using a team approach with the surgeon and interventional radiologist playing an important role.

  10. Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation for malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    WANG, FEI; LI, QUANPENG; ZHANG, XIUHUA; JIANG, GUOBING; GE, XIANXIU; YU, HONG; NIE, JUNJIE; JI, GUOZHONG; MIAO, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a novel palliation therapy for malignant biliary stricture; however, its feasibility and safety has not yet been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic RFA for the treatment of malignant biliary strictures. A total of 12 patients treated by endoscopic RFA between December 2011 and October 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Adverse events within 30 days post-intervention, stricture diameters prior to and following RFA, stent patency and survival time were investigated. A total of 12 patients underwent 20 RFA procedures as a treatment for malignant biliary strictures. Two patients required repeated elective RFA (4 and 6 times, respectively). All 20 RFA procedures were successfully performed without technical problems. During a 30 day period following each RFA procedure, two patients experienced fever (38.2 and 38.9°C, respectively) and another patient exhibited post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. The 30- and 90-day mortality rates were 0 and 8.3%, respectively. Mean stricture diameter prior to RFA was 5.3 mm (standard deviation (SD), 0.9 mm; range, 5–8 mm), and the mean diameter following RFA was 12.6 mm (SD, 3.1 mm; range, 8–15 mm). There was a significant increase of 7.3 mm in the bile duct diameter following RFA in comparison with prior to RFA (t=8.6; P≤0.001). Of the 11 patients with stents inserted following RFA, the median stent patency was 125.0 days [95% confidence interval (CI), 94.7–155.3 days]. Extrapolated median survival following the first RFA was 232 days (95% CI, 94.3–369.7 days). In conclusion, RFA appears to be an efficient and safe treatment strategy for the palliation of unresectable malignant biliary strictures. PMID:27284336

  11. Adenocarcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary tree.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. B.; Cooper, M. J.; Williamson, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Increasing survival rates for carcinoma of the biliary tree could reflect the selection of patients for referral to a specialist centre as well as modern improvements in diagnosis and treatment. To determine the true incidence and outcome of biliary cancer, the records of 243 unselected Bristol patients were reviewed retrospectively over a 15-year period. Mean age was 64 years. Gallstones were associated in 38% of cases. Sixty-nine of 87 patients with gallbladder carcinoma were submitted to laparotomy. The operative (30-day) mortality rate was 56% and the one-year survival rate was 7%; one patient with an unexpected carcinoma is alive 7 years after cholecystectomy (1% five-year survival rate). Among 31 patients with carcinoma of the ampulla the operative mortality rate was 27%; one-year and five-year survival rates were 46% and 15%. Bile duct cancers (n = 125) arose proximal to the entry of the cystic duct (n = 63), distal to that point (n = 46) or diffusely (n = 16). For proximal cholangiocarcinoma the operative mortality rate was 38% and 1-year survival rate 17%; no patient lived for 2 years. For distal cholangiocarcinoma the operative mortality rate was 45% and one-year survival rate 26%; no patient lived for 3 years. Only palliative procedures were undertaken for diffuse cholangiocarcinoma; 2 patients survived 1 year (13%). Overall 5 patients with carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary tree appear to have been cured (2%). PMID:2988399

  12. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Singh, Rajvinder; Loong, Cheong Kuan; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach). This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS) has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS). In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS-) guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized. PMID:26981114

  13. Excretion of biliary compounds during intrauterine life

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Rocio IR; Marin, Jose JG; Serrano, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    In adults, the hepatobiliary system, together with the kidney, constitute the main routes for the elimination of several endogenous and xenobiotic compounds into bile and urine, respectively. However, during intrauterine life the biliary route of excretion for cholephilic compounds, such as bile acids and biliary pigments, is very poor. Although very early in pregnancy the fetal liver produces bile acids, bilirubin and biliverdin, these compounds cannot be efficiently eliminated by the fetal hepatobiliary system, owing to the immaturity of the excretory machinery in the fetal liver. Therefore, the potentially harmful accumulation of cholephilic compounds in the fetus is prevented by their elimination across the placenta. Owing to the presence of detoxifying enzymes and specific transport systems at different locations of the placental barrier, such as the endothelial cells of chorionic vessels and trophoblast cells, this organ plays an important role in the hepatobiliary-like function during intrauterine life. The relevance of this excretory function in normal fetal physiology is evident in situations where high concentrations of biliary compounds are accumulated in the mother. This may result in oxidative stress and apoptosis, mainly in the placenta and fetal liver, which might affect normal fetal development and challenge the fate of the pregnancy. The present article reviews current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the hepatobiliary function of the fetal-placental unit and the repercussions of several pathological conditions on this tandem. PMID:19230042

  14. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Singh, Rajvinder; Loong, Cheong Kuan; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach). This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS) has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS). In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS-) guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized. PMID:26981114

  15. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  16. Septic Shock Due to Biliary Stones in a Postcholecystectomy Patient.

    PubMed

    Azfar, Mohammad Feroz; Khan, Muhammad Faisal; Khursheed, Moazzum

    2015-10-01

    Septic shock leading to multi-organ failure is not uncommon. Early diagnosis to confirm the source is the distinctive attribute of sepsis management guidelines. Cholangitis as the source of sepsis can become a diagnostic dilemma in patients who have had cholecystectomy in the past. CT abdomen should be the investigation of choice in this group of patients. This report describes two postcholecystectomy patients who presented with septic shock secondary to biliary stones. The source of septic shock in both patients were biliary stones was confirmed with abdominal CT. Ultrasound abdomen failed to report biliary stones in these patients. Both improved on percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage.

  17. Management of major biliary complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Branum, G; Schmitt, C; Baillie, J; Suhocki, P; Baker, M; Davidoff, A; Branch, S; Chari, R; Cucchiaro, G; Murray, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A total of 50 major bile duct injuries after laparoscopic cholecystectomy were managed by the Duke University Hepatobiliary Service from 1990-1992. The management of these complex cases is reviewed. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the preferred method for removing the gallbladder. Bile duct injury is the most feared complication of the new procedure. METHODS: Review of videotapes, pathology, and management of the original operations were reviewed retrospectively, and the injuries categorized. Major biliary injury was defined as a recognized disruption of any part of the major extrahepatic biliary system. Biliary leakage was defined as a clinically significant biliary fistula in the absence of major biliary injury, i.e., with an intact extrahepatic biliary system. RESULTS: Thirty-eight injuries were major biliary ductal injuries and 12 patients had simple biliary leakage. Twenty-four patients had the classic type injury or some variant of the classic injury. A standard treatment approach was developed which consisted of ERCP for diagnosis, preoperative PTC with the placement of stents, CT drainage immediately after the PTC for drainage of biliary ascites, and usually Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy with placement of O-rings for future biliary access if necessary. Major ductal injuries were high in the biliary system involving multiple ducts in 31 of the 38 patients. Re-operation was required in 5 of the 38 patients with particularly complex problems. CONCLUSIONS: Successful management of bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy requires careful understanding of the mechanisms, considerable preoperative assessment by experts, and a multidisciplinary approach. Images Figure 2. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:8489316

  18. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage With Postoperative Outcome Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Karpeh, Martin S.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Pancreaticoduodenectomy is accompanied by a considerable rate of postoperative complications and potential death. Controversy exists regarding the impact of preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage on morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods Two hundred forty consecutive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed between January 1994 and January 1997 were analyzed. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were examined. Pearson chi square analysis or Fisher’s exact test, when appropriate, was used for univariate comparison of all variables. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results One hundred seventy-five patients (73%) underwent preoperative biliary instrumentation (endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical instrumentation). One hundred twenty-six patients (53%) underwent preoperative biliary drainage (endoscopic stents, percutaneous drains/stents, or surgical drainage). The overall postoperative morbidity rate after pancreaticoduodenectomy was 48% (114/240). Infectious complications occurred in 34% (81/240) of patients. Intraabdominal abscess occurred in 14% (33/240) of patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 5% (12/240). Preoperative biliary drainage was determined to be the only statistically significant variable associated with complications (p = 0.025), infectious complications (p = 0.014), intraabdominal abscess (p = 0.022), and postoperative death (p = 0.037). Preoperative biliary instrumentation alone was not associated with complications, infectious complications, intraabdominal abscess, or postoperative death. Conclusions Preoperative biliary drainage, but not preoperative biliary instrumentation alone, is associated with increased

  19. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain March 2015 Handout on Health: Back Pain This publication is for people who have back ... to discuss them with your doctor. What Is Back Pain? Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem ...

  20. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider may ask questions such as: Is the pain between the shoulder blades? Under the breast bone? Does the pain ... How long does the pain last? Does the pain go from your chest into your shoulder, arm, neck, jaw, or back? Is the pain ...

  1. [Cesarean Section Under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia for a Pregnant Woman with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Hyoda, Akira; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Matsunami, Sayuri; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    We report the successful anesthetic management of a pregnant woman with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune hepatitis who underwent cesarean section. A 35 year-old pregnant woman with PBC was diagnosed with preterm rupture of membranes (PROM). Emergent cesarean section was scheduled. AST and ALT were elevated and she complained of itching due to PBC. Hydrocortisone 50 mg was intravenously administered. Spinal anesthesia was initiated with 2.4 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride and 10 µg fentanyl at L3-4; sensory loss (T2) was confirmed. Morphine was not included in spinal anesthesia to avoid worsening of the itching. Epidural anesthesia at T12-L1 was performed for postoperative pain control. Surgery proceeded uneventfully and postoperative pain control was satisfactory. Combined spinal and epidural anesthesia was beneficial for the perioperative management of a pregnant woman with PBC and autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:26790326

  2. Indocyanine-green-loaded microballoons for biliary imaging in cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Kinshuk; Melvin, James; Chang, Shufang; Park, Kyoungjin; Yilmaz, Alper; Melvin, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We encapsulate indocyanine green (ICG) in poly[(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-co-PEG] diblock (PLGA-PEG) microballoons for real-time fluorescence and hyperspectral imaging of biliary anatomy. ICG-loaded microballoons show superior fluorescence characteristics and slower degradation in comparison with pure ICG. The use of ICG-loaded microballoons in biliary imaging is demonstrated in both biliary-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo tissue model. The biliary-simulating phantoms are prepared by embedding ICG-loaded microballoons in agar gel and imaged by a fluorescence imaging module in a Da Vinci surgical robot. The ex vivo model consists of liver, gallbladder, common bile duct, and part of the duodenum freshly dissected from a domestic swine. After ICG-loaded microballoons are injected into the gallbladder, the biliary structure is imaged by both hyperspectral and fluorescence imaging modalities. Advanced spectral analysis and image processing algorithms are developed to classify the tissue types and identify the biliary anatomy. While fluorescence imaging provides dynamic information of movement and flow in the surgical region of interest, data from hyperspectral imaging allow for rapid identification of the bile duct and safe exclusion of any contaminant fluorescence from tissue not part of the biliary anatomy. Our experiments demonstrate the technical feasibility of using ICG-loaded microballoons for biliary imaging in cholecystectomy. PMID:23214186

  3. 21 CFR 876.5010 - Biliary catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Biliary catheter and accessories. 876.5010 Section 876.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5010 Biliary...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5010 - Biliary catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Biliary catheter and accessories. 876.5010 Section 876.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5010 Biliary...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5010 - Biliary catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Biliary catheter and accessories. 876.5010 Section 876.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5010 Biliary...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5010 - Biliary catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Biliary catheter and accessories. 876.5010 Section 876.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5010 Biliary...

  7. Indocyanine-green-loaded microballoons for biliary imaging in cholecystectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Kinshuk; Melvin, James; Chang, Shufang; Park, Kyoungjin; Yilmaz, Alper; Melvin, Scott; Xu, Ronald X.

    2012-11-01

    We encapsulate indocyanine green (ICG) in poly[(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-co-PEG] diblock (PLGA-PEG) microballoons for real-time fluorescence and hyperspectral imaging of biliary anatomy. ICG-loaded microballoons show superior fluorescence characteristics and slower degradation in comparison with pure ICG. The use of ICG-loaded microballoons in biliary imaging is demonstrated in both biliary-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo tissue model. The biliary-simulating phantoms are prepared by embedding ICG-loaded microballoons in agar gel and imaged by a fluorescence imaging module in a Da Vinci surgical robot. The ex vivo model consists of liver, gallbladder, common bile duct, and part of the duodenum freshly dissected from a domestic swine. After ICG-loaded microballoons are injected into the gallbladder, the biliary structure is imaged by both hyperspectral and fluorescence imaging modalities. Advanced spectral analysis and image processing algorithms are developed to classify the tissue types and identify the biliary anatomy. While fluorescence imaging provides dynamic information of movement and flow in the surgical region of interest, data from hyperspectral imaging allow for rapid identification of the bile duct and safe exclusion of any contaminant fluorescence from tissue not part of the biliary anatomy. Our experiments demonstrate the technical feasibility of using ICG-loaded microballoons for biliary imaging in cholecystectomy.

  8. 21 CFR 876.5010 - Biliary catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biliary catheter and accessories. 876.5010 Section 876.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5010 Biliary...

  9. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  10. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  11. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  12. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  13. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  14. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  15. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  16. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... BACK PAIN? There are many possible causes of low back pain, including stretched (strained) muscles, torn or stretched (sprained) ... appear to be at an increased risk for low back pain in comparison to the general population (estimates range ...

  17. Leg pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - leg; Aches - leg; Cramps - leg ... Leg pain can be due to a muscle cramp (also called a charley horse ). Common causes of ... a long time An injury can also cause leg pain from: A torn or overstretched muscle ( strain ) ...

  18. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  19. Biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy: Optimization of endoscopic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Bišćanin, Alen; Pavić, Tajana; Nikolić, Marko; Budimir, Ivan; Mijić, August; Đuzel, Ana

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the results of endoscopic treatment of postoperative biliary leakage occurring after urgent cholecystectomy with a long-term follow-up. METHODS: This is an observational database study conducted in a tertiary care center. All consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) for presumed postoperative biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy in the period between April 2008 and April 2013 were considered for this study. Patients with bile duct transection and biliary strictures were excluded. Biliary leakage was suspected in the case of bile appearance from either percutaneous drainage of abdominal collection or abdominal drain placed at the time of cholecystectomy. Procedural and main clinical characteristics of all consecutive patients with postoperative biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy, such as indication for cholecystectomy, etiology and type of leakage, ERC findings and post-ERC complications, were collected from our electronic database. All patients in whom the leakage was successfully treated endoscopically were followed-up after they were discharged from the hospital and the main clinical characteristics, laboratory data and common bile duct diameter were electronically recorded. RESULTS: During a five-year period, biliary leakage was recognized in 2.2% of patients who underwent urgent cholecystectomy. The median time from cholecystectomy to ERC was 6 d (interquartile range, 4-11 d). Endoscopic interventions to manage biliary leakage included biliary stent insertion with or without biliary sphincterotomy. In 23 (77%) patients after first endoscopic treatment bile flow through existing surgical drain ceased within 11 d following biliary therapeutic endoscopy (median, 4 d; interquartile range, 2-8 d). In those patients repeat ERC was not performed and the biliary stent was removed on gastroscopy. In seven (23%) patients repeat ERC was done within one to fourth week after their first ERC

  20. [An analysis of the endoscopies of the biliary tract performed at the Hospital Santo Tomás].

    PubMed

    Pérez Ferrari, R; Lambraño, L; Arana, R; Ferrabone, L

    1994-09-01

    Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was performed in 146 patients, 93 female and 53 male from 10 to 90 years of age. The patients were referred because it was deemed that it was necessary to perform the procedure to establish or confirm the clinical diagnosis (suspected choledocholithiasis, icterus or abdominal pain of undetermined etiology, pancreatitis or obstruction of prosthesis) and to perform cholangiography and pancreatography, papillotomy, extraction of calculi and placement of biliary prosthesis, as indicated. It was shown that the clinical picture was due to choledocholithiasis in the majority of patients. Stenosis due to inflammatory changes or to tumor were much less frequent. In few patients, there was biliary external fistula, distortion of intrahepatic ducts, cancer of the pancreas or sclerosing cholangitis. Chronic pancreatitis, choledochal granuloma or adenoma, or displacement of a T tube were found occasionally. There were few complications (cholangitis, pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia) and no mortality associated with the procedure.

  1. CD8 T cells mediate direct biliary ductule damage in NOD autoimmune biliary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guo-Xiang; Wu, Yuehong; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Leung, Patrick S.; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Rainbow, Daniel B.; Hunter, Kara M.; Morris, Gerard A.; Lyons, Paul A.; Peterson, Laurence B.; Wicker, Linda S.; Gershwin, M.E.; Ridgway, William M.

    2016-01-01

    We previously described the NOD.c3c4 mouse, which is protected from type 1 diabetes (T1D) due to protective alleles at multiple insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) genes, but develops autoimmune biliary disease (ABD) resembling primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Here we characterize the NOD.ABD strain, which is genetically-related to the NOD.c3c4 strain but develops both ABD and T1D. Histologically, NOD.ABD biliary disease is indistinguishable from that in NOD.c3c4 mice. The frequency of effector memory (CD44+CD62L-) and central memory (CD44+CD62L+) CD8 T cells is significantly increased in the intrahepatic lymphocyte fraction of NOD.ABD mice, and NOD.ABD CD8 T cells produce more IFN-γ and TNF-α, compared to controls. NOD.ABD splenocytes can transfer ABD and T1D to NOD.c3c4 scid mice, but only T1D to NOD scid mice, suggesting that the genetic origin of the target organ and/or its innate immune cells is critical to disease pathogenesis. The disease transfer model, importantly, shows that biliary duct damage (characteristic of PBC) and inflammation precede biliary epithelial cell proliferation. Unlike T1D where both CD4 and CD8 T cells are required for disease transfer, purified NOD.ABD CD8 T cells can transfer liver inflammation into NOD.c3c4 scid recipients, and disease transfer is ameliorated by co-transferring T regulatory cells. Unlike NOD.c3c4 mice, NOD.ABD mice do not develop antinuclear or anti-Smith autoantibodies; however, NOD.ABD mice do develop the anti-pyruvate dehydrogenase antibodies typical of human PBC. The NOD.ABD strain is a model of immune dysregulation affecting two organ systems, most likely by mechanisms that do not completely coincide. PMID:21169553

  2. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  3. Patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kay M; Callaghan, Michael J; van Linschoten, Robbart

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain refers to pain behind or around the patella (also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome, anterior knee pain, runner's knee, and, formerly, chondromalacia patellae). Patellofemoral pain is common, accounting for 11-17% of all knee pain presentations to general practice.(1 2) While it typically occurs in physically active people aged <40 years, it also affects people of all activity levels and ages.(1 2) Patellofemoral pain can be diagnosed in the clinic, and evidence based treatments can reduce pain and improve function, allowing patients to maintain a physically active lifestyle. PMID:26834209

  4. Amylase creatinine clearance ratio after biliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, L A; McIntosh, W; Joffe, S N

    1977-01-01

    The amylase creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) is considered to be a more sensitive index of acute pancreatitis than the serum amylase level. Serial ACCR estimations were undertaken in 25 patients undergoing an elective cholecystectomy. Using accepted criteria, 28% of these patients developed, in the postoperative period, biochemical evidence of pancreatic gland damage, although the serum amylase level remained normal. This raised ACCR was particularly noted in patients who had undergone an exploration of the common bile duct. The ACCR would appear to be a more sensitive index of pancreatic gland disruption secondary to biliary surgery than the serum amylase level.

  5. Amylase creatinine clearance ratio after biliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, L A; McIntosh, W; Joffe, S N

    1977-01-01

    The amylase creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) is considered to be a more sensitive index of acute pancreatitis than the serum amylase level. Serial ACCR estimations were undertaken in 25 patients undergoing an elective cholecystectomy. Using accepted criteria, 28% of these patients developed, in the postoperative period, biochemical evidence of pancreatic gland damage, although the serum amylase level remained normal. This raised ACCR was particularly noted in patients who had undergone an exploration of the common bile duct. The ACCR would appear to be a more sensitive index of pancreatic gland disruption secondary to biliary surgery than the serum amylase level. PMID:402305

  6. Hemobilia from Biliary Angiodysplasia Diagnosed with Cholangioscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ashley; Kudakachira, Shaismy; Ramberan, Hemchand

    2016-01-01

    Biliary angiodysplasia is extremely rare. Our background search revealed only a few case reports in the English literature. We present a case of angiodysplasia of the proximal common bile duct in a patient with subacute upper gastrointestinal bleeding and symptomatic anemia. A standard esophagogastroduodenoscopy with subsequent dedicated duodenoscopy revealed blood-stained bile draining from the major ampulla orifice. A contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography was unrevealing for any pancreaticobiliary pathology. The patient subsequently underwent an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and SpyGlass® cholangioscopy, which demonstrated intermittent bleeding from angiodysplasia in the proximal common bile duct. PMID:27807584

  7. Update of cholangioscopy and biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Marcus W; Byrne, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    Cholangioscopy remains another modality in the investigation of biliary strictures. At cholangioscopy, the “tumour vessel” sign is considered a specific sign for malignancy. Through its ability to not only visualise mucosa, but to take targeted biopsies, it has a greater accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for malignant strictures than endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography guided cytopathological acquisition. Cholangioscopy however, is time consuming and costly, requires greater technical expertise, and should be reserved for the investigation of undifferentiated strictures after standard investigations have failed. PMID:22025874

  8. Trends in pediatric ostomy surgery: intestinal diversion for necrotizing enterocolitis and biliary diversion for biliary hypoplasia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bastawrous, A A; Torosian, M B; Statter, M B; Arensman, R M

    1995-11-01

    Ostomies are placed in children for different indications than in the older population. Many ostomies of childhood are placed because of congenital or neonatal problems that require temporary or long-term diversion to stabilize the neonatal patient. Necrotizing enterocolitis, the most common reason for placement of neonatal colostomies and ileostomies, is increasing in frequency as more prematurely born infants survive. Recently, there has been an increase in treatment of various biliary hypoplasia syndromes with biliary cutaneous diversion. Children with biliary hypoplasia syndromes are a challenging group of patients who frequently can be helped by ostomies. This article reviews current information on biliary cutaneous diversion for the biliary hypoplasia syndromes and intestinal diversion for necrotizing enterocolitis.

  9. Elevated serum levels of a biliary glycoprotein (BGP I) in patients with liver or biliary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Svenberg, T; Wahren, B; Hammarström, S

    1979-05-01

    Human hepatic bile contains a glycoprotein (biliary glycoprotein I, BGP I) which cross-reacts with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). A radioimmunoassay for BGP I was developed. The interference of CEA or 'non-specific cross-reacting antigen' (NCA) in the assay was small. The serum levels of BGP I were determined in healthy subjects, in patients with hepato-biliary diseases and in patients with various infectious or inflammatory disorders. Healthy individuals, including pregnant women, had a serum BGP I concentration of about 0.5-1 mg/l. Diseases of the liver or biliary tract (e.g. hepatitis A or B, cytomegalovirus hepatitis, obstructive jaundice or primary biliary cirrhosis) were associated with elevated serum levels of BGP I, as opposed to infectious diseases not affecting the liver mostly showing values within the normal range. Raised levels of serum BGP I activity may reflect biliary obstruction as a result of interference with normal BGP I secretion to the bile.

  10. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment.

    PubMed

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-06-15

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.

  11. Endoscopic treatment of malignant biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting is a widely accepted strategy for providing effective drainage in both extrahepatic and intrahepatic malignant strictures. In patients with extrahepatic malignancies, uncovered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) provide excellent palliation. Hilar malignancies are probably best palliated by placement of uncovered SEMS although some disagreement exists among experts regarding the type and number of stents for optimal palliation. Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) is commonly performed although a higher risk of complications and the lack of clear benefit raise questions about this practice. Certain groups of patients such as those with markedly elevated bilirubin levels, and in those in whom neoadjuvant therapy is planned, are good candidates for PBD. Considerable controversy exists regarding the optimal method as well as type of stent for PBD in patients with hilar malignancies. Novel endoscopic therapies, including photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation, have emerged as potential adjuvant therapies in the management of malignant bile duct strictures but need further long-term evaluation to establish survival benefit. This review focuses on the current status of endoscopic therapies for malignant biliary obstructions.

  12. Metallic stents in malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, Andrea; Brambs, Hans-Juergen

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. Retrospective analysis of our results with metallic stent placement for malignant biliary strictures. We sought to determine parameters that influence stent patency. Methods. A total of 95 Wallstents were implanted in 65 patients (38 men, 27 women; mean age, 65.1 years) with malignant biliary obstruction. Serum bilirubin levels were assessed in 48 patients; the mean value prior to intervention was 15.0 mg/dl. Results. In 12 patients (21%) complications occurred as a result of percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Stent implantation was complicated in 13 patients, but was possible in all patients. A significant decrease in bilirubin level was seen in 83.3% of patients following stent implantation. Approximately 30% of patients developed recurrent jaundice after a mean 97.1 days. In 9 patients (15%) the recurrent jaundice was caused by stent occlusion due to tumor growth. The mean follow-up was 141.8 days, the mean survival 118.7 days. Patients with cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder carcinomas had the best results. Worse results were seen in patients with pancreatic tumors and with lymph node metastases of colon and gastric cancers. Conclusions. The main predictive factors for occlusion rate and survival are the type of primary tumor, tumor stage, the decrease in bilirubin level, and the general condition of the patient.

  13. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment.

    PubMed

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-06-15

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  14. Biliary atresia: Clinical advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nizery, Laure; Chardot, Christophe; Sissaoui, Samira; Capito, Carmen; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Debray, Dominique; Girard, Muriel

    2016-06-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare and severe inflammatory and obliterative cholangiopathy that affects both extra- and intrahepatic bile ducts. BA symptoms occur shortly after birth with jaundice, pale stools and dark urines. The prognosis of BA has dramatically changed in the last decades: before the Kasai operation most BA patients died, while nowadays with the sequential treatment with Kasai operation±liver transplantation BA patient survival is close to 90%. Early diagnosis is very important since the chances of success of the Kasai procedure decrease with time. The causes of BA remain actually unknown but several mechanisms including genetic and immune dysregulation may probably lead to the obliterative cholangiopathy. Current research focuses on the identification of blood or liver factors linked to the pathogenesis of BA that could become therapeutic targets and avoid the need for liver transplantation. No similar disease leading to total obstruction of the biliary tree exists in older children or adults. But understanding the physiopathology of BA may highlight the mechanisms of other destructive cholangiopathies, such as sclerosing cholangitis. PMID:26775892

  15. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  16. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  17. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Back Pain Information Page Condensed from Low Back Pain Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Back Pain? Acute or short-term low back pain generally ...

  18. Interferon-Gamma Directly Mediates Developmental Biliary Defects

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuang; EauClaire, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Biliary atresia (BA) is the most common identifiable hepatobiliary disease affecting infants, in which there are defects in intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts and progressive fibrosis. Activation of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) appears to be critical in both patients with BA and in rodent models of BA. We have recently reported a zebrafish model of biliary disease that shares features with BA, in which inhibition of DNA methylation leads to intrahepatic biliary defects and activation of IFNγ target genes. Here we report that ifng genes are hypomethylated and upregulated in zebrafish larvae treated with azacytidine (azaC), an inhibitor of DNA methylation. Injection of IFNγ protein into developing zebrafish larvae leads to biliary defects, suggesting that activation of the IFNγ pathway is sufficient to cause developmental biliary defects. These defects are associated with decreased cholangiocyte proliferation and with a decrease in the expression of vhnf1 (hnf1b, tcf2), which encodes a homeodomain protein with previously reported roles in biliary development in multiple models. These results support an importance of IFNγ in mediating biliary defects, and also demonstrate the feasibility of direct injection of intact protein into developing zebrafish larvae. PMID:23448251

  19. Biliary epithelial cells proliferate during oxygenated ex situ liver culture

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Congwen; Du, Yiqi; Ding, Rui; Huang, Jun; Dai, Yan; Bao, Sujin; Zhao, Lijuan; Shen, Hefang; Dong, Jing; Xu, Jianjian; Xiong, Qiru; Xu, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Biliary complications remain a major source of morbidity in liver transplant patients. Among these complications, nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) are especially common and they are frequently therapy resistant in part because biliary epithelial cells are more sensitive to warm ischemic injury than hepatocytes. It has been a challenge to maintain the physiological function of biliary epithelial cells during liver transplantation. In this work, we have examined the effect of oxygen on proliferation of biliary epithelial cells in the rat livers obtained from donation after circulatory death (DCD). Twelve rat livers from DCD were divided into two groups. Livers in the control group were isolated following a standard procedure without oxygen supply. Livers in the experimental group were isolated with a constant supply of oxygen. All livers were then connected to an ex situ liver culture system in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analogue and a marker for cell proliferation. After 6 hours of normothermic ex situ liver culture, morphology and DNA replication in hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells were assessed and compared between the two groups. We found that about 4.5% of the biliary epithelial cells in the experimental group proliferated compared with only 0.4% of cells in the control based on BrdU staining. No significant change in cell morphology was observed in those cells between the two groups. Thus, our results indicate that oxygen supply is required for maintenance of the physiological function of biliary epithelial cells during liver transplant and suggest that a constant oxygen supply during liver isolation along with ex situ liver organ culture can enhance the repair of biliary epithelial cell injury during liver transplantation. PMID:27725875

  20. Recent advances in endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary interventions.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Haba, Shin; Kawahata, Shuhei; Abe, Yoko; Kubota, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-08-28

    Interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) based on EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration has rapidly spread as a minimally invasive procedure. Especially in patients with failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, EUS-guided biliary intervention is reported to be useful as salvage therapy. EUS-guided biliary interventions are carried out using three techniques: EUS-guided bilioenteric anastomosis, EUS-guided rendezvous procedure, and EUS-guided antegrade treatment. Although interventional EUS is not yet a standardized procedure, there have been recent advances in this field that address various biliary diseases. Here, we summarize the indications, techniques, clinical results of previous studies, and future perspectives.

  1. Recent advances in endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Haba, Shin; Kawahata, Shuhei; Abe, Yoko; Kubota, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) based on EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration has rapidly spread as a minimally invasive procedure. Especially in patients with failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, EUS-guided biliary intervention is reported to be useful as salvage therapy. EUS-guided biliary interventions are carried out using three techniques: EUS-guided bilioenteric anastomosis, EUS-guided rendezvous procedure, and EUS-guided antegrade treatment. Although interventional EUS is not yet a standardized procedure, there have been recent advances in this field that address various biliary diseases. Here, we summarize the indications, techniques, clinical results of previous studies, and future perspectives. PMID:26327757

  2. Risk and Surveillance of Cancers in Primary Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hrad, Valery; Abebe, Yoftahe; Ali, Syed Haris; Velgersdyk, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary diseases have been associated in several studies with various malignancies. Understanding the risk and optimizing surveillance strategy of these malignancies in this specific subset of patients are an important facet of clinical care. For instance, primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with an increased risk for cholangiocarcinoma (which is very challenging to diagnose) and when IBD is present for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, primary biliary cirrhosis patients with cirrhosis or not responding to 12 months of ursodeoxycholic acid therapy are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review we will discuss in detail the risks and optimal surveillance strategies for patients with primary biliary diseases. PMID:27413366

  3. Recent advances in endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary interventions.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Haba, Shin; Kawahata, Shuhei; Abe, Yoko; Kubota, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-08-28

    Interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) based on EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration has rapidly spread as a minimally invasive procedure. Especially in patients with failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, EUS-guided biliary intervention is reported to be useful as salvage therapy. EUS-guided biliary interventions are carried out using three techniques: EUS-guided bilioenteric anastomosis, EUS-guided rendezvous procedure, and EUS-guided antegrade treatment. Although interventional EUS is not yet a standardized procedure, there have been recent advances in this field that address various biliary diseases. Here, we summarize the indications, techniques, clinical results of previous studies, and future perspectives. PMID:26327757

  4. Percutaneous dilatation of benign biliary strictures: single-session therapy with general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Mueller, P R; Saini, S; Hahn, P F; Dawson, S L

    1991-12-01

    Percutaneous biliary stricture dilatation (PBSD) is an uncomfortable procedure for patients that presently requires multiple dilatation sessions spread over many days. We evaluated the use of general anesthesia to enable PBSD to be performed in a single sitting in 14 patients with benign biliary strictures (11 anastomotic and three iatrogenic strictures). Four patients had multiple strictures, and the other 10 had a single stricture. Strictures were documented by transhepatic cholangiography (11 patients) or T-tube cholangiography (three); quantitative biliary perfusion studies were additionally performed in seven cases. Dilatation was performed transhepatically in 11 patients and via a T-tube track in three. Balloons ranged from 8 to 12 mm in diameter and were manually inflated for 3 min with an average of five inflations per stricture. Stenting catheters were left across the strictured areas in all patients for 6-21 days (mean, 10 days) before removal. The mean duration of hospital stay for all patients was 5.7 days, which could further be divided into means of 3.6 days (range, 1-6 days) for 11 patients without complications and 13.7 days (range, 13-14 days) for three patients who had complications. Complications included cholangitis; liver hematoma (which resolved with conservative therapy in both cases); and pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, which necessitated angiographic embolization. PBSD achieved long-term patency in 13 (93%) of 14 patients with a follow-up period of 2.0 to 5.5 years (mean, 3.2 years). A stricture recurred in one patient 1.5 years after dilatation. We conclude that PBSD with the patient under general anesthesia can be performed in a single visit to the radiology department with excellent long-term patency rates, a shorter hospital stay, and a pain-free procedure for the patient.

  5. Timing of cholecystectomy in biliary pancreatitis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Uygar; Yazıcı, Pınar; Bostancı, Özgür; Kaya, Cemal; Köksal, Hakan; Işıl, Gürhan; Bozdağ, Emre; Mihmanlı, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Gallstone pancreatitis constitutes 40% of all cases with pancreatitis while it constitutes up to 90% of cases with acute pancreatitis. The treatment modality in this patient population is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to compare the results of early and late cholecystectomy for patients with biliary pancreatitis. Material and Methods: Patients treated with a diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis in our clinics between January 2000 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: Group A, patients who underwent cholecystectomy during the first pancreatitis attack, Group B, patients who underwent an interval cholecystectomy at least 8 weeks after the first pancreatitis episode. The demographic characteristics, clinical symptoms, number of episodes, length of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality data were recorded. All data were evaluated with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 13.0 for windows and p <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: During the last 12 years, a total of 91 patients with surgical treatment for acute biliary pancreatitis were included into the study. There were 62 female and 29 male patients, with a mean age of 57.9±14.6 years (range: 21–89). A concomitant acute cholecystitis was present in 46.2% of the patients. Group A and B included 48 and 43 patients, respectively. The length of hospital stay was significantly higher in group B (9.4 vs. 6.8 days) (p<0,05). More than half of the patients in Group B were readmitted to the hospital for various reasons. No significant difference was observed between the two groups, one patient died due to heart failure in the postoperative period in group B. Conclusion: In-hospital cholecystectomy after remission of acute pancreatitis is feasible. It will not only result in lower recurrence and complication rates but also shorten length of hospital stay. We recommend performing cholecystectomy during the

  6. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in 2014.

    PubMed

    Ziessman, Harvey A

    2014-06-01

    Cholescintigraphy with (99m)Tc-hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals has been an important, clinically useful diagnostic imaging study for almost 4 decades. It continues to be in much clinical demand; however, the indications, methodology, and interpretative criteria have evolved over the years. This review will emphasize state-of-the-art methodology and diagnostic criteria for various clinical indications, including acute cholecystitis, chronic acalculous gallbladder disease, high-grade and partial biliary obstruction, and the postcholecystectomy pain syndrome, including sphincter-of-Oddi dysfunction and biliary atresia. The review will also emphasize the use of diagnostic pharmacologic interventions, particularly sincalide. PMID:24744445

  7. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in 2014.

    PubMed

    Ziessman, Harvey A

    2014-12-01

    Cholescintigraphy with (99m)Tc-hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals has been an important, clinically useful diagnostic imaging study for almost 4 decades. It continues to be in much clinical demand; however, the indications, methodology, and interpretative criteria have evolved over the years. This review will emphasize state-of-the-art methodology and diagnostic criteria for various clinical indications, including acute cholecystitis, chronic acalculous gallbladder disease, high-grade and partial biliary obstruction, and the postcholecystectomy pain syndrome, including sphincter-of-Oddi dysfunction and biliary atresia. The review will also emphasize the use of diagnostic pharmacologic interventions, particularly sincalide. PMID:25472513

  8. Biliary tract cancers: SEOM clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Benavides, M; Antón, A; Gallego, J; Gómez, M A; Jiménez-Gordo, A; La Casta, A; Laquente, B; Macarulla, T; Rodríguez-Mowbray, J R; Maurel, J

    2015-12-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is an uncommon and highly fatal malignancy. It is composed of three main different entities; Gall bladder carcinoma (GBC), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCC) and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (eCC) sharing different genetic, risk factors and clinical presentation. Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) are the more important diagnostic techniques. Surgery is the only potentially curative therapy but disease recurrence is frequent. Treatment with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both has not demonstrated survival benefit in the adjuvant setting. Cisplatin plus gemcitabine constitutes the gold standard in metastatic disease. New ongoing studies mainly in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting along with molecular research will hopefully help to improve survival and quality of life of this disease. PMID:26607930

  9. Vascular Biology of the Biliary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Morell, Carola M.; Fabris, Luca; Strazzabosco, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are involved in a variety of processes essential for liver pathophysiology. To meet their demanding metabolic and functional needs, bile ducts are nourished by an own arterial supply, the peribiliary plexus. This capillary network originates from the hepatic artery and is strictly arranged around the intrahepatic bile ducts. Biliary and vascular structures are linked by a close anatomic and functional association necessary for liver development, normal organ physiology and liver repair. This strong association is finely regulated by a range of angiogenic signals, enabling the crosstalk between cholangiocytes and the different vascular cell types. This review will briefly illustrate the “vascular” properties of cholangiocytes, their underlying molecular mechanisms and the relevant pathophysiological settings. PMID:23855292

  10. Pulmonary involvement in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Roisin, R; Pares, A; Bruguera, M; Coll, J; Picado, C; Agusti-Vidal, A; Burgos, F; Rodes, J

    1981-01-01

    The association of pulmonary fibrosis and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) remains controversial. To determine the frequency of pulmonary fibrosis in PBC, a carefully selected series of 14 PBC patients, seven patients with Sicca complex, and 14 control subjects have been studied. Seven of the 14 patients with PBC had Sjögren's syndrome, four of whom had some clinical evidence of pulmonary disease. Evaluation of ventilatory capacity, gas transfer factor, arterial blood gases, and lung mechanics were performed. Gas transfer was reduced in patients with PBC associated with Sjögen's syndrome and in patients with the Sicca complex. These results suggest that the respiratory, clinical, ad functional abnormalities found in PBC are related to the presence of an associated Sjögen's syndrome. PMID:7281088

  11. [A biliary fistula after T-tube removal in the transplant patient: its diagnosis by Tc-99m-HIDA].

    PubMed

    Calleja Kempin, I J; Polo Melero, J R; Bitini, A; Domínguez, P; Clemente, G; García Sabrido, J L; Bañares, R; Pérez Ferreiroa, J; Serantes, A

    1992-09-01

    The Tc-99m HIDA scan is a valuable study after liver transplantation, associated with other image techniques. We have used this technique as a reliable and objective diagnostic method for biliary fistula after removal of the T-tube in 5 liver transplantation patients with pain after T-tube removal. All five patients who developed fistula not only were diagnosed immediately but, furthermore, the surgical technique was indicated by the gammagraphic study. After this experience, we propose to remove the T-tube during the Tc-99 HIDA scan.

  12. Management of simultaneous biliary and duodenal obstruction: the endoscopic perspective.

    PubMed

    Baron, Todd H

    2010-09-01

    Obstructive jaundice often develops in patients with unresectable malignancy in and around the head of the pancreas. Duodenal obstruction can also occur in these patients, and usually develops late in the disease course. Palliation of both malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction is traditionally performed with surgical diversion of the bile duct and stomach, respectively. With the advent of nonsurgical palliation of biliary obstruction using endoscopic transpapillary expandable metal stent placement, a similar approach can be used to palliate duodenal obstruction by placement of expandable metal gastroduodenal stents. Endoscopic palliation can be achieved in patients who require relief of both biliary obstruction and duodenal obstruction, although this can be technically difficult to achieve depending on the level of duodenal obstruction in relation to the major papilla. This article reviews the endoscopic approaches for combined palliative relief of malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction.

  13. Biliary complications in right lobe living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chok, Kenneth S H; Lo, Chung Mau

    2016-07-01

    Living donor liver transplantation is an alternative to deceased donor liver transplantation in the face of insufficient deceased donor liver grafts. Unfortunately, the incidence of biliary complication after living donor liver transplantation is significantly higher than that after deceased donor liver transplantation using grafts from non-cardiac-death donations. The two most common biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation are bile leakage and biliary anastomotic stricture. Early treatment with endoscopic and interventional radiological approaches can achieve satisfactory outcomes. If treatment with these approaches fails, the salvage measure for prompt rectification will be surgical revision, which is now seldom performed. This paper also discusses risk factors in donor biliary anatomy that can affect recipients. PMID:26932842

  14. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  15. Serological and histological diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Goudie, R. B.; Macsween, R. N. M.; Goldberg, D. M.

    1966-01-01

    A simple immunofluorescence test for antibody to a mitochondrial antigen present in many tissues is a reliable method of distinguishing most cases of primary biliary cirrhosis from jaundice due to extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction. Of 30 cases diagnosed as primary biliary cirrhosis, 26 had antimitochondrial antibody whereas none of 77 cases with jaundice due to extrahepatic bile duct obstruction showed this serological abnormality. The antibody was also found in the serum of three of 42 patients who had other forms of cirrhosis and in two of 266 patients with no evidence of liver disease. Clinical, biochemical, and serological findings favour the view that primary biliary cirrhosis is a real entity which, in our present state of knowledge, cannot be defined clearly by any single method of investigation. In particular, the liver may show a variety of histological appearances which, interpreted without regard to the other features of the case, may lead to errors in diagnosis. Images PMID:5333256

  16. Fractionation of livers following diosgenin treatment to elevate biliary cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Roman, I D; Thewles, A; Coleman, R

    1995-03-01

    The plant saponin, diosgenin, is known to induce a marked increase in biliary cholesterol/phospholipid ratio. We reasoned that putative biliary lipid supply vesicles might be similarly enriched with cholesterol. Seven-day diosgenin feeding to rats resulted in significantly increased biliary cholesterol and cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, but had no effect on total cholesterol or phospholipid content of the liver. Subcellular fractionation of livers showed no selective increase in any fraction (nuclear, mitochondrial, lysosomal, microsomal) of the homogenate. Further subfractionation of microsomal or nuclear (plasma membrane) fractions also showed no difference between control and diosgenin groups. Thus, no intracellular vesicle fraction has been identified with the provision of the enhanced biliary cholesterol and the results are discussed in terms of the possible involvement of cytosolic lipid-binding proteins as putative lipid carriers to the canalicular membrane as an alternative to the presence of the lipid in lipid supply vesicles.

  17. Palliative treatment for advanced biliary adenocarcinomas with combination dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate infusion and S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Tran, Hung Q; Vu, Ut V; Pham, Quynh T; Shaw, D Graeme

    2014-09-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder and cholangiocarcinoma account for 4% and 3%, respectively, of all gastrointestinal cancers. Advanced biliary tract carcinoma has a very poor prognosis with all current available modalities of treatment. In this pilot open-label study, the authors investigated the efficacy and safety of a combination of dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate (DMSO-SB) infusion and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (ademetionine) oral supplementation as palliative pharmacotherapy in nine patients with advanced nonresectable biliary tract carcinomas (ABTCs). Patients with evidence of biliary obstruction with a total serum bilirubin ≤300 μmol/L were allowed to join the study. The results of this 6-month study and follow-up of all nine patients with ABTC indicated that the investigated combination treatment improved pain control, blood biochemical parameters, and quality of life for the patients. Moreover, this method of treatment has led to a 6-month progression-free survival for all investigated patients. The treatment was well tolerated for all patients without major adverse reactions. Given that ABTC is a highly fatal malignancy with poor response to chemotherapy and targeted drugs, the authors consider that the combination of DMSO-SB and ademetionine deserves further research and application as a palliative care and survival-enhancing treatment for this group of patients. PMID:25102038

  18. BIODEGRADABLE BILIARY STENTS: A NEW APPROACH FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEPATICOJEJUNOSTOMY STRICTURES FOLLOWING BILE DUCT INJURY. PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    GIMÉNEZ, Mariano E.; PALERMO, Mariano; HOUGHTON, Eduardo; ACQUAFRESCA, Pablo; FINGER, Caetano; VERDE, Juan M.; CÚNEO, Jorge Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Once a biliary injury has occurred, repair is done by a hepaticojejunostomy. The most common procedure is to perform a dilatation with balloon with a success of 70 %. Success rates range using biodegradable stents is from 85% to 95%. Biodegradable biliary stents should change the treatment of this complication. Aim: To investigate the use of biodegradable stents in a group of patients with hepaticojejunonostomy strictures. Methods: In a prospective study 16 biodegradable stents were placed in 13 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures secondary to bile duct repair of a biliary surgical injury. Average age was 38.7 years (23-67), nine were female and four male. All cases had a percutaneous drainage before at the time of biodegradable stent placement. Results: In one case, temporary haemobilia was present requiring blood transfusion. In another, pain after stent placement required intravenous medication. In the other 11 patients, hospital discharge was the next morning following stent placement. During the patient´s follow-up, none presented symptoms during the first nine months. One patient presented significant alkaline phosphatase elevation and stricture recurrence was confirmed. One case had recurrence of cholangitis 11 months after the stent placement. 84.6% continued asymptomatic with a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusion: The placement of biodegradable stents is a safe and feasible technique. Was not observed strictures caused by the stent or its degradation. It could substitute balloon dilation in strictures of hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:27438039

  19. [Fissures in biliary calculi. Personal contribution (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nano, M; Potenzoni, F; Camandona, M; Casalegno, P A

    1979-04-01

    In a series of 70 patients suffering from biliary lithiasis, the roentgenologic findings of fissures in the calculi was observed in 5 cases examined by means of cholecystography and in 7 cases who underwent cholangiocholecystography. Fissures were demonstrated 11 times in calculi after surgery. The "Mercedes-Benz" sign was never observed at the abdominal examination without contrast medium. The presence of fissures may be an additional sign in the radiologic diagnosis of biliary calculi, but its value is not determinant.

  20. Complications of the extrahepatic biliary surgery in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Stephen J

    2011-09-01

    Surgery of the biliary tract is demanding and is associated with several potentially life-threatening complications. Veterinarians face challenges in obtaining accurate diagnosis of biliary disease, surgical decision-making, surgical hemostasis and bile peritonitis. Intensive perioperative monitoring is required to achieve early recognition of common postoperative complications. Proper treatment and ideally, avoidance of surgical complications can be achieved by gaining a clear understanding physiology, anatomy, and the indications for hepatobiliary surgery.

  1. [Fissures in biliary calculi. Personal contribution (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nano, M; Potenzoni, F; Camandona, M; Casalegno, P A

    1979-04-01

    In a series of 70 patients suffering from biliary lithiasis, the roentgenologic findings of fissures in the calculi was observed in 5 cases examined by means of cholecystography and in 7 cases who underwent cholangiocholecystography. Fissures were demonstrated 11 times in calculi after surgery. The "Mercedes-Benz" sign was never observed at the abdominal examination without contrast medium. The presence of fissures may be an additional sign in the radiologic diagnosis of biliary calculi, but its value is not determinant. PMID:550199

  2. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  3. [Oral pain].

    PubMed

    Benslama, Lotfi

    2002-02-15

    Pain, a major symptom of stomatological disease, usually leads to a specialist consultation. Most commonly it is caused by dental caries and differs in nature and in intensity according to the stage of disease: dentinitis, pulpitis, desmodontitis and dental abscess. Added to this is peridental pain and the pre- and post-operative pains related to these diseases. Almost all oral-maxillary pathology is painful, be it boney such as in osteomyelitis and fractures, mucosal in gingivo-stomatitis and aphthous ulcers, or tumourous. However, besides the "multidisciplinary" facial pains such as facial neuralgia and vascular pain, two pain syndromes are specific to stomatology: pain of the tempero-mandibular joint associated with problems of the bite and glossodynia, a very common somatic expression of psychological problems.

  4. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain played a role in producing the perception of pain. In the 19th century, physician-scientists ... they are experiencing. Discoveries of differences in pain perceptions and responses to treatment by gender has have ...

  5. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  6. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of the pain, and the nature of other medical and psychiatric problems, should be ... information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of ...

  7. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  8. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  9. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain.

  10. Pain control.

    PubMed

    Boey, W K

    1991-01-01

    There are two components to the perception of pain; the 'sensory' and the 'reactive'. Psychological factors control the latter. Pain research is rapidly advancing: the discovery of endorphins and opioid receptors, the appreciation of the psychological component of pain and the multidisciplinary approach to chronic pain are major advances. Pain can be classified as acute or chronic. Acute pain is easy to diagnose, the cause of pain obvious and the treatment logical, chronic pain has a greater psychological component, is difficult to diagnose and treatment is often empirical. Methods of pain control include drugs, injection techniques, electro stimulation, non invasive therapies, denervation procedures and palliative procedures. A multidisciplinary approach and a combination of methods is necessary to treat chronic pain. Spinal opioids, radiofrequency thermocoagulation, intrapleural bupivacaine, cryoanalgesia and patient controlled analgesia are recent advances in pain control. However, most pain can be controlled adequately with simple methods; what is essential is the interest and commitment of the physician towards achieving optimum therapeutics. PMID:1674199

  11. Chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Russo, C M; Brose, W G

    1998-01-01

    Chronic pain is an emotional experience and is defined as pain lasting greater than six months. It is important to understand the neurophysiology of pain in order to treat it. Nociceptors in the periphery travel to the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord while secondary and tertiary afferents transmit information from the dorsal horn to the brain. Modification of pain information may take place in these ascending pathways or in descending pathways. Treatment of chronic pain is most successful when it is approached in a multidisciplinary fashion with the focus not only on treatment of underlying etiology, but also on the secondary impacts of pain on the patient's life. The management of chronic pain requires special expertise. Most of the experts in chronic pain assessment and management organize themselves into pain treatment centers. These centers vary widely in their approach to the problem. The most sophisticated is a multidisciplinary center that is university-based and includes teaching and research. Treatment of chronic pain includes a variety of medications, psychological support, and rehabilitation. Multidisciplinary pain management is also an integral part of the palliative care and hospice concept used to treat cancer pain.

  12. A comparison between endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous and percutaneous biliary drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Jason G.; Darcy, Michael; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L.; Mullady, Daniel K.; Gaddam, Srinivas; Murad, Faris M.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study Aims: Selective biliary cannulation is unsuccessful in 5 % to 10 % of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for malignant distal biliary obstruction (MDBO). Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) has been the gold standard, but endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUSr) have been increasingly used for biliary decompression in this patient population. Our aim was to compare the initial success rate, long-term efficacy, and safety of PBD and EUSr in relieving MDBO after failed ERC Patients and methods: A retrospective study involving 50 consecutive patients who had an initial failed ERCP for MDBO. Twenty-five patients undergoing EUSr between 2008 – 2014 were compared to 25 patients who underwent PBD immediately prior to the introduction of EUSr at our center (2002 – 2008). Comparisons were made between the two groups with regard to technical success, duration of hospital stay and adverse event rates after biliary decompression. Results: The mean age at presentation was 66.5 (± 12.6 years), 28 patients (54.9 %) were female. The etiology of MDBO was pancreaticobiliary malignancy in 44 (88 %) and metastatic disease in 6 (12 %) cases. Biliary drainage was technically successful by EUSr in 19 (76 %) cases and by PBD in 25 (100 %) (P = 0.002). Median length of hospital stay after initial drainage was 1 day in the EUSr group vs 5 days in PBD group (P = 0.02). Repeat biliary intervention was required for 4 patients in the EUSr group and 15 in the PBD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Initial technical success with EUSr was significantly lower than with PBD, however when EUSr was successful, patients had a significantly shorter post-procedure hospital stay and required fewer follow-up biliary interventions. Meeting presentations: Annual Digestive Diseases Week 2015 PMID:27652305

  13. Abnormal Anatomical Variations of Extra-Hepatic Biliary Tract, and Their Relation to Biliary Tract Injuries and Stones Formation

    PubMed Central

    Khayat, Meiaad F.; Al-Amoodi, Munaser S.; Aldaqal, Saleh M.; Sibiany, Abdulrahman

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the most common abnormal anatomical variations of extra-hepatic biliary tract (EHBT), and their relation to biliary tract injuries and stones formation. Methods This is a retrospective review of 120 patients, who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) and/or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP), between July 2011 and June 2013. The patients’ ERCP and MRCP images were reviewed and evaluated for the anatomy of EHBT; the medical records were reviewed for demographic data, biliary tracts injuries and stones formation. Results Out of 120 patients, 50 were males (41.7%) and 70 were females (58.3%). The mean age was 54 years old (range 20 - 88). Abnormal anatomy was reported in 30% (n = 36). Short cystic duct (CD) was found in 20% (n = 24), left CD insertion in 5% (n = 6), CD inserted into the right hepatic duct (RHD) in 1.7% (n = 2), duct of Luschka in 3.33% (n = 4) and accessory hepatic duct in also 3.33% (n = 4). Biliary tract injuries were reported in 15% (n = 18) and stones in 71.7% (n = 86). Biliary tract injuries were higher in abnormal anatomy (P = 0.04), but there was no relation between abnormal anatomy and stones formation. Conclusion Abnormal anatomy of EHBT was found to be 30%. The most common abnormality is short CD followed by left CD insertion. Surgeons should be aware of these common abnormalities in our patients, hence avoiding injuries to the biliary tract during surgery. The abnormal anatomy was associated with high incidence of biliary tract injury but has no relation to biliary stone formation.

  14. A comparison between endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous and percutaneous biliary drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Jason G.; Darcy, Michael; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L.; Mullady, Daniel K.; Gaddam, Srinivas; Murad, Faris M.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study Aims: Selective biliary cannulation is unsuccessful in 5 % to 10 % of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for malignant distal biliary obstruction (MDBO). Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) has been the gold standard, but endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUSr) have been increasingly used for biliary decompression in this patient population. Our aim was to compare the initial success rate, long-term efficacy, and safety of PBD and EUSr in relieving MDBO after failed ERC Patients and methods: A retrospective study involving 50 consecutive patients who had an initial failed ERCP for MDBO. Twenty-five patients undergoing EUSr between 2008 – 2014 were compared to 25 patients who underwent PBD immediately prior to the introduction of EUSr at our center (2002 – 2008). Comparisons were made between the two groups with regard to technical success, duration of hospital stay and adverse event rates after biliary decompression. Results: The mean age at presentation was 66.5 (± 12.6 years), 28 patients (54.9 %) were female. The etiology of MDBO was pancreaticobiliary malignancy in 44 (88 %) and metastatic disease in 6 (12 %) cases. Biliary drainage was technically successful by EUSr in 19 (76 %) cases and by PBD in 25 (100 %) (P = 0.002). Median length of hospital stay after initial drainage was 1 day in the EUSr group vs 5 days in PBD group (P = 0.02). Repeat biliary intervention was required for 4 patients in the EUSr group and 15 in the PBD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Initial technical success with EUSr was significantly lower than with PBD, however when EUSr was successful, patients had a significantly shorter post-procedure hospital stay and required fewer follow-up biliary interventions. Meeting presentations: Annual Digestive Diseases Week 2015

  15. A Case of Malignant Biliary Obstruction with Severe Obesity Successfully Treated by Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Biliary Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Shuuji

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a case of malignant biliary tract obstruction with severe obesity, which was successfully treated by endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD). A female patient in her sixties who had been undergoing chemotherapy for unresectable pancreatic head cancer was admitted to our institution for obstructive jaundice. She had diabetes mellitus, and her body mass index was 35.1 kg/m2. Initially, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was performed, but bile duct cannulation was unsuccessful. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) from the left hepatic biliary tree also failed. Although a second PTBD attempt from the right hepatic lobe was accomplished, biliary tract bleeding followed, and the catheter was dislodged. Consequently, EUS-BD (choledochoduodenostomy), followed by direct metallic stent placement, was performed as a third drainage method. Her postprocedural course was uneventful. Following discharge, she spent the rest of her life at home without recurrent jaundice or readmission. In cases of severe obesity, we consider EUS-BD, rather than PTBD, as the second drainage method of choice for distal malignant biliary obstruction when ERCP fails.

  16. Recurrent cholangitis associated with biliary sludge and Phrygian cap anomaly diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography despite normal ultrasound and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Basaranoglu, Metin; Balci, Numan Cem

    2005-06-01

    A 31-year-old woman presented with a one and half years' history of intermittent right upper quadrant (RUQ) pain, high fever and severely painful, warm and reddish swollen skin lesions on the fingers. Acute attack resolution occurred within 2 weeks after treatment with non-specific antibiotics. Low-grade fever (around 37.5 degrees C) and less painful swellings continued for 6 months after each attack. Abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scans did not show any abnormality during the attacks. Biopsy of the skin lesions after the second attack revealed lymphocytic vasculitis. All laboratory studies including rheumatologic serology panel were normal. One month after the complete resolution of the second attack, the patient was observed to have high fever, the same skin lesions on the fingers as at the initial stage, nausea and marked abdominal pain in the RUQ. Routine laboratory studies including complete blood count, liver function tests and serum amylase and lipase levels were normal. An abdominal CT scan revealed a slight thickening of the gallbladder wall (3.9 mm). Two weeks later, abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) were performed because of persistent abdominal pain. They revealed both biliary tract and pancreatic gland alterations consistent with past cholangitis and pancreatitis with coexisting Phrygian cap anomaly and biliary sludge on the neck of the gallbladder.

  17. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  18. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view.

  19. Temporomandibular pain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  20. Effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for analgesia during biliary lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Genz, A; Fache, J S; Ong, M; Coldman, A J; Burhenne, H J

    1991-10-01

    The effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in controlling pain during biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (BESWL) was assessed in 100 patients with symptomatic gallbladder calculi. Patients were divided into four groups: TENS electrodes were placed on the back at cutaneous anesthesia sites and on the right leg and the gallbladder acupuncture site in groups A and B. Electrodes were "turned on" only in group A. In groups C and D, electrodes were placed only on the back at cutaneous dermatomes. Electrodes were "turned on" in group C only. The TENS unit was stimulated at the pulse rate of 60 to 100 microseconds and frequency of 80 to 125 Hz. Lithotripsy was performed with the Lithostar Plus overhead module. The differences in the amount of analgesic used and the pain experiences by the patients in all groups were not statistically significant. The proportion of patients requiring intravenous analgesia in each group was also not significantly different (72%, 80%, 68%, 76% in groups A to D, respectively). Thus, TENS did not help in reducing the amount of intravenous analgesia required or the average pain perceived by the patient during lithotripsy treatment.

  1. Is Duct to Duct biliary Anastomosis the Rule in Orthotopic Liver Transplantation?

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, N; Saha, Brig Anupam; Naidu, Surg Capt Sudeep

    2013-10-01

    Biliary complications after Liver Transplantation continue to be the major cause of morbidity in 11-25 % of patients. Biliary complications in patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) at our institute between March 2007 and June 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. 32 patients underwent Deceased Donor Liver Transplantation (DDLT) and in 12 patients Living Donor Liver Transplantation (LDLT) was done. No patients were lost to follow up. Follow up ranged between 4 and 44 months. During the study period, 44 patients underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. Patients were divided into two groups: Biliary Complications group (BC) n = 5 and Non Biliary Complications group (NBC) n = 39. Biliary complications occurred in 15.9 % of patients. Bile leaks accounted for majority of biliary complications. Fifteen variables were analyzed as possible risk factors for biliary complications. Of these, split grafts, duct to duct biliary anastomosis and total blood loss were statistically significant (P < 0.05) for biliary complications. Endoscopic treatment was successful in managing biliary complications in 75 % of patients. Biliary complications are the most common major complications in orthotopic liver transplantation. Significant risk factors are split liver grafts and duct to duct biliary anastomosis. Increased blood loss is a predictor for post operative biliary complications. These complications should be managed by endoscopic interventions. Surgery is indicated following failure of endoscopic interventions. PMID:24426478

  2. The Timing of Biliary Surgery in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, John H. C.

    1979-01-01

    The timing of biliary surgery remains controversial in patients with acute pancreatitis associated with cholelithiasis. Eighty hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis, occurring in 74 patients with cholelithiasis, have therefore been reviewed. Among 22 patients who underwent abdominal surgery during the first week of treatment, there were five deaths (23%) and four patients (18%) who required more than seven days of intensive care. Fifty-eight episodes of pancreatitis were managed nonoperatively during the first week of treatment, with no deaths, although six (10%) required more than seven days of intensive care. Biliary surgery was undertaken later during the same admission in 37 patients, with no deaths. Twenty-one patients were discharged without biliary operation, but seven (33%) developed further pancreatitis. Previously reported prognostic signs were used to divide pancreatitis into 57 “mild” episodes (1.8% mortality) and 23 “severe” episodes (17% mortality). Early (day 0-7) definitive biliary surgery was undertaken in 11 patients with “mild” pancreatitis, with one death (9%), and in six patients with “severe” pancreatitis, with four deaths (67%). In three recent patients with “severe” pancreatitis, early biliary surgery was limited to cholecystostomy, with no deaths. These findings suggest that although early correction of associated biliary disease may be undertaken safely in many patients with “mild” acute pancreatitis, early definitive surgery is hazardous in “severe” pancreatitis and should, if possible, be deferred until pancreatitis has subsided. In most patients biliary surgery should precede hospital discharge. PMID:443917

  3. Primary biliary cirrhosis: From bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Kouroumalis, Elias; Notas, George

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic non-suppurative destructive intrahepatic cholangitis leading to cirrhosis after a protractive non cirrhotic stage. The etiology and pathogenesis are largely unknown and autoimmne mechanisms have been implicated to explain the pathological lesions. Many epitopes and autoantigens have been reported as crucial in the pathophysiology of the disease and T and B cells abnormalities have been described, the exact pathways leading to the destruction of small intrahepatic ductules are mostly speculative. In this review we examined the various epidemiologal and geoepidemiological data as well as the complex pathogenetic aspects of this disease, focusing on recent in vivo and in vitro studies in this field. Initiation and progression of PBC is believed to be a multifactorial process with strong infuences from the patient’s genetic background and by various environmental factors. The role of innate and adaptive immunity, including cytokines, chemokines, macrophages and the involvement of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species are outlined in detailed. The current pathogenetic aspects are presented and a novel pathogenetic theory unifying the accumulated clinical information with in vitro and in vivo data is formulated. A review of clinical manifestations and immunological and pathological diagnosis was presented. Treatment modalities, including the multiple mechanisms of action of ursodeoxycholate were finally discussed. PMID:26261733

  4. [Pancreas and biliary tract: recent developments].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease that is associated with significant morbidity and considerable mortality. In this article, developments relating to this disease that were presented in DDW 2014 are reviewed. Pancreatic steatosis could be a cause of recurrent AP. Patients with DM have an increased incidence of AP and pancreatic cancer. The use of anti-TNF drugs in inflammatory bowel disease may protect against the occurrence of AP. The presence of pancreas divisum protects against acute biliary pancreatitis. The PANCODE system for describing local complications of AP has good interobserver agreement, when the new definitions of the revised Atlanta classification are applied. The use of prophylactic antibiotics in early-stage AP predisposes the development of intra-abdominal fungal infections. Fluid sequestration in AP is linked with young age, alcoholism and indicators of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The most common cause of mortality in AP is early onset of multiple organ failure, not pancreatic necrosis infection. Patients with AP and vitamin D deficiency could benefit from taking vitamin D supplements. Moderate fluid administration in emergencies (500-1000 mL) could be associated with better AP development.

  5. Primary cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages.

    PubMed

    Mittal, B; Deutsch, M; Iwatsuki, S

    1985-04-01

    We analyzed the records of 22 patients with cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages (EHBP) to understand their natural histories and patterns of failure and to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments. None of the preoperative investigations consistently defined the entire extent of tumor. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) was the most helpful (100%) in accurately defining the site of ductal obstruction. Computed tomography was helpful in diagnosing liver metastases in 53% and primary tumor mass in 23% of patients. The most common sites of tumor failure or persistence were: liver (67%), tumor bed (56%), peritoneum (22%), porta hepatis and lymph nodes (17%). The median survival for the entire group was 6.8 months. Surgery plays an important role in managing these tumors and in defining tumor extent for subsequent adjuvant irradiation. Patients receiving radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF had a longer median survival (11 months) than patients receiving less than 70 TDF (4.4 months). All three patients, who were alive and free of disease greater than 1 year, received radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF. From our data, it is difficult to comment on the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We have made suggestions regarding radiation volume and doses to various structures. The need for entering these patients into multi-institutional clinical trials is stressed.

  6. Primary cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.; Deutsch, M.; Iwatsuki, S.

    1985-04-01

    The records of 22 patients with cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages (EHBP) were analyzed to understand their natural histories and patterns of failure and to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments. None of the preoperative investigations consistently defined the entire extent of tumor. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) was the most helpful (100%) in accurately defining the site of ductal obstruction. Computed tomography was helpful in diagnosing liver metastases in 53% and primary tumor mass in 23% of patients. The most common sites of tumor failure or persistence were: liver (67%), tumor bed (56%), peritoneum (22%), porta hepatis and lymph nodes (17%). The median survival for the entire group was 6.8 months. Surgery plays an important role in managing these tumors and in defining tumor extent for subsequent adjuvant irradiation. Patients receiving radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF had a longer median survival (11 months) than patients receiving less than 70 TDF (4.4 months). All three patients, who were alive and free of disease greater than 1 year, received radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF. From the data, it is difficult to comment on the effectiveness of chemotherapy. The authors have made suggestions regarding radiation volume and doses to various structures. The need for entering these patients into multi-institutional clinical trials is stressed.

  7. Primary cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages.

    PubMed

    Mittal, B; Deutsch, M; Iwatsuki, S

    1985-04-01

    We analyzed the records of 22 patients with cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages (EHBP) to understand their natural histories and patterns of failure and to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments. None of the preoperative investigations consistently defined the entire extent of tumor. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) was the most helpful (100%) in accurately defining the site of ductal obstruction. Computed tomography was helpful in diagnosing liver metastases in 53% and primary tumor mass in 23% of patients. The most common sites of tumor failure or persistence were: liver (67%), tumor bed (56%), peritoneum (22%), porta hepatis and lymph nodes (17%). The median survival for the entire group was 6.8 months. Surgery plays an important role in managing these tumors and in defining tumor extent for subsequent adjuvant irradiation. Patients receiving radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF had a longer median survival (11 months) than patients receiving less than 70 TDF (4.4 months). All three patients, who were alive and free of disease greater than 1 year, received radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF. From our data, it is difficult to comment on the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We have made suggestions regarding radiation volume and doses to various structures. The need for entering these patients into multi-institutional clinical trials is stressed. PMID:3980281

  8. Autotaxin, Pruritus and Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC).

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Zhang, Weici; Evans, Jilly F; Floreani, Annarosa; Zou, Zhengsheng; Nishio, Yukiko; Qi, Ruizhao; Leung, Patrick S C; Bowlus, Christopher L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-08-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a 125-kD type II ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (ENPP2 or NPP2) originally discovered as an unknown "autocrine motility factor" in human melanoma cells. In addition to its pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase activities ATX has lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, catalyzing the conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX is the only ENPP family member with lysoPLD activity and it produces most of the LPA in circulation. In support of this, ATX heterozygous mice have 50% of normal LPA plasma levels. The ATX-LPA signaling axis plays an important role in both normal physiology and disease pathogenesis and recently has been linked to pruritus in chronic cholestatic liver diseases, including primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). Several lines of evidence have suggested that a circulating puritogen is responsible, but the identification of the molecule has yet to be definitively identified. In contrast, plasma ATX activity is strongly associated with pruritus in PBC, suggesting a targetable molecule for treatment. We review herein the biochemistry of ATX and the rationale for its role in pruritus.

  9. The Diagnosis of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bowlus, Christopher L.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic liver disease characterized by the immune mediated destruction of small intrahepatic bile duct epithelial cells leading to cholestasis and cirrhosis. The autoimmune basis of PBC is supported by the highly specific anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) and autoreactive T cells, the former being the basis for diagnosis in the vast majority of cases. Although a rare disease, the incidence rates of PBC have been increasing, possibly due to increased testing and diagnosis as opposed to a true increase in disease incidence. Presently, most cases are asymptomatic and only suspected based upon routine liver tests. Those with symptoms typically complain of pruritus and fatigue. The diagnosis of PBC is based on the presence of at least 2 of 3 key criteria including a persistently elevated serum alkaline phosphatase, the presence of serum AMA, and liver histology consistent with PBC. Anti-nuclear antibodies specific to PBC are useful in cases in which AMA are not detected and may indicate a more aggressive course. Ursodeoxycholic acid is the only proven therapy for PBC and in most cases can delay or prevent disease progression. However, a subgroup of patients does not adequately respond to ursodeoxycholic acid and for whom new therapies are needed. PMID:24424173

  10. Incidence of hepatotropic viruses in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Rauschenfels, Stefan; Krassmann, Miriam; Al-Masri, Ahmed N; Verhagen, Willem; Leonhardt, Johannes; Kuebler, Joachim F; Petersen, Claus

    2009-04-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is the most frequent indication for paediatric liver transplantation. We tested the hypothesis of a viral aetiology of this disease by screening liver samples of a large number of BA patients for the common human hepatotropic viruses. Moreover, we correlated our findings to the expression of Mx protein, which has been shown to be significantly up-regulated during viral infections. Seventy-four liver biopsies (taken during Kasai portoenterostomy) were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for DNA viruses (herpes simplex virus [HSV], Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], varicella zoster virus [VZV], cytomegalovirus [CMV], adenovirus, parvovirus B19 and polyoma BK) and RNA viruses (enteroviruses, rotavirus and reovirus 3). Mx protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Virus DNA/RNA was found in less than half of the biopsies (8/74 CMV, 1/74 adenovirus; 21/64 reovirus, 1/64 enterovirus). A limited number presented with double infection. Patients that had detectable viral RNA/DNA in their liver biopsies were significantly older than virus-free patients (P = 0.037). The majority (54/59) of the liver biopsies showed expression of Mx proteins in hepatocytes, bile ducts and epithelium. Our data suggest that the known hepatotropic viruses do not play a major role in the aetiology and progression of BA. Their incidence appears to be, rather, a secondary phenomenon. Nonetheless, the inflammatory response in the livers of BA patients mimics that observed during viral infections.

  11. Multivesicular stellate cells in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R G; Neuman, M G; Shear, N H; Blendis, L M

    1997-09-01

    Stellate cells have only recently received attention in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We used electron microscopy and morphometry to perform a qualitative and quantitative examination of lipid-storing activity of stellate cells in liver biopsies of 26 patients with noncirrhotic and cirrhotic PBC. Parallel with this study, a comparative analysis of the morphology of stellate cells in 51 patients with livers of normal histology was performed. There was a marked increase in the total number of lipid vesicles in stellate cells in all PBC patients when compared to livers with normal histology. Multiple multivesicular stellate cells were seen in the livers of 21 out of 26 patients with PBC. There were 11 to 28 lipid vesicles per multivesicular stellate cell from 1 micromol/L to 5 micromol/L in diameter per lipid vesicle. Hepatocytes showed little or no steatosis in 24 out of 26 (92%) PBC patients. Multivesicular stellate cells were not seen in female patients with normal liver histology. These results suggest that there is an alteration in hepatic lipid-storage that involves stellate cells in PBC, which could be an early manifestation of this disease. Its significance remains to be determined.

  12. Multivesicular stellate cells in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R G; Neuman, M G; Shear, N; Blendis, L M

    1997-10-01

    Stellate cells have only recently received attention in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We have used electron microscopy and morphometry to perform a qualitative and quantitative examination of lipid-storing activity of stellate cells in liver biopsies of 26 patients with noncirrhotic and cirrhotic PBC. In parallel with this study, a comparative analysis of the morphology of stellate cells in 51 patients with livers of normal histology was performed. There was a marked increased in the total number of lipid vesicles in stellate cells in all PBC patients when compared with livers with normal histology. Multiple multivesicular stellate cells were seen in the livers of 21 of 26 patients with PBC. There were 11 to 28 lipid vesicles per multivesicular stellate cell in sizes of 1 microm to 5 microm in diameter per lipid vesicle. Hepatocytes showed little or no steatosis in 24 of 26 (92%) PBC patients. Multivesicular stellate cells were not seen in female patients with normal liver histology. These results suggest that there is an alteration in hepatic lipid storage that involves stellate cells in PBC that could be an early manifestation of this disease. Its significance remains to be elucidated.

  13. [Pancreas and biliary tract: recent developments].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease that is associated with significant morbidity and considerable mortality. In this article, developments relating to this disease that were presented in DDW 2014 are reviewed. Pancreatic steatosis could be a cause of recurrent AP. Patients with DM have an increased incidence of AP and pancreatic cancer. The use of anti-TNF drugs in inflammatory bowel disease may protect against the occurrence of AP. The presence of pancreas divisum protects against acute biliary pancreatitis. The PANCODE system for describing local complications of AP has good interobserver agreement, when the new definitions of the revised Atlanta classification are applied. The use of prophylactic antibiotics in early-stage AP predisposes the development of intra-abdominal fungal infections. Fluid sequestration in AP is linked with young age, alcoholism and indicators of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The most common cause of mortality in AP is early onset of multiple organ failure, not pancreatic necrosis infection. Patients with AP and vitamin D deficiency could benefit from taking vitamin D supplements. Moderate fluid administration in emergencies (500-1000 mL) could be associated with better AP development. PMID:25294273

  14. Geographic Clusters of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Mouch, Saif; Selmi, Carlo; Benson, Gordon D.; Kenny, Thomas P.; Invernizzi, Pietro; Zuin, Massimo; Podda, Mauro; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2003-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors have been widely suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology leading to destruction of small bile ducts. Interestingly, epidemiologic data indicate a variable prevalence of the disease in different geographical areas. The study of clusters of PBC may provide clues as to possible triggers in the induction of immunopathology. We report herein four such unique PBC clusters that suggest the presence of both genetic and environmental factors in the induction of PBC. The first cluster is represented by a family of ten siblings of Palestinian origin that have an extraordinary frequency of PBC (with 5/8 sisters having the disease). Second, we describe the cases of a husband and wife, both having PBC. A family in which PBC was diagnosed in two genetically unrelated individuals, who lived in the same household, represents the third cluster. Fourth, we report a high prevalence of PBC cases in a very small area in Alaska. Although these data are anedoctal, the study of a large number of such clusters may provide a tool to estimate the roles of genetics and environment in the induction of autoimmunity. PMID:14768943

  15. Biliary lipid composition in monozygotic and dizygotic pairs of twins.

    PubMed Central

    Antero Kesäniemi, Y; Koskenvuo, M; Vuoristo, M; Miettinen, T A

    1989-01-01

    The relative contribution of genetic factors to biliary and serum lipid composition was studied in 17 monozygotic and 18 dizygotic middle aged male pairs of twins. Cholesterol precursors, squalene and Methylated sterols which reflect the activity of cholesterol synthesis were also measured. Pairwise intraclass correlations were determined for monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs and heritability estimates were calculated. Molar % of biliary cholesterol and percentage distribution of biliary cholic acid and particularly deoxycholic acid showed significant pairwise correlations within the monozygotic but not the dizygotic pairs. Similar correlations were found for total biliary methylsterols and of the methylsterol subfractions for the two methostenols but not for squalene, lanosterol and dimethylsterols. In serum, the precursor sterols, but not squalene, showed even higher pairwise correlations in the monozygotic twins than the corresponding precursors in bile. Molar per cent of bile acids and phospholipids and cholesterol saturation index were not correlated significantly in either twin pairs, but the pairwise correlations tended to be higher in the monozygotic than in the dizygotic pairs. Gall stones were found in seven monozygotic and three dizygotic subjects. Two monozygotic twin pairs were concordant for gall stones; all the dizygotic pairs were discordant. Overall, these data suggest that molar percentage of biliary cholesterol, bile acid composition, cholesterol synthesis, bile cholesterol saturation, and gall stone formation may be under a significant genetic control. PMID:2612989

  16. Combined biliary and duodenal stenting for palliation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Profili, S; Feo, C F; Meloni, G B; Strusi, G; Cossu, M L; Canalis, G C

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this case report was to evaluate the usefulness of combined biliary and duodenal stenting in the palliation of pancreatic cancer. We report a series of 4 consecutive patients (2 men and 2 women, mean age 58.5 years, range 38-77 years) who underwent combined biliary and duodenal stenting in our department between March 2000 and April 2001. All patients had cancer of the head of the pancreas causing stricture of the common bile duct and second portion of the duodenum. Biliary and duodenal stents were successfully positioned, with relief of symptoms in all cases. No early complications were observed, except for a transient increase in serum lipase and amylase in one case. Mean follow-up was 7.5 months (range 5-14 months). One patient presenting recurrence of vomiting after 4 months because of tumour overgrowth at the distal edge of the prosthesis was successfully treated by insertion of a partially overlapping second coaxial stent. Combined biliary and duodenal stenting for the palliation of pancreatic cancer was performed safely and successfully. Stents allowed effective re-canalization of the biliary tract and duodenum, relieving both jaundice and vomiting. This procedure should be considered as an alternative to palliative surgery, especially in critically ill patients.

  17. Percutaneous minimally invasive treatment of malignant biliary strictures: current status.

    PubMed

    Krokidis, Miltiadis; Hatzidakis, Adam

    2014-04-01

    The concept of percutaneous management of malignant biliary obstruction has not significantly changed in the last two decades and is based on the successful drainage of bile toward the duodenum, which normalizes liver function and prevents the development of cholangitis and sepsis. However, patient survival has changed slightly in the last two decades due to the advance of the diagnostic methods, chemo-radiotherapy protocols, and minimally invasive local control of the disease. Bare metal stents have not improved; however, newly developed covered biliary stents have been designed, and there is now evidence supporting their use in the clinical practice. However, other novel devices that may potentially offer benefit to patients with malignant biliary obstruction have been developed, such as drug-eluting biliary stents and intraductal ablation devices, and first feasibility trials have been published that offer encouraging results. These new technological developments, in combination with increased patient survival, bring new exciting data in this constantly developing area. The purpose of this review article is to investigate the latest published evidence on percutaneous minimal invasive palliation of malignant biliary disease and to delineate current trends.

  18. Quasielastic light scattering evidence for vesicular secretion of biliary lipids.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D E; Angelico, M; Carey, M C

    1989-07-01

    We employed quasielastic light scattering, negative-stain, and freeze-fracture electron microscopy to study the time-dependent physicochemical behavior of biliary lipids in fresh rat bile. Three to five minutes after bile collection, the earliest light scattering measurements and electron microscopy revealed unilamellar vesicles (mean hydrodynamic radius, Rh = 430-740 A) coexisting with mixed micelles (Rh = 20-120 A) in all biles. Both percent biliary vesicles (1 to greater than 70%) and micellar sizes varied inversely with bile salt concentration (range 1.6-72 mM) both during endogenous pool drainage and sodium taurocholate infusion. With bile salt concentrations in the vicinity of or below the estimated critical micellar concentration, biliary vesicle concentrations remained constant or increased slightly with passage of time. However, with micellar bile salt concentrations, complete conversion of vesicles to micelles occurred at rates that were directly proportional to bile salt concentration. Back-extrapolation of weighted Rh averages of micelles plus vesicles as functions of time gave sizes of approximately 470 A at 1 min, suggesting the predominance of homogeneously sized unilamellar vesicles at the earliest stages of bile formation. After micellization of lipids, mixed protein aggregates of vesicle size were demonstrated in all biles. These experiments elucidate the dynamic coexistence of lipid vesicles and mixed micelles in cholesterol unsaturated biles and demonstrate that vesicle-to-micelle interconversions of biliary lipid aggregates are normal physiological phenomena within the biliary tree.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Imaging Pain.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Katherine T; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    The challenges and understanding of acute and chronic pain have been illuminated through the advancement of central neuroimaging. Through neuroimaging research, new technology and findings have allowed us to identify and understand the neural mechanisms contributing to chronic pain. Several regions of the brain are known to be of particular importance for the maintenance and amplification of chronic pain, and this knowledge provides novel targets for future research and treatment. This article reviews neuroimaging for the study of chronic pain, and in particular, the rapidly advancing and popular research tools of structural and functional MRI. PMID:27208709

  20. Transhepatic contemporary palliation of biliary and duodenal stenoses by means of metallic stents.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, G; Chiaraviglio, F; Bonfanti, G; Civelli, E M

    2004-01-01

    We describe the treatment of a stenosing lesion of the horizontal duodenum by means of a large-bore metallic stent inserted percutaneously in a patient with transhepatic biliary drainage. In the same session, we used an expandable metallic stent in the biliary tree to relieve jaundice. We recommend the transhepatic approach for duodenal metallic stent insertion in patients with percutaneous biliary drainage.

  1. [Suprapapilar puncture for biliary access to advanced cancer of the papilla and severe coagulopathy].

    PubMed

    Artifon, E; Couto, D S; Navarro, A

    2009-01-01

    Biliary cannulation to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) may be difficult in patients with advanced papillary cancer, due to anatomical and technical reasons. Sphincterotomy may be contraindicated in severe coagulopathy. We report a recently described technique of suprapapillary puncture for biliary access with use of an Artifon's catheter for biliary access in a high-risk patient with coagulopathy and periampullary neoplasm.

  2. Drug-eluting stent in malignant biliary obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Ki; Jang, Sung Ill

    2012-10-01

    Endoscopic stent insertion is the treatment of choice for patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, conventional stents enable only mechanical palliation of the obstruction, without any anti-tumor effects. Drugeluting stent (DES), which was first introduced in coronary artery disease, are currently under investigation for sustaining stent patency and prolonging patient survival by inhibiting tumor ingrowth in malignant biliary obstruction. Many factors affecting efficient drug delivery have been studied to determine how drugs with antitumor effects suppress tumor ingrowth, including the specific drugs incorporated, means of incorporating the drugs, mode of drug release, and stent structure. Advances have resulted in the construction of more effective non-vascular DES and ongoing clinical research. Non-vascular DES is expected to play a vital role in prolonging the survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.

  3. Liver and biliary tract cancer among chemical workers

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, G.G.; McLaren, E.A.; Sabel, F.L.; Bodner, K.M.; Lipps, T.E.; Cook, R.R. )

    1990-01-01

    A recent cohort mortality study of male, hourly wage employees of a large Michigan chemical production and research facility had found a greater than expected number of deaths coded to liver and biliary tract cancer. In response, an additional investigation was then undertaken of the 44 liver and biliary tract cancer deaths observed between 1940 and 1982. A random sample (N = 1,888) of subjects was selected from the total cohort (N = 21,437) to serve as referents. Company work history records were used to classify cases and referents by work area assignment and potential for exposure to 11 selected chemical agents which have been shown to produce cancer of the liver or biliary passages in experimental animals. Statistically significant associations in both positive and negative directions were found for several work areas within the facility. A suggestive association was found for vinyl chloride monomer, based on five cases with presumed exposure.

  4. Primary Biliary Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma (MANEC): A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Andres M; Wiley, Elizabeth Louise

    2016-10-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas (MANECs) are composite neoplasms with areas of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma intermingled with neuroendocrine carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumor, each composing at least 30% of the neoplasm. MANECs are very infrequent overall, and they are more commonly diagnosed in the appendix, colon, and stomach. Biliary MANECs are particularly rare, and their histogenesis is debated because neuroendocrine cells are seldom identified in the normal biliary tract. They can show one of the 3 different architectural patterns described in Lewin's original classification: collision tumors, combined lesions, or amphicrine neoplasms. The neuroendocrine component is usually of a high grade, with small or large cell cytomorphology, whereas the adenocarcinoma component is either an intestinal or biliary type. Clinical presentation is characterized by locally advanced disease at the time of initial diagnosis. Recent studies suggest that treatment should be guided by the most aggressive histologic component. PMID:27684986

  5. Liver and biliary tract cancer among chemical workers.

    PubMed

    Bond, G G; McLaren, E A; Sabel, F L; Bodner, K M; Lipps, T E; Cook, R R

    1990-01-01

    A recent cohort mortality study of male, hourly wage employees of a large Michigan chemical production and research facility had found a greater than expected number of deaths coded to liver and biliary tract cancer. In response, an additional investigation was then undertaken of the 44 liver and biliary tract cancer deaths observed between 1940 and 1982. A random sample (N = 1,888) of subjects was selected from the total cohort (N = 21,437) to serve as referents. Company work history records were used to classify cases and referents by work area assignment and potential for exposure to 11 selected chemical agents which have been shown to produce cancer of the liver or biliary passages in experimental animals. Statistically significant associations in both positive and negative directions were found for several work areas within the facility. A suggestive association was found for vinyl chloride monomer, based on five cases with presumed exposure.

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary and pancreatic duct interventions

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, David; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    When endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography fails to decompress the pancreatic or biliary system, alternative interventions are required. In this situation, endosonography guided cholangio-pancreatography (ESCP), percutaneous radiological therapy or surgery can be considered. Small case series reporting the initial experience with ESCP have been superseded by comprehensive reports of large cohorts. Although these reports are predominantly retrospective, they demonstrate that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided biliary and pancreatic interventions are associated with high levels of technical and clinical success. The procedural complication rates are lower than those seen with percutaneous therapy or surgery. This article describes and discusses data published in the last five years relating to EUS-guided biliary and pancreatic intervention. PMID:25400865

  7. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  8. Primary biliary cirrhosis--experience in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, R; Goh, K L; Wong, N W

    1996-03-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is an uncommon disease amongst Malaysians. Over a 12-year period, between 1979 and 1991, only seven patients with clinical, biochemical and histologic evidence of primary biliary cirrhosis were identified in University Hospital Kuala Lumpur. All were Chinese females between the ages of 30 to 55 years. The presenting complaint was pruritus in 5 patients. All except one patient was jaundiced when the diagnosis was made. These patients were followed up from 1 to 11 years. Three deaths were reported, one from massive hemetemesis and two from liver failure.

  9. [Congenital broncho-biliary fistula: a case report].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cinthia G; Reusmann, Aixa

    2016-10-01

    Congenital tracheo-or-bronchobiliary fistula or congenital he-patopulmonary fistula is a rare malformation with high morbidity and mortality if the diagnosis is not made early. The tracheo-or-bronchobiliary fistula is a communication between the respiratory (trachea or bronchus) and biliary tract. To date, only 35 cases have been published worldwide. We report a case of a neonate with right pneumonia and bilious fluid in the endotracheal tube. Diagnosis was made using bronchoscopy with fluoroscopy. Videothoracoscopy was used to remove the bronchobiliary fistula. Subsequently, a left he-patectomy with Roux-en-Y biliary-digestive anastomosis was performed as bile ductus hypoplasia was present. PMID:27606661

  10. High Uptake of FDG Along a Biliary Stent

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaki, Yasunari; Yamane, Hiromichi; Ochi, Nobuaki; Honda, Yoshihiro; Takigawa, Nagio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 66-year-old woman presented with abdominal discomfort. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed a mass in the pancreas and multiple liver metastases. Pathological examination confirmed the mass to be primary pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic insertion of a biliary stent was performed to prevent common bile duct obstruction. Subsequently, she received combination chemotherapy, which resulted in a complete response. FDG-PET-CT after chemotherapy revealed a high uptake of FDG along the outline of the biliary stent, with complete disappearance of both the primary and metastatic tumors. PMID:27607171

  11. Congenital biliary atresia and jaundice in lambs and calves.

    PubMed

    Harper, P; Plant, J W; Unger, D B

    1990-01-01

    An outbreak of congenital biliary atresia and jaundice is described, in which approximately 300 crossbred lambs and 9 crossbred calves died. The affected animals failed to thrive, developed jaundice and white scours and died within 4 weeks of birth. A common feature of this outbreak and a similar occurrence 24 years previously was the grazing of plants growing on the exposed silt foreshores of Burrinjuck Dam by ewes and cows in the early stages of pregnancy. Epidemiological and pathological findings suggested that a toxic insult to the foetus in early gestation caused choledysgenesis and biliary atresia, leading to diffuse, subacute to chronic cholangiohepatopathy and cirrhosis.

  12. [Congenital broncho-biliary fistula: a case report].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cinthia G; Reusmann, Aixa

    2016-10-01

    Congenital tracheo-or-bronchobiliary fistula or congenital he-patopulmonary fistula is a rare malformation with high morbidity and mortality if the diagnosis is not made early. The tracheo-or-bronchobiliary fistula is a communication between the respiratory (trachea or bronchus) and biliary tract. To date, only 35 cases have been published worldwide. We report a case of a neonate with right pneumonia and bilious fluid in the endotracheal tube. Diagnosis was made using bronchoscopy with fluoroscopy. Videothoracoscopy was used to remove the bronchobiliary fistula. Subsequently, a left he-patectomy with Roux-en-Y biliary-digestive anastomosis was performed as bile ductus hypoplasia was present.

  13. Intraductal radiofrequency ablation for management of malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2014-11-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are the current standard of care for the palliative management of malignant biliary strictures. Recently, endoscopic ablative techniques with direct affect to local tumor have been developed to improve SEMS patency. Several reports have demonstrated the technical feasibility and safety of intraductal radiofrequency ablation (RFA), by both endoscopic and percutaneous approaches, in palliation of malignant strictures of the bile duct. Intraductal RFA has also been used in the treatment of occlusion of both covered and uncovered SEMS occlusion from tumor ingrowth or overgrowth. This article provides a comprehensive review of intraductal RFA in the management of malignant biliary obstruction.

  14. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  15. Endoscopic biliary stent migration with small bowel perforation in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Esterl, R M; St Laurent, M; Bay, M K; Speeg, K V; Halff, G A

    1997-03-01

    Intestinal perforation from a migrated biliary stent is a rare complication after endoscopic stent placement for benign biliary stricture. We provide the first description of stent migration and distal small-bowel perforation after stent placement for biliary anastomotic stricture in a liver transplant recipient. We review the current literature on the diagnosis and management of stent migration and intestinal perforation after endoscopic or percutaneous stent placement for benign and malignant biliary strictures. Early diagnosis and treatment of biliary stent migration and subsequent intestinal perforation are essential in transplant patients, in whom immunosuppression sometimes blunts signs and symptoms of intestinal perforation.

  16. EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy for malignant distal biliary obstruction palliation: an article review.

    PubMed

    Artifon, Everson L A; Perez-Miranda, Manuel

    2012-04-01

    The EUS-guided biliary drainage is a new tool for the palliation of distal obstructive biliary lesions. The EUS-guided access, which creates a fistulization between the duodenal bulb and distal common biliary duct, is an effective method to relieve jaundice and has low morbidity and mortality, in patients with distal biliary obstruction (pancreatic mass or papillary câncer). This technique is called choledochoduodenostomy and is presented promptly in this article. The EUS-guided biliary drainage should be made within protocol conditions and done by very experienced endosonographers.

  17. Spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Izzo, R; Popolizio, T; D'Aprile, P; Muto, M

    2015-05-01

    The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic pain, much more difficult to treat. The clinical assessment of pain source can be a challenge because of the complex anatomy and function of the spine; the advanced imaging methods are often not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis because similar findings could be present in either asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects: a clinical correlation is always mandatory and the therapy cannot rely uniquely upon any imaging abnormalities. Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally

  18. A Rare Anomaly of Biliary System: MRCP Evidence of a Cystic Duct Cyst.

    PubMed

    Goya, Cemil; Arslan, Mehmet Serif; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Hamidi, Cihad; Kuday, Suzan; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; Aydogdu, Bahattin

    2014-01-01

    Cystic duct cysts are a rare congenital anomaly. While the other bile duct cysts (choledochus and the intrahepatic bile ducts) are classified according to the classification described by Tadoni, there is no classification method described by the cystic duct cysts, although it is claimed that the cystic duct cysts may constitute a new "Type 6" category. Only a limited number of patients with cystic duct cysts have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis is usually made in the neonatal period or during childhood. The clinical symptoms are nonspecific and usually include pain in the right upper quadrant and jaundice. The condition may also present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholelithiasis, or pancreatitis. In our case, the abdominal ultrasonography (US) performed on a 6-year-old female patient who presented with pain in the right upper quadrant pointed out an anechoic cyst at the neck of the gall bladder. Based on the magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) results, a cystic dilatation was diagnosed in the cystic duct. The aim of this case-report presentation was to discuss the US and MRCP findings of the cystic dilatation of cystic duct, which is an extremely rare condition, in the light of the literature information. PMID:24987540

  19. Combined Interventional Radiological and Endoscopical Approach for the Treatment of a Postoperative Biliary Stricture and Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Triller, Jürgen; Schmassmann, Adrian; Czerniak, Abraham

    1995-01-01

    A 43-year old woman was admitted 11 days after open cholecystectomy with a iatrogenic bile duct injury. On admission the patient showed an uncontrolled biliary fistula through an external drain placed at an emergency laparotomy for biliary peritonitis with fever and jaundice. PTC showed a biliary stricture type II (Bismuth). A percutaneous drainage was performed to decompress the biliary system. Three weeks later, percutaneous balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. However, bile leakage persisted. In a combined transhepatic/ endoscopic procedure, the percutaneous biliary drainage was replaced by a nasobiliary tube. One week later, no stricture was found and the biliary leak was sealed. The patient could be discharged without symptoms or signs of cholestasis. The multidisciplinary management of post-operative biliary fistula is presented, comparing the role of interventional radiology, endoscopy and surgery. PMID:18612478

  20. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  1. Holmium laser lithotripsy of a complicated biliary calculus.

    PubMed

    Monga, M; Gabal-Shehab, L L; Kamarei, M; D'Agostino, H

    1999-09-01

    More than 500,000 cholecystectomies are performed annually. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and endoscopic laser lithotripsy have been used for the management of common bile duct calculi, which complicate 10% of cases. We report the first successful clinical application of the Ho:YAG laser to a complex biliary calculus case.

  2. [Extracorporeal shockwave biliary lithotripsy. Physical basis and clinical application].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Sánchez, N; Uribe-Esquivel, M; Bosques, F; de la Mora, G; Sánchez, J M; Ponciano, G

    1990-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves lithotripsy is a new procedure discovered and applied in the present decade to treat urinary and biliary stones. Shock waves are acoustic waves similar to sonic waves which follow the acoustic laws and therefore the shock waves can be refracted or reflected depending on the medium interface. Due to the high water content, the human body can be crossed by shock waves which eventually may be focused on the target stone. There are several commercially available shock waves generators, i.e. the spark gap emisors which were the first ones, and the piezoceramic and electromagnetic emisors. To focus the shock waves on a biliary stone the machines are provided with fluoroscopic or ultrasound devices or with both in the most advanced machines. Using an electromagnetic emisor (Lithostar plus) our group has treated 78 patients with biliary stones without analgesia or anesthesia. Total stone fragmentation was achieved in 85% of the cases. In patients with cholesterol gallstones who undergo lithotripsy, an adjuvant treatment with oral cholesterol solvent is mandatory. Extracorporeal biliary lithotripsy is free of mortality, and the morbidity is less than 5%.

  3. The forgotten biliary stent: an unusual cause of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Sran, Harkiran; Sebastian, Joseph; Doughan, Samer

    2016-09-01

    This case highlights the possible complications of biliary stents, which may include migration and impaction in the gastrointestinal tract. It also emphasizes the need for a robust follow-up system after stent placement, to minimize the risks and possible sequelae of a forgotten stent. PMID:27648272

  4. Discordance of sonography and cholescintigraphy in acute biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, J.L.; Collins, T.L.

    1983-03-01

    Animal studies have shown that there is a brief interval of several hours after acute biliary obstruction during which sonography will demonstrate only normal-sized bile ducts while /sup 99m/Tc cholescintigraphy will document total obstruction. Serial studies documented this phenomenon in a patient whose case is reported and reviewed.

  5. Effect of pancreatic biliary reflux as a cofactor in cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Amr, Abdel Raouf; Hamdy, Hussam Mohamed; Nasr, Magid Mahmoud; Hedaya, Mohammed Saied; Hassan, Ahmed Mohamed Abdelaziz

    2012-04-01

    This study assessed the effect of pancreatico-biliary reflux (PBR) as co-factor in the process of chronic cholecystitis by measurement of the levels of active pancreatic enzyme amylase in gallbladder bile and serum of patients undergoing cholecystectomy. Pancreatic Amylase levels in bile from the gallbladder and serum were measured during surgery in 68 patients with chronic calcular cholecystitis subjected to elective open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institution and Theodore Bilharz Research Institute. Bile amylase was detected in 64 patients (94.1%) indicating pancreatico-biliary reflux. Biliary amylase level ranged from 20-50 IU/L in 42 patients (61.76%), below 20 IU/l in 14 patients (20.59%), over 50 IU/L in 8 patients (11.76%) and undetectable in two patients. According to gallbladder bile amylase, the incidence of Occult PBR in patients operated upon for chronic calcular cholecystitis was 94.1%. The reason should be clarified by further research and wider scale study. Routinely investigating biliary amylase in every patient having cholecystitis can be a method for early detection of precancerous lesions.

  6. Biliary manometry in choledochal cyst with abnormal choledochopancreatico ductal junction.

    PubMed

    Iwai, N; Tokiwa, K; Tsuto, T; Yanagihara, J; Takahashi, T

    1986-10-01

    Intraoperative manometry of the biliary tract and measurement of amylase levels in choledochal cysts were performed in seven patients, aged 14 months to 5 years, with choledochal cysts, in an investigation of the pathophysiology of the biliary tract. An abnormal choledochopancreatico ductal junction was observed in these seven patients by preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) or intraoperative cholangiograms. All six patients examined showed a high amylase level in the choledochal cyst (5,450 to 46,500 Somogyi Units). The intraoperative manometry of the biliary tract showed that a remarkable high pressure zone as was found in the area of sphincter of Oddi was not found in the area of abnormal choledochopancreatico ductal junction. The pressure recordings also demonstrated that the sphincter of Oddi pressure in the patient with choledochal cyst was increased by gastrin stimulation. On the contrary, no pressure reaction to gastrin or secretin was found in the area of abnormal choledochopancreatic ductal junction. From these results it seems that free reflux of pancreatic juice into the biliary system occurs, and the reflux stream depends upon the pressure gradient between pancreatic ductal pressure and common bile duct pressure because of the lack of a sphincter function at the choledochopancreatico ductal junction.

  7. Osteopontin Deficiency Alters Biliary Homeostasis and Protects against Gallstone Formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Shao, Wei-Qing; Chen, Zong-You; Zhu, Wen-Wei; Lu, Lu; Cai, Duan; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Jia, Hu-Liang; Lu, Ming; Chen, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation of excess biliary cholesterol as solid crystals is a prerequisite for cholesterol gallstone formation, which occurs due to disturbed biliary homeostasis. Biliary homeostasis is regulated by an elaborate network of genes in hepatocytes. If unmanaged, the cholesterol crystals will aggregate, fuse and form gallstones. We have previously observed that the levels of osteopontin (OPN) in bile and gallbladder were reduced in gallstone patients. However, the role and mechanism for hepatic OPN in cholesterol gallstone formation is undetermined. In this study, we found that the expression of hepatic OPN was increased in gallstone patients compared with gallstone-free counterparts. Then, we observed that OPN-deficient mice were less vulnerable to cholesterol gallstone formation than wild type mice. Further mechanistic studies revealed that this protective effect was associated with alterations of bile composition and was caused by the increased hepatic CYP7A1 expression and the reduced expression of hepatic SHP, ATP8B1, SR-B1 and SREBP-2. Finally, the correlations between the expression of hepatic OPN and the expression of these hepatic genes were validated in gallstone patients. Taken together, our findings reveal that hepatic OPN contributes to cholesterol gallstone formation by regulating biliary metabolism and might be developed as a therapeutic target for gallstone treatments. PMID:27484115

  8. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  9. Retroperitoneal perforation of the duodenum from biliary stent erosion.

    PubMed

    Miller, George; Yim, Duke; Macari, Michael; Harris, Marsha; Shamamian, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Endoscopically placed biliary stents have supplanted surgical decompression as the preferred treatment option for patients with obstructive jaundice from advanced pancreatic cancer. An unusual complication of indewelling biliary stents is duodenal perforation into the retroperitoneum. We describe the case of a patient with end-stage pancreatic cancer who presented with an acute abdomen from erosion of a previously placed bile duct stent through the wall of the second portion of the duodenum. Although our patient presented with advanced symptoms, clinical presentations can vary from mild abdominal discomfort and general malaise to overt septic shock. Definitive diagnosis is best made with computed tomography (CT) imaging, which can detect traces of retroperitoneal air and fluid. Treatment options vary from nonoperative management with antibiotics, bowel rest, and parenteral alimentation in the most stable patients to definitive surgery with complete diversion of gastric contents and biliary flow from the affected area in patients with clinical symptoms or radiologic evidence suggesting extensive contamination. Complications of management can include duodenal fistulization, residual retroperitoneal or intrabdominal abscess, and ongoing sepsis. This report highlights the salient issues in the presentation, diagnosis, and modern management of patients with this rare complication of indwelling biliary stents.

  10. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature.

  11. Absorption of biliary cobalamin in baboons following total gastrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.; Jacobsen, D.W.; Van Tonder, S.V.; Kew, M.C.; Metz, J.

    1982-11-01

    Absorption of radiolabeled cobalamin in baboons was assessed by whole body counting. Retention of biliary cobalamin and an aqueous solution of cyanocobalamin was measured in normal baboons and in baboons after total gastrectomy by using /sup 57/Co-labeled biliary cobalamin and /sup 58/C0-cyanocobalamin, with and without baboon gastric juice containing intrinsic factor. Radiolabeled biliary cobalamin was obtained by intravenous injection of /sup 57/Co-cyanocobalamin in baboons and collection of bile through a cannula placed in the common bile duct. Cobalamin absorption was not completely abolished by gastrectomy and biliary cobalamin was better retained than cyanocobalamin; intrinsic factor enhanced absorption of both forms. After gastrectomy there was steady depletion of liver and serum cobalamin levels, which ceased after a new equilibrium was reached between a progressively diminishing cobalamin loss and the impaired but significant residual level of absorption. These studies in the nonhuman primate provide further information concerning the enterohepatic circulation of cobalamin and suggest that the form of cobalamin in bile may be more readily absorbed than is cyanocobalamin or that bile itself may have an enhancing effect on cobalamin absorption. The data also suggest that physiologically significant amounts of cobalamin may be absorbed in the absence of a gastric source of intrinsic factor.

  12. Regional Differences in Hospitalizations and Cholecystectomies for Biliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Published studies suggest that socioeconomic factors contribute to increasing cholecystectomy rates for biliary dyskinesia (BD). The aim of this study was to identify factors driving admissions and operations for BD by examining regional variability in hospitalizations and cholecystectomies for this disorder. Methods Annual hospitalizations and cholecystectomy rates for biliary diseases were assessed using the State Inpatient Databases of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality based on diagnosis codes for biliary dyskinesia, cholecystolithiasis and cholecystitis. Results Annual admissions for BD varied nearly sevenfold among different states within the United States. Hospitalizations for gallstone disease and its complication showed less variability, differing 2-fold between states. Nearly 70% of admissions for BD and about 85% of admissions for gallstone disease resulted in cholecystectomies. Higher admission rates for BD were best predicted by high overall hospitalization rates, admission rate for gallstone disease and the physician workforce within a state. Cholecystectomy rates for BD were higher in states with low population density and high rates of cholecystectomy for gallstone disease. Conclusions These data suggest that established medical practice patterns significantly contribute to the variability in admissions and operations for biliary dyskinesia. The findings also indicate that lower thresholds for operative interventions are an important determinant in the approach to this disorder. Considering the benign course of functional illnesses, the bar for surgical interventions should be raised rather than lowered; in addition active conservative treatment options should be developed for these patients. PMID:23875106

  13. Long-term results of choledochoduodenostomy in benign biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajaz A; Rather, Shiraz A; Bari, Shams UL; Wani, Khursheed Alam

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the long-term results of choledochodudenostomy in patients with benign billiary obstruction. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted at Sheri Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences Srinagar Kashmir, India over a period of 10 years from January 1997 to December 2007. The total number of patients who underwent choledochoduodenostomy during this period was 270. On the basis of etiology of biliary tract obstruction, patients were divided into a calculus group, an oriental cholangiohepatitis group, a benign biliary stricture group and others. Patients were followed for a variable period of 13 mo to 15 years. RESULTS: Choledochoduodenostomy (CDD) with duo-denotomy was performend in four patients. CDD with removal of T- tube, CDD with left hepatic lobectomy and CDD with removal of intra biliary ruptured hydatid was performed in three patients each. In the remaining patients only CDD was performed. Immediate post operative complications were seen in 63 (23%) patients, while long-term complications were seen in 28 (11%) patients, which were statistically significant. Three patients died during hospitalization while four patients died in the late post-operative period. CONCLUSION: Our conclusion is that CDD is safe and produces good long term results when a permanent biliary drainage procedure is required. PMID:22408717

  14. [Modern approaches to the therapy of biliary system diseases].

    PubMed

    Galiullin, A R; Khakamova, G A; Uliamaeva, V V; Latypova, G A; Gur'ev, D A; Volevach, L V

    2010-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of duspatalin was evaluated in 72 patients with chronic cholecystitis and dyskinesia of the biliary tract (BT). Supplementation of duspatalin to the combined therapy in the patients with chronic cholecystitis shown to exert a pronounced therapeutic effect. This caused positive changes in clinical symptoms and BT function and quality of life, diminished the lithogenic properties of bile. PMID:20623959

  15. Osteopontin Deficiency Alters Biliary Homeostasis and Protects against Gallstone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Shao, Wei-qing; Chen, Zong-you; Zhu, Wen-wei; Lu, Lu; Cai, Duan; Qin, Lun-xiu; Jia, Hu-liang; Lu, Ming; Chen, Jin-hong

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation of excess biliary cholesterol as solid crystals is a prerequisite for cholesterol gallstone formation, which occurs due to disturbed biliary homeostasis. Biliary homeostasis is regulated by an elaborate network of genes in hepatocytes. If unmanaged, the cholesterol crystals will aggregate, fuse and form gallstones. We have previously observed that the levels of osteopontin (OPN) in bile and gallbladder were reduced in gallstone patients. However, the role and mechanism for hepatic OPN in cholesterol gallstone formation is undetermined. In this study, we found that the expression of hepatic OPN was increased in gallstone patients compared with gallstone-free counterparts. Then, we observed that OPN-deficient mice were less vulnerable to cholesterol gallstone formation than wild type mice. Further mechanistic studies revealed that this protective effect was associated with alterations of bile composition and was caused by the increased hepatic CYP7A1 expression and the reduced expression of hepatic SHP, ATP8B1, SR-B1 and SREBP-2. Finally, the correlations between the expression of hepatic OPN and the expression of these hepatic genes were validated in gallstone patients. Taken together, our findings reveal that hepatic OPN contributes to cholesterol gallstone formation by regulating biliary metabolism and might be developed as a therapeutic target for gallstone treatments. PMID:27484115

  16. Current status of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sakai, Yuji; Mikata, Rintaro; Yasui, Shin; Watanabe, Yuto; Sakamoto, Dai; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Senoo, Jun-Ichi; Kusakabe, Yuko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-08-28

    Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) was developed to improve obstructive jaundice, which affects a number of organs and physiological mechanisms in patients waiting for surgery. However, its role in patients who will undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy for biliary obstruction remains controversial. This article aims to review the current status of the use of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction. Relevant articles published from 1980 to 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed using the keywords "PBD", "pancreaticoduodenectomy", and "obstructive jaundice". Additional papers were identified by a manual search of the references from key articles. Current studies have demonstrated that PBD should not be routinely performed because of the postoperative complications. PBD should only be considered in carefully selected patients, particularly in cases where surgery had to be delayed. PBD may be needed in patients with severe jaundice, concomitant cholangitis, or severe malnutrition. The optimal method of biliary drainage has yet to be confirmed. PBD should be performed by endoscopic routes rather than by percutaneous routes to avoid metastatic tumor seeding. Endoscopic stenting or nasobiliary drainage can be selected. Although more expensive, the use of metallic stents remains a viable option to achieve effective drainage without cholangitis and reintervention. PMID:26328029

  17. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-09-14

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  18. Prevent Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Print This Topic En español Prevent Back Pain Browse Sections The Basics Overview Am I at ... Health: Back Pain . There are different types of back pain. Back pain can be acute or chronic. It ...

  19. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  20. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. Signs that may indicate a headache of dental origin include: ; Pain behind the eyes Sore jaw muscles or "tired" ... t Sleep? Check Your Bite What Causes a Toothache? Your Posture May Be the Cause of Jaw ...

  1. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  2. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Update Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  3. Pain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... have tried to find relief from cancer pain. ■■ Physical Therapy. Exercises or methods used to help restore strength, ... that you see a licensed expert when trying physical therapy, massage, hypnosis, or acupuncture. 25 To learn more ...

  4. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    A common cause of neck pain is muscle strain or tension. Most often, everyday activities are to blame. Such activities include: Bending over a desk for hours Having poor posture while watching TV or ...

  5. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gets worse when you bend forward) Tic douloureux Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome Sometimes the reason for the face pain ... is persistent, unexplained, or accompanied by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider. What to Expect at ...

  6. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  7. Interval Biliary Stent Placement Via Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Cholecystostomy: Another Approach to Palliative Treatment in Malignant Biliary Tract Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, James Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-12-15

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  8. Painful Issues in Pain Prediction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2016-04-01

    How perception of pain emerges from neural activity is largely unknown. Identifying a neural 'pain signature' and deriving a way to predict perceived pain from brain activity would have enormous basic and clinical implications. Researchers are increasingly turning to functional brain imaging, often applying machine-learning algorithms to infer that pain perception occurred. Yet, such sophisticated analyses are fraught with interpretive difficulties. Here, we highlight some common and troublesome problems in the literature, and suggest methods to ensure researchers draw accurate conclusions from their results. Since functional brain imaging is increasingly finding practical applications with real-world consequences, it is critical to interpret brain scans accurately, because decisions based on neural data will only be as good as the science behind them. PMID:26898163

  9. Health Related Quality of Life in Patients with Biliary Atresia Surviving with their Native Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Shikha S.; Alonso, Estella M.; Haber, Barbara; Magee, John C.; Fredericks, Emily; Kamath, Binita; Kerkar, Nanda; Rosenthal, Philip; Shepherd, Ross; Limbers, Christine; Varni, James W.; Robuck, Patricia; Sokol, Ronald J.; Liver, Childhood

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To quantify health related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with biliary atresia with their native livers and compare them with healthy children and patients with biliary atresia post-liver transplant (LT) and to examine the relationship between HRQOL and medical variables. Study design A cross-sectional HRQOL study of patients with biliary atresia with their native livers (ages 2-25 years) was conducted and compared with healthy and post-LT biliary atresia samples using PedsQL™ 4.0 child self and parent proxy reports, a validated measure of physical/psychosocial functioning. Results 221 patients with biliary atresia with native livers (54% female, 67% white) were studied. patient self and parent proxy reports showed significantly poorer HRQOL than healthy children across all domains (p < 0.001), particularly in emotional and psychosocial functioning. Child self and parent proxy HRQOL scores from patients with biliary atresia with their native livers and post-LT biliary atresia were similar across all domains (p=NS). Child self and parent proxy reports showed moderate agreement across all scales, except social functioning (poor to fair agreement). On multivariate regression analysis, black race and elevated total bilirubin were associated with lower Total and Psychosocial HRQOL summary scores. Conclusions HRQOL in patients with biliary atresia with their native livers is significantly poorer than healthy and similar to post-LT biliary atresia children. These findings identify significant opportunities to optimize the overall health of patients with biliary atresia. PMID:23746866

  10. Plasma Lipidomics as a Tool for Diagnosis of Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma in Biliary Strictures: a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Thearavathanasingha, Phataraphong; Thuwajit, Chanitra; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Jaresitthikunchai, Janthima; Thuwajit, Peti

    2016-01-01

    Biliary obstruction is a common clinical manifestation of various conditions, including extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. However, a screening test for diagnosis of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in patients with biliary obstruction is not yet available. According to the rationale that the biliary system plays a major role in lipid metabolism, biliary obstruction may interfere with lipid profiles in the body. Therefore, plasma lipidomics may help indicate the presence or status of disease in biliary obstruction suspected extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. This study aimed to use plasma lipidomics for diagnosis of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in patients with biliary obstruction. Plasma from healthy volunteers, patients with benign biliary obstruction extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and other related cancers were used in this study. Plasma lipids were extracted and lipidomic analysis was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Lipid profiles from extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients showed significant differences from both normal and benign biliary obstruction conditions, with no distinction between the latter two. Relative intensity of the selected lipid mass was able to successfully differentiate all extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma samples from patient samples taken from healthy volunteers, patients with benign biliary obstruction, and patients with other related cancers. In conclusion, lipidomics is a non-invasive method with high sensitivity and specificity for identification of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in patients with biliary obstruction. PMID:27644677

  11. [Myofascial pain syndrome--fascial muscle pain].

    PubMed

    Partanen, Juhani; Ojala, Tuula; Arokoski, Jari P A

    2010-01-01

    Symptoms of myofascial pain syndrome, i.e. fascial muscle pain may occur in several areas of the body, particularly in the neck-shoulder region. The muscle pain symptom in the neck-shoulder region is commonly termed tension neck pain or nonspecific neck pain, but myofascial pain syndrome can also be distinguished into its own diagnosis. This review deals with the clinical picture of myofascial pain syndrome along with pathophysiological hypotheses and treatment options.

  12. Analgesic effect of paracetamol combined with low-dose morphine versus morphine alone on patients with biliary colic: a double blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Farnia, Mohammad Reza; Babaei, Rasoul; Shirani, Farzaneh; Momeni, Mehdi; Hajimaghsoudi, Majid; Vahidi, Elnaz; Saeedi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous drugs have been proposed to alleviate pain in patients with biliary colic, especially opioids, but still there is a tendency to use less narcotics because of their side effects and the unwillingness of some patients. The present study aimed to compare the analgesic effect of paracetamol combined with low-dose morphine versus morphine alone in patients with biliary colic. METHODS: A randomized double-blind controlled trial was performed in 98 patients with biliary colic, recruited from two emergency departments from August 2012 to August 2013. Eleven patients were excluded and the remaining were randomized into two groups: group A received 0.05 mg/kg morphine+1 000 mg paracetamol in 100 mL normal saline and group B received 0.1 mg/kg morphine+normal saline (100 mL) as placebo. Pain scores were recorded using visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline and 15 and 30 minutes after drug administration. Adverse effects and the need for rescue medication (0.75 µg/kg intravenous fentanyl) were also reported within 60 minutes of drug administration. RESULTS: Before the infusion, the mean±SD VAS scores were 8.73±1.57 in group A and 8.53±1.99 in group B. At 15 minutes after drug administration, the mean±SD VAS scores were 2.16±1.90 in group A vs. 2.51±1.86 in group B; mean difference was –0.35, and 95%CI –1.15 to 0.45 (P=0.38). At 30 minutes the mean±SD VAS scores were 1.66±1.59 in group A vs. 2.14±1.79 in group B; mean difference was –0.48, and 95%CI –1.20 to 0.24 (P=0.19). The mean pain scores in the two groups at 15 and 30 minutes demonstrated no significant difference. CONCLUSION: Paracetamol combined with low-dose morphine may be effective for pain management in patients with biliary colic. PMID:27006734

  13. Chondrodermatitis nodularis chronica helicis in a patient with systemic sclerosis associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (Reynolds syndrome): A case report

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Walter Alberto Sifuentes; González-García, Carmen; de las Heras Alonso, Elena; de la Puente Bujidos, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Chondrodermatitis nodularis chronica helicis is a rare non-neoplastic inflammatory and degenerative process of the external ear, characterized by necrobiotic changes in the dermis that extend down to the perichondrium. This condition has been occasionally reported in patients with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis but not in those with concomitant primary biliary cirrhosis; this association is known as Reynolds syndrome. We report a 70-year-old woman diagnosed with primary biliary cirrhosis at age 47 and with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis at age 54 who developed a painful ulcerated nodule on the helical rim of the left ear shortly after the last diagnosis. The lesion was excised because of the suspicion of malignancy, but the histopathology was consistent with chondrodermatitis nodularis chronica helicis. Although this condition is infrequent, it is necessary to know, because it may occur in patients with systemic sclerosis and be mistaken for neoplasms, such as basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, and these patients have an increased risk for the development of skin malignancies.

  14. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  15. [Forefoot pain].

    PubMed

    Damiano, Joël

    2010-03-20

    Forefoot chronic pain is a frequent problem in daily clinical practice. Mechanical pathology of the forefoot, usually called static metatarsalgia, represents the most frequent reason for consultation in pathology of the foot. The cause is a functionnal disorder or anatomic derangement of the forefoot architecture. Metatarsalgia can originate from a wide range of affections. Etiologies of chronic pain are described from medial to lateral with first ray pathologies (hallux valgus, hallux rigidus and sesamoid pathology) and first ray insufficiency, pathologies of the second, third and fourth ray and intermetatarsal spaces (second ray syndrome, Freiberg's disease, Morton neuroma, stress or bone insufficiency metatarsal fractures, intermetatarsal bursitis) and fifth ray pathology (lateral bursitis, quintus varus). Sometimes forefoot pain could also be caused by chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis) with a risk of structural metatarsophalangeal joints alteration. The pathology of the toes can, more rarely, explain a forefoot pain. So, several pathologic conditions can produce forefoot pain and the diagnostic approach must always be based on the anamnesis and clinical examination. In a second time if the cause is difficult to establish based solely on clinical findings, radiography and ultrasonography are today the most usefull auxiliary investigations.

  16. The Role of ARF6 in Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Glessner, Joseph; Ashokkumar, Chethan; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Min, Jun; Higgs, Brandon W.; Sun, Qing; Haberman, Kimberly; Schmitt, Lori; Vilarinho, Silvia; Mistry, Pramod K.; Vockley, Gerard; Dhawan, Anil; Gittes, George K.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Jaffe, Ronald; Subramaniam, Shankar; Shin, Donghun; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Altered extrahepatic bile ducts, gut, and cardiovascular anomalies constitute the variable phenotype of biliary atresia (BA). Methods To identify potential susceptibility loci, Caucasian children, normal (controls) and with BA (cases) at two US centers were compared at >550000 SNP loci. Systems biology analysis was carried out on the data. In order to validate a key gene identified in the analysis, biliary morphogenesis was evaluated in 2-5-day post-fertilization zebrafish embryos after morpholino-antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of the candidate gene ADP ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6, Mo-arf6). Results Among 39 and 24 cases at centers 1 and 2, respectively, and 1907 controls, which clustered together on principal component analysis, the SNPs rs3126184 and rs10140366 in a 3’ flanking enhancer region for ARF6 demonstrated higher minor allele frequencies (MAF) in each cohort, and 63 combined cases, compared with controls (0.286 vs. 0.131, P = 5.94x10-7, OR 2.66; 0.286 vs. 0.13, P = 5.57x10-7, OR 2.66). Significance was enhanced in 77 total cases, which included 14 additional BA genotyped at rs3126184 only (p = 1.58x10-2, OR = 2.66). Pathway analysis of the 1000 top-ranked SNPs in CHP cases revealed enrichment of genes for EGF regulators (p<1 x10-7), ERK/MAPK and CREB canonical pathways (p<1 x10-34), and functional networks for cellular development and proliferation (p<1 x10-45), further supporting the role of EGFR-ARF6 signaling in BA. In zebrafish embryos, Mo-arf6 injection resulted in a sparse intrahepatic biliary network, several biliary epithelial cell defects, and poor bile excretion to the gall bladder compared with uninjected embryos. Biliary defects were reproduced with the EGFR-blocker AG1478 alone or with Mo-arf6 at lower doses of each agent and rescued with arf6 mRNA. Conclusions The BA-associated SNPs identify a chromosome 14q21.3 susceptibility locus encompassing the ARF6 gene. arf6 knockdown in zebrafish implicates early biliary

  17. Development of a Swine Benign Biliary Stricture Model Using Endoscopic Biliary Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Jeong, Seok; Kim, Joon Mee; Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Don Haeng

    2016-09-01

    The large animal model with benign biliary stricture (BBS) is essential to undergo experiment on developing new devices and endoscopic treatment. This study conducted to establish a clinically relevant porcine BBS model by means of endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was performed on 12 swine. The animals were allocated to three groups (60, 80, and 100 W) according to the electrical power level of RFA electrode. Endobiliary RFA was applied to the common bile duct for 60 seconds using an RFA catheter that was endoscopically inserted. ERC was repeated two and four weeks, respectively, after the RFA to identify BBS. After the strictures were identified, histologic evaluations were performed. On the follow-up ERC two weeks after the procedure, a segmental bile duct stricture was observed in all animals. On microscopic examination, severe periductal fibrosis and luminal obliteration with transmural inflammation were demonstrated. Bile duct perforations occurred in two pigs (100 W, n = 1; 80 W, n = 1) but there were no major complications in the 60 W group. The application of endobiliary RFA with 60 W electrical power resulted in a safe and reproducible swine model of BBS. PMID:27510388

  18. Prospective study of outcomes after percutaneous biliary drainage for malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Robson, P. C.; Heffernan, N.; Gonen, M.; Thornton, R.; Brody, L. A.; Holmes, R.; Brown, K. T.; Covey, A. M.; Fleischer, D.; Getrajdman, G. I.; Jarnagin, W.; Sofocleous, C.; Blumgart, L.; D’Angelica, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) is used to relieve malignant bile duct obstruction (MBO) when endoscopic drainage is not feasible. Little is known about the effects of PBD on the quality of life (QoL) in patients with MBO. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in QoL and pruritus after PBD and to explore the variables that impact these changes. Patients and Methods Eligible patients reported their QoL and pruritus before and after PBD using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – Hepatobiliary instrument (FACT-HS) and the Visual Analog Scale for Pruritus (VASP). Instruments were completed pre-procedure and at one and four weeks following PBD. Results One hundred and nine (60 male/49 female) patients enrolled, 102 (94%) had unresectable disease. PBD was technically successful (hepatic ducts cannulated at the conclusion of procedure) in all patients. There were two procedure-related deaths. All-cause mortality was 10% (N=11) at 4 weeks and 28% (N=31) at 8 weeks post PBD with a median survival of 4.74 months. The mean FACT-HS scores declined significantly (P<.01) over time (101.3, 94.8, 94.7 at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, respectively). The VASP scores showed significant improvement at 1 week with continued improvement at 4 weeks (P<.01). Conclusion PBD improves pruritus but not QoL in patients with MBO and advanced malignancy. There is high early mortality in this population. PMID:20358300

  19. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of chronic pain usually involves medicines and therapy. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ...

  20. Recognition of Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens on Cultured Human Biliary Epithelial Cells by Alloreactive Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saidman, Susan L.; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Zeevi, Adriana; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Demetris, A. Jake

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system to study the interactions between biliary epithelium and lymphocytes using cultured human biliary epithelial cells. No class II antigens were detected by immunoperoxidase staining of the normal biliary epithelial cells, but alloactivated lymphocyte culture supernatants were able to induce class II expression. The activity of the supernatants was blocked with an anti-γ-interferon monoclonal antibody. In addition, recombinant human γ-interferon alone induced the expression of class II antigens and increased the intensity of class I staining of cultured biliary epithelial cells. Biliary epithelial cell–induced proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex molecules carry functional lymphocyte-activating determinants. The recognition of major histocompatibility complex determinants was confirmed by monoclonal antibody–blocking studies and by stimulation of an alloreactive T-cell clone. However, the biliary epithelial cells were much less potent stimulators than arterial endothelial cells tested in the same assay system. PMID:1704868

  1. Serial insertion of bilateral uncovered metal stents for malignant hilar obstruction using an 8 Fr biliary system: a case series of 17 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Thosani, Amar; Grunwald, Matthew; Nagula, Satish; Bucobo, Juan Carlos; Buscaglia, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists over the need for unilateral versus bilateral stent placement in patients with malignant obstruction at the biliary hilum. Placement of bilateral uncovered self-expanding metal stent (UCSEMS) at this location is technically challenging, and generally associated with lower rates of procedural success. Serial insertion of side-by-side UCSEMS may be especially difficult when simultaneous deployment is not possible using larger stent delivery catheters. In this single-center, retrospective case series of all patients who underwent bilateral placement of uncovered WallflexTM biliary stents between July 2008 and July 2014, we evaluate the feasibility, technical success, and safety of patients undergoing serial insertion of bilateral UCSEMS using the 8 Fr WallflexTM biliary system for malignant hilar obstruction. A total of 17 patients were included. Primary cholangiocarcinoma, Bismuth IV, was the most common diagnosis. Mean procedure time was 54.4 minutes. Overall procedural technical success was achieved in 17/17 patients. Stricture dilation was necessary prior to WallflexTM insertion in 8/17 patients (47.1%). Transpapillary extension of two stents was performed in all patients. There were no cases of stent deployment malfunction, or inability to insert or deploy the 2nd stent. Nine of 17 patients (52.9%) required inpatient hospitalization following ERCP; the most common indications were abdominal pain and need for IV antibiotics. There was one case of ERCP-related cholangitis otherwise; there were no other major complications. Bilateral, serial insertion of UCSEMS using the 8 Fr WallflexTM biliary system in malignant hilar obstruction is feasible with an excellent technical success profile. Using this device for side-by-side deployment of UCSEMS appears to be safe in the majority of patients. PMID:26605283

  2. Improved biliary detection and diagnosis through intelligent machine analysis.

    PubMed

    Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports on work undertaken to improve automated detection of bile ducts in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) images, with the objective of conducting preliminary classification of the images for diagnosis. The proposed I-BDeDIMA (Improved Biliary Detection and Diagnosis through Intelligent Machine Analysis) scheme is a multi-stage framework consisting of successive phases of image normalization, denoising, structure identification, object labeling, feature selection and disease classification. A combination of multiresolution wavelet, dynamic intensity thresholding, segment-based region growing, region elimination, statistical analysis and neural networks, is used in this framework to achieve good structure detection and preliminary diagnosis. Tests conducted on over 200 clinical images with known diagnosis have shown promising results of over 90% accuracy. The scheme outperforms related work in the literature, making it a viable framework for computer-aided diagnosis of biliary diseases.

  3. Post-biliary sphincterotomy bleeding despite covered metallic stent deployment

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Gianfranco; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Dhumane, Parag; Tuszynski, Thierry; Vergeau, Bertrand Marie; Meduri, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Several endoscopic techniques have been proposed for the management of post-sphincterotomy bleeding. Lately, self-expandable metal stents deployment has gained popularity especially as a rescue therapy when other endoscopic techniques fail. Methods-results: We report the case report of a massive post-sphincterotomy bleeding in a patient with a self-expandable metal stent in the biliary tree. Despite the presence of a correctly positioned self-expandable metal stent, a new endoscopic session was required to control the bleeding. Conclusions: Self-expandable metal stent may be useful to manage post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. However, up to now there is no specifically designed self-expandable metal stent for such complication. Large new designed self-expandable metal stent may be a useful tool for biliary endoscopist. PMID:27489716

  4. Postoperative pancreatitis as a complication of biliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D M; House, A K; Garcia-Webb, P

    1979-08-01

    Forty patients who underwent biliary surgery were investigated for postoperative pancreatic disturbance as measured by the amylase creatinine clearance ration (ACCR). Its relevance to preoperative pancreatitis, exploration of the common bile duct, and operative cholangiography were examined. The results suggested that a recent clinically proven episode of pancreatitis did not predispose to a postoperative recurrence following biliary surgery. Similarly, cholecystectomy alone did not produce a postoperative pancreatic disturbance. However, exploration of the common bile duct did frequently cause a postoperative elevated ACCR, and hence we recommend that duct exploration should be performed as carefully and as atraumatically as possible. The small number of patients who did not have operative cholangiograms prevented statistical evaluation of the effect of this procedure on the pancreas. However, information from elsewhere suggests that the plasma amylase level is not likely to be raised by cholangiography. PMID:291412

  5. Combined radiologic and endoscopic treatment (using the "rendezvous technique") of a biliary fistula following left hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Gracient, Aurélien; Rebibo, Lionel; Delcenserie, Richard; Yzet, Thierry; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-14

    Despite the ongoing decrease in the frequency of complications after hepatectomy, biliary fistulas still occur and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Here, we report on an unusual technique for managing biliary fistula following left hepatectomy in a patient in whom the right posterior segmental duct joined the left hepatic duct. The biliary fistula was treated with a combined radiologic and endoscopic procedure based on the "rendezvous technique". The clinical outcome was good, and reoperation was not required. PMID:27570431

  6. Acceptable Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors Adjacent to the Central Biliary System

    SciTech Connect

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate biliary toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Among 297 consecutive patients with liver tumors treated with SBRT of 35 to 50 Gy in 5 fractions, patients who were irradiated with >20 Gy to the central biliary system (CBS), including the gallbladder, and had follow-up times >6 months were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicity profiles, such as clinical symptoms and laboratory and radiologic data especially for obstructive jaundice and biliary infection, were investigated in relation to the dose volume and length relationship for each biliary organ. Results: Fifty patients with 55 tumors were irradiated with >20 Gy to the CBS. The median follow-up period was 18.2 months (range, 6.0-80.5 months). In the dose length analysis, 39, 34, 14, and 2 patients were irradiated with >20 Gy, >30 Gy, >40 Gy, and >50 Gy, respectively, to >1 cm of the biliary tract. Seven patients were irradiated with >20 Gy to >20% of the gallbladder. Only 2 patients experienced asymptomatic bile duct stenosis. One patient, metachronously treated twice with SBRT for tumors adjacent to each other, had a transient increase in hepatic and biliary enzymes 12 months after the second treatment. The high-dose area >80 Gy corresponded to the biliary stenosis region. The other patient experienced biliary stenosis 5 months after SBRT and had no laboratory changes. The biliary tract irradiated with >20 Gy was 7 mm and did not correspond to the bile duct stenosis region. No obstructive jaundice or biliary infection was found in any patient. Conclusions: SBRT for liver tumors adjacent to the CBS was feasible with minimal biliary toxicity. Only 1 patient had exceptional radiation-induced bile duct stenosis. For liver tumors adjacent to the CBS without other effective treatment options, SBRT at a dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions is a safe treatment with regard to biliary toxicity.

  7. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Health Statistics survey indicated that low back pain was the most common (27%), followed by severe ...

  8. Liver failure posthepatectomy and biliary fistula: multidisciplinar treatment.

    PubMed

    Calleja Kempin, Javier; Colón Rodríguez, Arturo; Machado Liendo, Pedro; Acevedo, Agustín; Martín Gil, Jorge; Sánchez Rodríguez, Teresa; Zorrilla Matilla, Laura

    2016-05-01

    The main cause of morbimor-mortality after major liver surgery is the development of liver failure posthepatectomy(LFPH). Treatment must involve multiple options and will be aggressive from the beginning. We report a case of a patient with cholangiocarcinoma perihilar treated with surgery: right hepatectomy extended to sI + IVb with develop of LFPH and biliary fistula and being management successfully in a multidisciplinary way.

  9. Physical chemistry of biliary lipids during bile formation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D E; Carey, M C

    1990-09-01

    Present concepts suggest that the canalicular secretion of bile salts is monomeric, which in turn drives the hepatic secretion of lecithin and cholesterol presumably as unilamellar vesicles into bile. As biliary lipids are concentrated within the biliary tree and gallbladder, bile salts structurally alter lecithin-cholesterol vesicles to form a variety of metastable aggregates whose structures and phase transformations are predicted by phase equilibria considerations. These structural transformations ultimately result in the dispersion of biliary lipids as thermodynamically stable micelles or micelles plus thermodynamically unstable vesicles in common duct and gallbladder biles. The experiments reviewed herein represent experimental simulations of these processes. We used pure aqueous lipid systems to model the putative stages of biliary lipid aggregation on the basis of interactions of small unilamellar vesicles of lecithin-cholesterol with bile salts as the latter's concentrations were varied from below to well above the critical micellar concentration. With submicellar bile salt concentrations likely to be found within hepatocytes, vesicle structures are not appreciably altered. However, perimicellar bile salt concentrations possibly occurring in canaliculi and bile ductules induce the formation of a hexagonal rodlike phase. On further increases in bile salt concentration, the hexagonal rods (formed from lecithin-rich and cholesterol-poor vesicles) are dissolved into mixed micelles as bile salt concentrations exceed their critical micellar concentrations. In slightly cholesterol-"supersaturated" biles, the rapid dissolution of this intermediate phase results in the formation of cholesterol-supersaturated mixed micelles that, in time, give rise to a new population of cholesterol-rich vesicles that coexist with saturated micelles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Species differences in biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, E.H.; Bevan, D.R.

    1986-05-01

    Biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) was investigated in rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs following intratracheal administration. (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P, in amounts of approximately 150 ng or 350 ..mu..g, was instilled into lungs and amounts of radioactivity excreted in bile were monitored for six hrs following administration. Differences in biliary excretion of (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P and/or metabolites among species were observed at low doses but not at high doses. Six hours after instillation of a low dose of B(a)P, 70, 54, and 62% of the dose was excreted in bile of rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs, respectively. Upon administration of the higher dose of B(a)P, approximately 50% of the dose was excreted in bile in six hrs by all species. Thus, rats and guinea pigs exhibit differences in biliary excretion of low and high doses of B(a)P whereas hamsters do not. Profiles of phase II metabolites in rats and hamsters were similar at both low and high doses, with the majority of metabolites being glucuronides and thioether conjugates. However, differences in relative amounts of these conjugates were observed between the two doses, with a shift towards a greater proportion of glucuronides at the higher dose. Metabolites in bile from guinea pigs were primarily thioether conjugates, which accounted for 88% of metabolites at the low dose and 95% at the high dose.

  11. The Radiological Management of Biliary Complications Following Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, Andrea; Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Lauchart, Werner

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: Biliary complications contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in the liver transplant recipient. Surgery has been the mainstay of therapy, but interventional radiological techniques have made significant progress. Methods: Diagnostic percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) was performed in 12 patients; percutaneous transhepatic drainage (PTD) was performed in 10 patients. Additional interventional procedures included laser lithotripsy, biopsy, dilatation, and stent implantation. Results: In 6 patients PTC revealed anastomotic, and in 6 patients nonanastomotic biliary strictures. Four patients had intrahepatic stones. Biliary strictures were treated by implantation of Palmaz stents in 5 of 6 patients with anastomotic strictures, and in 3 of 6 patients with nonanastomotic strictures. The intrahepatic stones were fragmented with dye laser lithotripsy under cholangioscopic control in 3 of 4 patients. One spontaneous stent migration after 24 months and one stent occlusion were observed; the remaining stents are still patent. Patients with anastomotic strictures had a more favorable outcome: 5 of 6 of these patients are still alive and symptom-free after an average of 27.4 months, but only 3 of 6 patients with nonanastomotic strictures are alive after an average of 9.8 months. Conclusion: The different outcomes in patients with anastomotic versus nonanastomotic strictures may be explained by the different causes of these types of stricture.

  12. Kinetic analysis of biliary lipid excretion in man and dog.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, C I; Trotman, B W; Soloway, R D

    1976-01-01

    To understand better the mechanisms involved in biliary lipid excretion and to evaluate their role in cholesterol gallstone formation, the rates of biliary excretion of bile salts, cholesterol, and phospholipids were measured in two species, man and dog. Seven cholecystectomized patients with balloon-occludable reinfusion T-tubes were studied during intact and interrupted enterohepatic circulation and four cholecystectomized dogs were studied during interrupted enterohepatic circulation. In man and dog both cholesterol and phospholipid outputs were hyperbolically related to bile salt output by the equation y = x/(a + bx). The output curves intersected the origin and showed an initial rapid rise, followed by a slower increase to a maximum, suggesting a rate-limited mechanism. The shape of the curves permitted calculation of the theoretical maximal outputs and the rates of rise to those outputs. Comparison of these values showed that in both man and dog phospholipid output was greater than cholesterol output and that cholesterol and phospholipid were excreted at different rates. These studies (a) indicate that cholesterol, phospholipids, and bile salts are not excreted in a fixed relationship and (b) demonstrate the usefulness of the derived theoretical maximal lipid output, and the rate of rise of lipid excretion to a maximum, in evaluating the kinetics of biliary lipid excretion. PMID:943421

  13. Pathogenesis of biliary atresia: defining biology to understand clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Akihiro; Miethke, Alexander; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a severe cholangiopathy of early infancy that destroys extrahepatic bile ducts and disrupts bile flow. With a poorly defined disease pathogenesis, treatment consists of the surgical removal of duct remnants followed by hepatoportoenterostomy. Although this approach can improve the short-term outcome, the liver disease progresses to end-stage cirrhosis in most children. Further improvement in outcome will require a greater understanding of the mechanisms of biliary injury and fibrosis. Here, we review progress in the field, which has been fuelled by collaborative studies in larger patient cohorts and the development of cell culture and animal model systems to directly test hypotheses. Advances include the identification of phenotypic subgroups and stages of disease based on clinical, pathological and molecular features. Stronger evidence exists for viruses, toxins and gene sequence variations in the aetiology of biliary atresia, triggering a proinflammatory response that injures the duct epithelium and produces a rapidly progressive cholangiopathy. The immune response also activates the expression of type 2 cytokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production by nonparenchymal cells. These advances provide insight into phenotype variability and might be relevant to the design of personalized trials to block progression of liver disease. PMID:26008129

  14. Biliary parasitic diseases including clonorchiasis, opisthorchiasis and fascioliasis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Hoon; Mairiang, Eimorn; Ahn, Geung Hwan

    2008-01-01

    Parasitic infection of the biliary tree is caused by liver flukes, namely Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini. These flukes reside in the peripheral small bile ducts of the liver and produce chronic inflammation of the bile duct, bile duct dilatation, mechanical obstruction, and bile duct wall thickening. On imaging, peripheral small intrahepatic bile ducts are dilated, but the large bile ducts and extrahepatic bile ducts are not dilated or slightly dilated. There is no visible caused of obstruction. Sometimes, in heavy infection, adult flukes are demonstrated on sonography, CT or MR cholangiography as small intraluminal lesions. The flukes in the gallbladder may appear as floating, small objects on sonography. Chronic infection may result in cholangiocarcinoma of the liver parenchyma or along the bile ducts. Human infection of Fasciola hepatica, a cattle flukes, may occur inadvertently, and the flukes migrate in the liver (hepatic phase) and reside the bile ducts (biliary phase). Image findings in the hepatic phase present with multiple, small, clustered, necrotic cavities or abscesses in the peripheral parts of the liver, showing "tunnels and caves" sign, reflecting parasite migration in the liver parenchyma. In the biliary phase, the flukes are demonstrated in the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts and the gallbladder as small intraluminal flat objects, sometimes moving spontaneously. Bile ducts are dilated.

  15. Radiation Therapy for Primary Carcinoma of the Extrahepatic Biliary System

    PubMed Central

    Flickinger, John C.; Epstein, Alan H.; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Carr, Brian I.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    From 1976 to 1988, 63 patients received radiation therapy for primary cancers of the extrahepatic biliary system (eight gallbladder and 55 extrahepatic biliary duct). Twelve patients underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. Chemotherapy was administered to 13 patients. Three patients underwent intraluminal brachytherapy alone (range, 28 to 55 Gy). Sixty patients received megavoltage external-beam radiation therapy (range, 5.4 to 61.6 Gy; median, 45 Gy), of whom nine received additional intraluminal brachytherapy (range, 14 to 45 Gy; median, 30 Gy). The median survival of all patients was 7 months. Sixty patients died, all within 39 months of radiation therapy. One patient is alive 11 months after irradiation without surgical resection, and two are alive 50 months after liver transplantation and irradiation. Symptomatic duodenal ulcers developed after radiation therapy in seven patients but were not significantly related to any clinical variable tested. Extrahepatic biliary duct cancers, the absence of metastases, increasing calendar year of treatment, and liver transplantation with postoperative radiation therapy were factors significantly associated with improved survival. PMID:2070327

  16. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  17. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resected Extrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) for patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer treated with curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 168 patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer undergoing curative resection between August 2001 and April 2009. Of the 168 patients, 115 received adjuvant CRT (CRT group) and 53 did not (no-CRT group). Gender, age, tumor size, histologic differentiation, pre- and postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level, resection margin, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, T stage, N stage, overall stage, and the use of adjuvant CRT were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors associated with LRC, DFS, and OS. Results: For all patients, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rate was 54.8%, 30.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rates in the CRT group were significantly better than those in the no-CRT group (58.5% vs. 44.4%, p = .007; 32.1% vs. 26.1%, p = .041; 36.5% vs. 28.2%, p = .049, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant CRT was a significant independent prognostic factor for LRC, DFS, and OS (p < .05). Conclusion: Our results have suggested that adjuvant CRT helps achieve LRC and, consequently, improves DFS and OS in patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer.

  18. [Social pain].

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Naohito; Shimoyama, Megumi

    2011-09-01

    This chapter focuses on what social pain is and how it should be managed. In order to understand social pain in a cancer patient, it is necessary to recognize the change in the patient's daily life after the diagnosis of cancer. Because the degree of suffering and the relationships with family members and the people he or she worked with differ from patient to patient, it is important to note that the context of social pain is different in each patient. Five points shown below are essential in managing social pain. 1. Economical suffering may be alleviated by utilization of the social security system while taking into account each patient's standard of living. 2. Burdens on family members should be lessened, such as by not having them stay at the patient's bedside every day and letting them go home occasionally. 3. The normal patterns of communication, support, and conflict in the family should be identified, and the extent to which they have been disrupted by the illness should be assessed. 4. It is important to understand the ethnic, cultural, and religious background of the patient and the potential impact of their influence on the individual and the illness. 5. Practical or emotional unfinished business that the patient has needs to be identified, and efforts should be made to support fulfillment.

  19. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20-30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 22 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: a low-fat diet, antibiotics, bromocriptine, danazol, diuretics, evening primrose oil, gestrinone, gonadorelin analogues, hormone replacement therapy, lisuride, progestogens, pyridoxine, tamoxifen, tibolone, topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, toremifene, and vitamin E. PMID:19454068

  20. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20% to 30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 24 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, bromocriptine, combined oral contraceptive pill, danazol, diuretics, evening primrose oil, gestrinone, gonadorelin analogues, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), lisuride, low-fat diet, progestogens, pyridoxine, tamoxifen, tibolone, topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), toremifene, and vitamin E. PMID:21477394

  1. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20% to 30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to February 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 11 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: bra wearing, combined oral contraceptive pill, danazol, gonadorelin analogues, progestogens, tamoxifen, and topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

  2. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  3. Multidrug resistance p-glycoprotein 2 is essential for the biliary excretion of indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Vore, M

    2001-05-01

    Multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein 2 (Mdr2) is a phospholipid translocator in the canalicular membrane that is essential for the formation of biliary phospholipid vesicles and mixed lipid/bile salt micelles. Incorporation into biliary vesicles and micelles is thought to contribute to the hepatobiliary excretion of certain hydrophobic organic anions, such as indocyanine green (ICG). The present studies characterized the biliary excretion of two hydrophobic organic anions, ICG and estradiol-17beta(beta-D-glucuronide) (E(2)17G), in the single-pass isolated perfused liver and the biliary excretion of glutathione (GSH) in vivo in wild-type and Mdr2-/- female mice. The biliary excretion of ICG (0.4 micromol) was reduced by 90%, while the biliary excretion of total GSH was decreased by 65% in Mdr2-/- mice relative to wild-type mice. In contrast, the biliary excretion of E(2)17G (0.1 micromol) was increased by 30% in Mdr2-/- mice. These data indicate that the absence of Mdr2 differentially influences the biliary excretion of these organic anions and suggest that phospholipid vesicles and mixed micelles in bile are essential for the biliary excretion of ICG.

  4. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  5. Transjugular Insertion of Biliary Stents (TIBS) in Two Patients with Malignant Obstruction, Ascites, and Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Amygdalos, Michael A.; Haskal, Ziv J.; Cope, Constantin; Kadish, Steven L.; Long, William B.

    1996-03-15

    Two patients with pancreatic malignancies presented with biliary obstruction which could not be treated from an endoscopic approach. Standard transhepatic biliary drainage was relatively contraindicated because of moderate ascites and coagulopathy related to underlying liver disease. In one patient, a transjugular, transvenous approach was used to deliver a Wallstent endoprosthesis across the distal common bile duct obstruction in a single step procedure. In the second case, a previously placed biliary Wallstent was revised with an additional stent from a similar approach. Transjugular biliary catheterization offers a valuable alternative approach for primary stent placement or revision in patients with contraindication to standard transhepatic drainage.

  6. A new framework for reverse cholesterol transport: Non-biliary contributions to reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Ryan E; Brown, J Mark

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol through statin therapy has only modestly decreased coronary heart disease (CHD)-associated mortality in developed countries, which has prompted the search for alternative therapeutic strategies for CHD. Major efforts are now focused on therapies that augment high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and ultimately increase the fecal disposal of cholesterol. The process of RCT has long been thought to simply involve HDL-mediated delivery of peripheral cholesterol to the liver for biliary excretion out of the body. However, recent studies have revealed a novel pathway for RCT that does not rely on biliary secretion. This non-biliary pathway rather involves the direct excretion of cholesterol by the proximal small intestine. Compared to RCT therapies that augment biliary sterol loss, modulation of non-biliary fecal sterol loss through the intestine is a much more attractive therapeutic strategy, given that excessive biliary cholesterol secretion can promote gallstone formation. However, we are at an early stage in understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating the non-biliary pathway for RCT, and much additional work is required in order to effectively target this pathway for CHD prevention. The purpose of this review is to discuss our current understanding of biliary and non-biliary contributions to RCT with particular emphasis on the possibility of targeting the intestine as an inducible cholesterol secretory organ. PMID:21157970

  7. Primary biliary cirrhosis-specific autoantibodies in first degree relatives of Greek primary biliary cirrhosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Zografos, Theodoros A; Gatselis, Nikolaos; Zachou, Kalliopi; Liaskos, Christos; Gabeta, Stella; Koukoulis, George K; Dalekos, George N

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and significance of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC)-specific autoantibodies in first-degree relatives (FDRs) of Greek PBC patients. METHODS: The presence of antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) and PBC-specific antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were determined using indirect immunofluorescence assays, dot-blot assays, and molecularly based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 101 asymptomatic for liver-related symptoms FDRs of 44 PBC patients. In order to specify our results, the same investigation was performed in 40 healthy controls and in a disease control group consisting of 40 asymptomatic for liver-related symptoms FDRs of patients with other autoimmune liver diseases namely, autoimmune hepatitis-1 or primary sclerosing cholangitis (AIH-1/PSC). RESULTS: AMA positivity was observed in 19 (only 4 with abnormal liver function tests) FDRs of PBC patients and none of the healthy controls. The prevalence of AMA was significantly higher in FDRs of PBC patients than in AIH-1/PSC FDRs and healthy controls [18.8%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 12%-28.1% vs 2.5%, 95% CI: 0.1%-14.7%, P = 0.01; 18.8%, 95% CI: 12%-28.1% vs 0%, 95% CI: 0%-10.9%, P = 0.003, respectively]. PBC-specific ANA positivity was observed in only one FDR from a PSC patient. Multivariate analysis showed that having a proband with PBC independently associated with AMA positivity (odds ratio: 11.24, 95% CI: 1.27-25.34, P = 0.03) whereas among the investigated comorbidities and risk factors, a positive past history for urinary tract infections (UTI) was also independently associated with AMA detection in FDRs of PBC patients (odds ratio: 3.92, 95% CI: 1.25-12.35, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: In FDRs of Greek PBC patients, AMA prevalence is significantly increased and independently associated with past UTI. PBC-specific ANA were not detected in anyone of PBC FDRs. PMID:23002341

  8. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... related activities for a few days during each menstrual cycle. Painful menstruation is the leading cause of lost ... when did the pain begin? When in your menstrual cycle do you experience the pain? Is the pain ...

  9. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  10. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... Pain During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  11. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  12. B cell deficient mice are protected from biliary obstruction in the rotavirus-induced mouse model of biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Tucker, Rebecca M; Fenner, Erika K; Pelanda, Roberta; Mack, Cara L

    2013-01-01

    A leading theory regarding the pathogenesis of biliary atresia (BA) is that bile duct injury is initiated by a virus infection, followed by an autoimmune response targeting bile ducts. In experimental models of autoimmune diseases, B cells have been shown to play an important role. The aim of this study was to determine the role of B cells in the development of biliary obstruction in the Rhesus rotavirus (RRV)-induced mouse model of BA. Wild-type (WT) and B cell-deficient (Ig-α(-/-)) mice received RRV shortly after birth. Ig-α(-/-) RRV-infected mice had significantly increased disease-free survival rate compared to WT RRV-infected BA mice (76.8% vs. 17.5%). In stark contrast to the RRV-infected BA mice, the RRV-infected Ig-α(-/-) mice did not have hyperbilirubinemia or bile duct obstruction. The RRV-infected Ig-α(-/-) mice had significantly less liver inflammation and Th1 cytokine production compared to RRV-infected WT mice. In addition, Ig-α(-/-) mice had significantly increased numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs) at baseline and after RRV infection compared to WT mice. However, depletion of Tregs in Ig-α(-/-) mice did not induce biliary obstruction, indicating that the expanded Tregs in the Ig-α(-/-) mice were not the sole reason for protection from disease. Conclusion : B cell deficient Ig-α(-/-) mice are protected from biliary obstruction in the RRV-induced mouse model of BA, indicating a primary role of B cells in mediating disease pathology. The mechanism of protection may involve lack of B cell antigen presentation, which impairs T-cell activation and Th1 inflammation. Immune modulators that inhibit B cell function may be a new strategy for treatment of BA.

  13. Classification of biliary tract cancers established by the Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery: 3(rd) English edition.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masaru; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Miyakawa, Shuichi; Nagino, Masato; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Kokudo, Norihiro; Sano, Keiji; Endo, Itaru; Unno, Michiaki; Chijiiwa, Kazuo; Horiguchi, Akihiko; Kinoshita, Hisafumi; Oka, Masaaki; Kubota, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Masanori; Uemoto, Shinji; Shimada, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Inui, Kazuo; Tazuma, Susumu; Furuse, Junji; Yanagisawa, Akio; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kijima, Hiroshi; Takada, Tadahiro

    2015-03-01

    The 3(rd) English edition of the Japanese classification of biliary tract cancers was released approximately 10 years after the 5(th) Japanese edition and the 2(nd) English edition. Since the first Japanese edition was published in 1981, the Japanese classification has been in extensive use, particularly among Japanese surgeons and pathologists, because the cancer status and clinical outcomes in surgically resected cases have been the main objects of interest. However, recent advances in the diagnosis, management and research of the disease prompted the revision of the classification that can be used by not only surgeons and pathologists but also by all clinicians and researchers, for the evaluation of current disease status, the determination of current appropriate treatment, and the future development of medical practice for biliary tract cancers. Furthermore, during the past 10 years, globalization has advanced rapidly, and therefore, internationalization of the classification was an important issue to revise the Japanese original staging system, which would facilitate to compare the disease information among institutions worldwide. In order to achieve these objectives, the new Japanese classification of the biliary tract cancers principally adopted the 7(th) edition of staging system developed by the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). However, because there are some points pending in these systems, several distinctive points were also included for the purpose of collection of information for the future optimization of the staging system. Free mobile application of the new Japanese classification of the biliary tract cancers is available via http://www.jshbps.jp/en/classification/cbt15.html. PMID:25691463

  14. Classification of biliary tract cancers established by the Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery: 3(rd) English edition.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masaru; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Miyakawa, Shuichi; Nagino, Masato; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Kokudo, Norihiro; Sano, Keiji; Endo, Itaru; Unno, Michiaki; Chijiiwa, Kazuo; Horiguchi, Akihiko; Kinoshita, Hisafumi; Oka, Masaaki; Kubota, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Masanori; Uemoto, Shinji; Shimada, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Inui, Kazuo; Tazuma, Susumu; Furuse, Junji; Yanagisawa, Akio; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kijima, Hiroshi; Takada, Tadahiro

    2015-03-01

    The 3(rd) English edition of the Japanese classification of biliary tract cancers was released approximately 10 years after the 5(th) Japanese edition and the 2(nd) English edition. Since the first Japanese edition was published in 1981, the Japanese classification has been in extensive use, particularly among Japanese surgeons and pathologists, because the cancer status and clinical outcomes in surgically resected cases have been the main objects of interest. However, recent advances in the diagnosis, management and research of the disease prompted the revision of the classification that can be used by not only surgeons and pathologists but also by all clinicians and researchers, for the evaluation of current disease status, the determination of current appropriate treatment, and the future development of medical practice for biliary tract cancers. Furthermore, during the past 10 years, globalization has advanced rapidly, and therefore, internationalization of the classification was an important issue to revise the Japanese original staging system, which would facilitate to compare the disease information among institutions worldwide. In order to achieve these objectives, the new Japanese classification of the biliary tract cancers principally adopted the 7(th) edition of staging system developed by the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). However, because there are some points pending in these systems, several distinctive points were also included for the purpose of collection of information for the future optimization of the staging system. Free mobile application of the new Japanese classification of the biliary tract cancers is available via http://www.jshbps.jp/en/classification/cbt15.html.

  15. Mononuclear cell complement receptor blockade in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aghbar, M N; Neuberger, J; Williams, R; Eddleston, A L

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood monocyte and lymphocyte receptors for Fc and C3b fragments were examined in vitro in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases using sheep red blood cells coated with anti-SRBC IgG1 (to detect Fc receptors) and with anti-SRBC IgM and complement (to detect C3b receptors). The number of C3b receptors detected on 100 monocytes was significantly lower in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (23.0 +/- 12.0, mean +/- 1 SD) compared with normal controls (57.4 +/- 16.9) and other chronic liver disease (HBsAg negative chronic active hepatitis 62.0 +/- 17.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 50.9 +/- 4.0), while the number of Fc receptors detected on 100 monocytes was not significantly different in all the groups (primary biliary cirrhosis 72.8 +/- 28.6, chronic active hepatitis 74.7 +/- 14.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 58.0 +/- 13.5 and normal controls 69.6 +/- 19.9). When mononuclear cells isolated from normal individuals were pre-incubated with serum from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis before testing their receptor function there was a significant reduction in the number of C3b receptors detected per 100 monocytes (27.6 +/- 10.8) compared with pre-incubation with normal serum (72.0 +/- 18.0). This reduction in C3b-receptor function was again observed when the serum used for pre-incubation was depleted of circulating immune complexes; but when complement was further depleted from these sera, the number of C3b-receptors detected after pre-incubation was similar to normal values (64.0 +/- 11.8). Lymphocyte receptors showed a similar pattern of results. This implies a specific C3b receptor blockade on monocytes and lymphocytes from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis which appears to be because of blocking by serum factor(s) including complement fragments. PMID:3155513

  16. Biliary self-expandable metallic stent for unresectable malignant distal biliary obstruction: which is better: covered or uncovered?

    PubMed

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    Self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) are a widely accepted biliary endoprosthesis for patients with unresectable malignant distal biliary obstruction. There are two types of SEMS: covered and uncovered. Uncovered SEMS (UCSEMS) embed into the biliary wall due to their mesh structure and self-expandability, and are resistant to migration. However, the disadvantage of UCSEMS is occlusion due to tumor ingrowth (TI) via the stent mesh, and TI is the main cause of UCSEMS occlusion. To overcome this, covered SEMS (CSEMS) were developed and showed longer patency than UCSEMS. However, migration due to the non-embedded stent body is the main cause of CSEMS dysfunction. There are some randomized studies comparing CSEMS and UCSEMS; however, the results are different according to each study. From one meta-analysis, CSEMS showed longer patency than UCSEMS. A literature review revealed that covered SEMS showed longer patency than UCSEMS. Some studies cannot clearly demonstrate the superiority of CSEMS, as the CSEMS used did not prevent TI or migration. Mechanical properties of SEMS may influence the occurrence of complications. A recent clinical study comparing the Covered Wallstent and the Covered WallFlex revealed superiority of the WallFlex for the prevention of migration. Reducing the axial force and increasing the radial force may lead to good results. Migration of CSEMS should be prevented by taking into consideration the mechanical properties of stents and development of anti-migration systems.

  17. Influence of curcumin on cyclosporin-induced reduction of biliary bilirubin and cholesterol excretion and on biliary excretion of cyclosporin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Deters, M; Siegers, C; Hänsel, W; Schneider, K P; Hennighausen, G

    2000-06-01

    We investigated the ability of curcumin, which can be extracted from different Curcuma species, to prevent cyclosporin-induced reduction of biliary bilirubin and cholesterol excretion, and its influence on biliary excretion of cyclosporin (CS) and its metabolites in the bile fistula model in rats. I.v. injection of curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg) after 30 min increased dose-dependently basal bile flow (30 microliters/kg/min) up to 200%, biliary bilirubin excretion (3000 pmol/kg/min) up to 150%, and biliary cholesterol excretion (22 nmol/kg/min) up to 113%. CS (30 mg/kg) reduced bile flow to 66% and biliary excretion of bilirubin and of cholesterol to 33% of the basal value 30 min after i.v. injection. I.v. administration of curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg) 30 min after CS increased bile flow dose dependently again to 130% for 1 hour and biliary excretion of cholesterol and of bilirubin to 100% of the basal value for 30 and 150 min, respectively. Injection of curcumin 15 min before CS prevented the CS-induced drop of bile flow at 50 mg/kg and reduction of biliary bilirubin excretion already at 25 mg/kg until the end of the experiment (180 min). The CS-induced reduction of biliary cholesterol excretion, however, was not prevented by curcumin. Finally, the biliary excretions of CS (1200 ng/kg/min) and its metabolites (1200 ng/kg/min) were slightly reduced by curcumin at a dose of 50 mg/kg (to 83% of the initial values). The clinical importance of these controversial effects remains to be shown.

  18. Understanding pain, part 2: pain management.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Helen

    This article is the second in a two-part series which explores pain and its management from a physiological perspective. Nurses play an important role in assessing and managing pain. Effective pain management by nurses requires them to have an understanding of the biological basis of the pain interventions which may be used to control pain. This article emphasizes the importance of pain assessment as a precursor for effective pain management and explores the biological basis of pain interventions which contribute to pain control. The role of non-pharmacological approaches in alleviating pain and their actions which contribute to pain relief are explored. The three main types of pharmaceutical agents used, non-opioids, opioids and adjuvant drugs, are introduced and their mechanisms of actions discussed. PMID:16224328

  19. [Biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the surgical treatment concept of cholelithiasis].

    PubMed

    Meiser, G; Heinerman, M; Boeckl, O

    1990-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (BESWL) using the "Obertisch" module Lithostar Plus (Siemens AG) was carried out in 100 patients, comprising a total of 189 gallbladder stones with a size range from 8 to 35 mm. Chenodeoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acid was given as adjuvant litholytic therapy, beginning 14 days before treatment. 53% of the patients suffered from radiolucent solitary stones with an average size of 21 +/- 6 mm. 14% had more than 3 stones, another 12% had solitary stones with a small rim calcification. In 99 patients all stones could be disintegrated. In 90% we achieved a fragment size smaller than 5 mm, in 10% smaller than 8 mm. 68 patients were treated in a single session, in 32% a 2nd or 3rd treatment was necessary. In the average 4100 +/- 2200 shock-waves with energy level 9 (650 bar) were applied. During treatment 15 patients suffered from slight right kidney pain. In the following 48 hours after BESWL we observed a transitory significant elevation of transaminases (32%), urinary amylases without clinical symptoms (31%), bilirubin (31%) and white blood cells (71%). A microhematuria was seen in 33%, a macrohematuria in 2%. Post-BESWL sonographically we found a transitory edema of the gallbladder wall in 18%, in 15% a hydrops, in 10% a dilatation of the common bile duct and in 4% free fluid surrounding the gallbladder. After dismission 31% of the patients suffered from slight colicky pain. In 3 patients acute biliary pancreatitis was observed 4 and 8 weeks after BESWL which could be treated by EPT and endoscopic stone removal.

  20. Routine liver function tests and serum amylase determinations after biliary lithotripsy: are they necessary?

    PubMed

    Goodacre, B W; Malone, D E; Fache, J S; Rawat, B; Burhenne, H J

    1990-10-01

    Shock-wave-induced soft-tissue damage after biliary extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (BESWL) has been reported. Every patient treated in Vancouver has, therefore, had liver function tests and serum amylase levels measured before and within 6 days after BESWL. All patients had symptomatic cholecystolithiasis with normal pre-BESWL biochemistry. Analysis of 311 patients after treatment with the Siemens Lithostar unit showed elevation of one or more laboratory value in 19% (60/311). Serum aspartate transaminase level was most frequently abnormal (38 cases). The majority of abnormalities were mild, less than two times normal levels. Clinically significant complications occurred in five patients (three pancreatitis, one cholecystitis, one common bile duct obstruction); four of these occurred 1 week or more after treatment. The results of routine laboratory tests could not be used to predict complications. No correlation was seen between abnormal values and number of shock waves administered or peak shock-wave pressure. Of 112 patients surveyed at the time of post-BESWL enzyme measurement, 49 (44%) reported a degree of pain, which was severe in eight cases. Presence of severe pain correlated strongly (p less than .001) with abnormal laboratory findings, however not with the degree of abnormality. As results of these laboratory tests are nonspecific, have not been shown to correlate with the degree of severity of BESWL-induced tissue damage, and do not predict complications, the tests are of little value in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms. These conclusions, however, apply only to the Siemens Lithostar Plus with patients treated in the steep left posterior oblique position. Cost savings can be expected if routine post-BESWL biochemical tests are abandoned.

  1. Pigment gallstone pathogenesis: slime production by biliary bacteria is more important than beta-glucuronidase production.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L; Ponce, R; Oesterle, A L; Griffiss, J M; Way, L W

    2000-01-01

    Pigment stones are thought to form as a result of deconjugation of bilirubin by bacterial beta-glucuronidase, which results in precipitation of calcium bilirubinate. Calcium bilirubinate is then aggregated into stones by an anionic glycoprotein. Slime (glycocalyx), an anionic glycoprotein produced by bacteria causing foreign body infections, has been implicated in the formation of the precipitate that blocks biliary stents. We previously showed that bacteria are present within the pigment portions of gallstones and postulated a bacterial role in pigment stone formation through beta-glucuronidase or slime production. Ninety-one biliary bacterial isolates from 61 patients and 12 control stool organisms were tested for their production of beta-glucuronidase and slime. The average slime production was 42 for biliary bacteria and 2.5 for stool bacteria (P <0.001). Overall, 73% of biliary bacteria and 8% of stool bacteria produced slime (optical density >3). In contrast, only 38% of biliary bacteria produced beta-glucuronidase. Eighty-two percent of all patients, 90% of patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones, 100% of patients with primary CBD stones, and 93% of patients with biliary tubes had one or more bacterial species in their stones that produced slime. By comparison, only 47% of all patients, 60% of patients with CBD stones, 62% of patients with primary CBD stones, and 50% of patients with biliary tubes had one or more bacteria that produced beta-glucuronidase. Most biliary bacteria produced slime, and slime production correlated better than beta-glucuronidase production did with stone formation and the presence of biliary tubes or stents. Patients with primary CBD stones and biliary tubes had the highest incidence of slime production. These findings suggest that bacterial slime is important in gallstone formation and the blockage of biliary tubes.

  2. Regulation of biliary cholesterol secretion in the rat. Role of hepatic cholesterol esterification.

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, F; Bronfman, M; Allalón, W; Depiereux, E; Del Pozo, R

    1984-01-01

    Although the significance of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in the solubilization and biliary excretion of cholesterol is well established, little is known about the intrahepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol output. Studies were undertaken to elucidate some of these determinants in the rat. Feeding 1% diosgenin for 1 wk increased biliary cholesterol output and saturation by 400%. Bile flow, biliary bile salt, phospholipid and protein outputs remained in the normal range. When ethynyl estradiol (EE) was injected into these animals, biliary cholesterol output decreased to almost normal levels under circumstances of minor changes in the rates of biliary bile salt and phospholipid outputs. Similarly, when chylomicron cholesterol was intravenously injected into diosgenin-fed animals, biliary cholesterol output significantly decreased as a function of the dose of chylomicron cholesterol administered. Relative rates of hepatic cholesterol synthesis and esterification were measured in isolated hepatocytes. Although hepatic cholesterogenesis increased 300% in diosgenin-fed animals, the contribution of newly synthesized cholesterol to total biliary cholesterol output was only 19 +/- 9%, compared with 12 +/- 6% in control and 15 +/- 5% in diosgenin-fed and EE-injected rats. The rate of oleate incorporation into hepatocytic cholesterol esters was 30% inhibited in diosgenin-fed rats. When EE was injected into these animals, the rate of cholesterol esterification increased to almost 300%. To investigate further the interrelationship between hepatic cholesterol esterification and biliary cholesterol output, we studied 21 diosgenin-fed rats. Six of them received in addition EE and 10 received chylomicron cholesterol. The relationships between biliary cholesterol output as a function of both microsomal acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity and hepatic cholesterol ester concentration were significantly correlated in a reciprocal manner. From these

  3. The origin of biliary ductular cells that appear in the spleen after transplantation of hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Kenji; Sugihara, Ayako; Nakasho, Keiji; Tsujimura, Tohru; Yamada, Naoko; Okaya, Atsuhito; Sakagami, Masafumi; Terada, Nobuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Transplantation of rat hepatocytes into the syngeneic rat spleen results in the appearance of cytokeration (CK)-19-positive biliary cells that form ductules. The exact origin of CK-19-positive cells is not known and the possibility that they are derived from biliary cells or precursors of oval cells in transplanted hepatocyte preparations has been raised. In the present study, we found that the number of CK-19-positive biliary cells increased rapidly after transplantation of hepatocytes, reached the maximum at 4 weeks, and then gradually decreased. However, a Ki-67 labeling index of CK-19-positive biliary cells was low and showed no significant changes throughout the experimental period. In addition, no or few CK-19-positive cells appeared in the spleen after transplantation of nonparenchymal liver cells enriched with biliary cells. These results showed that biliary cells were not the source of CK-19-positive cells in the spleen. Impairment of precursors of oval cells in the liver by administration of 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane 24 h before transplantation of hepatocytes did not prevent the appearance of CK-19-positive biliary cells in the spleen. Moreover, transplantation of nonparenchymal cells carrying an increased number of oval cells by means of treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial hepatectomy resulted in no appearance of CK-19-positive biliary cells in the spleen. These results ruled out oval cells as the origin of CK-19-positive biliary cells in the spleen. Because CK-19-positive biliary cells appeared in the spleen only when hepatocyte fractions were transplanted, we suggest transdifferentiation of heptocytes may be the mechanism by which CK-19-positive biliary cells are generated.

  4. Sequential algorithm analysis to facilitate selective biliary access for difficult biliary cannulation in ERCP: a prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous clinical trials to improve the success rate of biliary access in difficult biliary cannulation (DBC) during ERCP have been reported. However, standard guidelines or sequential protocol analysis according to different methods are limited in place. We planned to investigate a sequential protocol to facilitate selective biliary access for DBC during ERCP. Methods This prospective clinical study enrolled 711 patients with naïve papillae at a tertiary referral center. If wire-guided cannulation was deemed to have failed due to the DBC criteria, then according to the cannulation algorithm early precut fistulotomy (EPF; cannulation time > 5 min, papillary contacts > 5 times, or hook-nose-shaped papilla), double-guidewire cannulation (DGC; unintentional pancreatic duct cannulation ≥ 3 times), and precut after placement of a pancreatic stent (PPS; if DGC was difficult or failed) were performed sequentially. The main outcome measurements were the technical success, procedure outcomes, and complications. Results Initially, a total of 140 (19.7%) patients with DBC underwent EPF (n = 71) and DGC (n = 69). Then, in DGC group 36 patients switched to PPS due to difficulty criteria. The successful biliary cannulation rate was 97.1% (136/140; 94.4% [67/71] with EPF, 47.8% [33/69] with DGC, and 100% [36/36] with PPS; P < 0.001). The mean successful cannulation time (standard deviation) was 559.4 (412.8) seconds in EPF, 314.8 (65.2) seconds in DGC, and 706.0 (469.4) seconds in PPS (P < 0.05). The DGC group had a relatively low successful cannulation rate (47.8%) but had a shorter cannulation time compared to the other groups due to early switching to the PPS method in difficult or failed DGC. Post-ERCP pancreatitis developed in 14 (10%) patients (9 mild, 1 moderate), which did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.870) or compared with the conventional group (P = 0.125). Conclusions Based on the sequential protocol

  5. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  6. Shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shoulder pain covers a wide range of problems and affects up to 20% of the population. It is not a specific diagnosis. Shoulder pain can be caused by problems with the acromioclavicular joint, shoulder muscles, or referred pain from the neck. Rotator cuff problems account for 65-70% of cases of shoulder pain. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatment; topical drug treatment; local injections; non-drug treatment; and surgical treatment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to February 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 53 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: arthroscopic laser subacromial decompression, corticosteroid injections (intra-articular), corticosteroids (oral, subacromial injection), electrical stimulation, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, guanethidine (intra-articular), ice, laser treatment, manipulation under anaesthesia (plus intra-articular injection in people with frozen shoulder), multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation, nerve block, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral, topical or intra-articular injection), opioid analgesics, paracetamol, phonophoresis, physiotherapy (manual treatment, exercises), surgical arthroscopic decompression, transdermal glyceryl trinitrate, ultrasound.

  7. Shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Shoulder pain is a common problem with an estimated prevalence of 4% to 26%. About 1% of adults aged over 45 years consult their GP with a new presentation of shoulder pain every year in the UK. The aetiology of shoulder pain is diverse and includes pathology originating from the neck, glenohumeral joint, acromioclavicular joint, rotator cuff, and other soft tissues around the shoulder girdle. The most common source of shoulder pain is the rotator cuff, accounting for over two-thirds of cases. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatment, topical drug treatment, local injections, non-drug treatment, and surgical treatment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, arthroscopic subacromial decompression, autologous whole blood injection, corticosteroids (oral, subacromial injection, or intra-articular injection), electrical stimulation, excision of distal clavicle, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, ice, laser treatment, manipulation under anaesthesia, suprascapular nerve block, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral, topical or intra-articular injection), opioid analgesics, paracetamol, physiotherapy (manual treatment, exercises), platelet-rich plasma injection

  8. [The treatment of external biliary fistulae by means of lavage and continuous aspiration].

    PubMed

    Katergiannakis, V; Manouras, A; Xepapadakis, G; Pierrakakis, S; Papadopoulou, A; Karkanias, G; Apostolidis, N

    1990-10-15

    In 99% of cases external biliary fistulas are caused by liver and biliary tract surgery. The paper describes a new continuous aspiration of the fistula. This method was used to treat 18 patients and full closure of the fistula was achieved in 15 out of 18 patients.

  9. Double Sigmoid colon perforation due to migration of a biliary stent.

    PubMed

    Malgras, B; Pierret, C; Tourtier, J-P; Olagui, G; Nizou, C; Duverger, V

    2011-10-01

    Migration of pancreatico-biliary stents is a rare event, usually benign, but which can lead to severe complications such as digestive tube perforation. We report the case of a patient with double sigmoid perforation due to distal migration of a biliary stent placed to decompress a pancreatic head carcinoma.

  10. Duodenal diversion of percutaneous biliary drain through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, K M; Swaroop, V S; Desai, D C; Nagral, A; Jagannath, P; Desouza, L J; Kamble, M

    1991-10-01

    Occasionally, percutaneous biliary drainage is the only possible form of treatment in a patient with a malignant obstruction at the porta hepatis. We report on a case of gallbladder carcinoma with a complete block at the porta hepatis, which was palliated with a percutaneous biliary drain. Enteral reinfusion of bile was accomplished through a duodenal tube placed through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

  11. Biomarkers in bile-complementing advanced endoscopic imaging in the diagnosis of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Lourdusamy, Vennisvasanth; Tharian, Benjamin; Navaneethan, Udayakumar

    2015-01-01

    Biliary strictures present a diagnostic challenge and a conundrum, particularly when an initial work up including abdominal imaging and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography based sampling are non-diagnostic. Advances in endoscopic imaging have helped us diagnose these strictures better. However, even with modern technology, some strictures remain a diagnostic challenge. The proximity of bile fluid to the bile duct epithelia makes it an attractive option to investigate for bio-markers, which might be representative of the functions/abnormal changes taking place in the biliary system. A number of biomarkers in bile have been discovered recently in approaching biliary strictures with their potential future diagnostic utility, further supported by the immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tissue specimens. Novel biliary biomarkers especially carcinoembryonic cell adhesion molecule 6 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin seem promising in differentiating malignant from benign biliary strictures. Recent developments in lipidomic profiling of bile are also very promising. Biliary biomarkers appear to complement endoscopic imaging in diagnosing malignant etiologies of biliary stricture. Future studies addressing these biomarkers need to be incorporated to the current endoscopic techniques to determine the best approach in determining the etiology of biliary strictures. PMID:25901209

  12. Biliary stenting: indications, choice of stents and results: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) clinical guideline.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J-M; Tringali, A; Blero, D; Devière, J; Laugiers, R; Heresbach, D; Costamagna, G

    2012-03-01

    This article is part of a combined publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy about endoscopic biliary stenting. The present Clinical Guideline describes short-term and long-term results of biliary stenting depending on indications and stent models; it makes recommendations on when, how, and with which stent to perform biliary drainage in most common clinical settings, including in patients with a potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction and in those who require palliative drainage of common bile duct or hilar strictures. Treatment of benign conditions (strictures related to chronic pancreatitis, liver transplantation, or cholecystectomy, and leaks and failed biliary stone extraction) and management of complications (including stent revision) are also discussed. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. A separate Technology Review describes the models of biliary stents available and the stenting techniques, including advanced techniques such as insertion of multiple plastic stents, drainage of hilar strictures, retrieval of migrated stents and combined stenting in malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions.The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes digestive endoscopists, gastroenterologists, oncologists, radiologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technology Review should be most useful to endoscopists who perform biliary drainage.

  13. Interventional Endoscopy Database for Pancreatico-biliary, Gastrointestinal and Esophageal Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Ampullary Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Bile Duct Disorders; Gallstones; Obstructive Jaundice; Pancreatic Disorders (Noncancerous); Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Barrett's Esophagus; Gastric Malignancies; Pancreatic Cancer; Pediatric Gastroenterology; Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Pseudocysts; Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis; Recurrent Pancreatitis; Cholangitis; Bile Leak; Biliary Strictures; Pancreatic Divisum; Biliary and Pancreatic Stones; Choledocholithiasis

  14. Prolonged exposure of cholestatic rats to complete dark inhibits biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuyan; Onori, Paolo; Meng, Fanyin; DeMorrow, Sharon; Venter, Julie; Francis, Heather; Franchitto, Antonio; Ray, Debolina; Kennedy, Lindsey; Greene, John; Renzi, Anastasia; Mancinelli, Romina; Gaudio, Eugenio; Glaser, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis are common features in cholestatic liver disease. Melatonin is synthesized by the pineal gland as well as the liver. Melatonin inhibits biliary hyperplasia of bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats. Since melatonin synthesis (by the enzyme serotonin N-acetyltransferase, AANAT) from the pineal gland increases after dark exposure, we hypothesized that biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis are diminished by continuous darkness via increased melatonin synthesis from the pineal gland. Normal or BDL rats (immediately after surgery) were housed with light-dark cycles or complete dark for 1 wk before evaluation of 1) the expression of AANAT in the pineal gland and melatonin levels in pineal gland tissue supernatants and serum; 2) biliary proliferation and intrahepatic bile duct mass, liver histology, and serum chemistry; 3) secretin-stimulated ductal secretion (functional index of biliary growth); 4) collagen deposition, liver fibrosis markers in liver sections, total liver, and cholangiocytes; and 5) expression of clock genes in cholangiocytes. In BDL rats exposed to dark there was 1) enhanced AANAT expression/melatonin secretion in pineal gland and melatonin serum levels; 2) improved liver morphology, serum chemistry and decreased biliary proliferation and secretin-stimulated choleresis; and 4) decreased fibrosis and expression of fibrosis markers in liver sections, total liver and cholangiocytes and reduced biliary expression of the clock genes PER1, BMAL1, CLOCK, and Cry1. Thus prolonged dark exposure may be a beneficial noninvasive therapeutic approach for the management of biliary disorders. PMID:25214401

  15. A novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles prolongs the unobstructed period and survival via anti-bacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fuchun; Ren, Zhigang; Chai, Qinming; Cui, Guangying; Jiang, Li; Chen, Hanjian; Feng, Zhiying; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Jian; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic biliary stricture causes life-threatening complications, such as jaundice, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) are gaining acceptance for treatments of benign biliary stricture and palliative management of malignant biliary obstructions. However, the high rate of FCSEMS obstruction limits their clinic use. In this study, we developed a novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and investigated its efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. We first identified properties of the AgNP complex using ultraviolet detection. The AgNP complex was stable without AgNP agglomeration, and Ag abundance was correspondingly increased with an increased bilayer number. The AgNP biliary stent demonstrated good performance in the spin-assembly method based on topographic observation. The AgNP biliary stent also exhibited a long-term anti-coagulation effect and a slow process of Ag+ release. In vitro anti-bacteria experiments indicated that the AgNP biliary stent exhibited high-efficiency anti-bacterial activity for both short- and long-term periods. Importantly, application of the AgNP biliary stent significantly prolonged the unobstructed period of the biliary system and improved survival in preclinical studies as a result of its anti-microbial activity and decreased granular tissue formation on the surface of the anastomotic biliary, providing a novel and effective treatment strategy for symptomatic biliary strictures. PMID:26883081

  16. Early endoscopic ultrasonography in acute biliary pancreatitis: A prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Anderloni, Andrea; Galeazzi, Marianna; Ballarè, Marco; Pagliarulo, Michela; Orsello, Marco; Del Piano, Mario; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical usefulness of early endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in the management of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP). METHODS: All consecutive patients entering the emergency department between January 2010 and December 2012 due to acute abdominal pain and showing biochemical and/or radiological findings consistent with possible ABP were prospectively enrolled. Patients were classified as having a low, moderate, or high probability of common bile duct (CBD) stones, according to the established risk stratification. Exclusion criteria were: gastrectomy or patient in whom the cause of biliary obstruction was already identified by ultrasonography. All enrolled patients underwent EUS within 48 h of their admission. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed immediately after EUS only in those cases with proven CBD stones or sludge. The following parameters were investigated: (1) clinical: age, sex, fever; (2) radiological: dilated CBD; and (3) biochemical: bilirubin, AST, ALT, gGT, ALP, amylase, lipasis, PCR. Association between presence of CBD stone at EUS and the individual predictors were assessed by univariate logistic regression. Predictors significantly associated with CBD stones (P < 0.05) were entered in a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients with pancreatitis were admitted to the emergency department between January 2010 and December 2012. After exclusion criteria a total of 71 patients (38 females, 53.5%, mean age 58 ± 20.12 years, range 27-89 years; 33 males, 46.5%, mean age 65 ± 11.86 years, range 41-91 years) were included in the present study. The probability of CBD stones was considered low in 21 cases (29%), moderate in 26 (37%), and high in the remaining 24 (34%). The 71 patients included in the study underwent EUS, which allowed for a complete evaluation of the target sites in all the cases. The procedure was completed in a mean time of 14.7 min (range 9-34 min), without

  17. Pain and Hand Function.

    PubMed

    Howland, Nicholas; Lopez, Mariela; Zhang, Andrew Y

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a unique somatosensory perception that can dramatically affect our ability to function. It is also a necessary perception, without which we would do irreparable damage to ourselves. In this article, the authors assess the impact of pain on function of the hand. Pain can be categorized into acute pain, chronic pain, and neuropathic pain. Hand function and objective measurements of hand function are analyzed as well as the impact of different types of pain on each of these areas.

  18. Role of endoscopy in the conservative management of biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lisotti, Andrea; Fusaroli, Pietro; Caletti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients receiving liver transplantation could be significantly affected by biliary complications, including strictures, leaks, stones and bilomas; early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions lead to markedly reduction in morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic gold standard is represented by conservative approaches, both endoscopic and percutaneous, based on the type of biliary reconstruction, the local availability of the procedures and specific expertise. In patients with previous transplantation, the difficult biliary access and the possible presence of concomitant complications (mainly strictures) further restrict the efficacy of the endoscopic and percutaneous treatments; on the other hand, surgery should generally be avoided because of the even increased morbidity and mortality due to technical and clinical issues. Here we review the most common biliary complications occurring after liver transplantation and discuss available treatment options including future perspectives such as endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary access in patients with Roux-en-Y choledocho-jejunostomy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for difficult stones. PMID:26730271

  19. Heterogeneity and stochastic growth regulation of biliary epithelial cells dictate dynamic epithelial tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kamimoto, Kenji; Kaneko, Kota; Kok, Cindy Yuet-Yin; Okada, Hajime; Miyajima, Atsushi; Itoh, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the intrahepatic biliary epithelial tissue plays key roles in liver regeneration, yet the cellular basis for this process remains unclear. We took an unbiased approach based on in vivo clonal labeling and tracking of biliary epithelial cells in the three-dimensional landscape, in combination with mathematical simulation, to understand their mode of proliferation in a mouse liver injury model where the nascent biliary structure formed in a tissue-intrinsic manner. An apparent heterogeneity among biliary epithelial cells was observed: whereas most of the responders that entered the cell cycle upon injury exhibited a limited and tapering growth potential, a select population continued to proliferate, making a major contribution in sustaining the biliary expansion. Our study has highlighted a unique mode of epithelial tissue dynamics, which depends not on a hierarchical system driven by fixated stem cells, but rather, on a stochastically maintained progenitor population with persistent proliferative activity. PMID:27431614

  20. Decreased gallbladder emptying in dogs with biliary sludge or gallbladder mucocele.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Taro; Ohno, Koichi; Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Nakashima, Ko; Fujino, Yasuhito; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Biliary sludge in dogs is dismissed commonly as an incidental finding. On the other hand, gallbladder mucocele is reported increasingly in dogs and can lead to biliary obstruction or gallbladder rupture. Cholestasis is suspected to play a role in development of sludge and mucoceles, though there are no data in dogs to support this. We investigated gallbladder emptying, a key factor in biliary flow, in dogs with mobile sludge, immobile sludge, or gallbladder mucocele and in healthy controls. Gallbladder ejection fraction estimated by ultrasonography was used as the index of gallbladder emptying. The ejection fraction at 60 min after eating was significantly decreased in all three abnormal groups. Moreover, all dogs with sludge or a mucocele had gallbladder distension. These changes were the greatest in the mucocele group. Thus, biliary stasis occurs not only in dogs with gallbladder mucocele but also in dogs with biliary sludge. Cholestasis may play a role in the pathogenesis or progression of these diseases in dogs.

  1. B CELL DEPLETION THERAPY EXACERBATES MURINE PRIMARY BILIARY CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Dhirapong, Amy; Lleo, Ana; Yang, Guo-Xiang; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn; Packard, Thomas A.; Cambier, John C.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Lindor, Keith; Coppel, Ross L.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is considered a model autoimmune disease due to the clinical homogeneity of patients and the classic hallmark of anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMAS). Indeed, the presence of AMAS is the most highly directed and specific autoantibody in autoimmune diseases. However, the contribution of B cells to the pathogenesis of PBC is unclear. Thus, although AMAs appear to interact with the biliary cell apotope and contribute to biliary pathology, there is no correlation of disease severity and titer of AMA. The recent development of well characterized mAbs specific for the B cell populations, anti-CD20 and anti-CD79, and the development of a well defined xenobiotic induced model of autoimmune cholangitis, prompted us to utilize these reagents and the model to address the contribution of B cells in the pathogenesis of murine PBC. Prior to the induction of autoimmune cholangitis, mice were treated with either anti-CD20, anti-CD79, or isotype matched control mAb and followed for B cell development, the appearance of AMAs, liver pathology and cytokine production. Results of the studies reported herein show that the in vivo depletion of B cells using either anti-CD20 or anti-CD79 led to the development of a more severe form of cholangitis than control mice which is in contrast with results from a number of other autoimmune models which have documented an important therapeutic role of B cell specific depletion. The anti-CD20/CD79 treated mice have increased liver T cell infiltrates and higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, our results reflect a novel disease protective role of B cells in PBC and suggest that B cell depletion therapy in humans with PBC should be approached with caution. PMID:21274873

  2. Effect of diethyl ether on the biliary excretion of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J B; Siegers, C P; Klaassen, C D

    1984-10-01

    The biliary and renal excretion of acetaminophen and its metabolites over 8 hr was determined in rats exposed to diethyl ether by inhalation for 1 hr. Additional rats were anesthetized with urethane (1 g/kg ip) while control animals were conscious throughout the experiment (surgery was performed under hexobarbital narcosis: 150 mg/kg ip; 30-min duration). The concentration of UDP-glucuronic acid was decreased 80% in livers from ether-anesthetized rats but was not reduced in urethane-treated animals when compared to that in control rats. The concentration of reduced glutathione was not affected by either urethane or diethyl ether. Basal bile flow was not altered by the anesthetic agents. Bile flow rate after acetaminophen injection (100 mg/kg iv) was increased slightly over basal levels for 2 hr in hexobarbital-treated control rats, was unaltered in urethane-anesthetized animals, and was decreased throughout the 8-hr experiment in rats exposed to diethyl ether for 1 hr. In control and urethane-anesthetized animals, approximately 30-35% of the total acetaminophen dose (100 mg/kg iv) was excreted into bile in 8 hr, while only 16% was excreted in rats anesthetized with diethyl ether. Urinary elimination (60-70% of the dose) was not altered by exposure to ether. Separation of metabolites by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography showed that ether decreased the biliary elimination of unchanged acetaminophen and its glucuronide, sulfate, and glutathione conjugates by 47, 40, 49, and 73%, respectively, as compared to control rats. Excretion of unchanged acetaminophen and the glutathione conjugate into bile was depressed in urethane-anesthetized animals by 45 and 66%, respectively, whereas elimination of the glucuronide and sulfate conjugates was increased by 27 and 50%, respectively. These results indicate that biliary excretion is influenced by the anesthetic agent and that diethyl ether depresses conjugation with sulfate and glutathione as well as glucuronic

  3. Management of biliary tract stones in heart transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Milas, M; Ricketts, R R; Amerson, J R; Kanter, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report their experience with biliary tract stones in adult and pediatric heart transplant patients, and review the current literature relative to this problem. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Prior studies in adults have noted that heart transplant patients frequently have cholelithiasis, but offer no consensus about treatment strategy. Few studies exist for pediatric heart transplant patients. A higher rate of hemolysis and cyclosporine-induced changes in bile metabolism may contribute to lithogenesis in this population. METHODS: A chart review was conducted for 211 patients who had heart transplants between January 1988 and September 1994 to determine prevalence of biliary tract stones, management strategies used, and outcome. RESULTS: Of 175 long-term heart transplant survivors, 52 (29.7%) had stones detected: 32.8% of adults (47/143) and 15.6% of children (5/32). The majority of patients (31) were diagnosed 4 months (mean) after transplantation; cholelithiasis developed in 10 of these patients (32%) within 11 months (median) after a negative ultrasound. Symptoms developed in 45% of patients. All patients underwent either elective (36) or urgent (6) cholecystectomy via an open (32) or laparoscopic (10) approach, or endoscopy for common bile duct stones (2). There were no deaths or complications during a follow-up period of up to 7 years. CONCLUSION: Heart transplant patients have a high prevalence of symptomatic biliary tract stone disease. They can be treated safely via an open or laparoscopic approach after transplantation. The authors recommend routine gallbladder ultrasound screening and elective cholecystectomy in the post-transplant period if stones are detected. Images Figure 4. PMID:8645048

  4. Pulmonary Manifestations among Patients with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Koksal, Deniz; Koksal, Aydin Seref; Gurakar, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease caused by diffuse inflammation, destruction and fibrosis of the intrahepatic bile ducts, ultimately leading to cirrhosis, portal hypertension and liver failure. The pathogenesis of PBC is incompletely understood, but current data suggest roles for genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. PBC is often thought of as an organ-specific autoimmune disease, which mainly targets the liver; however, lung tissue is also a site for autoimmune involvement of PBC. The pulmonary manifestations of PBC include abnormalities in gas transfer and pulmonary function, subclinical alveolitis, interstitial lung disease, granulomatous lung disease, airway disease, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary hemorrhage and pleural effusion. PMID:27777894

  5. Aetiology of biliary atresia: what is actually known?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease of unknown etiology and unpredictable outcome, even when there has been timely diagnosis and exemplary surgery. It has been the commonest indication for liver transplantation during childhood for the past 20 years. Hence much clinical and basic research has been directed at elucidating the origin and pathology of BA. This review summarizes the current clinical variations of BA in humans, its occasional appearance in animals and its various manifestations in the laboratory as an experimental model. PMID:23987231

  6. [RENTGENOENDOSCOPIC INTERVENTIONS FOR BILIARY OBSTRUCTION OF NON-TUMOR GENESIS].

    PubMed

    Nastashenko, L

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed the immediate and long-term results of endoscopic diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in patients on the non-tumor obstruction of the bile ducts. Application of the developed diagnostic algorithm using ultrasound, fistulocholangiography, computer and magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, diagnostic endoscopic papillosphincterotomy, instrumental revision of bile ducts, transduodenal holedohoscopy provided sensitive diagnostic reasons of non-tumor biliary obstruction to (94.2 +/- 1.7)%. Optimization of treatment strategy developed with the introduction of the clinic endobiliary endoscopic intervention has achieved positive results in 83.7% of patients, reducing the morbidity of 1.7%, mortality--0.9%.

  7. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Presenting with Mass and Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Frank, Amber A; Morse, Michael D; Smith, Benjamin R; Shaffer, Kitt

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of autoimmune pancreatitis in a 31-year-old man with signs and symptoms of biliary tract obstruction. Evaluation with sonography, computed tomography, and ultimately endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, demonstrated a 5 by 2 cm hypoechoic, hypodense mass near the head of the pancreas that extended into the porta hepatis. Common bile duct obstruction with proximal dilatation was present. Following fine needle aspiration of the mass, cytology showed findings consistent with autoimmune pancreatitis. Treatment with common bile duct stent was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms.

  8. [Association between chronic urinary tract infection and primary biliary cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Wang, J B; Wang, S

    2016-06-01

    The etiology of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) remains unclear, and at present, this disease is considered to be caused by the combined effect of genetic factors, infection, autoimmunity, and environmental factors. Since infection is the major cause for PBC, scholars have been focusing on the association between chronic microbial infection. Studies have shown that Escherichia coli is the most common bacterium for urinary tract infection (UTI), and recurrent UTI has been confirmed to be a risk factor for the development and progression of autoimmune liver diseases and is closely associated with PBC. This article investigates the association between UTI and PBC and possible mechanisms. PMID:27465958

  9. [Is ursodeoxycholic acid effective in primary biliary cirrhosis?].

    PubMed

    Rada, Gabriel; Mac-Namara, Macarena

    2014-09-24

    Ursodeoxycholic acid is considered as first line treatment in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Its mechanism of action in this disease is unknown and there is controversy about its clinical impact. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 19 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 16 studies. We combined the evidence using tables with summary of findings following the GRADE approach and concluded ursodeoxycholic acid may not have any effect on pruritus, and there is uncertainty about its effect on mortality, need for liver transplantation or on any other important outcome for the patient.

  10. Endoscopic management of biliary leaks after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Aslanian, Harry R

    2014-09-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the procedure of choice for management of symptomatic cholelithiasis. Although it has distinct advantages over open cholecystectomy, bile leak is more common. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is the diagnostic and therapeutic modality of choice for management of postcholecystectomy bile leaks and has a high success rate with the placement of plastic biliary stents. Repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with placement of multiple plastic stents, a covered metal stent, or possibly cyanoacrylate therapy may be effective in refractory cases. This review will discuss the indications, efficacy, and complications of endoscopic therapy.

  11. Impacted and Fractured Biliary Basket: A Second Basket Rescue Technique.

    PubMed

    Benatta, Mohammed Amine; Desjeux, Ariane; Barthet, Marc; Grimaud, Jean Charles; Gasmi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman was treated with ERCP, ES, and biliary plastic stent, for large and multiple common bile duct stones. During a second ERCP basket extraction was impacted with a round entrapped stone. The basket handle was cut off; a metal sheath of extraendoscopic lithotriptor was advanced over the basket. The mechanical lithotripsy was complicated with basket traction wires fracturing, without breakage of the stone. A rescue standard basket was pushed until it caught the basket/stone complex. Using this method disengagement of the whole fractured basket/stone complex was achieved without need of surgery. It is the third case reported in the English literature. PMID:27293442

  12. Current diagnosis and treatment of benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Inseok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Han, Sok Won

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) remain a significant biliary complication and play an important role in graft and patient survival. Benign biliary strictures after transplantation are classified into anastomotic or non-anastomotic strictures. These two types differ in presentation, outcome, and response to therapy. The leading causes of biliary strictures include impaired blood supply, technical errors during surgery, and biliary anomalies. Because patients usually have non-specific symptoms, a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Magnetic resonance cholangiography has gained widespread acceptance as a reliable noninvasive tool for detecting biliary complications. Endoscopy has played an increasingly prominent role in the diagnosis and treatment of biliary strictures after LDLT. Endoscopic management in LDLT recipients may be more challenging than in deceased donor liver transplantation patients because of the complex nature of the duct-to-duct reconstruction. Repeated aggressive endoscopic treatment with dilation and the placement of multiple plastic stents is considered the first-line treatment for biliary strictures. Percutaneous and surgical treatments are now reserved for patients for whom endoscopic management fails and for those with multiple, inaccessible intrahepatic strictures or Roux-en-Y anastomoses. Recent advances in enteroscopy enable treatment, even in these latter cases. Direct cholangioscopy, another advanced form of endoscopy, allows direct visualization of the inner wall of the biliary tree and is expected to facilitate stenting or stone extraction. Rendezvous techniques can be a good option when the endoscopic approach to the biliary stricture is unfeasible. These developments have resulted in almost all patients being managed by the endoscopic approach. PMID:26819525

  13. Isolation and purification of human biliary vesicles with potent cholesterol-nucleation-promoting activity.

    PubMed

    Miquel, J F; Rigotti, A; Rojas, E; Brandan, E; Nervi, F

    1992-02-01

    1. Cholesterol nucleation is a critical step in the formation of cholesterol gallstones. This nucleation takes place after aggregation and fusion of cholesterol-rich biliary vesicles, a process probably modulated by biliary proteins. The present study was conducted to identify specific proteins associated with native cholesterol-rich biliary vesicles and to explore their effect on the cholesterol-nucleation time of supersaturated artificial bile. 2. Hepatic bile was obtained from six patients with cholesterol gallstone disease. Biliary vesicles were isolated by ultracentrifugation and were purified by gel filtration chromatography. A small amount of protein (less than 1% by weight) remained associated with the purified cholesterol-rich biliary vesicles. The electrophoretic profile of these proteins was remarkably similar in all six patients, showing the presence of at least six polypeptides (of molecular mass from 52 to 200 kDa), five of them having carbohydrate residues (except the 52 kDa one). The effect of reconstituted biliary vesicle solutions, containing their specific vesicular proteins, on cholesterol-nucleation time was studied by mixing the vesicle solution with artificial supersaturated bile. A potent cholesterol-pronucleating activity, reflected in a 20-70% reduction in nucleation time, was present in the biliary vesicle solutions compared with control solutions having a similar lipid composition. The pronucleating activity disappeared on heating and was not detected in the micellar fraction containing the major proportion of biliary proteins. 3. These results indicate that cholesterol-rich biliary vesicles containing a unique and defined glycoprotein profile can be isolated and purified from human hepatic bile. The potent cholesterol-pronucleating activity of the biliary vesicles from patients with gallstones was unrelated to their lipid composition or cholesterol content.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Current diagnosis and treatment of benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Inseok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Han, Sok Won

    2016-01-28

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) remain a significant biliary complication and play an important role in graft and patient survival. Benign biliary strictures after transplantation are classified into anastomotic or non-anastomotic strictures. These two types differ in presentation, outcome, and response to therapy. The leading causes of biliary strictures include impaired blood supply, technical errors during surgery, and biliary anomalies. Because patients usually have non-specific symptoms, a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Magnetic resonance cholangiography has gained widespread acceptance as a reliable noninvasive tool for detecting biliary complications. Endoscopy has played an increasingly prominent role in the diagnosis and treatment of biliary strictures after LDLT. Endoscopic management in LDLT recipients may be more challenging than in deceased donor liver transplantation patients because of the complex nature of the duct-to-duct reconstruction. Repeated aggressive endoscopic treatment with dilation and the placement of multiple plastic stents is considered the first-line treatment for biliary strictures. Percutaneous and surgical treatments are now reserved for patients for whom endoscopic management fails and for those with multiple, inaccessible intrahepatic strictures or Roux-en-Y anastomoses. Recent advances in enteroscopy enable treatment, even in these latter cases. Direct cholangioscopy, another advanced form of endoscopy, allows direct visualization of the inner wall of the biliary tree and is expected to facilitate stenting or stone extraction. Rendezvous techniques can be a good option when the endoscopic approach to the biliary stricture is unfeasible. These developments have resulted in almost all patients being managed by the endoscopic approach. PMID:26819525

  15. A case of biliary stones and anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplant treated with the rendez - vous technique and electrokinetic lithotritor

    PubMed Central

    Pisa, Marta Di; Traina, Mario; Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Volpes, Riccardo; Piazza, Salvatore; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The paper studies the combined radiologic and endoscopic approach (rendez vous technique) to the treatment of the biliary complications following liver transplant. The “rendez-vous” technique was used with an electrokinetic lithotripter, in the treatment of a biliary anastomotic stricture with multiple biliary stones in a patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplant. In this patient, endoscopic or percutaneous transhepatic management of the biliary complication failed. The combined approach, percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic treatment (rendez-vous technique) with the use of an electrokinetic lithotritor, was used to solve the biliary stenosis and to remove the stones. Technical success, defined as disappearance of the biliary stenosis and stone removal, was obtained in just one session, which definitively solved the complications. The combined approach of percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic (rendez-vous technique) treatment, in association with an electrokinetic lithotritor, is a safe and feasible alternative treatment, especially after the failure of endoscopic and/or percutaneous trans-hepatic isolated procedures. PMID:18473423

  16. Postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Lovich-Sapola, Jessica; Smith, Charles E; Brandt, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Prevention and control of postoperative pain are essential. Inadequate treatment of postoperative pain continues to be a major problem after many surgeries and leads to worse outcomes, including chronic postsurgical pain. Optimal management of postoperative pain requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of pain, methods available to reduce pain, invasiveness of the procedure, and patient factors associated with increased pain, such as anxiety, depression, catastrophizing, and neuroticism. Use of a procedure-specific, multimodal perioperative pain management provides a rational basis for enhanced postoperative pain control, optimization of analgesia, decrease in adverse effects, and improved patient satisfaction.

  17. Pain Part 3: Acute Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Nadine; Renton, Tara

    2015-06-01

    Acute trigeminal pain is a common presentation in the dental surgery, with a reported 22% of the US adult population experiencing orofacial pain more than once during a 6-month period. This article discusses the mechanisms underlying the pain experience, diagnosis and subsequent management of acute trigeminal pain, encompassing pre-, peri- and post-operative analgesia. The dental team spend most of their working lives managing patients and acute pain. The patient may present to the clinician in existing pain, which may often provide a diagnostic challenge. Prevention and managing intra-operative and post-surgical pain are implicit in providing your patient with optimum care. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This paper aims to provide an overview of conditions that may present with acute orofacial pain and their management using the most recent evidence base. Intra-operative and post-surgical pain management are also scrutinized and evidence based treatment is recommended.

  18. Pain and the ethics of pain management.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B

    1984-01-01

    In this article I clarify the concepts of 'pain', 'suffering', 'pains of body', 'pains of soul'. I explore the relevance of an ethic to the clinical setting which gives patients a strong prima facie right to freedom from unnecessary and unwanted pain and which places upon medical professionals two concomitant moral obligations to patients. First, there is the duty not to inflict pain and suffering beyond what is necessary for effective diagnosis, treatment and research. Next, there is the duty to do all that can be done to relieve all the pain and suffering which can be alleviated. I develop in some detail that individuality of pain sensitivity must be taken into account in fulfilling these obligations. I explore the issue of the relevance of informed consent and the right to refuse treatment to the matter of pain relief. And I raise the question of what conditions, if any, should override the right to refuse treatment where pain relief is of paramount concern.

  19. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low Back Pain Overview What is low back pain? Low back pain is a common problem for many people. It can be caused by many ... lift and exercise correctly. Symptoms When is low back pain serious? Call your family doctor if: Pain goes ...

  20. Interleukin-32 production associated with biliary innate immunity and proinflammatory cytokines contributes to the pathogenesis of cholangitis in biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, A; Harada, K; Nio, M; Nakanuma, Y

    2013-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is thought to be associated with infections by viruses such as Reoviridae and is characterized histologically by fibrosclerosing cholangitis with proinflammatory cytokine-mediated inflammation. Interleukin (IL)-32 affects the continuous inflammation by increasing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. In this study, the role of IL-32 in the cholangitis of BA was examined. Immunohistochemistry for IL-32 and caspase 1 was performed using 21 samples of extrahepatic bile ducts resected from BA patients. Moreover, using cultured human biliary epithelial cells (BECs), the expression of IL-32 and its induction on stimulation with a Toll-like receptor [(TLR)-3 ligand (poly(I:C)] and proinflammatory cytokines was examined. BECs composing extrahepatic bile ducts showing cholangitis expressed IL-32 in BA, but not in controls. Caspase 1 was expressed constantly on BECs of both BA and control subjects. Furthermore, poly(I:C) and proinflammatory cytokines [(IL-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α] induced IL-32 expression strongly in cultured BECs, accompanying the constant expression of TLR-3 and caspase 1. Our results imply that the expression of IL-32 in BECs was found in the damaged bile ducts of BA and induced by biliary innate immunity via TLR-3 and proinflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that IL-32 is involved initially in the pathogenic mechanisms of cholangitis in BA and also plays an important role in the amplification and continuance of periductal inflammatory reactions. It is therefore tempting to speculate that inhibitors of IL-32 could be useful for attenuating cholangitis in BA. PMID:23607494

  1. Increased MMP-7 expression in biliary epithelium and serum underpins native liver fibrosis after successful portoenterostomy in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Kerola, Anna; Lampela, Hanna; Lohi, Jouko; Heikkilä, Päivi; Mutanen, Annika; Hagström, Jaana; Tervahartiala, Taina; Sorsa, Timo; Haglund, Caj; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying progressive liver fibrosis following surgical treatment of biliary atresia (BA) remain unclear. Our aim was to address hepatic gene and protein expression and serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) after successful portoenterostomy (PE), and relate them to histological signs of liver injury, clinical follow-up data and biochemical markers of hepatic function. LIver biopsies and serum samples were obtained from 25 children after successful PE at median age of 3.3 years. Serum MMP concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. Hepatic gene expression of MMPs and TIMPs was analyzed using real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Liver expression of MMP-7 and cytokeratin-7 was studied using immunohistochemistry. Despite effective clearance of biochemical and histological cholestasis following PE, BA patients showed increased hepatic gene expression of MMP-7 (29-fold, p < 0.001), MMP-2 (3.1-fold, p < 0.001), MMP-14 (1.7-fold, p = 0.007), and TIMP-1 (1.8-fold, p < 0.001), when compared to controls. Similar to a biliary epithelial marker cytokeratin-7, expression of MMP-7 localized in biliary epithelium of bile ducts and ductal proliferations and periportal hepatocytes and was increased (p < 0.001) in relation to controls. BA patients had 6-fold higher serum levels of MMP-7 (p < 0.001), which correlated positively with hepatic MMP-7 gene (r = 0.548, p = 0.007) and protein (r = 0.532, p = 0.007) expression. Patients showed a positive correlation between biliary MMP-7 expression and Metavir fibrosis stage (r = 0.605, p = 0.001) and portal fibrosis grade (r = 0.606, p = 0.001). Neither similarly increased MMP-7 expression nor correlation with liver fibrosis was observed in patients with intestinal failure-associated liver disease and comparable Metavir stage. In conclusion, our findings support an unique role of altered

  2. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia and primary biliary cirrhosis-like lung involvement in a patient with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Strobel, E S; Bonnet, R B; Werner, P; Schaefer, H E; Peter, H H

    1998-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with a 6-year history of primary biliary cirrhosis presented with an acute onset of fever, dyspnoea, crackles over both lower lung fields, and diffuse interstitial and bibasilar patchy pulmonary opacities. After exclusion of an infectious aetiology, an open lung biopsy was performed which revealed two histopathological features: (1) bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia and (2) lympho-histiocytic interstitial pneumonitis and destructive bronchiolitis. Treatment response to corticosteroids and azathioprine followed a bimodal pattern with immediate resolution of her initial presenting symptoms and late resolution of residual gas exchange defects.

  3. Laparoscopy in the Management of Children with Chronic Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Berezin, Stuart H.; Bostwick, Howard E.; Halata, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the results of diagnostic laparoscopy in children with chronic recurrent abdominal pain. Patients and Methods: Thirteen children with chronic recurrent abdominal pain were subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy. Ages varied from 10 to 17 years. There were six males and seven females. Abdominal pain was present from 3 weeks to 12 months (mean, 2 months). Extensive laboratory and imaging studies did not contribute to the diagnosis. In all patients, the pain was disabling and severe enough to warrant repeated visits to the pediatrician, emergency room visits, or hospital admissions, as well as absence from school. Results: All children recovered uneventfully. Laparoscopic findings that identified the cause of abdominal pain were obtained in 12 of 13 patients. Laparoscopic appendectomy was done in all patients. There were no operative complications. One child presented three months later with incomplete small bowel obstruction, which resolved with conservative management. There were no other postoperative complications. Follow-up varied from six months to three years. Abdominal pain resolved in ten patients. One patient presented eight months later with biliary dyskinesia. She improved following laparoscopic cholecystectomy and later on sphincterotomy, but her pain has not yet completely resolved. One patient presented six months later with abdominal pain secondary to intestinal adhesions. Her pain completely resolved after laparoscopic lysis of adhesions. A third patient who developed lower abdominal pain six months after laparoscopy improved with conservative management and antibiotics for pelvic inflammatory disease. Conclusions: Diagnostic laparoscopy is a valuable procedure in the management of children with chronic recurrent abdominal pain. In the present study, laparoscopic examination revealed the cause of abdominal pain in most patients, and this pain resolved in most cases. Based on our

  4. Pathophysiologic effects of biliary shockwave lithotripsy in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Chapman, W C; Parish, K L; Kaufman, A J; Stephens, W H; Anderson, S; Woodward, S; Williams, L F

    1991-01-01

    At least 10 extracorporeal shockwave lithotripters are under investigation in the United States for treatment of biliary stone disease. Few reports, however, have documented the potential side effects of this new treatment method. In this study, we performed a series of acute and chronic studies in dogs exposed to varying numbers of shockwaves directed at the gallbladder wall via a transthoracic or transabdominal targeting approach. When shockwaves were directed transthoracically, pulmonary hemorrhagic contusions were found which were sometimes large in size. When a transabdominal approach was used, however, only focal areas of hemorrhage were found in the gallbladder wall and adjacent liver with no alterations in postlithotripsy pancreatic or liver enzymes, and normal cholecystokinin-octapeptide stimulated oral cholecystograms were obtained 6 days after treatment. Biliary shockwaves appear to cause few side effects under normal conditions but should be used with caution in patients with potential bleeding disorders. Until further studies are performed, lung tissue should be avoided in the shockwave beam path during treatment. PMID:1796795

  5. The Sea Lamprey as an Etiological Model for Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive, inflammatory, and fibrosclerosing cholangiopathy in infants that results in obstruction of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts. It is the most common cause for pediatric liver transplantation. In contrast, the sea lamprey undergoes developmental BA with transient cholestasis and fibrosis during metamorphosis, but emerges as a fecund adult with steatohepatitis and fibrosis in the liver. In this paper, we present new histological evidence and compare the sea lamprey to existing animal models to highlight the advantages and possible limitations of using the sea lamprey to study the etiology and compensatory mechanisms of BA and other liver diseases. Understanding the signaling factors and genetic networks underlying lamprey BA can provide insights into BA etiology and possible targets to prevent biliary degeneration and to clear fibrosis. In addition, information from lamprey BA can be used to develop adjunct treatments for patients awaiting or receiving surgical treatments. Furthermore, the cholestatic adult lamprey has unique adaptive mechanisms that can be used to explore potential treatments for cholestasis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). PMID:26101777

  6. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery for biliary tract disease

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Shu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), or laparoendoscopic single-site surgery, has been employed in various fields to minimize traumatic effects over the last two decades. Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) has been the most frequently studied SILS to date. Hundreds of studies on SILC have failed to present conclusive results. Most randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been small in scale and have been conducted under ideal operative conditions. The role of SILC in complicated scenarios remains uncertain. As common bile duct exploration (CBDE) methods have been used for more than one hundred years, laparoscopic CBDE (LCBDE) has emerged as an effective, demanding, and infrequent technique employed during the laparoscopic era. Likewise, laparoscopic biliary-enteric anastomosis is difficult to carry out, with only a few studies have been published on the approach. The application of SILS to CBDE and biliary-enteric anastomosis is extremely rare, and such innovative procedures are only carried out by a number of specialized groups across the globe. Herein we present a thorough and detailed analysis of SILC in terms of operative techniques, training and learning curves, safety and efficacy levels, recovery trends, and costs by reviewing RCTs conducted over the past three years and two recently updated meta-analyses. All existing literature on single-incision LCBDE and single-incision laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy has been reviewed to describe these two demanding techniques. PMID:26811621

  7. A simple method for the quantification of biliary reflux.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, J J; Silberbusch, J; van Roon, F; Schopman, W; vd Berg, J W

    1980-01-01

    99mTc-diethyl-IDA is completely excreted into the bile. When cholecystokinin is given after priming of the biliary tract with this tracer, gallbladder contraction leads to expulsion of bile into the duodenum. At the same time cholecystokinin causes contraction of the pylorus, which should normally prevent substantial reflux of tracer into the stomach. We have applied these physiological characteristics in a method to quantify biliary gastric reflux. Fourteen controls had a median reflux of 4.3% of the intravenous dose (93% of controls had values less than 9%). In 18 patients with Billroth II gastrectomies the median reflux was 46% (p less than 0.001). Patients with chronic gastritis (no. = 18) had also increased reflux (median 18.1%, p less than 0.001). The same was found in gastric ulcer (no. = 18, median 11.8%, p less than 0.003). In duodenal ulcer (no. = 7) increased reflux existed in only two patients with pyloric deformation. Patients with hiatal hernia did not show increased reflux (no. = 10, median 2.2%). Bilirubin measurements tended to underestimate reflux in pathological cases, whereas bile acid measurements and reflux percentages of tracer showed a close relationship (r = 0.87, p less than 0.001). PMID:7209386

  8. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Yang, Chen-Yen; Roberts, Krista; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Worman, Howard J.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Experimental models of autoimmune diseases have led to the conclusion that an immune response to nuclear antigens is a sentinel marker for loss of tolerance and potential tissue damage. Various proteins are targets of antinuclear antibodies in a variety of autoimmune diseases, ranging from systemic rheumatologic disorders to diseases affecting specific organs such as the liver. Autoantibodies against specific nuclear constituents have also been used as probes to understand the structure and the function of the targeted components and their relevance to disease pathogenesis. Approximately a quarter of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have antibodies targeting proteins of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a multi-protein structure that mediates molecular transport across the nuclear envelope. Autoantibodies against the integral membrane glycoprotein gp210 and nucleoporin p62 appear to be highly specific for PBC, an autoimmune disease characterized by progressive destruction of intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells. This review discusses the diagnostic and clinical relevance of anti-NPC antibodies in PBC and the possibility that this autoimmune response may arise as a result of molecular mimicry. PMID:22487189

  9. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H.; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G.; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20–22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  10. Pathophysiologic effects of biliary shockwave lithotripsy in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Chapman, W C; Parish, K L; Kaufman, A J; Stephens, W H; Anderson, S; Woodward, S; Williams, L F

    1991-01-01

    At least 10 extracorporeal shockwave lithotripters are under investigation in the United States for treatment of biliary stone disease. Few reports, however, have documented the potential side effects of this new treatment method. In this study, we performed a series of acute and chronic studies in dogs exposed to varying numbers of shockwaves directed at the gallbladder wall via a transthoracic or transabdominal targeting approach. When shockwaves were directed transthoracically, pulmonary hemorrhagic contusions were found which were sometimes large in size. When a transabdominal approach was used, however, only focal areas of hemorrhage were found in the gallbladder wall and adjacent liver with no alterations in postlithotripsy pancreatic or liver enzymes, and normal cholecystokinin-octapeptide stimulated oral cholecystograms were obtained 6 days after treatment. Biliary shockwaves appear to cause few side effects under normal conditions but should be used with caution in patients with potential bleeding disorders. Until further studies are performed, lung tissue should be avoided in the shockwave beam path during treatment.

  11. [Morphological study of bile in the diagnosis of biliary diseases].

    PubMed

    Potekhina, Iu P

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study principles of bile structurization in healthy people and patients with various biliary diseases. 160 patients with different biliary diseases and other diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone were examined. Samples of gallbladder bile were taken from corpses of young men, who did not have any diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone. Their diagnoses were confirmed by an ultrasound morphological study. Bile was studied by the cuneate dehydration and viscosimetric methods. The structure of facies of gallbladder bile under conditions of absence of diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone was shown. The facies have a wide convex peripheral zone (a cushion) without any well-defined border. The central part of the facies is amorphous or fine-grained, sometimes with occasional inclusions of larger crystals. Markers of exacerbation of chronic cholecystitis (dendrites in the central zone of bile facies) as well as signs of the presence of a malignant neoplasm touching the bile (large diamond-shaped crystals in the central zone of bile facies where dendrites begin) were discovered. PMID:14556555

  12. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-09-15

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  13. Autocrine regulation of biliary pathology by activated cholangiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kendal; Marzioni, Marco; Munshi, Kamruzzaman; Afroze, Syeda

    2012-01-01

    The bile duct system of the liver is lined by epithelial cells (i.e., cholangiocytes) that respond to a large number of neuroendocrine factors through alterations in their proliferative activities and the subsequent modification of the microenvironment. As such, activation of biliary proliferation compensates for the loss of cholangiocytes due to apoptosis and slows the progression of toxic injury and cholestasis. Over the course of the last three decades, much progress has been made in identifying the factors that trigger the biliary epithelium to remodel and grow. Because a large number of autocrine factors have recently been identified as relevant clinical targets, a compiled review of their contributions and function in cholestatic liver diseases would be beneficial. In this context, it is important to define the specific processes triggered by autocrine factors that promote cholangiocytes to proliferate, activate neighboring cells, and ultimately lead to extracellular matrix deposition. In this review, we discuss the role of each of the known autocrine factors with particular emphasis on proliferation and fibrogenesis. Because many of these molecules interact with one another throughout the progression of liver fibrosis, a model speculating their involvement in the progression of cholestatic liver disease is also presented. PMID:22194419

  14. Biliary Microbiota, Gallstone Disease and Infection with Opisthorchis felineus

    PubMed Central

    Saltykova, Irina V.; Petrov, Vjacheslav A.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Ivanova, Polina G.; Merzlikin, Nikolay V.; Sazonov, Alexey E.; Ogorodova, Ludmila M.; Brindley, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the microbiome of the hepatobiliary system. This study investigated the influence of infection with the fish-borne liver fluke, Opisthorchis felineus on the biliary microbiome of residents of the Tomsk region of western Siberia. Methodology/Principal Findings Samples of bile were provided by 56 study participants, half of who were infected with O. felineus, and all of who were diagnosed with gallstone disease. The microbiota of the bile was investigated using high throughput, Illumina-based sequencing targeting the prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene. About 2,797, discrete phylotypes of prokaryotes were detected. At the level of phylum, bile from participants with opisthorchiasis showed greater numbers of Synergistetes, Spirochaetes, Planctomycetes, TM7 and Verrucomicrobia. Numbers of > 20 phylotypes differed in bile of the O. felineus-infected compared to non-infected participants, including presence of species of the genera Mycoplana, Cellulosimicrobium, Microlunatus and Phycicoccus, and the Archaeans genus, Halogeometricum, and increased numbers of Selenomonas, Bacteroides, Rothia, Leptotrichia, Lactobacillus, Treponema and Klebsiella. Conclusions/Significance Overall, infection with the liver fluke O. felineus modified the biliary microbiome, increasing abundance of bacterial and archaeal phylotypes. PMID:27447938

  15. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerable bursts of sharp pain similar to the pain caused by a dental probe on an exposed nerve. Individuals may have numbness in the areas affected by the pain. The burning and loss of touch sensations are ...

  16. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... focuses on their pain as well as their perception of its severity. Pain that becomes chronic also ... that stimulating the nervous system can modify the perception of pain. Early studies of TENS suggested that ...

  17. Pain: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... illness, our very lives. Pain is a complex perception that differs enormously among individual patients, even those ... that the two peptides are involved in the perception of pain sensations, especially moderate-to-severe pain. ...

  18. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    Painkillers; Drugs for pain; Analgesics; Opioids ... Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are used only for pain that is severe and is not helped by other types of painkillers. When used ...

  19. What Is Back Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain PDF Version Size: 127 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 12.5 MB November 2014 What Is Back Pain? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  20. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... leg pain from clogged arteries Stomach/Digestive: Gallstones, intestinal obstruction, diverticulitis, ulcers, severe indigestion, severe gas pain, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis Urinary/Reproductive: Kidney stones, pelvic pain, vulvodynia, ...

  1. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doses of these medicines can help with chronic low back pain , even if the person does not feel sad ... notices pain. Antidepressants most commonly used for chronic low back pain also help you sleep. Antidepressants most often used ...

  2. A surprising cause of acute right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Stitt, Rodger Scott; Greenwood, Robert; Laczek, Jeffrey

    2014-08-06

    A 42 year-old African-American woman was admitted for severe acute right upper quadrant pain. Her liver function tests showed a cholestatic pattern of hepatitis. She had no known history of liver disease or sarcoidosis. Imaging of her liver and biliary tree did not reveal any apparent cause for her right upper quadrant pain. A liver biopsy was performed which showed granulomatous disease. This prompted a CT chest that showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the mediastinal lymphnode revealed non-caseating granulomas. Despite having no pulmonary symptoms or history of pulmonary sarcoidosis, she was diagnosed with systemic pulmonary sarcoidosis. She was treated with corticosteroids and had complete resolution of symptoms over the next several weeks.

  3. Biliary obstruction dissipates bioelectric sinusoidal-canalicular barrier without altering taurocholate uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Cotting, J.; Zysset, T.; Reichen, J.

    1989-02-01

    To study immediate events during extrahepatic cholestasis, we investigated the effect of short-term biliary obstruction on the bioelectrical sinusoidal-canalicular barrier in the rat using molecular weight-matched uncharged and negatively charged inert solute pairs. The bioelectrical barrier averaged -22 +/- 5 and -18 +/- 4 mV (NS) using the pair carboxy-/methoxyinulin and ferrocyanide/sucrose, respectively. After a 20-min biliary obstruction both decreased by 61 and 11%, respectively, but only the large molecular weight pair (the inulins) returned to base line after release of the obstruction. Inert solute clearances were increased after short biliary obstruction depending on molecular size and negative charge (ferrocyanide greater than sucrose greater than carboxyinulin greater than inulin), suggesting that both permeability and bioelectrical barriers were affected by obstruction. The hepatic extraction in vivo of a passively transported drug not excreted into bile (D-propranolol) was not affected by obstruction, whereas that of an actively transported drug (glycocholate) decreased from 66 +/- 8 to 41 +/- 20% during biliary obstruction (P less than 0.01). Unidirectional transfer of glycocholate was not affected by short-term biliary obstruction in the situ perfused rat liver; however, 2 min after (14C)glycocholate administration, increased return was observed in hepatic venous effluent in obstructed animals. Our findings demonstrate a loss of the bioelectrical barrier immediately after short-term biliary obstruction. Decreased hepatic extraction in the view of unaltered sinusoidal uptake demonstrates regurgitation of bile into blood during short-term biliary obstruction.

  4. Depression of biliary glutathione excretion by chronic ethanol feeding in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Vendemiale, G.; Jayatilleke, E.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1984-03-12

    The effects of chronic alcohol feeding on biliary glutathione excretion were studied in rats pair fed diets containing either ethanol (36% of total energy) or isocaloric carbohydrate for 4-6 weeks. An exteriorized biliary-duodenal fistula was established and total glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were measured. A significant decrease was observed in rats fed alcohol chronically compared to their pair fed controls in the biliary excretion of GSH (55.7 +/- 37.0 vs 243.1 +/- 29.0 ..mu..g/ml bile, p < 0.025) as well as biliary GSSG (12.5 +/- 5.0 vs 49.9 +/- 8.0 ..mu..g/ml bile, p < 0.05) and in bile flow (23.1 +/- 1.6 vs 29.2 +/- 1.3 ..mu..g/min, p < 0.05). An acute dose of ethanol tended to exaggerate the decrease on biliary GSH and GSSG in the two groups of animals. The depression in biliary GSH could not be attributed to decreased GSH synthesis since S/sup 35/-L-methionine incorporation into hepatic and biliary GSH was unchanged or even increased after chronic ethanol feeding. 22 references, 4 figures.

  5. Comparative study of biliary trace elements and clinical phenotypes in Wilson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ming-Shan; Fan, Yu-Xin; Yang, Ren-Min; Han, Yong-Zhu; Wu, Guo-Jun; Xin, Yu-Rong; Yu, Long

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To further explore the etiological mechanism of Wilson’s disease (WD) by comparing the changes of biliary trace elements and its clinical phenotype. METHODS: WD patients with different types and conditions (n = 20), non-WD patients with chronic liver damage (n = 22), and healthy volunteers (n = 10; used as controls) were studied. Biliary samples were taken by duodenal drainage. Atom absorption spectrophotometer was used to assay the copper and zinc content of each sample. RESULTS: In WD, the copper content and copper/zinc ratio of biliary juice were evidently lower than those of non-WD patients with chronic liver damage and of healthy controls (F = 14.76, 25.4; 14.92, 26.2 respectively; P < 0.01), while the biliary zinc level had no significant difference from the two non-WD control groups (P > 0.05). There were significant differences in biliary copper excretion among patients with different types and conditions (F = 3.75, P < 0.05; F = 6.20, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Copper excretion by liver and the biliary system decreases obviously in WD, which plays a key role in the phenotypic copper retention, and the biliary copper retention is closely related with the severity of hepatic injury and illness. PMID:27053888

  6. A new clarification method to visualize biliary degeneration during liver metamorphosis in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Davidson, Peter J.; Scott, Anne M.; Walaszczyk, Erin J.; Brant, Cory O.; Buchinger, Tyler; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a rare disease of infancy, with an estimated 1 in 15,000 frequency in the southeast United States, but more common in East Asian countries, with a reported frequency of 1 in 5,000 in Taiwan. Although much is known about the management of biliary atresia, its pathogenesis is still elusive. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanism and progression of biliary degeneration. Sea lamprey develop through three distinct life stages: larval, parasitic, and adult. During the transition from larvae to parasitic juvenile, sea lamprey undergo metamorphosis with dramatic reorganization and remodeling in external morphology and internal organs. In the liver, the entire biliary system is lost, including the gall bladder and the biliary tree. A newly-developed method called “CLARITY” was modified to clarify the entire liver and the junction with the intestine in metamorphic sea lamprey. The process of biliary degeneration was visualized and discerned during sea lamprey metamorphosis by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. This method provides a powerful tool to study biliary atresia in a unique animal model.

  7. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  8. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J B; Myers, B M; Kost, L J; Kuntz, S M; LaRusso, N F

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload. Images PMID:2910913

  9. Palliation of Malignant Biliary and Duodenal Obstruction with Combined Metallic Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Devrim Akhan, Okan; Ozkan, Fuat; Ciftci, Turkmen; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Ozmen, Mustafa N.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction with combined metallic stenting under fluoroscopy guidance. Materials and Methods. A retrospective analysis of 9 patients (6 men and 3 women) who underwent biliary and duodenal stenting was performed. The mean age of patients was 61 years (range: 42-80 years). The causes of obstruction were pancreatic carcinoma in 7 patients, cholangiocellular carcinoma in one, and duodenal carcinoma in the other. Biliary and duodenal stents were placed simultaneously in 4 patients. In other 5 patients dudodenal stents were placed after biliary stenting when the duodenal obstruction symptoms have developed. In two patients duodenal stents were advanced via transgastric approach. Results. Technical success rate was 100 %. After percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting bilirubin levels decreased to normal levels in 6 patients and in remaining 3 patients mean reduction of 71% in bilirubin levels was achieved. Tumoral ingrowth occurred in one patient and percutaneous biliary restenting was performed 90 days after the initial procedure. Of the 9 patients, 6 patients were able to tolerate solid diet, whereas 2 patients could tolerate liquid diet and one patient did not show any improvement. Mean survival periods were 111 and 73 days after biliary and duodenal stenting, respectively. Conclusion. Combined biliary and duodenal stent placement which can be performed under fluoroscopic guidance without assistance of endoscopy is feasible and an effective method of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions. If transoral and endoscopic approaches fail, percutaneous gastrostomy route allows duodenal stenting.

  10. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.B. Jr.; Myers, B.M.; Kost, L.J.; Kuntz, S.M.; LaRusso, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload.

  11. Orofacial pain: a primer.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S

    2013-07-01

    Orofacial pain refers to pain associated with the soft and hard tissues of the head, face, and neck. It is a common experience in the population that has profound sociologic effects and impact on quality of life. New scientific evidence is constantly providing insight into the cause and pathophysiology of orofacial pain including temporomandibular disorders, cranial neuralgias, persistent idiopathic facial pains, headache, and dental pain. An evidence-based approach to the management of orofacial pain is imperative for the general clinician. This article reviews the basics of pain epidemiology and neurophysiology and sets the stage for in-depth discussions of various painful conditions of the head and neck.

  12. A Double-Layered Covered Biliary Metal Stent for the Management of Unresectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction: A Multicenter Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Kyu Taek; Dong, Seok Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The covered self-expandable metal stent (CMS) was developed to prevent tumor ingrowth-induced stent occlusion during the treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. However, complications such as cholecystitis, pancreatitis, and stent migration can occur after the endoscopic insertion of CMSs. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a double-layered CMS (DCMS) for the management of malignant bile duct obstruction. Methods DCMSs were endoscopically introduced into 59 patients with unresectable malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction at four tertiary referral centers, and the patient medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Results Both the technical and functional success rates were 100%. Procedure-related complications including pancreatitis, cholangitis, stent migration, and liver abscess occurred in five patients (8.5%). The median follow-up period was 265 days (range, 31 to 752 days). Cumulative stent patency rates were 68.2% and 40.8% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. At the final follow-up, the rate of stent occlusion was 33.9% (20/59), and the median stent patency period was 276 days (range, 2 to 706 days). Conclusions The clinical outcomes of DCMSs were comparable to the outcomes previously reported for CMSs with respect to stent patency period and complication rates. PMID:27172927

  13. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  14. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain.

  15. Utility of Stent-Grafts in Treatment of Porto-Biliary Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-12-15

    A porto-biliary fistula causing hemobilia is a known complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). We present two patients with hemobilia secondary to porto-biliary fistula, treated successfully by percutaneous placement of stent-grafts. In one case, the stent-graft was placed in the bile duct, and in the other case, it was placed in the intrahepatic portal vein branch. Hemobilia stopped and there were no complications except a small area of hepatic infarction, distal to the stent-graft in the portal vein.

  16. Multimodality imaging of hepato-biliary disorders in pregnancy: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Ong, Eugene M W; Drukteinis, Jennifer S; Peters, Hope E; Mortelé, Koenraad J

    2009-09-01

    Hepato-biliary disorders are rare complications of pregnancy, but they may be severe, with high fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Imaging is, therefore, essential in the rapid diagnosis of some of these conditions so that appropriate, life-saving treatment can be administered. This pictorial essay illustrates the multimodality imaging features of pregnancy-induced hepato-biliary disorders, such as acute fatty liver of pregnancy, preeclamsia and eclampsia, and HELLP syndrome, as well as those conditions which occur in pregnancy but are not unique to it, such as viral hepatitis, Budd-Chiari syndrome, focal hepatic lesions, biliary sludge, cholecystolithiasis, and choledocholithiasis. PMID:19225816

  17. Drug eluting biliary stents to decrease stent failure rates: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shatzel, Joseph; Kim, Jisoo; Sampath, Kartik; Syed, Sharjeel; Saad, Jennifer; Hussain, Zilla H; Mody, Kabir; Pipas, J Marc; Gordon, Stuart; Gardner, Timothy; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting is clinically effective in relieving both malignant and non-malignant obstructions. However, there are high failure rates associated with tumor ingrowth and epithelial overgrowth as well as internally from biofilm development and subsequent clogging. Within the last decade, the use of prophylactic drug eluting stents as a means to reduce stent failure has been investigated. In this review we provide an overview of the current research on drug eluting biliary stents. While there is limited human trial data regarding the clinical benefit of drug eluting biliary stents in preventing stent obstruction, recent research suggests promise regarding their safety and potential efficacy. PMID:26839648

  18. Quality of life across chemotherapy lines in patients with cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In patients with cancers of the pancreatic and biliary tract quality of life (QOL) improvement is the main treatment goal, since survival can be prolonged only marginally. Up to date, knowledge on QOL impairments throughout the entire treatment process, often including several chemotherapy lines, is scarce. Our study aimed at investigating QOL trajectories from adjuvant treatment to palliative 3rd-line therapy Methods Patients were included in routine electronic patient-reported outcome monitoring at Kufstein County Hospital at the time of diagnosis and assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 during each chemotherapy cycle. Results Eighty out of 147 patients with pancreatic cancer or cancer of the bile ducts treated at the Kufstein County Hospital, fulfilled inclusion criteria and could be included in the study (mean age 67.4 years; 53.8% women). Physical, Emotional and Cognitive Functioning, and Global QOL deteriorated across chemotherapy lines, whereas Fatigue, Pain, Dyspnoea, Sleeping Disturbances, Diarrhoea, and Taste Alterations increased. With regard to Physical Functioning, Global QOL, Fatigue, Dyspnoea, Diarrhoea and Taste Alterations, the patients receiving adjuvant or 1st-line palliative chemotherapy did not differ significantly. Most patients in 2nd- or 3rd-line chemotherapy showed significantly higher impairments and symptom burden. However, patients under 1st and 2nd-line treatment showed stable QOL trajectories, whereas 3rd-line patients perceived substantial deteriorations. Conclusions The results suggest early palliative treatment initiation to stabilise QOL on a level as high as possible. The continuous QOL improvement during adjuvant treatment, probably reflecting post-operative recovery, may indicate that deleterious effects of adjuvant chemotherapy on QOL are highly unlikely. PMID:22950826

  19. Association of primary biliary cirrhosis with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Yamato, Ryumei; Kobashi, Haruhiko; Nishino, Ken; Inada, Nobu; Sakanoue, Ritsuko; Suehiro, Mitsuhiko; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Yamada, Gotaro

    2008-01-01

    Although both primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are autoimmune diseases, the association of the 2 diseases is rare. Here, we report a case of ITP that developed during the follow-up of PBC in a 74-year-old man. The patient had been diagnosed with PBC 12 years previously, and had received treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid. The platelet count decreased from approximately 60 × 109/L to 8 × 109/L, and the association of decompensated liver cirrhosis (PBC) with ITP was diagnosed. Steroid and immune gamma globulin therapy were successful in increasing the platelet count. Interestingly, human leukocyte antigen genotyping detected the alleles DQB1*0601 and DRB1*0803, which are related to both PBC and ITP in Japanese patients. This case suggests common immunogenetic factors might be involved in the development of PBC and ITP. PMID:18416479

  20. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rerknimitr, Rungsun Naprasert, Pisit; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2007-06-15

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration.

  1. Biliary atresia: Will blocking inflammation tame the disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bessho, Kazuhiko; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cholangiopathy of childhood. With complete obstruction of segments or the entire length of extrahepatic bile ducts, the timely pursuit of hepatoportoenterostomy is the best strategy to restore bile drainage. However, even with prompt surgical intervention, ongoing injury of intrahepatic bile ducts and progressive cholangiopathy lead to end-stage cirrhosis. The pace of disease progression is not uniform; it may relate to clinical forms of disease and/or staging of liver pathology at diagnosis. Although the etiology of disease is not yet defined, several biological processes have been linked to pathogenic mechanisms of bile duct injury. Among them, there is increasing evidence that the immune system targets the duct epithelium and disrupts bile flow. In this review, we discuss how careful clinical phenotyping, staging of disease, and pre-clinical research give insight into response to ongoing trials and rational design of new therapies to block progression of disease. PMID:21226614

  2. Xenobiotics and Autoimmunity: Does Acetaminophen Cause Primary Biliary Cirrhosis?

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Patrick S.C.; Lam, Kit; Kurth, Mark J.; Coppel, Ross L.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2012-01-01

    The serologic hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is the presence of antimitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA) directed against the E2 subunit of PDC-E2. The PBC-related autoepitope of PDC-E2 contains lipoic acid, and previous work has demonstrated that mimics of lipoic acid following immunization of mice lead to a PBC-like disease. Furthermore, approximately one third of patients who have ingested excessive amounts of acetaminophen (paracetamol) develop AMA of the same specificity as patients with PBC. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) data indicates that acetaminophen metabolites are particularly immunoreactive with AMA, and we submit that in genetically susceptible hosts, electrophilic modification of lipoic acid in PDC-E2 by acetaminophen or similar drugs can facilitate a loss of tolerance and lead to the development of PBC. PMID:22920894

  3. Hepatic progenitor cells of biliary origin with liver repopulation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Boulter, Luke; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Cole, Alicia M; Hay, Trevor; Guest, Rachel V; Wojtacha, Davina; Man, Tak Yung; Mackinnon, Alison; Ridgway, Rachel A; Kendall, Timothy; Williams, Michael J; Jamieson, Thomas; Raven, Alex; Hay, David C; Iredale, John P; Clarke, Alan R; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes self renew following liver injury. Following severe injury hepatocytes are increasingly senescent, whether Hepatic Progenitor Cells (HPCs) then contribute to liver regeneration is unclear. Here, we describe a mouse model where Mdm2 is inducibly deleted in over 98% of hepatocytes, causing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence with nearly all hepatocytes expressing p21. This results in florid HPC activation, which is necessary for survival, followed by complete, functional liver reconstitution. HPCs isolated from genetically normal mice, using cell surface markers, were highly expandable and phenotypically stable in vitro. These HPCs were transplanted into adult mouse livers where hepatocyte Mdm2 was repeatedly deleted, creating a non-competitive repopulation assay. Transplanted HPCs contributed significantly to restoration of liver parenchyma, regenerating hepatocytes and biliary epithelia, highlighting their in vivo lineage potency. HPCs are therefore a potential future alternative to hepatocyte or liver transplantation for liver disease. PMID:26192438

  4. Manometric characteristics of the extrahepatic biliary tract in dogs.

    PubMed

    Miranda, M; Espinoza, M; Csendes, A

    1981-05-01

    Pressure measurements of the whole extrahepatic biliary tract were performed in dogs using constant perfusion techniques. Studies were done during general anesthesia and in conscious trained dogs. Gallbladder intraluminal fasting pressure was significantly lower than common bile duct pressure. No motor activity was demonstrated in the common bile duct. At the cysticocholedochal junction a static high-pressure zone was observed, probably due to mechanical factors. At the level of the choledochoduodenal junction, a high-pressure zone with a sphincter behavior was demonstrated, with a resting pressure of 38 cm H2O above intraduodenal pressure and with rhythmic contractions with a mean amplitude of 88 cm H2O above duodenal pressure. Duodenal motility was completely different from sphincter dynamics. No differences in pressure values were seen during general anesthesia or in conscious state.

  5. The diagnosis and treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Ah

    2011-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. The initial presentation of PBC is various from asymptomatic, abnormal liver biochemical tests to overt cirrhosis. The diagnosis of PBC is based on cholestatic biochemical liver tests, presence of antimitochondrial antibody and histologic findings of nonsuppurative destructive cholangitis. Although the diagnosis is straightforward, it could be underdiagnosed because of its asymptomatic presentation, or underrecognition of the disease. UDCA in a dose of 13-15 mg/kg is the widely approved therapy which can improve the prognosis of patients with PBC. However, one-third of patients does not respond to UDCA therapy and may require liver transplantation. Every effort to diagnose PBC in earlier stage and to develop new therapeutic drugs and clinical trials should be made. PMID:22102382

  6. Clinical significance of autoantibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Minoru

    2014-08-01

    Antimitochondrial, anti-gp210, anti-sp100, and anticentromere antibodies are specifically detected in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). In clinical practice, they are useful for the diagnosis of PBC or for evaluating disease severity, clinical phenotype, and long-term outcome. In the typical or classical form of PBC which shows slow progressive loss of small bile ducts with a parallel increase in liver fibrosis, anti-gp210 antibodies are a strong risk factor for progression to jaundice and hepatic failure, whereas the presence of anticentromere antibodies is a risk factor for progression to cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Of note, the autoimmune repertoire, which is established during the early stage of the disease process, can influence the clinical phenotype and the long-term prognosis of PBC. Because the natural course of PBC is being altered by treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid, the clinical significance of these PBC-specific autoantibodies awaits re-evaluation in various ethnicities.

  7. Hepatic progenitor cells of biliary origin with liver repopulation capacity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei-Yu; Bird, Thomas G; Boulter, Luke; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Cole, Alicia M; Hay, Trevor; Guest, Rachel V; Wojtacha, Davina; Man, Tak Yung; Mackinnon, Alison; Ridgway, Rachel A; Kendall, Timothy; Williams, Michael J; Jamieson, Thomas; Raven, Alex; Hay, David C; Iredale, John P; Clarke, Alan R; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes self-renew following liver injury. Following severe injury hepatocytes are increasingly senescent, but whether hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) then contribute to liver regeneration is unclear. Here, we describe a mouse model where the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 is inducibly deleted in more than 98% of hepatocytes, causing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence with nearly all hepatocytes expressing p21. This results in florid HPC activation, which is necessary for survival, followed by complete, functional liver reconstitution. HPCs isolated from genetically normal mice, using cell surface markers, were highly expandable and phenotypically stable in vitro. These HPCs were transplanted into adult mouse livers where hepatocyte Mdm2 was repeatedly deleted, creating a non-competitive repopulation assay. Transplanted HPCs contributed significantly to restoration of liver parenchyma, regenerating hepatocytes and biliary epithelia, highlighting their in vivo lineage potency. HPCs are therefore a potential future alternative to hepatocyte or liver transplantation for liver disease.

  8. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions.

  9. Pain syndromes in children.

    PubMed

    Malleson, Pete; Clinch, Jacqui

    2003-09-01

    This review discusses the recent literature on pain conditions in children that should be of interest to rheumatologists. The focus of the review is therefore on musculoskeletal pains in children, particularly chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain. Articles that have a broader focus on pain are discussed when these are likely to be of general interest to rheumatologists. Chronic or recurrent pain in childhood is common and can be caused by a wide variety of conditions, several of which are discussed here. The importance of being able to measure pain in children has been emphasized repeatedly in the recent literature. With increased understanding of how to evaluate pain in children has come the recognition that pain in children is multifactorial and that even when there are obvious "organic" causes of the pain (such as arthritis), psychosocial factors are critical in how pain is perceived, and they influence the extent to which pain leads to dysfunction. There is also increasing evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapies are effective in managing chronic pain in children. The frequency of back pain in children is increasingly recognized, and the role of children's work and play, carrying heavy backpacks, and sitting for long periods of time at computers in causing back pain is of interest. The studies reviewed here add to an increasingly rich and informative literature on musculoskeletal and other chronic pain in children, and they help emphasize the importance of proper evaluation and management of pain in children. PMID:12960483

  10. The extended Kasai portoenterostomy for biliary atresia: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Priya; Safwan, Mohamed; Srinivas, Sankaranarayanan; Shanmugam, Naresh; Vij, Mukul; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In 1955, Professor Morio Kasai first performed a hepatic portoenterostomy. Since then, the procedure has changed the lives of children with biliary atresia (BA). We report our initial experience in performing “extended” Kasai portoenterostomy (KPE), a modification of the original procedure. Materials and Methods: Since 2013, we have used the technique of “extended KPE” and prospectively recorded data on all children undergoing this operation. Data on demographics, clinical features, liver function tests, and perioperative cholangiogram findings were collected. Outcome of KPE was measured by Jaundice Disappearance Rate (JDR) and Native Liver Survival Rate (NLSR). We present our preliminary results from a 30-month period (February 2013 to May 2015). Results: Thirty-one children underwent KPE during this period (19 males) and only 1 child had biliary atresia splenic malformation (BASM). The mean age at KPE was 73 ± 24 days. Five (16.1%) children were more than 90 days old at the time of KPE. Fourteen children cleared jaundice (JDR 45.2%). Eleven (35.5%) children developed episodes of cholangitis, of whom 8 had early cholangitis (within 3 months of the operation). The proportion of children who survived with their own liver 6 months after KPE (NLSR) was 84.2%. Of those children older than 90 days, 2 cleared jaundice and have survived with their native livers for more than 16 months. Conclusion: In our preliminary report of 31 children, we conclude that the extended KPE leads to increased jaundice clearance and improved NLSR in children with BA. PMID:27046977

  11. Biliary lipid secretion in health and in cholesterol gallstone disease.

    PubMed

    Carey, M C; Mazer, N A

    1984-01-01

    The secretory compartment for biliary lecithin and cholesterol secretion probably resides in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum of the hepatocyte. The secretory compartment for bile salts lies predominantly in the enterohepatic circulation which fluxes bile salts continuously through the smooth endoplasmic reticulum compartment and extracts lipids for secretion into bile. Most of bile lecithin is newly synthesized by the liver; most of bile cholesterol is derived from extrahepatic sources. Both cholesterol and lecithin secretion are coupled to bile salt secretion and describe output curves which can be fitted by rectangular hyperbolae: since bile salt secretion is a linear function of input, the relative proportions of cholesterol to bile salts plus lecithin in bile increase at low bile salt outputs. In health, an adequate bile salt (+ lecithin) secretion coupled with normal cholesterol secretion maintains the relative composition of bile in a stable state: fasting compositions usually lie within the micellar zone or metastable supersaturated zone of a triangular coordinate-phase diagram plot. In cholesterol gallstone disease, mean bile salt (+ lecithin) secretion rates are subnormal and/or mean cholesterol secretion rates are supranormal, especially in the fasting state. If individuals are obese there is also enhanced hypersecretion of biliary cholesterol. Either or both secretory defects lead to an elevation and persistence of cholesterol supersaturation of bile. The physical state of the secreted lipids in bile is complex and fluctuant, and probably involves vesicle structures and mixed micelles at high water and cholesterol concentrations and predominantly micellar structures at low water and cholesterol concentrations. In lithogenic bile, the physical state, proportions and nucleation potential of the lipid aggregates are probably different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. [COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTIC OF VARIOUS METHODS OF SIMULATION OF BILIARY PERITONITIS IN EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Nichitaylo, M Yu; Furmanov, Yu O; Gutsulyak, A I; Savytska, I M; Zagriychuk, M S; Goman, A V

    2016-02-01

    In experiment on rabbits a comparative analysis of various methods of a biliary peritonitis simulation was conducted. In 6 animals a biliary peritonitis was simulated, using perforation of a gallbladder, local serous-fibrinous peritonitis have occurred in 50% of them. In 7 animals biliary peritonitis was simulated, applying intraabdominal injection of medical sterile bile in a 5-40 ml volume. Diffuse peritonitis with exudates and stratification of fibrin was absent. Most effective method have appeared that, when intraabdominal injection of bile was done together with E. coli culture in the rate of 0.33 microbal bodies McF (1.0 x 10(8) CFU/ml) on 1 kg of the animal body mass. Diffuse biliary peritonitis have occurred in all 23 animals, including serous-fibrinous one--in 17 (76%), and purulent-fibrinous--in 6 (24%). PMID:27244928

  13. Managing malignant biliary obstruction in pancreas cancer: choosing the appropriate strategy.

    PubMed

    Boulay, Brian R; Parepally, Mayur

    2014-07-28

    Most patients with pancreatic cancer develop malignant biliary obstruction. Treatment of obstruction is generally indicated to relieve symptoms and improve morbidity and mortality. First-line therapy consists of endoscopic biliary stent placement. Recent data comparing plastic stents to self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) has shown improved patency with SEMS. The decision of whether to treat obstruction and the means for doing so depends on the clinical scenario. For patients with resectable disease, preoperative biliary decompression is only indicated when surgery will be delayed or complications of jaundice exist. For patients with locally advanced disease, self-expanding metal stents are superior to plastic stents for long-term patency. For patients with advanced disease, the choice of metallic or plastic stent depends on life expectancy. When endoscopic stent placement fails, percutaneous or surgical treatments are appropriate. Endoscopic therapy or surgical approach can be used to treat concomitant duodenal and biliary obstruction.

  14. Transnasal endoscopic biliary drainage as a rescue management for the treatment of acute cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Itoi, Takao; Sofuni, Atushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Kurihara, Toshio; Ishii, Kentaro; Tsuji, Shujiro; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic biliary drainage has been established to provide effective treatment for acute obstructive jaundice and cholangitis. A recently developed ultrathin transnasal videoendoscope (TNE) is minimally invasive even for critically ill patients and can be performed without conscious sedation. Transnasal endoscopic biliary drainage (TNE-BD) is performed using a front-viewing TNE with approximately 5 mm outer diameter and 2 mm working channel diameter. Finally, 5F naso-biliary tube or plastic stent are placed. Technical success rates are approximately 100% and 70% for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy or placement of self-expandable metallic stent, and intact papilla, respectively. There are no serious complications. In conclusion, although further cases should be accumulated, TNE-BD and in particular, one-step naso-biliary drainage using TNE may be a useful and novel technique for the treatment of acute cholangitis. PMID:21160690

  15. Surgical treatment of incarcerated calculi via laparoscopic bile duct exploration using laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H.; Wang, S. Y.; Jin, X. L.; Jin, J. C.; Gu, H. B.; Zhang, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the practicability and clinical value of applying laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps to laparoscopic bile duct exploration (LCBDE) for the surgical treatment of incarcerated calculi. A total of 63 patients were diagnosed with cholecystolithiasis and choledocholithiasis. The present study performed a retrospective analysis of clinical samples from 16 of these patients who had incarcerated calculi at the terminus of the common bile duct, and who had been treated with laparoscopic cholecystectomy and LCBDE. During the procedure, laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps were used to gently remove the calculi from the common bile duct. Of the surgical procedures that used laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps, one case was unsuccessful and 15 cases were successful. The results of the present study suggested that it may be clinically advisable to use laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps to remove incarcerated calculi from the common bile duct during a laparoscopy, since it is easy, economical and effective. PMID:27698730

  16. [The surgical treatment of hepatic echinococcosis and of its biliary complications].

    PubMed

    Agnifili, A; Gola, P; Ibi, I; Verzaro, R; Carducci, G; Marino, M; Gianfelice, F; De Bernardinis, G

    1993-09-30

    The authors report the experience of 47 patients submitted to surgery for hepatic hydatidosis. Results from different therapeutic procedures are then compared. Finally, possible biliary complications of the hepatic echinococcosis and their surgical treatment are discussed.

  17. Surgical treatment of incarcerated calculi via laparoscopic bile duct exploration using laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H.; Wang, S. Y.; Jin, X. L.; Jin, J. C.; Gu, H. B.; Zhang, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the practicability and clinical value of applying laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps to laparoscopic bile duct exploration (LCBDE) for the surgical treatment of incarcerated calculi. A total of 63 patients were diagnosed with cholecystolithiasis and choledocholithiasis. The present study performed a retrospective analysis of clinical samples from 16 of these patients who had incarcerated calculi at the terminus of the common bile duct, and who had been treated with laparoscopic cholecystectomy and LCBDE. During the procedure, laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps were used to gently remove the calculi from the common bile duct. Of the surgical procedures that used laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps, one case was unsuccessful and 15 cases were successful. The results of the present study suggested that it may be clinically advisable to use laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps to remove incarcerated calculi from the common bile duct during a laparoscopy, since it is easy, economical and effective.

  18. [COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTIC OF VARIOUS METHODS OF SIMULATION OF BILIARY PERITONITIS IN EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Nichitaylo, M Yu; Furmanov, Yu O; Gutsulyak, A I; Savytska, I M; Zagriychuk, M S; Goman, A V

    2016-02-01

    In experiment on rabbits a comparative analysis of various methods of a biliary peritonitis simulation was conducted. In 6 animals a biliary peritonitis was simulated, using perforation of a gallbladder, local serous-fibrinous peritonitis have occurred in 50% of them. In 7 animals biliary peritonitis was simulated, applying intraabdominal injection of medical sterile bile in a 5-40 ml volume. Diffuse peritonitis with exudates and stratification of fibrin was absent. Most effective method have appeared that, when intraabdominal injection of bile was done together with E. coli culture in the rate of 0.33 microbal bodies McF (1.0 x 10(8) CFU/ml) on 1 kg of the animal body mass. Diffuse biliary peritonitis have occurred in all 23 animals, including serous-fibrinous one--in 17 (76%), and purulent-fibrinous--in 6 (24%).

  19. Prevalence, risk factors, and biochemical markers in dogs with ultrasound-diagnosed biliary sludge.

    PubMed

    Secchi, P; Pöppl, A G; Ilha, A; Kunert Filho, H C; Lima, F E S; García, A B; González, F H D

    2012-12-01

    Regarded as an incidental finding, biliary sludge is often diagnosed in dogs on abdominal ultrasound. The aims of the present study were to assess the risk factors, biochemical markers and ultrasonographic findings and to estimate the prevalence and influence of different breeds, sexes, and ages on biliary sludge in dogs. Results demonstrate that the prevalence of biliary sludge is high, especially in senior dogs. The biochemical markers did not have a significant correlation with biliary sludge, and the type of diet was not considered to be the major risk factor. Hepatomegaly was frequently observed on the ultrasound scan of affected animals and of dogs on different systemic drugs and with cardiopathies, which have been referred to as risk groups for the development of inspissated bile.

  20. The Brain in Pain

    PubMed Central

    AHMAD, Asma Hayati; ABDUL AZIZ, Che Badariah

    2014-01-01

    Pain, while salient, is highly subjective. A sensation perceived as painful by one person may be perceived as uncomfortable, not painful or even pleasant to others. Within the same person, pain may also be modulated according to its threat value and the context in which it is presented. Imaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, have identified a distributed network in the brain, the pain-relevant brain regions, that encode the sensory-discriminative aspect of pain, as well as its cognitive and affective/emotional factors. Current knowledge also implicates the prefrontal cortex as the modulatory area for pain, with its subdivisions forming the cortico-cortical pathway, an alternative pain modulatory pathway distinct from the descending modulatory pathway of pain. These findings from neuroimaging in human subjects have paved the way for the molecular mechanisms of pain modulation to be explored in animal studies. PMID:25941463

  1. Diagnosis of bile duct cancer by bile cytology: usefulness of post-brushing biliary lavage fluid

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Sasaki, Keiko; Nagata, Kaori; Ohno, Sachiyo; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Mori, Keita; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Takizawa, Kohei; Kakushima, Naomi; Tanaka, Masaki; Kawata, Noboru; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pathologic evidence of biliary diseases can be obtained from cytology in addition to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP); however, the diagnostic effectiveness is not satisfactory. Study aim: This retrospective, single-center study evaluated the efficacy of various sampling methods for the cytologic diagnosis of bile duct cancer. Patients and methods: Biliary samples included bile that was simply aspirated, brush smear, brush-rinsed saline, and post-brushing biliary lavage fluid. A set of samples was compared for cytologic efficacy in 76 patients with surgically proven bile duct cancer and in 50 patients with benign biliary stricture. Results: The cytologic sensitivity for diagnosing biliary cancer was 34 % with aspirated bile, 32 % with brush smear, 43 % with brush-rinsed saline, and 70 % with post-brushing biliary lavage fluid, in contrast to the null false-positive result in the benign cases. The sensitivity of cytology was significantly higher with post-brushing lavage fluid than with the other three sampling methods (P < 0.0001), and post-brushing lavage fluid improved the cumulative sensitivity by 24 % (P = 0.002). The sensitivity of biliary cytology was also associated with the amount of aspirated bile (P = 0.01) and with the aspiration site (P = 0.03). The rate of cancer positivity in a cytology set differed according to the tumor macroscopic type (85 % in the protruding type vs. 40 % in the flat type; P = 0.003), and according to the size of the cancer (87 % for tumors ≥ 50 mm vs. 66 % for tumors < 50 mm; P = 0.02). Conclusions: Post-brushing biliary lavage fluid cytology provides superior diagnostic efficacy, and its addition to ERCP procedures is recommended for obtaining cytologic evidence of bile duct cancer. PMID:26357678

  2. National assessment of early biliary complications following liver transplantation: incidence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David A; Lentine, Krista L; Xiao, Huiling; Dzebisashvilli, Nino; Schnitzler, Mark; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E; Segev, Dorry L

    2014-04-01

    Despite improved overall liver transplant outcomes, biliary complications remain a significant cause of morbidity. A national data set linking transplant registry and Medicare claims data for 17,012 liver transplant recipients was used to identify all recipients with a posttransplant biliary diagnosis code within the first 6 months after transplantation. Patients were further categorized as follows: a diagnosis without a procedure, a diagnosis and an associated radiological or endoscopic procedure, or a diagnosis treated with surgery. Overall, 15.0% had a biliary diagnosis, 11.2% required a procedure, and 2.2% had a surgical revision. Factors independently associated with biliary complications included donation after cardiac death (DCD), donor age, recipient age, split grafts, and long cold ischemia times. Graft loss was significantly more common for patients with biliary diagnoses [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.89, confidence interval (CI) = 1.63-2.19], interventions (aHR = 2.08, CI = 1.77-2.44), and surgical procedures (aHR = 1.80, CI = 1.31-2.49). Mortality after transplantation was also markedly increased for patients with biliary diagnoses (aHR = 2.18, CI = 1.97-2.40), procedures (aHR = 2.21, CI = 1.99-2.46), and surgeries (aHR = 1.77, CI = 1.41-2.23). In stratified analyses, the impact of early biliary complications was greater for DCD liver recipients, but they remained highly significant for recipients of allografts from brain-dead donors as well. Reducing biliary complications should improve posttransplant survival and reduce graft loss. PMID:24478266

  3. Treatment of biliary complications after liver transplant: results of a single center.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Sedat; Ayvazoglu Soy, Ebru Hatice; Akdur, Aydincan; Kirnap, Mahir; Boyvat, Fatih; Karakayali, Feza; Torgay, Adnan; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    Biliary complications are major sources of morbidity after liver transplant due to vulnerable vascularization of the bile ducts. Biliary complications are the "Achilles' heel" of liver transplant with their high incidence, need for repeated and prolonged treatment, and potential effects on graft and patient survival. Although standardization of reconstruction techniques and improvements in immunosuppression and organ preservation have reduced the incidence of biliary complications, in early reports the morbidity rates are 50%, with related mortality rate 25% to 30%. Prophylaxis is a major issue. Although many risk factors (old donor age, marginal graft, prolonged ischemia time, living-donor liver transplant, partial liver transplant, donation after cardiac death, hepatic arterial thrombosis, organ preservation, chronic rejection, and other donor and recipient characteristics) do not directly affect biliary complications, accumulation of the factors mentioned above, should be avoided. However, no accepted standard has been established. Treatment strategy is a subject of debate. Recently, nonoperative treatment of biliary complications have been preferred for diagnosis and therapy, because percutaneous or endoscopic treatment may prevent the need for surgical intervention. In this study, we reviewed our treatment of early and late biliary complications after liver transplant.

  4. Circadian rhythmic hepatic biliary flow, constituents, concentrations and excretory rates in patients after cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Ho, K J

    1994-01-01

    Twelve adult patients with indwelling common bile duct T-tube were selected for the study of circadian fluctuation of biliary excretion. From the 10th postoperative day on when the enterohepatic circulation was well reestablished a 5 ml bile sample was collected at the end of each 4-h interval for 3 to 4 days for determination of the concentrations of various biliary constituents. This was followed by measurement of bile flow rate by collecting the bile continuously through the T-tube at 4-h intervals for another 3 to 4 days. One quarter of the twelve patients showed no persistent daily fluctuation of all the variables studied. A circadian rhythm was demonstrated by single cosinor rhythmometry in the biliary concentrations of bile acid, cholesterol, phospholipid, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the remaining nine patients. Among them six also showed a circadian fluctuation of hepatic bile flow. The lack of synchronization of the rhythm of the concentrations of various biliary constituents with the bile flow rate resulted in undetectability of a circadian rhythm for their excretory rate in the great majority of patients. Those few patients in whom a rhythm remained to be detectable had a much reduced amplitude but the same acrophase. We concluded that bile flow rate played a major role in the circadian rhythm of biliary excretion and might coordinate the fluctuation of the concentrations of various biliary constituents. However, a true circadian rhythm for their concentrations also existed at least in certain subjects.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage as an alternative to percutaneous drainage and surgical bypass

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography had been a treatment modality of choice for both benign and malignant biliary tract obstruction for more than half century, with a very high clinical success rate and low complications. But in certain circumstances, such as advanced and locally advanced pancreatobiliary malignancies (pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, ampullary tumor) and tight benign strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) fails. Up to this point, the only alternative interventions for these conditions were percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventions was introduced for a couple decades with the better visualization and achievement of the pancreatobiliary tract. And it’s still in the process of ongoing development. The inventions of new techniques and accessories lead to more feasibility of high-ended procedures. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage was a novel treatment modality for the patient who failed ERCP with the less invasive technique comparing to surgical bypass. The technical and clinical success was high with acceptable complications. Regarded the ability to drain the biliary tract internally without an exploratory laparotomy, this treatment modality became a very interesting procedures for many endosonographers, worldwide, in a short period. We have reviewed the literature and suggest that endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage is also an option, and one with a high probability of success, for biliary drainage in the patients who failed conventional endoscopic drainage. PMID:25610532

  6. Mutagenicity of bile and pancreatic juice from patients with pancreatico-biliary maljunction.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, T; Tsuji, T; Miyama, A; Yamaguchi, H; Funabiki, T

    1995-04-01

    We attempted to detect mutagenic activity in bile and pancreatic juice from patients with biliary tract disease using the spore rec assay and wild (H17) and mutant (M45) strains. Three bile samples out of 5 obtained from patients with pancreatico-biliary maljunction showed positive reaction in the spore rec assay, and all contained a high level of amylase activity, while 300 microliters of bile samples obtained from 10 control patients without pancreatico-biliary maljunction did not show any positive reaction. Moreover, 300 microliters of the in vitro mixture of bile with an equal volume of pancreatic juice also showed a positive reaction after treatment for 12 days at 37 degrees C or for 10 min at 100 degrees C, suggesting that they were very stable and long-acting in vivo. These data suggest that possible mutagens might be formed by the mixing of bile with pancreatic juice regurgitated into the biliary tract, and that there might be a relationship to biliary tract cancer which often accompanies pancreatico-biliary maljunction.

  7. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Pai, Madhava Xi Feng; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Ao Guokun; Kyriakides, Charis; Dickinson, Robert; Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  8. Spontaneously removed biliary stent drainage versus T-tube drainage after laparoscopic common bile duct exploration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yakun; Dong, Chengyong; Ma, Kexin; Long, Fei; Jiang, Keqiu; Shao, Ping; Liang, Rui; Wang, Liming

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE) as a minimally invasive treatment options for choledocholithiasis. Use of T-tube or biliary stent drainage tube placement after laparoscopic choledochotomy for common bile duct (CBD) stones is still under debate. This study tried to confirm the safety of spontaneously removable biliary stent in the distal CBD after LCBDE to allow choledochus primary closure. A total of 47 patients with choledocholithiasis underwent LCBDE with primary closure and internal drainage using a spontaneously removable biliary stent drainage tube (stent group, N = 22) or T-tube (T-tube group, N = 25). Operative parameters and outcomes are compared. Surgical time, intraoperative blood loss, length of hospital stay, drainage tube removal time, postoperative intestinal function recovery, and cost of treatment were all significantly lower in the stent group as compared to that in the T-tube group (P < 0.05 for all). Otherwise, Bile leakage between the two groups had no significant difference (P > 0.05). The biliary stent drainage tube was excreted spontaneously 4 to 14 days after surgery with the exception of one case, where endoscopic removal of biliary tube was required due to failure of its spontaneous discharge. LCBDE with primary closure and use of spontaneously removable biliary stent drainage showed advantage over the use of traditional T-tube drainage in patients with choledocholithiasis.

  9. Ultracentrifugal isolation of vesicular carriers of biliary cholesterol in native human and rat bile.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, N; Garrido, J; Nervi, F

    1987-01-01

    We have utilized ultracentrifugation of native bile-Metrizamide density gradients to isolate a vesicular transport system of biliary lipids in both man and rat. We identified vesicular structures by electron microscopy. Fresh bile specimens were obtained from bile fistula rats (unsaturated bile) and from patients 1 week after bile duct surgery (supersaturated bile). Metrizamide was dissolved in bile (33% w/v), and continuous density gradients were performed with undiluted bile (density limits = 1.020 to 1.300 gm per ml). The relative distribution of biliary cholesterol, phospholipid and bile salt was studied as a function of the density of the fractions. Approximately 50% of total rat biliary cholesterol and between 61 and 90% of human biliary cholesterol was concentrated in the lightest fractions of the gradients (density less than 1.060 gm per ml). In contrast, less than 20% of bile salts was present in fractions with densities lower than 1.060 gm per ml. The highest amounts of bile salts and phospholipids of the bile-Metrizamide density gradients were found in the density range of 1.075 to 1.100 gm per ml in both human and rat bile. More than 80% of biliary proteins was found in fractions with densities greater than 1.075 gm per ml, and only 2% was found in the cholesterol-rich fraction with density less than 1.060 gm per ml in both species. When bile salt concentration was raised in rat bile from 38 to 97 mM by adding taurocholate, the low density cholesterol-rich fraction almost disappeared. Electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations of the fractions with density less than 1.060 gm per ml showed 40 to 120 nm vesicles, which were not apparent in the other fractions. Similar vesicles were demonstrated also in fresh rat bile and within the canaliculi after acute depletion of the bile salt pool (biliary bile salt concentration of 3.45 mM; total biliary lipid concentration of 0.25 gm%). The structure of these vesicles was shown in thin sections of liver

  10. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated.

  11. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated. PMID:9037997

  12. Chiropractic care for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  13. Managing your chronic back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  14. Chronically symptomatic patients with undetectable gall bladder on ultrasonography could benefit from early cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Stephen D; Blackburn, Simon C; Adewole, Victoria A; Mahomed, Anies A

    2013-01-01

    90 percent of symptomatic patients undergoing cholecystectomy have cholelithiasis with 10% categorized as asymptomatic cholecystitis. In both instances, the gallbladder is evident on ultrasonography. In children with symptomatic biliary dyspepsia, the decision to proceed to cholecystectomy is made difficult if choleliths are not seen on ultrasonography. This decision is made even more difficult if the gallbladder itself is not seen on repeated imaging. In a cohort of 54 cholecystectomies, 3 cases, with recurrent right upper quadrant pain and undetectable gallbladders on repeat ultrasonography, were identified. After prolonged observation all underwent successful cholecystectomy. Histology demonstrated a markedly fibrotic and thickened gallbladder in all. Given this experience, we suggest that nonvisibility of the gallbladder, in fact, maybe be a feature of a chronic acalculous cholecystitis. We advise consideration of cholecystectomy for chronic biliary dyspepsia where repeat ultrasonography fails to demonstrate a gallbladder. PMID:23401761

  15. [Biliary atresias operated with favourable results: predictable outcome].

    PubMed

    Broto, J; Gil Vernet, J M; Ormaechea, M

    2005-01-01

    Since 1975, our experience in the treatment of biliary atresia with Kasai's technique has improved little by little, achieving 65% favourable outcome in the last five years. We define "good results" as the complete restoration of biliary flow and normalization of bilirrubin levels. The long-term evolution of these good results can be diverse. The objective of the present work is to analyze the outcome of patients in our series in whom a favourable initial response was achieved, as well as evaluating their present situation and future perspectives. The authors present a total of 17 patients operated by Kasai's technique since 1985, that constitutes the group with good results in our series. The controls were based on general analysis, liver function and periodic ultrasound explorations. All received a standardized medical treatment consisting of vitamin supplements (A, D3, E, K) minerals (zinc, calcium, phosphate, iron) ursodexoxicolic acid, luminal,as well as close control of calorie intake. In two patients the levels of bilirrubine were progressively increased with time, stabilizing at between 5/6 mgs/100 ml, with progressive hepatic hardening, appearance of splenomegalia, indirect signs of portal hypertension and a slight deterioration of hepatic function. One received a transplant at age 12 with Quick levels below 50%. The other, aged 16, continues with an acceptable hepatic function and good quality of life under recommendation of transplant. Eleven patients with ages ranging from fourteen months to seventeen years presented slight and firm hepatomegalia, moderate portal hypertension, GOT 71 +/- 8 mg/100 ml, GPT 97 +/- 11 mg/100 ml and normal bilirrubine levels. From this group, 3 patients, all under five years of age, experienced bleeding from esophageal varices which were controlled by sclerosis and medical treatment (propanolol and isosorbide dinitrate). Recently, one three year-old patient developed a hepatocarcinoma of rapid, mortal evolution. Since then

  16. Endoscopic management of biliary complications after liver transplantation: An evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Macías-Gómez, Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Biliary tract diseases are the most common complications following liver transplantation (LT) and usually include biliary leaks, strictures, and stone disease. Compared to deceased donor liver transplantation in adults, living donor liver transplantation is plagued by a higher rate of biliary complications. These may be promoted by multiple risk factors related to recipient, graft, operative factors and post-operative course. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is the first-choice examination when a biliary complication is suspected following LT, in order to diagnose and to plan the optimal therapy; its limitations include a low sensitivity for the detection of biliary sludge. For treating anastomotic strictures, balloon dilatation complemented with the temporary placement of multiple simultaneous plastic stents has become the standard of care and results in stricture resolution with no relapse in > 90% of cases. Temporary placement of fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) has not been demonstrated to be superior (except in a pilot randomized controlled trial that used a special design of FCSEMSs), mostly because of the high migration rate of current FCSEMSs models. The endoscopic approach of non-anastomotic strictures is technically more difficult than that of anastomotic strictures due to the intrahepatic and/or hilar location of strictures, and the results are less satisfactory. For treating biliary leaks, biliary sphincterotomy and transpapillary stenting is the standard approach and results in leak resolution in more than 85% of patients. Deep enteroscopy is a rapidly evolving technique that has allowed successful treatment of patients who were not previously amenable to endoscopic therapy. As a result, the percutaneous and surgical approaches are currently required in a minority of patients. PMID:26078829

  17. Bile Culture and Susceptibility Testing of Malignant Biliary Obstruction via PTBD

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Haipeng; Guo Zhi Xing Wenge; Guo Xiuying; Liu Fang; Li Baoguo

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the information obtained by bile culture and susceptibility testing for malignant biliary obstruction by a retrospective one-center study. Methods: A total of 694 patients with malignant biliary obstruction received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during the period July 2003 to September 2010, and subsequently, bile specimens were collected during the procedure. Among the 694 patients, 485 were men and 209 were women, ranging in age from 38 to 78 years (mean age 62 years). Results: A total of 42.9% patients had a positive bile culture (298 of 694). Further, 57 species of microorganisms and 342 strains were identified; gram-positive bacteria accounted for 50.9% (174 of 342) and gram-negative bacteria accounted for 41.5% (142 of 342) of these strains. No anaerobes were obtained by culture during this study. The most common microorganisms were Enterococcus faecalis (41 of 342, 11.9%), Escherichia coli (34 of 342, 9.9%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (28 of 342, 8.2%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (19 of 342, 5.5%), Enterococcus (18 of 342, 5.3%), and Enterobacter cloacae (16 of 342, 4.7%). The percentage of {beta}-lactamase-producing gram-positive bacteria was 27.6% (48 of 174), and the percentage of gram-negative bacteria was 19.7% (28 of 142). The percentage of enzyme-producing Escherichia coli was 61.7% (21 of 34). Conclusion: The bile cultures in malignant biliary obstruction are different from those in the Tokyo Guidelines and other benign biliary obstruction researches, which indicates that a different antibacterial therapy should be applied. Thus, knowledge of the antimicrobial susceptibility data could aid in the better use of antibiotics for the empirical therapy of biliary infection combined with malignant biliary obstruction.

  18. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  19. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for increased overall health care costs. A person’s perception of pain can be affected by emotional factors. ... medications such as levodopa can affect a person’s perception of pain. People with Parkinson’s who are in ...

  20. Rib cage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply) Home ...

  1. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    SIJ pain - aftercare; SIJ dysfunction - aftercare; SIJ strain - aftercare; SIJ subluxation -aftercare; SIJ syndrome - aftercare ... little movement at the SIJ. Major reasons for pain around the SIJ include: Muscle tightness Pregnancy: the ...

  2. Pain in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew Rd; Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients' quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available. PMID:26516548

  3. Eldercare at Home: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, and may be best treated with physical therapy without taking any medicine at all. Pain can ... medicine and non-medicine strategies. Treatments such as physical therapy, massage, heat and/or cold packs, exercise, and ...

  4. Lower Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor. Get plenty of rest and use an anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve pain. If your pain is ... or a HERNIATED DISK. Apply heat, use an anti-inflammatory medicine and get rest. If you don't ...

  5. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve pain due to: Cancer Carpal tunnel syndrome Fibromyalgia Childbirth (labor) Musculoskeletal injuries (such as the neck, ... pain for: After surgery or labor Arthritis Cancer Fibromyalgia Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine headache Tension headache Both ...

  6. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described. PMID:9298380

  7. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... block. This is an injection of an anesthetic (pain reliever) into certain nerves to block the pain signals. If the injection works, it may be repeated. Physical therapy and psychological counseling are also helpful. However, a ...

  8. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... related, condition. Chronic Pain and the Americans with Disabilities Act Is chronic pain a disability under the ADA? The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of ...

  9. Ketogenic Diets and Pain

    PubMed Central

    Masino, Susan A.; Ruskin, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Ketogenic diets are well-established as a successful anticonvulsant therapy. Based on overlap between mechanisms postulated to underlie pain and inflammation, and mechanisms postulated to underlie therapeutic effects of ketogenic diets, recent studies have explored the ability for ketogenic diets to reduce pain. Here we review clinical and basic research thus far exploring the impact of a ketogenic diet on thermal pain, inflammation, and neuropathic pain. PMID:23680946

  10. Back pain: osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bandilla, K K

    1977-02-01

    Back pain is one of the chief complaints of the elderly. It may be either a chronic deep skeletal muscular pain or an acute circumscribed pain arising from nerve-root irritation. The main causes of back pain in older people are: 1) degenerative changes (spondylosis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing hyperostosis); 2) malignancy (multiple myeloma, metastases from carcinoma or lymphoma); and 3) metabolic disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia, chondrocalcinosis, Paget's disease). Mechanisms and variations are discussed in detail.

  11. Low back pain, radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Selkirk, Stephen M; Ruff, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is a pervasive problem in the adult population. Most patients with low back pain will not require imaging as spontaneous recovery within 12 weeks is the rule. However, a small percentage of patients with low back pain will have serious underlying pathology requiring more intensive investigation. This chapter delineates the signs and symptoms related to potential serious underlying causes and discusses appropriate imaging modalities that should be utilized in patients with low back pain. PMID:27430456

  12. Brain abscess in hepatopulmonary syndrome associated with biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Morita, Keiichi; Fukuzawa, Hiroaki; Maeda, Kosaku

    2015-12-01

    The first-choice therapy for biliary atresia (BA) is Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy, which has been shown to greatly improve outcome. Various long-term complications, however, such as portal hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), can occur in patients with native liver. A rare case of brain abscess in an 11-year-old girl with HPS associated with BA is reported. The patient underwent hepatoportoenterostomy for BA at 53 days of age, with resolution of hyperbilirubinemia. At 10 years of age, she was diagnosed with severe HPS with right-to-left shunting, and preparations for liver transplantation proceeded. Three months after the diagnosis, she had a right parietal brain abscess. Given that the brain abscess enlarged in size, surgical drainage of the brain abscess was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, but a slight left hemiplegia remained at discharge. The presumed mechanism of abscess formation in HPS may be right-to-left bacterial transit through intrapulmonary vascular dilatations and/or arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:26711920

  13. Molecular profiling of biliary tract cancer: a target rich disease

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are relatively uncommon orphan tumors that have an aggressive disease course and a poor clinical outcome. Surgery is the only curative treatment, but most patients present with advanced disease and therefore have a limited survival. Gemcitabine and cisplatin based chemotherapy has been the only widely accepted standard systemic therapy regimen in these patients but these tumors can be chemoresistant, further complicating their management. In recent times, there has been considerable research in the genetics of BTC and with the advent of new, advanced technologies like next-generation sequencing (NGS) we are achieving a greater understanding of its disease biology. With the help of NGS, we have now been able to identify actionable mutations such as in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), FGFR2, BRAF and HER2/neu genes for targeted therapeutics and correlate the genetic variations with distinct clinical prognoses. This recent genetic information has the potential to make precision medicine a part of routine clinical practice for the management of BTC patients. PMID:27747093

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts in Children with Biliary Atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Huppert, Peter E.; Goffette, Pierre; Sokal, Emil M.; Schweizer, Paul; Claussen, Claus D.

    2002-12-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the technical and long-term clinical results of transjugularintrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) in children with portal hypertension and biliary atresia (BA). Methods: Nine children with BA and recurrent bleeding from esophagogastric and/or intestinal varices were treated by TIPS at the age of 34-156 months and followed-up in two centers. Different types of stents were used. Results: Shunt insertion succeeded in all patients, but in two a second procedure was necessary. Seven procedures lasted more than 3 hr, mainly due to difficult portal vein puncture.Variceal bleeding ceased in all patients; however, 16 reinterventions were performed in eight patients for clinical reasons (n =11) and sonographically suspected restenosis (n =5). Four patients underwent successful liver transplantation 4-51 months after TIPS and five are in good clinical conditions 64-75 months after TIPS. Conclusions: TIPS in children with BA is technically difficult, mainly due to periportal fibrosis and small portal veins. Frequency of reinterventions seems to be higher compared with adults.

  15. Xenobiotics and loss of tolerance in primary biliary cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinjun; Yang, Guoxiang; Dubrovsky, Alana Mari; Choi, Jinjung; Leung, Patrick SC

    2016-01-01

    Data from genome wide association studies and geoepidemiological studies established that a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental stimulation is required for the loss of tolerance in primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). The serologic hallmark of PBC are the presence of high titer anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA) that recognize the lipoyl domain of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E2 (PDC-E2) subunit. Extensive efforts have been directed to investigate the molecular basis of AMA. Recently, experimental data has pointed to the thesis that the breaking of tolerance to PDC-E2 is a pivotal event in the initial etiology of PBC, including environmental xenobiotics including those commonly found in cosmetics and food additives, suggesting that chemical modification of the PDC-E2 epitope may render its vulnerable to become a neo-antigen and trigger an immune response in genetically susceptible hosts. Here, we will discuss the natural history, genetics and immunobiology of PBC and structural constraints of PDC-E2 in AMA recognition which makes it vulnerable to chemical modification. PMID:26755880

  16. Primary biliary cirrhosis: Clinical and laboratory criteria for its diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic progressive cholestatic granulomatous, and destructive inflammatory lesion of small intralobular and septal bile ducts, which is likely to be caused by an autoimmune mechanism with a the presence of serum antimitochondrial antibodies and a potential tendency to progress to cirrhosis. Despite the fact that the etiology of this disease has been unknown so far, there has been a considerable body of scientific evidence that can reveal the clinical and laboratory signs of PBC and the individual components of its pathogenesis and elaborate diagnostic criteria for the disease and its symptomatic therapy. Deficiencies in autoimmune tolerance are critical factors for the initiation and perpetuation of the disease. The purpose of this review is to summarize the data available in the literature and the author’s findings on clinical and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis of PBC. This review describes the major clinical manifestations of the disease and the mechanisms of its development. It presents the immunological, biochemical, and morphological signs of PBC and their significance for its diagnosis. A great deal of novel scientific evidence for the problem of PBC has been accumulated. However, the inadequate efficiency of therapy for the disease lends impetus to the quest for its etiological factors and to further investigations of its pathogenetic mechanisms and, on this basis, to searches for new methods for its early diagnosis. PMID:26167070

  17. Prolonged treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Crippa, G; Cagnoni, C; Castelli, A; Concesi, C; Girometta, S; Pancotti, D; Sverzellati, E; Tacchini, G; Pierfranceschi, M G; Carrara, G C

    1995-05-01

    Eighteen patients affected with biopsy-proved primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) (histological stage III and IV) received ursodeoxicholic acid (UDCA) 600 mg for 1 year. Signs and symptoms and biochemical tests (glutamic and oxalcetic transaminase, glutamic and pyruvic transaminase, bilirubine, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase, bile acids, plasma proteins electrophoresis, immunoglubulins A, G and M) and antimitochondrial antibodies were evaluated before the treatment and every four months during the treatment. The results were compared with those obtained in 8 untreated patients affected PBC. The control group of patients were comparable (as far as age, histological stage, biochemical tests are concerned) to the group who received UDCA. Bilirubine, ALP, gamma-GT and LAP decreased during the treatment with UDCA and remained lower than baseline values until the end of the observation (12 months), while no changes occurred in the untreated patients. Both in the treated and untreated group plasma protein electrophoresis, serum immunoglubulins A, G and M remained unchanged, as well as anti-mitochondrial antibody. A moderate reduction of transaminases and bile acids was observed in the group of patients receiving UDCA but it did not reach statistical significance. In 16 out of the 18 treated patients pruritus disappeared and resulted diminished in the remaining 2 patients. No significant amelioration of pruritus was observed in the patients who did not receive UDCA. In conclusion, our data show that prolonged treatment with UDCA drastically reduces pruritus and improves cholestasis biochemical tests in patients affected with symptomatic PBC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Biliary epithelial senescence and plasticity in acute cellular rejection.

    PubMed

    Brain, J G; Robertson, H; Thompson, E; Humphreys, E H; Gardner, A; Booth, T A; Jones, D E J; Afford, S C; von Zglinicki, T; Burt, A D; Kirby, J A

    2013-07-01

    Biliary epithelial cells (BEC) are important targets in some liver diseases, including acute allograft rejection. Although some injured BEC die, many can survive in function compromised states of senescence or phenotypic de-differentiation. This study was performed to examine changes in the phenotype of BEC during acute liver allograft rejection and the mechanism driving these changes. Liver allograft sections showed a positive correlation (p < 0.0013) between increasing T cell mediated acute rejection and the number of BEC expressing the senescence marker p21(WAF1/Cip) or the mesenchymal marker S100A4. This was modeled in vitro by examination of primary or immortalized BEC after acute oxidative stress. During the first 48 h, the expression of p21(WAF1/Cip) was increased transiently before returning to baseline. After this time BEC showed increased expression of mesenchymal proteins with a decrease in epithelial markers. Analysis of TGF-β expression at mRNA and protein levels also showed a rapid increase in TGF-β2 (p < 0.006) following oxidative stress. The epithelial de-differentiation observed in vitro was abrogated by pharmacological blockade of the ALK-5 component of the TGF-β receptor. These data suggest that stress induced production of TGF-β2 by BEC can modify liver allograft function by enhancing the de-differentiation of local epithelial cells.

  19. [Biliary sludge: diagnosis and treatment at an outpatient's clinic].

    PubMed

    Manushkin, O N; Burdina, E G; Novozhenova, E V; Vasil'chenko, S A; Gurova, N Iu

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study--to develop a diagnostic and management tactics for patients with biliary sludge (BS) in an outpatient setting. The study included 115 patients who, according to the ultrasound revealed a BS. Own methodological approach used by ultrasound scan of the gall bladder and the interpretation of ultrasonographic BS types: Type 1 (suspension echo-positive particles) was set at 59.1%, type 2 (low level of mobile like putty echo-positive bile)--23.5%, 3 type (like putty bile in the form of mobile and/or fixed clots)--17.4%. For the treatment of BS used drugs ursodeoxycholic acid. The daily dosage depends upon the type BS. For the treatment of type 1 requires a minimum of 1 month, 2 types--not less than 3 months. Sludge was the most resistant type 3, which is the duration of treatment was 6-12 months or more. Allocation of risk factors forming the BS is the basis for the formation of risk groups and prevention activities (including pharmacotherapeutic).

  20. Feasibility and safety of using Soehendra stent retriever as a new technique for biliary access in endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and safety of the use of soehendra stent retriever as a new technique for biliary access in endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage. METHODS: The medical records and endoscopic reports of the patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) owing to failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in our institute between June 2011 and January 2014 were collected and reviewed. All the procedures were performed in the endoscopic suite under intravenous sedation with propofol and full anaesthetic monitoring. Then we used the Soehendra stent retriever as new equipment for neo-tract creation and dilation when performing EUS-BD procedures. The patients were observed in the recovery room for 1-2 h and transferred to the regular ward, patients’ clinical data were reviewed and analysed, clinical outcomes were defined by using several different criteria. Data were analysed by using SPSS 13 and presented as percentages, means, and medians. RESULTS: A total of 12 patients were enrolled. The most common indications for EUS-BD in this series were failed common bile duct cannulation, duodenal obstruction, failed selective intrahepatic duct cannulation, and surgical altered anatomy for 50%, 25%, 16.7%, and 8.3%, respectively. Seven patients underwent EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (58.3%), and 5 underwent EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy (41.7%). The technical success rate was 100%, while the clinical success rate was 91.7%. Major and minor complications occurred in 16.6% and 33.3% of patients, respectively, but there were no procedure-related death. CONCLUSION: Soehendra stent retriever could be used as an alternative instrument for biliary access in endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage. PMID:25759542