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Sample records for acanthamoeba keratitis ak

  1. Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Pogson, C

    1993-01-01

    1. Acanthamoeba keratitis is an uncommon but increasingly prevalent infection with the potential to cause severe ocular damage. Acanthamoeba is a nonflagellated free-living amoeba that is ubiquitous in the environment. The most common type is A castellani, but A polyphagia, A rhysodes, A culbertson, and A hatchetti have been isolated from infected eyes. 2. Clinical features include foreign body sensation, blurred vision, tearing, and photophobia. There is minimal pain in the early stages of infection, but severe pain is a manifestation of the advanced stages of the disease. 3. The incidence of Acanthamoeba keratitis appears to be decreasing because of increased awareness, but education emphasizing proper lens sterilization is essential and should be carried out when contact lenses are first dispensed. PMID:8158668

  2. Photochemotherapeutic strategies against Acanthamoeba keratitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here, we determined the potential of photochemotherapy, namely the application of photodynamic compounds followed by exposure to a suitable source of UV-visible radiation against corneal pathogen, Acanthamoeba. Organometallic macromolecule, tin porphyrin [Sn(IV)porphyrin] was synthesized and purity confirmed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The Sn(IV)porphyrin was tested against a keratitis isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype using growth and viability assays. The effects of Sn(IV)porphyrin on A. castellanii binding to and cytopathogenicity of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro were tested. The metalloporphyrin showed potent amoebistatic effects. The tin porphyrin inhibited amoebae binding to and cytopathogenicity of corneal epithelial cells. By using derivatives of photodynamic compounds [Sn(IV)porphyrin-antibody conjugates] for selective targeting of the parasite together with appropriate selection of light source will determine the potential of photochemotherapy against Acanthamoeba keratitis. PMID:22950898

  3. Medical interventions for acanthamoeba keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Alkharashi, Majed; Lindsley, Kristina; Law, Hua Andrew; Sikder, Shameema

    2016-01-01

    Background Acanthamoeba are microscopic, free-living, single-celled organisms which can infect the eye and lead to Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). AK can result in loss of vision in the infected eye or loss of eye itself; however, there are no formal guidelines or standards of care for the treatment of AK. Objectives To evaluate the relative effectiveness and safety of medical therapy for the treatment of AK. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to January 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2015), PubMed (1948 to January 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (1982 to January 2015), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic search for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 9 January 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of medical therapy for AK, regardless of the participants' age, sex, or etiology of disease. We included studies that compared either anti-amoeba therapy (drugs used alone or in combination with other medical therapies) with no anti-amoeba therapy or one anti-amoeba therapy with another anti-amoeba therapy. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened search results and full-text reports, assessed risk of bias, and abstracted data. We used standard methodological procedures as set forth by the Cochrane Collaboration. Main results We included one RCT (56 eyes of 55 participants) in this review. The study compared two types of topical biguanides for the treatment of AK

  4. Culture Negative Confoscan Positive Acanthamoeba Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Al Kharousi, Nadia S; Wali, Upender K

    2009-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a protozoal infection of the eye, mainly due to the use of non-sterile solutions, like saline for disinfecting contact lenses. We report a case where delay in the diagnosis of acanthamoeba keratitis due to inadequate laboratory investigations and clinical management led to an excruciatingly painful course of the disease. The importance of non-invasive imaging techniques of confocal microscopy in the diagnosis of acanthamoeba keratitis, in the absence of positive culture reports, is highlighted in this case. PMID:21509321

  5. The Value of Cytology Smears for Acanthamoeba Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Jamie L.; Paterson, Joyce; Liu, Weiguo; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Acanthamoeba keratitis remains a difficult diagnosis despite advances in genetic and imaging technologies. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the utility of cytology smears for diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Methods. This is a case study of the diagnostic course for a patient with suspected Acanthamoeba keratitis. Results. A 40-year-old male with poor contact lens hygiene presented with severe left eye pain. Slit lamp examination showed two peripheral ring infiltrates without an epithelial defect. The epithelium over both infiltrates was removed with a Kimura spatula. Half of the sample was smeared on a dry microscope slide and the other half was submitted for Acanthamoeba culture and PCR. Both culture and PCR were negative for Acanthamoeba, but hematoxylin and eosin stain of the smear revealed double-walled cysts. Conclusion. H&E staining of corneal cytology specimens is an efficient and readily available test for diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. PMID:27403362

  6. Comparison of Fluorescence Microscopy and Different Growth Media Culture Methods for Acanthamoeba Keratitis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Avi; Geffen, Yuval; Socea, Soergiu D.; Pastukh, Nina; Graffi, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a potentially blinding infection of the cornea, is caused by a free-living protozoan. Culture and microscopic examination of corneal scraping tissue material is the conventional method for identifying Acanthamoeba. In this article, we compared several methods for AK diagnosis of 32 patients: microscopic examination using fluorescent dye, specific culture on growth media—non-nutrient agar (NNA), culture on liquid growth media—peptone yeast glucose (PYG), and TYI-S-33. AK was found in 14 patients. Thirteen of the specimens were found AK positive by fluorescence microscopic examination, 11 specimens were found AK positive on PYG growth media, and 9 specimens were found AK positive on TYI-S-33 growth media. Only five specimens were found AK positive on NNA growth media. Therefore, we recommend using fluorescence microscopy technique and culture method, especially PYG liquid media. PMID:25962772

  7. Acanthamoeba genotypes T3 and T4 as causative agents of amoebic keratitis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Vanzzini-Zago, Virginia; Hernandez-Martinez, Dolores; Gonzalez-Robles, Arturo; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Ramirez-Flores, Elizabeth; Oregon-Miranda, Eric; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Martinez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2016-02-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely distributed worldwide. Some genera included in this group act as opportunistic pathogens causing fatal encephalitis and Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a sight-threatening infection of the cornea associated with the use of soft contact lenses that could even end in blindness if an early diagnosis and treatment are not achieved. Furthermore, the numbers of AK cases keep rising worldwide mainly due to an increase of contact lens wearers and lack of hygiene in the maintenance of lenses and their cases. In Mexico, no cases of AK have been described so far although the isolation of other pathogenic FLA such as Naegleria fowleri and Balamuthia mandrillaris from both clinical and environmental sources has been reported. The present study reports two cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis diagnosed in two patients admitted to the Hospital "Luis Sánchez Bulnes" for Blindness Prevention in Mexico City, Mexico. Corneal scrapes and contact lenses were checked for the presence of Acanthamoeba strains in both patients. Strains were axenized after initial isolation to classify at the genotype level. After sequencing the diagnostic fragment 3 (DF3) region located on the 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene of Acanthamoeba, genotype T3 and genotype T4 were identified in clinical case 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of AK in Mexico in the literature and the first description of Acanthamoeba genotypes T3 and T4 as causative agents of amoebic infection. PMID:26581373

  8. Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Acanthamoeba Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Benjamin; Sinha, Arti; Parmar, Dipak N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to review the recent literature describing Acanthamoeba keratitis and outline current thoughts on pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment as well as currently emerging diagnostic and treatment modalities. PMID:23304449

  9. An update on Acanthamoeba keratitis: diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Khan, Naveed A.; Walochnik, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba are causal agents of a severe sight-threatening infection of the cornea known as Acanthamoeba keratitis. Moreover, the number of reported cases worldwide is increasing year after year, mostly in contact lens wearers, although cases have also been reported in non-contact lens wearers. Interestingly, Acanthamoeba keratitis has remained significant, despite our advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. In part, this is due to an incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of the disease, diagnostic delays and problems associated with chemotherapeutic interventions. In view of the devastating nature of this disease, here we present our current understanding of Acanthamoeba keratitis and molecular mechanisms associated with the disease, as well as virulence traits of Acanthamoeba that may be potential targets for improved diagnosis, therapeutic interventions and/or for the development of preventative measures. Novel molecular approaches such as proteomics, RNAi and a consensus in the diagnostic approaches for a suspected case of Acanthamoeba keratitis are proposed and reviewed based on data which have been compiled after years of working on this amoebic organism using many different techniques and listening to many experts in this field at conferences, workshops and international meetings. Altogether, this review may serve as the milestone for developing an effective solution for the prevention, control and treatment of Acanthamoeba infections. PMID:25687209

  10. An update on Acanthamoeba keratitis: diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Khan, Naveed A; Walochnik, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba are causal agents of a severe sight-threatening infection of the cornea known as Acanthamoeba keratitis. Moreover, the number of reported cases worldwide is increasing year after year, mostly in contact lens wearers, although cases have also been reported in non-contact lens wearers. Interestingly, Acanthamoeba keratitis has remained significant, despite our advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. In part, this is due to an incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of the disease, diagnostic delays and problems associated with chemotherapeutic interventions. In view of the devastating nature of this disease, here we present our current understanding of Acanthamoeba keratitis and molecular mechanisms associated with the disease, as well as virulence traits of Acanthamoeba that may be potential targets for improved diagnosis, therapeutic interventions and/or for the development of preventative measures. Novel molecular approaches such as proteomics, RNAi and a consensus in the diagnostic approaches for a suspected case of Acanthamoeba keratitis are proposed and reviewed based on data which have been compiled after years of working on this amoebic organism using many different techniques and listening to many experts in this field at conferences, workshops and international meetings. Altogether, this review may serve as the milestone for developing an effective solution for the prevention, control and treatment of Acanthamoeba infections. PMID:25687209

  11. Acanthamoeba keratitis presenting as dendritic keratitis in a soft contact lens wearer.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Edward Yip; Huang, Samuel Chao-Ming; Tsai, Ray Jui-Fang

    2002-03-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a rare cause of corneal infection in Taiwan, which can result in devastating visual outcomes. A 37-year-old woman, who wore soft contact lenses, suffered from severe pain in her left eye. Biomicroscopy revealed dendritic keratitis, radial keratoneuritis, and fine keratic precipitates on her cornea. Culture, using non-nutrient agar plate seeded with Escherichia coli, resulted in heavy growth of Acanthamoeba. The inpatient treatment, including topical neomycin-polymyxin B and metronidazole (0.5%) eyedrops, oral ketoconazole, and then oral prednisolone, successfully controlled the corneal infection. The best-corrected visual acuity was 0.9 without any evidence of recurrence of infection after 21 months of follow up. Acanthamoeba keratitis can present as dendritic keratitis, which mimics herpes simplex infection, thus, delays appropriate treatment. Early diagnosis and judicious treatment are essential for restoring the vision and avoiding the subsequent need of penetrating keratoplasty. PMID:12022742

  12. Autophagy inhibitors as a potential antiamoebic treatment for Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Kyung; Kim, So-Hee; Hong, Yeonchul; Chung, Dong-Il; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2015-07-01

    Acanthamoeba cysts are resistant to extreme physical and chemical conditions. Autophagy is an essential pathway for encystation of Acanthamoeba cells. To evaluate the possibility of an autophagic Acanthamoeba encystation mechanism, we evaluated autophagy inhibitors, such as 3-methyladenine (3MA), LY294002, wortmannin, bafilomycin A, and chloroquine. Among these autophagy inhibitors, the use of 3MA and chloroquine showed a significant reduction in the encystation ratio in Acanthamoeba cells. Wortmannin also inhibited the formation of mature cysts, while LY294002 and bafilomycin A did not affect the encystation of Acanthamoeba cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that 3MA and wortmannin inhibited autophagy formation and that chloroquine interfered with the formation of autolysosomes. Inhibition of autophagy or autolysosome formation resulted in a significant block in the encystation in Acanthamoeba cells. Clinical treatment with 0.02% polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) showed high cytopathic effects on Acanthamoeba trophozoites and cysts; however, it also revealed high cytopathic effects on human corneal epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated effects of the combination of a low (0.00125%) concentration of PHMB with each of the autophagy inhibitors 3MA, wortmannin, and chloroquine on Acanthamoeba and human corneal epithelial cells. These new combination treatments showed low cytopathic effects on human corneal cells and high cytopathic effects on Acanthamoeba cells. Taken together, these results provide fundamental information for optimizing the treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis. PMID:25896709

  13. Isolation and genotyping of Acanthamoeba strains (T4, T9, and T11) from amoebic keratitis patients in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hajialilo, Elham; Behnia, Massoud; Tarighi, Fatemeh; Niyyati, Maryam; Rezaeian, Mostafa

    2016-08-01

    The continuous increase in Acanthamoeba keratitis, a severe corneal infection, worldwide is mainly due to the increase in the number of soft contact lens users. In the present study, which involves a 5-year study, a total of 138 corneal scraps and contact lenses together with their paraphernalias were obtained from suspected amoebic keratitis patients. All samples were cultured using culture-enrichment method. Pathogenic assay, using thermotolerance and osmotolerance tests were also performed on the positive strains. Sequencing of the isolated strains was done by targeting the DF3 region of 18s rRNA gene. The results revealed that 18 (13 %) of patients were infected with Acanthamoeba spp. As expected, T4 genotype was the most common genotype among the clinical samples; however, in three cases, Acanthamoeba belonging to T11 and T9 were detected. Interestingly, T9 genotype, commonly classified as non-pathogenic amoebae, was identified as a causal agent of a patient with amoebic keratitis. From the pathogenic assay, four strains belonging to T4 genotypes were highly pathogenic. This is the first report of Acanthamoeba T9 genotypes isolated in Iran and the first report of T9 type occurring in amoebic keratitis patients worldwide. Due to the increasing trend of amoebic keratitis (AK) and the identification of new genotypes, such as T9 as the causative agent of AK, more researches in this field are necessary in the region and the world at large. PMID:27102637

  14. Raman Microspectroscopy Analysis in the Treatment of Acanthamoeba Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Rusciano, Giulia; Capriglione, Paola; Pesce, Giuseppe; Del Prete, Salvatore; Cennamo, Gilda; Di Cave, David; Cerulli, Luciano; Sasso, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a rare but serious corneal disease, often observed in contact lens wearers. Clinical treatment of infected patients frequently involves the use of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), a polymer used as a disinfectant and antiseptic, which is toxic also for the epithelial cells of the cornea. Prompt and effective diagnostic tools are hence highly desiderable for both starting early therapy and timely suspension of the treatment. In this work we use Raman microspectroscopy to analyse in vitro a single Acanthamoeba cell in cystic phase. In particular, we investigate the effect of PHMB at the single-cell level, providing useful information on both the underlying biochemical mechanism and the time frame for Acanthamoeba eradication in ocular infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy, in conjunction with standard multivariate analysis methods, allows discriminating between live and dead Acanthamoebas, which is fundamental to optimizing patients’ treatment. PMID:23977228

  15. Identifying differentially expressed genes in trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype: Implications for developing new treatments for Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Abedkhojasteh, Hoda; Niyyati, Maryam; Rezaei, Sasan; Mohebali, Mehdi; Farnia, Shohreh; Kazemi-Rad, Elham; Roozafzoon, Reza; Sianati, Hamed; Rezaeian, Mostafa; Heidari, Mansour

    2015-02-01

    Acanthamoeba T4 genotype is the most prevalent genotype associated with amoebic keratitis. Acanthamoeba keratitis therapy is difficult due to transformation of trophozoite to cyst stage, which hinders the treatment of the disease. Although encystation assists the organism to survive against the chemotherapeutic compounds, the precise mechanism of encystation remains poorly understood. The purpose of this work was to identify differentially expressed genes in Acanthamoeba T4 genotype which might be useful for understanding of the encystment process and may thus help develop more efficient treatment. The mRNA profile of trophozoite and cyst of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype isolated from a soft contact lens wearer were analyzed using a cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. Subsequently, a real time reverse transcriptase-PCR was performed to validate the cDNA-AFLP results. Three genes, heat shock protein70 (hsp70), actin-I and elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1α) were differentially expressed during Acanthamoeba differentiation. An in silico result predicted that transformation of trophozoite to cyst could be mediated through their cooperation with the protein partners interaction. Taken together, our experimental and bioinformatics findings suggested potential functions of hsp70, EF-1α and actin-I in differentiation of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype which may be useful in the design of an efficient therapeutic strategy in AK. PMID:25543551

  16. Reevaluation of an Acanthamoeba Molecular Diagnostic Algorithm following an Atypical Case of Amoebic Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Rachel; Cunanan, Marlou; Jackson, Jonathan; Ali, Ibne Karim M.; Chong-Kit, Ann; Gasgas, Jason; Tian, Jinfang; Ralevski, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Amoebic keratitis (AK) is a potentially blinding infection, the prompt diagnosis of which is essential for limiting ocular morbidity. We undertook a quality improvement initiative with respect to the molecular detection of acanthamoebae in our laboratory because of an unusual case of discordance. Nine ATCC strains of Acanthamoeba and 40 delinked, biobanked, surplus corneal scraping specimens were analyzed for the presence of acanthamoebae with four separate real-time PCR assays. The assay used by the Free-Living and Intestinal Amebas Laboratory of the CDC was considered the reference standard, and the performance characteristics of each individual assay and pairs of assays were calculated. Outcome measures were sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Of 49 included specimens, 14 (28.6%) were positive by the gold standard assay, and 35 (71.4%) were negative. The sensitivities of the individual assays ranged from 64.3% to 92.9%, compared to the gold standard, while the specificities ranged from 88.6% to 91.4%. The PPVs and NPVs ranged from 69.2% to 78.6% and from 86.1% to 96.9%, respectively. Combinations of assay pairs led to improved performance, with sensitivities ranging from 92.9% to 100% and specificities ranging from 97.1% to 100%. ATCC and clinical strains of Acanthamoeba that failed to be detected by certain individual assays included Acanthamoeba castellanii, Acanthamoeba culbertsoni, and Acanthamoeba lenticulata. For three clinical specimens, false negativity of the gold standard assay could not be excluded. Molecular diagnostic approaches, especially combinations of highly sensitive and specific assays, offer a reasonably performing, operator-independent, rapid strategy for the detection of acanthamoebae in clinical specimens and are likely to be more practical than either culture or direct microscopic detection. PMID:26202123

  17. Acanthamoeba and Fusarium interactions: A possible problem in keratitis.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Thais Esther Teixeira; Brazil, Nathalya Tesch; Fuentefria, Alexandre Meneghello; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of Acanthamoeba and Fusarium species has increased in contact lens-related infectious keratitis. They share several environments and cases of co-infection have been reported. The interaction between the amoebae and other microorganisms may result in significant changes for both, like increased virulence in mammalian hosts. In this study, we evaluated the interaction of three Acanthamoeba castellanii strains with Fusarium conidia and the possible implications on keratitis. F. conidia were internalized by A. castellanii strains and were able to germinate inside the amoebae. The co-culture with the live amoebae, as well as the amoebal culture supernatant and lysate, increased the fungal growth significantly. Moreover, live F. solani and its culture supernatant enhanced the survival of amoebae, but in a different way in each amoebal strain. The encystment of the A. castellanii strain re-isolated from rat lung was increased by the fungus. These results show that A. castellanii and F. solani interaction may have an important influence on survival of both, and specially indicate a possible effect on virulence characteristics of these microorganisms. These data suggest that the A. castellanii-F. solani interaction may cause severe impacts on keratitis. PMID:26851515

  18. Risk factors for acanthamoeba keratitis in contact lens users: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, C. F.; Bacon, A. S.; Dart, J. K.; Minassian, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate reasons for an increase in cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis related to contact lenses. DESIGN--Case-control study. Cases were contact lens related acanthamoeba keratitis patients treated between 1 September 1989 and 31 August 1992. Controls were lens users without lens related disease who presented as new patients to the casualty department from 1 March 1992 to 31 August 1992. All subjects completed a questionnaire detailing lens use and hygiene practices. SETTING--Eye hospital. SUBJECTS--35 cases with acanthamoeba keratitis and 378 controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Relative risks comparing different contact lens types, socioeconomic classification, age, sex, lens use, lens wearing experience, hygiene compliance, and hygiene systems. RESULTS--The crude relative risk for developing acanthamoeba keratitis with the use of daily wear disposable lenses was 49.45 (95% confidence interval 6.53 to 2227; P < 0.001) compared with conventional soft lenses (the referent). Multivariable analysis showed that this increased risk could be largely attributed to lack of disinfection (relative risk 55.86 (10 to 302); P < 0.001) and use of chlorine based disinfection (14.63 (2.8 to 76); P = 0.001) compared with other chemical systems (the referent). None of the other outcome measures showed a significant association. CONCLUSIONS--Both failure to disinfect daily wear soft contact lenses and the use of chlorine release lens disinfection systems, which have little protective effect against the organism, are major risk factors for acanthamoeba keratitis. These risks have been particularly common in disposable lens use. Over 80% of acanthamoeba keratitis could be avoided by the use of lens disinfection systems that are effective against the organism. PMID:7787645

  19. Failure of chemotherapy in the first reported cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Chaudhry, Tanveer; Lakhundi, Sahreena; Ahmad, Khabir; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a painful and progressive infection of the cornea that can result in loss of vision. Here, for the first time in Pakistan, we report two cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis. The first patient was a 37-year-old female who presented with severe itching, redness, pain, along with loss of vision. The patient was a regular soft contact lens wearer. The second patient was a 25-year-old female who had been using soft contact lenses for the past two years. She presented with a burning sensation and extreme pain, along with loss of vision. Both patients were treated for a possible microbial keratitis with topical moxifloxacin hydrochloride drops, vancomycin drops, propamidine isethionate ointment, amphotericin B drops, and amikacin drops. However, the response was inadequate and both patients were referred for corneal transplant. Acanthamoeba castellanii was isolated by placing contact lenses and contact lens cases on non-nutrient agar plates containing a lawn of non-invasive Escherichia coli K-12 HB101 bacteria. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using genus-specific probes confirmed the identity of Acanthamoeba spp., whereas the morphological characteristics of trophozoites and cysts were suggestive of A. castellanii in both cases. With growing use of contact lenses for vision correction/cosmetic use coupled with sub-standard lens care in this region and the possibility of non-contact lens-associated Acanthamoeba keratitis, a need for increased awareness of this sight-threatening infection is discussed further. PMID:24548160

  20. Emerging Threats for Human Health in Poland: Pathogenic Isolates from Drug Resistant Acanthamoeba Keratitis Monitored in terms of Their In Vitro Dynamics and Temperature Adaptability

    PubMed Central

    Chomicz, Lidia; Conn, David Bruce; Padzik, Marcin; Szaflik, Jacek P.; Walochnik, Julia; Zawadzki, Paweł J.; Pawłowski, Witold; Dybicz, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Amphizoic amoebae generate a serious human health threat due to their pathogenic potential as facultative parasites, causative agents of vision-threatening Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). Recently, AK incidences have been reported with increasing frequency worldwide, particularly in contact lens wearers. In our study, severe cases of AK in Poland and respective pathogenic isolates were assessed at clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. Misdiagnoses and the unsuccessful treatment in other ophthalmic units delayed suitable therapy, and resistance to applied chemicals resulted in severe courses and treatment difficulties. Molecular assessment indicated that all sequenced pathogenic corneal isolates deriving from Polish patients with AK examined by us showed 98–100% homology with Acanthamoeba genotype T4, the most prevalent genotype in this human ocular infection worldwide. In vitro assays revealed that the pathogenic strains are able to grow at elevated temperature and have a wide adaptive capability. This study is our subsequent in vitro investigation on pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains of AK originating from Polish patients. Further investigations designed to foster a better understanding of the factors leading to an increase of AK observed in the past years in Poland may help to prevent or at least better cope with future cases. PMID:26682216

  1. Acanthamoeba keratitis in Tennessee: a growing problem in patients wearing contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Johns, K J; Parrish, C M; Seal, M R; Jerkins, G W; Berrie, W R; Litchford, D W; Sullivan, W R; Boone, J E; Elliott, J H; O'Day, D M

    1989-11-01

    All physicians evaluating a painful red eye in a contact lens wearer should consider the diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Although it remains relatively rare, the incidence of this infection is on the rise. Clues to the correct diagnosis include a corneal abrasion that fails to heal appropriately, pain out of proportion to the clinical findings, and a history of poor contact lens hygiene. Prompt recognition and appropriate ophthalmologic intervention can improve the visual outcome for patients with this devastating corneal infection. PMID:2622154

  2. Comparison of molecular diagnostic methods for the detection of Acanthamoeba spp. from clinical specimens submitted for keratitis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Tamber, Gurdip S; Ralevski, Filip; Pillai, Dylan R

    2011-08-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. are responsible for a significant annual number of keratitis (AK) cases leading to vision-threatening disease worldwide. Current methods rely on direct examination of specimens by microscopy and/or culture. The former lacks sensitivity and the latter suffers from a poor turnaround time. We undertook a comparison of all published molecular methods, evaluating performance characteristics such as analytical sensitivity, specificity, limit of detection (LOD), reproducibility, accuracy, and cost of test. The study population comprised 128 patients. Eligible specimens were tested prospectively between April 2007 and May 2010 by microscopy and/or culture. Eleven different specimen types were used including corneal scrapings (51.5%), corneal swab (17.9%), and contact lens material (10.9%). Results of 2 published gel-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 2 published real-time quantitative (Q) PCR methods were compared in a blinded manner to direct microscopic examination and/or culture for the detection of Acanthamoeba in clinical specimens. QPCR (Riviere method) had the highest sensitivity at 89.3%, excellent accuracy using ROC analysis (AUC ∼0.90), lowest LOD down to 0.1 organism per microliter, and superior linear correlation with parasite density (R(2) = 0.9965) when compared with microscopy, culture, and other molecular methods. Phylogenetic analysis using a sequence-based typing method revealed that clinical isolates in this population with AK were genetically distinct from granulomatous amebic encephalitis or environmental isolates. The QPCR method was more expensive ($14.80) than traditional methods such as culture ($2.50) or microscopy ($2.50). However, 13 culture- and microscopy-negative specimens were positive by QPCR during the study period, suggesting that detection using QPCR may result in reduced complications and health care costs associated with misdiagnosed AK. PMID:21658877

  3. Acanthamoeba keratitis update-incidence, molecular epidemiology and new drugs for treatment.

    PubMed

    Seal, D V

    2003-11-01

    A reliable figure for the expected incidence of Acanthamoeba keratitis of one per 30000 contact lens wearers per year has now been obtained from a combination of three cohort and three Questionnaire Reporting Surveys; 88% of cases wore hydrogel lenses and 12% wore rigid lenses. This figure now provides a basis for the expected number of cases against which to judge either epidemic outbreaks or effects of prevention with disinfecting solutions, better hygiene, or the use of disposable lenses. Molecular biology of Acanthamoeba has advanced considerably in the last 10 years with new automated sequencing technology. This has allowed the construction of a genotype identification scheme with 13 different genotypes against which to compare clinical isolates for epidemiological investigations or pathogenicity markers. So far, only four genotypes have been associated with keratitis of which the majority have been T4 but T3, T6, and T11 have each caused individual cases. Each genotype is heterogenous and can be further subdivided by comparison of sequences of diagnostic fragments of 18S rDNA, riboprinting by PCR-RFLP of 18S rDNA, or by mitochondrial DNA RFLP. Drug therapy has been revolutionised with the introduction of the biguanides-chlorhexidine or polyhexamethylene biguanide-with most but not all infections quickly resolving. Failure can still occur occasionally and further research is needed on more effective combination chemotherapy. A number of guanidines have been identified in this paper that could be usefully pursued as part of combination chemotherapy along with the alkylphosphocholines. PMID:14631394

  4. Temperature limitation may explain the containment of the trophozoites in the cornea during Acanthamoeba castellanii keratitis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Mattias Kiel; Nielsen, Kim; Hjortdal, Jesper; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov

    2014-12-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious sight-threatening disease. The relatively low temperature of the cornea may explain why amoebic infections usually are localized in this tissue and rarely spread to other parts of the eye. In this study, the growth rate of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii was examined at different temperatures. The aim was to establish the optimal growth temperature for A. castellanii and to examine the growth within the vicinity of the core body temperature. The growth rates of four clinical and two environmental strains of A. castellanii were estimated at different temperatures, and temperature limitations for the trophozoite stage was established. Movements influenced by temperature gradients were monitored for two clinical strains of A. castellanii. The highest growth rate for each of the six amoebic strains tested was found to be close to 32 °C. The growth of the trophozoites of all examined strains was greatly reduced or completely halted at temperatures above 36 °C and encysted at the elevated temperature. Thus, the optimal growth temperature for the four strains of A. castellanii is close to the surface temperature of the human cornea, while the higher body core-temperature induced encysting of the amoebae. This may explain why most amoebic eye infections are confined to the cornea. PMID:25204727

  5. Role of phospholipase A₂ (PLA₂) inhibitors in attenuating apoptosis of the corneal epithelial cells and mitigation of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Trivendra; Abdi, Mahshid; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if the mannose-induced protein (MIP-133) from Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites induces apoptosis of corneal epithelial cells through a cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α)-mediated pathway. The efficacy of cPLA2α inhibitors to provide protection against Acanthamoeba keratitis was examined in vivo. Chinese hamster corneal epithelial (HCORN) cells were incubated with or without MIP-133. MIP-133 induces significant increase in cPLA2α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2/CXCL2) levels from corneal cells. Moreover, cPLA2α inhibitors, MAFP (Methyl-arachidonyl fluorophosphonate) and AACOCF3 (Arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone), significantly reduce cPLA2α and CXCL2 from these cells (P < 0.05). Additionally, cPLA2α inhibitors significantly inhibit MIP-133-induced apoptosis in HCORN cells (P < 0.05). Subconjunctival injection of purified MIP-133 in Chinese hamster eyes induced cytopathic effects resulting in corneal ulceration. Animals infected with A. castellanii-laden contact lenses and treated with AACOCF3 and CAY10650, showed significantly less severe keratitis as compared with control animals. Collectively, the results indicate that cPLA2α is involved in MIP-133 induced apoptosis of corneal epithelial cells, polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration, and production of CXCL2. Moreover, cPLA2α inhibitors can be used as a therapeutic target in Acanthamoeba keratitis. PMID:23792108

  6. A novel antiamoebic agent against Acanthamoeba sp. - A causative agent for eye keratitis infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusrini, Eny; Hashim, Fatimah; Azmi, Wan Nor Nadhirah Wan Noor; Amin, Nakisah Mat; Estuningtyas, Ari

    2016-01-01

    The terbium trinitrate.trihydrate.18-crown ether-6, Tb(NO3)3(OH2)3.(18C6) complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, photoluminescence and single X-ray diffraction. The IC50 values were determined based on MTT assay while light and fluorescence microscopy imaging were employed to evaluate the cellular morphological changes. Alkaline comet assay was performed to analyze the DNA damage. The photoluminescence spectrum of the Tb complex excited at 325 nm displayed seven luminescence peaks corresponding to the 5D4 → 7F0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 transitions. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies indicated that the Tb(NO3)3(OH2)3.(18C6) complex and its salt form as well as the 18C6 molecule have excellent anti-amoebic activity with very low IC50 values are 7, 2.6 and 1.2 μg/mL, respectively, with significant decrease (p < 0.05) in Acanthamoeba viability when the concentration was increased from 0 to 30 μg/mL. The mode of cell death in Acanthamoeba cells following treatment with the Tb complex was apoptosis. This is in contrast to the Tb(NO3)3.6H2O salt- and 18C6 molecule-treated Acanthamoeba, which exhibited necrotic type cells. The percentage of DNA damage following treatment with all the compounds at the IC25 values showed high percentage of type 1 with the % nuclei damage are 14.15 ± 2.4; 46.00 ± 4.2; 36.36 ± 2.4; 45.16 ± 0.6%, respectively for untreated, treated with Tb complex, Tb salt and 18C6 molecule. The work features promising potential of Tb(NO3)3(OH2)3.(18C6) complex as anti-amoebic agent, representing a therapeutic option for Acanthamoeba keratitis infection.

  7. A novel antiamoebic agent against Acanthamoeba sp.--A causative agent for eye keratitis infection.

    PubMed

    Kusrini, Eny; Hashim, Fatimah; Azmi, Wan Nor Nadhirah Wan Noor; Amin, Nakisah Mat; Estuningtyas, Ari

    2016-01-15

    The terbium trinitrate.trihydrate.18-crown ether-6, Tb(NO3)3(OH2)3.(18C6) complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, photoluminescence and single X-ray diffraction. The IC50 values were determined based on MTT assay while light and fluorescence microscopy imaging were employed to evaluate the cellular morphological changes. Alkaline comet assay was performed to analyze the DNA damage. The photoluminescence spectrum of the Tb complex excited at 325 nm displayed seven luminescence peaks corresponding to the (5)D4→(7)F(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) transitions. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies indicated that the Tb(NO3)3(OH2)3.(18C6) complex and its salt form as well as the 18C6 molecule have excellent anti-amoebic activity with very low IC50 values are 7, 2.6 and 1.2 μg/mL, respectively, with significant decrease (p<0.05) in Acanthamoeba viability when the concentration was increased from 0 to 30 μg/mL. The mode of cell death in Acanthamoeba cells following treatment with the Tb complex was apoptosis. This is in contrast to the Tb(NO3)3.6H2O salt- and 18C6 molecule-treated Acanthamoeba, which exhibited necrotic type cells. The percentage of DNA damage following treatment with all the compounds at the IC25 values showed high percentage of type 1 with the % nuclei damage are 14.15±2.4; 46.00±4.2; 36.36±2.4; 45.16±0.6%, respectively for untreated, treated with Tb complex, Tb salt and 18C6 molecule. The work features promising potential of Tb(NO3)3(OH2)3.(18C6) complex as anti-amoebic agent, representing a therapeutic option for Acanthamoeba keratitis infection. PMID:26474244

  8. Detection Of Bacterial Endosymbionts In Clinical Acanthamoeba Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Iovieno, Alfonso; Ledee, Dolena R.; Miller, Darlene; Alfonso, Eduardo C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the presence of four clinically relevant bacterial endosymbionts in Acanthamoeba isolates obtained from patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and the possible contribution of endosymbionts to the pathogenesis of AK. Design Experimental study Participants Acanthamoeba isolates (N=37) recovered from cornea and contact lens paraphernalia of 23 patients with culture proven AK and 1 environmental isolate. Methods Acanthamoeba isolates were evaluated for the presence of microbial endosymbionts belonging to the bacterial genera Legionella, Pseudomonas, Mycobacteria and Chlamydia using molecular techniques (Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization) and transmission electron microscopy. Corneal toxicity and virulence of Acanthamoeba isolates with and without endosymbionts were compared using a cytopathic effect (CPE) assay of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Initial visual acuity (VA), location and characteristics of the infiltrate, time to detection of the infection and symptoms duration at presentation were evaluated in all patients. Main Outcome Measures Prevalence and potential pathobiology of bacterial endosymbionts detected in Acanthamoeba isolates recovered from AK. Results Twenty-two of the 38 (59.4%) cultures examined contained at least one bacterial endosymbiont. One isolate contained two endosymbionts, Legionella and Chlamydia, confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Corneal toxicity (CPE) was significantly higher for Acanthamoebae hosting endosymbionts compared to isolates without endosymbionts (p<0.05). Corneal pathogenic endosymbionts such as Pseudomonas and Mycobacterium enhanced Acanthamoeba CPE significantly more than Legionella (p<0.05). In the presence of bacterial endosymbionts, there was a trend toward worse initial VA (p>0.05), central location (p<0.05), absence of radial perineuritis (p<0.05), delayed time to detection (p>0.05) and longer symptoms duration at

  9. Twenty Years of Acanthamoeba Diagnostics in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Walochnik, Julia; Scheikl, Ute; Haller-Schober, Eva-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoebae are the causative agents of an often seriously progressing keratitis (AK) occurring predominantly in contact lens wearers and can cause several disseminating infections potentially resulting in granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) in the immunocompromised host. Our institution is the Austrian reference laboratory for Acanthamoeba diagnostics and the aim of this study was to give an overview of proven cases of Acanthamoeba infections in Austria during the past 20 yr. All samples of patients with suspected AK or GAE were screened for Acanthamoeba spp. by culture and/or PCR and the detected amoebae were genotyped. Altogether, 154 cases of AK and three cases of GAE were diagnosed. Age of the AK patients ranged from 8 to 82 yr (mean 37.8) and 58% of the patients were female. Approximately 89% of the AK patients were contact lens wearers, almost all cases were unilateral and 19% of the patients required a keratoplasty. Age of the GAE patients ranged from 2 to 25 yr (mean 14.7), all were HIV-negative, but two were severely immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis. The predominant genotype in the AK cases was T4, other genotypes found were T3, T5, T6, T10 and T11. The three GAE cases involved genotypes T2, T4 and T5. PMID:25047131

  10. Cytotoxic effect of acriflavine against clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba spp.

    PubMed

    Polat, Zubeyda Akin; Karakus, Gulderen

    2013-02-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a potentially devastating and sight-threatening infection of the cornea caused by the ubiquitous free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba species. Its eradication is difficult because the amoebas encyst, making it highly resistant to anti-amoebic drugs. Acriflavine neutral (ACF) has been used for treatment of microbial infections for humans and fishes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the time-dependent cytotoxicities of ACF against Acanthamoeba spp. Trophozoites and cysts of three different strains (strain PAT06 Acanthamoeba castellanii, strain 2HH Acanthamoeba hatchetti, and strain 11DS A. hatchetti) of Acanthamoeba spp. were tested. All strains had been isolated from patients suffering from a severe AK. The effects of the ACF with the concentrations ranging from 15 to 500 mg mL(-1) on the cytotoxicity of Acanthamoeba strains were examined. ACF showed a time- and dose-dependent amebicidal action on the trophozoites and cysts. Pat06 (A. castellanii) was the most resistant, while strain 11DS (A. hatchetti) was the most sensitive. As a result, ACF could be concluded as a new agent for the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections. On the other hand, it still needs to be further evaluated by in vivo test systems to confirm the efficiency of its biological effect. PMID:23052789

  11. Acanthamoeba spp. in Contact Lenses from Healthy Individuals from Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Thiago dos Santos; Magnet, Angela; Izquierdo, Fernando; Vaccaro, Lucianna; Redondo, Fernando; Bueno, Sara; Sánchez, Maria Luisa; Angulo, Santiago; Fenoy, Soledad; Hurtado, Carolina; del Aguila, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a painful and potentially blinding corneal infection caused by Acanthamoeba spp. In Madrid, environmental studies have demonstrated a high presence of these free-living amoebae in tap water. Since most of AK cases occur in contact lenses (CL) wearers with inadequate hygiene habits, the presence of Acanthamoeba in discarded CL has been studied and compared with other common etiological agents of keratitis, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Methods One hundred and seventy-seven healthy individuals from Madrid contributed their discarded CL and answered a questionnaire on hygiene habits. DNA was extracted from the CL solution and analyzed by real-time PCR for Acanthamoeba, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. These CL and their solutions were also cultured on non-nutrient agar to isolate Acanthamoeba. Results Among the 177 samples, Acanthamoeba DNA was detected in 87 (49.2%), P. aeruginosa DNA in 14 (7.9%) and S. aureus DNA in 19 (10.7%). Cultivable amoebae, however, were observed in only one sample (0.6%). This isolate was genotyped as T4. The habits reported by this CL owner included some recognized risk factors for AK, but in this study only the practice of “not cleaning the CL case” presented some statistical significant association with Acanthamoeba DNA presence. Detection of the investigated bacterial DNA did not demonstrate statistical significant association with the studied practices, but the presence of P. aeruginosa revealed a possible inhibition of Acanthamoeba in these samples. Conclusions The PCR results suggest a high presence of Acanthamoeba spp. in healthy CL wearers from Madrid, but we can assume that CL solutions are properly disinfecting the CL since only 1.1% of the positive PCR samples correspond to viable amoebae and, after four years, only one participant reported stronger ocular problems. Nevertheless, more studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis. PMID

  12. In vitro efficacies of clinically available drugs against growth and viability of an Acanthamoeba castellanii keratitis isolate belonging to the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Baig, Abdul Mannan; Iqbal, Junaid; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2013-08-01

    The effects of clinically available drugs targeting muscarinic cholinergic, adrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic receptors; intracellular calcium levels and/or the function of calcium-dependent biochemical pathways; ion channels; and cellular pumps were tested against a keratitis isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype. In vitro growth inhibition (amoebistatic) assays were performed by incubating A. castellanii with various concentrations of drugs in the growth medium for 48 h at 30°C. To determine amoebicidal effects, amoebae were incubated with drugs in phosphate-buffered saline for 24 h, and viability was determined using trypan blue exclusion staining. For controls, amoebae were incubated with the solvent alone. Of the eight drugs tested, amlodipine, prochlorperazine, and loperamide showed potent amoebicidal effects, as no viable trophozoites were observed (>95% kill rate), while amiodarone, procyclidine, digoxin, and apomorphine exhibited up to 50% amoebicidal effects. In contrast, haloperidol did not affect viability, but all the drugs tested inhibited A. castellanii growth. Importantly, amlodipine, prochlorperazine, and loperamide showed compelling cysticidal effects. The cysticidal effects were irreversible, as cysts treated with the aforementioned drugs did not reemerge as viable amoebae upon inoculation in the growth medium. Except for apomorphine and haloperidol, all the tested drugs blocked trophozoite differentiation into cysts in encystation assays. Given the limited availability of effective drugs to treat amoebal infections, the clinically available drugs tested in this study represent potential agents for managing keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba spp. and possibly against other meningoencephalitis-causing amoebae, such as Balamuthia mandrillaris and Naegleria fowleri. PMID:23669391

  13. In Vitro Efficacies of Clinically Available Drugs against Growth and Viability of an Acanthamoeba castellanii Keratitis Isolate Belonging to the T4 Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Abdul Mannan; Iqbal, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    The effects of clinically available drugs targeting muscarinic cholinergic, adrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic receptors; intracellular calcium levels and/or the function of calcium-dependent biochemical pathways; ion channels; and cellular pumps were tested against a keratitis isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype. In vitro growth inhibition (amoebistatic) assays were performed by incubating A. castellanii with various concentrations of drugs in the growth medium for 48 h at 30°C. To determine amoebicidal effects, amoebae were incubated with drugs in phosphate-buffered saline for 24 h, and viability was determined using trypan blue exclusion staining. For controls, amoebae were incubated with the solvent alone. Of the eight drugs tested, amlodipine, prochlorperazine, and loperamide showed potent amoebicidal effects, as no viable trophozoites were observed (>95% kill rate), while amiodarone, procyclidine, digoxin, and apomorphine exhibited up to 50% amoebicidal effects. In contrast, haloperidol did not affect viability, but all the drugs tested inhibited A. castellanii growth. Importantly, amlodipine, prochlorperazine, and loperamide showed compelling cysticidal effects. The cysticidal effects were irreversible, as cysts treated with the aforementioned drugs did not reemerge as viable amoebae upon inoculation in the growth medium. Except for apomorphine and haloperidol, all the tested drugs blocked trophozoite differentiation into cysts in encystation assays. Given the limited availability of effective drugs to treat amoebal infections, the clinically available drugs tested in this study represent potential agents for managing keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba spp. and possibly against other meningoencephalitis-causing amoebae, such as Balamuthia mandrillaris and Naegleria fowleri. PMID:23669391

  14. Acanthamoeba Keratitis FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... lenses improperly Disinfecting lenses improperly (such as using tap water or homemade solutions to clean the lenses) Swimming, ... rinsed with sterile contact lens solution (never use tap water), emptied, and left open to dry after each ...

  15. Ecology of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    De Jonckheere, J F

    1991-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living ameba that is present in all types of environments throughout the world. The recent increase in cases of keratitis, especially in relation to an increase in the use of contact lenses, is probably due to the omnipresence of the organism as a result of the pronounced resistance of its cysts to disinfection and desiccation. The temperature of the eye is lower than that of the rest of the human body. Therefore, the presence of Acanthamoeba strains that grow at lower temperatures may also contribute to infection, thereby increasing the number of possibly infectious amebas. Recent evidence, however, indicates that perhaps only a limited number of species cause ocular disease. Delineation of the exact species of Acanthamoeba that cause keratitis is a prerequisite for the study of the ecology of the keratitis-producing amebas. PMID:2047667

  16. In vitro anti-Acanthamoeba synergistic effect of chlorhexidine and cationic carbosilane dendrimers against both trophozoite and cyst forms.

    PubMed

    Heredero-Bermejo, I; Sánchez-Nieves, J; Soliveri, J; Gómez, R; de la Mata, F J; Copa-Patiño, J L; Pérez-Serrano, J

    2016-07-25

    Acanthamoeba sp. are the causative agents of severe illnesses in humans such as Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE). Medical therapy is not yet well established. Treatments of AK last for several months and generate toxicity, resistances appear due to the cysts stage and recurrences can occur. In this study has been demonstrated that the combination of chlorhexidine digluconate (CLX) and carbosilane dendrimers containing ammonium or guanidine moieties has in vitro synergistic effect against Acanthamoeba polyphaga. This synergy provokes an important reduction in the minimal trophozoite amoebicidal concentration (MTAC) of CLX, which means a reduction of their toxic effects on human cells. Moreover, some CLX/dendrimer combinations show important activity against the cyst resistance stage. PMID:27173821

  17. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens. PMID:22229971

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular secreted proteins expressed by two pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii clinical isolates and a non-pathogenic ATCC strain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Ming; Lin, Wei-Chen; Li, Sung-Chou; Shih, Min-Hsiu; Chan, Wen-Ching; Shin, Jyh-Wei; Huang, Fu-Chin

    2016-07-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a serious ocular disease caused by pathogenic Acanthamoeba gaining entry through wounds in the corneal injury; generally, patients at risk for contracting AK wear contact lenses, usually over a long period of time. Moreover, pathogenic Acanthamoeba causes serious consequences: it makes the cornea turbid and difficult to operate on, including procedures such as enucleation of the eyeball. At present, diagnosis of this disease is not straightforward, and treatment is very demanding. We have established the comparative transcriptome and extracellular secreted proteomic database according to the non-pathogenic strain ATCC 30010 and the pathogenic strains NCKU_B and NCKU_D. We identified 44 secreted proteins successfully, 10 consensus secreted proteins and 34 strain-specific secreted proteins. These proteins may provide targets for therapy and immuno-diagnosis of Acanthamoeba infections. This study shows a suitable approach to identify secreted proteins in Acanthamoeba and provides new perspectives for the study of molecules potentially involved in the AK. PMID:26995533

  19. Acanthamoeba infection in lungs of mice expressed by toll-like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4).

    PubMed

    Derda, Monika; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Hadaś, Edward; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Wandurska-Nowak, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the innate immune responses to a variety of pathogens including parasites. TLRs are among the most highly conserved in the evolution of the receptor family, localized mainly on cells of the immune system and on other cells such as lung cells. The aim of this study was to determine for the first time the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the lung of Acanthamoeba spp. infected mice using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. The Acanthamoeba spp. were isolated from a patient with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) (strain Ac 55) and from environmental samples of water from Malta Lake (Poznań, Poland - strain Ac 43). We observed a significantly increased level of expression of TLR2 as well as TLR4 mRNA from 2 to 30 days post Acanthamoeba infection (dpi) in the lungs of mice infected with Ac55 (KP120880) and Ac43 (KP120879) strains. According to our observations, increased TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the pneumocytes, interstitial cells and epithelial cells of the bronchial tree may suggest an important role of these receptors in protective immunity against Acanthamoeba infection in the lung. Moreover, increased levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression in infected Acanthamoeba mice may suggest the involvement of these TLRs in the recognition of this amoeba pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). PMID:26940205

  20. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hong; Wu, Xinyi

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2 in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88

  1. Isolation and molecular characterization of Acanthamoeba strains isolated from the oral cavity of immunosuppressed individuals in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Memari, Fatemeh; Niyyati, Maryam; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Jonaydi, Zaynab

    2016-09-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. is an opportunistic protozoan parasite which is the causative agent of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). GAE usually occurs in immunocompromised patients which in most cases is fatal. The present study was conducted to determine the genotypes of Acanthamoeba isolated from patients with compromised immunological status. For this purpose, 90 samples from the oral cavity of these individuals were collected in different hospitals of Tehran, Iran using sterile cotton swabs. Samples were cultured in 2% Non-Nutrient Agar (NNA) plates in order to check for the presence of amoebae. Identification of isolates was carried out using both morphological and molecular tools. The pathogenic potential of the obtained strains was assessed by performing osmo- and thermotolerance assays as previously described. Genotyping of the isolates was carried out by PCR/sequencing of the DF3 region of the 18S rDNA gene of Acanthamoeba. From the 90 collected samples, 11 (13.4%) were positive for Acanthamoeba genus. Molecular analysis revealed the presence of genotypes T3, T4 and T11, although most of the isolates belonged to genotype T4. Only 3 of the isolates genotyped as T4 were positive for the pathogenic potential assays. To this end if the immunological status is considered as one of the key factors for the development of GAE due to Acanthamoeba in the previous reported cases, individuals suffering from the conditions mentioned in this study should be considered as a high risk group of population in Iran and worldwide. PMID:27447206

  2. Proteases as Markers for Differentiation of Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Species of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naveed A.; Jarroll, Edward L.; Panjwani, Noorjahan; Cao, Zhiyi; Paget, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a vision-threatening infection caused by pathogenic species of the genus Acanthamoeba. Although not all Acanthamoeba spp. can cause keratitis, it is important to differentiate pathogenic species and isolates from nonpathogens. Since extracellular proteases may play a role in ocular pathology, we used colorimetric, cytopathic, and zymographic assays to assess extracellular protease activity in pathogenic and nonpathogenic Acanthamoeba. Colorimetric assays, using azo-linked protein as a substrate, showed extracellular protease activity in Acanthamoeba-conditioned medium and differentiated pathogenic and nonpathogenic Acanthamoeba. Monolayers of immortalized corneal epithelial cells in four-well plates were used for cytopathic effect (CPE) assays. Pathogenic Acanthamoeba isolates exhibited marked CPE on immortalized corneal epithelial cells, while nonpathogenic isolates did not exhibit CPE. Protease zymography was performed with Acanthamoeba-conditioned medium as well as with Acanthamoeba- plus epithelial-cell-conditioned medium. The zymographic protease assays showed various banding patterns for different strains of Acanthamoeba. In pathogenic Acanthamoeba isolates, all protease bands were inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), suggesting serine type proteases, while in nonpathogenic strains only partial inhibition was observed by using PMSF. The pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains grown under typical laboratory conditions without epithelial cells exhibited one overexpressed protease band of 107 kDa in common; this protease was not observed in nonpathogenic Acanthamoeba strains. The 107-kDa protease exhibited activity over a pH range of 5 to 9.5. PMID:10921939

  3. Current Status of Acanthamoeba in Iran: A Narrative Review Article

    PubMed Central

    NIYYATI, Maryam; REZAEIAN, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Free-living amoebae belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba have an environmental distribution. Amoebic keratitis due to these protozoan parasites continue to rise in Iran and worldwide. In Iran, there are various researches regarding both morphological and molecular identification of Acanthamoeba spp. in environmental and clinical samples. However, there is no thorough review about Acanthamoeba genotypes and their distribution in environmental sources such as water, dust and biofilm in Iran. Besides, according to increasing cases of Amoebic keratitis in the region awareness regarding the pathogenic potential of these sight-threatening amoebae is of utmost importance. Methods: We conducted a thorough review based on the database sources such as MEDLINE, PubMed and Google scholar. No restrictions were placed on study date, study design or language of publication. We searched all valuable and relevant information considering the occurrence of the Acanthamoeba in both environmental and clinical samples. Results: According to our thorough review Acanthamoeba belonging to T4 genotype is the most prevalent type strain in environmental and clinical samples in several regions in Iran and worldwide, however, there are reports regarding Acanthamoeba belonging to other genotypes such as T2, T3, T5, T6 and T11 and the mentioned point could leads us to more researches with the goal of presenting the real genotype dominance of Acanthamoeba and related disease in the country. Conclusion: Overall, the present review will focus on present status of genotypes of Acanthamoeba in Iran during recent years. PMID:26246812

  4. Diversity and Seasonal Impact of Acanthamoeba Species in a Subtropical Rivershed

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Po-Min; Chou, Ming-Yuan; Tao, Chi-Wei; Huang, Wen-Chien; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Shen, Shu-Min; Fan, Cheng-Wei; Chiu, Yi-Chou

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the presence of Acanthamoeba species in the Puzih River watershed, which features typical subtropical monsoon climate and is located just above the Tropic of Cancer in Taiwan. The relationship between the seasonal and geographical distributions of Acanthamoeba species in this rivershed was also investigated. Acanthamoeba species were detected in water samples using the amoebal enrichment culture method and confirmed by PCR. A total of 136 water samples were included in this study, 16 (11.7%) of which contained Acanthamoeba species. Samples with the highest percentage of Acanthamoeba (32.4%) were obtained during the summer season, mainly from upstream areas. The identified species in the four seasons included Acanthamoeba palestinensis (T2), Acanthamoeba sp. IS2/T4 (T4), Acanthamoeba lenticulata (T5), Acanthamoeba hatchetti (T11), Acanthamoeba healyi (T12), and Acanthamoeba jacobsi (T15). The most frequently identified Acanthamoeba genotype was T4 (68.7%). Acanthamoeba genotype T4 is responsible for Acanthamoeba keratitis and should be considered for associated human health risk potential in the rivershed. PMID:24490160

  5. Photochemotherapeutic Strategy against Acanthamoeba Infections

    PubMed Central

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Khoja, Shahrukh

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a protist pathogen that can cause serious human infections, including blinding keratitis and a granulomatous amoebic encephalitis that almost always results in death. The current treatment for these infections includes a mixture of drugs, and even then, a recurrence can occur. Photochemotherapy has shown promise in the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections; however, the selective targeting of pathogenic Acanthamoeba has remained a major concern. The mannose-binding protein is an important adhesin expressed on the surface membranes of pathogenic Acanthamoeba organisms. To specifically target Acanthamoeba, the overall aim of this study was to synthesize a photosensitizing compound (porphyrin) conjugated with mannose and test its efficacy in vitro. The synthesis of mannose-conjugated porphyrin was achieved by mixing benzaldehyde and pyrrole, yielding tetraphenylporphyrin. Tetraphenylporphyrin was then converted into mono-nitrophenylporphyrin by selectively nitrating the para position of the phenyl rings, as confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The mono-nitrophenylporphyrin was reduced to mono-aminophenylporphyrin in the presence of tin dichloride and confirmed by a peak at m/z 629. Finally, mono-aminoporphyrin was conjugated with mannose, resulting in the formation of an imine bond. Mannose-conjugated porphyrin was confirmed through spectroscopic analysis and showed that it absorbed light of wavelengths ranging from 425 to 475 nm. To determine the antiacanthamoebic effects of the derived product, amoebae were incubated with mannose-conjugated porphyrin for 1 h and washed 3 times to remove extracellular compound. Next, the amoebae were exposed to light of the appropriate wavelength for 1 h. The results revealed that mannose-conjugated porphyrin produced potent trophicidal effects and blocked excystation. In contrast, Acanthamoeba castellanii incubated with mannose alone and porphyrin alone did not exhibit an antiamoebic effect

  6. Isolation of Acanthamoeba-Specific Antibodies from a Bacteriophage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naveed A.; Greenman, John; Topping, Katherine P.; Hough, Victoria C.; Temple, Graham S.; Paget, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    Acanthamoeba causes opportunistic eye infections in humans, which can lead to severe keratitis and may ultimately result in blindness. Current methods for identifying this organism rely on culture and microscopy. In this paper, we describe the isolation of antibody fragments that can be used for the unequivocal identification of Acanthamoeba. A bacteriophage antibody display library was used to isolate antibody fragments that bind specifically to Acanthamoeba. Individual clones were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence. Four antibody clones that specifically bind to Acanthamoeba spp. were identified. PMID:10835006

  7. Allovahlkampfia spelaea Causing Keratitis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tolba, Mohammed Essa Marghany; Huseein, Enas Abdelhameed Mahmoud; Farrag, Haiam Mohamed Mahmoud; Mohamed, Hanan El Deek; Kobayashi, Seiki; Suzuki, Jun; Ali, Tarek Ahmed Mohamed; Sugano, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    Background Free-living amoebae are present worldwide. They can survive in different environment causing human diseases in some instances. Acanthamoeba sp. is known for causing sight-threatening keratitis in humans. Free-living amoeba keratitis is more common in developing countries. Amoebae of family Vahlkampfiidae are rarely reported to cause such affections. A new genus, Allovahlkampfia spelaea was recently identified from caves with no data about pathogenicity in humans. We tried to identify the causative free-living amoeba in a case of keratitis in an Egyptian patient using morphological and molecular techniques. Methods Pathogenic amoebae were culture using monoxenic culture system. Identification through morphological features and 18S ribosomal RNA subunit DNA amplification and sequencing was done. Pathogenicity to laboratory rabbits and ability to produce keratitis were assessed experimentally. Results Allovahlkampfia spelaea was identified as a cause of human keratitis. Whole sequence of 18S ribosomal subunit DNA was sequenced and assembled. The Egyptian strain was closely related to SK1 strain isolated in Slovenia. The ability to induce keratitis was confirmed using animal model. Conclusions This the first time to report Allovahlkampfia spelaea as a human pathogen. Combining both molecular and morphological identification is critical to correctly diagnose amoebae causing keratitis in humans. Use of different pairs of primers and sequencing amplified DNA is needed to prevent misdiagnosis. PMID:27415799

  8. Interstitial keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cornea. This condition is often caused by infections. Syphilis is the most common cause of interstitial keratitis, ... Tuberculosis In the United States, most cases of syphilis are recognized and treated before this eye condition ...

  9. Bacterial Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... very quickly, and if left untreated, can cause blindness. The bacteria usually responsible for this type of ... to intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, e.g. snow blindness or welder's arc eye). Next Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ...

  10. Role of Contact Lens Wear, Bacterial Flora, and Mannose-Induced Pathogenic Protease in the Pathogenesis of Amoebic Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Hassan; Neelam, Sudha; Hurt, Michael; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2005-01-01

    The ocular surface is continuously exposed to potential pathogens, including free-living amoebae. Acanthamoeba species are among the most ubiquitous amoebae, yet Acanthamoeba keratitis is remarkably rare. The pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis is a complex, sequential process. Here we show that Acanthamoeba keratitis is profoundly affected by mannosylated proteins on the ocular surface, which stimulate the amoebae to elaborate a 133-kDa pathogenic protease. The mannose-induced protease (MIP133) mediates apoptosis of the corneal epithelium, facilitates corneal invasion, and degrades the corneal stroma. We show that contact lens wear upregulates mannosylated proteins on the corneal epithelium, stimulates MIP133 secretion, and exacerbates corneal disease. Corynebacterium xerosis, a constituent of the ocular flora, contains large amounts of mannose and is associated with Acanthamoeba keratitis. The present results show that amoebae exposed to C. xerosis produce increased amounts of MIP133 and more severe corneal disease. Oral immunization with MIP133 mitigates Acanthamoeba keratitis and demonstrates the feasibility of antidisease vaccines for pathogens that resist immune elimination. PMID:15664950

  11. Azotobacter keratitis.

    PubMed

    Liesegang, T J; Jones, D R; Robinson, N M

    1981-09-01

    Ten cases of Azotobacter keratitis were identified at the Baylor College of Medicine and Cullen Eye Institute, Houston, from 1972 to 1980. Azotobacter are large, pleomorphic, aerobic, Gram-negative rods of the family Azotobacteraceae. The genus comprises four species (A beijerinckii, A chroococcum, A paspali, and A vinelandii) that are found in soil and water throughout the world. To our knowledge, Azotobactger species have not previously been recognized as causing human, animal, or plant disease. On the basis of the similarity of the organisms, other cases of Azotobacter keratitis may have been identified erroneously as Moraxella species. PMID:7283809

  12. Several staining techniques to enhance the visibility of Acanthamoeba cysts.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Hikal, Wafaa Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Acanthamoeba is one of the most common free-living amoebae. It is widespread in the environment and can infect humans causing keratitis. Delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis leads to extensive corneal inflammation and profound visual loss. Therefore, accurate and rapid diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis is essential for successful treatment and good prognosis. This study was designed to use different staining techniques to facilitate the identification of Acanthamoeba cysts. Acanthamoeba cysts were isolated by cultivation of either corneal scraping specimens or tap water samples onto non-nutrient agar plates seeded with Escherichia coli. Subcultures were done from positive cultures until unique cysts were isolated. Acanthamoeba cysts were stained temporarily using iodine, eosin, methylene blue, and calcofluor white (CFW) stains and as permanent slides after processing for mounting using modified trichrome, Gimenez and Giemsa staining. These stains were compared on the basis of staining quality including clarity of morphological details, differentiation between cytoplasm and nuclei, color and contrast, and also other characteristics of the staining techniques, including ease of handling, time taken for the procedure, and cost effectiveness. The cysts of Acanthamoeba were recognized in the form of double-walled cysts: the outer wall (ectocyst) that was being differentiated from the variably stained surrounding background and the inner wall (endocyst) that was sometimes stellated, polygonal, round, or oval and visualized as separate from the spherical, sometimes irregular, outline of the ectocyst. Regarding the temporary stains, it was found that they were efficient for visualizing the morphological details of Acanthamoeba cysts. In CFW staining, Acanthamoeba cysts appeared as bluish-white or turquoise oval halos although the internal detail was not evident. On the other hand, the results of permanent-stained slides showed the most consistent stain for identification of

  13. Statins and Voriconazole Induce Programmed Cell Death in Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; Reyes-Batlle, María; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E.; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a life-threatening encephalitis. In order to treat those infections properly, it is necessary to target the treatment not only to the trophozoite but also to the cyst. Furthermore, it may be advantageous to avoid parasite killing by necrosis, which may induce local inflammation. We must also avoid toxicity of host tissue. Many drugs which target eukaryotes are known to induce programmed cell death (PCD), but this process is poorly characterized in Acanthamoeba. Here, we study the processes of programmed cell death in Acanthamoeba, induced by several drugs, such as statins and voriconazole. We tested atorvastatin, fluvastatin, simvastatin, and voriconazole at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) and IC90s that we have previously established. In order to evaluate this phenomenon, we investigated the DNA fragmentation, one of the main characteristics of PCD, with quantitative and qualitative techniques. Also, the changes related to phosphatidylserine exposure on the external cell membrane and cell permeability were studied. Finally, because caspases are key to PCD pathways, caspase activity was evaluated in Acanthamoeba. All the drugs assayed in this study induced PCD in Acanthamoeba. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where PCD induced by drugs is described quantitatively and qualitatively in Acanthamoeba. PMID:25733513

  14. Lethal Effects of Helianthemum lippii (L.) on Acanthamoeba castellanii Cysts in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Badria, F.A.; Hetta, M.H.; Sarhan, Rania M.; Ezz El-Din, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. commonly cause Acanthamoeba keratitis which is typically associated with the wear of contact lenses. Therefore, finding an economic, efficient, and safe therapy of natural origin is of outmost importance. This study examined the in vitro lethal potential of ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Helianthemum lippii (L.) (sun roses) against Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts isolated from patients with amoebic keratitis. Both extracts proved to be potent as regard to their lethal effects on A. castellanii cysts with comparable results to chlorhexidine. The ethyl acetate was more promising with cumulative lethality. It showed a highly significant lethal percentage along the duration of treatment. The analysis of the more potent ethyl acetate extract revealed the presence of 2.96 mg/100 g of total phenolics, 0.289 mg/100 ml of total flavonoids and 37 mg/100 mg of total tannins which highlighted their phytomedicinal role. PMID:25031463

  15. Prevalence of infectious keratitis in Central China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The baseline data pertaining to the national epidemiological survey of infectious keratitis remain scarce in China, and currently there is no corneal blindness control strategy developed by the nation. Methods Geographically defined cluster sampling was used to randomly select a cross-section of residents from representative urban and rural populations in Hubei Province. Participants were selected from village registers, followed by door-to-door household visits. The assessment items included a structured interview, visual acuity testing, external eye examination, and anterior segment examination using slit lamp. Causes and sequelae of corneal disease were identified according to uniform customized protocol. Results The prevalence of presenting corneal diseases was 0.8% (211/26 305), while the prevalence of infectious keratitis was 0.148% (39/26 305). The prevalences of viral, bacterial, and fungal keratitis were 0.065, 0.068, and 0.015%, respectively. There were no significant differences found between the prevalences of viral (accounting for 43.6%) and bacterial (accounting for 46.2%) corneal ulcers. cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis were not found. Infectious keratitis was the leading cause of corneal blindness (85.7%), and the prevalence of blindness in at least one eye resulting from infected corneas was 0.091% (95% CI: 0.067-0.127%). Conclusions Viral and bacterial mechanisms constitute the most important risk factors for infectious corneal ulcers in Central China. To reduce the rate and severity of infectious keratitis, he public health care policy should be focused on designing cost-effective strategies and operational programs for the prevention and prompt treatment of infectious corneal ulcers. PMID:24690368

  16. Acanthamoebae bind to glycolipids of rabbit corneal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Panjwani, N; Zhao, Z; Baum, J; Pereira, M; Zaidi, T

    1992-01-01

    By use of a thin-layer chromatogram (TLC) overlay procedure, 35S-labeled acanthamoebae were shown to bind to seven glycolipids of rabbit corneal epithelium. Corneal epithelial cells were grown in culture and were subjected to Folch extraction to isolate a chloroform-rich lower phase containing neutral glycosphingolipids (NGSL) and an aqueous upper phase containing gangliosides, i.e., sialic acid-containing glycolipids. Thin-layer chromatography of the upper phase revealed the presence of 10 ganglioside components. Acanthamoebae were shown to bind to four of these components, referred to as 2, 3, 6, and 7. On TLC plates, ganglioside components 2 and 3 migrated slightly ahead of the glycolipid standard GD1a, component 7 comigrated with standard GM3, and component 6 migrated a little more slowly than GM3. Likewise, of the 10 NGSL known to be present in the lower phase, acanthamoebae bound to components 1, 5, and 6. NGSL components 1, 5, and 6 migrated on TLC plates with relative mobilities similar to those of standards asialo GM1, asialo GM2, and ceramidetrihexoside, respectively. We propose that one or more of the Acanthamoeba-reactive glycolipids of corneal epithelium identified in this study may play a role in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis by mediating the adherence of the parasites to the cornea. Images PMID:1639517

  17. Acanthamoeba adherence to contact lenses, removal by rinsing procedures, and survival to some ophthalmic products.

    PubMed

    Cancrini, G; Iori, A; Mancino, R

    1998-09-01

    Unworn soft and rigid gas-permeable contact lenses were inoculated with an Acanthamoeba keratitis strain to study the protozoon's ability to adhere. Furthermore, the efficacy of the rinsing in saline on acanthamoeba removal was evaluated, as well as the amebicidal activity of five commercial cleaning/disinfecting products: hydrogen peroxide, chlorhexidine, polyaminopropyl biguanide-poloxamine, thimerosal-polyquaternium, and thimerosal-chlorhexidine. Microscopic count of cells showed that Acanthamoeba trophozoites and cysts adhered to all types of contact lenses. A significantly greater adherence of trophozoites than cysts was recorded. The rinsing in saline using a flow-method was significantly more effective than the immersion-method, particularly in removing trophozoites from rigid gas-permeable lenses. The cleaning/disinfecting solutions tested were ineffective in removing or in affecting the viability of all Acanthamoeba trophozoites or cysts in the 17 hours allotted for the experiment. The need for a better care in mechanical and physical hygiene procedures is stressed. PMID:10376283

  18. Artemether Exhibits Amoebicidal Activity against Acanthamoeba castellanii through Inhibition of the Serine Biosynthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yihong; Ran, Wei; Man, Suqin; Li, Xueping; Gao, Hongjian; Tang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba sp. parasites are the causative agents of Acanthamoeba keratitis, fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis, and cutaneous infections. However, there are currently no effective drugs for these organisms. Here, we evaluated the activity of the antimalarial agent artemether against Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites and identified potential targets of this agent through a proteomic approach. Artemether exhibited in vitro amoebicidal activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner and induced ultrastructural modification and cell apoptosis. The iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis identified 707 proteins that were differentially expressed after artemether treatment. We focused on phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and phosphoserine aminotransferase in the serine biosynthesis pathway because of their importance to the growth and proliferation of protozoan and cancer cells. The expression of these proteins in Acanthamoeba was validated using quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting after artemether treatment. The changes in the expression levels of phosphoserine aminotransferase were consistent with those of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. Therefore, the downregulation of phosphoserine aminotransferase may be due to the downregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. Furthermore, exogenous serine might antagonize the activity of artemether against Acanthamoeba trophozoites. These results indicate that the serine biosynthesis pathway is important to amoeba survival and that targeting these enzymes would improve the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections. Artemether may be used as a phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase inhibitor to control or block Acanthamoeba infections. PMID:26014935

  19. Killing acanthamoebae with polyaminopropyl biguanide: quantitation and kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Burger, R M; Franco, R J; Drlica, K

    1994-01-01

    The two Acanthamoeba species most often implicated in corneal keratitis, A. castellanii and A. polyphaga, were exposed as cysts to polyaminopropyl biguanide (PAPB), a commonly used antimicrobial agent. Killing of amoeba cysts was rapid and extensive, with fewer than 2% of either species surviving 30 s of exposure to > or = 45 ppm of PAPB. Killing kinetics were biphasic, and further exposures of 15 min to 1 h killed greater than 90% of those surviving initial killing. This potency of PAPB, together with its low toxicity to humans when ingested or applied topically, underscores the potential of PAPB as an antiamoebic agent. PMID:8031066

  20. Immunity to Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, A

    1991-01-01

    Human serum contains antibodies, mainly of the IgM and IgG isotypes, to pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba. This, as well as the capacity of these amebas to activate complement via the alternative pathway, may be a first-line defense against acanthamoeba infections in humans. Both antibody and complement appear to be important in promoting recognition of these amebas by phagocytic cells such as neutrophils. However, killing of amebas by neutrophils is dependent on lymphokine/monokine priming of the neutrophil. This priming augments the respiratory-burst activity and release of lysosomal enzymes of neutrophils in their response to the ameba. The products of the oxygen-dependent respiratory burst appear to be of prime importance in the killing of this free-living ameba. Antibodies also may prevent tissue invasion by Acanthamoeba by inhibiting its adherence, phagocytic activity, and migration and by neutralizing cytopathogenic amebic agents. Studies on experimental Acanthamoeba infections in mice showed marked species and strain specificity with regard to induction of protection with amebic antigens. Immune compromise or, alternatively, invasion at unique body sites in healthy individuals may form the basis for human infection with Acanthamoeba. PMID:2047675

  1. Keratitis solaris and sunbeds.

    PubMed

    Daxecker, F; Blumthaler, M; Ambach, W

    1995-01-01

    Keratitis solaris is caused by ultraviolet radiation in the range 200-320 nm. The threshold dose for keratitis solaris is 40 J/m2 for short-term exposure. We measured the emission spectra of 22 sunbeds in the range 250-500 nm with a high-resolution double monochromator and calculated the exposure times for the threshold dose of keratitis solaris. Depending on the type of lamp used, the exposure times ranged from 90 s to 3.5 h. Lamps with short exposure times for keratitis solaris can induce keratitis solaris if protective goggles are not used (e.g., to achieve a uniform tan of the eye area) and if the eyes are opened briefly several times, perhaps, to look at a watch. Generally, sunbed users have no way of ascertaining the lamp type or its emission spectrum and of determining the exposure time for the threshold dose of keratitis solaris. PMID:8751341

  2. Acanthamoeba genotypes T2, T4, and T11 in soil sources from El Hierro island, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Batlle, María; Zamora-Herrera, Jonadab; Vargas-Mesa, Alejandro; Valerón-Tejera, Marco Antonio; Wagner, Carolina; Martín-Navarro, Carmen Ma; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Valladares, Basilio; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2016-08-01

    The genus Acanthamoeba includes pathogenic strains which are causative agents of keratitis and encephalitis that often may end fatal in humans and other animals. In the present study, forty soil samples were collected in the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain, and checked for the presence of Acanthamoeba. Samples were cultivated onto 2 % non-nutrient agar plates seeded with a layer of heat killed Escherichia coli. Amplification by PCR and sequencing of the DF3 region of the 18S rDNA of Acanthamoeba was carried out in order to confirm morphological identification of the amoebae. Furthermore, Acanthamoeba spp. was isolated from 47.5 % of soil samples. Moreover, genotypes T2, T4, and T11 were identified in these samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to establish genotypes T2, T4, and T11 in soil sources from El Hierro island. PMID:27075307

  3. Acanthamoeba spp. in domestic tap water in houses of contact lens wearers in the metropolitan area of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Lemus, Patricia; Ramírez-Bautista, Gerardo A; Zamora-Muñoz, Claudia; Ibarra-Montes, María Del Rocío; Ramírez-Flores, Elizabeth; Hernández-Martínez, María Dolores

    2010-09-01

    A survey was carried out in the metropolitan area of Mexico City to determine the presence of Acanthamoeba in the tap water of houses of contact lens wearers. Water samples were taken from the mains water entry, bathroom sinks and storage containers (roof tanks, cisterns) of 27 houses; and from the solution contained in the contact lens cases. Samples were filtered and cultured onto NNE medium. The isolates were identified based on their morphological features and pathogenicity. Total and fecal coliforms, water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen and residual free-chlorine were measured by standard methods. Forty five isolates of Acanthamoeba from 200 water samples were obtained. The highest number of amoebae was isolated from cisterns and roof tanks. Most Acanthamoeba isolates were non-pathogenic, however, their presence in tap water is a potential hazard since some species can cause Acanthamoeba keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. PMID:19995560

  4. Nocardia asteroides keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, L W; Harrison, G K; Merz, W G; Stark, W J

    1979-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides has been reported as the cause of keratitis in only 7 cases and of other ocular disease in another 12 cases. We report a case of N. asteroides keratitis that presented 3 weeks after rural trauma and progressed despite trials of appropriate antibiotics. Seven weeks after the origianl injury a successful conjunctival flap was placed over the cornea. The morphology and the sensitivity testing of N. asteroides to antibiotics appears necessary before reliable information can be obtained for clinical use. Moreover, our case did not show the relatively benign course of other reported cases of nocardia keratitis. Images PMID:380634

  5. Superficial Punctate Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an allergy to eye drops, the drug or eye drops must be discontinued. Resources In This Article Figure 1 Locating the Cornea Corneal Disorders Introduction to Corneal Disorders Bullous Keratopathy Corneal Transplantation Corneal Ulcer Herpes Simplex Keratitis Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus ...

  6. Viability and morphological changes of Acanthamoeba spp. cysts after treatment with Effective microorganisms (EM).

    PubMed

    Sampaotong, Tanitta; Lek-Uthai, Usa; Roongruangchai, Jantima; Roongruangchai, Kosol

    2016-06-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living opportunistic protozoan parasite that is found in diverse environments. It can cause keratitis, mostly related to inappropriate use of contact lenses, as well as life threatening diseases including encephalitis, disseminated sinusitis, and skin ulcers. This study investigated morphological changes and fine structures of the cyst form of Acanthamoeba spp. after treatment with effective microorganisms (EM™) using light and scanning electron microscopies. Acanthamoeba cysts treated with 1:2, 1:4, 1:6, and undiluted EM™ showed higher percentages of non-viable cysts than those treated with 1:8, 1:10, 1:100, 1:200, and 1:400 EM™ and at 5 days post-treatment developed from cystic stage to trophozoite stage. Acanthamoeba cysts treated at concentrations of 1:2, 1:4, 1:6, and undiluted EM™ exhibited cytoplasmic clumping and shrinkage of amoeba cells away from cyst walls. The effective EM™ concentration lethal to Acanthamoeba spp. cyst could provide information to monitor the environmental control system. PMID:27413306

  7. Anti-Acanthamoeba activity of contact lens solutions

    PubMed Central

    Niszl, I.; Markus, M.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of contact lens disinfecting solutions on strains of Acanthamoeba from the United Kingdom and southern Africa and to compare the results with those of other researchers. No information was previously available for southern African isolates.
METHODS—11 contact lens solutions were tested on cysts of 10 strains of Acanthamoeba.
RESULTS—Not all solutions used in the study were effective, with some for hard and gas permeable contact lenses being more satisfactory than those for soft contact lenses. The most effective of the gas permeable and hard contact lens solutions tested was Transoak (0.01% (wt/vol) benzalkonium chloride), which killed cysts of all strains within 4 hours of exposure. Oxysept 1 (31 mg hydrogen peroxide/ml) was the best soft contact lens solution tested. It eliminated cysts of certain strains within 4 hours, whereas cysts of other strains were only inactivated within either 8 or 72 hours.
CONCLUSIONS—Manufacturers should be aware of the killing time for Acanthamoeba by contact lens solutions and should provide appropriate guidelines for the use thereof. The killing time for cysts of the African and UK isolates studied is, in general, similar. Therefore, it must in the present state of knowledge be assumed that usage guidelines suggested in the UK are also appropriate for travellers to South Africa and for local residents in South Africa.

 Keywords: contact lenses; Acanthamoeba; keratitis PMID:9893594

  8. Inactivation of Acanthamoeba spp. and Other Ocular Pathogens by Application of Cold Atmospheric Gas Plasma.

    PubMed

    Heaselgrave, Wayne; Shama, Gilbert; Andrew, Peter W; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-15

    Currently there are estimated to be approximately 3.7 million contact lens wearers in the United Kingdom and 39.2 million in North America. Contact lens wear is a major risk factor for developing an infection of the cornea known as keratitis due to poor lens hygiene practices. While there is an international standard for testing disinfection methods against bacteria and fungi (ISO 14729), no such guidelines exist for the protozoan Acanthamoeba, which causes a potentially blinding keratitis most commonly seen in contact lens wearers, and as a result, many commercially available disinfecting solutions show incomplete disinfection after 6 and 24 h of exposure. Challenge test assays based on international standard ISO 14729 were used to determine the antimicrobial activity of cold atmospheric gas plasma (CAP) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Acanthamoeba castellanii P. aeruginosa and C. albicans were completely inactivated in 0.5 min and 2 min, respectively, and trophozoites of A. polyphaga and A. castellanii were completely inactivated in 1 min and 2 min, respectively. Furthermore, for the highly resistant cyst stage of both species, complete inactivation was achieved after 4 min of exposure to CAP. This study demonstrates that the CAP technology is highly effective against bacterial, fungal, and protozoan pathogens. The further development of this technology has enormous potential, as this approach is able to deliver the complete inactivation of ocular pathogens in minutes, in contrast to commercial multipurpose disinfecting solutions that require a minimum of 6 h. PMID:26994079

  9. Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl–Coenzyme A Reductase and Application of Statins as a Novel Effective Therapeutic Approach against Acanthamoeba Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Machin, Rubén P.; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; García-Castellano, José Manuel; de Fuentes, Isabel; Loftus, Brendan; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Valladares, Basilio; Piñero, José E.

    2013-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic pathogen in humans, whose infections most commonly manifest as Acanthamoeba keratitis or, more rarely, granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. Although there are many therapeutic options for the treatment of Acanthamoeba, they are generally lengthy and/or have limited efficacy. Therefore, there is a requirement for the identification, validation, and development of novel therapeutic targets against these pathogens. Recently, RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely used for these validation purposes and has proven to be a powerful tool for Acanthamoeba therapeutics. Ergosterol is one of the major sterols in the membrane of Acanthamoeba. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl–coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, one of the precursors for the production of cholesterol in humans and ergosterol in plants, fungi, and protozoa. Statins are compounds which inhibit this enzyme and so are promising as chemotherapeutics. In order to validate whether this enzyme could be an interesting therapeutic target in Acanthamoeba, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against HMG-CoA were developed and used to evaluate the effects induced by the inhibition of Acanthamoeba HMG-CoA. It was found that HMG-CoA is a potential drug target in these pathogenic free-living amoebae, and various statins were evaluated in vitro against three clinical strains of Acanthamoeba by using a colorimetric assay, showing important activities against the tested strains. We conclude that the targeting of HMG-CoA and Acanthamoeba treatment using statins is a novel powerful treatment option against Acanthamoeba species in human disease. PMID:23114753

  10. Tarantula hair keratitis.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Simran Singh; Newman, Bill

    2012-10-26

    We describe a 12-year-old boy in England with keratitis secondary to tarantula hairs embedded within the stroma of his cornea. Every attempt must be made to isolate these hairs at the first visit as they have a barbed nature and have a propensity to propagate through ocular tissues. A chronic keratitis requiring long-term steroid use may result if hairs persist in the cornea. Children who keep tarantulas as pets should be instructed on safe handling to prevent the tarantula from adopting defence mechanisms and shedding their hairs. PMID:23242405

  11. Ulocladium atrum Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Badenoch, P. R.; Halliday, C. L.; Ellis, D. H.; Billing, K. J.; Mills, R. A. D.

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of Ulocladium atrum keratitis in a 43-year-old man. No predisposing event was known. He received natamycin and fluconazole drops and the infection resolved. The isolate was identified by morphological and rRNA gene sequence analyses. U. atrum is a dematiaceous hyphomycete not hitherto reported to infect humans. PMID:16517929

  12. Molecular Characterization of Pathogenic Acanthamoeba Isolated from Drinking and Recreational water in East Azerbaijan, Northwest Iran

    PubMed Central

    Behniafar, Hamed; Niyyati, Maryam; Lasjerdi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba- related infections, such as amoebic keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis, can develop in high-risk population through contaminated water sources. Thus, surveying water resources, particularly those available for human use, is of the utmost importance. In the present study, 67 water samples were collected from water resources in East Azerbaijan, a province in northwestern Iran. Samples were cultured on enriched non-nutrient agar plates, and sequencing-based approaches were used for genotyping. The pathogenic potential of the isolates was determined using thermo- and osmo-tolerance tests. Acanthamoeba were detected in 17 (25.4%) of the 67 collected samples. Sequencing analysis revealed that the isolates belonged to the T3 (23.52%), mixed T3/T4 (5.88%), T4 (58.82%), T5 (5.88%), and T13 (5.88%) genotypes. Through thermo- and osmo-tolerance tests, 88.23% of isolates were resistant to 37 °C, 40 °C temperature, and 0.5 M and 1 M osmolarity; thus, these isolates had the potential for pathogenicity. These findings point toa serious public health concern in the studied region. This study is the first to report Acanthamoeba isolated from drinking and recreational water sources in East Azerbaijan and Acanthamoeba T13 isolated from tap water in Iran. PMID:26157334

  13. Isolation and identification of Acanthamoeba spp. from thermal swimming pools and spas in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fabres, Laura Fuhrich; Rosa Dos Santos, Sayonara Peixoto; Benitez, Lisianne Brittes; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2016-03-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely distributed in soil and water. A few number of them are implicated in human disease: Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris and Sappinia diploidea. Species of Acanthamoeba can cause keratitis and brain infections. In this study, 72 water samples were taken from both hot tubs and thermal swimming pools in the city of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, to determine the presence of Acanthamoeba in the water as well as perform the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of the isolates. The identification of the isolates was based on the cysts morphology and PCR amplification using genus-specific oligonucleotides. When the isolates were submitted to PCR reaction only 8 were confirmed as belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba. The sequences analysis when compared to the sequences in the GenBank, showed genotype distribution in group T3 (12,5%), T5 (12,5%), T4 (25%) and T15 (50%). The results of this study confirmed the presence of potentially pathogenic isolates of free living amoebae in hot swimming pool and spas which can present risks to human health. PMID:27078644

  14. Isolation of Acanthamoeba Genotype T4 from a Non-Contact Lens Wearer from the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Buerano, Corazon C.; Trinidad, Abigail D.; Fajardo, Lindsay Sydney N.; Cua, Irwin Y.; Baclig, Michael O.; Natividad, Filipinas F.

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 76-year old Filipino male who presented with pain, redness, and blurring of vision of the right eye. Corneal scraping was done and sent to the St. Luke’s Research and Biotechnology Group for detection and identification of the infectious agent. Morphological detection was performed by allowing the organism from the scraping to grow in 1.5% non-nutrient agar plate with heat-killed E. coli. Trophozoites with acanthopodia and double-walled cysts characteristic of Acanthamoeba were observed within the first and second week of observations, respectively. Molecular identification of the amoebae at the genus level based on the presence of Acanthamoeba-specific amplimer S1, ASA.S1 confirmed the morphological identification. Genotyping through sequence revealed that the organism belonged to T4, which is the genotype commonly present in the eye of keratitis patients. PMID:25589879

  15. Proteomic profiling of the infective trophozoite stage of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    PubMed

    Caumo, Karin Silva; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Ott, Thiely Rodrigues; Maschio, Vinicius José; Wagner, Glauber; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2014-12-01

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga is a free-living protozoan pathogen, whose infective trophozoite form is capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis in humans. The damage caused by A. polyphaga trophozoites in human corneal or brain infections is the result of several different pathogenic mechanisms that have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the proteins expressed by A. polyphaga trophozoites, based on complementary 2-DE MS/MS and gel-free LC-MS/MS approaches. Overall, 202 non-redundant proteins were identified. An A. polyphaga proteomic map in the pH range 3-10 was produced, with protein identification for 184 of 370 resolved spots, corresponding to 142 proteins. Additionally, 94 proteins were identified by gel-free LC-MS/MS. Functional classification revealed several proteins with potential importance for pathogen survival and infection of mammalian hosts, including surface proteins and proteins related to defense mechanisms. Our study provided the first comprehensive proteomic survey of the trophozoite infective stage of an Acanthamoeba species, and established foundations for prospective, comparative and functional studies of proteins involved in mechanisms of survival, development, and pathogenicity in A. polyphaga and other pathogenic amoebae. PMID:25149354

  16. Detection of Acanthamoeba on the ocular surface in a Spanish population using the Schirmer strip test: pathogenic potential, molecular classification and evaluation of the sensitivity to chlorhexidine and voriconazole of the isolated Acanthamoeba strains.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Cabrera, Pedro; Reyes-Batlle, María; Martín-Navarro, Carmen María; Dorta-Gorrín, Alexis; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E; Martín-Barrera, Fernando; Valladares, Basilio; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    Pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba are causative agents of a sight-threatening infection of the cornea known as Acanthamoeba keratitis, which is often associated with the misuse of contact lenses. However, there is still a question remaining to be answered, which is whether these micro-organisms are present on the ocular surface of healthy individuals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the presence of Acanthamoeba on the ocular surface in healthy patients and also in those with other ocular surface infections. Sterile Schirmer test strips were used to collect samples from a group of patients who attended an ophthalmology consultation at the Hospital del Norte, Icod de los Vinos, Tenerife, Canary Islands. Most of the patients (46 individuals, 79.31  %) presented ocular surface pathologies such as blepharitis or conjunctivitis; the rest did not present any pathology. None of the patients included in the study wore contact lenses. The collected samples were cultured in 2  % non-nutrient agar plates and positive plates were then cultured in axenic conditions for further analyses. Molecular analysis classified all isolated strains as belonging to Acanthamoeba genotype tbl4, and osmotolerance and thermotolerance assays revealed that all strains were potentially pathogenic. Furthermore, all strains were assayed for sensitivity against voriconazole and chlorhexidine. Assays showed that both drugs were active against the tested strains. In conclusion, the Schirmer strip test is proposed as an effective tool for the detection of Acanthamoeba on the ocular surface. PMID:26293786

  17. Synthesis, characterization and amoebicidal potential of locally synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles against pathogenic Acanthamoeba trophozoites in vitro.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Muazzam, Ambreen Gul; Habib, Amir; Matin, Abdul

    2016-06-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protozoan pathogen that plays a pivotal role in the ecosystem. It may cause blinding keratitis and fatal encephalitis involving the central nervous system. Here we synthesized pure and Zn doped TiO2 nanoparticles (~10-30nm) via sol-gel and sol-hydrothermal methods and demonstrated its impact on the biological characteristics of pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii. Our results revealed that pure and Zn doped TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized by sol-hydrothermal methods (ranging 5, 10, 25 and 50μg/ml) exhibited amoebicidal effects i.e., >60% of trophozoites executed under normal light at maximum dose (50μg/ml) within 1h incubation. In contrast pure/doped TiO2 obtained via sol gel method showed ~40% amoeba damage. Furthermore, amoebae growth assay demonstrated that Zn doped TiO2 also inhibited Acanthamoeba numbers up to 7days in dose dependent manner. It was interesting to note that all the tested TiO2 nanoparticles have shown maximum amoebicidal effects at pH7 which is quite relevant to amoebic growth favorable conditions. Our results confirmed that TiO2 has inhibitory effects on Acanthamoeba growth and viability. Overall, we reported the amoebicidal and amoebic growth inhibition potential of pure and Zn doped TiO2 nanoparticles against Acanthamoeba due to attached OH(-) groups, reduced size and decreased band gap of sol hydrothermally synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:27054875

  18. Characterization of a New Pathogenic Acanthamoeba Species, A. byersi n. sp., Isolated from a Human with Fatal Amoebic Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Nerad, Thomas A.; Visvesvara, Govinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. are free-living amoebae that are ubiquitous in natural environments. They can cause cutaneous, nasopharyngeal and disseminated infection, leading to granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) in immunocompromised individuals. In addition, they can cause amoebic keratitis in contact lens wearers. Acanthamoeba GAE is almost always fatal because of difficulty and delay in diagnosis and lack of optimal antimicrobial therapy. Here we report the description of an unusual strain isolated from skin and brain of a GAE patient. The amoebae displayed large trophozoites and star-shaped cysts, characteristics for acanthamoebas belonging to morphology Group 1. However, its unique morphology and growth characteristics differentiated this new strain from other Group 1 species. DNA sequence analysis, secondary structure prediction and phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rRNA gene confirmed that this new strain belonged to Group 1 but that it was distinct from the other sequence types within that group. Thus, we hereby propose the establishment of a new species, Acanthamoeba byersi n. sp. as well as a new sequence type, T18, for this new strain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a Group 1 Acanthamoeba that is indisputably pathogenic in humans. PMID:23879685

  19. High occurrence of Acanthamoeba genotype T4 in soil sources from Bolívar State, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Carolina; Reyes-Batlle, María; Hernán, Aurora; Rojas, Elsy; Pérez, Gladymar; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E; Valladares, Basilio; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    Pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba are causative agents of keratitis and encephalitis that often may end fatal in humans and other animals. In the present study, twenty-seven soil samples were collected in the Bolivar State in Venezuela and checked for the presence of Acanthamoeba. Samples were cultivated onto 2% non-nutrient agar plates seeded with a layer of heat killed E. coli. Amplification by PCR and sequencing of the DF3 region of the 18S rDNA of Acanthamoeba was carried out in order to confirm morphological identification of the amoebae. Furthermore, Acanthamoeba spp. was isolated from 51.8% of soil samples. Sequencing of the DF3 region of the 18S rDNA resulted in the identification of genotype T4 in all samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of genotype T4 in soil sources from Venezuela. Further studies should be carried out in this State and in the country in order to determine the current occurrence of Acanthamoeba in Venezuelan environments. PMID:27447209

  20. Animal Models of Bacterial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a disease of the cornea characterized by pain, redness, inflammation, and opacity. Common causes of this disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Animal models of keratitis have been used to elucidate both the bacterial factors and the host inflammatory response involved in the disease. Reviewed herein are animal models of bacterial keratitis and some of the key findings in the last several decades. PMID:21274270

  1. The role of oral co-trimoxazole in treating Nocardia farcinica keratitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neharika; O'Hagan, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    Nocardia farcinica is one of the more recently identified species of the Nocardia genus. Nocardia farcinica keratitis is a rare occurrence, with only eight previously reported cases. Semi-permeable rigid contact lens use was associated with one of these reported cases. We report the first case of an extended wear soft contact lens-related Nocardia farcinica keratitis and recommend a new treatment regime. A 47-year-old lady presented with a right eye keratitis after wearing her extended wear soft contact lenses for five continuous weeks. There was no history of trauma or swimming with contact lenses in. Empirical ciprofloxacin and tobramycin eye drops were not tolerated due to ocular surface irritation on application, and instead, empirical treatment was with chloramphenicol and fortified gentamicin 1.5 % eye drops. Corneal scrapings grew Nocardia farcinica after 3 weeks-sensitive to amikacin and co-trimoxazole. Treatment was changed to amikacin 2.5 % eye drops, resulting in partial resolution of the corneal infiltrates. Oral co-trimoxazole 160 mg/800 mg BD was added, due to cultured drug sensitivity and its high ocular penetration, with good results and a final right eye best-corrected visual acuity of 6/5. Nocardia farcinica keratitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of contact lens-related keratitis. We report the first case occurring in association with extended wear soft contact lenses. Nocardia species can mimic fungal and acanthamoeba keratitis. Treatment with oral co-trimoxazole has not been previously reported. This case demonstrates the role of co-trimoxazole in treating Nocardia farcinica keratitis based on cultured drug sensitivities. PMID:27294730

  2. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    PubMed

    Kicinska, Anna; Leluk, Jacek; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil), a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds) or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups. PMID:25338074

  3. Clinical Characteristics of Alternaria Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Chen, Phil Y. F.; Ma, David H. K.; Tan, Hsin-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Alternaria spp. are an uncommon cause of mycotic keratitis. Previous studies on Alternaria keratitis have generally been limited to case reports. We examined the clinical characteristics of Alternaria keratitis in this study. Methods. The characteristics and outcomes of 7 patients with culture-proven Alternaria keratitis treated in our hospital were compared with 25 previously reported cases. Results. The risk factors for Alternaria keratitis were trauma in 5 patients and soft contact lenses in 1 patient. Six patients with early diagnosis (<2 weeks) were cured with medical antimicrobial treatment; a patch graft was required in 1 patient with perforation. When incorporated with previous reports on Alternaria keratitis (n = 32), 14 (44%) infections followed trauma, 10 (31%) were associated with preexisting corneal disease or previous ocular surgery, and 5 (16%) occurred in soft contact lens wearers. Successful medical treatment was achieved in 23 (72%) patients, including 10 out of 21 eyes (48%) treated with natamycin and/or amphotericin B. Therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed in 9 (28%) cases. Conclusions. Alternaria keratitis is generally associated with specific risk factors and responds to medical treatment when early diagnosis is performed and prompt antifungal treatment is initiated. PMID:24778867

  4. Photodynamic inactivation of Acanthamoeba polyphaga with curcuminoids: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, Thaila Q.; Geralde, Mariana C.; Carvalho, Mariana T.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina; de Souza, Clovis W. O.

    2016-03-01

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga are free-living amoebae that can be considered potentially pathogenic organisms by cause serious human infections, including keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis that usually results in death. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used for the biological control of microorganisms and can be promise in the control of Acanthamoeba infections. This study evaluated the in vitro effectiveness of PDI in A. polyphaga using curcuminoids salt as photosensitizer (PS) besides observing morphological changes caused by this PS in this organism, in confocal microscopy. A. polyphaga trophozoites were grown at 37°C in PYG medium for 48 to 72 hours. After, the trophozoites were incubated with PS solution during one hour and the samples were irradiated using light-emitting diodes at 460 nm at light doses 30 and 50 J/cm2. The results revealed reduction of 27.7%, 61.4% and 82.5% at 30 J/cm2 and 75.2%, 85.0% and 95.9% at 50 J/cm2, respectively, at curcuminoid salt concentrations of 500, 1000 and 1500 μg/mL. Through fluorescence images, it was possible to visualize the curcuminoid salt's uptake by the trophozoites. The PS showed toxicity to amoebae, in the dark, but the irradiation in PDI contributed to amoebae death effect. These data suggest that PDI may be an application of therapeutic intervention against Acanthamoeba infections, since it was effective in the inactivation of these amoebae.

  5. Evaluation of Acanthamoeba Myosin-IC as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E.; Valladares, Basilio; Maciver, Sutherland K.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a fatal encephalitis. We have targeted myosin-IC by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing as a therapeutic approach, since it is known that the function of this protein is vital for the amoeba. In this work, specific siRNAs against the Acanthamoeba myosin-IC gene were developed. Treated and control amoebae were cultured in growth and encystment media to evaluate the induced effects after myosin-IC gene knockdown, as we have anticipated that cyst formation may be impaired. The effects of myosin-IC gene silencing were inhibition of cyst formation, inhibition of completion of cytokinesis, inhibition of osmoregulation under osmotic stress conditions, and death of the amoebae. The finding that myosin-IC silencing caused incompletion of cytokinesis is in agreement with earlier suggestions that the protein plays a role in cell locomotion, which is necessary to pull daughter cells apart after mitosis in a process known as “traction-mediated cytokinesis”. We conclude that myosin-IC is a very promising potential drug target for the development of much-needed antiamoebal drugs and that it should be further exploited for Acanthamoeba therapy. PMID:24468784

  6. Comparison of Mycotic Keratitis with Nonmycotic Keratitis: An Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Khater, Mohammad M.; Shehab, Nehal S.; El-Badry, Anwar S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This work aims to study the problems encountered with and the different epidemiological features of patients with fungal keratitis. Patients and Methods. All cases with keratitis attending the Outpatient Clinic of Ophthalmology Department at Tanta University Hospital during three years from the first of January 2011 to the end of December 2013 were selected and carefully examined and cases with mycotic keratitis were further examined and investigated. Results. From 66303 attendants during this period with different complaints, there were 361 cases (0.54%) with mycotic keratitis and 473 cases (0.71%) of nonmycotic origin. Mycotic keratitis is common between 40 and 60 years, more in farmers (64%), families with large number and large crowding index, rural than urban residence, and patients with outdoor water sources and insanitary sewage disposal. Positive fungal cultures were obtained in 84.5% and were negative in 15.5% of cases in spite of their typical clinical findings for diagnosis and their improvement with antifungal therapy. Conclusion. Mycotic keratitis is more frequent in farmers, rural areas, outdoor water supply, insanitary sewage disposal, and patients preceded with organic trauma. Atypical clinical findings were found in some cases and not all cases improved with specific antifungal therapy. PMID:25548657

  7. Corticosteroids as a therapy for bacterial keratitis: an evidence-based review of 'who, when and why'.

    PubMed

    Tallab, Raghad T; Stone, Donald U

    2016-06-01

    Corticosteroids have been proposed as an adjunct to antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial keratitis, with significant controversy regarding the appropriate use of this therapy. Recent prospective randomised controlled trials have provided additional evidence to guide clinical decision-making. A review of the epidemiology and mechanisms of pathogenesis, preliminary animal studies, retrospective human studies and prospective randomised clinical trials that address the potential risks and benefits of corticosteroids in patients with bacterial keratitis was performed. Four prospective randomised controlled trials were identified. Three small studies found no benefit of topical corticosteroids, but were underpowered to evaluate adverse events. The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) study and subgroup analyses provide evidence for a relative gain of one line of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity in patients with non-Nocardia bacterial keratitis, especially when corticosteroids were initiated within 3 days of presentation; no increase in adverse events was noted. No evidence was found to support the concern for corneal thinning attributable to corticosteroids in the absence of an inadequately treated infectious process. In patients with culture-proven non-Nocardia bacterial keratitis, corticosteroids provide one line of vision improvement over antimicrobials alone, with no increase in adverse events. This benefit should not be extrapolated to patients with other aetiologies of keratitis, such as fungus, herpes viruses, acanthamoeba or atypical mycobacteria, and these entities should be excluded before considering adjunctive steroid therapy. PMID:26743622

  8. Amebicidal activity of the essential oils of Lippia spp. (Verbenaceae) against Acanthamoeba polyphaga trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Santos, Israel Gomes de Amorim; Scher, Ricardo; Rott, Marilise Brittes; Menezes, Leociley Rocha; Costa, Emmanoel Vilaça; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Aguiar, Jaciana dos Santos; da Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves; Dolabella, Silvio Santana

    2016-02-01

    Amoebic keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis are caused by some strains of free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba. In the case of keratitis, one of the greatest problems is the disease recurrence due to the resistance of parasites, especially the cystic forms, to the drugs that are currently used. Some essential oils of plants have been used as potential active agents against this protist. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the amebicidal activity of essential oils from plants of the genus Lippia against Acanthamoeba polyphaga trophozoites. To that end, 8 × 10(4) trophozoites were exposed for 24 h to increasing concentrations of essential oils from Lippia sidoides, Lippia gracilis, Lippia alba, and Lippia pedunculosa and to their major compounds rotundifolone, carvone, and carvacrol. Nearly all concentrations of oils and compounds showed amebicidal activity. The IC50 values for L. sidoides, L. gracilis L. alba, and L. pedunculosa were found to be 18.19, 10.08, 31.79, and 71.47 μg/mL, respectively. Rotundifolone, carvacrol, and carvone were determined as the major compounds showing IC50 of 18.98, 24.74, and 43.62 μg/mL, respectively. With the exception of oil from L. alba, the other oils evaluated showed low cytotoxicity in the NCI-H292 cell line. Given these results, the oils investigated here are promising sources of compounds for the development of complementary therapy against amoebic keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and can also be incorporated into cleaning solutions to increase their amebicidal efficiency. PMID:26446087

  9. Microbial keratitis after penetrating keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Bates, A K; Kirkness, C M; Ficker, L A; Steele, A D; Rice, N S

    1990-01-01

    Thirty cases of microbial keratitis after penetrating keratoplasty were reviewed to examine the associated risk factors, the spectrum of pathogens and the prognosis for graft survival and visual outcome. The indications for keratoplasty in this group differed markedly from those for all corneal grafts performed with a much higher incidence of previous microbial keratitis and of herpes simplex keratitis. A positive culture was obtained in 93% of cases and in contrast to microbial keratitis overall, Gram positive organisms predominated particularly streptococcus pneumoniae and staphylococcus aureus. Risk factors identified were loose or broken sutures, graft decompensation and a poor ocular surface environment. There was a poor prognosis for graft survival with only 23% of cases retaining a clear graft. Overall 53% of cases were regrafted. PMID:2323481

  10. Herpes simplex keratitis.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Stephen; Choudhary, Anshoo

    2006-07-01

    Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) results from an infection with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) also known as human herpesvirus type 1 (HHV-1). Primary infection may involve an ocular or non-ocular site, following which latency might be established principally in the trigeminal ganglion but also in the cornea. During latency, the virus appears as a circular episome associated with histones with active transcription only from the region encoding the latency-associated transcript (LAT). The LAT region is implicated in neuronal survival, anti-apoptosis, virulence, suppression of transcription, establishment of and reactivation from latency. The initial keratitis may develop after infection through the "front door route" (entry into the ocular surface from droplet spread) or "back door route" (spread to the eye from a non-ocular site, principally the mouth). The initial ocular infection may be mild. Visual morbidity results from recurrent keratitis, which leads to corneal scarring, thinning and neovascularisation. Although, recurrent disease may potentially occur through anterograde axonal spread from the trigeminal ganglion to the cornea, recent evidence suggests that HSV-1 in the cornea may be another source of recurrent disease. The pathogenesis and severity of HSK is largely determined by an interaction between viral genes encoded by the strain of HSV-1 and the make up of the host's immune system. Herpetic stromal disease is due to the immune response to virus within the cornea and the ability of the strain to cause corneal stromal disease is correlated with its ability to induce corneal vascularisation. The pathogenesis of corneal scarring and vascularisation is uncertain but appears to be a complex interaction of various cytokines, chemokines and growth factors either brought in by inflammatory cells or produced locally in response to HSV-1 infection. Evidence now suggests that HSV-1 infection disrupts the normal equilibrium between angiogenic and anti

  11. Experimental infection of T4 Acanthamoeba genotype determines the pathogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Alves, Daniella de Sousa Mendes Moreira; Moraes, Aline Silva; Alves, Luciano Moreira; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Lino Junior, Ruy de Souza; Cuba-Cuba, César Augusto; Vinaud, Marina Clare

    2016-09-01

    T4 is the Acanthamoeba genotype most related to cases of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) in immunocompromised patients and of keratitis in contact lens wearers. The determination of the pathogenic potential of Acanthamoeba clinical and environmental isolates using experimental models is extremely important to elucidate the capacity of free-living organisms to establish and cause disease in hosts. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the histopathology and culture between two different routes of experimental infection of T4 Acanthamoeba isolated from environmental and clinical source in mice (intracranial and intraperitoneal). Swiss isogenic healthy mice were inoculated with 10(4) trophozoites by intracranial (IC) and intraperitoneal (IP) routes and observed during 21 days. The brains from animals inoculated by the IC route were collected and from the animals of the IP inoculation group, the brains, livers, kidneys, spleens, and lungs were removed. The organs were prepared and appropriately divided to be evaluated with histopathology and culture. There was no significant difference between the inoculation routes in terms of isolates recovery (χ(2) = 0.09; p = 0.76). In the IC group, isolate recovery rate was significantly higher in histopathology than the one achieved by culture (χ(2) = 6.45; p < 0.01). Experimental infection revealed that all isolates inoculated could be considered invasive because it was possible to recover evolutive forms of Acanthamoeba in both routes. This work represents the first in vivo pathogenicity assay of primary isolation source in Central region of Brazil showing in vivo pathogenicity and hematogenous spread capacity of these protozoa, improving the knowledge on free-living amoebae isolates. PMID:27164833

  12. Prevalence of Acanthamoeba and other naked amoebae in South Florida domestic water.

    PubMed

    Shoff, M E; Rogerson, A; Kessler, K; Schatz, S; Seal, D V

    2008-03-01

    The purpose was to identify the prevalence of naked amoebae in tap water in south Florida to ascertain the risk of amoebal infections of the cornea in contact lens wearers. Over the course of a 2-year period, water samples were collected from sites throughout Broward, Palm Beach, and Dade counties, Florida. The presence of amoebae in samples was based on an enrichment cultivation method appropriate for Acanthamoeba. Amoebae were identified using diagnostic features discernable by light microscopy. A total of 283 water samples were processed and amoebae were noted in 80 of these. Acanthamoeba were found on 8 occasions (2.8%). The genera Hartmannella and Vahlkampfia, rarely involved in keratitis cases, were found in 3.5% and 2.8% of samples, respectively. A total of 19 different naked amoebae were recorded and amoebae (regardless of genus) were present in 19.4% of all samples. Previous surveys in England and Korea have shown that acanthamoebae are found in 15 to 30% of tap water samples in the home and have been associated with corneal infection in contact lens wearers. The incidence of acanthamoebae infection in the USA (2.8%) has been found to be lower than that in the UK and it has been postulated that this is related to the lack of a storage water tank in the roof loft space. However, the level of treatment of municipal water is clearly not effective at killing amoebal cysts (or trophozoites) as evidenced by the high occurrence of amoebae (19.4%) in this study. PMID:17998610

  13. Acanthamoeba castellanii: cellular changes induced by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2010-09-01

    Chlorination is a well-known disinfection method, used in water treatment to inactivate various microorganisms, it induces numerous cellular changes. Even though Acanthamoebae are frequently found in water, the cellular changes induced in Acanthamoebae have not been described in the literature. Acanthamoebae are pathogenic amoebae and may provide a reservoir for pathogenic bacteria such as Legionellapneumophila; it is consequently important to understand the response of this amoeba to chlorination, and our study was indeed aimed at examining cellular changes in Acanthamoebae following chlorination. Acanthamoeba trophozoites were treated at various chlorine concentrations (1-5mg/L). A 3-log reduction in Acanthamoebae population was achieved with 5mg/L of free chlorine. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry experiments indicated that chlorination induced cell permeabilization, size reduction and likely intracellular thiol concentration. Our data show that among the non-cultivable cells some remained impermeabilized (negative staining with propidium iodide), thereby suggesting that these cells might remained viable. A similar state is described in other microorganisms as a VBNC (viable but not cultivable) state. Electron microscopy observations illustrate drastic morphological changes: the pseudopods disappeared and subcellular components, such as mitochondrion, were pronouncedly affected. In conclusion, depending on the concentration used, chlorination leads to many cellular effects on Acanthamoeba that could well arise in cell inactivation. PMID:20034490

  14. [Fungal keratitis caused by Scedosporium apiospermum: first report from Turkey-comment].

    PubMed

    Atalay, Mustafa Altay; Koc, Ayşe Nedret

    2014-04-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is a saprophytic fungus which is isolated worldwide in soil, fertilizers, polluted water, rotten vegetables, and other natural environments. It is the cause of mycetoma, a subcutaneous infection, characterized by granule formation. It may also cause severe local or diffuse infections in immunosuppressive patients. S.apiospermum-induced arthritis, endocarditis, keratitis, scleritis, endophthalmitis, meningitis, osteomyelitis, otomycosis, onychomycosis, chronic prostatitis, peritonitis, esophagitis, renal infection, and hepatosplenic abscess have been previously reported in the literature. Possible risk factors of fungal keratitis, one of the major causes of fungal ocular infection, include ocular injury, long-term therapy with topical or systemic steroids, immunosuppressive agents, and underlying diseases such as pre-existing corneal surface abnormality and diabetes mellitus, and wearing contact lenses. We paid great attention to the case report presented by Kalkan Akçay E et al. titled "Fungal keratitis caused by Scedosporium apiospermum: first report from Turkey", which was published in the October 2013 issue of Bulletin of Microbiology [Mikrobiyol Bul 2013; 47(4): 727-33]. Although it is deemed as the first case report of S.apiospermum-related fungal keratitis in Turkey, there were several previous case reports of ocular infections associated with this type of fungus in Turkey, including those of Yucel A titled "An eye mycosis caused by Scedosporium apiospermum (Monosporium apiospermum)" published in 1989, Kiratli et al. titled "Scedosporium apiospermum chorioretinitis" in 2001, Saracli et al. titled "Scedosporium apiospermum keratitis treated with itraconazole" in 2003 and Erdem et al. titled "Clinical follow up of a keratomycosis case with total corneal melting" in 2005. In conclusion, it should be highlighted that the report of Kalkan Akcay et al. is not the first case report of Scedosporium apiospermum-related fungal keratitis in

  15. Unexpected postmortem diagnosis of acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent child

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Karimi, Mehran; Navabii, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba spp. is a rare opportunistic infection, difficult to diagnose and treat, which causes death in almost all cases. Here, the authors report a 5-year-old Iranian immunocompetent girl who died of fulminant acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in Iran. PMID:22679147

  16. Extended wear contact lens related bacterial keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Tabbara, K.; El-Sheikh, H.; Aabed, B.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To report the clinical findings and visual outcome of patients with extended wear contact lens (EWCL) related bacterial keratitis.
METHODS—11 cases with EWCL related bacterial keratitis were included. Corneal scrapings were obtained for cytology and cultures.
RESULTS—Nine patients had unilateral bacterial keratitis and two patients showed bilateral involvement. Corneal scrapings revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa in seven patients, Staphylococcus aureus coagulase positive in one patient, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in three patients.
CONCLUSION—EWCLs may be associated with bacterial keratitis and may result in visual loss. Dispensing contact lenses by optometrists should be performed in consultation with ophthalmologists.

 PMID:10684847

  17. Corneal ulcers and infections

    MedlinePlus

    Bacterial keratitis; Fungal keratitis; Acanthamoeba keratitis; Herpes simplex keratitis ... occur in people with a suppressed immune system. Herpes simplex keratitis is a serious viral infection. It ...

  18. Visual recovery in treated bacterial keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Ray, Kathryn J.; Zegans, Michael E.; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Keenan, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. However, the natural history of treated bacterial keratitis has not been well characterized. We performed a secondary analysis of the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT; clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00324168) to better characterize the rate of visual acuity improvement after successful antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24612976

  19. Occurrence of Naegleria and Acanthamoeba in aquaria.

    PubMed Central

    De Jonckheere, J F

    1979-01-01

    Samples from 24 aquaria were incubated at 28, 37, and 45 degrees C for the isolation of Naegleria and Acanthamoeba. Naegleria was the predominant genus (60.9%), whereas Acanthamoeba represented 15.5% of the isolates. No pathogenic N. fowleri was identified, although a high number of strains were closely related to this species. One isolate (Aq/9/1/45D) was compared with an aquarium isolate (PPMFB-6) from Australia. The Belgian isolate was found to be more related to N. fowleri, whereas the Australian isolate was closer to N. gruberi. PMID:539818

  20. Some secrets are revealed: parasitic keratitis amoebae as vectors of the scarcely described pandoraviruses to humans.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Patrick; Balczun, Carsten; Schaub, Günter A

    2014-10-01

    In this article, the results of a long effort to derive valuable phylogenetic data about an extraordinary spore-like infectious particle (endocytobiont) within host amoebae (Acanthamoeba sp.) recently isolated from the contact lens and the inflamed eye of a patient with keratitis are presented. The development of these endocytobionts has already been demonstrated with electron microscopic photo sequences, leading to a relevant model of its development presented here. The molecular biological investigation following the discovery of two other Pandoravirus species within aquatic sediments in 2013 led to the taxonomic affiliation of our endocytobiont with the genus Pandoravirus. A range of endocytobionts (intracellular biofilms) have been found in recent years, among which are several viruses which obligatorily proliferate within free-living amoebae. In human medicine, foreign objects which are placed in or on humans cause problems with microorganisms in biofilms. Contact lenses are especially important, because they are known as a source of a rapid formation of biofilm. These were the first Pandoraviruses described, and because this is additionally the first documented association with humans, we have clearly demonstrated how easily such (viral) endocytobionts can be transferred to humans. This case counts as an example of parasites acting as vectors of phylogenetically different microorganisms especially when living sympatric within their biocoenosis of biofilms. As the third part of the "Pandoravirus trilogy", it finally reveals the phylogenetic nature of these "extraordinary endocytobionts" within Acanthamoebae. PMID:25033816

  1. Corneal cross linking and infectious keratitis: a systematic review with a meta-analysis of reported cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Collagen cross linking (CXL) of the cornea has been developed recently as a new treatment for multidrug-resistant infectious keratitis. The aim of this study is to summarize the previously published data and evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment. Results The search identified 12 articles. The number of eyes was 104. The infectious keratitis was associated with bacteria in 58 eyes (57f%): Gram-positive bacteria in 44 (43%; 4 of which were infected with Mycobacterium (3.6%)) and Gram-negative bacteria in 14 eyes (13%), fungus in 13 eyes (12%), and Acanthamoeba in 7 eyes (7%). In 26 eyes (25%), the microbiological culture was negative or not performed. The mean time of re-epithelization after CXL was 20.7±28.1 days (minimum of 3, maximum of 145). Sixteen eyes underwent deep or lamellar keratoplasty. The pooled analysis suggested that CXL has a favorable effect on the block of corneal melting in 85% (95%; CI 0.77, 0.91) of eyes. Conclusion Although randomized controlled trials are needed, the available evidence supports the use of CXL in the treatment of infectious keratitis. PMID:23718849

  2. MOLECULAR AND PHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF SUBTROPICAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ACANTHAMOEBA KERATITIS. (R828830)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Scleritis and Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2008-01-01

    Scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) can present as isolated conditions or as part of a systemic inflammatory or infectious disorder. Both are serious ocular conditions that can result in vision loss and therefore require early diagnosis and treatment. Nearly two-thirds of patients with non-infectious scleritis require systemic glucocorticoid therapy, and one fourth need a glucocorticoid-sparing agent, as well. Essentially all patients with non-infectious PUK require systemic glucocorticoids. Detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination, and thoughtful laboratory evaluations are all important in the exclusion of underlying disorders and extraocular involvement. PMID:18037120

  4. [Advances of molecular diagnosis in infectious keratitis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ge; Xie, Lixin

    2015-09-01

    Infectious keratitis is a serious eye disease that may cause blindness. Currently, microbial culture remains the gold standard for diagnosis of many ocular infections, but the technique is limited by low sensitivity and time consuming. Developing rapid and sensitive early diagnostic methods for infectious keratitis is important for guiding timely and effective treatment in clinical practice. Molecular diagnostic techniques use detection of specific nucleic acid sequences as evidence for presence of suspected pathogens. This kind of techniques develops very fast because of its sensitive, specific, rapid and high-throughput advantages. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the application of molecular diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of infectious keratitis, and discuss the problems and prospects of molecular diagnosis for detecting pathogens in keratitis. PMID:26693656

  5. Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis with Pyoderma Gangrenosum

    PubMed Central

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrián; Vargas-Laguna, Elena; Aguilar, Antonio; Gallego, Miguel Ángel; Vergara, Claudia; Nistal, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is an unusual necrotizing noninfective and ulcerative skin disease whose cause is unknown. Ophthalmic involvement in pyoderma gangrenosum is an unusual event. Only a few cases have been reported, from which we can highlight scleral, corneal, and orbital cases. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis is a process which destroys the peripheral cornea. Its cause is still unknown although it is often associated with autoimmune conditions. Pyoderma gangrenosum should be included in the differential diagnosis of peripheral ulcerative keratitis. Early recognition of these manifestations can vary the prognosis by applying the appropriate treatment. We introduce a 70-year-old woman who suffered pyoderma gangrenosum associated with peripheral ulcerative keratitis in her left eye. The patient's skin lesions and peripheral keratitis responded successfully to systemic steroids and cyclosporine A. PMID:26527531

  6. Alternaria keratitis after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Naik, Mekhla; Mohd Shahbaaz; Sheth, Jay; Sunderamoorthy, S K

    2014-01-01

    To describe a case of Alternaria keratitis in a 30-year-old male patient who presented with bilateral vascularised central corneal opacity and underwent deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) in the left eye. Patient was treated for recurrent epithelial defect with a bandage contact lens in the follow-up visits after DALK. Subsequently, patient presented with pigmented fungal keratitis, which on culture examination of the corneal scrapping demonstrated Alternaria species. Patient had to undergo a repeat DALK as the keratitis did not resolve with medical therapy alone. Patient did not have a recurrence for 11 months following the regraft. This case report highlights the importance of considering the Alternaria species as a possibile cause of non-resolving fungal keratitis after DALK. PMID:24669155

  7. Is there evidence of sexual reproduction (meiosis) in Acanthamoeba?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naveed A.; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of independently breeding species into males and females (gametes) has remained a puzzle. Given the significant advantages of sexual reproduction over asexual reproduction as a long-term species survival strategy; here, we pose the question whether there is some form of meiosis in Acanthamoeba species, which represents our ancient lineage. The recently available Acanthamoeba genome revealed several genes implicated in meiosis in sexual eukaryotes such as Spo11, Mre11, Rad50, Rad51, Rad52, Mnd1, Dmc1, Msh, and Mlh, suggesting that Acanthamoeba is capable of some form of meiosis, inferring the presence of sexual reproduction in Acanthamoeba, and that meiosis evolved early in eukaryotic evolution. PMID:25800982

  8. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Lakhundi, Sahreena; Iqbal, Junaid; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, Diclofenac, targeting COX have shown promise in the treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Using various NSAIDs, Diclofenac sodium, Indomethacin, and Acetaminophen, here we determined the effects of NSAIDs on the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype. Using amoebicidal assays, the results revealed that Diclofenac sodium, and Indomethacin affected growth of A. castellanii. In contrast, none of the compounds tested had any effect on the viability of A. castellanii. Importantly, all NSAIDs tested abolished A. castellanii encystation. This is a significant finding as the ability of amoebae to transform into the dormant cyst form presents a significant challenge in the successful treatment of infection. The NSAIDs inhibit production of cyclo-oxegenase, which regulates the synthesis of prostaglandins suggesting that cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and prostaglandins play significant role(s) in Acanthamoeba biology. As NSAIDs are routinely used in the clinical practice, these findings may help design improved preventative strategies and/or of therapeutic value to improve prognosis, when used in combination with other anti-amoebic drugs. PMID:27381503

  9. Efficacy of contact lens storage solutions against trophozoite and cyst of Acanthamoeba castellanii strain 1BU and their cytotoxic potential on corneal cells.

    PubMed

    Polat, Zubeyde Akin; Vural, Ayse; Cetin, Ali

    2007-09-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba causing a potentially blinding infection of the cornea. Contact lens wearers are most at risk and account for about 95% of cases. We investigated the in vitro effectiveness of 10 contact lens solutions against Acanthamoeba castellanii and their cytotoxicity on corneal cells in vitro. Contact lens solutions were evaluated for their amoebicidal activities using an inverted light microscope. To determine of their cytotoxicity on corneal cells, agar diffusion tests were performed. According to the results obtained from the tests, AVIZOR Aqua Soft Comfort and Elegance(R) showed the best amoebicidal effect on A. castellanii trophozoites. Cysts were still viable after overnight (8 h) exposure. In the case of the cyctotoxic acitivities, All In One Light, Astek, SOLO-Care Aqua, Maxima, and Horien showed no cytotoxicity on the corneal cells. ReNu MultiPlus, AVIZOR Aqua Soft Comfort, Carrera, and Elegance showed mild cytotoxicity on the corneal cells. Plurisol.M presented moderate cytotoxicity on the corneal cells. All commercial solutions examined in this study are the lack of efficacy against A. castellanii. Improvement or development of new contact lens disinfecting systems by the manufacturers is needed to prevent Acanthamoeba keratitis. PMID:17514482

  10. Recent trends: Medical management of infectious keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Sneha; Rathi, Manisha; Khanduja, Sumeet; Dhull, C.S.; Sachdeva, Sumit; Phogat, Jitender

    2015-01-01

    This review article highlights the newer diagnostic modalities and approaches in the medical management of infectious keratitis. A Medline literature search conducted to March 2014 has been included. Recent studies or publications were selected from international indexed journals using suitable key words. Development of specular microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has a promising role as diagnostic modalities in infectious keratitis, especially in refractory cases. Previously fortified antibiotics have been the mainstay of treatment for bacterial keratitis. Recently, the advent of fourth-generation fluoroquinolones monotherapy has shown promising results in the management of bacterial keratitis. Corneal collagen cross-linking is being considered in the refractory cases. Topical natamycin and amphotericin B should be considered as the first choice anti-fungal agents in suspected filamentous or yeast infection respectively. Voriconazole and newer routes of administration such as intrastromal and intracameral injection of conventional anti-fungal agents have demonstrated a positive clinical response. Ganciclovir is a newer anti-viral agent with promising results in herpes simplex keratitis. Thus, introduction of newer diagnostic modalities and collagen cross-linking along with fourth-generation fluoroquinolones and newer azoles have a promising role in the management of infectious keratitis. PMID:26622133

  11. Evaluation of the activity of new cationic carbosilane dendrimers on trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    PubMed

    Heredero-Bermejo, Irene; Copa-Patiño, Jose Luis; Soliveri, Juan; Fuentes-Paniagua, Elena; de la Mata, Francisco Javier; Gomez, Rafael; Perez-Serrano, Jorge

    2015-02-01

    Dendrimers are repetitively branched molecules with a broad spectrum of applications, mainly for their antimicrobial properties and as nanocarriers for other molecules. Recently, our research group have synthesized and studied their activity against Acanthamoeba sp., causative agent of a severe ocular disease in humans: Acanthamoeba keratitis. New cationic carbosilane dendrimers were tested against the protozoa forms at different concentrations and for different incubation times. Trophozoite viability was determined by manual counting and cyst viability by observing excystment in microplates with fresh culture medium. Cytotoxicity was checked on HeLa cells using the microculture tetrazolium assay. Alterations were observed by optical microscopy and by flow cytometry staining with propidium iodide. Six out of the 18 dendrimers tested were non-cytotoxic and effective against the trophozoite form, having one of them (dendrimer 14 with an IC50 of 2.4 + 0.1 mg/L) a similar activity to chlorhexidine digluconate (IC50 1.7 + 0.1 mg/L). This dendrimer has a polyphenoxo core and a sulphur atom close to the six -NH3+ terminal groups. On the other hand, only two dendrimers showed some effect against cysts (dendrimers 14 and 17). However, their minimum cysticidal concentrations were cytotoxic and less effective than the control drug. The alterations on the amoeba morphology produced by the treatment with dendrimers were size reduction, increased complexity, loss of acanthopodia and cell membrane disruption. In conclusion, these results suggest that some dendrimers may be studied in animal models to test their effect and that new dendrimers with similar features should be synthesized. PMID:25358240

  12. Contact lens care solution killing efficacy against Acanthamoeba castellanii by in vitro testing and live-imaging.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Satya Sree N; Manarang, Joseph C; Burns, Alan R; Miller, William L; McDermott, Alison M; Bergmanson, Jan P G

    2015-12-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased incidence of Acanthamoeba keratitis, particularly in contact lens wearers. The aim of this study was to utilize in vitro killing assays and to establish a novel, time-lapse, live-cell imaging methodology to demonstrate the efficacy of contact lens care solutions in eradicating Acanthamoeba castellanii (A. castellanii) trophozoites and cysts. Standard qualitative and quantitative in vitro assays were performed along with novel time-lapse imaging coupled with fluorescent dye staining that signals cell death. Quantitative data obtained demonstrated that 3% non-ophthalmic hydrogen peroxide demonstrated the highest percent killing at 87.4% corresponding to a 4.4 log kill. The other contact lens care solutions which showed a 72.9 to 29.2% killing which was consistent with 4.3-2.8 log reduction in trophozoite viability. Both analytical approaches revealed that polyquaternium/PHMB-based was the least efficacious in terms of trophicidal activity. The cysticidal activity of the solutions was much less than activity against trophozoites and frequently was not detected. Live-imaging provided a novel visual endpoint for characterizing the trophocidal activity of the care solutions. All solutions caused rapid rounding or pseudocyst formation of the trophozoites, reduced motility and the appearance of different morphotypes. Polyquaternium/alexidine-based and peroxide-based lens care system induced the most visible damage indicated by significant accumulation of debris from ruptured cells. Polyquaternium/PHMB-based was the least effective showing rounding of the cells but minimal death. These observations are in keeping with care solution biocides having prominent activity at the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba. PMID:26208952

  13. Endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba Isolated from Domestic Tap Water in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seon Hee; Cho, Min Kyoung; Ahn, Soon Cheol; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jong Soo; Kim, Dong-Hee; Xuan, Ying-Hua; Hong, Yeon Chul; Kong, Hyun Hee; Chung, Dong Il

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported our discovery of Acanthamoeba contamination in domestic tap water; in that study, we determined that some Acanthamoeba strains harbor endosymbiotic bacteria, via our molecular characterization by mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (Mt DNA RFLP). Five (29.4%) among 17 Acanthamoeba isolates contained endosymbionts in their cytoplasm, as demonstrated via orcein staining. In order to estimate their pathogenicity, we conducted a genetic characterization of the endosymbionts in Acanthamoeba isolated from domestic tap water via 16S rDNA sequencing. The endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba sp. KA/WP3 and KA/WP4 evidenced the highest level of similarity, at 97% of the recently published 16S rDNA sequence of the bacterium, Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus. The endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba sp. KA/WP8 and KA/WP12 shared a 97% sequence similarity with each other, and were also highly similar to Candidatus Odyssella thessalonicensis, a member of the α-proteobacteria. The endosymbiont of Acanthamoeba sp. KA/WP9 exhibits a high degree of similarity (85-95%) with genus Methylophilus, which is not yet known to harbor any endosymbionts. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, to show that Methylophilus spp. can live in the cytoplasm of Acanthamoeba. PMID:19967080

  14. The role of Src kinase in the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acanthamoeba species are the causative agents of fatal granulomatous encephalitis in humans. Haematogenous spread is thought to be a primary step, followed by blood–brain barrier penetration, in the transmission of Acanthmaoeba into the central nervous system, but the associated molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the role of Src, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase in the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba. Methods Amoebistatic and amoebicidal assays were performed by incubating amoeba in the presence of Src kinase-selective inhibitor, PP2 (4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine) and its inactive analog, PP3 (4-amino-7-phenylpyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine). Using this inhibitor, the role of Src kinase in A. castellanii interactions with Escherichia coli was determined. Zymographic assays were performed to study effects of Src kinase on extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. The human brain microvascular endothelial cells were used to determine the effects of Src kinase on A. castellanii adhesion to and cytotoxicity of host cells. Results Inhibition of Src kinase using a specific inhibitor, PP2 (4-amino-5-(4 chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo [3,4-d] pyrimidine) but not its inactive analog, PP3 (4-amino-7-phenylpyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidine), had detrimental effects on the growth of A. castellanii (keratitis isolate, belonging to the T4 genotype). Interestingly, inhibition of Src kinase hampered the phagocytic ability of A. castellanii, as measured by the uptake of non-invasive bacteria, but, on the contrary, invasion by pathogenic bacteria was enhanced. Zymographic assays revealed that inhibition of Src kinases reduced extracellular protease activities of A. castellanii. Src kinase inhibition had no significant effect on A. castellanii binding to and cytotoxicity of primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood–brain barrier. Conclusions For the first

  15. Recent advances in diagnosis and management of Mycotic Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Prafulla K; Sharma, Namrata; Nagpal, Ritu; Jhanji, Vishal; Das, Sujata; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic keratitis is a major cause of corneal blindness, especially in tropical and subtropical countries. The prognosis is markedly worse compared to bacterial keratitis. Delayed diagnosis and scarcity of effective antifungal agents are the major factors for poor outcome. Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made to rapidly diagnose cases with mycotic keratitis and increase the efficacy of treatment. This review article discusses the recent advances in diagnosis and management of mycotic keratitis with a brief discussion on rare and emerging organisms. A MEDLINE search was carried out for articles in English language, with the keywords, mycotic keratitis, fungal keratitis, emerging or atypical fungal pathogens in mycotic keratitis, investigations in mycotic keratitis, polymerase chain reaction in mycotic keratitis, confocal microscopy, treatment of mycotic keratitis, newer therapy for mycotic keratitis. All relevant articles were included in this review. Considering the limited studies available on newer diagnostic and therapeutic modalities in mycotic keratitis, case series as well as case reports were also included if felt important. PMID:27380973

  16. Occurrence of Potentially Pathogenic Bacterial-Endosymbionts in Acanthamoeba Spp.

    PubMed Central

    NIYYATI, Maryam; MAFI, Mahyar; HAGHIGHI, Ali; HAKEMI VALA, Mojdeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acanthamoeba- bacteria interactions enable pathogenic bacteria to tolerate harsh conditions and lead to transmission to the susceptible host. The present study was aimed to address the presence of bacterial endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba isolated from recreational water sources of Tehran, Iran. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study regarding occurrence of bacteria in environmental Acanthamoeba spp. in Iran. Methods: A total of 75 samples of recreational water sources were collected. Samples were cultured on non- nutrient agar 1.5% plates. Positive Acanthamoeba spp. were axenically grown. DNA extraction and PCR reaction was performed using JDP1-2 primers. All positive samples of Acanthamoeba were examined for the presence of endosymbionts using staining and molecular methods. The PCR products were then sequenced in order to determine the genotypes of Acanthamoeba and bacteria genera. Results: Out of 75 samples, 16 (21.3%) plates were positive for Acanthamoeba according to the morphological criteria. Molecular analysis revealed that Acanthamoeba belonged to T4 and T5 genotypes. Five isolates (35.7%) were positive for bacterial endosymbionts using staining method and PCR test. Sequencing of PCR products confirmed the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Agrobacterium tumefasiens. Conclusion: The presence of Acanthamoeba bearing pathogenic endosymbionts in water sources leads us to public health issues including improved sanitation and decontamination measures in recreational water sources in order to prevent amoebae-related infection. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report regarding the isolation of A. tumefasiens from Acanthamoeba in Iran and worldwide. PMID:26246815

  17. Mycotic keratitis: epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P A; Kaliamurthy, J

    2013-03-01

    Mycotic keratitis (an infection of the cornea) is an important ocular infection, especially in young male outdoor workers. There are two frequent presentations: keratitis due to filamentous fungi (Fusarium, Aspergillus, phaeohyphomycetes and Scedosporium apiospermum are frequent causes) and keratitis due to yeast-like fungi (Candida albicans and other Candida species). In the former, trauma is usually the sole predisposing factor, although previous use of corticosteroids and contact lens wear are gaining importance as risk factors; in the latter, there is usually some systemic or local (ocular) defect. The clinical presentation and clinical features may suggest a diagnosis of mycotic keratitis; increasingly, in vivo (non-invasive) imaging techniques (confocal microscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography) are also being used for diagnosis. However, microbiological investigations, particularly direct microscopic examination and culture of corneal scrape or biopsy material, still form the cornerstone of diagnosis. In recent years, the PCR has gained prominence as a diagnostic aid for mycotic keratitis, being used to complement microbiological methods; more importantly, this molecular method permits rapid specific identification of the aetiological agent. Although various antifungal compounds have been used for therapy, management of this condition (particularly if deep lesions occur) continues to be problematic; topical natamycin and, increasingly, voriconazole (given by various routes) are key therapeutic agents. Therapeutic surgery, such as therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty, is needed when medical therapy fails. Increased awareness of the importance of this condition is likely to spur future research initiatives. PMID:23398543

  18. Bilateral Nocardia Keratitis after Photorefractive Keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Amir; Feizi, Sepehr; Javadi, Mohammad-Ali; Rezaei Kanavi, Mozhgan; Yazdizadeh, Forouzan; Moein, Hamid-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical, confocal scan, and histopathologic features of nocardia keratitis in a patient who developed bilateral infection following photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Case Report A 23-year-old woman underwent bilateral PRK for low myopia. On postoperative day 3, dense central stromal infiltrates were noticed in both eyes. Empirical antibiotic therapy was initiated which was converted into specific therapy after a definite diagnosis was made based on clinical features and confirmed by confocal scan and histopathologic findings. Clinical and confocal scan features were consistent with the diagnosis of Nocardia keratitis, and topical 2% amikacin eye drops were started. Because of poor response to medical therapy, lamellar keratectomy was performed in both eyes which shortened the treatment course. Histopathologic examination reconfirmed the initial diagnosis. Conclusion Familiarity with clinical and confocal scan features facilitates early diagnosis of Nocardia keratitis leading to proper management and hence a rapid therapeutic response. PMID:23275825

  19. Medical management of suspected Paecilomyces sp. deep keratitis.

    PubMed

    Holland, Lee; Lee, Graham A

    2015-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman developed a deep keratitis presenting with an endothelial plaque without overlying stromal involvement. Owing to the characteristic clinical appearance, she was provisionally diagnosed with a Paecilomyces sp. keratitis. Corneal scrapings and aqueous humour samples were culture negative. The difficulties in diagnosing Paecilomyces sp. keratitis are discussed. The patient's keratitis was managed with a combination of topical, oral and intracameral injections of voriconazole. This medical management strategy was successful in achieving good infection control and visual outcome. We report a rarely encountered presentation of keratitis in which the clinical appearance and response to voriconazole are highly suggestive evidence of a Paecilomyces sp. keratitis. We believe the combination of topical, oral and intracameral injections of voriconazole represents a novel treatment approach for Paecilomyces sp. keratitis. Our case supports the potential for a medical approach as initial treatment in this otherwise devastating form of oculomycosis. PMID:26135494

  20. Gene discovery in the Acanthamoeba castellanii genome

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain J.; Watkins, Russell F.; Samuelson, John; Spencer,David F.; Majoros, William H.; Gray, Michael W.; Loftus, Brendan J.

    2005-08-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoeba found in soil, freshwater, and marine environments and an important predator of bacteria. Acanthamoeba castellanii is also an opportunistic pathogen of clinical interest, responsible for several distinct diseases in humans. In order to provide a genomic platform for the study of this ubiquitous and important protist, we generated a sequence survey of approximately 0.5 x coverage of the genome. The data predict that A. castellanii exhibits a greater biosynthetic capacity than the free-living Dictyostelium discoideum and the parasite Entamoeba histolytica, providing an explanation for the ability of A. castellanii to inhabit adversity of environments. Alginate lyase may provide access to bacteria within biofilms by breaking down the biofilm matrix, and polyhydroxybutyrate depolymerase may facilitate utilization of the bacterial storage compound polyhydroxybutyrate as a food source. Enzymes for the synthesis and breakdown of cellulose were identified, and they likely participate in encystation and excystation as in D. discoideum. Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase is present, suggesting that trehalose plays a role in stress adaptation. Detection and response to a number of stress conditions is likely accomplished with a large set of signal transduction histidine kinases and a set of putative receptorserine/threonine kinases similar to those found in E. histolytica. Serine, cysteine and metalloproteases were identified, some of which are likely involved in pathogenicity.

  1. Contralateral Clinically Unaffected Eyes of Patients With Unilateral Infectious Keratitis Demonstrate a Sympathetic Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Cruzat, Andrea; Schrems, Wolfgang A.; Schrems-Hoesl, Laura M.; Cavalcanti, Bernardo M.; Baniasadi, Neda; Witkin, Deborah; Pavan-Langston, Deborah; Dana, Reza; Hamrah, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the contralateral unaffected eyes of patients with microbial keratitis (MK) for any immune cell or nerve changes by laser in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Methods A prospective study was performed on 28 patients with MK, including acute bacterial, fungal, and Acanthamoeba keratitis, as well as on their contralateral clinically unaffected eyes and on control groups, which consisted of 28 age-matched normal controls and 15 control contact lens (CL) wearers. Laser IVCM with the Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph 3/Rostock Cornea Module and Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometry of the central cornea were performed. Two masked observers assessed central corneal dendritiform cell density and subbasal corneal nerve parameters. Results The contralateral clinically unaffected eyes of patients with MK demonstrated significant diminishment in nerve density (15,603.8 ± 1265.2 vs. 24,102.1 ± 735.6 μm/mm2), total number of nerves (11.9 ± 1.0 vs. 24.9 ± 1.2/frame), number of branches (1.7 ± 0.2 vs. 19.9 ± 1.3/frame), and branch nerve length (5775.2 ± 757.1 vs. 12,715.4 ± 648.4 μm/mm2) (P < 0.001 for all parameters) compared to normal controls and CL wearers. Further, dendritiform cell density in the contralateral unaffected eyes was significantly increased as compared to that in controls (117.5 ± 19.9 vs. 24.2 ± 3.5 cells/mm2, P < 0.001). Conclusions We demonstrate a subclinical involvement in the contralateral clinically unaffected eyes in patients with unilateral acute MK. In vivo confocal microscopy reveals not only a diminishment of the subbasal corneal nerves and sensation, but also an increase in dendritiform cell density in the contralateral unaffected eyes of MK patients. These findings show bilateral immune alterations in a clinically unilateral disease. PMID:26465889

  2. Update: Fusarium Keratitis - United States, 2005 - 2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the results of a Fusarium keratitis outbreak investigation being conducted by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The epidemiological data indicate that the 2005-2006 outbreaks of corneal infections within the United States are linked to the use of on...

  3. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Elbadawy, Hossein Mostafa; Gailledrat, Marine; Desseaux, Carole; Ponzin, Diego; Ferrari, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis. PMID:23326647

  4. Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis after contact lens usage.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Hyun; Song, Nang Hee; Koh, Jae Woong

    2012-02-01

    To report on Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis in two healthy patients who had worn contact lenses foran extended period of time. A 36-year-old female and a 21-year-old female visited our hospital with ocular pain and blurred vision. Both patients had a history of wearing soft contact lenses for over fve years with occasional overnight wear. At the initial presentation, a slit lamp examination revealed corneal stromal infiltrations and epithelial defects with peripheral neovascularization in both patients. Microbiological examinations were performed from samples of corneal scrapings, contact lenses, contact lens cases, and solution. The culture resulting from the samples taken from the contact lenses, contact lens cases, and solution were all positive for Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Confrming that the direct cause of the keratitis was the contact lenses, the frst patient was prescribed ceftazidime and amikacin drops sensitive to Achromobacter xylosoxidans. The second patient was treated with 0.3% gatifoxacin and fortifed tobramycin drops. After treatment, the corneal epithelial defects were completely healed, and subepithelial corneal opacity was observed. Two cases of Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis were reported in healthy young females who wore soft contact lenses. Achromobacter xylosoxidans should be considered a rare but potentially harmful pathogen for lens-induced keratitis in healthy hosts. PMID:22323886

  5. Seasonal trends of microbial keratitis in south India

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Charles C.; Prajna, Lalitha; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Prajna, N. Venkatesh; McLeod, Stephen D.; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Porco, Travis C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior studies suggest that fungal keratitis is more common in hot, humid climates while bacterial keratitis is independent of seasonal variation. This study analyzes seasonal trends in the incidence of fungal and bacterial keratitis at the Aravind Eye Hospital in southeast India. Methods Using microbiology records from August 2006 to July 2009, retrospective analyses of infectious keratitis were performed. Bacterial and fungal keratitis incidence data were analyzed for seasonal patterns. Results Among the 6,967 infectious keratitis cases, cultures were performed in 5,221 (74.9%) and positive in 3,028 (58%). Of the positive cultures cases, 1,908 (63%) and 1,081 (35.7%) were of fungal and bacterial etiology, respectively. The predominant fungal organism was Fusarium spp (42.3%) and the predominant bacterial organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (35.1%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (24.3%), and Nocardia spp (8.1%). Analyses revealed an uneven distribution of fungal keratitis throughout the year (p<0.001) with peaks in July and January. No significant seasonal trend was observed for the combined bacterial keratitis group. Conclusion A higher incidence of fungal keratitis occurs during the months corresponding to the windy and harvest seasons, during which time infection from vegetative corneal injury may be more likely. Robust screening efforts during these periods may mitigate visually debilitating sequelae from infectious keratitis. PMID:22868629

  6. Encystment in Acanthamoeba castellanii: a review.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David

    2014-11-01

    Differentiation of Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites involves massive turnover of cellular components and remodelling of organelle structure and function so as to produce a cryptobiotic cell, resistant to desiccation, heat, freezing, and chemical treatments. This review presents a summary of a decade of research on the most studied aspects of the biochemistry of this process, with emphasis on problems of biocide and drug resistances, putative new targets, molecular and cell biology of the process of encystment, and the characteristics of the encysted state. As well as the intrinsic pathogenicity of the organism towards the cornea, and the ability of related species to invade the human brain, its propensity for harbouring and transmitting pathogenic bacteria and viruses is considerable and leads to increasing concerns. The long-term survival and resistance of cysts to drugs and biocides adds another layer of complexity to the problem of their elimination. PMID:24726698

  7. Current Thoughts in Fungal Keratitis: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Zubair; Miller, Darlene; Galor, Anat

    2013-01-01

    Fungal keratitis remains a challenging and often elusive diagnosis in geographic regions where it is endemic. Marred by delays in diagnosis, the sequelae of corneal fungal infections, though preventable, can be irreversible. Recent studies and advances in the arena have broadened the approach and treatment to mycotic keratitis. This review will discuss current diagnostic modalities of fungal keratitis and will particularly focus on treatment regimens. It will also explore future therapeutic models and critique the potential benefit of each. PMID:24040467

  8. Fatal Acanthamoeba Encephalitis in a Patient With a Total Artificial Heart (Syncardia) Device

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Susanna K.; Gajurel, Kiran; Tung, Christie; Albers, Gregory; Deresinski, Stan; Montoya, Jose G.; Sheikh, Ahmad Y.; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Ha, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba encephalitis is an uncommon but often fatal infection complication. Here we report the first case of Acanthamoeba encephalitis in a patient with a Total Artificial Heart device. PMID:25734127

  9. Fatal acanthamoeba encephalitis in a patient with a total artificial heart (syncardia) device.

    PubMed

    Tan, Susanna K; Gajurel, Kiran; Tung, Christie; Albers, Gregory; Deresinski, Stan; Montoya, Jose G; Sheikh, Ahmad Y; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Ha, Richard

    2014-09-01

    Acanthamoeba encephalitis is an uncommon but often fatal infection complication. Here we report the first case of Acanthamoeba encephalitis in a patient with a Total Artificial Heart device. PMID:25734127

  10. [Fungal keratitis caused by Cylindrocarpon lichenicola].

    PubMed

    Gaujoux, T; Borsali, E; Gavrilov, J-C; Touzeau, O; Goldschmidt, P; Despiau, M-C; Chaumeil, C; Laroche, L; Borderie, V

    2012-05-01

    We report a case of a 67-year-old woman with no significant past ocular history, who was referred for management of an unresponsive microbial keratitis resulting from trauma with a piece of clothing fabric 1 month previously in Portugal and worsening despite topical fortified antibiotics. On examination, visual acuity was limited to "light perception". Slit lamp examination revealed an 11×11mm full-thickness corneal infiltrate. Confocal images showed branching hyphae suggestive of a fungal infection. Fungal cultures of corneal scrapings revealed growth of Cylindrocarpon lichenicola, a saprophytic, filamentous fungus, which is an unusual cause of keratitis. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy with voriconazole and amphotericin B, she required penetrating keratoplasty for impending corneal perforation. Follow-up was uneventful, with no recurrence at 1 year. Fungal infections must be suspected in all corneal ulcers of traumatic etiology. Specific cultures and confocal microscopy must be performed early, so as to enable early treatment modification. PMID:22137679

  11. Unilateral Punctate Keratitis Secondary to Wallenberg Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boto, Ana; Del Hierro, Almudena; Capote, Maria; Noval, Susana; Garcia, Amanda; Santiago, Susana

    2014-01-01

    We studied three patients who developed left unilateral punctate keratitis after suffering left-sided Wallenberg Syndrome. A complex evolution occurred in two of them. In all cases, neurophysiological studies showed damage in the trigeminal sensory component at the bulbar level. Corneal involvement secondary to Wallenberg syndrome is a rare cause of unilateral superficial punctate keratitis. The loss of corneal sensitivity caused by trigeminal neuropathy leads to epithelial erosions that are frequently unobserved by the patient, resulting in a high risk of corneal-ulcer development with the possibility of superinfection. Neurophysiological studies can help to locate the anatomical level of damage at the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, confirming the suspected etiology of stroke, and demonstrating that prior vascular involvement coincides with the location of trigeminal nerve damage. In some of these patients, oculofacial pain is a distinctive feature. PMID:24882965

  12. Corneal Lymphangiogenesis in Herpetic Stromal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul J; Chang, Michael; Garg, Nitin; Zhu, Jimmy; Chang, Jin-Hong; Shukla, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Corneal lymphangiogenesis is the extension of lymphatic vessels into the normally alymphatic cornea, a process that compromises the cornea’s immune privileged state and facilitates herpetic stromal keratitis (HSK). HSK results most commonly from infection by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and is characterized by immune- and inflammation-mediated damage to the deep layers of the cornea. Current research demonstrates the potential of anti-lymphangiogenic therapy to decrease and prevent herpes-induced lymphangiogenesis. PMID:25444520

  13. First aid for complications of infectious keratitis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Infectious keratitis is a fairly common entity in India. However while paying attention to the primary entity, the associated events may be overlooked. Enhanced pain usually suggests a worsening of the condition or development of associated problems like secondary glaucoma. However, contrary to logic, a sudden decrease in pain is also liley to suggest a worsening, e.g. perforation of the corneal ulcer. Various such problems with their management are outlined. PMID:18417823

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF Pseudomonas spp. AS AMOEBA-RESISTANT MICROORGANISMS IN ISOLATES OF Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Maschio, Vinicius José; Corção, Gertrudes; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a “Trojan horse” of the microbial world. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of Pseudomonas as an amoeba-resistant microorganism in 12 isolates of Acanthamoeba. All isolates showed the genus Pseudomonas spp. as amoeba-resistant microorganisms. Thus, one can see that the Acanthamoeba isolates studied are hosts of Pseudomonas. PMID:25651331

  15. Photodynamic inactivation of pathogens causing infectious keratitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Carole; Wolf, G.; Walther, M.; Winkler, K.; Finke, M.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bischoff, Markus; Seitz, B.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance requires new approaches also for the treatment of infectious keratitis. Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) using the photosensitizer (PS) Chlorin e6 (Ce6) was investigated as an alternative to antibiotic treatment. An in-vitro cornea model was established using porcine eyes. The uptake of Ce6 by bacteria and the diffusion of the PS in the individual layers of corneal tissue were investigated by fluorescence. After removal of the cornea's epithelium Ce6-concentrations < 1 mM were sufficient to reach a penetration depth of 500 μm. Liquid cultures of microorganisms were irradiated using a specially constructed illumination chamber made of Spectralon(R) (reflectance: 99 %), which was equipped with high power light emitting diodes (λ = 670 nm). Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) from keratitis patients were tested in liquid culture against different concentrations of Ce6 (1 - 512 μM) using 10 minutes irradiation (E = 18 J/cm2 ). This demonstrated that a complete inactivation of the pathogen strains were feasible whereby SA was slightly more susceptible than PA. 3909 mutants of the Keio collection of Escherichia coli (E.coli) were screened for potential resistance factors. The sensitive mutants can be grouped into three categories: transport mutants, mutants in lipopolysaccharide synthesis and mutants in the bacterial SOS-response. In conclusion PDI is seen as a promising therapy concept for infectious keratitis.

  16. Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype is a potential environmental host for Enterobacter aerogenes and Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acanthamoeba can interact with a wide range of microorganisms such as viruses, algae, yeasts, protists and bacteria including Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio cholerae, Helicobacter pylori, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium spp., and Escherichia coli. In this capacity, Acanthamoeba has been suggested as a vector in the transmission of bacterial pathogens to the susceptible hosts. Methods Here, we used a keratitis isolate of A. castellanii of the T4 genotype and studied its interactions with two bacterial genera which have not been tested before, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Aeromonas hydrophila, as well as E. coli. Assays were performed to determine bacterial association with and invasion of A. castellanii. Additionally, bacterial survival intracellular of A. castellanii trophozoites as well as cysts was determined. Results All three bacterial isolates tested, associated, invaded, and survived inside A. castellanii trophozoites as well as A. castellanii cysts. However, E. aerogenes and E. coli exhibited significantly reduced association with and invasion of A. castellanii as compared with A. hydrophila (P < 0.01 using paired T-test, one tail distribution). In the long term survival assays, all three bacterial isolates tested remained viable inside A. castellanii trophozoites, while amoeba remained intact; however A. hydrophila exhibited higher survival inside amoebae (14.54 ± 3.3 bacteria:amoeba ratio) compared with E. aerogenes (3.96 ± 0.7 bacteria:amoeba ratio) and E. coli (5.85 ± 1.1 bacteria:amoeba ratio). A. hydrophila, E. coli, and E. aerogenes remained viable during the encystment process and exhibited higher levels of recovery from mature cysts (14.13 ± 0.89 A. hydrophila:amoeba ratio, 10.13 ± 1.17 E. aerogenes:amoeba ratio, and 11.95 ± 0.7 E. coli:amoeba ratio). Conclusions A. hydrophila and E. aerogenes also joined the ranks of other bacteria that could benefit from A. castellanii

  17. Acanthamoeba royreba sp. n. from a human tumor cell culture.

    PubMed

    Willaert, E; Stevens, A R; Tyndall, R L

    1978-02-01

    A new species of Acanthamoeba was isolated from a culture of an established line of human choriocarcinoma cells. The identification of this strain, originally called the Oak Ridge strain, and the establishment of a new species for it were based on morphologic, serologic, and immunochemical studies. In general, the structure of the trophozoite did not differ significantly from that of other species of Acanthamoeba, except that a body which more closely resembled a centriole than material described previously as centriolar satellites was observed in trophozoites examined with the electron microscope. The dimensions of the trophozoite were the smallest among the species of Acanthamoeba. The cyst was typical of the genus, but differed from those of other species by its smaller size and the presence of numerous ostioles. Studies of the Oak Ridge strain by immunofluorescence using antisera developed against the isolate and Acanthamoeba culbertsoni, A. castellanii, A. polyphaga, A. rhysodes, A. astronyxis, and A. palestinensis revealed the antigenic uniqueness of the Oak Ridge strain. It was demonstrated by immunoelectrophoretic analyses of the soluble proteins of the Oak Ridge strain that shared approximately 1/2 of its antigenic structure with A. castellanii and A. culbertsoni. The antigenic differences of the isolate from other species of Acanthamoeba were deduced from comparison of the antigenic constitution of these species and the Oak Ridge strain with A. culbertsoni and A. castellanii. Although the strain was initially recognized by its cytopathogenicity for cultures, it did not produce acute infections in mice after intranasal inoculation of 1 X 10(4) ameba/mouse. The foregoing results constituted the basis for the establishment of the Oak Ridge strain as a new species, A. royreba sp. n., in the genus Acanthamoeba. PMID:566323

  18. Candida albicans keratitis in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, H Mohammed J; Papanikolaou, Theocharis; Mariatos, Georgios; Hammad, Amany; Hassan, Hala

    2010-01-01

    Purpose When investigating a case of unexplained corneal ulceration, we need to think of fungal infection and any predisposing factors. Methods A case study of a corneal ulceration in a patient who was HIV positive with a devastating visual outcome. Results Therapeutic corneal graft was necessary due to corneal perforation. Immunocompromised state of patient was retrospectively diagnosed. Conclusions Candida albicans keratitis is an opportunistic infection of a compromised cornea, and sometimes unknowingly compromised host, which can be initially misdiagnosed. Despite intensive antifungal therapy, occasionally patients require corneal grafting to improve vision, and before it is possible to establish an accurate diagnosis. PMID:21060674

  19. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of infectious keratitis in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Nentwich, Martin M; Bordón, M; di Martino, D Sánchez; Campuzano, A Ruiz; Torres, W Martínez; Laspina, F; Lichi, S; Samudio, M; Farina, N; Sanabria, Rosa R; de Kaspar, Herminia Mino

    2015-06-01

    To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with severe infectious keratitis in Asunción, Paraguay between April 2009 and September 2011. All patients with the clinical diagnosis of severe keratitis (ulcer ≥2 mm in size and/or central location) were included. Empiric treatment consisted of topical antibiotics and antimycotics; in cases of advanced keratitis, fortified antibiotics were used. After microbiological analysis, treatment was changed if indicated. In total 48 patients (62.5 % males, 25 % farmers) were included in the analysis. A central ulcer was found in 81.3 % (n = 39). The median delay between onset of symptoms and time of first presentation at our institution was 7 days (range 1-30 days). Fungal keratitis was diagnosed in 64.5 % (n = 31) of patients, of which Fusarium sp. (n = 17) was the most common. Twenty-one patients (43.8 %) reported previous trauma to the eye. The globe could be preserved in all cases. While topical therapy only was sufficient in most patients, a conjunctival flap was necessary in six patients suffering from fungal keratitis. The high rate of fungal keratitis in this series is remarkable, and microbiological analysis provided valuable information for the appropriate treatment. In this setting, one has to be highly suspicious of fungal causes of infectious keratitis. PMID:24789079

  20. Management and treatment of contact lens-related Pseudomonas keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, Mark DP

    2012-01-01

    Pubmed and Medline were searched for articles referring to Pseudomonas keratitis between the years 2007 and 2012 to obtain an overview of the current state of this disease. Keyword searches used the terms “Pseudomonas” + “Keratitis” limit to “2007–2012”, and [“Ulcerative” or “Microbial”] + “Keratitis” + “Contact lenses” limit to “2007–2012”. These articles were then reviewed for information on the percentage of microbial keratitis cases associated with contact lens wear, the frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of microbial keratitis around the world, the most common therapies to treat Pseudomonas keratitis, and the sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas to commonly prescribed antibiotics. The percentage of microbial keratitis associated with contact lens wear ranged from 0% in a study from Nepal to 54.5% from Japan. These differences may be due in part to different frequencies of contact lens wear. The frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of keratitis ranged from 1% in Japan to over 50% in studies from India, Malaysia, and Thailand. The most commonly reported agents used to treat Pseudomonas keratitis were either aminoglycoside (usually gentamicin) fortified with a cephalosporin, or monotherapy with a fluoroquinolone (usually ciprofloxacin). In most geographical areas, most strains of Pseudomonas sp. (≥95%) were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, but reports from India, Nigeria, and Thailand reported sensitivity to this antibiotic and similar fluoroquinolones of between 76% and 90%. PMID:22791973

  1. Colonization of broilers by Campylobacter jejuni internalized within Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present the first report that Campylobacter jejuni, internalized within Acanthamoeba castellanii, colonized broilers. After 1, 3, 7 and 14 days post challenge none of the broilers challenged with negative controls were colonized, but were with internalized C. jejuni. The biology of protozoa-Cam...

  2. Early Diagnosis and Successful Treatment of Cryptococcus albidus Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Hsun; Lin, I-Huang; Chang, Tsung-Chain; Tseng, Sung-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cryptococcus albidus keratitis is a rare and difficult diagnosed disease. Here we report a case of C albidus keratitis early diagnosed by dot hybridization assay and successfully treated with intrastromal injection of Amphotericin B (AB). A 45-year-old man presented with left red eye for 2 days. The slit lamp examination exhibited deep corneal infiltrations. Smears and cultures were performed but revealed negative findings. Molecular detection of pathogens was performed by dot hybridization assay, and C albidus keratitis was diagnosed. Despite the identification of C albidus, the clinical condition still worsened due to deep corneal infiltration. After performing intrastromal injection of AB, the corneal infiltration gradually improved. C albidus is a rare cause of diseases in humans and should be considered as a potential pathogen of corneal ulcer. The prognosis of C albidus keratitis will improve if the condition is recognized early and treated properly. PMID:25984681

  3. Multidrug-resistant Fusarium keratitis: diagnosis and treatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Sara, Sergio; Sharpe, Kendall; Morris, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic keratitis is an ocular infective process derived from any fungal species capable of corneal invasion. Despite its rarity in developed countries, its challenging and elusive diagnosis may result in keratoplasty or enucleation following failed medical management. Filamentous fungi such as Fusarium are often implicated in mycotic keratitis. Bearing greater morbidity than its bacterial counterpart, mycotic keratitis requires early clinical suspicion and initiation of antifungal therapy to prevent devastating consequences. We describe a case of multidrug-resistant mycotic keratitis in a 46-year-old man who continued to decline despite maximal therapy and therapeutic keratoplasty. Finally, enucleation was performed as a means of source control preventing dissemination of a likely untreatable fungal infection into the orbit. Multidrug-resistant Fusarium is rare, and may progress to endophthalmitis. We discuss potential management options which may enhance diagnosis and outcome in this condition. PMID:27489066

  4. Acanthamoeba castellanii Induces Host Cell Death via a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sissons, James; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Jayasekera, Samantha; Alsam, Selwa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis due to Acanthamoeba castellanii is a serious human infection with fatal consequences, but it is not clear how the circulating amoebae interact with the blood-brain barrier and transmigrate into the central nervous system. We studied the effects of an Acanthamoeba encephalitis isolate belonging to the T1 genotype on human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier. Using an apoptosis-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we showed that Acanthamoeba induces programmed cell death in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Next, we observed that Acanthamoeba specifically activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Acanthamoeba-mediated brain endothelial cell death was abolished using LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. These results were further confirmed using brain microvascular endothelial cells expressing dominant negative forms of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. This is the first demonstration that Acanthamoeba-mediated brain microvascular endothelial cell death is dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. PMID:15845472

  5. Successful treatment of Beauveria bassiana fungal keratitis with topical voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akiko; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Yaguchi, Takashi; Shimmura, Shigeto; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    We describe a 66-year-old woman who suffered from fungal keratitis after corneal transplantation. The causative organism was identified as Beauveria bassiana on the basis of morphological characteristics and the sequence of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA gene. The patient was successfully treated with topical voriconazole (VRCZ) use only. We, hereby, present the first report of a case with B. bassiana fungal keratitis that responded to topical antifungal VRCZ treatment. PMID:26603426

  6. Serratia keratitis transmitted by contaminated eyedroppers.

    PubMed

    Templeton, W C; Eiferman, R A; Snyder, J W; Melo, J C; Raff, M J

    1982-06-01

    Serratia marcescens keratitis developed in three patients after keratoplasty. Two patients were using prednisolone sodium phosphate eyedrops and the third was using 0.5% timolol maleate eyedrops. All three cases resolved after treatment with topically and subconjunctivally administered antibiotics. Although S. marcescens was isolated from the outer grooves of the bottletops and from the inner surfaces of the eyedropper caps, it was not cultured from the solutions in the bottles. Moisture collecting in the dead space between the cap and bottle was apparently a culture medium for Serratia. When eyedrops were expressed into the patient's eyes, the eyes were inoculated with Serratia from the contaminated liquid flowing down the eyedropper shaft. PMID:7046448

  7. Microbiological diagnosis of suppurative keratitis in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, G; Billson, F; Husain, R; Howlader, S A; Islam, N; McClellan, K

    1987-01-01

    Experience in setting up an inexpensive microbiology laboratory in the Bangladesh National Society for the Blind Eye Hospital and Training Complex at Chittagong is presented, together with the results of a pilot study to identify organisms responsible in 33 consecutive cases of suppurative keratitis in the Chittagong area of Bangladesh. Of the 33 cases 21 were positively identified by means of Gram stain and/or culture. Two-thirds of the responsible organisms were bacteria, and one-third were fungi. The bacterial causes included Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The fungi isolated were Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus ochraceus, and Fusarium solani. Among the causes of failure to diagnose the organism was chronicity of infection and previous treatment. The value of the study in the planning of future treatment regimens, and the implications of setting up similar relatively cheap microbiology laboratory facilities in developing countries, are discussed. Images PMID:3555609

  8. Proinflammatory chemokines during Candida albicans keratitis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoyong; Hua, Xia; Wilhelmus, Kirk R

    2010-03-01

    Chemotactic cytokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes into infected tissues. This study investigated the profile of chemokines during experimental Candida albicans keratitis and determined the effects of chemokine inhibition on leukocyte infiltration and fungal growth during murine keratomycosis. Scarified corneas of BALB/c mice were topically inoculated with C. albicans and monitored daily over one week for fungal keratitis. After a gene microarray for murine chemokines compared infected corneas to controls, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunostaining assessed chemokine expression in infected and mock-inoculated corneas. An anti-chemokine antibody was then administered subconjunctivally and evaluated for effects on clinical severity, corneal inflammation, fungal recovery, and cytokine expression. Of 33 chemokine genes examined by microarray, 6 CC chemokines and 6 CXC chemokines were significantly (P<0.05) upregulated more than two-fold. Chemokine (CC-motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) was upregulated 108-fold (P=0.03) by real-time RT-PCR within one day after fungal inoculation and remained increased 28-fold (P=0.02) at one week, and its in situ expression increased in the epithelium and stroma of infected corneas. Compared to the control antibody-treated group, eyes treated with anti-CCL3 antibody showed reduced clinical severity (P<0.05), less corneal neovascularization (P=0.02), and fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating corneal tissue, but the amount of recoverable fungi was not significantly (P=0.4) affected. Anti-CCL3 treatment significantly (P=0.01) reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1beta in infected corneas. These results indicate that chemokines, especially the CC chemokine CCL3, play important roles in the acute inflammatory response to C. albicans corneal infection. PMID:20005222

  9. Seasonal distribution of potentially pathogenic Acanthamoeba species from drinking water reservoirs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Ji, Wen-Tsai; Tzeng, Kai-Jiun; Huang, Shih-Wei; Huang, Yu-Li

    2015-03-01

    In order to detect the presence/absence of Acanthamoeba along with geographical variations, water quality variations and seasonal change of Acanthamoeba in Taiwan was investigated by 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected quarterly at 19 drinking water reservoir sites from November 2012 to August 2013. Acanthamoeba was detected in 39.5 % (30/76) of the water sample, and the detection rate was 63.2 % (12/19) from samples collected in autumn. The average concentration of Acanthamoeba was 3.59 × 10(4) copies/L. For geographic distribution, the detection rate for Acanthamoeba at the northern region was higher than the central and southern regions in all seasons. Results of Spearman rank test revealed that heterotrophic plate count (HPC) had a negative correlation (R = -0.502), while dissolved oxygen (DO) had a positive correlation (R = 0.463) in summer. Significant differences were found only between the presence/absence of Acanthamoeba and HPC in summer (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.05). T2 and T4 genotypes of Acanthamoeba were identified, and T4 was the most commonly identified Acanthamoeba genotypes. The presence of Acanthamoeba in reservoirs presented a potential public health threat and should be further examined. PMID:25263419

  10. Detection of glycoproteins in the Acanthamoeba plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Paatero, G.I.L. ); Gahmberg, C.G. )

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors have shown that glycoproteins are present in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii by utilizing different radioactive labeling techniques. Plasma membrane proteins in the amoeba were iodinated by {sup 125}I-lactoperoxidase labeling and the solubilized radiolabeled glycoproteins were separated by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The periodate/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} and galactose oxidase/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} labeling techniques were used for labeling of surface carbohydrates in the amoeba. Several surface-labeled glycoproteins were observed in addition to a diffusely labeled region with M{sub r} of 55,000-75,000 seen on electrophoresis, which could represent glycolipids. The presence of glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii was confirmed by metabolic labeling with ({sup 35}S)methionine followed by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  11. Efficiency of water disinfectants against Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Mathieu; Mazoua, Stéphane; Berne, Florence; Bodet, Charles; Garrec, Nathalie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Ménard-Szczebara, Florence; Oberti, Sandrine; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Soreau, Sylvie; Wallet, France; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic by themselves and be a reservoir for bacterial pathogens, such as Legionella pneumophila. Not only could amoebae protect intra-cellular Legionella but Legionella grown within amoebae could undergo physiological modifications and become more resistant and more virulent. Therefore, it is important to study the efficiency of treatments on amoebae and Legionella grown within these amoebae to improve their application and to limit their impact on the environment. With this aim, we compared various water disinfectants against trophozoites of three Acanthamoeba strains and L. pneumophila alone or in co-culture. Three oxidizing disinfectants (chlorine, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide) were assessed. All the samples were treated with disinfectants for 1 h and the disinfectant concentration was followed to calculate disinfectant exposure (Ct). We noticed that there were significant differences of susceptibility among the Acanthamoeba strains. However no difference was observed between infected and non-infected amoebae. Also, the comparison between the three disinfectants indicates that monochloramine was efficient at the same level towards free or co-cultured L. pneumophila while chlorine and chlorine dioxide were less efficient on co-cultured L. pneumophila. It suggests that these disinfectants should have different modes of action. Finally, our results provide for the first time disinfectant exposure values for Acanthamoeba treatments that might be used as references for disinfection of water systems. PMID:21093012

  12. [Fungal keratitis caused by Scedosporium apiospermum: first report from Turkey].

    PubMed

    Kalkan Akçay, Emine; Açıkgöz, Ziya Cibali; Can, Mehmet Erol; Celikbilek, Nevreste; Dereli Can, Gamze; Cağıl, Nurullah

    2013-10-01

    Fungal keratitis, an eye infection with poor prognosis, is difficult to treat and can lead to loss of vision. Among filamentous fungi Scedosporium spp. rarely lead to fungal keratitis. Here we present a case of keratitis caused by Scedosporium apiospermum. A 61-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of right eye pain and decreased vision after a foreign body trauma to the right eye. The patient was diagnosed as keratitis by biomicroscopic examination. Conjunctival swabs collected from both eyes were inoculated onto sheep blood agar, chocolate agar, eosin methylene blue agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar. Corneal scrapings from the right eye were inoculated onto the same solid media by "C-streak" method, and in brain-heart-infusion broth by immersion. While gram-stained smears of conjunctival swabs showed no significant finding, smears of corneal scrapings revealed abundant neutrophils and profuse septate hyphae. Fungal keratitis was diagnosed and topical enhanced amphotericin B (0.5 mg/ml) therapy was initiated with netilmicin sulfate and oxytetracycline HCl plus polymyxin B sulfate. At the 10th day of therapy a mold growth was detected in corneal scraping cultures and was identified microscopically as S.apiospermum. Based on the relevant literature, therapy was changed to enhanced topical voriconazole (2 mg/ml) applied hourly, plus systemic voriconazole administration. At the third day of treatment, reduction of epithelial defect and decline in the focus of keratitis were observed. In the following days, however, a progression occurred in the focus of keratitis and 5% natamycin ophthalmic suspension was added to the therapy. Since the patient did not respond to any of the medical treatments, therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was planned; yet, the patient refused the operation and was discharged with her own request. As far as the local literature was concerned, this is the first report of keratitis caused by S.apiospermum in

  13. Clinical utility of voriconazole eye drops in ophthalmic fungal keratitis.

    PubMed

    Al-Badriyeh, Daoud; Neoh, Chin Fen; Stewart, Kay; Kong, David C M

    2010-01-01

    Fungal keratitis is one of the major causes of ophthalmic mycosis and is difficult to treat. The range of common antifungal agents available for fungal keratitis remains inadequate and is generally associated with poor clinical outcomes. Voriconazole is a new generation triazole antifungal agent. Only marketed in systemic formulation and, with broad-spectrum activity and high intraocular penetration, voriconazole has demonstrated effectiveness against fungal keratitis. Systemic voriconazole, however, is not without side effects and is costly. Voriconazole eye drops have been prepared extemporaneously and used for the treatment of ophthalmic fungal keratitis. The current article sought to review the literature for evidence related to the effectiveness and safety of topical voriconazole and its corneal penetration into the aqueous humor of the eye. The voriconazole eye drops used are typically of 1% concentration, well tolerated by the eye, and are stable. Despite existing evidence to suggest that the eye drops are effective in the treatment of fungal keratitis, more studies are needed, especially in relation to using the eye drops as first-line and stand-alone treatment, preparation of higher concentrations, and optimal dosing frequency. PMID:20463910

  14. First case of fungal keratitis caused by Pestalotiopsis clavispora

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yu; Yamamoto, Shohaku; Yamakawa, Ryoji; Sunada, Atsuko; Asari, Seishi; Makimura, Koichi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report the isolation of Pestalotiopsis clavispora from the cornea of a patient with recurrent keratitis. Case report A 73-year-old male gardener presented with conjunctival injection and an oval infiltrate with feathery margins in the temporal half of the cornea in the right eye. His ocular history in the right eye included cataract surgery, five episodes of herpes simplex keratitis, three glaucoma surgeries, and bullous keratopathy. He had been treated with corticosteroids for years. Light microscopy of corneal scrapings revealed a filamentous fungus, and fungal keratitis was diagnosed. Treatment with topical voriconazole and pimaricin ointment was commenced. One month later, the infiltrate resolved. The antifungal agents were discontinued 7 months later, and keratitis relapsed 4 days after the discontinuation. The fungus was isolated and identified by molecular techniques as P. clavispora. Based on the results of antifungal susceptibility testing, treatment with topical and intravenous micafungin was initiated. The corneal infiltrate resolved 1 month after the relapse. Conclusion Molecular identification of the pathogen, and antifungal susceptibility testing, are useful in treating patients with fungal keratitis caused by a rare human pathogen. PMID:24348013

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus keratitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Kazuki; Sinjyo, Akiko; Ito, Toshio; Noda, Yoshizumi; Goto, Hiroshi; Ito, Norihiko

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) keratitis in a dog. A 7-year-old intact male American cocker spaniel that had undergone removal of a nictitating gland was referred for severe ulcerative keratitis. Slit-lamp examination showed swelling of the eyelid, mucopurulent discharge, conjunctival injection and chemosis, diffuse corneal edema and opacity, and a deep ulcer in central cornea. Gram staining of discharge from the eye demonstrated Gram-positive cocci. Despite topical ofloxacin, oxytetracycline and polymyxin B ophthalmic solution and intravenous cefazolin, there was no improvement. Cultures revealed MRSA that was sensitive only to chloramphenicol, vancomycin, lincomycin, and clindamycin. The antibiotic regimen was changed to topical and systemic chloramphenicol. After 9 days of treatment, although inflammation started to be resolved, the dog developed nonregenerative anemia. The antimicrobial regimen was changed again to topical and systemic vancomycin. Inflammation continued to improve over the next week. MRSA should be considered a potential organism in infectious keratitis, especially when general antibiotics are not effective. Although topical and systemic chloramphenicol and/or vancomycin are effective for treating MRSA keratitis, vancomycin should only be used when culture and susceptibility results indicate it is appropriate and no other options are available. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed case report of MRSA keratitis in a dog. PMID:23127159

  16. Actinomyces bowdenii ulcerative keratitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Amanda; Daniels, Joshua B; Wilkie, David A; Lutz, Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    A 5-year-old spayed female diabetic mixed-breed dog underwent phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation to correct bilateral hypermature cataracts. Two months postsurgery, the patient presented with ulcerative keratitis and multifocal stromal abscessation OD, which was controlled, but never resolved, with topical fluoroquinolone therapy. The patient re-presented 2 months later with a new, raised, white gritty corneal opacity associated with hyperemia, chemosis, and blepharospasm OD. Cytology of the right cornea revealed filamentous bacteria, suggestive of Actinomyces spp. Actinomyces bowdenii was subsequently isolated in pure culture and identified via 16s rDNA sequencing. Actinomyces bowdenii has never before been described as a cause of ocular infection. An immunosuppressed corneal environment likely contributed to this opportunistic Actinomycosis. The infection was not controlled with fluoroquinolone therapy, and the isolate, in vitro, was resistant to three fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin), which also has not been previously reported for this species of Actinomyces. A superficial keratectomy with conjunctival graft was employed to successfully manage the infection. PMID:23121462

  17. Granulomatous keratic precipitates in birdshot retinochoroiditis.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Pascal B; Papadia, Marina; Herbort, Carl P

    2013-04-01

    With the purpose of facilitating clinical studies of this infrequent disease, an expert panel published research criteria for birdshot retinochoroiditis (RCBRC). The aim of our study was to investigate the sensitivity of the exclusion criteria of the RCBRC as applied to all patients seen in our center with a diagnosis of BRC. This was a single center retrospective study involving all patients with an ocular inflammatory disease seen at the Centre for Ophthalmic Specialized Care, Lausanne, Switzerland, between 1995 and 2012. The percentage of patients with a diagnosis of BRC was identified. The exclusion criteria of the RCBRC were applied to all patients and the percentage of patients with absence of keratic precipitates (KPs) and absence of posterior synechiae were calculated. Out of 1,504 new patients, 25 patients (1.66 %; 19 female, 6 male) were diagnosed with BRC and 19 patients had sufficient data to be included in the study (1.26 %, 13 female). All patients were positive for HLA-A29 testing. The sensitivity of the RCBRC with respect to the exclusion criteria applied to our patient cohort was 84.2 % due to the exclusion of three patients showing KPs. Our study supports the motion to re-evaluate the RCBRC, since granulomatous KPs can be present and are more frequent than previously estimated and stringent application of the criteria would lead to a substantial loss of study patients. PMID:23080031

  18. Infectious keratitis after photorefractive keratectomy in a comanaged setting.

    PubMed

    Heidemann, D G; Clune, M; Dunn, S P; Chow, C Y

    2000-01-01

    A 48-year-old man had simultaneous bilateral photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). The surgeon who performed the PRK did not see the patient in follow-up, and there was confusion regarding the comanaging doctor. Therefore, the patient was not examined immediately postoperatively. Several days later, he was hospitalized for an unrelated, painful orthopedic problem and heavily sedated. Seven days after the PRK, an ophthalmologist was consulted for ocular irritation and discharge. Examination showed bilateral, purulent conjunctivitis and severe infectious keratitis in the left eye. The patient was treated with periocular and topical antibiotics. Corneal cultures yielded Staphylococcus aureus. The keratitis resolved slowly, leaving the patient with hand motion visual acuity. A corneal transplant and cataract extraction was performed 15 months later, resulting in a best corrected visual acuity of 20/400 because of glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Severe infectious keratitis may occur after PRK. Poor communication between the surgeon, comanaging doctor, and patient may result in treatment delay. PMID:10646160

  19. Penicillium keratitis in a HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Anutarapongpan, Orapin; Thanathanee, Onsiri; Suwan-Apichon, Olan

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old HIV-positive man presented with symptoms of redness, blurred vision and foreign body sensation in his right eye for 3 months. The slit lamp examination revealed deep stromal infiltration with a feathery margin in an otherwise minimal anterior chamber reaction. A corneal scraping was negative. Confocal microscopy demonstrated an abnormal large hyper-reflective oval shape in the corneal stroma. Corneal infiltration did not show improvement after topical, intrastromal and intracameral antifungal treatment. Therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed to eradicate the infection. Corneal button culture and histopathological results confirmed the diagnosis of Penicillium marneffei keratitis. No recurrent infection occurred after corneal transplantation. This appears to be the first report of P. marneffei keratitis in an HIV-infected patient. Although it is an uncommon condition, it should be one of the differential diagnoses in an HIV-infected patient presenting with keratitis. PMID:27535731

  20. Corneal cross-linking in 9 horses with ulcerative keratitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Corneal ulcers are one of the most common eye problems in the horse and can cause varying degrees of visual impairment. Secondary infection and protease activity causing melting of the corneal stroma are always concerns in patients with corneal ulcers. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL), induced by illumination of the corneal stroma with ultraviolet light (UVA) after instillation of riboflavin (vitamin B2) eye drops, introduces crosslinks which stabilize melting corneas, and has been used to successfully treat infectious ulcerative keratitis in human patients. Therefore we decided to study if CXL can be performed in sedated, standing horses with ulcerative keratitis with or without stromal melting. Results Nine horses, aged 1 month to 16 years (median 5 years) were treated with a combination of CXL and medical therapy. Two horses were diagnosed with mycotic, 5 with bacterial and 2 with aseptic ulcerative keratitis. A modified Dresden-protocol for CXL could readily be performed in all 9 horses after sedation. Stromal melting, diagnosed in 4 horses, stopped within 24 h. Eight of nine eyes became fluorescein negative in 13.5 days (median time; range 4–26 days) days after CXL. One horse developed a bacterial conjunctivitis the day after CXL, which was successfully treated with topical antibiotics. One horse with fungal ulcerative keratitis and severe uveitis was enucleated 4 days after treatment due to panophthalmitis. Conclusions CXL can be performed in standing, sedated horses. We did not observe any deleterious effects attributed to riboflavin or UVA irradiation per se during the follow-up, neither in horses with infectious nor aseptic ulcerative keratitis. These data support that CXL can be performed in the standing horse, but further studies are required to compare CXL to conventional medical treatment in equine keratitis and to optimize the CXL protocol in this species. PMID:23803176

  1. Bipolaris oryzae, a novel fungal opportunist causing keratitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luxia; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Lai, Xuwen; Peng, Lianghong; Yang, Chuanhong; Lai, Huangwen; Li, Jianxun; Meis, Jacques F; de Hoog, G Sybren; Zhuo, Chao; Chen, Min

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of mycotic keratitis caused by Bipolaris oryzae with predisposing trauma from a foreign body. The fungus was identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region, translation elongation factor 1α (TEF1) gene, and partial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) gene, and the species identity was confirmed on the basis of its characteristic conidial phenotype. The patient was treated with surgical intervention and antifungal agents, including intravenous fluconazole (FLC), oral itraconazole, topical 0.15% amphotericin B eye drops, and 0.5% FLC eye drops. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mycotic keratitis caused by B. oryzae worldwide. PMID:26976720

  2. Non Traumatic Keratitis Due to Colletotrichum Coccodes: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Aarti; Kakati, Barnali; Bahadur, Harsh; Gupta, Neeti

    2015-01-01

    Colletotrichum species, a rare and emerging fungus is a well- known plant pathogen and an uncommon cause of human infection. It has been implicated as the etiological agent of cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis and keratitis, particularly following colonization of traumatized tissues or in immunocompromised patients. However, it has hardly ever been reported in the absence of such predisposing risk factors. Here, we report a case of keratitis with Colletotrichum coccodes occurring in a middle- aged, immunocompetent person without any history of trauma or co-morbidity. The isolate was sensitive to Amphotericin B and Voriconazole, and accordingly the patient was treated successfully with ocular administration of Amphotericin B. PMID:25859457

  3. Susceptibility of Acanthamoeba castellanii to contact lens disinfecting solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, S; Fiori, P L; Pinna, A; Usai, S; Carta, F; Fadda, G

    1995-01-01

    A corneal isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii was exposed to commercial contact lens disinfecting solutions containing hydrogen peroxide, benzalkonium chloride, polyaminopropyl biguanide, polyquaternium 1, and chlorhexidine-thimerosal. The minimum trophozoite amebicidal concentration and exposure times required to kill trophozoites and cysts were determined. Solutions containing hydrogen peroxide or chlorhexidine-thimerosal were active against both trophozoites and cysts. The benzalkonium chloride-based solution was effective only against trophozoites. Solutions containing polyaminopropyl biguanide or polyquaternium 1 were completely ineffective. The need for adequate exposure times must be stressed. PMID:7492111

  4. Rhizopus Keratitis Associated with Poor Contact Lens Hygiene

    PubMed Central

    Warner, David B.; WrightIII, Hugh E.; Rosenbaum, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Rhizopus keratitis in a young woman with poor contact lens hygiene. The mold was highly sensitive to treatment with amphotericin 0.15% drops, after a relatively prompt diagnosis. Obtaining cultures of both corneal infiltrates and presumably infected contact lenses may help to avoid a delay in proper treatment. PMID:26889155

  5. Clinical experiences in fungal keratitis caused by Acremonium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Jae; Cho, Yong-Wun; Seo, Seong-Wook; Kim, Sun-Joo; Yoo, Ji-Myong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the predisposing risk factors, clinical presentation, management, and therapeutic outcomes of fungal keratitis caused by Acremonium. Methods This is a retrospective study of cases with Acremonium fungal keratitis that presented to our tertiary referral center between January 2006 and August 2012. Patient demographic and clinical details were determined and reported. Results Five cases of fungal keratitis from Acremonium species were identified in five patients (three males, two females). The mean age of the patients was of 73.4±5.46 years, with a mean follow-up time of 124±72 days. All patients had a history of corneal trauma with vegetable matter. Four cases were unresponsive to initial treatment (0.2% fluconazole, 0.15% amphotericin B) and required topical 5% natamycin, and, in two out of five cases, topical 1% voriconazole. Conclusion The most common risk factors for Acremonium fungal keratitis was ocular trauma. When a corneal lesion is found to be unresponsive to the initial treatment, we should consider adding or substituting topical natamycin or voriconazole for treatment. PMID:24492439

  6. Spectrum and Sensitivity of Bacterial Keratitis Isolates in Auckland

    PubMed Central

    Swift, S.; Dean, S. J.; Ormonde, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The bacteria isolated from severe cases of keratitis and their antibiotic sensitivity are recognised to vary geographically and over time. Objectives. To identify the most commonly isolated bacteria in keratitis cases admitted over a 24-month period to a public hospital in Auckland, New Zealand, and to investigate in vitro sensitivity to antibiotics. Methods. Hospital admissions for culture-proven bacterial keratitis between January 2013 and December 2014 were identified. Laboratory records of 89 culture positive cases were retrospectively reviewed and antibiotic sensitivity patterns compared with previous studies from other NZ centres. Results. From 126 positive cultures, 35 species were identified. Staphylococcus was identified to be the most common isolate (38.2%), followed by Pseudomonas (21.3%). Over the last decade, infection due to Pseudomonas species, in the same setting, has increased (p ≤ 0.05). Aminoglycosides, cefazolin, ceftazidime, erythromycin, tetracycline, and doxycycline were 100% effective against tested isolates in vitro. Amoxicillin (41.6%), cefuroxime (33.3%), and chloramphenicol (94.7%) showed reduced efficacy against Gram-negative bacteria, whereas penicillin (51%) and ciprofloxacin (98.8%) showed reduced efficacy against Gram-positive bacteria. Conclusions. Despite a shift in the spectrum of bacterial keratitis isolates, antibiotic sensitivity patterns have generally remained stable and show comparability to results within the last decade from NZ centres. PMID:27213052

  7. Choice of the laser wavelength for a herpetic keratitis treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, Alexander M.; Bagayev, Sergei N.; Chernikh, Valery V.; Kargapoltsev, Evgeny S.; Trunov, Alexander; Zhupikov, Andrey A.

    2002-06-01

    For the first time the effect of the UV laser radiation to human eye cornea with herpetic keratitis was experimentally investigated. In experiments the UV radiation of ArF (193 nm), KrCl (223 nm), KrF (248 nm) excimer lasers were used. Optimal laser radiation parameters for the treatment of the herpetic keratitis were determined. The immuno-biochemical investigations were carried out and the results of clinical trials are presented. The maximum ablation rate was obtained for the 248 nm radiation wavelength. The process of healing was successful but in some cases the haze on the surface of the cornea was observed. When used the 193 nm radiation wavelength the corneal surface was clear without any hazes but the epithelization process was slower than for 248 nm wavelength and in some cases the relapse was occurred. The best results for herpetic keratitis treatment have been achieved by utilizing the 223 nm radiation wavelength of the KrCl excimer laser. The use of the 223 nm radiation wavelength allows treating the herpetic keratitis with low traumatic process of ablation and provides high quality of corneal surface.

  8. Pathogenic and nonpathogenic Acanthamoeba spp. in thermally polluted discharges and surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    de Jonckheere, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    During spring and autumn, the total number of amoebae and the number of acanthamoeba species able to grow at 37 degrees C were determined in six thermally polluted factory discharges and the surrounding surface waters. The isolated Acanthamoeba strains were studied for growth in axenic medium, cytopathic effect in Vito cell cultures, and virulence in mice. Although more amoebae were isolated in autumn, the number of Acanthamoeba species was lower than in spring, when the percent of pathogenic strains among the isolates was highest. Higher concentrations of amoebae were found in warm discharges, and more virulent strains occurred in thermal discharges than in surface waters.

  9. Azole Antifungal Agents To Treat the Human Pathogens Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga through Inhibition of Sterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51)

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, David C.; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Rolley, Nicola J.; Parker, Josie E.; Nes, W. David; Smith, Stephen N.; Kelly, Diane E.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the amebicidal activities of the pharmaceutical triazole CYP51 inhibitors fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole against Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga and assess their potential as therapeutic agents against Acanthamoeba infections in humans. Amebicidal activities of the triazoles were assessed by in vitro minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) determinations using trophozoites of A. castellanii and A. polyphaga. In addition, triazole effectiveness was assessed by ligand binding studies and inhibition of CYP51 activity of purified A. castellanii CYP51 (AcCYP51) that was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Itraconazole and voriconazole bound tightly to AcCYP51 (dissociation constant [Kd] of 10 and 13 nM), whereas fluconazole bound weakly (Kd of 2,137 nM). Both itraconazole and voriconazole were confirmed to be strong inhibitors of AcCYP51 activity (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50] of 0.23 and 0.39 μM), whereas inhibition by fluconazole was weak (IC50, 30 μM). However, itraconazole was 8- to 16-fold less effective (MIC, 16 mg/liter) at inhibiting A. polyphaga and A. castellanii cell proliferation than voriconazole (MIC, 1 to 2 mg/liter), while fluconazole did not inhibit Acanthamoeba cell division (MIC, >64 mg/liter) in vitro. Voriconazole was an effective inhibitor of trophozoite proliferation for A. castellanii and A. polyphaga; therefore, it should be evaluated in trials versus itraconazole for controlling Acanthamoeba infections. PMID:26014948

  10. Azole Antifungal Agents To Treat the Human Pathogens Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga through Inhibition of Sterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51).

    PubMed

    Lamb, David C; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Rolley, Nicola J; Parker, Josie E; Nes, W David; Smith, Stephen N; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the amebicidal activities of the pharmaceutical triazole CYP51 inhibitors fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole against Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga and assess their potential as therapeutic agents against Acanthamoeba infections in humans. Amebicidal activities of the triazoles were assessed by in vitro minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) determinations using trophozoites of A. castellanii and A. polyphaga. In addition, triazole effectiveness was assessed by ligand binding studies and inhibition of CYP51 activity of purified A. castellanii CYP51 (AcCYP51) that was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Itraconazole and voriconazole bound tightly to AcCYP51 (dissociation constant [Kd] of 10 and 13 nM), whereas fluconazole bound weakly (Kd of 2,137 nM). Both itraconazole and voriconazole were confirmed to be strong inhibitors of AcCYP51 activity (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50] of 0.23 and 0.39 μM), whereas inhibition by fluconazole was weak (IC50, 30 μM). However, itraconazole was 8- to 16-fold less effective (MIC, 16 mg/liter) at inhibiting A. polyphaga and A. castellanii cell proliferation than voriconazole (MIC, 1 to 2 mg/liter), while fluconazole did not inhibit Acanthamoeba cell division (MIC, >64 mg/liter) in vitro. Voriconazole was an effective inhibitor of trophozoite proliferation for A. castellanii and A. polyphaga; therefore, it should be evaluated in trials versus itraconazole for controlling Acanthamoeba infections. PMID:26014948

  11. Development of a real-time PCR assay for quantification of Acanthamoeba trophozoites and cysts.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Delphine; Szczebara, Florence Ménard; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Frère, Jacques; Héchard, Yann

    2006-01-01

    Free-living amoebae have been found to be a reservoir for various pathogenic bacteria in aquatic environments. For example, the Acanthamoeba genus renders possible the intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila, which is responsible for legionellosis. It consequently matters to quantify Acanthamoeba cells and thereby enhance our assessment of the risk of contamination. The classical microbiological method of quantification relies on amoebae growth and most probable number calculation. We have developed a real-time PCR assay based on a TaqMan probe that hybridizes onto 18S rDNA. This probe is specific to the Acanthamoeba genus. The assay was successful with both the trophozoite and the cyst forms of Acanthamoeba. Highly sensitive, it proved to permit detection of fewer than 10 cells, even those that are not easily cultivable, such as the cyst forms. PMID:15923051

  12. Juglone induces cell death of Acanthamoeba through increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2015-12-01

    Juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a major chemical constituent of Juglans mandshruica Maxim. Recent studies have demonstrated that juglone exhibits anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-parasitic properties. However, its effect against Acanthamoeba has not been defined yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juglone on Acanthamoeba. We demonstrate that juglone significantly inhibits the growth of Acanthamoeba castellanii at 3-5 μM concentrations. Juglone increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caused cell death of A. castellanii. Inhibition of ROS by antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) restored the cell viability. Furthermore, our results show that juglone increased the uptake of mitochondrial specific dye. Collectively, these results indicate that ROS played a significant role in the juglone-induced cell death of Acanthamoeba. PMID:26358271

  13. Use of In Vitro Assays To Determine Effects of Human Serum on Biological Characteristics of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Stins, Monique; Rivas, Antonio Ortega; Morales, Jacob Lorenzo; Faull, Jane; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    Normal human serum inhibits Acanthamoeba (encephalitis isolate) binding to and cytotoxicity of human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier. Zymographic assays revealed that serum inhibits extracellular protease activities of acanthamoebae. But it is most likely that inhibition of specific properties of acanthamoebae is a consequence of the initial amoebicidal-amoebistatic effects induced by serum. For example, serum exhibited amoebicidal effects; i.e., up to 50% of the exposed trophozoites were killed. The residual subpopulation, although viable, remained static over longer incubations. Interestingly, serum enhanced the phagocytic ability of acanthamoebae, as measured by bacterial uptake. Overall, our results demonstrate that human serum has inhibitory effects on Acanthamoeba growth and viability, protease secretions, and binding to and subsequent cytotoxicity for brain microvascular endothelial cells. Conversely, Acanthamoeba phagocytosis was stimulated by serum. PMID:16825391

  14. Lethal Keratitis, Ichthyosis, and Deafness Syndrome Due to the A88V Connexin 26 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Esmer, Carmen; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Fajardo-Ramirez, Oscar R; Ramírez, Brenda; Hua, Rong; Choate, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome is a well-characterized disease that has been related to mutations in the GJB6 gene. Clinical features such as erythrokeratoderma, palmoplantar keratoderma, alopecia, and progressive vascularizing keratitis, among others, are well known in this entity. In this report we describe a newborn female patient diagnosed with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome with a lethal outcome due to sepsis. The patient harbored the mutation A88V that has been previously reported in lethal cases. PMID:27409001

  15. In the case of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans in buruli ulcer disease Acanthamoeba species stand accused.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M D; Boakye, D A; Mosi, L; Asiedu, K

    2011-03-01

    Buruli ulcer disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans results in extensive destruction of skin and soft tissue and long-term functional disabilities that ultimately require surgery and rehabilitation. The disease is associated with aquatic and swampy environments with the mycobacterium occurring in biofilms, soil, aquatic insects, fish and wildlife however, the mode of transmission to humans remains an enigma. Current transmission ideas including bites from predatory water bugs and mosquitoes, do not explain satisfactorily the spasmodic disease distribution in human populations. Here we argue that Acanthamoeba species are the natural hosts of M. ulcerans and are mainly responsible for disease transmission because; (i) Acanthamoebae are known natural hosts of several microbial pathogens including M. marinum, M. avium and Legionella pneumophila, (ii) culture of slow-to-grow microbial pathogens hosted in nature by Acanthamoeba spp is enhanced when the media is seeded with the protozoa, (iii) acanthamoebae and M. ulcerans share similar bio-ecological and epidemiological settings, (iv) documented evidence that prior growth of L. pneumophila and M. avium in acanthamoebae influences entry mechanisms, intracellular growth and virulence in human monocytes, (v) Acanthamoeba spp also infect humans and cause diseases via routes of openings including broken skin and sites of trauma similar to M. ulcerans and (vi) M. ulcerans is rather a fastidious intracellular organism as recent analysis of the genome indicate. We argue further that temperature plays a significant role in transmission determining the fate of either the intracellular microbe or the host cells. Also, Acanthamoeba-pathogen association has a long evolutionary history because the same set of bacterial genes and gene products e.g. in L. pneumophila are required for survival in both mammalian and protozoan host cells. We suggest that the involvement of Acanthamoeba in the transmission of M. ulcerans to humans better

  16. Vectorial role of Acanthamoeba in Legionella propagation in water for human use.

    PubMed

    Magnet, A; Peralta, R H S; Gomes, T S; Izquierdo, F; Fernandez-Vadillo, C; Galvan, A L; Pozuelo, M J; Pelaz, C; Fenoy, S; Del Águila, C

    2015-02-01

    Legionella spp. is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease and is transmitted through aerosols emanating from man-made water systems. Legionella resistance to water treatments has been related to its association with environmental amoebae such as Acanthamoeba. Due to the high presence of this protozoon in Spain and the high rate of notification of Legionnaires' disease of this country, the aims of this work were to study the coexistence of these bacteria and protozoa in water as well as their interaction. The usefulness of Acanthamoeba co-culture for the isolation of environmental Legionella was also studied. For this purpose, 70 water samples were collected in 2011 from three Drinking Water Treatment Plants, three Wastewater Treatment Plants and five Natural Pools in Spain. Acanthamoeba was found by PCR in 87.1% (61/70) samples and, by culture in 85.7% (60/70) samples. Legionella was detected by PCR in 58.6% (41/70) of water samples, in 5.7% (4/70) by agar culture and 75.7% (53/70) by Acanthamoeba co-culture. From the 54 Acanthamoeba water isolates, Legionella was detected in 43 of them independently of Acanthamoeba's genotype (T3, T4 and T11). Legionella feeleii, Legionella birminghamiensis, Legionella gresilensis/berliardensis, Legionella fairfieldensis, Legionella drozanski and Legionella falloni were identified. In conclusion, our results showed that environmental Acanthamoeba is infected by Legionella to a high percentage, and due to its ubiquity, high resistance and its pathogenic potential per se, new methods for its elimination should be studied. Also, the high effectivity of Acanthamoeba co-culture for Legionella detection has been shown. PMID:25461091

  17. A novel rat contact lens model for Fusarium keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Abou Shousha, Mohamed; Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Oechsler, Rafael A.; Iovieno, Alfonso; Maestre-Mesa, Jorge; Ruggeri, Marco; Echegaray, Jose J.; Dubovy, Sander R.; Perez, Victor L.; Miller, Darlene; Alfonso, Eduardo C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a new contact lens–associated fungal keratitis rat model and to assess the ability of non-invasive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to detect pathological changes in vivo in fungal keratitis. Methods We used SD-OCT to image and measure the cornea of Sprague Dawley rats. Fusarium infection was initiated in the rat eye by fitting Fusarium solani–soaked contact lenses on the experimental eye, while the control animals received contact lenses soaked in sterile saline. The fungal infection was monitored with periodic slit-lamp examination and in vivo SD-OCT imaging of the rat eye, and confirmed by histology, counting of viable fungi in the infected rat cornea, and PCR with specific primers for Fusarium sp. Results We imaged and measured the rat cornea with SD-OCT. Custom-made contact lenses were developed based on the OCT measurements. Incubation of contact lenses in a F. solani suspension resulted in biofilm formation. We induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis by fitting the rat eyes for 4 h with the Fusarium-contaminated contact lenses. The SD-OCT images of the cornea correlated well with the slit-lamp and histopathological results and clearly defined clinical signs of infection, namely, increased corneal thickening, loss of epithelial continuity, hyper-reflective areas representing infiltrates, and endothelial plaques characteristic of fungal infection. Moreover, in three cases, SD-OCT detected the infection without any clear findings on slit-lamp examination. Infection was confirmed with histological fungal staining, PCR, and microbiological culture positivity. Conclusions We developed a highly reproducible rat contact lens model and successfully induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in this model. The clinical presentation of contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in the rat model is similar to the human condition. SD-OCT is a valuable tool that

  18. Detection of Acanthamoeba and Toxoplasma in River Water Samples by Molecular Methods in Iran

    PubMed Central

    MAHMOUDI, Mohammad Reza; KAZEMI, Bahram; HAGHIGHI, Ali; KARANIS, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Free-living amoebae such as Acanthamoeba species may act as carriers of Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma oocysts, thus, may play an important role in the water-borne transmission of these parasites. In the present study, a loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for detection of Toxoplasma and a PCR assay were developed for investigation of Acanthamoeba in environmental water samples. Methods: A total of 34 samples were collected from the surface water in Guilan Province. Water samples were filtrated with membrane filters and followed by DNA extraction. PCR and LAMP methods used for detection of the protozoan parasites Acanthamoeba and Toxoplasma respectively. Results: Totally 30 and 2 of 34 samples were positive for Acanthamoeba and Toxoplasma oocysts respectively. Two samples were positive for both investigated parasites. Conclusion: The investigated water supplies, are contaminated by Toxoplasma and Acanthamoeba (oo)cystes. Acanthamoeba may play an important role in water-borne transmission of Toxoplasma in the study area. For the first time in Iran, protocol of LAMP method was used effectively for the detection of Toxoplasma in surface water samples in Iran. PMID:26246823

  19. Evaluation of Ozone Application in Dental Unit Water Lines Contaminated with Pathogenic Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    HIKAL, Wafaa; ZAKI, Basma; SABRY, Hany

    2015-01-01

    Background: In this study morphological and molecular characterization of Acanthamoeba strains, isolated from dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) were surveyed and the levels of disinfection achievable in vitro by the application of ozone disinfectant to DUWLs were evaluate. Methods: Water samples were collected from air-water syringes, cup fillers and tap water before and at the end of the working day. They were cultured on non-nutrient agar (NNA) plates. Species identification was carried out with a PCR assay based on sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene. The cellular response to ozone was tested on Acanthamoeba cyst with different doses at different contact time in vitro twice. Results: Prevalence rates for Acanthamoeba contamination were 100, 100 and 72% for air-water syringes, cup fillers and tap water, respectively. The morphological analysis revealed the presence of A. castellanii, A. griffin, A. hatchitti and A. lenticulata. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences showed the four strains to be closely related to a sequence type (T3, T4, T5 and T11). Acanthamoeba cells were stained with trypan blue, which revealed killed of Acanthamoeba instantaneously after 10 minutes in ozonized water. There was no growth of Acanthamoeba occurred after ozone treatment in water bottles for 5 minutes with a flow rate of 500 mg/hour. Conclusion : Ozone can play an important role in controlling the problem of contamination of DUWLs as a potent disinfectant. PMID:26622296

  20. Arcobacter butzleri survives within trophozoite of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, María P; Medina, Gustavo; Fernández, Heriberto

    2016-01-01

    The survival of three Arcobacter butzleri strains inside Acanthamoeba castellanii was assessed using axenic cultures of A. castellanii that were inoculated with the tested strains and incubated at 26°C under aerobic conditions for 240h. The behavior of bacteria in contact with amoebae was monitored using phase contrast microscopy. The bacterial survival rate within amoebae was assessed through counting colony forming units, using the gentamicin protection assay. All A. butzleri strains were able to survive during 240h within the amoebae, thus suggesting that (i) A. butzleri resists the amoebic digestion processes at least for the analyzed time; (ii) that A. castellanii could serve as an environmental reservoir for this bacterium, probably acting as a transmission vehicle for A. butzleri. PMID:26972277

  1. Topically administered corticosteroids: effect on antibiotic-treated bacterial keratitis.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, H M; Kupferman, A

    1980-07-01

    The effect of a topically administered corticosteroid, 1.0% prednisolone acetate, on bacterial replication in rabbit cornea receiving adequate antibiotic therapy was determined. Staphylococcus aureus keratitis was treated either with neomycin sulfate or gentamicin sulfate, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis was treated either with gentamicin or polymyxin B sulfate. Each antibiotic was administered topically at hourly intervals in both the commercially available concentration and as a formulation containing four times the quantity of drug found in the commercial preparations. In each instance, the antibiotic regimen sharply reduced the number of viable organisms in the cornea, although the concentrated preparations did so more rapidly and effectively. The addition of 1.0% prednisolone acetate had no measurable effect on outcome. In no instance was there a statistically significant difference between number of residual viable organisms in antibiotic-treated corneas and antibiotic/corticosteroid-treated corneas. PMID:7396786

  2. [Severe infectious keratitis in renal transplant patient: a case report].

    PubMed

    Limaiem, Rim; Mnasri, Heni; El Maazi, Abir; Ammari, Hela; Chaabouni, Afif; Mghaieth, Fatma; El Matri, Leila

    2009-07-01

    Keratitis occurring in renal transplant patients are often severe, with difficult management. We describe the case of a renal transplant patient, 44 year-old man, with history of recurrent herpetic keratitis, which developed an impending corneal perforation. Conjunctival smear showed the presence of amoebic cysts. Anti-amoebic treatment was undertaken in addition with oral aciclovir, and a therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed. An ulceration of the graft occurred within five months. Ocular samples showed the presence of Candida albicans. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy, he required a second therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty for graft perforation. One month later, we noted a recurrence of the ulcer with corneal thinning which evolved to perforation. PMID:19345628

  3. [Keratitis by Lasiodiplodia theobromae: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Samudio, Margarita; Laspina, Florentina; Fariña, Norma; Franco, Alicia; Mino de Kaspar, Herminia; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of mycotic keratitis caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae in a 60-year-old man with a history of ocular trauma with vegetable matter. Ophthalmological assessment with slit-lamp and microbiological evaluation of the corneal ulcer by conventional microbiological techniques were performed. Mycology study of the corneal scraping showed the presence of fungal filaments and the isolate was identified as Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Patient was treated with natamycin 5% and fluconazole 0.2% for 37 days. The infection was controlled but the corneal scars required a cornea transplant. This is the first case of keratitis by Lasiodiplodia theobromae in Paraguay. Difficulties in the management of these cases, which often requires surgical procedures, are discussed. PMID:25679935

  4. Therapeutic keratectomy for Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after LASIK.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Chen; Wang, I-Jong; Chen, Wei-Li; Hu, Fung-Rong

    2003-11-01

    We report successful treatment of a case of Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with therapeutic lamellar keratectomy. A 34-year-old woman developed a 2 x 2 mm feathery infiltration within the interface inferior to the pupil margin with mild inflammation of the conjunctiva in her left eye 40 days after LASIK surgery. Bacterial culture from the infiltrates of the interface of the stromal bed revealed Mycobacterium abscessus. After combination antibiotic therapy including amikacin and ciprofoxacin was given for 6 weeks, infiltration persisted despite the development of necrosis in the flap tissue. Therapeutic lamellar keratectomy combined with flap removal was performed. No recurrence was found 1 year after the surgery. Therapeutic lamellar keratectomy with flap removal can provide an effective treatment modality for the management of post-LASIK Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis that is unresponsive to medical treatment. PMID:14724729

  5. Immunological Aspects of Acute and Recurrent Herpes Simplex Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Hus, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) belongs to the major causes of visual morbidity worldwide and available methods of treatment remain unsatisfactory. Primary infection occurs usually early in life and is often asymptomatic. Chronic visual impairment and visual loss are caused by corneal scaring, thinning, and vascularization connected with recurrent HSV infections. The pathogenesis of herpetic keratitis is complex and is still not fully understood. According to the current knowledge, corneal scarring and vascularization are the result of chronic inflammatory reaction against HSV antigens. In this review we discuss the role of innate and adaptive immunities in acute and recurrent HSV ocular infection and present the potential future targets for novel therapeutical options based on immune interventions. PMID:25276842

  6. Experimental ulcerative herpetic keratitis. III. Evaluation of hyperimmune gammaglobulin therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C A; Easty, D L

    1981-01-01

    The value of hyperimmune gammaglobulin (HGG) therapy in ulcerative herpetic keratitis was assessed in rabbits. HGG treated of early disease in normal rabbits was very effective, producing a 10-fold rise in the virus concentration needed to infect 50% of sites (CID50) and an 88% inhibition of ulceration after 2 days. The efficacy of the gammaglobulin preparations tested depended on their anti-HSV antibody content. Established disease was considerably less responsive to HGG therapy. No conclusive effect of HGG therapy could be demonstrated in rabbits with a previous HSV skin infection ('immunised'). Corticosteroid-induced geographic ulceration in immunised rabbits was not prevented by concurrent HGG therapy. The findings indicate that HGG is unlikely to represent a useful therapy for ulcerative herpetic keratitis but that it may be valuable in primary disease and in long-term prophylaxis. PMID:6167281

  7. Acanthamoeba and bacteria produce antimicrobials to target their counterpart

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the microbial ecosystem, microbes compete for space and nutrients. Consequently, some have developed the ability to kill or inhibit the growth of other competing microbes by producing antimicrobial substances. As the ‘producer’ species are generally immune to these substances, their compounds act on the competing microbial species and give the producer more space and access to nutrients for growth. Many currently used antibiotics were developed by exploiting this potential of certain microbes. Findings Here, the free-living amoeba, Acanthamoeba castellanii, was investigated for its antibacterial activity against representative Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, while bacterial isolates were tested for their anti-amoebic properties. Conditioned medium from A. castellanii showed remarkable bactericidal properties against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) exhibiting almost 100% kill rate, but had limited effect against Acinetobacter sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). Similarly, the conditioned medium of E. coli K1 and Enterobacter sp., exhibited potent anti-Acanthamoebic effects in a concentration-dependent manner. Conditioned media of Acanthamoeba, E. coli K1 and Enterobacter sp. showed no cytotoxicity in vitro when tested against human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Active molecule/s in aforementioned amoebic and two bacterial conditioned media were 5 – 10 kDa, and <5 kDa respectively. Conclusions A. castellanii conditioned medium showed potent bactericidal properties against MRSA. The active molecule(s) are heat- and pronase-resistant, and in the 5 to 10 kDa molecular mass range. Contrary to this, E. coli K1 and Enterobacter sp., conditioned medium showed anti-amoebic effects that are <5 kDa in molecular mass, suggestive of active metabolites. PMID:24479709

  8. Early-onset hypoparathyroidism and chronic keratitis revealing APECED.

    PubMed

    Mezgueldi, Ellia; Bertholet-Thomas, Aurélia; Milazzo, Solange; Morris, Michael; Bacchetta, Justine; Fabien, Nicole; Cochat, Pierre; Weetman, Anthony P; Kemp, Elizabeth Helen; Belot, Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis of potentially life-threatening autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is crucial, but is often delayed due to the clinical heterogeneity of the disorder. Even in the absence of the classic disease triad of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and adrenocortical insufficiency, a diagnosis of APECED should be considered in children who have hypoparathyroidism and chronic keratitis, with a past medical history showing a mild and transient Candida infection. PMID:26509012

  9. Voriconazole for the treatment of refractory Aspergillus fumigatus keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Hitendra B; Garg, Prashant; Kodial, Harish

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of Aspergillus fumigatus keratitis in a 53-year-old, well-controlled diabetic female who did not respond to standard antifungal treatment. She was started on topical natamycin eye drops, but the infiltrate continued to progress. Topical amphotericin B and systemic ketoconazole was added, however, there was no response and the infiltrate increased further. She was then switched to topical and systemic voriconazole. Steady resolution of the infiltrate was noted within 2 weeks of therapy. PMID:18417831

  10. Characterization of Edenia gomezpompae isolated from a patient with keratitis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan; Jia, Hui; He, Dan; Yu, Huimei; Gao, Song; Yokoyama, Koji; Li, Jing; Wang, Li

    2013-08-01

    Edenia gomezpompae, isolated from a patient suffering from keratitis, who was an agricultural worker with a 4-year history of diabetes mellitus, is described. Fungal hyphae were detected in corneal scrapings after microscopic examination and repeated culture. Isolates were identified by morphology and by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA. Chlamydospore characteristics of E. gomezpompae are described for the first time. The in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of the isolate were tested using five antifungal agents. With the exception of fluconazole, the other drugs (natamycin, amphotericin B, itraconazole, and voriconazole) assayed were highly effective against this fungus. The keratitis was cured after debridement of the corneal ulcer and treatment with 5 % natamycin. After 3 months, when the patient was reexamined, the corneal ulcer showed signs of healing, with no recurrence. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of keratitis caused by E. gomezpompae, as well as being the first known case of disease in humans caused by this species. PMID:23739800

  11. Microbial Keratitis Profile at a University Hospital in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tracy H. T.; Young, Alvin L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the recent trends in demographics, risk factors, and microbiological profiles of microbial keratitis at a university hospital in Hong Kong. Design. Retrospective review. Methods. The medical records of 51 patients admitted to the Prince of Wales Hospital for microbial keratitis from January 2010 to June 2012 were reviewed. Demographics, risk factors, clinical features, microbiological results, and treatment were recorded. Data was analyzed and compared to our historical sampled data collected 11 years ago. Results. The mean age of patients was 41.6 ± 20.3 years. Contact lens use was the major risk factor (45%), followed by injury (12%). The culture positive rate was 59%, of which 37% were Gram-positive organisms and 53% were Gram-negative organisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (13%) were the most commonly isolated pathogens. No resistance to fluoroquinolones was identified. Conclusions. Our study showed that contact lens wear remained the major risk factor for microbial keratitis in Hong Kong and Pseudomonas aeruginosa remained the commonest bacterium isolated. This is comparable to our historical data and other studies conducted in East Asia.

  12. Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis following Laser in situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Bryn M.; Kuo, Irene C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report a case of a patient with a history of glomerulonephropathy, not disclosed prior to laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), who developed severe postoperative peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) soon after surgery. Method Case report. Results Within a week of surgery, the patient, who had no blepharitis or ocular surface disease, also developed diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) that was not contiguous with the PUK. Microbiologic evaluation of the flap interface disclosed no organisms, and no epithelial ingrowth was found. Both PUK and DLK resolved with topical and oral steroid therapy, and the patient's induced refractive error improved over the 12 months following LASIK. Conclusions Necrotizing keratitis has been described after LASIK surgery in patients with or without autoimmune disease. However, to our knowledge, there has been no case of PUK following LASIK. As shown by our patient's clinical course and the typical association of PUK with systemic conditions, patients with a history of atypical postinfectious sequelae may require additional preoperative counseling, vigilant postoperative monitoring, and possibly additional intervention. Because patients do not always divulge medical details, especially if an extraocular site was involved or illness occurred many years prior, this case demonstrates the importance of performing a diligent history that excludes autoimmune disorders or atypical postinfectious sequelae prior to proceeding with keratorefractive intervention. PMID:26889153

  13. Antifungal Effect of Essential Oils against Fusarium Keratitis Isolates.

    PubMed

    Homa, Mónika; Fekete, Ildikó Pálma; Böszörményi, Andrea; Singh, Yendrembam Randhir Babu; Selvam, Kanesan Panneer; Shobana, Coimbatore Subramanian; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Kredics, László; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Galgóczy, László

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the antifungal effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Citrus limon, Juniperus communis, Eucalyptus citriodora, Gaultheria procumbens, Melaleuca alternifolia, Origanum majorana, Salvia sclarea, and Thymus vulgaris essential oils against Fusarium species, the most common etiologic agents of filamentous fungal keratitis in South India. C. zeylanicum essential oil showed strong anti-Fusarium activity, whereas all the other tested essential oils proved to be less effective. The main component of C. zeylanicum essential oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, was also tested and showed a similar effect as the oil. The in vitro interaction between trans-cinnamaldehyde and natamycin, the first-line therapeutic agent of Fusarium keratitis, was also investigated; an enhanced fungal growth inhibition was observed when these agents were applied in combination. Light and fluorescent microscopic observations revealed that C. zeylanicum essential oil/trans-cinnamaldehyde reduces the cellular metabolism and inhibits the conidia germination. Furthermore, necrotic events were significantly more frequent in the presence of these two compounds. According to our results, C. zeylanicum essential oil/trans-cinnamaldehyde provides a promising basis to develop a novel strategy for the treatment of Fusarium keratitis. PMID:26227503

  14. [Use of the presence of cellulose in cellular wall of Acanthamoeba cysts for diagnostic purposes].

    PubMed

    Derda, Monika; Hadaś, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Species identification within the genus Acanthamoeba is based predominantly on morphological and biochemical features. It is labor-intensive and requires cloning and axenization. We described a novel immunocytochemical method for the identification of Acanthamoeba spp. based on selective binding of Clostridium cellulovorans cellulase to protozoan cyst wall cellulose. Free-living amoebae isolated from different water sources by filtration and subsequent cultivation on non-nutrient agar were assigned to genera Acanthamoeba, Naegleria or Hartmannella using morphological taxonomic criteria. Tissues samples from experimentally infected mice were fixed in formalin and for sectioning embedded in paraffin or snap frozen. The Cellulose-Binding Domain of C. cellulovorans cellulase (CBD) obtained as a recombinant protein, were coupled to the fluorescent dye using Alexa Fluor350, 488, 568 - Protein Labelling Kit or labelled with the biotin using EZ-Link Sulfo-NHS-Biotin. All coupling procedures were performed according to the methods provided by manufacturers. For staining with CBD conjugate, slides containing cysts collected from the agar plates or tissue sections were immersed with PBS and incubated with CBD for 30 min at room temperature, washed 3 times with PBS. For staining with CBD-biotin slides containing cysts were incubated with biotinylated CBD for 30 min at room temperature. Subsequent washings in changes of PBS were followed by the incubation with Strept ABComplex/HRP, for 30 min at room temperature, than 3,3 diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride was added for 15 min. Slides were rinsed with water, dried and examined in the light microscope. We showed that cellulose could be easily detected by immunofluorescence using conjugated CBD in the inner cyst wall of Acanthamoeba spp. The reference strains of Acanthamoeba spp. and all Acanthamoeba strains isolated from water and from tissues of infected animals gave positive reaction. CBD prepared as a biotynylated protein

  15. AN OUTBREAK OF FUSARIUM KERATITIS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF A NEW CONTACT LENS SOLUTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Fusarium keratitis is a serious corneal infection, most commonly associated with corneal injury. Beginning in March, 2006, CDC received multiple reports of non-traumatic Fusarium keratitis among contact lens wearers. Objective: To define the specific activities, contact lens hygiene pra...

  16. Chloroquine Has a Cytotoxic Effect on Acanthamoeba Encystation through Modulation of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Kim, Hyun Ah; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii is associated with resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Blocking the encystation process could potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and biocides. During encystation, autophagy is highly stimulated and required for proper encystation of Acanthamoeba. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of chloroquine, a well-known autophagy-inhibitory drug, was tested in A. castellanii. Chloroquine was able to selectively reduce cell survival during the encystation of A. castellanii. However, A. castellanii trophozoites and mature cysts were resistant to chloroquine. Chloroquine treatment led to an increase in the number and size of lysosomes in encysting cells. Moreover, chloroquine inhibited the degradation of long-lived proteins in the encysting cells. Decreased autophagic flux, indicated by an increased number of lysosomes and decreased degradation of long-lived proteins, may be the mechanism by which cell death is induced by chloroquine in encysting Acanthamoeba. These results suggest a potential novel therapeutic application of chloroquine as an anti-Acanthamoeba drug. Our findings also suggest that targeting autophagy could be a therapeutic strategy against Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:25114131

  17. A multisystemic Acanthamoeba infection in a dog in Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Valladares, María; Reyes-Batlle, María; Mora-Peces, Inmaculada; Martín-Navarro, Carmen M; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Dorta-Gorrín, Alexis; Comyn-Afonso, Estefanía; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Maciver, Sutherland K; Piñero, José E; Valladares, Basilio; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-10-15

    A 22-month-old male Spanish water dog was hospitalized after its physical examination revealed fever and movement difficulty. After 24h, the dog was found to have a high fever (39.5 °C) and was treated empirically with doxycycline/ciprofloxacin. At 48 h, after submission the fever rose to 41 °C and the animal presented with a stiff neck and dehydration. Peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were sampled and trophozoites with an Acanthamoeba-like morphology were observed in the CSF. PCR specific for Acanthamoeba, Naegleria fowleri and Balamuthia mandrillaris were performed and the CSF sample found positive for Acanthamoeba. Lungs, kidney, liver and spleen samples were collected post mortem. All collected organ samples were positive for Acanthamoeba by PCR, thus confirming a multisystemic infection. Water samples taken at a suspected site of infection yielded an almost identical PCR fragment to those of the clinical samples, indicating that this was probably where the infection originated. This is the first report of a fatal case of Acanthamoeba disseminated infection in a dog in Spain. PMID:25193180

  18. Chloroquine has a cytotoxic effect on Acanthamoeba encystation through modulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Kim, Hyun Ah; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2014-10-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii is associated with resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Blocking the encystation process could potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and biocides. During encystation, autophagy is highly stimulated and required for proper encystation of Acanthamoeba. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of chloroquine, a well-known autophagy-inhibitory drug, was tested in A. castellanii. Chloroquine was able to selectively reduce cell survival during the encystation of A. castellanii. However, A. castellanii trophozoites and mature cysts were resistant to chloroquine. Chloroquine treatment led to an increase in the number and size of lysosomes in encysting cells. Moreover, chloroquine inhibited the degradation of long-lived proteins in the encysting cells. Decreased autophagic flux, indicated by an increased number of lysosomes and decreased degradation of long-lived proteins, may be the mechanism by which cell death is induced by chloroquine in encysting Acanthamoeba. These results suggest a potential novel therapeutic application of chloroquine as an anti-Acanthamoeba drug. Our findings also suggest that targeting autophagy could be a therapeutic strategy against Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:25114131

  19. Detection and quantification of human adenovirus genomes in Acanthamoeba isolated from swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Arantes, Thalita; Caumo, Karin S; Rott, Marilise B; Spilki, Fernando R

    2016-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is the most common free-living environmental amoeba, it may serve as an important vehicle for various microorganisms living in the same environment, such as viruses, being pathogenic to humans. This study aimed to detect and quantify human adenoviruses (HAdV) in Acanthamoebas isolated from water samples collected from swimming pools in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba were isolated from water samples, and isolates (n=16) were used to investigate the occurrence of HAdVs. HAdV detection was performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). HAdVs were detected in 62.5% (10/16) of Acanthamoeba isolates, ranging from 3.24x103 to 5.14x105 DNA copies per milliliter of isolate. HAdV viral loads found in this study are not negligible, especially because HAdV infections are associated with several human diseases, including gastroenteritis, respiratory distress, and ocular diseases. These findings reinforce the concept that Acanthamoeba may act as a reservoir and promote HAdV transmission through water. PMID:27142544

  20. Fonsecaea Pedrosoi: A Rare Etiology in Fungal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Jyoti; Lathwal, Sumit; Juyal, Deepak; Sharma, Neelam

    2013-01-01

    Fungal corneal ulcer is common in India due to tropical climate and a large agrarian population that is at risk. Fonsecaea pedrosoi is the most common agent of chromoblastomycosis, a chronic localized fungal infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues mainly involving lower extremities. We report a rare case of corneal chromoblastomycosis caused by F.pedrosoi, which was successfully treated with topical Amphotericin B followed by a long course of oral antifungal therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of mycotic keratitis caused by F.pedrosoi, from the foothills of Himalayas. PMID:24298496

  1. Use of penetrating keratoplasty in acute bacterial keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J C

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with bacterial keratitis had penetrating keratoplasties performed for deep indolent ulceration or descemetoceles, during the acute period. The period in hospital (17.6 days) was significantly lower than for a control group (35.4 days) who were treated medically and had subsequent grafts. The number of grafts remaining clear was similar, 70% and 72% respectively. Eleven patients (48%) of those who had an acute graft achieved corrected visual acuities of 6/12 or better. No cases of reinfection occurred and no eyes were lost. Images PMID:3521719

  2. Keratoprosthesis in pediatric keratitis-icthyosiform-deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cortlyn; Rowlands, Megan; Lee, Daniel; Geffin, Joel A; Huang, John

    2016-02-01

    We report the first case of Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) implantation in a 7-year-old girl with keratitis-ichthyosiform-deafness syndrome and persistent, highly vascular corneal surface disease. An adult aphakic KPro with 8.5 mm backplate was implanted successfully and without operative or postoperative complications following 3 failed penetrating keratoplasties. Visual acuity improved from hand motions to 20/70 in the left eye 22 months after KPro surgery and from hand motion to hand motion with direction in the right eye. Glaucoma developed in the left eye, but intraocular pressure was successfully controlled with Ahmed valve placement and topical dorzolamide-timolol. PMID:26917078

  3. Suppurative keratitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae after cataract surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Charteris, D G; Batterbury, M; Armstrong, M; Tullo, A B

    1994-01-01

    Six elderly patients are described (age range 76-86 years) in whom a characteristic peripheral suppurative keratitis developed 1-36 months after uncomplicated cataract surgery. A corneal section had been used in all patients and four or five interrupted nylon sutures were present at the time of onset. Streptococcus pneumoniae was cultured from a corneal scrape in all cases. Treatment with appropriate antibiotics resulted in slow resolution though supplementary topical steroids were necessary in five of the six patients, and corneal opacification persists in all cases. Images PMID:7848983

  4. Surgical management of fungal endophthalmitis resulting from fungal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Chen, Nan; Dong, Xiao-Guang; Yuan, Gong-Qiang; Yu, Bin; Xie, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To report the fungal organisms, clinical features, surgical treatment strategies, and outcomes of patients with culture-proven exogenous fungal endophthalmitis (EFE) secondary to keratitis, and evaluate the role of surgery in the treatment. METHODS The clinical records of 27 patients (27 eyes) with culture-proven EFE resulting from fungal keratitis treated at Shandong Eye Institute from January 2007 to January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Information about fungal culture results, clinical features, surgical procedures, and final visual acuity was obtained. RESULTS There were 39 positive culture results from samples of cornea, hypopyon, vitreous and lens capsule, accounting for 56%, 26%, 15% and 2.5%, respectively. Fusarium was identified in 44% (12/27) of the eyes, followed by Aspergillus in 22% (6/27). Posterior segment infection was involved in 78% (21/27) of the patients. The corneal infection was larger than 3 mm ×3 mm in 89% (24/27) of the patients, and 22% (6/27) of them had the entire cornea, and even the sclera involved. Three eyes had silicone oil tamponade, and two eyes had retinal detachment. Twenty-two eyes (81.5%) underwent penetrating keratoplasty (PKP), and over half of them (54.5%) were operated within 3d from the onset of antifungal therapy. Fourteen eyes (52%) underwent intracameral antifungal drug injection, and three of them required repeated injections. Fifteen eyes (55.6%) underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). The rate of the eyes undergoing PPV as the initial surgical procedure was 60% (9/15), lower than 77% in PKP. Intravitreal injection was given in 59% of the eyes (16/27), and 75% of them required repeated injections. The final visual acuity was 20/100 or better in 37% of the eyes, and better than counting fingers in 55.6% of the eyes. Five eyes (18.5%) were eviscerated. In the two eyes with concurrent retinal detachment, one achieved retinal reattachment, and the other was eviscerated. In the three eyes with silicone oil

  5. Temperature-induced membrane-lipid adaptation in Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Jones, A L; Hann, A C; Harwood, J L; Lloyd, D

    1993-02-15

    A method has been developed for the separation of the major membrane fractions of Acanthamoeba castellanii after growth at different temperatures. The acyl-lipid compositions of individual membrane fractions, microsomal membranes, plasma membrane and mitochondria were analysed after a shift in culture temperature from 30 degrees C to 15 degrees C. The major change in lipid composition observed was an alteration in the relative proportions of oleate and linoleate. This reciprocal change was seen in all the membrane fractions, but occurred most rapidly in the phosphatidylcholine of the microsomal fraction. Thus, there appears to be a rapid induction of delta 12-desaturase activity in A. castellanii after a downward shift in growth temperature. Changes were also seen in the proportions of the n-6 C20 fatty acids, with a decrease in the proportions of icosadienoate and increases of icosatrienoate and arachidonate. However, unlike the alteration in oleate/linoleate ratios, this change was not seen in all the individual lipids of each membrane fraction. PMID:8439295

  6. Acanthamoeba polyphaga-Enhanced Growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Medie, Felix Mba; Drancourt, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium smegmatis is a rapidly-growing mycobacterium causing rare opportunistic infections in human patients. It is present in soil and water environments where free-living amoeba also reside, but data regarding M. smegmatis-amoeba relationships have been contradictory from mycobacteria destruction to mycobacteria survival. Methodology/Principal Findings Using optic and electron microscopy and culture-based microbial enumeration we investigated the ability of M. smegmatis mc2 155, M. smegmatis ATCC 19420T and M. smegmatis ATCC 27204 organisms to survive into Acanthamoeba polyphaga trophozoites and cysts. We observed that M. smegmatis mycobacteria penetrated and survived in A. polyphaga trophozoites over five-day co-culture resulting in amoeba lysis and the release of viable M. smegmatis mycobacteria without amoebal cyst formation. We further observed that amoeba-co-culture, and lysed amoeba and supernatant and pellet, significantly increased five-day growth of the three tested M. smegmatis strains, including a four-fold increase in intra-amoebal growth. Conclusions/Significance Amoebal co-culture increases the growth of M. smegmatis resulting in amoeba killing by replicating M. smegmatis mycobacteria. This amoeba-M. smegmatis co-culture system illustrates an unusual paradigm in the mycobacteria-amoeba interactions as mycobacteria have been mainly regarded as amoeba-resistant organisms. Using these model organisms, this co-culture system could be used as a simple and rapid model to probe mycobacterial factors implicated in the intracellular growth of mycobacteria. PMID:22253795

  7. Acanthamoeba royreba: morphological features and in vitro cytopathic effect.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Arturo; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2013-04-01

    Observations on cultured Acanthamoeba royreba trophozoites and in vitro cytopathogenicity of this amoeba are described. In culture, amoebae were active, pleomorphic and moved on the substrate by producing endocytic structures and emitting slight cytoplasmic microprojections from the cell surface. These projections were formed by hyaline cytoplasm and they were related to motion structures such as acanthopodia and lamellipodia, in which actin provides a framework that allows rapid changes in morphology. In the cytoplasm abundant vacuoles of different size and content were seen. By means of electron microscopy, it was possible to observe the compact fibrogranular appearance of the cytoplasm, along with the main cellular organelles such as the Golgi complex, the endoplasmic reticulum, digestive vacuoles, mitochondria and contractile vacuoles. Incubation of MDCK epithelial cell monolayers with conditioned medium did not produce a significant structural damage to the monolayer, even after 24h of incubation. When the trophozoites were incubated with the target cells the monolayer exhibited a clear injury created by the amoebae, which produced focal damage. Nevertheless, the rest of the monolayer appeared to remain intact, suggesting that a contact-dependent interaction is necessary to damage the target cells. These observations demonstrate the low invasive capacity of this amoeba. PMID:23357648

  8. Survival of taylorellae in the environmental amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Taylorella equigenitalis is the causative agent of contagious equine metritis, a sexually-transmitted infection of Equidae characterised in infected mares by abundant mucopurulent vaginal discharge and a variable degree of vaginitis, cervicitis or endometritis, usually resulting in temporary infertility. The second species of the Taylorella genus, Taylorella asinigenitalis, is considered non-pathogenic, although mares experimentally infected with this bacterium can develop clinical signs of endometritis. To date, little is understood about the basic molecular virulence and persistence mechanisms employed by the Taylorella species. To clarify these points, we investigated whether the host-pathogen interaction model Acanthamoeba castellanii was a suitable model for studying taylorellae. Results We herein demonstrate that both species of the Taylorella genus are internalised by a mechanism involving the phagocytic capacity of the amoeba and are able to survive for at least one week inside the amoeba. During this one-week incubation period, taylorellae concentrations remain strikingly constant and no overt toxicity to amoeba cells was observed. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the capacity of taylorellae to survive in a natural environment other than the mammalian genital tract, and shows that the alternative infection model, A. castellanii, constitutes a relevant alternative system to assess host-pathogen interactions of taylorellae. The survival of taylorellae inside the potential environmental reservoir A. castellanii brings new insight, fostering a broader understanding of taylorellae biology and its potential natural ecological niche. PMID:24641089

  9. Proteomic analysis of keratitis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Abby; Dunmire, Jeffrey; Wehmann, Michael; Rowe, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the proteomic profile of a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) obtained from an infected cornea of a contact lens wearer and the laboratory strain P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145. Methods Antibiotic sensitivity, motility, biofilm formation, and virulence tests were performed using standard methods. Whole protein lysates were analyzed with liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in triplicate, and relative protein abundances were determined with spectral counting. The G test followed by a post hoc Holm-Sidak adjustment was used for the statistical analyses to determine significance in the differential expression of proteins between the two strains. Results A total of 687 proteins were detected. One-hundred thirty-three (133) proteins were significantly different between the two strains. Among these, 13 were upregulated, and 16 were downregulated in the clinical strain compared to ATCC 10145, whereas 57 were detected only in the clinical strain. The upregulated proteins are associated with virulence and pathogenicity. Conclusions Proteins detected at higher levels in the clinical strain of P. aeruginosa were proteins known to be virulence factors. These results confirm that the keratitis-associated P. aeruginosa strain is pathogenic and expresses a higher number of virulence factors compared to the laboratory strain ATCC 10145. Identification of the protein profile of the corneal strain of P. aeruginosa in this study will aid in elucidating novel intervention strategies for reducing the burden of P. aeruginosa infection in keratitis. PMID:25221424

  10. The treatment of herpes simplex virus epithelial keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmus, K R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epithelial keratitis is the most common presentation of ocular infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Quantitative assessment of available therapy is needed to guide evidence-based ophthalmology. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of various treatments for dendritic or geographic HSV epithelial keratitis and to evaluate the role of various clinical characteristics on epithelial healing. METHODS: Following a systematic review of the literature, information from clinical trials of HSV dendritic or geographic epithelial keratitis was extracted, and the methodological quality of each study was scored. Methods of epithelial cauterization and curettage were grouped as relatively equivalent physicochemical therapy, and solution and ointment formulations of a given topical antiviral agent were combined. The proportion healed with 1 week of therapy, a scheduled follow-up day that approximated the average time of resolution with antiviral therapy, was selected as the primary outcome based on a masked evaluation of maximum treatment differences in published healing curves. The proportion healed at 14 days was recorded as supplemental information. Fixed-effects and random-effects meta-analysis models were used to obtain summary estimates by pooling results from comparative treatment trials. Hypotheses about which prognostic factors might affect epithelial healing during antiviral therapy were developed by multivariate analysis of the Herpetic Eye Disease Study dataset. RESULTS: After excluding 48 duplicate reports, 14 nonrandomized studies, 15 studies with outdated or similar treatments, and 29 trials lacking sufficient data on healing or accessibility, 76 primary reports were identified. These reports involved 4,251 patients allocated to 93 treatment comparisons of dendritic epithelial keratitis in 28 categories and 9 comparisons of geographic epithelial keratitis in 6 categories. For dendritic keratitis, idoxuridine was better than placebo at 7 days

  11. Interactions between Human Norovirus Surrogates and Acanthamoeba spp.

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Tun-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the most common cause of food-borne disease outbreaks, as well as virus-related waterborne disease outbreaks in the United States. Here, we hypothesize that common free-living amoebae (FLA)—ubiquitous in the environment, known to interact with pathogens, and frequently isolated from water and fresh produce—could potentially act as reservoirs of HuNoV and facilitate the environmental transmission of HuNoVs. To investigate FLA as reservoirs for HuNoV, the interactions between two Acanthamoeba species, A. castellanii and A. polyphaga, as well as two HuNoV surrogates, murine norovirus type 1 (MNV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV), were evaluated. The results showed that after 1 h of amoeba-virus incubation at 25°C, 490 and 337 PFU of MNV-1/ml were recovered from A. castellanii and A. polyphaga, respectively, while only few or no FCVs were detected. In addition, prolonged interaction of MNV-1 with amoebae was investigated for a period of 8 days, and MNV-1 was demonstrated to remain stable at around 200 PFU/ml from day 2 to day 8 after virus inoculation in A. castellanii. Moreover, after a complete amoeba life cycle (i.e., encystment and excystment), infectious viruses could still be detected. To determine the location of virus associated with amoebae, immunofluorescence experiments were performed and showed MNV-1 transitioning from the amoeba surface to inside the amoeba over a 24-h period. These results are significant to the understanding of how HuNoVs may interact with other microorganisms in the environment in order to aid in its persistence and survival, as well as potential transmission in water and to vulnerable food products such as fresh produce. PMID:25841006

  12. Acanthamoeba Encephalitis: Isolation of Genotype T1 in Mycobacterial Liquid Culture Medium

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Rula; Badenoch, Paul R.; Francis, Michelle J.; Fernandez, Charles; Adamson, Penelope J.; Dendle, Claire; Woolley, Ian; Robson, Jenny; Korman, Tony M.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Acanthamoeba encephalitis diagnosed from an antemortem brain biopsy specimen, where the organism was first isolated in mycobacterial liquid medium and first identified by using a sequence generated by a commercial panfungal sequencing assay. We correlate susceptibility results with clinical outcome. PMID:25502534

  13. Microarray and KOG analysis of Acanthamoeba healyi genes up-regulated by mouse-brain passage.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Kyung; Xuan, Ying-Hua; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2014-08-01

    Long-term cultivation in a laboratory could reduce the virulence of Acanthamoeba. To identify virulence factors of Acanthamoeba, the authors compared the transcription profiles of long-term cultivated Acanthamoeba healyi (OLD) and three times mouse-brain passaged A. healyi (MBP) using microarray analysis and eukaryotic orthologous group (KOG) assignments. Microarray analysis revealed that 601 genes were up-regulated by mouse-brain passage. The results of real-time PCR of 8 randomly selected genes up-regulated in the MBP strain confirmed microarray analysis findings. KOG assignments showed relatively higher percentages of the MBP strain up-regulated genes in T article (signal transduction mechanism), O article (posttranslational modification, protein turnover, chaperones), C article (energy production and conversion), and J article (translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis). In particular, the MBP strain showed higher expressions of cysteine protease and metalloprotease. A comparison of KOG assignments by microarray analysis and previous EST (expressed sequence tags) analysis showed similar populations of up-regulated genes. These results provide important information regarding the identification of virulence factors of pathogenic Acanthamoeba. PMID:24859526

  14. Fatal Granulomatous Amoebic Encephalitis Caused by Acanthamoeba in a Patient With Kidney Transplant: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Bello, Nancy; Becker, Jennifer; Zangeneh, Tirdad

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) due to Acanthamoeba is almost a uniformly fatal infection in immune-compromised hosts despite multidrug combination therapy. We report a case of GAE in a female who received a deceased donor kidney graft. She was treated with a combination of miltefosine, pentamidine, sulfadiazine, fluconazole, flucytosine, and azithromycin. PMID:26280011

  15. Essential Role for an M17 Leucine Aminopeptidase in Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Ran; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Moon, Eun-Kyung; Song, Su-Min; Joo, So-Young; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2015-01-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba leads to the formation of resilient cysts from vegetative trophozoites. This process is essential for parasite survival under unfavorable conditions such as starvation, low temperatures, and exposure to biocides. During encystation, a massive turnover of intracellular components occurs, and a large number of organelles and proteins are degraded by proteases. Previous studies with specific protease inhibitors have shown that cysteine and serine proteases are involved in encystation of Acanthamoeba, but little is known about the role of metalloproteases in this process. Here, we have biochemically characterized an M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Acanthamoeba castellanii (AcLAP) and analyzed its functional involvement in encystation of the parasite. Recombinant AcLAP shared biochemical properties such as optimal pH, requirement of divalent metal ions for activity, substrate specificity for Leu, and inhibition profile by aminopeptidase inhibitors and metal chelators with other characterized M17 family LAPs. AcLAP was highly expressed at a late stage of encystation and mainly localized in the cytoplasm of A. castellanii. Knockdown of AcLAP using small interfering RNA induced a decrease of LAP activity during encystation, a reduction of mature cyst formation, and the formation of abnormal cyst walls. In summary, these results indicate that AcLAP is a typical M17 family enzyme that plays an essential role during encystation of Acanthamoeba. PMID:26075721

  16. Bilateral methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus keratitis following hyperopic photorefractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Magli, Adriano; Forte, Raimondo; Rombetto, Luca; Carelli, Roberta

    2012-02-01

    To report clinical manifestations of a female patient with bilateral bacterial keratitis following photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Bilateral PRK was performed for moderate hyperopia. Bandage contact lenses were fitted at the conclusion of the surgery. Bilateral infectious keratitis with hypopion was diagnosed within 4 days after surgery. Smear and culture were obtained and showed the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The patient was treated with systemic prednisone and topical antibiotics (vancomycin, tobramycin and netylmicin) and betamethasone. After 1 month corneal leukoma was still present and remained unchanged during the following 7 months. Infectious keratitis is a rare complication of PRK that appears early in the postoperative period. MRSA keratitis may determine long-term visual impairment despite prompt therapeutic intervention. PMID:22215418

  17. In vivo challenging of polymyxins and levofloxacin eye drop against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Kazuki; Miyake, Taku; Koike, Naohito; Hattori, Takaaki; Kumakura, Shigeto; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Koji; Kuroda, Masahiko; Ito, Norihiko; Goto, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish a rabbit multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP) keratitis model, and test the efficacy of levofloxacin, colistin methanesulfate (CL-M), colistin sulfate (CL-S) and polymyxin B (PL-B) against MDRP infection. In a rabbit eye, making a 2-mm circular corneal excision, and MDRP strain #601 or representative P. aeruginosa strain IID1210 were instilled into the corneal concavity. IID1210 was used to confirm this model developed P. aeruginosa keratitis. After MDRP keratitis developed, we treated the eyes with levofloxacin, CL-M, CL-S or PL-B eye drops. The infected eyes were evaluated by clinical score, histopathological examination and viable bacterial count (CFU). Rabbits developed MDRP keratitis reproducibly after instilled the bacteria into the corneal lesion. MDRP produced severe keratitis similarly with IID1210, as shown by slit lamp examination and clinical score. In MDRP keratitis models, clinical scores and viable bacterial counts were significantly lower in levofloxacin- and CL-M-treated groups compared with PBS-treated group, but the magnitudes of reduction were not remarkable. However, clinical scores were dramatically lowered in CL-S- and PL-B-treated groups compared with PBS-treated group. CL-S- and PL-B-treated group were kept corneal translucency and little influx of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in histopathological examination. In addition, both CL-S- and PL-B-treated groups were not detected viable bacteria in infected cornea. Using our MDRP keratitis model, we showed that topical levofloxacin and CL-M are not adequately effective, while CL-S and PL-B are efficacious in controlling MDRP keratitis. Especially, PL-B, which is commercially available eye drop, might be most effective against MDRP. PMID:24726376

  18. Early post-LASIK flap amputation in the treatment of aggressive, branching keratitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Au, John; Plesec, Thomas; Rocha, Karolinne; Dupps, William; Krueger, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    Infectious keratitis is rare following laser vision correction. We present a case of aggressive fungal keratitis caused by Aspergillus flavus, following laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the setting of a unique environmental risk factor. We describe the key features of the acute case presentation, which guided empirical medical and surgical treatment, resulting in the most favorable outcome found in the literature, to date. PMID:26840170

  19. A 5-year retrospective review of fungal keratitis at hospital universiti sains malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Tahir, Fadzillah; Norhayati, A; Siti-Raihan, Ishak; Ibrahim, M

    2012-01-01

    Background. Corneal blindness from healed infected keratitis is one of the most preventable causes of monocular blindness in developing countries, including Malaysia. Our objectives were to identify the causative fungi, predisposing risk factors, the proportion of correct clinical diagnosis, and visual outcome of patients treated in our hospital. Methods. A retrospective review of medical and microbiology records was conducted for all patients who were treated for fungal keratitis at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia from January 2007 until December 2011. Results. Forty-seven patients (47/186, 25.27%) were treated for fungal keratitis during the study period. This demonstrated that the incidence of fungal keratitis has increased each year from 2007 to 2011 by 12.50%, 17.65%, 21.21%, 26.83%, and 28.57%, respectively. The most common predisposing factors were injury to the eye followed by use of topical steroid, and preexisting ocular surface disease. Fusarium species were the most common fungal isolated, followed by Candida species. Clinical diagnosis of fungal keratitis was made in 26 of the 41 (63.41%) cases of positive isolates. Of these, in eleven cases (23.40%) patients required surgical intervention. Clinical outcome of healed scar was achieved in 34 (72.34%) cases. Conclusions. The percentage of positive fungal isolated has steadily increased and the trend of common fungal isolated has changed. The latest review regarding fungal keratitis is important for us to improve patients' outcome in the future. PMID:23304138

  20. Role of steroids in the treatment of bacterial keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Palioura, Sotiria; Henry, Christopher R; Amescua, Guillermo; Alfonso, Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis can lead to severe visual impairment from corneal ulceration, subsequent scarring, and possible perforation. The mainstay of treatment is topical antibiotics, whereas the use of adjunctive topical corticosteroid drops remains a matter of debate. Herein, we review the rationale for and against the use of topical corticosteroids and we assess their effectiveness and safety in the published randomized controlled trials that have evaluated their role as adjunctive therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. In the largest study to date, the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial, topical corticosteroid drops were neither helpful nor harmful for the 500 participants as a whole. However, subgroup analyses suggested that topical corticosteroids may be beneficial upon early administration (within 2–3 days after starting antibiotics) for more central corneal ulcers with poorer vision at presentation, for invasive Pseudomonas strains, and for non-Nocardia ulcers. These results are discussed within the limitations of the study. PMID:26869751

  1. Bilateral Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Linke, Stephan J; Skevas, Christos; Richard, Gisbert; Katz, Toam

    2010-06-01

    A 31-year-old man was referred to us 2 months after bilateral laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). On presentation, the corrected distance visual acuity was hand motion in the right eye and 20/25 in the left eye. Slitlamp examination showed a diffuse central stromal infiltrate, flap melting, and hypopyon in the right eye and marked interface opacities with crystal-like edges in the left eye. Flap lift and irrigation were performed. Because of the progressive keratitis, penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) was done in both eyes. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was isolated from both corneal buttons, and therapy was changed to chloramphenicol prednisolone eyedrops 8 times a day and intravenous meropenem 500 mg 3 times a day according to sensitivity testing. Two months after surgery, both transplants remained clear. PMID:20494781

  2. Colletotrichum truncatum: an Unusual Pathogen Causing Mycotic Keratitis and Endophthalmitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Shivaprakash, M. R.; Appannanavar, Suma B.; Dhaliwal, Manpreet; Gupta, Amit; Gupta, Sunita; Gupta, Amod; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the well-known plant pathogens of the Colletotrichum genus were increasingly reported to cause ophthalmic infections in humans. Among 66 species in the Colletotrichum genus, only a few are known to be pathogenic for humans. We report here five cases of ophthalmic infections due to Colletotrichum truncatum, a species never reported earlier to cause human infection. The isolates were identified by morphological characteristics and the sequencing of internal spacer regions of ribosomal DNA. The progress of lesions in those patients was slow compared to that of lesions caused by Aspergillus or Fusarium infections. The surgical management included total penetrating keratoplasty in patients with keratitis and pars plana vitrectomy in endophthalmitis. Two patients were treated additionally with intravitreal amphotericin B deoxycholate, one patient with oral itraconazole, and another patient with oral and topical fluconazole therapy. The present series therefore highlights the expanding spectrum of agents causing eye infections and the inclusion of C. truncatum as a human pathogen. PMID:21653772

  3. Fungal keratitis in a gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus).

    PubMed

    Myers, Debbie A; Isaza, Ramiro; Ben-Shlomo, Gil; Abbott, Jeffrey; Plummer, Caryn E

    2009-09-01

    A free-ranging gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) presented for trauma and blindness. Fibrinous exudate obscured visualization of the globes. This exudative crust extended from the conjunctival fornices through the palpebral fissure and was manually removed. Ophthalmic examination revealed bilateral corneal ulcerations and scarring and phthisis bulbi of the left globe. Histology of the crust revealed a necrotic conjunctivitis with intralesional fungal hyphae. Culture of the corneal ulcer of the left eye isolated moderate growth of a mixed fungal flora consisting of Curvularia sp. and Aspergillus sp. Miconazole ophthalmic solution was administered and the ulcers in both eyes healed, but corneal edema continued. After 2 mo of treatment with miconazole, tramadol, acetylcysteine, hypertonic saline ointment, artificial tears, and hypertonic saline flushes, the right eye was normal with only a small scar. The left eye remained phthisical. This is the first report of fungal keratitis in a wild reptile and a gopher tortoise. PMID:19746878

  4. Status of free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris) in drinking water supplies in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Farzana Abubakar; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Subhani, Faysal; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    The ability of pathogenic free-living amoebae to produce infections is a growing concern. In this study, we investigated the presence of free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris) in drinking water supplies in Karachi, Pakistan. Fifty-two domestic tap water samples were examined. Amoebae were identified by morphological characteristics and polymerase chain reaction. Thirty percent of the examined samples were positive for Acanthamoeba spp., 8% for N. fowleri while B. mandrillaris were not recovered. Additionally we examined secretory IgA antibody to Acanthamoeba and B. mandrillaris. Acanthamoeba antibody prevalence rate was 100% in both males and females, while B. mandrillaris antibody prevalence rate was 5.5% in males only (females were negative). Our findings suggest that free-living amoebae are a potential health hazard in domestic water supplies in Karachi, Pakistan. PMID:23708583

  5. Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in a Captive Black and White Ruffed Lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) Caused by Acanthamoeba T4 Genotype.

    PubMed

    Gaide, N; Pelandakis, M; Robveille, C; Albaric, O; Jouvion, G; Souchon, M; Risler, A; Abadie, J

    2015-11-01

    A mature male, black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) died in a zoological garden after a 4-day history of lethargy and non-responsive convulsions. Necropsy and histopathological examinations revealed acute necrotizing and haemorrhagic meningoencephalitis with intralesional amoebas confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Acanthamoeba T4 genotype was identified as the causative agent of the brain lesion, based on amplification and sequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA genes. The presence of free-living amoebas in water and mud from the lemur's environment was investigated by morphological and molecular analyses. The two predominant genera, representing 80% of isolated amoebas, were Naegleria spp. and Acanthamoeba spp. All Acanthamoeba isolates belonged to the T4 genotype. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of a meningoencephalitis due to Acanthamoeba T4 genotype in Lemuridae with concurrent analysis of pathological tissues and environment. PMID:26297109

  6. Topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Herretes, Samantha; Wang, Xue; Reyes, Johann MG

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial keratitis is a serious ocular infectious disease that can lead to severe visual disability. Risk factors for bacterial corneal infection include contact lens wear, ocular surface disease, corneal trauma, and previous ocular or eyelid surgery. Topical antibiotics constitute the mainstay of treatment in cases of bacterial keratitis, whereas the use of topical corticosteroids as an adjunctive therapy to antibiotics remains controversial. Topical corticosteroids are usually used to control inflammation using the smallest amount of the drug. Their use requires optimal timing, concomitant antibiotics, and careful follow-up. Objectives The objective of the review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. Secondary objectives included evaluation of health economic outcomes and quality of life outcomes. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 14 July 2014. We also searched the Science Citation Index to identify additional studies that had cited the only trial included in the original version of this review, reference lists of included trials, earlier reviews, and the American Academy of Ophthalmology guidelines. We also contacted experts to identify any unpublished and

  7. Acanthamoeba produces disseminated infection in locusts and traverses the locust blood-brain barrier to invade the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many aspects of Acanthamoeba granulomatous encephalitis remain poorly understood, including host susceptibility and chronic colonization which represent important features of the spectrum of host-pathogen interactions. Previous studies have suggested locusts as a tractable model in which to study Acanthamoeba pathogenesis. Here we determined the mode of parasite invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). Results Using Acanthamoeba isolates belonging to the T1 and T4 genotypes, the findings revealed that amoebae induced sickness behaviour in locusts, as evidenced by reduced faecal output and weight loss and, eventually, leading to 100% mortality. Significant degenerative changes of various tissues were observed by histological sectioning. Both isolates produced disseminated infection, with viable amoebae being recovered from various tissues. Histological examination of the CNS showed that Acanthamoeba invaded the locust CNS, and this is associated with disruption of the perineurium cell/glial cell complex, which constitutes the locust blood-brain barrier. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that Acanthamoeba invades locust brain by modulating the integrity of the insect's blood-brain barrier, a finding that is consistent with the human infection. These observations support the idea that locusts provide a tractable model to study Acanthamoeba encephalitis in vivo. In this way the locust model may generate potentially useful leads that can be tested subsequently in mammalian systems, thus replacing the use of vertebrates at an early stage, and reducing the numbers of mammals required overall. PMID:20615207

  8. Isolation and molecular characterization of Acanthamoeba genotypes in recreational and domestic water sources from Jamaica, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Todd, Cheridah D; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Valladares, Basilio; Streete, Don; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Lindo, John F

    2015-09-01

    Free living amoebae (FLA) are amphizoic protozoa that are ubiquitous in nature. Infection with FLA may result in neurological, ocular and skin infections. Exposure to Acanthamoeba occurs frequently through water contact and knowledge of the presence of the organisms in water sources is important in understanding transmission dynamics. The distribution of Acanthamoeba was studied in recreational and domestic water samples collected from across Jamaica. Morphological assessment and polymerase chain reaction revealed Acanthamoeba spp. isolates in 50.6% (42/83) and 17.3% (14/81) of recreational and domestic water, respectively. Sequencing of the DF3 region of the 18S rDNA resulted in the identification of genotypes T3, T4, T5, T10 and T11 corresponding to Acanthamoeba spp: A. griffini, A. triangularis, A. lenticulata, A. culbertsoni and A. hatchetti. Moreover, T4 was the most frequently isolated genotype in both recreational and domestic water. Thermotolerance and osmotolerance assays indicated that most isolates were potentially pathogenic. This is the first report of T3 and T10 genotypes in the Caribbean and the first report of these Acanthamoeba spp. in Jamaican waters. The study shows that there is potential risk of infection to contact wearers who practise poor lens care. Further, Acanthamoeba should be considered as a cause of neurological infections in Jamaica. PMID:26322776

  9. Isolation and genotyping of free-living environmental isolates of Acanthamoeba spp. from bromeliads in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Salton, Juliana; Caumo, Karin; Broetto, Leonardo; Rott, Marilise B

    2013-07-01

    Species of Acanthamoeba are frequently isolated from distinct environmental sources such as water, soil, dust and air. They are responsible to cause infections and disease in humans and animals. In addition, Acanthamoeba sp. are considered an important reservoir of bacteria, virus and fungi, which act as "Trojan horses" to protect these microorganisms of harsh environmental conditions. In this study, nine Acanthamoeba isolates from bromeliads phylloplane were identified based on the morphology of cyst and trophozoite forms. The genotype level was accessed by the sequence analysis of Acanthamoeba small-subunit rRNA gene. Genotypic characterization grouped five isolates in the genotype T2/T6, three in the T4 genotype and one in the genotype T16. The results obtained indicate that the genotype T2/T6 is common on phylloplane. To predict the pathogenic potential of the Acanthamoeba isolates, thermo and osmotolerance assays were employed, although all isolates were capable of surviving at temperatures of 37°C, other tests will be conducted in the future to determine the potential pathogenic of the isolates. Altogether, our results revealed the importance of the presence of Acanthamoeba associated with bromeliads in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and the necessity for further studies to determine the environmental distribution and the role of these species. PMID:23562883

  10. Acanthamoeba misidentification and multiple labels: redefining genotypes T16, T19, and T20 and proposal for Acanthamoeba micheli sp. nov. (genotype T19).

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Walochnik, Julia; Köhsler, Martina; Rott, Marilise B

    2015-07-01

    Acanthamoeba species are ubiquitous amoebae able to cause important infections in humans and other vertebrates. The full/near-full sequences (>2000 bp) of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rDNA or 18S rDNA) are used to cluster Acanthamoeba as genotypes, labeled T1 to T20. Genotype T15 remains an exception, being described only partially on a 1500-bp fragment. Strains are thus usually identified based on their 18S identity matches with reference strains, often using shorter (<500 bp) diagnostic fragments of the gene. Nevertheless, short fragments (<1000 bp) have been used to propose genotypes. This has been criticized, and doubts arise therefore on possible confusion leading to classify distinct partial sequences with a same label(s). We demonstrate herein that several partial sequences misassigned either to T16 or to T4, actually belong to at least two separate and distinct genotypes. We obtained the full 18S rDNA of a strain previously typed as T16 on the basis of a small fragment and demonstrated that it actually belongs to the recently described T19. We propose the name Acanthamoeba micheli sp. nov., for this strain. Furthermore, partial molecular phylogenies were performed to show that several other misassigned T16 partial sequences belong to a new genotype. This latter includes also misassigned T4 partial sequences, only recently available as full sequences and labeled as T20. We thus reassign these partial sequences to the genotype T20. Longer sequences, ideally at least 90 % of the total gene length, should be obtained from strains to ensure reliable diagnostic and phylogenetic results. PMID:25869957

  11. Topical nanoparticulate formulation of drugs for ocular keratitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyan

    The primary objective of this project is to develop drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles suspended in a biocompatible gel for topical delivery of therapeutic agents commonly employed in the treatment of ocular viral/bacterial keratitis. PART 1: Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) of dipeptide monoester prodrugs of ganciclovir (GCV) including L-Val-L-Val-GCV (LLGCV), L-Val-D-Val-GCV (LDGCV), D-Val-L-Val-GCV (DLGCV) were formulated and dispersed in thermosensitive PLGA-PEG-PLGA polymer gel for the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induced viral corneal keratitis. NP containing prodrugs of GCV were prepared by a double-emulsion solvent evaporation technique using various PLGA polymers with different drug/polymer ratios. Cytotoxicity studies suggested that all NP formulations are non-toxic. In vitro release of prodrugs from NP showed a biphasic release pattern with an initial burst phase followed by a sustained phase. Such burst effect was completely eliminated when NP were suspended in thermosensitive gels with near zero-order release kinetics. Prodrugs-loaded PLGA NP dispersed in thermosensitive gels can thus serve as a promising drug delivery system for the treatment of anterior eye diseases. Maximum uptake (around 60%) was noted at 3 h for NP. Cellular uptake and intracellular accumulation of prodrugs are significantly different among three stereoisomeric dipeptide prodrugs. The microscopic images show that NP are avidly internalized by HCEC cells and distributed throughout the cytoplasm instead of being localized on the cell surface. Following cellular uptake, prodrugs released from NP gradually bioreversed into parent drug GCV. LLGCV showed the highest degradation rate, followed by LDGCV and DLGCV. LLGCV, LDGCV and DLGCV released from NP exhibited superior uptake and bioreversion in corneal cells. PART 2: PLGA NP of hydrocortisone butyrate (HB) suspended in thermosensitive PLGA-PEG-PLGA gel were developed for the treatment of

  12. Distribution of Acanthamoeba Genotypes Isolated from Recreational and Therapeutic Geothermal Water Sources in Southwestern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Niyyati, Maryam; Saberi, Reza; Latifi, Alireza; Lasjerdi, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive survey was conducted along 10 km of geothermal rivers in southwestern Iran. A total of 40 water samples were tested for the presence of Acanthamoeba spp., and genotypes were determined by targeting the diagnostic fragment 3 region of the 18S rRNA gene. The pathogenic potential of all positive isolates was also identified using tolerance ability test. High occurrences of Acanthamoeba (50%) were detected in the sampling areas. Based on sequencing analysis, isolates belonging to T4 (93.7%) and T2 (6.25%) genotypes were reported. Thermo- and osmotolerance tests revealed that five strains are highly pathogenic. Since every collection site of this study was associated with high human activity, posting of warning signs, monitoring of recreational water sources, and awareness of high-risk people are of utmost importance. To the best of our knowledge, the present research is the first to report T2 genotype from geothermal water sources in Iran. PMID:27127409

  13. Distribution of Acanthamoeba Genotypes Isolated from Recreational and Therapeutic Geothermal Water Sources in Southwestern Iran.

    PubMed

    Niyyati, Maryam; Saberi, Reza; Latifi, Alireza; Lasjerdi, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive survey was conducted along 10 km of geothermal rivers in southwestern Iran. A total of 40 water samples were tested for the presence of Acanthamoeba spp., and genotypes were determined by targeting the diagnostic fragment 3 region of the 18S rRNA gene. The pathogenic potential of all positive isolates was also identified using tolerance ability test. High occurrences of Acanthamoeba (50%) were detected in the sampling areas. Based on sequencing analysis, isolates belonging to T4 (93.7%) and T2 (6.25%) genotypes were reported. Thermo- and osmotolerance tests revealed that five strains are highly pathogenic. Since every collection site of this study was associated with high human activity, posting of warning signs, monitoring of recreational water sources, and awareness of high-risk people are of utmost importance. To the best of our knowledge, the present research is the first to report T2 genotype from geothermal water sources in Iran. PMID:27127409

  14. PACK-CXL: Corneal Cross-linking for Treatment of Infectious Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Tabibian, David; Richoz, Olivier; Hafezi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses corneal cross-linking (CXL) and how it transitioned from a modality for treating corneal ectatic disorders to an inventive means of treating infectious keratitis. Initially, CXL was successfully developed to halt the progression of ectatic diseases such as keratoconus, using the standard Dresden protocol. Later, indications were extended to treat iatrogenic ectasia developing after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photo-refractive keratectomy (PRK). At the time, it had been postulated that the combination of ultraviolet light with riboflavin could not only biomechanically strengthen the cornea but also was capable of destroying living cells and organisms including keratocytes and pathogens. Thus a new and innovative concept of treatment for infectious keratitis emerged through the use of CXL technology. Initially only advanced infectious melting ulcers resisting standard microbicidal therapy were treated with CXL in addition to standard therapy. In subsequent studies CXL was also used to treat bacterial keratitis as first line therapy without the use of concomitant antibiotic therapy. With the increasing interest in CXL technology to treat infectious keratitis and to clearly separate its use from the treatment of ectatic disorders, a new term was adopted at the 9(th) CXL congress in Dublin for this specific indication: PACK-CXL (photoactivated chromophore for infectious keratitis). PACK-CXL has the potential to eventually become an interesting alternative to standard antibiotic therapy in treating infectious corneal disorders, and may help reduce the global burden of microbial resistance to antibiotics and other therapeutic agents. PMID:26005557

  15. Established and emerging ancillary techniques in management of microbial keratitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Robaei, Dana; Carnt, Nicole; Watson, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Microbial keratitis is a sight-threatening condition and an ocular emergency, because of the potential for rapid progression. Intensive topical antimicrobials are the mainstay and the gold standard of treatment for microbial keratitis. However, despite appropriate diagnosis and therapy, treatment failure is still common, and can result in significant morbidity due to corneal perforation and/or scarring. For this reason, clinicians continue to seek novel treatment techniques in order to expand the armamentarium of tools available to manage microbial keratitis, and in doing so improve clinical outcomes. In this review, we examine the evidence for some established, as well as a few emerging ancillary techniques used to manage microbial keratitis. These include topical corticosteroids, corneal collagen cross-linking, intrastromal antimicrobials, amniotic membrane transplantation and miscellaneous other techniques. Of these, collagen cross-linking shows some promise for selected cases of infectious keratitis, although more research in the area is required before it is accepted as mainstream treatment for this potentially blinding condition. PMID:26888977

  16. Identification and properties of proteases from an Acanthamoeba isolate capable of producing granulomatous encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Goldsworthy, Graham; Lightfoot, Mary; Jarroll, Edward L; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    Background Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis due to Acanthamoeba is often a fatal human disease. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of Acanthamoeba encephalitis remain unclear. In this study, the role of extracellular Acanthamoeba proteases in central nervous system pathogenesis and pathophysiology was examined. Results Using an encephalitis isolate belonging to T1 genotype, we observed two major proteases with approximate molecular weights of 150 KD and 130 KD on SDS-PAGE gels using gelatin as substrate. The 130 KD protease was inhibited with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) suggesting that it is a serine protease, while the 150 KD protease was inhibited with 1, 10-phenanthroline suggesting that it is a metalloprotease. Both proteases exhibited maximal activity at neutral pH and over a range of temperatures, indicating their physiological relevance. These proteases degrade extracellular matrix (ECM), which provide structural and functional support to the brain tissue, as shown by the degradation of collagen I and III (major components of collagenous ECM), elastin (elastic fibrils of ECM), plasminogen (involved in proteolytic degradation of ECM), as well as casein and haemoglobin. The proteases were purified partially using ion-exchange chromatography and their effects were tested in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Neither the serine nor the metalloprotease exhibited HBMEC cytotoxicity. However, the serine protease exhibited HBMEC monolayer disruptions (trypsin-like) suggesting a role in blood-brain barrier perturbations. Conclusion Overall, these data suggest that Acanthamoeba proteases digest ECM, which may play crucial role(s) in invasion of the brain tissue by amoebae. PMID:16672059

  17. Effect of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae on pulmonary function parameters in a bovine respiratory model.

    PubMed

    Lohr, M; Prohl, A; Ostermann, C; Diller, R; Greub, G; Reinhold, P

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pulmonary dysfunction induced by experimental infection with Parachlamydia acanthamoebae in calves. Intrabronchial inoculation with P. acanthamoebae was performed in 31 calves aged 2-3 months old at two different challenge doses of 10(8) and 10(10) inclusion-forming units (IFU) per animal. Control animals received heat inactivated bacteria. The effects on pulmonary gas exchange were determined by arterial blood gas analysis and haemoximetry during the 7 days post inoculation (DPI). For pulmonary function testing (PFT), impulse oscillometry, capnography, and measurement of O2 uptake were undertaken in spontaneously breathing animals 7 and 3 days before inoculation and were repeated until 10 DPI. In the early phase after challenge (1-3 DPI), mild hypoxaemia occurred, which was accompanied by a significant reduction in both tidal and alveolar volumes (each related to bodyweight, BW). In parallel, expiratory flow rate and specific ventilation (i.e. minute ventilation related to O2 uptake) were significantly increased. Minute and alveolar ventilations (each related to metabolic BW) increased significantly due to higher respiratory rates, lasting until 4 and 5 DPI, respectively. Oxygen uptake was slightly reduced during the first 2 days after challenge, but increased significantly during the recovery phase, from 4 to 8 DPI. No deterioration in respiratory mechanics or acid-base balance was observed. Respiratory infection with 10(10) IFU P. acanthamoebae per calf induced mild respiratory dysfunction, mainly characterised by hypoxaemia. The study's findings do not indicate severe pathophysiological consequences of P. acanthamoebae infection on pulmonary function in the bovine host. PMID:27240907

  18. Anaerobic respiration: In vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against mitochondriate Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Farooq, Maria; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protist pathogen that is responsible for serious human and animal infection. Being one of the most frequently isolated protists from the environment, it is likely that it readily encounters microaerophilic environments. For respiration under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions in several amitochondriate protists, decarboxylation of pyruvate is catalyzed by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase instead of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In support, Nitazoxanide, an inhibitor of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, is effective and non-mutagenic clinically against a range of amitochondriate protists, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The overall aim of the present study was to determine in vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Acanthamoeba castellanii. At micromolar concentrations, the findings revealed that Nitazoxanide neither affected A. castellanii growth or viability nor amoeba-mediated host cell monolayer damage in vitro or extracellular proteolytic activities. Similarly, microaerophilic conditions alone had no significant effects. In contrast, microaerophilic conditions together with Nitazoxanide showed amoebicidal effects and inhibited A. castellanii-mediated host cell monolayer damage as well as extracellular proteases. Using encystation assays, it was observed that Nitazoxanide inhibited trophozoite transformation into cysts both under aerophilic and microaerophilic conditions. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cysts with Nitazoxanide inhibited A. castellanii excystation. These findings are important in the identification of potential targets that could be useful against parasite-specific respiration as well as to understand the basic biology of the life cycle of Acanthamoeba. PMID:26297676

  19. Prevalence of acanthamoeba from tap water in rio grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Winck, Mari Aline Todero; Caumo, Karin; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2011-11-01

    A total of 136 samples of tap water were collected from state and municipal schools between March and November 2009. The samples were filtered through cellulose nitrate membranes that were seeded at non-nutrient agar 1.5% containing an overlayer of Escherichia coli suspension. Thirty-one (22.79%) tap water samples investigated were found positive for free-living amoebae (FLA). From these, 13 presented as FLA that seems to belong to the genus Acanthamoeba. All samples of FLA were cloned and identified as belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba by the morphology of cysts and trophozoites and by PCR using genus-specific primers that amplify the ASA.S1 region of 18S rDNA gene. Physiological tests of thermotolerance and osmotolerance were used to evaluate the pathogenicity of the isolates. The sequencing analysis by comparing the sequences submitted to GenBank, showed genotype distribution into groups T2, T2/T6, T6, and T4. In tests of thermotolerance and osmotolerance, 50% of the isolates had a low pathogenic potential. The results indicated the presence of Acanthamoeba in tap water in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, revealing its importance and the need for more epidemiological studies to determine their distribution in the environment and its pathogenic potential. PMID:21882008

  20. Mycotic Keratitis in a Khaki Campbell Duck ( Anas platyrhynchos domesticus).

    PubMed

    Sadar, Miranda J; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Burton, Andrew G; Byrne, Barbara A; Wiggans, K Tomo; Hollingsworth, Steven R

    2014-12-01

    A 1.5-year-old, intact female khaki Campbell duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) was evaluated for lethargy and a swollen left eye (OS). Mucoid discharge, chemosis, and conjunctival hyperemia with trace aqueous flare, indicating anterior uveitis, in the anterior chamber were evident on ophthalmic examination. There was no fluorescein stain uptake by the cornea. Initial topical antibiotic therapy and systemic anti-inflammatory treatments were unsuccessful, and the lesion progressed to a diffuse, yellow-white plaque, which covered 90%-95% of the cornea 4 days later. There was moderate blepharospasm, mild blepharedema, and epiphora OS. The mobility of the nictitating membrane was impaired because of the presence of the plaque over the cornea. Cytologic examination of a corneal scraping revealed fungal hyphae, and aerobic culture confirmed Aspergillus species. Treatment with topical voriconazole (1 drop OS q4h-q6h) was initiated and was switched to oral voriconazole (20 mg/kg PO q12h) 6 days after initiating treatment. The ocular disease improved during the antifungal treatment period. Eighty-four days after initial presentation (9 days after discontinuation of treatment), there was no clinical evidence of mycotic keratitis on ophthalmic examination. PMID:25843471

  1. Successful treatment of Fusarium keratitis after photo refractive keratectomy.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Gian Maria; Ducange, Pietro; Volante, Veronica; Benatti, Caterina

    2013-11-01

    A 39-year-old woman presented to our hospital with a history of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), performed two weeks prior; slit-lamp examination revealed diffuse conjunctival congestion, corneal ulcer and stromal infiltration. After 5 days of antifungal and antibacteric treatment, the infiltrate progressively increased so that a therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was necessary. The microbiological analyses revealed the presence of fungal filaments. Twenty days after surgery the patient had recurrent fungal infiltrate in the donor cornea with wound dehiscence. We performed a second penetrating keratoplasty. With the matrix-assisted-laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight analysis (MALDI-TOF) we identified a Fusarium solani. Intravenous amphothericine B, a combination of intracameral and intrastromal voriconazole and intracameral amphotericine B were administered. After 6 months from the last surgery the infection was eradicated. The management of fungal keratitis after PRK depends on many factors: In our experience, a prompt keratoplasty and the use of intracameral antifungal medication proved to be very effective. PMID:24178402

  2. Congenital Corneal Anesthesia and Neurotrophic Keratitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Flavio; Nardella, Chiara; Tiberi, Eloisa; Sacchetti, Marta; Bruscolini, Alice; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic keratitis (NK) is a rare degenerative disease of the cornea caused by an impairment of corneal sensory innervation, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensitivity resulting in epithelial keratopathy, ulceration, and perforation. The aetiopathogenesis of corneal sensory innervation impairment in children recognizes the same range of causes as adults, although they are much less frequent in the pediatric population. Some extremely rare congenital diseases could be considered in the aetiopathogenesis of NK in children. Congenital corneal anesthesia is an extremely rare condition that carries considerable diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Typically the onset is up to 3 years of age and the cornea may be affected in isolation or the sensory deficit may exist as a component of a congenital syndrome, or it may be associated with systemic somatic anomalies. Accurate diagnosis and recognition of risk factors is important for lessening long-term sequelae of this condition. Treatment should include frequent topical lubrication and bandage corneal or scleral contact lenses. Surgery may be needed in refractory cases. The purpose of this review is to summarize and update data available on congenital causes and treatment of corneal hypo/anesthesia and, in turn, on congenital NK. PMID:26451380

  3. Topical fluconazole for experimental candida keratitis in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Behrens-Baumann, W; Klinge, B; Rüchel, R

    1990-01-01

    Using a reproducible model of Candida albicans keratitis in rabbits we studied the effect of topical fluconazole, a new triazole. Candida albicans DSM 70010 (2.5 X 10(5) cells) was injected into the corneal stroma of both eyes of 21 rabbits. All eyes developed a corneal ulcer. Forty-eight hours after inoculation the animals were divided into three groups: (1) 14 eyes, received fluconazole (2 mg/ml) and the epithelium subsequently removed; (2) 14 eyes, received only fluconazole drops; (3) 14 eyes, received 0.9% NaCl: half of this group was also debrided. We applied one drop of either substance 10 times a day for 24 days. A further six rabbits were used to judge if the drug penetrated into the cornea and aqueous humour. There was a highly significant difference between the fluconazole groups (1,2) and the control group (3) as to hypopyon and complications (descemetocele, corneal perforation) as well as recultivation of C. albicans from corneal tissue. The difference between the fluconazole groups with and without debridement was not significant. The drug penetrated into the cornea and aqueous humour of both uninflamed and inflamed eyes. Images PMID:2306443

  4. Congenital Corneal Anesthesia and Neurotrophic Keratitis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mantelli, Flavio; Nardella, Chiara; Tiberi, Eloisa; Sacchetti, Marta; Bruscolini, Alice; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic keratitis (NK) is a rare degenerative disease of the cornea caused by an impairment of corneal sensory innervation, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensitivity resulting in epithelial keratopathy, ulceration, and perforation. The aetiopathogenesis of corneal sensory innervation impairment in children recognizes the same range of causes as adults, although they are much less frequent in the pediatric population. Some extremely rare congenital diseases could be considered in the aetiopathogenesis of NK in children. Congenital corneal anesthesia is an extremely rare condition that carries considerable diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Typically the onset is up to 3 years of age and the cornea may be affected in isolation or the sensory deficit may exist as a component of a congenital syndrome, or it may be associated with systemic somatic anomalies. Accurate diagnosis and recognition of risk factors is important for lessening long-term sequelae of this condition. Treatment should include frequent topical lubrication and bandage corneal or scleral contact lenses. Surgery may be needed in refractory cases. The purpose of this review is to summarize and update data available on congenital causes and treatment of corneal hypo/anesthesia and, in turn, on congenital NK. PMID:26451380

  5. Robo 4 Counteracts Angiogenesis in Herpetic Stromal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Fernanda; Bhela, Siddheshvar; Rouse, Barry T.

    2015-01-01

    The cornea is a complex tissue that must preserve its transparency to maintain optimal vision. However, in some circumstances, damage to the eye can result in neovascularization that impairs vision. This outcome can occur when herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) causes the immunoinflammatory lesion stromal keratitis (SK). Potentially useful measures to control the severity of SK are to target angiogenesis which with herpetic SK invariably involves VEGF. One such way to control angiogenesis involves the endothelial receptor Robo4 (R4), which upon interaction with another protein activates an antiangiogenic pathway that counteracts VEGF downstream signaling. In this study we show that mice unable to produce R4 because of gene knockout developed significantly higher angiogenesis after HSV-1 ocular infection than did infected wild type (WT) controls. Moreover, providing additional soluble R4 (sR4) protein by subconjunctival administration to R4 KO HSV-1 infected mice substantially rescued the WT phenotype. Finally, administration of sR4 to WT HSV-1 infected mice diminished the extent of corneal angiogenesis compared to WT control animals. Our results indicate that sR4 could represent a useful therapeutic tool to counteract corneal angiogenesis and help control the severity of SK. PMID:26720197

  6. Successful treatment of Fusarium keratitis after photo refractive keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cavallini, Gian Maria; Ducange, Pietro; Volante, Veronica; Benatti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman presented to our hospital with a history of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), performed two weeks prior; slit-lamp examination revealed diffuse conjunctival congestion, corneal ulcer and stromal infiltration. After 5 days of antifungal and antibacteric treatment, the infiltrate progressively increased so that a therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was necessary. The microbiological analyses revealed the presence of fungal filaments. Twenty days after surgery the patient had recurrent fungal infiltrate in the donor cornea with wound dehiscence. We performed a second penetrating keratoplasty. With the matrix-assisted-laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight analysis (MALDI-TOF) we identified a Fusarium solani. Intravenous amphothericine B, a combination of intracameral and intrastromal voriconazole and intracameral amphotericine B were administered. After 6 months from the last surgery the infection was eradicated. The management of fungal keratitis after PRK depends on many factors: In our experience, a prompt keratoplasty and the use of intracameral antifungal medication proved to be very effective. PMID:24178402

  7. Clinical and corneal microbial profile of infectious keratitis in a high HIV prevalence setting in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Schaftenaar, E; Peters, R P H; Baarsma, G S; Meenken, C; Khosa, N S; Getu, S; McIntyre, J A; Osterhaus, A D M E; Verjans, G M G M

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the clinical and corneal microbial profile of infectious keratitis in a high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence setting in rural South Africa. Data in this cross-sectional study were collected from patients presenting with symptoms of infectious keratitis (n = 46) at the ophthalmology outpatient department of three hospitals in rural South Africa. Corneal swabs were tested for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and adenovirus DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for bacteria and fungi by culture. Based on clinical history, disease characteristics and laboratory results, 29 (63 %) patients were diagnosed as viral keratitis, including 14 (48 %) viral keratitis cases complicated by bacterial superinfection, and 17 (37 %) as bacterial keratitis. VZV and HSV-1 DNA was detected in 11 (24 %) and 5 (11 %) corneal swabs, respectively. Among clinically defined viral keratitis cases, a negative viral swab was predominantly (93 %) observed in cases with subepithelial inflammation and was significantly associated with an increased duration of symptoms (p = 0.003). The majority of bacteria cultured were Gram-positive (24/35), including Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus. Viral aetiology was significantly associated with a history of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (p < 0.001) and a trend was observed between viral aetiology and HIV infection (p = 0.06). Twenty-one (47 %) keratitis cases were complicated by anterior uveitis, of which 18 (86 %) were HIV-infected cases with viral keratitis. The data implicate a high prevalence of herpetic keratitis, in part complicated by bacterial superinfection and/or uveitis, in HIV-infected individuals presenting with infectious keratitis in rural South Africa. PMID:27236644

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ulcerative keratitis in a Thoroughbred racehorse.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Taisuke; Kinoshita, Yuta; Niwa, Hidekazu; Mizobe, Fumiaki; Ueno, Takanori; Kuwano, Atsutoshi; Hatazoe, Takashi; Hobo, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) keratitis in a racehorse. A 5-year-old mare developed punctate keratitis after racing. The corneal ulcer continued to expand despite ophthalmic antimicrobial therapy. On day 6, a conjunctival graft surgery was performed. The mare was euthanized, following colitis and laminitis development on day 10. MRSA was isolated from the corneal swab taken at the time of euthanasia. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated gram-positive and anti-S. aureus monoclonal antibody-positive cocci infiltration of the corneal stroma; and a diagnosis of MRSA ulcerative keratitis was made. An ophthalmic antimicrobial against the isolated MRSA did not improve the ocular lesion. The MRSA strain was found to be staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type II, a strain frequently isolated from humans in Japan. PMID:26435683

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ulcerative keratitis in a Thoroughbred racehorse

    PubMed Central

    KURODA, Taisuke; KINOSHITA, Yuta; NIWA, Hidekazu; MIZOBE, Fumiaki; UENO, Takanori; KUWANO, Atsutoshi; HATAZOE, Takashi; HOBO, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the first case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) keratitis in a racehorse. A 5-year-old mare developed punctate keratitis after racing. The corneal ulcer continued to expand despite ophthalmic antimicrobial therapy. On day 6, a conjunctival graft surgery was performed. The mare was euthanized, following colitis and laminitis development on day 10. MRSA was isolated from the corneal swab taken at the time of euthanasia. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated gram-positive and anti-S. aureus monoclonal antibody-positive cocci infiltration of the corneal stroma; and a diagnosis of MRSA ulcerative keratitis was made. An ophthalmic antimicrobial against the isolated MRSA did not improve the ocular lesion. The MRSA strain was found to be staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type II, a strain frequently isolated from humans in Japan. PMID:26435683

  10. Fungal interface keratitis by Candida orthopsilosis following deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Julia M; Bachmann, Björn O; Meiller, Ralph; Kruse, Friedrich E

    2013-01-01

    A 39-year-old male patient underwent uncomplicated deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty due to keratoconus. On day 5 after surgery, small whitish infiltrates developed in the corneal interface. The diagnosis of fungal keratitis was made when the culture medium of the graft grew Candida after the surgical intervention. Despite intensive antimycotic treatment and irrigation of the interface, the infiltrates persisted and eventually enlarged. Therefore, revision surgery with penetrating keratoplasty was performed. Microbiological analysis showed Candida orthopsilosis in the culture of the excised graft button. Histopathological staining of the excised graft showed periodic acid–Schiff-positive and Grocott methenamine silver-positive clusters of yeast between Descemet's membrane and the deep corneal stroma with focal perforations through Descemet's membrane. The treatment of mycotic keratitis caused by C orthopsilosis is challenging. Antimycotic treatment was unsuccessful in this case. Progression of the keratitis and perforation of Descemet's membrane suggest that early surgical intervention by penetrating keratoplasty is required. PMID:23349184

  11. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  12. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  13. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  14. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  15. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  16. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  17. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  18. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  19. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  20. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  1. Targeting cyst wall is an effective strategy in improving the efficacy of marketed contact lens disinfecting solutions against Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts.

    PubMed

    Abjani, Farhat; Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Yousuf, Farzana Abubakar; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah

    2016-06-01

    Acanthamoeba cysts are highly resistant to contact lens disinfecting solutions. Acanthamoeba cyst wall is partially made of 1,4 β-glucan (i.e., cellulose) and other complex polysaccharides making it a hardy shell that protects the resident amoeba. Here, we hypothesize that targeting the cyst wall structure in addition to antiamoebic compound would improve the efficacy of marketed contact lens disinfecting solutions. Using chlorhexidine as an antiamoebic compound and cellulase enzyme to disrupt cyst wall structure, the findings revealed that combination of both agents abolished viability of Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts and trophozoites. When tested alone, none of the agents nor contact lens disinfecting solutions completely destroyed A. castellanii cysts and trophozoites. The absence of cyst wall-degrading enzymes in marketed contact lens disinfecting solutions render them ineffective against Acanthamoeba cysts. It is concluded that the addition of cyst wall degrading molecules in contact lens disinfecting solutions will enhance their efficacy in decreasing the incidence of Acanthamoeba effectively. PMID:26675112

  2. Isolation, morphologic, serologic and molecular identification of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype from the liver of a Temminck's tragopan (Tragopan temminckii).

    PubMed

    Visvesvara, Govinda S; Shoff, Megan E; Sriram, Rama; Booton, Gregory C; Crary, Monica; Fuerst, Paul A; Hanley, Christopher S; Garner, Michael M

    2010-06-24

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are usually free-living amoebae that are found in a variety of ecological niches including soil, fresh and brackish water, dust in the air, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning filters, swimming pools and hot tubs. Occasionally they are also known to cause central nervous system infections in humans and animals. We isolated into culture an amoeba from the liver of a Temminck's tragopan (horned pheasant) (Tragopan temminckii) that died of amoebic infection. We identified the infecting amoeba as Acanthamoeba sp. based on culture characteristics, cyst morphology and immunofluorescence assays. Additionally, we identified the amoeba as Acanthamoeba, genotype T4, by sequencing a diagnostic region of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. PMID:20347228

  3. A comparative, retrospective, observational study of the clinical and microbiological profiles of post-penetrating keratoplasty keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Huang; Chang, Yi-Sheng; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Huang, Yi-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Infectious keratitis after penetrating keratoplasty (PK) is a devastating condition that may result in graft failure and poor visual outcome. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent PK between 2009 and 2014, and recorded those who developed infectious keratitis. We compared the predisposing factors and organisms isolated to those identified in our previous study, conducted between 1989 and 1994. The incidence of post-PK infectious keratitis decreased from 11.6% (41 out of 354 cases, 1989–1994) to 6.5% (9 out of 138 cases, 2009–2014). Graft epithelial defect and suture-related problems remained the leading two risk factors of infectious keratitis after PK. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial infection decreased from 58.5% and 46.3% to 11.1% and 22.2%, respectively (P = 0.023 and P = 0.271). In contrast, fungus infection increased from 9.8% to 66.7% (P = 0.001); fungi have become the major pathogen for post-PK infectious keratitis. In conclusion, while the incidence of post-PK infectious keratitis has decreased over time, the number and frequency of fungal infections have significantly increased in the recent study period. Clinicians should be aware of the shifting trend in pathogens involved in post-PK infectious keratitis. PMID:27587283

  4. Interleukin 17 expression in peripheral blood neutrophils from fungal keratitis patients and healthy cohorts in southern India.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Rajapandian Sivaganesa; Vareechon, Chairut; Prajna, Namperumalsamy Venkatesh; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu; Pearlman, Eric; Lalitha, Prajna

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17) production by peripheral blood neutrophils was examined in patients with fungal keratitis and in uninfected individuals in southern India, which has high levels of airborne Aspergillus and Fusarium conidia. Il17a gene expression and intracellular IL-17 were detected in all groups, although levels were significantly elevated in neutrophils from patients with keratitis. There were no significant differences in plasma IL-17 and IL-23 between patients with keratitis and uninfected individuals; however, combined data from all groups showed a correlation between the percentage IL-17 producing neutrophils and plasma IL-23, and between plasma IL-17 and IL-6 and IL-23. PMID:25001461

  5. Pathogen induced changes in the protein profile of human tears from Fusarium keratitis patients.

    PubMed

    Ananthi, Sivagnanam; Venkatesh Prajna, Namperumalsamy; Lalitha, Prajna; Valarnila, Murugesan; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium is the major causative agent of fungal infections leading to corneal ulcer (keratitis) in Southern India and other tropical countries. Keratitis caused by Fusarium is a difficult disease to treat unless antifungal therapy is initiated during the early stages of infection. In this study tear proteins were prepared from keratitis patients classified based on the duration of infection. Among the patients recruited, early infection (n = 35), intermediate (n = 20), late (n = 11), samples from five patients in each group were pooled for analysis. Control samples were a pool of samples from 20 patients. Proteins were separated on difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and the differentially expressed proteins were quantified using DeCyder software analysis. The following differentially expressed proteins namely alpha-1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin α2 chain, zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, apolipoprotein, albumin, haptoglobin precursor - β chain, lactoferrin, lacrimal lipocalin precursor, cystatin SA III precursor, lacritin precursor were identified using mass spectrometry. Variation in the expression level of some of the proteins was confirmed using western blot analysis. This is the first report to show stage specific tear protein profile in fungal keratitis patients. Validation of this data using a much larger sample set could lead to clinical application of these findings. PMID:23308132

  6. First Human Case of Fungal Keratitis Caused by a Putatively Novel Species of Lophotrichus.

    PubMed

    Eghrari, Allen O; Gibas, Connie; Watkins, Tonya; Vahedi, Sina; Lee, Rick; Houle, Elizabeth; Suarez, Maria Jose; Eberhart, Charles; Sutton, Deanna A; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Sikder, Shameema; Zhang, Sean X

    2015-09-01

    We report an aggressive fungal keratitis caused by a putatively novel species of Lophotrichus in a patient with traumatic injury to the cornea from a dog paw. The organism was isolated from the patient's necrotic cornea, which perforated despite coverage with hourly fortified broad-spectrum topical antibiotic therapy. This report represents the first case of human infection caused by this species. PMID:26109445

  7. First Human Case of Fungal Keratitis Caused by a Putatively Novel Species of Lophotrichus

    PubMed Central

    Eghrari, Allen O.; Gibas, Connie; Watkins, Tonya; Vahedi, Sina; Lee, Rick; Houle, Elizabeth; Suarez, Maria Jose; Eberhart, Charles; Sutton, Deanna A.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.

    2015-01-01

    We report an aggressive fungal keratitis caused by a putatively novel species of Lophotrichus in a patient with traumatic injury to the cornea from a dog paw. The organism was isolated from the patient's necrotic cornea, which perforated despite coverage with hourly fortified broad-spectrum topical antibiotic therapy. This report represents the first case of human infection caused by this species. PMID:26109445

  8. Keratitis due to the wood saprobic ascomycete, Auerswaldia lignicola (Family Botryosphaeriaceae), in a carpenter in India.

    PubMed

    Ruban, Vasanthakumar Vasantha; Kaliamurthy, Jayaraman; Dineshkumar, Muniyandi; Jesudasan, Christadoss Arul Nelson; Geraldine, Pitchairaj; Thomas, Philip Aloysius

    2013-12-01

    Keratitis due to Auerswaldia lignicola in a 32-year-old Indian male carpenter is described. At presentation, the patient reported persistent pain and tearing (left eye) in spite of topical antimicrobial therapy for more than 3 weeks. Clinically, mycotic keratitis was suspected, and direct microscopy of corneal scrapings stained by lactophenol cotton blue and Gram stains revealed broad septate hyphae. Intensive topical antifungal therapy was then given for 15 days. The keratitis continued to progress, necessitating therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. Following the keratoplasty, there was rapid reduction in inflammation and gradual quietening of the eye. Brown-black fungal colonies resembling Lasiodiplodia theobromae were isolated from corneal scrape and corneal button (post-surgery) material on Sabouraud glucose-neopeptone agar; however, sporulation did not occur, so the morphological identification could not be confirmed. Sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA region of extracted fungal genomic DNA yielded an identification of A. lignicola Ariyawansa, J.K. Liu & K.D. Hyde; the sequence data have been deposited in GenBank (A. lignicola strain DK/V4, accession number KC866317.1). Medical management of keratitis due to such rarely reported fungal species may be difficult, necessitating surgical procedures. PMID:24158617

  9. Viral Capsid Is a Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern in Adenovirus Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V.; Zhou, Xiaohong; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2010-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) infection of the human eye, in particular serotypes 8, 19 and 37, induces the formation of corneal subepithelial leukocytic infiltrates. Using a unique mouse model of adenovirus keratitis, we studied the role of various virus-associated molecular patterns in subsequent innate immune responses of resident corneal cells to HAdV-37 infection. We found that neither viral DNA, viral gene expression, or viral replication was necessary for the development of keratitis. In contrast, empty viral capsid induced keratitis and a chemokine profile similar to intact virus. Transfected viral DNA did not induce leukocyte infiltration despite CCL2 expression similar to levels in virus infected corneas. Mice without toll-like receptor 9 (Tlr9) signaling developed clinical keratitis upon HAdV-37 infection similar to wild type mice, although the absolute numbers of activated monocytes in the cornea were less in Tlr9−/− mice. Virus induced leukocytic infiltrates and chemokine expression in mouse cornea could be blocked by treatment with a peptide containing arginine glycine aspartic acid (RGD). These results demonstrate that adenovirus infection of the cornea induces chemokine expression and subsequent infiltration by leukocytes principally through RGD contact between viral capsid and the host cell, possibly through direct interaction between the viral capsid penton base and host cell integrins. PMID:20419141

  10. miR-155 suppresses bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced keratitis by targeting Rheb.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Minhao; Li, Meiyu; Li, Dandan; Peng, Anping; Nie, Xinxin; Sun, Mingxia; Wang, Jinli; Wu, Yongjian; Deng, Qiuchan; Zhu, Min; Chen, Kang; Yuan, Jin; Huang, Xi

    2014-07-01

    miR-155 (microRNA-155) is an important noncoding RNA in regulating host inflammatory responses. However, its regulatory role in ocular infection remains unclear. Our study first explored the function of miR-155 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced keratitis, one of the most common sight-threatening ocular diseases. We found that miR-155 expression was enhanced in human and mouse corneas after P. aeruginosa infection and was mainly expressed in macrophages but not neutrophils. In vivo studies demonstrated that miR-155 knockout mice displayed more resistance to P. aeruginosa keratitis, with a higher inducible nitric oxide synthase level and a lower bacterial burden. More importantly, in vitro data indicated that miR-155 suppressed the macrophage-mediated bacterial phagocytosis and intracellular killing of P. aeruginosa by targeting Rheb (Ras homolog enriched in brain). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to explore the role of miR-155 in bacterial keratitis, which may provide a promising target for clinical treatment of P. aeruginosa keratitis and other infectious diseases. PMID:24403554

  11. Postkeratoplasty Keratitis Caused by Abiotrophia defectiva: An Unusual Cause of Graft Infection

    PubMed Central

    Manderwad, Guru Prasad; Murthy, Somasheila I.; Motukupally, Swapna Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Abiotrophia defectiva is a nutritional variant of Streptococci. We describe a case of microbial keratitis due to A. defectiva in a patient who had undergone penetrating keratoplasty and was on corticosteroid therapy for recent graft rejection. Isolation of this organism confirmed this to be an opportunistic infection. PMID:26180481

  12. Evaluation of Fungal Keratitis using a Newly Developed Computer Program, Optscore, for Grading Digital Corneal Photographs

    PubMed Central

    Toutain-Kidd, Christine M.; Porco, Travis C.; Kidd, Eric M.; Srinivasan, M; Prajna, Namperumalsamy V.; Acharya, Nisha; Lietman, Thomas; Zegans, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To validate computer software developed to assess digital corneal photographs of fungal keratitis in clinical research. Methods A cornea specialist and five medical students (after training) graded on two occasions 100 corneal photographs of patients with fungal keratitis using Optscore software. Variables assessed were lesion area, location, degree of opacity, percentage of the ulcer lying within a central 4mm circle of the cornea. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess intragrader reliability, agreement of the students with the corneal specialist, and the reliability of the group mean of the student raters. The area determined using Optscore was compared to the area estimated from slit lamp and to visual acuity. Results As a group, medical students achieved an ICC greater than 0.9 for five out of the seven assessed variables. Similar levels of consistency were found after analyzing the graders’ individual results compared to the specialist. The area estimated using slit lamp examination was highly correlated with the mean area determined by Optscore, as was the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity at enrollment. Conclusions Non-expert graders using Optscore to assess digital photographs of fungal keratitis are self-consistent, agree with an expert grader both as a group and individually, and measurements of ulcer area obtained from Optscore are highly correlated with measurements of the same patients obtained on clinical examination. These observations support the validity of Optscore for assessing corneal pathology associated with fungal keratitis and make it a promising clinical research tool. PMID:24467559

  13. Contact Lens-Related Infectious Keratitis with White Plaque Formation Caused by Corynebacterium propinquum

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Norihiro; Sodeyama, Hirotake; Hosoya, Ryuichi; Kishi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of Corynebacterium propinquum keratitis in the compromised cornea of a diabetic patient wearing therapeutic contact lenses. The strain was identified to the species level based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and RNA polymerase β-subunit-encoding gene (rpoB). Ophthalmologists should be aware of nondiphtherial corynebacterial infection of compromised corneas. PMID:26179302

  14. Keratitis with Elizabethkingia meningoseptica Occurring after Contact Lens Wear: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Young Seong; Chun, Ji Woong

    2013-01-01

    To report keratitis with Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, which occurred in a healthy patient after wearing contact lenses for 6 months. A 24-year-old male patient visited our hospital with ocular pain. This patient had a history of wearing soft contact lenses for 6 months, about 10 hours per day. At initial presentation, slit lamp examination showed corneal stromal infiltrations and small epithelial defect. Microbiological examinations were performed from corneal scrapings, contact lenses, and the contact lens case and solution. The culture results from contact lenses, contact lens case and solution were all positive for Elizabethkingia meningoseptica. Thus, we could confirm that the direct cause of keratitis was contamination of the contact lenses. The patient was treated with 0.3% gatifloxacin. After treatment, the corneal epithelial defect was completely healed, and a slight residual subepithelial corneal opacity was observed. We diagnosed keratitis with Elizabethkingia meningoseptica in a healthy young male wearing soft contact lenses. We conclude that Elizabethkingia meningoseptica should be considered as a rare but potential pathogen for lens-related keratitis in a healthy host. PMID:23543626

  15. A novel murine model of Fusarium solani keratitis utilizing fluorescent labeled fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmin; Wang, Liya; Li, Zhijie; Liu, Susu; Xie, Yanting; He, Siyu; Deng, Xianming; Yang, Biao; Liu, Hui; Chen, Guoming; Zhao, Huiwen; Zhang, Junjie

    2013-05-01

    Fungal keratitis is a common disease that causes blindness. An effective animal model for fungal keratitis is essential for advancing research on this disease. Our objective is to develop a novel mouse model of Fusarium solani keratitis through the inoculation of fluorescent-labeled fungi into the cornea to facilitate the accurate and early identification and screening of fungal infections. F. solani was used as the model fungus in this study. In in vitro experiment, the effects of Calcofluor White (CFW) staining concentration and duration on the fluorescence intensity of F. solani were determined through the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI); the effects of CFW staining on the growth of F. solani were determined by the colony diameter. In in vivo experiment, the F. solani keratitis mice were induced and divided into a CFW-unlabeled and CFW-labeled groups. The positive rate, corneal lesion score and several positive rate determination methods were measured. The MFIs of F. solani in the 30 μg/ml CFW-30 min, 90 μg/ml CFW-10 min and 90 μg/ml CFW-30 min groups were higher than that in the 10 μg/ml CFW-10 min group (P < 0.01). Compared with the 30 μg/ml CFW-30 min group, only the 90 μg/ml CFW-30 min group showed higher MFI (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the colony diameter in the CFW unstained group compared with that in the 10, 30, 90, 270, or 810 μg/ml CFW groups stained for either 10 or 30 min (P > 0.05). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed for the positive rate or the corneal lesion scores between the CFW-unlabeled and the CFW-labeled group. On day 1 and 2, the positive rates of the infected corneas in the scraping group were lower than those in the fluorescence microscopy group (P < 0.05). On day 3, these observe methods showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Thus, these experiments established a novel murine model of F. solani keratitis utilizing fluorescent labeled fungi. This model

  16. Antimicrobial management of presumed microbial keratitis: guidelines for treatment of central and peripheral ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, H; Hay, J; Kirkness, C; Seal, D; Devonshire, P.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the quantitative relation between the major risk factors for microbial keratitis of previous ocular surface disease and contact lens wear and central and peripheral infiltration, often associated with ulceration, in order to establish a rational chemotherapeutic management algorithm.
METHODS—Data from 55 patients were collected over a 10 month period. All cases of presumed microbial keratitis where corneal scrapes had been subjected to microbiological examination were included. Risk factor data and laboratory outcome were recorded. Antimicrobial regimens used to treat each patient were documented.
RESULTS—57 episodes of presumed microbial keratitis were identified from 55 patients, 24 male and 31 female. There were 30 central infiltrates and 27 peripheral infiltrates of which 28 were culture positive (73% of central infiltrates, 22% of peripheral infiltrates). 26 patients had worn contact lenses of whom 12 had culture positive scrapes (9/14 for central infiltrates, 3/12 for peripheral infiltrates). 31 patients had an ocular surface disease of whom five previous herpes simplex virus keratitis patients developed secondary bacterial infection. Anterior chamber activity and an infiltrate size ⩾ 4 mm2 were more common with culture positive central infiltrates than peripheral infiltrates (χ2 test = 11.98, p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS—Predisposing factors for "presumed" microbial keratitis, either central or peripheral, were: ocular surface disease (26/57 = 45.6%), contact lens wear (26/57 = 45.6%), and previous trauma (5/57 = 8.8%). Larger ulceration (⩾4 mm2) with inflammation was more often associated with positive culture results for central infiltration. None of these four variables (contact lens wear, ocular surface disease, ulcer size, anterior chamber activity) were of intrinsic value in predicting if a peripheral infiltrate would yield identifiable micro-organisms. Successful management of presumed microbial

  17. Acanthamoeba encystment: multifactorial effects of buffers, biocides, and demulcents present in contact lens care solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Christopher J; Lynch, Shawn C; Rah, Marjorie J; Millard, Kimberly A; Morris, Timothy W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether agents which are purportedly capable of inducing encystment of Acanthamoeba can recapitulate the signal when tested in differing formulations. Methods In accordance with the International Standard ISO 19045, Acanthamoeba castellanii ATCC 50370 trophozoites were cultured in antibiotic-free axenic medium, treated with test solutions, and encystment rates plus viability were measured via bright field and fluorescent microscopy. Test solutions included phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), borate-buffered saline, biguanide- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-based biocides, propylene glycol (PG) and povidone (POV) ophthalmic demulcents, and one-step H2O2-based contact lens disinfection systems. Results Only PBS solutions with 0.25 ppm polyaminopropyl biguanide (PAPB) and increasing concentrations of PG and POV stimulated A. castellanii encystment in a dose-dependent manner, whereas PBS solutions containing 3% H2O2 and increasing concentrations of PG and POV did not stimulate encystment. Borate-buffered saline and PBS/citrate solutions containing PG also did not stimulate encystment. In addition, no encystment was observed after 24 hours, 7 days, or 14 days of exposures of trophozoites to one-step H2O2 contact lens disinfection products or related solutions. Conclusion The lack of any encystment observed when trophozoites were treated with existing or new one-step H2O2 contact lens care products, as well as when trophozoites were exposed to various related test solutions, confirms that Acanthamoeba encystment is a complex process which depends upon simultaneous contributions of multiple factors including buffers, biocides, and demulcents. PMID:26508829

  18. Meningoencephalitis due to Acanthamoeba SP. Pathogenesis and clinico-pathological study.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A J; Sotelo-Avila, C; Garcia-Tamayo, J; Morón, J T; Willaert, E; Stamm, W P

    1977-03-31

    Amebic Meningoencephalitis (AM) and Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) are infectious diseases essentially confined to the Central Nervous System (CNS) and caused by free-living amebas of the genus Acanthamoeba (A.) and Naegleria (N.) respectively. AM due to A. sp. (Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba culbertsoni) have been reported in chronically ill debilitated individuals, some of them under immunosuppressive therapy, or in immunologically impaired patients without a history of recent swimming in contrast to cases due to N. sp. which usually occurs in healthy, young individuals with a recent history of swimming in man-made lakes or heated swimming pools. AM due to A.sp. is characterized by a subacute or chronic granulomatous meningoencephalitis involving mainly the midbrain, basal areas of the temporal and occipital lobes and posterior fossa structures. CNS lesions in AM are perhaps secondary and the portal of entry in humans is probably from the lower respiratory tract, genitourinary system or skin reaching the CNS by hematogenous spread. The predominant host reaction is usually composed of lymphocytes, plasma cells, monocytes and multinucleated foreign body giant cells. Necrosis is moderate and hemorrhage scant or absent. Cysts as well as trophozoites may be seen within the CNS lesions. PAM is due to Naegleria fowleri and is characterized by an hemorrhagic necrotizing meningoencephalities with an acute inflammatory response. Only trophozoites are found in lesions. The portal of entry is through the olfactory neuroepithelium. CNS tissues fixed in formalin may be used for further identification and taxonomical classification of the causative protoza using immunofluorescent antibody techniques (IFAT) and electron microscopic methods. PMID:857580

  19. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus and other giant viruses: an open field to outstanding discoveries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV) was first described and began to impact researchers around the world, due to its structural and genetic complexity. This virus founded the family Mimiviridae. In recent years, several new giant viruses have been isolated from different environments and specimens. Giant virus research is in its initial phase and information that may arise in the coming years may change current conceptions of life, diversity and evolution. Thus, this review aims to condense the studies conducted so far about the features and peculiarities of APMV, from its discovery to its clinical relevance. PMID:24976356

  20. Treatment with intrastromal and intracameral voriconazole in 2 eyes with Lasiodiplodia theobromae keratitis: case reports.

    PubMed

    Lekhanont, Kaevalin; Nonpassopon, Manachai; Nimvorapun, Nutthida; Santanirand, Pitak

    2015-02-01

    To report the clinical presentation and the role of intrastromal and intracameral voriconazole injection in the management of rare cases of fungal keratitis caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae.Two eyes of 2 patients with Lasiodiplodia keratitis unresponsive to topical and oral antifungal medications were included in this study. Diagnosis of Lasiodiplodia keratitis was confirmed by microbiological analysis, including culture-based (case 1 and 2) and DNA sequencing techniques (case 2 only).The first patient presented with multiple satellite lesions and one of these infiltrates spread deeply into the cornea, forming a stromal abscess. Another patient had a large full-thickness corneal infiltrates with several fungal balls in the anterior chamber, requiring a limbus-to-limbus therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. Despite aggressive topical therapy, the stromal abscess continued to worsen in the first case and recurrent keratitis was observed postoperatively in the second case. Voriconazole 50 μg/0.1 mL was administered intracamerally and intrastromally around the fungal abscess as adjuncts to topical antimycotics in the first case. The second patient who needed therapeutic keratoplasty was treated with an intracameral injection of 50 μg/0.1 mL voriconazole at the end of surgery. Postoperatively, 100 μg/0.1 mL voriconazole was also injected intracamerally after the recurrence of infection was noted in the graft. Reinjections were given 48 hours apart in both cases. After the injections, all corneal and anterior chamber lesions were reduced in size and density and completely resolved within 4 weeks.Intrastromal and intracameral voriconazole injections may offer safe and effective treatment options for L theobromae keratitis. PMID:25674759

  1. Time-dependent matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases expression change in fusarium solani keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Gao, Xin-Rui; Cui, Hong-Ping; Lang, Li-Li; Xie, Xiu-Wen; Chen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) expression during the progress of fusarium solani (F.solani) keratitis in a rat model. METHODS A rat model of F.solani keratitis was produced using corneal scarification and a hand-made contact lens. MMPs and TIMPs expressiond were explored in this rat model of F.solani keratitis using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DIF. GM6001 (400 µmol/mL) was used to treat infected corneas. The keratitis duration, amount and area of corneal neovascularization (CNV) were evaluated. RESULTS MMP-3 expression was 66.3 times higher in infected corneas compared to normal corneas. MMP-8, -9, and -13 expressions were significantly upregulated in the mid-period of the infection, with infected-to-normal ratios of 4.03, 39.86, and 5.94, respectively. MMP-2 and -7 expressions increased in the late period, with the infected-to-normal ratios of 5.94 and 16.22, respectively. TIMP-1 expression was upregulated in the early period, and it was 43.17 times higher in infected compared to normal corneas, but TIMP-2, -3, and -4 expressions were mildly downregulated or unchanged. The results of DIF were consistent with the result of real-time PCR. GM6001, a MMPs inhibitor, decreased the duration of F.solani infection and the amount and area of CNV. CONCLUSION MMPs and TIMPs contributed into the progress of F.solani keratitis. PMID:27162721

  2. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in a murine model of Aspergillus fumigatus keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jing; Hu, Li-Ting; Che, Cheng-Ye; Li, Cui; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Peng, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To observe the presence and expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) during the corneal immunity to Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) in the murine models. METHODS The murine model of fungal keratitis was established by smearing with colonies of A. fumigatus after scraping central epithelium of cornea and covering with contact lenses in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were randomly divided into control group, sham group and A. fumigatus keratitis group. The cornea was monitored daily using a slit lamp and recorded disease score after infection. Corneal lesion was detected by immunofluorescence staining. IDO mRNA and protein were also detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. RESULTS The disease score and slit lamp photography indicated that disease severity was consistent with corneal inflammation in the murine models, and the disease scores in A. fumigatus keratitis group were obviously higher than those in the sham group. By immunofluorescence staining, IDO was mainly localized in corneal epithelium and stroma in the murine corneal tissues with A. fumigatus keratitis. Compared with the sham group, IDO mRNA expression was significantly enhanced in corneal epithelium infected by A. fumigatus. Furthermore, IDO protein expression detected by Western blot was in accord with transcript levels of IDO mRNA measured by qRT-PCR. IDO protein expression was enhanced after A. fumigatus infection compared with the sham group. CONCLUSION IDO is detected in corneal epithelium and stroma locally, which indicates IDO takes part in the pathogenesis of A. fumigatus keratitis and plays a key role in immune regulation at the early stage. PMID:27162718

  3. Antibiotic Resistance in the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Keratitis: A 20-Year Review

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Victoria S.; Dhaliwal, Deepinder K.; Raju, Leela; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared the resistance patterns of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) keratitis isolates to common topically applied ophthalmic antimicrobials. Methods We reviewed the antibiotic susceptibility results of 122 MRSA and 276 MSSA keratitis isolates from January 1993 to November 2012. In vitro susceptibility testing of each SA isolate was performed using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion based on modified serum interpretations for cefoxitin, bacitracin, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, gentamicin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, polymyxin B, sulfamethoxazole, tobramycin, and trimethoprim. Results MRSA represented 30.7% (122 of 398) of the total SA isolates. All SA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, while less susceptible to the fluoroquinolones than to the non-fluoroquinolones. In comparison to MSSA, MRSA was significantly more resistant to all antibiotics tested other than polymyxin B (both equally resistant) and vancomycin (both equally susceptible) (p<0.001). Besides vancomycin, MRSA demonstrated the best susceptibilities to sulfamethoxazole (94.3%), bacitracin (89.3%), trimethoprim (88.5%), and gentamicin (86.1%). Additionally, MRSA was found to be significantly more resistant to the second-generation fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin) than to the fourth-generation fluoroquinolones (moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin). An increase in resistance to the fourth-generation fluoroquinolones was detected for both MRSA and MSSA over the study period. Conclusions The in vitro susceptibilities of commonly used topical antibiotics differ for MRSA and MSSA isolates, thus successful treatment of bacterial keratitis should be supported with laboratory studies. Vancomycin remains the treatment of choice for MRSA keratitis. The empiric use of second-generation fluoroquinolones appears to be contraindicated in the treatment of MRSA keratitis. PMID:25811722

  4. Acanthamoeba feature a unique backpacking strategy to trap and feed on Listeria monocytogenes and other motile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Doyscher, Dominik; Fieseler, Lars; Dons, Lone; Loessner, Martin J; Schuppler, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Despite its prominent role as an intracellular human pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes normally features a saprophytic lifestyle, and shares many environmental habitats with predatory protozoa. Earlier studies claimed that Acanthamoeba may act as environmental reservoirs for L. monocytogenes, whereas others failed to confirm this hypothesis. Our findings support the latter and provide clear evidence that L. monocytogenes is unable to persist in Acanthamoeba castellanii and A. polyphaga. Instead, external Listeria cells are rapidly immobilized on the surface of Acanthamoeba trophozoites, forming large aggregates of densely packed bacteria that we termed backpacks. While the assembly of backpacks is dependent on bacterial motility, flagellation alone is not sufficient. Electron micrographs showed that the aggregates are held together by filaments of likely amoebal origin. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that shortly after the bacteria are collected, the amoeba can change direction of movement, phagocytose the backpack and continue to repeat the process. The phenomenon was also observed with avirulent L. monocytogenes mutants, non-pathogenic Listeria, and other motile bacteria, indicating that formation of backpacks is not specific for L. monocytogenes, and independent of bacterial pathogenicity or virulence. Hence, backpacking appears to represent a unique and highly effective strategy of Acanthamoeba to trap and feed on motile bacteria. PMID:22925311

  5. Campylobacter jejuni Actively Invades the Amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Survives within Non Digestive Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Jenny; Axelsson-Olsson, Diana; Brudin, Lars; Olsen, Björn; Ellström, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni is able to enter, survive and multiply within the free living amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga, but the molecular mechanisms behind these events are still unclear. We have studied the uptake and intracellular trafficking of viable and heat killed bacterial cells of the C. jejuni strain 81–176 in A. polyphaga. We found that viable bacteria associated with a substantially higher proportion of Acanthamoeba trophozoites than heat killed bacteria. Furthermore, the kinetics of internalization, the total number of internalized bacteria as well as the intracellular localization of internalized C. jejuni were dramatically influenced by bacterial viability. Viable bacteria were internalized at a high rate already after 1 h of co-incubation and were observed in small vacuoles tightly surrounding the bacteria. In contrast, internalization of heat killed C. jejuni was low at early time points and did not peak until 96 h. These cells were gathered in large spacious vacuoles that were part of the degradative pathway as determined by the uptake of fluorescently labeled dextran. The amount of heat killed bacteria internalized by A. polyphaga did never reach the maximal amount of internalized viable bacteria. These results suggest that the uptake and intracellular survival of C. jejuni in A. polyphaga is bacterially induced. PMID:24223169

  6. Investigating the role of Acanthamoeba polyphaga in protecting Human Adenovirus from water disinfection treatment.

    PubMed

    Verani, Marco; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Tammaro, Carmine; Carducci, Annalaura

    2016-06-01

    Human adenoviruses are responsible for a wide range of clinical infections and are present in aquatic environments, including river, seawater, drinking-water and sewage. Free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba) in the same environments may internalize them and other microorganisms can act as a reservoir for the internalized viruses. In this study, we studied the interaction between Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Human Adenovirus type 5 (HAdV 5) to determine whether the amoeba played a role in protecting the internalized viruses from chemical disinfection. The efficacy of sodium hypochlorite disinfection against A. polyphaga and HAdV 5 either singly or in combination was assessed at three different concentrations. Individually, the amoeba were more resistant to chemical disinfection than HAdV 5 and remained alive after exposure to 5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. In contrast, HAdV 5 lost infectivity following exposure to 2.5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. When the amoeba and HAdV 5 were co-cultured, infectious virus was found in the cytoplasm of the amoeba at 5mg/l disinfectant concentration. These findings suggest that the A. polyphaga is providing protection for the HAdV 5. PMID:26999560

  7. Identification of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 as a Regulator for Encystation of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Yeonchul; Chung, Dong-Il; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Encystation is an essential process for Acanthamoeba survival under nutrient-limiting conditions and exposure to drugs. The expression of several genes has been observed to increase or decrease during encystation. Epigenetic processes involved in regulation of gene expression have been shown to play a role in several pathogenic parasites. In the present study, we identified the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), a known epigenetic regulator, in Acanthamoeba castellanii. PRMT5 of A. castellanii (AcPRMT5) contained domains found in S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases and in PRMT5 arginine-N-methyltransferase. Expression levels of AcPRMT5 were increased during encystation of A. castellanii. The EGFP-PRMT5 fusion protein was mainly localized in the nucleus of trophozoites. A. castellanii transfected with siRNA designed against AcPRMT5 failed to form mature cysts. The findings of this study lead to a better understanding of epigenetic mechanisms behind the regulation of encystation in cyst-forming pathogenic protozoa. PMID:27180570

  8. Glycogen Phosphorylase in Acanthamoeba spp.: Determining the Role of the Enzyme during the Encystment Process Using RNA Interference▿

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Kliescikova, Jarmila; Martinez-Carretero, Enrique; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Profotova, Bronislava; Nohynkova, Eva; Osuna, Antonio; Valladares, Basilio

    2008-01-01

    Acanthamoeba infections are difficult to treat due to often late diagnosis and the lack of effective and specific therapeutic agents. The most important reason for unsuccessful therapy seems to be the existence of a double-wall cyst stage that is highly resistant to the available treatments, causing reinfections. The major components of the Acanthamoeba cyst wall are acid-resistant proteins and cellulose. The latter has been reported to be the major component of the inner cyst wall. It has been demonstrated previously that glycogen is the main source of free glucose for the synthesis of cellulose in Acanthamoeba, partly as glycogen levels fall during the encystment process. In other lower eukaryotes (e.g., Dictyostelium discoideum), glycogen phosphorylase has been reported to be the main tool used for glycogen breakdown in order to maintain the free glucose levels during the encystment process. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the regulation of the key processes involved in the Acanthamoeba encystment may be similar to the previously reported regulation mechanisms in other lower eukaryotes. The catalytic domain of the glycogen phosphorylase was silenced using RNA interference methods, and the effect of this phenomenon was assessed by light and electron microscopy analyses, calcofluor staining, expression zymogram assays, and Northern and Western blot analyses of both small interfering RNA-treated and control cells. The present report establishes the role of glycogen phosphorylase during the encystment process of Acanthamoeba. Moreover, the obtained results demonstrate that the enzyme is required for cyst wall assembly, mainly for the formation of the cell wall inner layer. PMID:18223117

  9. 46 CFR 7.150 - Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to Cape Spencer, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to Cape Spencer, AK. 7.150 Section 7.150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.150 Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to...

  10. 46 CFR 7.150 - Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to Cape Spencer, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to Cape Spencer, AK. 7.150 Section 7.150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.150 Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to...

  11. Imported pythium insidiosum keratitis after a swim in Thailand by a contact lens-wearing traveler.

    PubMed

    Lelievre, Lucie; Borderie, Vincent; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Brignier, Anne C; Sterkers, Margaret; Chaumeil, Christine; Lortholary, Olivier; Lanternier, Fanny

    2015-02-01

    A 30-year-old woman with a history of contact lens wear and exposure to swimming pool water in Thailand presented with a non-responsive, progressive corneal ulcer of the right eye. Confocal microscopy evidenced septate linear branching structures, raising suspicion of fungal keratitis. She was promptly treated with topical antibiotics and both topical and intravenous caspofungin plus voriconazole. Worsening of the clinical picture after 1 month of intensive medical therapy led to a large therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty being performed. Corneal cultures grew a mold-like organism, which was identified by sequencing as Pythium insidiosum, an aquatic oomycete. After 4 years of follow-up, the graft exhibits no infection relapse, but graft transparency has been lost after two rejection episodes. Keratoplasty combined with antifungal treatment may offer a cure to P. insidiosum keratitis, although long-term preservation of corneal transparency is difficult to obtain. PMID:25535313

  12. Imported Pythium insidiosum Keratitis After a Swim in Thailand by a Contact Lens-Wearing Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Lelievre, Lucie; Borderie, Vincent; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Brignier, Anne C.; Sterkers, Margaret; Chaumeil, Christine; Lortholary, Olivier; Lanternier, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman with a history of contact lens wear and exposure to swimming pool water in Thailand presented with a non-responsive, progressive corneal ulcer of the right eye. Confocal microscopy evidenced septate linear branching structures, raising suspicion of fungal keratitis. She was promptly treated with topical antibiotics and both topical and intravenous caspofungin plus voriconazole. Worsening of the clinical picture after 1 month of intensive medical therapy led to a large therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty being performed. Corneal cultures grew a mold-like organism, which was identified by sequencing as Pythium insidiosum, an aquatic oomycete. After 4 years of follow-up, the graft exhibits no infection relapse, but graft transparency has been lost after two rejection episodes. Keratoplasty combined with antifungal treatment may offer a cure to P. insidiosum keratitis, although long-term preservation of corneal transparency is difficult to obtain. PMID:25535313

  13. Long-term follow-up after successful treatment of Pythium insidiosum keratitis in Israel.

    PubMed

    Barequet, Irina S; Lavinsky, Fabio; Rosner, Mordechai

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to report a case of severe Pythium insidiosum keratitis confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and its long-term cure after therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. A 24-year-old woman with a history of contact lens wear and exposure to swimming pool water presented with a severe corneal abscess. She was treated with intensive fortified topical antibiotics and natamycin with limited response. Initial cultures suggested the presence of a septate mold, unclearly identified; therefore, both topical and intravenous voriconazole were administered. Despite the above treatment, there was worsening of the clinical picture. PCR assay revealed homology to Pythium insidiosum. Promptly, the patient underwent a large therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. After five years of follow-up, the graft exhibits neither signs of rejection nor any recurrence of infection. We conclude that prompt identification of Pythium insidiosum keratitis and aggressive treatment by therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty may offer a cure to this disease. PMID:23627654

  14. Surgical treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis and necrotizing scleritis in granulomatosis with polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Zhou, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jiao; Hao, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of surgical management of refractory ophthalmic complications of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), which is a sight threatening was reported. A 70-year-old man presented with a progressively worsening pain and redness in his right eye during the previous 6 months, and decreasing visual acuity that started one month earlier. He was misdiagnosed and treated as keratitis elsewhere, but the pain has not decreased. The diagnosis of necrotizing scleritis with peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) in GPA was made in our department. Surgery was performed with necrotic tissue removal, combined with cryotherapy and a conjunctival flap covering surgery. The symptom was relieved after surgery, and the patient’s ocular condition remained stable thereafter. This case first demonstrates limited ophthalmic GPA (such as, PUK and necrotizing scleritis) that was not sensitive or aggravated for traditional methods can be successfully treated by combined surgical interventions. PMID:26837405

  15. Bacterial Keratitis: Perspective on Epidemiology, Clinico-Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mujaini, Abdullah; Al-Kharusi, Nadia; Thakral, Archana; Wali, Upender K

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is an acute or chronic, transient or recurrent infection of the cornea with varying predilection for anatomical and topographical parts of the cornea like marginal or central. It is a potentially sight-threatening corneal infection in humans that is generally found in eyes with predisposing elements, the most common of which is contact lens wear. The epidemiological data reveals the universal occurrence of this disease. With advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis, laboratory investigations like immunohistochemistry, fluorescent microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and molecular biology, and the availability of fourth generation antibiotics, the overall visual outcome in bacterial keratitis has improved with time. Particular attention should be given to this condition as it can progress very rapidly with complete corneal destruction occurring within 24–48 hours. Early diagnosis, which is primarily clinical and substantiated largely by microbiological data, and prompt treatment are needed to minimise the possibility of permanent visual loss and reduce structural damage to the cornea. PMID:21509299

  16. Purification and Characterization of a Mitogenic Lectin from Cephalosporium, a Pathogenic Fungus Causing Mycotic Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Chachadi, Vishwanath B.; Eligar, Sachin M.; Shubhada, C.; Pujari, Radha; Shastry, Padma; Swamy, Bale M.; Inamdar, Shashikala R.

    2010-01-01

    Ophthalmic mycoses caused by infectious fungi are being recognized as a serious concern since they lead to total blindness. Cephalosporium is one amongst several opportunistic fungal species implicated in ophthalmic infections leading to mycotic keratitis. A mitogenic lectin has been purified from the mycelia of fungus Cephalosporium, isolated from the corneal smears of a keratitis patient. Cephalosporium lectin (CSL) is a tetramer with subunit mass of 14 kDa, agglutinates human A, B, and O erythrocytes, and exhibits high affinity for mucin compared to fetuin and asialofetuin but does not bind to simple sugars indicating its complex sugar specificity. CSL showed strong binding to normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to elicit mitogenic activity. The sugar specificity of the lectin and its interaction with PBMCs to exhibit mitogenic effect indicate its possible role in adhesion and infection process of Cephalosporium. PMID:21188078

  17. Occurrence and molecular characterization of free-living amoeba species (Acanthamoeba, Hartmannella, and Saccamoeba limax) in various surface water resources of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza; Rahmati, Behnaz; Seyedpour, Seyed Hosssen; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence and molecular identity of Acanthamoeba species in the surface water resources of four provinces in Iran, namely Guilan, Mazandaran (North of Iran), Alborz, and Tehran (capital city), using culture- and molecular-based methods. During March to November 2014, 49 surface water samples were collected from environmental water sources-the distinct surface waters of Guilan, Mazandaran, Alborz, and Tehran provinces, in Iran. For the isolation of Acanthamoeba species, approximately 500 ml of the water samples were filtered through a cellulose nitrate membrane with a pore size of 0.45 μ. The filter was transferred onto non-nutrient agar plates seeded with Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) as a food source. The presence of Acanthamoeba was confirmed by the genus-specific primer pair JDP1 and 2, and/or NA primers were used to identify Acanthamoeba and certain other free-living amoebae. In total, 38 out of 49 samples were positive by culture and/or PCR for Acanthamoeba and other free-living amoebae from all three provinces. By sequencing the positive isolates, the strains were shown to belong to Acanthamoeba (16 isolates belonged to T4 and 2 isolates belonged to T5), Hartmannella vermiformis (3/24), and Saccamoeba limax (2/24). The T4 and T5 genotypes were detected in Guilan and Mazandaran provinces. Two isolates from Guilan and Tehran provinces belonged to S. limax, and H. vermiformis was detected in Guilan province. The results of this study highlight the need to pay more attention to free-living amoebae, as human activity was observed in all of the localities from which these samples were taken. These surface waters can be potential sources for the distribution and transmission of pathogenic Acanthamoeba in the study areas, and free-living amoebas (FLA) (particularly the Acanthamoeba species) can serve as hosts for and vehicles of various microorganisms. PMID:26346454

  18. Topical voriconazole therapy of Purpureocillium lilacinum keratitis that occurred in disposable soft contact lens wearers.

    PubMed

    Todokoro, Daisuke; Yamada, Norihiro; Fukuchi, Mariko; Kishi, Shoji

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to describe 2 cases of keratitis caused by Purpureocillium lilacinum (formerly Paecilomyces lilacinus) that occurred in disposable contact lens users, which were successfully treated with topical voriconazole. Case 1 was a healthy 44-year-old woman, who wore weekly disposable contact lenses and had developed a superficial corneal infection in her right eye. For diagnosis, corneal scraping and molecular identification of the cultured pathogen were performed. A corneal smear revealed the presence of fungi. The pathogen was identified as P. lilacinum by traditional morphological identification of fungal culture, and this identification was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. Therapy with topical fluconazole, topical pimaricin (natamycin), and oral itraconazole were ineffective. Topical voriconazole showed a significant effect, and the keratitis was successfully treated. Case 2 was a 43-year-old woman with bilateral recurrent peripheral corneal ulcers by meibomian gland dysfunction, who used therapeutic bandage contact lenses on her left eye. However, a corneal abscess with hypopyon occurred in the eye after 3 months. The microbial smear examination showed the presence of fungi and the fungal culture, and the DNA sequence of ITS region revealed that the causative agent was P. lilacinum. The susceptibility testing against antifungal agents showed that voriconazole was effective. The lesion improved gradually by topical voriconazole. As a conclusion, P. lilacinum keratitis can occur in disposable soft contact lens wearer. Early and accurate detection of the pathogenic organism is essential. Topical voriconazole was effective against P. lilacinum keratitis. PMID:24974133

  19. Acyclovir-resistant herpetic keratitis in a solid-organ transplant recipient on systemic immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Liam Daniel; Beckingsale, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of acyclovir-resistant herpetic keratitis in a solid-organ lung transplant recipient that was effectively treated with topical trifluridine. Methods A case of a 35-year-old female with herpetic epithelial keratitis resistant to acyclovir is described. The patient presented following treatment for 4 weeks with topical acyclovir ointment five times per day and oral valacyclovir 1 g three times per day for herpetic keratitis with no resolution of the epithelial defect or symptoms. Corneal scrapes and swabs were taken for confirmation of the diagnosis and resistance testing. The results were positive for herpes simplex virus 1 and showed acyclovir resistance (inhibitor concentration 90 = 200 μg/mL) and foscarnet sensitivity (inhibitor concentration 90 = 200 μg/mL). The patient was treated with topical trifluridine 2-hourly for 3 weeks and weaned off the drops over the following week. Results The patient showed resolution of the epithelial defect, but did have significant corneal toxicity associated with the use of the trifluridine. At 8 weeks, the patient had some stromal shadowing associated with the recent active infection, but symptoms had settled. Conclusion This case documents the effective use of topical trifluridine in proven acyclovir-resistant herpetic keratitis. It highlights three things: (1) the importance of considering topical trifluridine as an alternative to topical acyclovir in unresponsive disease; (2) the need to consider solid-organ transplant recipients in the immunocompromised population with resistant herpetic disease, and (3) the need to look for alternatives to treatment of resistant herpetic disease. PMID:23386782

  20. A case of acute postoperative keratitis after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty by multidrug resistant Klebsiella

    PubMed Central

    Bajracharya, Leena; Sharma, Binita; Gurung, Reeta

    2015-01-01

    A healthy lady of 42 years underwent deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty for granular dystrophy. The very next day, it was complicated by development of infectious keratitis. The organism was identified as multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Donor corneal button may be implicated in the transmission of infection in an otherwise uneventful surgery and follow-up. Nosocomial infections are usually severe, rapidly progressive and difficult to treat. Finally, the lady had to undergo therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty for complete resolution of infection. PMID:26044477

  1. Bilateral diffuse lamellar keratitis following consecutive selective laser trabeculoplasty in LASIK patient.

    PubMed

    Holz, Huck; Pirouzian, Amir

    2010-05-01

    A 48-year-old man with a history of myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) had selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) for the treatment of glaucoma in the right eye. He subsequently developed grade 2 diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK). He then elected to have SLT in the left eye and developed grade 1 DLK. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bilateral consecutive late postoperative DLK following SLT after LASIK. PMID:20457380

  2. γδ T Cell-Dependent Regulatory T Cells Prevent the Development of Autoimmune Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yafei; Yang, Zhifang; Huang, Chunjian; McGowan, Jessica; Casper, Tamara; Sun, Deming; Born, Willi K; O'Brien, Rebecca L

    2015-12-15

    To prevent potentially damaging inflammatory responses, the eye actively promotes local immune tolerance via a variety of mechanisms. Owing to trauma, infection, or other ongoing autoimmunity, these mechanisms sometimes fail, and an autoimmune disorder may develop in the eye. In mice of the C57BL/10 (B10) background, autoimmune keratitis often develops spontaneously, particularly in the females. Its incidence is greatly elevated in the absence of γδ T cells, such that ∼80% of female B10.TCRδ(-/-) mice develop keratitis by 18 wk of age. In this article, we show that CD8(+) αβ T cells are the drivers of this disease, because adoptive transfer of CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T cells to keratitis-resistant B10.TCRβ/δ(-/-) hosts induced a high incidence of keratitis. This finding was unexpected because in other autoimmune diseases, more often CD4(+) αβ T cells, or both CD4(+) and CD8(+) αβ T cells, mediate the disease. Compared with wild-type B10 mice, B10.TCRδ(-/-) mice also show increased percentages of peripheral memory phenotype CD8(+) αβ T cells, along with an elevated frequency of CD8(+) αβ T cells biased to produce inflammatory cytokines. In addition, B10.TCRδ-/- mice have fewer peripheral CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) αβ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which express lower levels of receptors needed for Treg development and function. Together, these observations suggest that in B10 background mice, γδ T cells are required to generate adequate numbers of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs, and that in B10.TCRδ(-/-) mice a Treg deficiency allows dysregulated effector or memory CD8(+) αβ T cells to infiltrate the cornea and provoke an autoimmune attack. PMID:26566677

  3. Fungal Keratitis Due to Beauveria bassiana in a Contact Lenses Wearer and Review of Published Reports.

    PubMed

    Lara Oya, Ana; Medialdea Hurtado, María Eloisa; Rojo Martín, María Dolores; Aguilera Pérez, Antonia; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Miranda Casas, Consuelo; Rubio Prats, Marina; Medialdea Marcos, Santiago; Navarro Marí, José María

    2016-10-01

    Fungal keratitis is a severe ocular infection that primarily affects subjects engaged in outdoor activities. Risk factors include allergic conjunctivitis, previous eye surgery, previous treatment with wide-spectrum antimicrobial agents and corticosteroids and using contact lenses. Corneal infection is usually secondary to trauma involving organic material, which is often the only predisposing factor. Early diagnosis based on clinical examination and microbiological investigation (microscopy, cultures and molecular techniques) is crucial to selecting the appropriate antifungal therapy and prevent progression. We report the case of a patient with keratitis due to Beauveria bassiana, an opportunistic and entomopathogenic filamentous fungus that is used as a biological insecticide and which is a rare cause of corneal infection. We review previous cases reports of B. bassiana keratitis published and its main features to compare with our case, a female occasional agriculture worker who had not suffered any trauma involving organic material. The patient received topical and oral antifungal therapy and debridement surgery, with a satisfactory outcome. PMID:27300341

  4. Keratitis due to Fusarium langsethiae: clinical profile, molecular identification, and susceptibility to antifungals.

    PubMed

    Vasantha Ruban, Vasanthakumar; Geraldine, Pitchairaj; Kaliamurthy, Jayaraman; Jesudasan, Christadoss Arul Nelson; Thomas, Philip Aloysius

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of keratitis due to Fusarium langsethiae in a 56-year-old man. The patient presented with pain and tearing of 10 days duration in the right eye, which had sustained a paddy stalk injury. On examination, a hypopyon corneal ulcer was noted in the right eye. Multiple scrapings were obtained from the affected part of the cornea. A lactophenol cotton blue wet mount and a Gram-stained smear of scrapings were made. Scrapings were also inoculated on various culture media, including Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA). A fungal etiology was sought by conventional microbiological techniques and polymerase chain reaction. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by an agar dilution method. Direct microscopy of corneal scrapings revealed septate hyphae, leading to initiation of intensive topical therapy with natamycin (5 %). However, the keratitis progressed, necessitating therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. White, powdery-like colonies, with abundant aerial mycelium, were recovered on SDA from corneal scrape material. Based on macroscopic and microscopic morphological features, the isolated fungus was initially identified as a Fusarium species. Sequence analysis of the 28S rRNA region of the fungal genome led to a specific identification of F. langsethiae. Antifungal susceptibility testing results suggested that the strain isolated was susceptible to voriconazole, ketoconazole, and itraconazole. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of keratitis due to F. langsethiae; attention is drawn to the unique characteristics of the fungal isolate, difficulties in identification and non-responsiveness to medical therapy. PMID:25645251

  5. Rheumatoid polyarthritis suspected in an HIV patient with scleritis, peripheral ulcerative keratitis, and anterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Domngang Noche, Christelle; Singwé-Ngandeu, Madeleine; Bella, Assumpta Lucienne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis are ocular manifestations found in many inflammations and infections. Therefore, their association should prompt a search for inflammatory or infectious causes that may be life-threatening, especially in the context of AIDS due to HIV infection. Findings We report the case of a 37-year-old female, first seen in 2011 with a nodular scleritis in the right eye and a peripheral ulcerative keratitis, a necrotizing scleritis, and a granulomatous anterior uveitis in the left eye, in the context of chronic polyarthropathies that had evolved over 6 months. The patient was diagnosed with AIDS (HIV) in 2008 and was on antiretroviral therapy for the past 2 years. Ophthalmic workup was negative for opportunistic infections and potential causes of scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis, and the patient was unresponsive to topical antibacterial and anti-inflammatory treatment. Ocular lesion resolution and articular swelling improvement was observed less than 6 weeks after sulfasalazine treatment. Based on American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism classification criteria, and considering the good response to the treatment (sulfasalazine), diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis was made in the absence of confirmatory lab tests results. Conclusion In the context of ocular manifestations associated with polyarthropathies, coexisting pathologies should be considered. Diagnostic workup of chronic inflammatory rheumatism should be carried out, even in the context of HIV/AIDS. PMID:26893583

  6. Big bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty for management of deep fungal keratitis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hua; Song, Peng; Echegaray, Jose J; Jia, Yanni; Li, Suxia; Du, Man; Perez, Victor L; Shi, Weiyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of big bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) in patients with deep fungal keratitis. Methods.Consecutive patients who had DALK for deep fungal keratitis at Shandong Eye Hospital between July 2011 and December 2012 were included. In all patients, the infiltration depth was more than 4/5ths of the corneal thickness. DALK surgery was performed with bare Descemet membrane (DM) using the big bubble technique. Corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), graft status, and intraoperative and postoperative complications were monitored. Results. Big bubble DALK was performed in 23 patients (23 eyes). Intraoperative perforation of the DM occurred in two eyes (8.7%) during stromal dissection. The patients received lamellar keratoplasty with an air bubble injected into the anterior chamber. Double anterior chamber formed in 3 eyes (13.0%). Mean CDVA of the patients without cataract, amblyopia, and fungal recurrence was improved from preoperative HM/20 cm-1.0 (LogMAR) to 0.23 ± 0.13 (LogMAR) at the last followup (P < 0.01). Fungal recurrence was found in two patients (8.7%). Corneal stromal graft rejection was noted in one patient (4.3%). Conclusions. DALK using the big bubble technique seems to be effective and safe in the treatment of deep fungal keratitis unresponsive to medication. PMID:25105019

  7. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun-Xin; Wang, Lin-Nong; Zhou, Ru-Xia; Yu, Yang; Du, Tong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design, optimize and validate a rapid, internally controlled real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. METHODS Tears alone or together with corneal epithelium scrapings from 30 patients (30 eyes) suspected of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis were tested for HSV DNA by RT-PCR. The samples were collected during the first visit and then on the subsequent 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56d. The symptoms of the patients were scored before treatment to determine the correlation between HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores. RESULTS The positive rate (46.4%) in the corneal epithelium group before the therapy was significantly higher than that (13.3%) in the tears group (P=0.006). There were 13 positive HSV patients before the therapy, the concentration of HSV DNA in corneal epithelium scrapings group was significantly higher than that in the tears group (paired t-test, P=0.0397). Multilevel mixed-effects model analysis showed that the difference between the corneal epithelium scrapings group and the tears group was statistically significant (P=0.0049). The Spearman rank correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between the HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores before the treatment (r=0.844, P<0.0001). CONCLUSION RT-PCR appears to be a powerful molecular tool for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. PMID:27275421

  8. Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome in association with follicular occlusion triad.

    PubMed

    Maintz, Laura; Betz, Regina C; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Wenzel, Jörg; Jaksche, Axel; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Bieber, Thomas; Novak, Natalija

    2005-01-01

    Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome is a rare congenital disorder of the ectoderm caused by mutations in the connexin-26 gene (GJB2) on chromosome 13q11-q12, giving rise to keratitis, erythrokeratoderma and neurosensory deafness. We report the case of a 31-year-old black male diagnosed as having KID syndrome. Sequencing analysis showed a heterozygous missense mutation D50N (148G > A) in the GJB2 gene. In addition to the classical features of vascularizing keratitis, erythrokeratoderma and congenital deafness, our patient presented a follicular occlusion triad with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS, alias acne inversa), acne conglobata and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, leading to cicatricial alopecia and disfiguring, inflammatory vegetations of his scalp. Conservative therapy such as a keratolytic, rehydrating and antiseptic external therapy, antibiotic, antimycotic and retinoids were only of moderate benefit, so we finally chose the curative possibility of surgery therapy of the axillar papillomas and of the scalp. The inflammatory papillomatous regions of the axillae and of the scalp were radically debrided. Clean granulation was awaited and covered in a second session with a mesh graft from the thigh, achieving a satisfactory result. To our knowledge, only one case of KID syndrome occurring in association with follicular occlusion triad has been reported before. PMID:16172043

  9. Etiological Analysis of Fungal Keratitis and Rapid Identification of Predominant Fungal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    He, Dan; Hao, Jilong; Gao, Song; Wan, Xue; Wang, Wanting; Shan, Qiushi; Wang, Li

    2016-02-01

    Fungal keratitis is a worldwide-distributed refractory and potentially blinding ocular infection caused by various fungi. It is necessary to investigate the etiological and epidemiological characteristics of this disease and establish a rapid and specific pathogenic identification method. Here, we isolated and identified fungal pathogens of 275 patients with presumed fungal keratitis from Jilin Province, China, and conducted statistical analyses of epidemiological information. The positive rate of fungal culture was 72.0 %. Fusarium sp. was the most common genus among 210 fungal isolates. The predominant species were Fusarium solani, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Candida glabrata, which accounted for over 50 % of the isolated organisms. Corneal trauma and previous use of drugs were the most important predisposing factors. In addition, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was designed with species-specific primers of the three species that could identify them with amplicons of approximately 330 bp from F. solani, 275 bp from A. fumigatus, and 230 bp from C. glabrata. Additionally, PCR with fungal universal primers and multiplex PCR were performed using DNA prepared by an improved DNA extraction method from corneal scrapings. With this method, fungal pathogens from corneal scrapings could be specifically and rapidly identified within 8 h. The culture-independent rapid identification of corneal scrapings may have great significance for the early diagnosis and treatment of fungal keratitis. PMID:26446032

  10. Post intrastromal corneal ring segments insertion complicated by Candida parapsilosis keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Bradley M; Kanellopoulos, A John; Font, Ramon L

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical and histopathologic features, including molecular confirmation, of fungal keratitis after intrastromal corneal ring segments placement for keratoconus. A 52-year-old woman underwent insertion of Intacs® corneal implants for treatment of keratoconus. Extrusion of the implants was noted 5 months post insertion and replaced. Three months later, monocular infiltrates and an epithelial defect were observed. The Intacs were removed and the infiltrates were treated with ofloxacin and prednisolone acetate. Microbial cultures and stains were negative. The patient demonstrated flares and exacerbation one month later. Mycoplasma and/or fungus were suspected and treated without improvement. Therapeutic keratoplasty was performed 10 months following initial placement of the corneal ring implants. The keratectomy specimen was analyzed by light microscopy and a panfungal polymerase chain reaction assay. A histopathologic diagnosis of Candida parapsilosis keratitis was made and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. One year postoperatively, a systemic workup of the patient was done with no signs of recurrence. This rare report of fungal keratitis following Intacs insertion is the first reported case of C. parapsilosis complicating Intacs implantation. PMID:23467516

  11. Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis and its effective treatment with topical colistimethate

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Samrat; Agrawal, Deepshikha

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical outcome in multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) bacterial keratitis and report the successful use of an alternative antibiotic, topical colistimethate in some of them. The medical records of 12 culture-proven MDR-PA keratitis patients, all exhibiting in vitro resistance by Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion method to ≥ three classes of routinely used topical antibiotics were reviewed. Eight patients were treated with 0.3% ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin, 1 patient with 5% imipenem/cilastatin and 3 patients with 1.6% colistimethate. The outcomes in 8 eyes treated with only fluoroquinolones were evisceration in 4 eyes, therapeutic corneal graft in 1 eye, phthisis bulbi in 1 eye, and no improvement in 2 eyes. The eye treated with imipenem/cilastin required a therapeutic corneal graft. All the three eyes treated with 1.6% colistimethate healed. Colistimethate may prove to be an effective alternative antibiotic in the treatment of MDR-PA keratitis. PMID:27050354

  12. Effects of Lamellar Keratectomy and Intrastromal Injection of 0.2% Fluconazole on Fungal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    You, Xinying; Li, Jun; Li, Suxia; Shi, Weiyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate effects of lamellar keratectomy and intrastromal injection of 0.2% fluconazole (LKIIF) on fungal keratitis. Methods. Data for 54 eyes of consecutive patients with fungal keratitis treated with LKIIF were retrospectively analyzed. The lesions in these eyes did not heal or were aggravated after antifungal chemotherapy for 7 days. The maximum lesion diameters were ≤5 mm and maximum depth was not more than half of full corneal thickness. Cases were followed up for at least 90 days. Results. Forty-six eyes were cured (85.2%). The wound healing times were 3–16 days and were less than 7 days in 28 cases (51.9%). In cured eyes, uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were both 20/250–20/20. The UCVA improved in 38 eyes and was unchanged in seven eyes. BCVA improved in 44 eyes and was unchanged in two eyes. When followed up for more than 90 days, 89% (41 of 46 eyes) showed improvement in UCVA and 11% were unchanged. Regarding BCVA, 98% improved and one eye was unchanged. No other complications were observed except neovascularization in one eye and thinner corneas. Conclusions. LKIIF was quick and effective for small fungal keratitis confined to half of the corneal thickness. PMID:26064673

  13. Oxygen induces fatty acid (n-6)-desaturation independently of temperature in Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K; Rutter, A; Suller, M; Harwood, J; Lloyd, D

    1998-03-20

    Induction of a microsomal oleate delta12 (n-6) desaturase which is mainly responsible for an increase in membrane lipid unsaturation at low temperature has been observed in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. In this study we show that the enzyme can also be regulated by oxygen independently of temperature in batch cultures grown to O2-limitation. Raising the oxygen concentration from below the lower limit of detection (< 0.1 microM) to approximately air-saturation (230 microM), whilst maintaining the growth temperature constant (30 degrees C), increased lipid unsaturation and elevated n-6-desaturase activity 2.3-fold. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin, showed that increased desaturase activity was due to new protein synthesis rather than activation of pre-existing enzyme. These observations are important for future studies of the mechanism of temperature adaptation in poikilotherms. PMID:9541030

  14. Rapid induction of microsomal delta 12(omega 6)-desaturase activity in chilled Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Jones, A L; Lloyd, D; Harwood, J L

    1993-11-15

    The activity of microsomal delta 12-desaturase in Acanthamoeba castellanii was increased after growing cultures were chilled from the optimal growth temperature (30 degrees C) to 15 degrees C. This increase was detectable in microsomes isolated from organisms subjected to only 10 min chilling. The mechanism of induction was investigated. The increase in activity on chilling was greatly reduced when protein synthesis was blocked before the temperature shift. Thus the major mechanism for the induction of delta 12-desaturase is increased protein synthesis. delta 12-Desaturase activity was higher when assayed at 20 degrees C than when assayed at 30 degrees C, but these changes were not due to the increased solubility of O2 at 20 degrees C. The major substrate of delta 12-desaturase was found to be 1-acyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine. PMID:8250841

  15. Acanthamoeba castellanii: proteins involved in actin dynamics, glycolysis, and proteolysis are regulated during encystation.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Sabrina; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Guillot, Alain; Héchard, Yann

    2009-09-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a pathogenic free-living amoeba. Cyst forms are particularly important in their pathogenicity, as they are more resistant to treatments and might protect pathogenic intracellular bacteria. However, encystation is poorly understood at the molecular level and global changes at the protein level have not been completely described. In this study, we performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to compare protein expression in trophozoite and cyst forms. Four proteins, specifically expressed in trophozoites, and four proteins, specifically expressed in cysts, were identified. Two proteins, enolase and fructose bisphosphate aldolase, are involved in the glycolytic pathway. Three proteins are likely actin-binding proteins, which is consistent with the dramatic morphological modifications of the cells during encystation. One protein belongs to the serine protease family and has been already linked to encystation in A. castellanii. In conclusion, this study found that the proteins whose expression was modified during encystation were likely involved in actin dynamics, glycolysis, and proteolysis. PMID:19523468

  16. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus NDK: preliminary crystallographic analysis of the first viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jeudy, Sandra; Coutard, Bruno; Lebrun, Régine; Abergel, Chantal

    2005-01-01

    The complete sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, has recently been determined [Raoult et al. (2004 ▶), Science, 306, 1344–1350] and revealed numerous genes not expected to be found in a virus. A comprehensive structural and functional study of these gene products was initiated [Abergel et al. (2005 ▶), Acta Cryst. F61, 212–215] both to better understand their role in the virus physiology and to obtain some clues to the origin of DNA viruses. Here, the preliminary crystallographic analysis of the viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase protein is reported. The crystal belongs to the cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameter 99.425 Å. The self-rotation function confirms that there are two monomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold non-crystallographic axis and that the unit cell thus contains four biological entities. PMID:16511098

  17. An intracellular replication niche for Vibrio cholerae in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Van der Henst, Charles; Scrignari, Tiziana; Maclachlan, Catherine; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a human pathogen and the causative agent of cholera. The persistence of this bacterium in aquatic environments is a key epidemiological concern, as cholera is transmitted through contaminated water. Predatory protists, such as amoebae, are major regulators of bacterial populations in such environments. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between V. cholerae and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii at the single-cell level. We observed that V. cholerae can resist intracellular killing. The non-digested bacteria were either released or, alternatively, established a replication niche within the contractile vacuole of A. castellanii. V. cholerae was maintained within this compartment even upon encystment. The pathogen ultimately returned to its aquatic habitat through lysis of A. castellanii, a process that was dependent on the production of extracellular polysaccharide by the pathogen. This study reinforces the concept that V. cholerae is a facultative intracellular bacterium and describes a new host-pathogen interaction. PMID:26394005

  18. Raman spectroscopic study on the excystation process in a single unicellular organism amoeba (Acanthamoeba polyphaga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chung; Perevedentseva, Elena; Cheng, Chia-Liang

    2015-05-01

    An in vivo Raman spectroscopic study of amoeba (Acanthamoeba polyphaga) is presented. The changes of the spectra during the amoeba cyst activation and excystation are analyzed. The spectra show the changes of the relative intensities of bands corresponding to protein, lipid, and carotenoid components during cyst activation. The presence of carotenoids in the amoeba is observed via characteristic Raman bands. These signals in the Raman spectra are intense in cysts but decrease in intensity with cyst activation and exhibit a correlation with the life cycle of amoeba. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for the detection of single amoeba microorganisms in vivo and for the analysis of the amoeba life activity. The information obtained may have implications for the estimation of epidemiological situations and for the diagnostics and prognosis of the development of amoebic inflammations.

  19. Resistance of Acanthamoeba cysts to disinfection treatments used in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Céline; Collignon, Anne; McDonnell, Gerald; Thomas, Vincent

    2010-08-01

    Free-living amoebae that belong to the genus Acanthamoeba are widespread in the environment, including water. They are responsible for human infections and can host pathogenic microorganisms. Under unfavorable conditions, they form cysts with high levels of resistance to disinfection methods, thus potentially representing a threat to public health. In the present study we evaluated the efficacies of various biocides against trophozoites and cysts of several Acanthamoeba strains. We demonstrated that disinfectant efficacy varied depending on the strains tested, with environmental strains demonstrating greater resistance than collection strains. Trophozoites were inactivated by all treatments except those using glutaraldehyde as an active compound: for these treatments, we observed resistance even after 30 min exposure. Cysts resisted many treatments, including certain conditions with glutaraldehyde and other biocides. Moist heat at 55 degrees C was not efficient against cysts, whereas exposure at 65 degrees C was. Several chemical formulations containing peracetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, or ortho-phthalaldehyde presented greater efficacy than glutaraldehyde, as did ethanol and sodium hypochlorite; however, some of these treatments required relatively long incubation times to achieve cyst inactivation. Amoebal cysts can be highly resistant to some high-level disinfectants, which has implications for clinical practice. These results highlight the need to consider the effective disinfection of protozoa in their vegetative and resistant forms due to their intrinsic resistance. This is important not only to prevent the transmission of protozoa themselves but also due to the risks associated with a range of microbial pathogens that are found to be associated intracellularly with these microorganisms. PMID:20519477

  20. Public health implications of Acanthamoeba and multiple potential opportunistic pathogens in roof-harvested rainwater tanks.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, K A; Ahmed, W; Palmer, A; Sidhu, J P S; Hodgers, L; Toze, S; Haas, C N

    2016-10-01

    A study of six potential opportunistic pathogens (Acanthamoeba spp., Legionella spp., Legionella longbeachae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare) and an accidental human pathogen (Legionella pneumophila) in 134 roof-harvested rainwater (RHRW) tank samples was conducted using quantitative PCR (qPCR). All five opportunistic pathogens and accidental pathogen L. pneumophila were detected in rainwater tanks except Legionella longbeachae. Concentrations ranged up to 3.1×10(6) gene copies per L rainwater for Legionella spp., 9.6×10(5) gene copies per L for P. aeruginosa, 6.8×10(5) gene copies per L for M. intracellulare, 6.6×10(5) gene copies per L for Acanthamoeba spp., 1.1×10(5) gene copies per L for M. avium, and 9.8×10(3) gene copies per L for L. pneumophila. Among the organisms tested, Legionella spp. (99% tanks) were the most prevalent followed by M. intracellulare (78%). A survey of tank-owners provided data on rainwater end-uses. Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. were enumerated using culture-based methods, and assessed for correlations with opportunistic pathogens and L. pneumophila tested in this study. Opportunistic pathogens did not correlate well with FIB except E. coli vs. Legionella spp. (tau=0.151, P=0.009) and E. coli vs. M. intracellulare (tau=0.14, P=0.015). However, M. avium weakly correlated with both L. pneumophila (Kendall's tau=0.017, P=0.006) and M. intracellulare (tau=0.088, P=0.027), and Legionella spp. also weakly correlated with M. intracellulare (tau=0.128, P=0.028). The presence of these potential opportunistic pathogens in tank water may present health risks from both the potable and non-potable uses documented from the current survey data. PMID:27336236

  1. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Fungal Keratitis in the United States, 2001–2007: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Keay, Lisa J.; Gower, Emily W.; Iovieno, Alfonso; Oechsler, Rafael A.; Alfonso, Eduardo C.; Matoba, Alice; Colby, Kathryn; Tuli, Sonal S.; Hammersmith, Kristin; Cavanagh, Dwight; Lee, Salena M.; Irvine, John; Stulting, R. Doyle; Mauger, Thomas F.; Schein, Oliver D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the epidemiology, clinical observations, and microbiologic characteristics of fungal keratitis at tertiary eye care centers in the United States. Design Retrospective multicenter case series. Participants Fungal keratitis cases presenting to participating tertiary eye care centers. Methods Charts were reviewed for all fungal keratitis cases confirmed by culture, histology, or confocal microscopy between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2007, at 11 tertiary clinical sites in the United States. Main Outcome Measures Frequency of potential predisposing factors and associations between these factors and fungal species. Results A total of 733 cases of fungal keratitis were identified. Most cases were confirmed by culture from corneal scraping (n = 693) or biopsies (n = 19); 16 cases were diagnosed by microscopic examination of corneal scraping alone; and 5 cases were diagnosed by confocal microscopy alone. Some 268 of 733 cases (37%) were associated with refractive contact lens wear, 180 of 733 cases (25%) were associated with ocular trauma, and 209 of 733 cases (29%) were associated with ocular surface disease. No predisposing factor was identified in 76 cases (10%). Filamentous fungi were identified in 141 of 180 ocular trauma cases (78%) and in 231 of 268 refractive contact lens-associated cases (86%). Yeast was the causative organism in 111 of 209 cases (53%) associated with ocular surface disease. Yeast accounted for few cases of fungal keratitis associated with refractive contact-lens wear (20 cases), therapeutic contact-lens wear (11 cases), or ocular trauma (21 cases). Surgical intervention was undertaken in 26% of cases and was most frequently performed for fungal keratitis associated with ocular surface disease (44%). Surgical intervention was more likely in cases associated with filamentous fungi (P = 0.03). Among contact lens wearers, delay in diagnosis of 2 or more weeks increased the likelihood of surgery (age-adjusted odds ratio = 2

  2. Chemokine CXCL1/KC and its Receptor CXCR2 Are Responsible for Neutrophil Chemotaxis in Adenoviral Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), caused by human adenovirus (HAdV), is one of the most common ocular infections and results in corneal inflammation and subepithelial infiltrates. Adenoviral keratitis causes significant morbidity to the patients, and is characterized by infiltration of leukocytes in the corneal stroma, and expression of chemokines. The exact role of these chemokines in adenoviral infection has not been studied due to lack of animal models. Here, we have characterized the role of chemokine CXCL1/KC and receptor CXCR2 in adenoviral keratitis using a novel mouse model. Analysis of chemokine expression, leukocyte infiltration, and development of keratitis was performed by ELISA, flow cytometry, and histopathology, respectively. Deficiency of CXCL1 and CXCR2 resulted in delayed infiltration of neutrophils, but not inflammatory monocytes in HAdV-37 corneal infection. CXCL1−/− mice showed decreased expression of CXCL2/MIP-2, but not CCL2/MCP-1. CXCR2−/− mice showed increased expression of CXCL1 and CXCL2, but not CCL2. Both CXCL1−/− and CXCR2−/− mice demonstrated keratitis similar to wild-type mice. In conclusion, both CXCL1 and CXCR2 play an important role in chemokine expression and neutrophil infiltration following adenoviral corneal infection, but have a redundant role in the development of keratitis. PMID:19642907

  3. Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel 0.15% for the treatment of acute herpetic keratitis: background, effectiveness, tolerability, safety, and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Timothy Y; Hong, Bennett Y

    2014-01-01

    Eye disease due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a leading cause of ocular morbidity and the number one infectious cause of unilateral corneal blindness in the developed parts of the globe. Recurrent keratitis can result in progressive corneal scarring, thinning, and vascularization. Antiviral agents employed against HSV have primarily been nucleoside analogs. Early generation drugs included idoxuridine, iododesoxycytidine, vidarabine, and trifluridine. While effective, they tended to have low bioavailability and measurable local cellular toxicity due to their nonselective mode of action. Acyclovir 0.3% ointment is a more selective agent, and had become a first-line topical drug for acute HSV keratitis in Europe and other places outside of the US. Ganciclovir 0.15% gel is the most recently approved topical treatment for herpes keratitis. Compared to acyclovir 0.3% ointment, ganciclovir 0.15% gel has been shown to be better tolerated and no less effective in several Phase II and III trials. Additionally, topical ganciclovir does not cause adverse systemic side effects and is therapeutic at lower concentrations. Based on safety, efficacy, and tolerability, ganciclovir 0.15% gel should now be considered a front-line topical drug in the treatment of dendritic herpes simplex epithelial keratitis. Topics of future investigation regarding other potential uses for ganciclovir gel may include the prophylaxis of recurrent HSV epithelial keratitis, treatment of other forms of ocular disease caused by herpesviruses and adenovirus, and ganciclovir gel as an adjunct to antitumor therapy. PMID:25187721

  4. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    SciTech Connect

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-10

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0/sup 0/C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain.

  5. Clinical course and management of postoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus keratitis in immunocompromised patients: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Timothy Y; Prabhu, Sujata P

    2011-01-01

    We describe the clinical course and successful treatment of two cases of methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) keratitis. In case 1, MRSA keratitis occurred 5 days after cataract extraction, associated with endophthalmitis; in case 2, diagnosis was made 19 months after penetrating keratoplasty. Treatment in both cases consisted of topical fortified vancomycin and fortified bacitracin. A third topical antibiotic, polymyxin B-trimethoprim, was added to the therapeutic regimen in case 2, one month into the treatment. Oral doxycycline was prescribed to reduce collagenase activity and treat blepharitis. Mupirocin nasal ointment and skin antiseptics were used to decrease and eliminate potential MRSA colonization. Topical prednisolone acetate 1% was applied conservatively to mitigate inflammation in both cases. In case 2, topical cyclosporine A was also used for similar purposes. Keratitis may have worsened while on these immune-modulating drops, especially in case 2, and eradication of infection may have been slowed. Eventually both patients achieved full resolution of infection. Duration of keratitis was 3 and 1.5 months, respectively. Polyantimicrobial therapy is effective in eradicating MRSA-related postoperative keratitis. Topical fortified vancomycin and fortified bacitracin were used in both cases, with a third topical antibiotic, polymyxin B-trimethoprim, also required in case 2. Oral doxycycline, nasal mupirocin, and antiseptic soap may be useful adjuncts in management. Treatment time to achieve full resolution may be prolonged relative to other types of bacterial keratitis. Alterations in immune status may have lengthened the time of treatment. Our two patients were immune compromised and were also susceptible to endophthalmitis. It is possible that topical immune-modulating drops such as prednisolone acetate may potentiate MRSA infection, and if used, should be only done so with great caution. PMID:22267913

  6. Common and New Acyclovir Resistant Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Mutants Causing Bilateral Recurrent Herpetic Keratitis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dongli; Kaye, Stephen B.; Hopkins, Mark; Kirwan, Ruaidhri; Hart, Ian J.; Coen, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated thymidine kinase (tk) mutants isolated during multiple episodes of recurrent bilateral acyclovir resistant herpes simplex keratitis in an immunocompetent patient. From one eye, we found a single guanine insertion, previously shown to greatly reduce TK expression, and from the other, a previously unidentified substitution, which genetic experiments confirmed confers drug resistance. The substitution, although distant from substrate binding sites, reduced thymidine phosphorylation 10–20-fold, and acyclovir phosphorylation >100-fold. This phenotype should permit reactivation from latency to cause recurrent disease. The results may have implications for the prevalence and prevention of acyclovir resistance in patients with herpes simplex keratitis. PMID:23945375

  7. Natamycin in the treatment of fungal keratitis: a systematic review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Sheng; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jing; Wang, Xue; Hu, Li-Ting; Du, Zhao-Dong; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    AIM To review published clinical studies examining the effect of natamycin in the treatment of fungal keratitis. METHODS We selected the publications in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CNKI, and CBM. This study systematically reviewed published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared natamycin to other antifungal agents, and conducted feasible Meta-analysis of efficacy results using Revman 5.2 software. RESULTS We included seven trials which were mainly carried out in developing countries of Asia, with five trials conducted in India, one each in China and Bangladesh. A total of 804 participants were randomized to following comparisons: 2% econazole versus 5% natamycin showed little difference in the effects of treatment of fungal keratitis [RR=0.99, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8 to 1.21]; chlorhexidine gluconate versus 5% natamycin indicated that the results on healing of the ulcer at 21d was less conclusive (RR=0.77, 95% CI, 0.55 to 1.08; I2=0%); 1% voriconazole versus 5% natamycin suggested that natamycin treatment appeared to be significantly better outcomes than voriconazole (regression coefficient =-0.18 logMAR; 95% CI, -0.30 to -0.05; P=0.006), especially in Fusarium cases (regression coefficient=-0.41 logMAR; 95% CI, -0.61 to -0.20; P<0.001); natamycin versus fluconazole showed a significant difference in cure rate (χ2=5.048, P<0.05) and natamycin group was more effective than fluconazole in average period of therapy (t=7.94, P<0.01). CONCLUSION Natamycin was a preferable choice in the treatment of fungal keratitis, especially in the early period of Fusarium cases. PMID:26086015

  8. Efficacy of Systemic Vitamin C Supplementation in Reducing Corneal Opacity Resulting from Infectious Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Wun; Yoo, Woong-Sun; Kim, Seong-Jae; Chung, In-Young; Seo, Seong-Wook; Yoo, Ji-Myong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vitamin C supplementation on reducing the size of corneal opacity resulting from infectious keratitis. The study included 82 patients (82 affected eyes), admitted for infectious keratitis from January 2009 to August 2013, who were followed for more than 3 months. Patients were divided into control, oral vitamin C (3 g/d), and intravenous vitamin C (20 g/d) groups during hospitalization. Corneal opacity sizes were measured using anterior segment photographs and Image J program (version 1.27; National Institutes of Health, Jinju, South Korea) at admission, discharge, and final follow-up. The corneal opacity size used for analysis was the measured opacity size divided by the size of the whole cornea. The corneal opacity size decreased by 0.03 ± 0.10 in the oral vitamin C group, 0.07 ± 0.22 in the intravenous vitamin C group, and 0.02 ± 0.15 in the control group. Intravenous vitamin C reduced the corneal opacity size more than oral vitamin C (P = 0.043). Intravenous vitamin C produced greater reduction in corneal opacity size in younger patients (P = 0.015) and those with a hypopyon (P = 0.036). Systemic vitamin C supplementation reduced the size of corneal opacity resulting from infectious keratitis. Intravenous vitamin C was more beneficial than oral supplementation, especially in younger patients and those with hypopyon. PMID:25415664

  9. Visual Outcomes in Treated Bacterial Keratitis: Four Years of Prospective Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    McClintic, Scott M.; Prajna, Namperumalsamy V.; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Lalitha, Prajna; Rajaraman, Revathi; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; O'Brien, Kieran S.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Keenan, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We described the change in visual acuity experienced by eyes successfully treated for bacterial keratitis. Methods. This was a prospective cohort study of a subset of study participants who had previously enrolled in the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT). All study participants had been diagnosed with culture-proven bacterial keratitis before enrollment in SCUT and subsequently were randomized to adjunctive topical corticosteroids or placebo. During SCUT, we monitored study participants at enrollment, 3 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months. We invited a subset to complete a comprehensive eye examination approximately 4 years after enrollment in SCUT. Certified refractionists assessed best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) using the same protocol at each study visit. Results. We examined 50 SCUT participants at 4 years after enrollment. Among those in this cohort, mean logMAR BSCVA at enrollment was 0.85 (Snellen equivalent, 20/160; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71–0.99). On average, visual acuity improved by 2.9 logMAR lines from enrollment to 3 weeks (P < 0.001), 1.2 lines from 3 weeks to 3 months (P = 0.002), and 0.8 lines from 3 to 12 months (P = 0.01). The BSCVA did not change significantly between 12 months and 4 years (0.04-line improvement, P = 0.88). After controlling for visual acuity at enrollment, BSCVA was not significantly different between the corticosteroid and placebo groups at 4 years (P = 0.53). Conclusions. Cases of bacterial keratitis may continue to demonstrate improvements in visual acuity up to 12 months following diagnosis, but further improvements are unlikely. These findings may guide the appropriate timing of surgical intervention in these patients. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00324168.) PMID:24618327

  10. Pneumococcal keratitis at the flap interface after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Manuel; Hernández-Quintela, Everardo; Beltrán, Francisco; Naranjo-Tackman, Ramón

    2002-03-01

    A 28-year-old woman had uneventful laser in situ keratomileusis in the right eye. Six days postoperatively, she reported ocular pain and a large corneal stromal infiltrate was observed at the flap interface. A second surgery including lifting and excising the flap and scraping the stromal bed was performed. Topical antibiotics were prescribed. A bacterial culture revealed Streptococcus pneumoniae. The keratitis responded well to topical vancomycin. Twelve days after the second surgery, the stromal infiltrate had regressed, the hypopyon had resolved, and visual acuity was hand movements at 0.5 m. PMID:11973108

  11. Keratitis by Paecilomyces lilacinus: A case report from Sub-Himalayan region.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V; Angrup, A; Panwar, P; Verma, S; Singh, D; Kanga, A

    2015-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus is a filamentous fungus found in soil and air, which is a rare cause of ocular infection. The majority of case reports involving P. lilacinus among healthy hosts are of endophthalmitis and keratitis. We report a rare case of keratomycosis by P. lilacinus, in an immunocompetent, which responded well to treatment with ketoconazole. Some species belonging to the genus Paecilomyces such as P. lilacinus generally shows a poor response to conventional antifungal drugs. Therefore, correct identification of clinical isolates to the species level is mandatory for the appropriate treatment of the disease. PMID:26470971

  12. In vitro culture, serologic and molecular analysis of Acanthamoeba isolated from the liver of a keel-billed toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus).

    PubMed

    Visvesvara, Govinda S; Booton, Gregory C; Kelley, Darryl J; Fuerst, Paul; Sriram, Rama; Finkelstein, Ariana; Garner, Michael M

    2007-01-19

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are usually free-living amebae and are found in a variety of ecological niches including soil, fresh and brackish water, dust in air, filters of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning units, swimming pools and hot tubs, etc. Occasionally, they are also known to cause central nervous system infections in humans and other animals. We isolated into culture an amoeba from the liver tissue of a keel-billed toucan and identified it as Acanthamoeba sp. based on culture characteristics and immunofluorescent analysis. Further, we characterized the cultured amoeba and also the amoeba in the liver tissue as Acanthamoeba, genotype T4, by sequencing a diagnostic region of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. PMID:16962705

  13. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Shanan, Salah; Bayoumi, Magdi; Saeed, Amir; Sandström, Gunnar; Abd, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 with A. castellanii. The interaction between A. castellanii and V. cholerae strains was studied by means of amoeba cell counts, viable counts of the bacteria in the absence or presence of amoebae, and of the intracellularly growing bacteria, visualised by electron microscopy. These results show that all V. cholerae can grow and survive outside and inside the amoebae, disclosing that V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 all can be considered as facultative intracellular bacteria. PMID:27118300

  14. Composition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in acanthamoeba castellanii: structural and evolutionary insights.

    PubMed

    Gawryluk, Ryan M R; Chisholm, Kenneth A; Pinto, Devanand M; Gray, Michael W

    2012-11-01

    The mitochondrion, derived in evolution from an α-proteobacterial progenitor, plays a key metabolic role in eukaryotes. Mitochondria house the electron transport chain (ETC) that couples oxidation of organic substrates and electron transfer to proton pumping and synthesis of ATP. The ETC comprises several multiprotein enzyme complexes, all of which have counterparts in bacteria. However, mitochondrial ETC assemblies from animals, plants and fungi are generally more complex than their bacterial counterparts, with a number of 'supernumerary' subunits appearing early in eukaryotic evolution. Little is known, however, about the ETC of unicellular eukaryotes (protists), which are key to understanding the evolution of mitochondria and the ETC. We present an analysis of the ETC proteome from Acanthamoeba castellanii, an ecologically, medically and evolutionarily important member of Amoebozoa (sister to Opisthokonta). Data obtained from tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analyses of purified mitochondria as well as ETC complexes isolated via blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are combined with the results of bioinformatic queries of sequence databases. Our bioinformatic analyses have identified most of the ETC subunits found in other eukaryotes, confirming and extending previous observations. The assignment of proteins as ETC subunits by MS/MS provides important insights into the primary structures of ETC proteins and makes possible, through the use of sensitive profile-based similarity searches, the identification of novel constituents of the ETC along with the annotation of highly divergent but phylogenetically conserved ETC subunits. PMID:22709906

  15. Cellular response of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine treatments.

    PubMed

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-07-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii. PMID:21602398

  16. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii. PMID:21602398

  17. Relationship between Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba polyphaga: Physiological status and susceptibility to chemical inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.; Farrell, I. ); Brown, M.R.W.; Collier, P.J.; Gilbert, P. )

    1992-08-01

    Survival studies were conducted on Legionella pneumophila cells that had been grown intracellulary in Acanthamoeba polyphaga and then exposed to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), benzisothiazolone (BIT), and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT). Susceptibilities were also determined for L. pneumophila grown under iron-sufficient and iron-depleted conditions. BIT was relatively ineffective against cells to PHMB and CMIT. The activities of all three biocides were greatly reduced against L. pneumophila grown in amoebae. PHMB (1 [times] MIC) gave 99.99% reductions in viability for cultures grown in broth within 6 h and no detectable survivors at 24 h but only 90 and 99.9% killing at 6 h and 24 h, respectively, for cells grown in amoebae. The antimicrobial properties of the three biocides against A. polyphaga were also determined. The majority of amoebae recovered from BIT treatment, but few, if any, survived CMIT treatment or exposure of PHMB. This study not only shows the profound effect that intra-amoebal growth has on the physiological status and antimicrobial susceptibility of L. pneumophila but also reveals PHMB to be a potential biocide for effective water treatment. In this respect, PHMB has significant activity, below its recommended use concentrations, against both the host amoeba and L. pneumophila.

  18. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP32953 survives and replicates in trophozoites and persists in cysts of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Montañez, Jennifer; Benavides-Montaño, Javier A.; Hinz, Angela K.; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a foodborne enteric pathogen that causes a mild self-limiting diarrhea in humans. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is able to persist in soil and water and in association with fresh produce, but the mechanism by which it persists is unknown. It has been shown that Y. pseudotuberculosis co-occurs with protozoans in these environments; therefore, this study investigates if bacterivorous free-living amoeba (FLA) are able to support persistence of Y. pseudotuberculosis. Coculture studies of Y. pseudotuberculosis and the prototype FLA, Acanthamoeba castellanii revealed that bacteria had an enhanced capacity to survive in association with amoeba and in the absence of any cytotoxic effects. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is able to survive and replicate in trophozoites specifically localized within vacuoles, and persists within cysts over a period of at least a week. These data present the first evidence that Y. pseudotuberculosis is able to resist the bacterivorous nature of FLA and instead exhibits an enhanced ability to replicate and persist in coculture with amoeba. This study sheds light on the potential role of FLA in the ecology of Y. pseudotuberculosis which may have implications for food safety. PMID:26025069

  19. Increased Persistence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi in the Presence of Acanthamoeba castellanii▿

    PubMed Central

    Douesnard-Malo, Frédéric; Daigle, France

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is the etiological agent of the systemic disease typhoid fever. Transmission occurs via ingestion of contaminated food or water. S. Typhi is specific to humans, and no animal or environmental reservoirs are known. As the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii is an environmental host for many pathogenic bacteria, this study investigates interactions between S. Typhi and A. castellanii by using cocultures. Growth of both organisms was estimated by cell count, viable count, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. Results indicate that S. Typhi can survive at least 3 weeks when grown with A. castellanii, as opposed to less than 10 days when grown as singly cultured bacteria under the same conditions. Interestingly, growth rates of amoebae after 14 days were similar in cocultures or when amoebae were singly cultured, suggesting that S. Typhi is not cytotoxic to A. castellanii. Bacteria surviving in coculture were not intracellular and did not require a physical contact with amoebae for their survival. These results suggest that S. Typhi may have a selective advantage when it is associated with A. castellanii and that amoebae may contribute to S. Typhi persistence in the environment. PMID:21926221

  20. Atomic force microscopic imaging of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Ateeq, Muhammad; Raza Shah, Muhammad; Kulsoom, Huma; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy have been successfully used in the study of microbes, as well as free-living protists. Unlike light microscopy, which enables us to observe living organisms or the electron microscope which provides a two-dimensional image, atomic force microscopy provides a three-dimensional surface profile. Here, we observed two free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris under the phase contrast inverted microscope, transmission electron microscope and atomic force microscope. Although light microscopy was of lower magnification, it revealed functional biology of live amoebae such as motility and osmoregulation using contractile vacuoles of the trophozoite stage, but it is of limited value in defining the cyst stage. In contrast, transmission electron microscopy showed significantly greater magnification and resolution to reveal the ultra-structural features of trophozoites and cysts including intracellular organelles and cyst wall characteristics but it only produced a snapshot in time of a dead amoeba cell. Atomic force microscopy produced three-dimensional images providing detailed topographic description of shape and surface, phase imaging measuring boundary stiffness, and amplitude measurements including width, height and length of A. castellanii and B. mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts. These results demonstrate the importance of the application of various microscopic methods in the biological and structural characterization of the whole cell, ultra-structural features, as well as surface components and cytoskeleton of protist pathogens. PMID:25041405

  1. Exploring the Unique N-Glycome of the Opportunistic Human Pathogen Acanthamoeba*

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Birgit; Makrypidi, Georgia; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Paschinger, Katharina; Walochnik, Julia; Wilson, Iain B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Glycans play key roles in host-pathogen interactions; thus, knowing the N-glycomic repertoire of a pathogen can be helpful in deciphering its methods of establishing and sustaining a disease. Therefore, we sought to elucidate the glycomic potential of the facultative amoebal parasite Acanthamoeba. This is the first study of its asparagine-linked glycans, for which we applied biochemical tools and various approaches of mass spectrometry. An initial glycomic screen of eight strains from five genotypes of this human pathogen suggested, in addition to the common eukaryotic oligomannose structures, the presence of pentose and deoxyhexose residues on their N-glycans. A more detailed analysis was performed on the N-glycans of a genotype T11 strain (4RE); fractionation by HPLC and tandem mass spectrometric analyses indicated the presence of a novel mannosylfucosyl modification of the reducing terminal core as well as phosphorylation of mannose residues, methylation of hexose and various forms of pentosylation. The largest N-glycan in the 4RE strain contained two N-acetylhexosamine, thirteen hexose, one fucose, one methyl, and two pentose residues; however, in this and most other strains analyzed, glycans with compositions of Hex8–9HexNAc2Pnt0–1 tended to dominate in terms of abundance. Although no correlation between pathogenicity and N-glycan structure can be proposed, highly unusual structures in this facultative parasite can be found which are potential virulence factors or therapeutic targets. PMID:23139421

  2. Acanthamoeba and other free-living amoebae in bat guano, an extreme habitat.

    PubMed

    Mulec, Janez; Dietersdorfer, Elisabeth; Üstüntürk-Onan, Miray; Walochnik, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Several representatives of the so-called free-living amoebae (FLA) are of medical relevance, not only as facultative pathogens but also as vehicles for pathogenic bacteria. Some FLA can survive and even grow under extreme environmental conditions. Bat guano is an exceptional habitat, the conditions becoming gradually more extreme with aging. In the current study, samples of bat guano of different ages from five caves in Slovenia were screened for the presence of FLA. FLA were isolated from almost all guano samples, including guano with a pH of 3.5. Only the two samples that had been drawn from >20-year-old guano were negative for FLA. Generally, FLA diversity correlated to high concentrations of cultivable bacteria (∼10(8) CFU/g) and fungi (∼10(5) CFU/g). Interestingly, the absence of FLA in seasoned guanos was mirrored by the presence of dictyostelid slime moulds. The isolated amoebae were identified as belonging to the genera Acanthamoeba, Copromyxa, Naegleria, Sappinia, Tetramitus, Thecamoeba, Vahlkampfia, Vannella and Vermamoeba. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the diversity of FLA in guano. PMID:26678653

  3. Evidence for a Hydrogenosomal-Type Anaerobic ATP Generation Pathway in Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Michael W.; Roger, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Diverse, distantly-related eukaryotic lineages have adapted to low-oxygen environments, and possess mitochondrion-related organelles that have lost the capacity to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through oxidative phosphorylation. A subset of these organelles, hydrogenosomes, has acquired a set of characteristic ATP generation enzymes commonly found in anaerobic bacteria. The recipient of these enzymes could not have survived prior to their acquisition had it not still possessed the electron transport chain present in the ancestral mitochondrion. In the divergence of modern hydrogenosomes from mitochondria, a transitional organelle must therefore have existed that possessed both an electron transport chain and an anaerobic ATP generation pathway. Here, we report a modern analog of this organelle in the habitually aerobic opportunistic pathogen, Acanthamoeba castellanii. This organism possesses a complete set of enzymes comprising a hydrogenosome-like ATP generation pathway, each of which is predicted to be targeted to mitochondria. We have experimentally confirmed the mitochondrial localizations of key components of this pathway using tandem mass spectrometry. This evidence is the first supported by localization and proteome data of a mitochondrion possessing both an electron transport chain and hydrogenosome-like energy metabolism enzymes. Our work provides insight into the first steps that might have occurred in the course of the emergence of modern hydrogenosomes. PMID:24086244

  4. Detection limits of Legionella pneumophila in environmental samples after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficiency of recovery and the detection limit of Legionella after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga are not known and so far no investigations have been carried out to determine the efficiency of the recovery of Legionella spp. by co-culture and compare it with that of conventional culturing methods. This study aimed to assess the detection limits of co-culture compared to culture for Legionella pneumophila in compost and air samples. Compost and air samples were spiked with known concentrations of L. pneumophila. Direct culturing and co-culture with amoebae were used in parallel to isolate L. pneumophila and recovery standard curves for both methods were produced for each sample. Results The co-culture proved to be more sensitive than the reference method, detecting 102-103 L. pneumophila cells in 1 g of spiked compost or 1 m3 of spiked air, as compared to 105-106 cells in 1 g of spiked compost and 1 m3 of spiked air. Conclusions Co-culture with amoebae is a useful, sensitive and reliable technique to enrich L. pneumophila in environmental samples that contain only low amounts of bacterial cells. PMID:23442526

  5. Genome of Acanthamoeba castellanii highlights extensive lateral gene transfer and early evolution of tyrosine kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Amoebozoa constitute one of the primary divisions of eukaryotes, encompassing taxa of both biomedical and evolutionary importance, yet its genomic diversity remains largely unsampled. Here we present an analysis of a whole genome assembly of Acanthamoeba castellanii (Ac) the first representative from a solitary free-living amoebozoan. Results Ac encodes 15,455 compact intron-rich genes, a significant number of which are predicted to have arisen through inter-kingdom lateral gene transfer (LGT). A majority of the LGT candidates have undergone a substantial degree of intronization and Ac appears to have incorporated them into established transcriptional programs. Ac manifests a complex signaling and cell communication repertoire, including a complete tyrosine kinase signaling toolkit and a comparable diversity of predicted extracellular receptors to that found in the facultatively multicellular dictyostelids. An important environmental host of a diverse range of bacteria and viruses, Ac utilizes a diverse repertoire of predicted pattern recognition receptors, many with predicted orthologous functions in the innate immune systems of higher organisms. Conclusions Our analysis highlights the important role of LGT in the biology of Ac and in the diversification of microbial eukaryotes. The early evolution of a key signaling facility implicated in the evolution of metazoan multicellularity strongly argues for its emergence early in the Unikont lineage. Overall, the availability of an Ac genome should aid in deciphering the biology of the Amoebozoa and facilitate functional genomic studies in this important model organism and environmental host. PMID:23375108

  6. Apoptosis-like cell death induced by Salmonella in Acanthamoeba rhysodes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Chu, Chishih; Tang, Petrus; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2009-08-01

    Free-living amoebae act as environmental hosts of several intracellular pathogens. We examined the interaction between Acanthamoeba rhysodes and Salmonella, a human intracellular pathogen. There was no difference among three different serovars of Salmonella in terms of their growth within A. rhysodes over time. The number of intracellular bacteria increased at 6 h post-infection, and the viability of A. rhysodes was significantly reduced at 24 h post-infection. Amoebic cell death was characterized by TUNEL and Annexin V assay, without DNA ladder identified, indicating an apoptosis-like cell death in Salmonella-infected A. rhysodes. Global gene expression screening between intracellular and extracellular Salmonella by microarray and quantitative PCR showed that genes from Salmonella pathogenicity islands and virulence plasmid were up-regulated within A. rhysodes. The phase-dependent expression pattern suggests their distinct roles in the pathogenesis. A. rhysodes and Salmonella provide a model to study transient symbiosis between bacterial pathogens and protozoa in an aquatic ecosystem. PMID:19446019

  7. Oxygen induction of a novel fatty acid n-6 desaturase in the soil protozoon, Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Andrew J; Thomas, Katie L; Herbert, Derek; Henderson, R James; Lloyd, David; Harwood, John L

    2002-11-15

    Induction of fatty acid desaturation is very important for the temperature adaptation of poikilotherms. However, in oxygen-limited late-exponential-phase Acanthamoeba castellanii cultures, oxygen alone was able to induce increased activity of a fatty acid desaturase that converts oleate into linoleate and which has been implicated in the temperature adaptation of this organism. Experiments with Delta(10)-nonadecenoate showed that the enzyme is an n -6 desaturase rather than a Delta(12)-desaturase. It also used preferentially 1-acyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine as substrate and NAD(P)H as electron donor. The involvement of cytochrome b (5) as an intermediate electron carrier was shown by difference spectra measurements and anti-(cytochrome b (5)) antibody experiments. Of the three protein components of the desaturase complex, oxygen only increased the activity of the terminal (cyanide-sensitive) protein during n -6 desaturase induction. The induction of this terminal protein paralleled well the increase in overall oleate n -6 desaturation. The ability of oxygen to induce oleate desaturase independently of temperature in this lower eukaryotic animal model is of novel intrinsic interest, as well as being important for the design of future experiments to determine the molecular mechanism of temperature adaptation in poikilotherms. PMID:12153399

  8. A case of retained graphite anterior chamber foreign body masquerading as stromal keratitis.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Ryung; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Jin Hak; Hyon, Joon Young

    2011-04-01

    We report a case of a retained graphite anterior chamber foreign body that was masquerading as stromal keratitis. A 28-year-old male visited with complaints of visual disturbance and hyperemia in his right eye for four weeks. On initial examination, he presented with a stromal edema involving the inferior half of the cornea, epithelial microcysts, and moderate chamber inflammation. Suspecting herpetic stromal keratitis, he was treated with anti-viral and anti-inflammatory agents. One month after the initial visit, anterior chamber inflammation was improved and his visual acuity recovered to 20/20, but subtle corneal edema still remained. On tapering the medication, after three months, a foreign body was incidentally identified in the inferior chamber angle and was surgically removed resulting in complete resolution of corneal edema. The removed foreign body was a fragment of graphite and he subsequently disclosed a trauma with mechanical pencil 12 years earlier. This case showed that the presence of an anterior chamber foreign body should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic localized corneal edema. PMID:21461226

  9. Clinical features of infectious keratitis at a tertiary referral center in a rural area of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Lee, Jang Hun; Kim, Moosang; Han, Sang Beom; Hyon, Joon Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate clinical features of infectious keratitis at a tertiary referral center in a rural area of Korea. Results This was a retrospective study. Medical records of 70 patients who were diagnosed with infectious keratitis and underwent corneal culture were reviewed. Data including demographics, predisposing factors, and microbiological profiles were collected and analyzed. Results Age distribution showed one peak at sixth and seventh decade, and 48 patients (68.6%) were ≥50 years old. The male to female ratio was 43 (61.4%):27 (38.6%). Ocular surface disease was the most frequently found (48 cases, 68.6%). Gram-positive bacteria were most common (ten patients, 66.7%), followed by Gram-negative bacteria (three patients, 20%) and fungi (two patients, 13.3%). In this study, 34.3% of patients were treated by at least one topical antimicrobial before culture. Patients who received topical therapy before culture showed positive culture rate of 16.7%, and patients who underwent corneal culture without topical antibiotics showed positive culture rate of 23.9%. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in positive culture rate (P=0.554). Conclusion The proportions of the elderly and male patients were higher than the young and female patients, respectively. Gram-positive bacteria were the most common pathogens, and ocular surface disease was the most common predisposing factor. PMID:26675320

  10. Assessment of Rose Bengal vs. Riboflavin Photodynamic Therapy for Inhibition of Fungal Keratitis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda, Alejandro; Miller, Darlene; Cabot, Florence; Taneja, Mukesh; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Alawa, Karam; Amescua, Guillermo; Yoo, Sonia H.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the in vitro effect of rose bengal and riboflavin as photosensitizing agents for photodynamic therapy (PDT) on fungal isolates that are common causes of fungal keratitis Design Experimental study Methods Three isolates (Fusarium solani, Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans) recovered from patients with confirmed fungal keratitis were used in the experiments. Isolates were grown on Sabouraud-Dextrose agar, swabbed and prepared in suspension, and one milliliter aliquots were inoculated onto test plates in triplicate. Test plates were separated into 5 groups: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - 0.1% rose bengal alone, Group 3 - 518 nm irradiation alone, Group 4 - riboflavin PDT (riboflavin + 375 nm irradiation), and Group 5 - rose bengal PDT (rose bengal + 518 nm irradiation). Irradiation was performed over a circular area using either a green LED array (peak wavelength: 518 nm) or a UV-A LED array (peak wavelength: 375 nm). Test plates were irradiated with an energy density of 5.4 J/cm2. Later, plates were placed in a 30° C incubator and observed for growth. Results Rose bengal-mediated PDT successfully inhibited the growth of all three fungal isolates in the irradiated area. All other groups exhibited unrestricted growth throughout the plate. Conclusions Rose bengal-mediated PDT successfully inhibited the growth of three types of fungi. No other experimental groups, including riboflavin-mediated PDT, had any inhibitory effect on the isolates. The results might be useful for the treatment of patients suffering from corneal infection. PMID:24792103

  11. Therapeutic Effect of Intrastromal Voriconazole, Topical Voriconazole, and Topical Natamycin on Fusarium Keratitis in Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Nejabat, Mahmood; Yaqubi, Nafiseh; Khosravi, Amir; Zomorodian, Kamiar; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Salouti, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Evaluating the therapeutic effect of topical and intrastromal voriconazole and topical natamycin on Fusarium keratitis. Methods. 24 rabbits were selected. The stroma of their corneas was inoculated with suspension of Fusarium solani species complex. Seven days after injection they were divided into 4 groups randomly: the first group was treated with topical voriconazole (TV) 1% for one week, the second one with one-time intrastromal injection of voriconazole (ISV) 50 microgram/0.1 mL, and the third group with topical gel of natamycin (TN) for one week, and the last one did not receive any antifungal treatment. Finally the eyes were enucleated and sclerocorneal buttons were sent for histological and microbiological examinations. Results. After treatment the ISV group and TN group showed significantly lower clinical score and colony forming units than the control group (P = 0.040 and P = 0.026, resp.), but there was statistically no significant difference between control and TV groups (P = 0.249) or between ISV and TN groups (P = 0.665). In pathological evaluation, fewer chronic inflammations were reported in 2 of the 3 buttons from TV group and 3 of the 3 buttons from ISV and TN groups in comparison with the control group. Conclusion. Intrastromal injection of voriconazole seems to be effective in treatment of Fusarium keratitis as much as topical natamycin and these are more effective than topical voriconazole. PMID:27298734

  12. In-vivo immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Stephen C.; Laird, Jeffery A.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    1996-05-01

    The white-light confocal microscope offers an in vivo, cellular-level resolution view of the cornea. This instrument has proven to be a valuable research and diagnostic tool for the study of infectious keratitis. In this study, we investigate the direct visualization of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected corneal epithelium, with in vivo confocal microscopy, using HSV-1 immunofluorescent antibodies. New Zealand white rabbits were infected with McKrae strain of HSV-1 in one eye; the other eye of each rabbit was used as an uninfected control. Four days later, the rabbits were anesthetized and a cellulose sponge was applied to each cornea, and a drop of direct HSV fluorescein-tagged antibody was placed on each sponge every 3 to 5 minutes for 1 hour. Fluorescence confocal microscopy was then performed. The HSV-infected corneas showed broad regions of hyperfluorescent epithelial cells. The uninfected corneas revealed no background fluorescence. Thus, using the confocal microscope with a fluorescent cube, we were able to visualize HSV-infected corneal epithelial cells tagged with a direct fluorescent antibody. This process may prove to be a useful clinical tool for the in vivo diagnosis of HSV keratitis.

  13. Clinical efficacy of oral and topical acyclovir in herpes simplex virus stromal necrotizing keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Surabhi; Acharya, Manisha; Gour, Abha; Sapra, Neelam; Chauhan, Lokesh; Mathur, Umang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of systemic and topical antiviral therapy in the treatment of active herpes simplex virus (HSV) necrotizing stromal keratitis (NSK). Design: Prospective interventional case series. Methodology: Patients with a diagnosis of HSV NSK based on history and clinical findings were enrolled in the study. A standard protocol was used for microbiologic investigations. Ten weeks regime of systemic acyclovir and 2 weeks of topical acyclovir was given. Complete ophthalmic examination was performed at every visit. Outcome measures were a reduction in the area of infiltration and improvement in visual acuity. Results: Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age of presentation was 51.53 years. The duration of symptoms at presentation ranged from 2 to 8 weeks. HSV1 DNA polymerase chain reaction was positive in 70% cases of those tested. Area of infiltration at trial entry and at the end of 2 weeks of antiviral treatment reduced significantly (P = 0.007). All patients showed a complete resolution of keratitis at the end of study. Conclusion: Topical and systemic acyclovir for treatment of NSK facilitates healing of ulceration. Topical steroids after initial antiviral therapy are safe and decreases inflammation and improve visual recovery. Early initiation of therapy has better outcomes as compared to late presentations. PMID:27221681

  14. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Keratitis After Glaucoma Infiltration Surgery: A Clinical Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiaxu; Xu, Jianjiang; Cao, Wenjun; Ji, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans infection is a rare and easily misdiagnosed ocular disease. In this article, the authors report a chronic, purulent, and difficult-to-treat case of A actinomycetemcomitans keratitis following a glaucoma infiltration surgery.A 56-year-old man with a long-standing history of open-angle glaucoma in both eyes presented with a 12-week history of ocular pain, redness, and blurred vision in his right eye. He underwent a glaucoma infiltration surgery in his right eye 6 months ago. Three months postoperatively, he developed peripheral corneal stromal opacities associated with a white, thin, cystic bleb, and conjunctival injection. These opacities grew despite topical treatment with topical tobramycin, levofloxacin, natamycin, amikacin, and metronidazole eye drops.Multiple corneal scrapings revealed no organisms, and no organisms grew on aerobic, anaerobic, fungal, or mycobacterial cultures. The patient's right eye developed a severe purulent corneal ulcer with a dense hypopyon and required a corneal transplantation. Histopathologic analysis and 16S ribosomalribonucleic acid polymerase chain reaction sequencing revealed A actinomycetemcomitans as the causative organism. Postoperatively, treatment was initiated with topical levofloxacin and cyclosporine, as well as oral levofloxacin and cyclosporine. Graft and host corneal transparency were maintained at the checkup 1 month after surgery.Although it is a rare cause of corneal disease, A actinomycetemcomitans should be suspected in patients with keratitis refractory to topical antibiotic therapy. Delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment can result in vision loss. PMID:26817919

  15. Bacterial and fungal keratitis in Upper Egypt: In vitro screening of enzymes, toxins and antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    Gharamah, Abdullah A; Moharram, Ahmed M; Ismail, Mady A; AL-Hussaini, Ashraf K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work was conducted to study the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates from keratitis cases in Upper Egypt to produce enzymes, toxins, and to test the isolated fungal species sensitivity to some therapeutic agents. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients clinically diagnosed to have microbial keratitis were investigated. From these cases, 37 bacterial isolates and 25 fungal isolates were screened for their ability to produce extra-cellular enzymes in solid media. In addition, the ability of fungal isolates to produce mycotoxins and their sensitivity to 4 antifungal agents were tested. Results: Protease, lipase, hemolysins, urease, phosphatase, and catalase were detected respectively in 48.65%, 37.84%, 59.46%, 43.24%, 67.57%, and 100% out of 37 bacterial isolates tested. Out of 25 fungal isolates tested during the present study, 80% were positive for protease, 84% for lipase and urease, 28% for blood hemolysis, and 100% for phosphatase and catalase enzymes. Thirteen fungal isolates were able to produce detectable amounts of 7 mycotoxins in culture medium (aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2), sterigmatocystin, fumagillin, diacetoxyscirpenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and trichodermin). Among the antifungal agents tested in this study, terbinafine showed the highest effect against most isolates in vitro. Conclusion: In conclusion, the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and toxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues, which, in turn, lead to vision loss. PMID:24008795

  16. Effectiveness of Posaconazole in Recalcitrant Fungal Keratitis Resistant to Conventional Antifungal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kurna, S. A.; Sengor, T.; Altun, G.; Olcaysu, O. O.; Aki, S. F.; Simsek, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To present the success of posaconazole in two cases with recalcitrant fugal keratitis that were resistant to conventional antifungal drugs. Method. We presented two cases that were treated with posaconazole after the failure of fluconazole or voriconazole, amphotericin B, and natamycin therapy. Case 1 was a 62-year-old man with a history of ocular trauma. He had been using topical fluorometholone and tobramycin. His best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was hand motion. He had 5.0 × 4.5 mm area of deep corneal ulcer with stromal infiltration. Case 2 was a 14-year-old contact lens user. He had been using topical moxifloxacin, tobramycin, and cyclopentolate. His BCVA was 20/200. He had a 4.0 × 3.0 mm area of pericentral corneal ulcer with deep corneal stromal infiltration and 2 mm hypopyon. Results. Both patients initially received systemic and topical fluconazole or voriconazole and amphotericin B and topical natamycin that were all ineffective. But the response of posaconazole was significant. After posaconazole, progressive improvement was seen in clinical appearance. BCVA improved to 20/100 in case 1 and 20/40 in case 2. Conclusion. Posaconazole might be an effective treatment option for recalcitrant fusarium keratitis and/or endophthalmitis resistant to conventional antifungal drugs. PMID:25184064

  17. A Hydrogel-Based Hybrid Theranostic Contact Lens for Fungal Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Fei; Zhong, Jing; Chen, Guo-Pu; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Deng, Yuqing; Liu, Yong-Lin; Cao, Piao-Yang; Wang, Bowen; Wei, Yantao; Wu, Tianfu; Yuan, Jin; Jiang, Gang-Biao

    2016-07-26

    Fungal keratitis, a severe ocular disease, is one of the leading causes of ocular morbidity and blindness, yet it is often neglected, especially in developing countries. Therapeutic efficacy of traditional treatment such as eye drops is very limited due to poor bioavailability, whereas intraocular injection might cause serious side effects. Herein, we designed and fabricated a hybrid hydrogel-based contact lens which comprises quaternized chitosan (HTCC), silver nanoparticles, and graphene oxide (GO) with a combination of antibacterial and antifungal functions. The hydrogel is cross-linked through electrostatic interactions between GO and HTCC, resulting in strong mechanical properties. Voriconazole (Vor), an antifungal drug, can be loaded onto GO which retains the drug and promotes its sustained release from the hydrogel-based contact lenses. The contact lenses also exhibited good antimicrobial functions in view of glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride and silver nanoparticles. The results from in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that contact lenses loaded with Vor have excellent efficacy in antifungal activity in vitro and could significantly enhance the therapeutic effects on a fungus-infected mouse model. The results indicate that this hydrogel contact lenses-based drug delivery system might be a promising therapeutic approach for a rapid and effective treatment of fungal keratitis. PMID:27244244

  18. Evaluation of nested pcr technique for detection of Pythium insidiosum in pathological specimens from patients with suspected fungal keratitis.

    PubMed

    Kosrirukvongs, Panida; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Uiprasertkul, Mongkol; Chongcharoen, Metinee; Banyong, Ramrada; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Wanachiwanawin, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of Pythium keratitis is problematic due to the difficulty in obtaining a culture report resulting in unnecessarily prolonged usage of antimicrobial medication due to misdiagnosis. This study evaluated and compared nested PCR technique with culture and immunoperoxidase staining assays of Pythium insidiosum in paraffin-embedded corneal tissues from patients with suspected fungal keratitis. Six of 51 pathological reports compatible with fungal infection and 6 of 48 culture-proven fungal keratitis were identified as Pythium. Twenty-seven specimens were PCR-positive for Pythium insidiosum. In comparison with fungal culture for P. insidiosum, PCR had 83% sensitivity and 77% specificity with fair agreement (Kappa score of 0.227, p = 0.001). The mean age of PCR-positive is younger than PCR-negative group and there is a female preponderance in Pythium-infected group (p = 0.002 and p = 0.004, respectively). Nineteen specimens had positive results using immunoperoxidase staining assay with fair agreement to culture method (Kappa 0.340, p < 0.001), and 83% sensitivity, 85% specificity and 85% accuracy (95% CI: 76.7-90.7). PCR-based technique compared with culture and/or immunoperoxidase staining assay had 91.7% sensitivity, 81.8% specificity and 83% accuracy (95% CI: 74.5-89.1) with moderate agreement (Kappa 0.477, p < 0.001). Thus nested PCR detection of P. insidiosum should be employed in preliminary diagnosis of Pythium keratitis in order to initiate proper management. PMID:24964666

  19. Comparison of reflectance confocal microscopy and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy in fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Park, Jin Hyoung; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Fungal keratitis is an infection of the cornea by fungal pathogens. Diagnosis methods based on optical microscopy could be beneficial over the conventional microbiology method by allowing rapid and non-invasive examination. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy (TPSHGM) have been applied to pre-clinical or clinical studies of fungal keratitis. In this report, RCM and TPSHGM were characterized and compared in the imaging of a fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo. Fungal infection was induced by using two strains of fungi: aspergillus fumigatus and candida albicans. The infected corneas were imaged in fresh condition by both modalities sequentially and their images were analyzed. Both RCM and TPSHGM could detect both fungal strains within the cornea based on morphology: aspergillus fumigatus had distinctive filamentous structures, and candida albicans had round structures superficially and elongated structures in the corneal stroma. These imaging results were confirmed by histology. Comparison between RCM and TPSHGM showed several characteristics. Although RCM and TPSHGM images had good correlation each other, their images were slightly different due to difference in contrast mechanism. RCM had relatively low image contrast with the infected turbid corneas due to high background signal. TPSHGM visualized cells and collagen in the cornea clearly compared to RCM, but used higher laser power to compensate low autofluorescence. Since these two modalities provide complementary information, combination of RCM and TPSHGM would be useful for fungal keratitis detection by compensating their weaknesses each other. PMID:26977371

  20. Multiphoton microscopy for imaging infectious keratitis: demonstration of the pattern of microbial spread in an experimental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Wu, Ruei-Jhih; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the application of multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging and monitoring the disease progress of infectious keratitis in an experimental model, and to investigate the possible correlation of tissue architecture with spreading patterns of pathogens in an experimental model. Porcine eyes are to be obtained from slaughter house and processed and placed in organ culture system. Fungal infections by common pathogens of infectious keratitis are to be induced in porcine cornea buttons. Multiphoton fluorescence and SHG microscopy will be used for imaging and for monitoring the progression and extension of tissue destruction and possibly the pattern of pathogen spreading. We found that SHG imaging is useful in identifying alterations to collagen architecture while autofluorescence microscopy can be used to visualize the fungi and cells within the stroma. In summary, multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy can non-invasively demonstrate and monitor tissue destruction associated with infectious keratitis. The pattern of pathogen spreading and its correlation with the tissue architecture can also be shown, which can be useful for future studies of the tissue-microbial interactions for infectious keratitis.

  1. Therapeutic potential of the antimicrobial peptide OH-CATH30 for antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-An; Liu, Jie; Xiang, Yang; Wang, Yan-Jie; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    The therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has been evaluated in many infectious diseases. However, the topical application of AMPs for ocular bacterial infection has not been well investigated. The AMP OH-CATH30, which was identified in the king cobra, exhibits potent antimicrobial activity. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of OH-CATH30 for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis. Ten isolates of P. aeruginosa from individuals with keratitis were susceptible to OH-CATH30 but not to cefoperazone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and levofloxacin. The microdilution checkerboard assay showed that OH-CATH30 exhibited synergistic activity with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin against antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa. Meanwhile, P. aeruginosa did not develop resistance to OH-CATH30, even after exposure at 0.5× the MIC for up to 25 subcultures. Furthermore, treatment with OH-CATH30, alone or in combination with levofloxacin, significantly improved the clinical outcomes of rabbit keratitis induced by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa. Taken together, our data indicate that the topical application of OH-CATH30 is efficacious against drug-resistant P. aeruginosa keratitis. In addition, our study highlights the potential application of AMPs in treating ocular bacterial infections. PMID:24637683

  2. Comparison of reflectance confocal microscopy and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy in fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J; Park, Jin Hyoung; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-02-01

    Fungal keratitis is an infection of the cornea by fungal pathogens. Diagnosis methods based on optical microscopy could be beneficial over the conventional microbiology method by allowing rapid and non-invasive examination. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy (TPSHGM) have been applied to pre-clinical or clinical studies of fungal keratitis. In this report, RCM and TPSHGM were characterized and compared in the imaging of a fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo. Fungal infection was induced by using two strains of fungi: aspergillus fumigatus and candida albicans. The infected corneas were imaged in fresh condition by both modalities sequentially and their images were analyzed. Both RCM and TPSHGM could detect both fungal strains within the cornea based on morphology: aspergillus fumigatus had distinctive filamentous structures, and candida albicans had round structures superficially and elongated structures in the corneal stroma. These imaging results were confirmed by histology. Comparison between RCM and TPSHGM showed several characteristics. Although RCM and TPSHGM images had good correlation each other, their images were slightly different due to difference in contrast mechanism. RCM had relatively low image contrast with the infected turbid corneas due to high background signal. TPSHGM visualized cells and collagen in the cornea clearly compared to RCM, but used higher laser power to compensate low autofluorescence. Since these two modalities provide complementary information, combination of RCM and TPSHGM would be useful for fungal keratitis detection by compensating their weaknesses each other. PMID:26977371

  3. The antimicrobial agent C31G is effective for therapy for HSV-1 ocular keratitis in the rabbit eye model.

    PubMed

    Hill, James M; Stern, Ethan M; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Malamud, Daniel; Clement, Christian; Rodriguez, Paulo; Lukiw, Walter J; Ochoa, Augusto C; Foster, Timothy P; Velasco, Cruz; McFerrin, Harris E

    2013-10-01

    The amphoteric C31G solution contains equimolar alkyl dimethlyglycine and alkyl dimethyl amine oxide buffered with citric acid. C31G acts as a broad spectrum antiviral and an antibacterial. No previous in vivo studies have been done to test C31G in an animal model of HSV-1 ocular keratitis. We assessed the anti-herpetic activity of C31G in the rabbit eye model using three treatment groups: (1) 1% trifluorothymidine (TFT); (2) 0.25% C31G plus 0.5% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC); and (3) vehicle, 0.5% HPMC. Scarified rabbit corneas were inoculated with the HSV-1 strain McKrae. On post inoculation (PI) day 3, rabbits were placed in three balanced groups based on slit-lamp examination (SLE) scores. Treatment began on PI day 3, five times a day for five consecutive days. In addition to the daily, masked SLE scoring, the eyes were assessed daily for stromal opacity, scleral inflammation, neovascularization, eyelid inflammation, inflammatory discharge, and epiphora. C31G and TFT were very effective in reducing the lesions and pathogenesis associated with HSV-1 ocular keratitis. The vehicle control scores were significantly higher and did not effectively treat HSV-1 keratitis. C31G has the potential to be used to treat herpetic keratitis as well as other herpetic topical lesions in humans. PMID:23860013

  4. AK-cut crystal resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahan, A.; Euler, F. K.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations have predicted the existence of crystallographically doubly rotated quartz orientations with turnover temperatures which are considerably less sensitive to angular misorientation then comparable AT- or BT-cuts. These crystals are arbitrarily designated as the AK-cut. Experimental data is given for seven orientations, phi-angle variations between 30-46 deg and theta-angle variations between 21-28 deg measured on 3.3-3.4 MHz fundamental mode resonators vibrating in the thickness shear c-mode. The experimental turnover temperatures of these resonators are between 80 C and 150 C, in general agreement with calculated values. The normalized frequency change as a function of temperature has been fitted with a cubic equation.

  5. Free-living Acanthamoeba and Naegleria spp. amebae in water sources of León, Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Byron; Clasdotter, Emma; Linder, Ewert; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga

    2008-06-01

    Free-living amebae (FLA) are known to occur worldwide in water-related biotopes, but only limited information is available on these organisms in developing countries and so far no information on their presence is available from Nicaragua. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of potentially pathogenic Acanthamoeba spp. and Naegleria spp. in different water sources to which the population of Le6n municipality is exposed. Since pathogenic amebae are thermotolerant, we were especially interested in the occurrence of FLA in geothermal areas. Water samples were collected from Le6n area in Nicaragua: 88 samples were from rivers and springs, 111 from wells, 74 from water taps and 21 from water tanks in urban and suburban Le6n and from three nearby geothermal areas of San Jacinto, Posoltega and Tipitapa. Amebae were identified using morphological and physiological criteria, immunohistochemical staining procedures and molecular methods. Indirect immunofluorescent test was performed on cysts and trophozoites fixed on microscopical slides and incubated for 30 min at room temperature in separate experiments with the following antibodies: rabbit-anti N fowleri/N lovanensis (Nf-Pab), mouse monoclonal antibody anti N. fowleri (Nf-5D12u), rabbit antibodies against Acanthamoeba spp. And fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using 18S rRNA-targeted fluorescent oligonucleotide probes. Probes: GSP for the detection of Acanthamoeba and NAEG1088 for the detection of Naegleria. Free-living amebae were recovered from approximately 43 % of the samples. Acanthamoeba spp was found in 21% of samples from León municipality and in 2% of samples from geothermal areas. Amoeboflagellates were found in 10 % of samples from Le6n and in 19% in geothermal areas. Fifty three percent of tested wells in the geothermal area contained thermotolerant amoeboflagellates. Naegleria spp. was identified in 24 out of 39 (61.5 %) of isolated amoeboflagellates. Twelve of them were

  6. Prophylactic Vancomycin Drops Reduce the Severity of Early Bacterial Keratitis in Keratoprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Konstantopoulos, Aris; Tan, Xiao Wei; Goh, Gwendoline Tze Wei; Saraswathi, Padmanabhan; Chen, Liyan; Nyein, Chan Lwin; Zhou, Lei; Beuerman, Roger; Tan, Donald Tiang Hwee; Mehta, Jod

    2015-01-01

    Background Artificial cornea transplantation, keratoprosthesis, improves vision for patients at high risk of failure with human cadaveric cornea. However, post-operative infection can cause visual loss and implant extrusion in 3.2–17% of eyes. Long-term vancomycin drops are recommended following keratoprosthesis to prevent bacterial keratitis. Evidence, though, in support of this practice is poor. We investigated whether prophylactic vancomycin drops prevented bacterial keratitis in an animal keratoprosthesis model. Methodology Twenty-three rabbits were assigned either to a prophylactic group (n = 13) that received vancomycin 1.4% drops 5 times/day from keratoprosthesis implantation to sacrifice, or a non-prophylactic group (n = 10) that received no drops. All rabbits had Staphylococcus aureus inoculation into the cornea at 7–12 days post-implantation and were sacrificed at predetermined time-points. Prophylactic and non-prophylactic groups were compared with slit-lamp photography (SLP), anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), and histology, immunohistochemistry and bacterial quantification of excised corneas. Corneal vancomycin pharmacokinetics were studied in 8 additional rabbits. Results On day 1 post-inoculation, the median SLP score and mean±SEM AS-OCT corneal thickness (CT) were greater in the non-prophylactic than the prophylactic group (11 vs. 1, p = 0.049 and 486.9±61.2 vs. 327.4±37.1 μm, p = 0.029 respectively). On days 2 and 4, SLP scores and CT were not significantly different. Immunohistochemistry showed a greater CD11b+ve/non-CD11b+ve cell ratio in the non-prophylactic group (1.45 vs. 0.71) on day 2. Bacterial counts were not significantly different between the two groups. Corneal vancomycin concentration (2.835±0.383 μg/ml) exceeded minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Staphylococcus aureus only after 16 days of vancomycin drops. Two of 3 rabbits still developed infection despite bacterial inoculation after 16 days of

  7. An Acanthamoeba castellanii metacaspase associates with the contractile vacuole and functions in osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Saheb, Entsar; Trzyna, Wendy; Bush, John

    2013-03-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living protozoan. Some strains are opportunistic pathogens. A type-I metacaspase was identified in A. castellanii (Acmcp) and was shown to be expressed through the encystation process. The model organism, Dictyostelium discoideum, has been used here as a model for studying these caspase-like proteins. Separate cell lines expressing a GFP-tagged version of the full length Acmcp protein, as well as a deletion proline region mutant of Acmcp protein (GFP-Acmcp-dpr), have been introduced into D. discoideum. Both mutants affect the cellular metabolism, characterized by an increase in the growth rate. Microscopic imaging revealed an association between Acmcp and the contractile vacuole system in D. discoideum. The treatment of cells with selected inhibitors in different environments added additional support to these findings. This evidence shows that Acmcp plays an important role in contractile vacuole regulation and mediated membrane trafficking in D. discoideum. Additionally, the severe defect in contractile vacuole function in GFP-Acmcp-dpr mutant cells suggests that the proline-rich region in Acmcp has an essential role in binding this protein with other partners to maintain this process. Furthermore, Yeast two-hybrid system identified there are weak interactions of the Dictyostelium contractile vacuolar proteins, including Calmodulin, RabD, Rab11 and vacuolar proton ATPase, with Acmcp protein. Taken together, our findings suggest that A. castellanii metacaspase associate with the contractile vacuole and have an essential role in cell osmoregulation, which contributes to its attractiveness as a possible target for treatment therapies against A. castellanii infection. PMID:23274641

  8. Genome Segregation and Packaging Machinery in Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus Is Reminiscent of Bacterial Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Chelikani, Venkata; Ranjan, Tushar; Zade, Amrutraj; Shukla, Avi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome packaging is a critical step in the virion assembly process. The putative ATP-driven genome packaging motor of Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV) and other nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) is a distant ortholog of prokaryotic chromosome segregation motors, such as FtsK and HerA, rather than other viral packaging motors, such as large terminase. Intriguingly, APMV also encodes other components, i.e., three putative serine recombinases and a putative type II topoisomerase, all of which are essential for chromosome segregation in prokaryotes. Based on our analyses of these components and taking the limited available literature into account, here we propose for the first time a model for genome segregation and packaging in APMV that can possibly be extended to NCLDV subfamilies, except perhaps Poxviridae and Ascoviridae. This model might represent a unique variation of the prokaryotic system acquired and contrived by the large DNA viruses of eukaryotes. It is also consistent with previous observations that unicellular eukaryotes, such as amoebae, are melting pots for the advent of chimeric organisms with novel mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Extremely large viruses with DNA genomes infect a wide range of eukaryotes, from human beings to amoebae and from crocodiles to algae. These large DNA viruses, unlike their much smaller cousins, have the capability of making most of the protein components required for their multiplication. Once they infect the cell, these viruses set up viral replication centers, known as viral factories, to carry out their multiplication with very little help from the host. Our sequence analyses show that there is remarkable similarity between prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and large DNA viruses, such as mimivirus, vaccinia virus, and pandoravirus, in the way that they process their newly synthesized genetic material to make sure that only one copy of the complete genome is generated and is meticulously placed inside

  9. A rat model of bacterial keratitis. Effect of antibiotics and corticosteroid.

    PubMed

    Badenoch, P R; Hay, G J; McDonald, P J; Coster, D J

    1985-05-01

    A model of bacterial keratitis in rats was developed to quantify the effect of antibiotics and corticosteroid on the infective process. Corneas were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Streptococcus pneumoniae. The natural history of infection with these organisms was determined. Groups of animals received topical antibiotics and prednisolone acetate. The effect of treatment on the number of leukocytes and viable bacteria in the corneas was determined. Prednisolone did not influence the effect of the antibiotics; however, steroid treatment alone increased the pseudomonad count as much as 20-fold above the count in untreated eyes. In general, both the antibiotic and steroid treatments were more successful when begun eight hours after infection than when begun at 24 hours. a 1% gentamicin sulfate preparation proved effective against each of the infections, including a pneumococcal strain considered resistant on the basis of in vitro tests. PMID:3843063

  10. Nosocomial keratitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: case report and preventative measures

    PubMed Central

    Braich, Puneet S.; Aggarwal, Shruti; Mukhtar, Sabrina; Almeida, David RP.

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old African-American woman was admitted to the intensive care unit of our community hospital for respiratory failure secondary to severe decompensated heart failure, requiring intubation. In the ensuing days, she developed a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection of the cornea, despite no growth of MRSA in multiple blood, sputum, and urine cultures. This unexpected corneal infection complicated her hospital stay, and increased morbidity and disease-related cost. Risk factors, warning signs, and preventative measures for MRSA keratitis secondary to lagophthalmos (inability to completely close one's eyelids) are outlined in this case report. Implementing simple precautions such as taping eyelids shut or using artificial lubrication may reduce patient morbidity and disease-related costs. These recommendations are directed to non-ophthalmic clinicians who provide care to patients in settings where MRSA colonization is widespread. PMID:26486112

  11. Traumatic flap displacement and subsequent diffuse lamellar keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G S; Park, D H; Schloff, S; Lane, S S

    2001-05-01

    A 45-year-old man was struck in the left eye by the edge of a paper shopping bag 3 weeks after having laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). The injury resulted in partial displacement of the LASIK flap. The patient developed diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) the day after the flap was repositioned. By day 4, visual acuity diminished to 20/60. By day 9, the clinical evidence of the DLK had resolved, and by day 15, uncorrected visual acuity was 20/20. Eye trauma 3 weeks after LASIK can result in displacement of the LASIK flap, and DLK can develop following flap replacement. Long-term anatomic and visual results are usually good. PMID:11377912

  12. Investigation of the clinical features in filamentary keratitis in Hangzhou, east of China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siming; Ruan, Yimeng; Jin, Xiuming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Filamentary keratitis (FK) is a chronic and recurrent disorder of the cornea. FK is reportedly associated with various kinds of ocular surface diseases or conditions. Until now, there have been lacks of studies based on quantitative sample analysis concerning FK incidence regularity and inducement characteristics at different ages. This was a retrospective study of 147 patients (162 eyes) with FK who had been continuously and completely recorded from August 2012 to August 2015 at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, east of China. Our results suggest that the causative factors of FK varied at different ages and the distribution of filaments on the corneal surface was also diverse with different inducements. By exploring the frequency and clinical features of FK, we believe that the findings from our research will be clinically significant and aid in the early prevention and treatment guidance of the disease. PMID:27583881

  13. A rare case of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yong-Sok; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2014-08-01

    We report a rare case of peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) associated with Behçet's disease. A 34-year-old female presented with right ocular pain persisting for 8 months. The patient had been treated for previously diagnosed Behçet's disease. The corrected visual acuity was 20/32 in the right eye. Ocular examination revealed mild conjunctival hyperemia and a deep ulcerative lesion with perilesional haziness in the peripheral cornea. Autoimmune screening and corneal culture were negative. One month following treatment with topical and systemic immunosuppressants, the symptom had resolved. Slit-lamp examination showed a healed corneal lesion, and visual acuity improved to 20/20. Despite its rare occurrence, PUK can develop in patients with Behçet's disease. Therefore, patients presenting PUK require examination for Behçet's disease using a systemic evaluation. PMID:24493356

  14. In the aftermath of the Fusarium keratitis outbreak: What have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Arthur B

    2007-01-01

    The 2005–2006 outbreak of Fusarium keratitis associated with soft hydrophilic contact lens wear was both unprecedented and unexpected. More than 250 cases have been reported worldwide that have primarily been associated with Bausch & Lomb ReNu with MoistureLoc and, more recently, with Bausch and Lomb ReNu MultiPlus multipurpose contact lens disinfecting solutions. This article documents the outbreak, presenting the time line and the historical and scientific basis for its occurrence. Underlying causes are explored including likely mechanisms of contamination and subsequent corneal infection. Thorough exploration of this unique occurrence affords the opportunity to examine contact lens and lens care actions and interactions and to develop greater understanding of possible associated risks and ways to minimize them. PMID:19668512

  15. Investigation of the clinical features in filamentary keratitis in Hangzhou, east of China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siming; Ruan, Yimeng; Jin, Xiuming

    2016-08-01

    Filamentary keratitis (FK) is a chronic and recurrent disorder of the cornea. FK is reportedly associated with various kinds of ocular surface diseases or conditions. Until now, there have been lacks of studies based on quantitative sample analysis concerning FK incidence regularity and inducement characteristics at different ages. This was a retrospective study of 147 patients (162 eyes) with FK who had been continuously and completely recorded from August 2012 to August 2015 at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, east of China. Our results suggest that the causative factors of FK varied at different ages and the distribution of filaments on the corneal surface was also diverse with different inducements.By exploring the frequency and clinical features of FK, we believe that the findings from our research will be clinically significant and aid in the early prevention and treatment guidance of the disease. PMID:27583881

  16. Pathogenesis of Herpes stromal keratitis-a focus on corneal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Giménez, Fernanda; Suryawanshi, Amol; Rouse, Barry T

    2012-01-01

    The cornea is a complex sensory organ that must maintain its transparency for optimal vision. Infections such as with herpes simplex virus can result in blinding immunoinflammatory reactions referred to as herpes stromal keratitis (HSK). In this review we discuss the pathogenesis of HSK referring to work mainly done using animal model systems. We briefly discuss the role of multiple cell types and soluble mediators but focus on the critical role of corneal vascularization (CV) in contributing to corneal damage. We describe how VEGF and other angiogenic molecules are induced following infection and discuss the many ways by which CV can be controlled. Speculations are made regarding future approaches that could improve the management of HSK. PMID:22892644

  17. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with chronic malabsorption syndrome and miliary tuberculosis in a child.

    PubMed

    Arora, Tarun; Sharma, Namrata; Shashni, Adarsh; Titiyal, Jeewan S

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with pain, redness, watering, and blurring of vision in her right eye. Slit lamp examination revealed the presence of peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) and nodular scleritis. On clinical examination, the patient had stunted growth, low body mass index, and enlarged axillary nodes. Giardia cysts were present in the stool sample and histopathology of axillary lymph nodes showed caseating necrosis suggestive of tuberculosis (TB). A diagnosis of PUK with chronic malabsorption syndrome secondary to giardiasis and miliary TB was made. Oral metronidazole, anti-tubercular treatment, high protein diet and vitamin supplements were started. Topical steroids were started for peripheral ulcerative lesions following, which the PUK resolved. PMID:26903734

  18. Recurrent presumed herpes simplex keratitis and episcleritis in keratosis follicularis (Darier's disease).

    PubMed

    Radia, Meera; Gilhooley, Michael James; Panos, Chris; Claoué, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Keratosis follicularis (Darier's disease) is an autosomal dominant dermatological disorder characterised by abnormal epidermal differentiation and loss of normal cell-to-cell adhesion. Cardinal features include diffuse hyperkeratotic warty papules with scaly plaques in seborrhoeic regions with associated mucous membrane changes. Darier's disease is rare (prevalence 2.7 in 100,000), with few ocular sequelae reported: commonly dry eye with or without Sjögren's syndrome. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, to describe a case of recurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis and episcleritis in a 47-year-old man suffering from Darier's disease. The patient's condition predisposed him towards developing ocular complications due to several factors: impaired desmosome function leading to poor cell-to-cell adhesion in the corneal epithelium, dry eye and HSV invasion of inflamed periocular skin presumably combining to allow viral colonisation of a poorly protected cornea. PMID:26184361

  19. Experimental ulcerative herpetic keratitis. II. Influence of topical corticosteroid in immunised rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C A; Easty, D L; Walker, S R

    1981-01-01

    Since the great majority of patients possess immune response to herpes simplex virus (HSV), the influence of a topical anti-inflammatory corticosteroid (0.1% clobetasone butyrate) on ulcerative herpetic keratitis was studied in rabbits with a previous HSV skin infection (immunised) and compared with that in normal rabbits. Corticosteroid treatment had a much greater ulceration-exacerbating effect in immunised than in normal animals. On day 7 the mean area of ulceration in immunised rabbits were 3 times greater in treated eyes. 0.01% clobetasone butyrate treatment had less effect on immunised rabbits; 0.001% had no effect. It is concluded that the immunised rabbit provides a useful experimental model for studying the relationship between concentration of topical anti-inflammatory agents and enhancement of herpetic ulceration. PMID:7260009

  20. The effect of peptidic and non-peptidic proteasome inhibitors on the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Saleem, Sahreena; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of Acanthamoeba infections remains problematic, suggesting that new targets and/or chemotherapeutic agents are needed. Bioassay-guided screening of drugs that are clinically-approved for non-communicable diseases against opportunistic eukaryotic pathogens is a viable strategy. With known targets and mode of action, such drugs can advance to clinical trials at a faster pace. Recently Bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor) has been approved by FDA in the treatment of multiple myeloma. As proteasomal pathways are well known regulators of a variety of eukaryotic cellular functions, the overall aim of the present study was to study the effects of peptidic and non-peptidic proteasome inhibitors on the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype, in vitro. Zymographic assays revealed that inhibition of proteasome had detrimental effects on the extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. Proteasome inhibition affected A. castellanii growth (using amoebistatic assays), but not viability of A. castellanii. Importantly, proteasome inhibitors affected encystation as determined by trophozoite transformation into the cyst form, as well as excystation, as determined by cyst transformation into the trophozoite form. The ability of proteasome inhibitor to block Acanthamoeba differentiation is significant, as it presents a major challenge in the successful treatment of Acanthamoeba infection. As these drugs are used clinically against non-communicable diseases, the findings reported here have the potential to be tested in a clinical setting against amoebic infections. PMID:27327524

  1. The fate of Helicobacter pylori phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerization chain reaction tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Helicobacter pylori able to express green fluorescent protein, as well as an ATCC strain, and a clinical isolate of this pathogen were evaluated for their ability to survive predation by Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Ingestion was evaluated by microscopic observation of the GFP-H. pyl...

  2. Topical levofloxacin 1.5% overcomes in vitro resistance in rabbit keratitis models

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Regis P.; Romanowski, Eric G.; Mah, Francis S.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Gordon, Y. J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether topical levofloxacin 1.5% will successfully treat both levofloxacin-resistant and susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) in rabbit keratitis models. Methods For levofloxacin-resistant and susceptible SA, respectively, 32 New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were intrastromally injected with 1000 colony-forming units (CFU). After 4 hr, the corneas of eight rabbits were homogenized to determine onset CFU/ml. Twenty-four rabbits were divided into three treatments: levofloxacin, vancomycin (cefazolin for levofloxacin-susceptible SA) and saline. Twenty-one drops were administered over 5 hr. One hour post-treatment, the corneas were homogenized for CFU/ml. For levofloxacin-resistant and susceptible PA, respectively, 32 NZW rabbits were intrastromally injected with 1000 CFU. After 16 hr, the corneas of eight rabbits were homogenized for CFU/ml. Twenty-four rabbits were divided into three treatments: levofloxacin, tobramycin (ciprofloxacin for levofloxacin-susceptible PA) and saline. Nineteen drops were administered over 8 hr. One hour post-treatment, the corneas were homogenized for CFU/ml. The CFU/ml data were analysed for sterilization and non-parametrically for reduction. Results Levofloxacin 1.5% significantly reduced more (p < 0.05) levofloxacin-resistant SA than vancomycin; was equivalent to cefazolin (p > 0.05) for levofloxacin-susceptible SA; was equivalent to tobramycin for levofloxacin-resistant PA; was equivalent to ciprofloxacin for levofloxacin-susceptible PA; and significantly reduced more SA and PA than saline and onset. Levofloxacin 1.5% sterilized the corneas in the levofloxacin-resistant and susceptible PA groups (32/32) and levofloxacin-susceptible SA group (16/16), but not the levofloxacin-resistant SA group (0/16). Conclusion Levofloxacin 1.5% was effective for reducing SA and PA in the rabbit keratitis models regardless of in vitro resistance. PMID:20456251

  3. The role of CXC chemokine receptor 2 in Staphylococcus aureus keratitis.

    PubMed

    Cole, Nerida; Hume, Emma B H; Khan, Shamila; Garthwaite, Linda; Conibear, Tim C R; Willcox, Mark D P

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of corneal infection. CXC receptor 2 binding chemokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis. The role of this receptor in immune responses during Staphylococcus keratitis remains to be fully understood. Corneas of CXC receptor 2 knockout and wild-type mice (Cmkar -/- & Cmkar +/+) were scratched and 1 × 10(8) cfu/ml of strain Staph 38 applied. Twenty-four hours post-infection, mice were sacrificed and eyes harvested for enumeration of bacteria and measurement of myeloperoxidase levels. Production of inflammatory mediators, cellular adhesion molecules and chemokines in response to infection were investigated by ELISA, and PCR. 24 h after challenge with S. aureus, Cmkar -/- mice had developed a more severe response with a 50-fold higher bacterial load than WT mice. PMNs failed to penetrate the corneas of Cmkar -/- mice. However, concentrations of KC, MIP-2, IL-1β and IL-6 were significantly elevated (6-13 fold) in Cmkar-/- mice. The concentration of LTB4 was decreased (2 fold). Cmkar-/- mice failed to upregulate mRNA for VCAM-1 or PECAM-1 in response to infection, but had constitutively higher levels of ICAM-1. A lack of CXC receptor 2 lead to an inability to control bacterial numbers as a result of failure of PMNs to penetrate the cornea to the site of infection, even when chemokines were more highly produced. These results imply that CXCR2-mediated signaling through upregulation of adhesion molecules is essential to margination of PMNs in this infection model. PMID:25107538

  4. The anterior segment disorder autosomal dominant keratitis is linked to the Aniridia/PAX-6 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; Mah, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disease characterized by anterior stromal corneal opacification and vascularization in the peripheral cornea. Progression into the central cornea may compromise visual acuity. Other anterior segment features include minimal radial defects of the iris stroma. Posterior segment involvement is characterized by foveal hypoplasia with minimal effect on visual acuity. Aniridia is a second autosomal dominantly inherited ocular disorder defined by structural defects of the iris, frequently severe enough to cause an almost complete absence of iris. This may be accompanied by other anterior segment manifestations, including cataract and keratitis. Posterior segment involvement in aniridia is characterized by foveal hypoplasia resulting in a highly variable impairment of visual acuity, often with nystagmus. Aniridia is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease and occurs in 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 people. Aniridia has been shown to result from mutations in PAX-6, a gene thought to regulate fetal eye development. The similar clinical findings in ADK and aniridia, with the similar patterns of inheritance, compelled us to investigate if these two ocular disorders are variants of the same genetic disorder. We have tested for linkage between PAX-6 and ADK within an ADK family with 33 members over four generations, including 11 affected individuals. Linkage studies reveal that D11S914 (located within 3 cM of PAX-6) does not recombine with ADK (LOD score 3.61; {theta} = 0.00), consistent with PAX-6 mutations being responsible for ADK. Direct sequencing of PAX-6 RT-PCR products from ADK patients is underway to identify the mutation within the PAX-6 gene that results in ADK. The linkage of PAX-6 with ADK, along with a recent report that mutations in PAX-6 also underlie Peter`s anomaly, implicates PAX-6 widely in anterior segment malformations.

  5. In-depth study of Mollivirus sibericum, a new 30,000-y-old giant virus infecting Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Matthieu; Lartigue, Audrey; Bertaux, Lionel; Jeudy, Sandra; Bartoli, Julia; Lescot, Magali; Alempic, Jean-Marie; Ramus, Claire; Bruley, Christophe; Labadie, Karine; Shmakova, Lyubov; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Couté, Yohann; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba species are infected by the largest known DNA viruses. These include icosahedral Mimiviruses, amphora-shaped Pandoraviruses, and Pithovirus sibericum, the latter one isolated from 30,000-y-old permafrost. Mollivirus sibericum, a fourth type of giant virus, was isolated from the same permafrost sample. Its approximately spherical virion (0.6-µm diameter) encloses a 651-kb GC-rich genome encoding 523 proteins of which 64% are ORFans; 16% have their closest homolog in Pandoraviruses and 10% in Acanthamoeba castellanii probably through horizontal gene transfer. The Mollivirus nucleocytoplasmic replication cycle was analyzed using a combination of “omic” approaches that revealed how the virus highjacks its host machinery to actively replicate. Surprisingly, the host’s ribosomal proteins are packaged in the virion. Metagenomic analysis of the permafrost sample uncovered the presence of both viruses, yet in very low amount. The fact that two different viruses retain their infectivity in prehistorical permafrost layers should be of concern in a context of global warming. Giant viruses’ diversity remains to be fully explored. PMID:26351664

  6. In-depth study of Mollivirus sibericum, a new 30,000-y-old giant virus infecting Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Matthieu; Lartigue, Audrey; Bertaux, Lionel; Jeudy, Sandra; Bartoli, Julia; Lescot, Magali; Alempic, Jean-Marie; Ramus, Claire; Bruley, Christophe; Labadie, Karine; Shmakova, Lyubov; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Couté, Yohann; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-22

    Acanthamoeba species are infected by the largest known DNA viruses. These include icosahedral Mimiviruses, amphora-shaped Pandoraviruses, and Pithovirus sibericum, the latter one isolated from 30,000-y-old permafrost. Mollivirus sibericum, a fourth type of giant virus, was isolated from the same permafrost sample. Its approximately spherical virion (0.6-µm diameter) encloses a 651-kb GC-rich genome encoding 523 proteins of which 64% are ORFans; 16% have their closest homolog in Pandoraviruses and 10% in Acanthamoeba castellanii probably through horizontal gene transfer. The Mollivirus nucleocytoplasmic replication cycle was analyzed using a combination of "omic" approaches that revealed how the virus highjacks its host machinery to actively replicate. Surprisingly, the host's ribosomal proteins are packaged in the virion. Metagenomic analysis of the permafrost sample uncovered the presence of both viruses, yet in very low amount. The fact that two different viruses retain their infectivity in prehistorical permafrost layers should be of concern in a context of global warming. Giant viruses' diversity remains to be fully explored. PMID:26351664

  7. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a mammalian cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase from Acanthamoeba healyi.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yeon-Chul; Hwang, Mi-Yul; Yun, Ho-Cheol; Yu, Hak-Sun; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Yong, Tai-Soon; Chung, Dong-Il

    2002-03-01

    We have cloned a cDNA encoding a cysteine proteinase of the Acanthamoeba healyi OC-3A strain isolated from the brain of a granulomatous amoebic encephalitis patient. A DNA probe for an A. healyi cDNA library screening was amplified by PCR using degenerate oligonucleotide primers designed on the basis of conserved amino acids franking the active sites of cysteine and asparagine residues that are conserved in the eukaryotic cysteine proteinases. Cysteine proteinase gene of A. healyi (AhCP1) was composed of 330 amino acids with signal sequence, a proposed pro-domain and a predicted active site made up of the catalytic residues. Cys25, His159, and Asn175. Deduced amino acid sequence analysis indicates that AhCP1 belong to ERFNIN subfamily of C1 peptidases. By Northern blot analysis, no direct correlation was observed between AhCP1 mRNA expression and virulence of Acanthamoeba, but the gene was expressed at higher level in amoebae isolated from soil than amoeba from clinical samples. These findings raise the possibility that Ahcp1 protein may play a role in protein metabolism and digestion of phagocytosed bacteria or host tissue debris rather than in invasion of amoebae into host tissue. PMID:11949209

  8. Fungal Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 Over-the-Counter Costume Contacts May Contain Chemicals Harmful to Eyes Oct 05, 2015 Three Rising Stars Bullied for Childhood ... Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  9. Herpes Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Over-the-Counter Costume Contacts May Contain Chemicals Harmful to Eyes Oct 05, 2015 Contact Lens Horror Stories: Poor Care Can Lead ... at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  10. Esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2: a frog skin-derived peptide for microbial keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Kolar, Satya Sree N.; Luca, Vincenzo; Baidouri, Hasna; Mannino, Giuseppe; McDermott, Alison M.; Mangoni, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary bacterial pathogen causing contact lens related keratitis. Available ophthalmic agents have reduced efficacy and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hold promise as future antibiotics. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo anti-Pseudomonal activity of esculentin-1a(1-21)-NH2, derived from a frog skin AMP. The data revealed a minimum inhibitory concentration between 2 and 16 μM against reference strains or drug-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa without showing toxicity to human corneal epithelial cells up to 50 μM. At 1 μM the peptide rapidly killed bacterial cells and this activity was fully retained in 150 mM sodium chloride and 70% (v/v) human basal tears, particularly against the virulent ATCC 19660 strain. Furthermore, its dropwise administration at 40 μM to the ocular surface in a murine model of P. aeruginosa keratitis (three times daily, for 5 days post-infection) resulted in a significant reduction of infection. The mean clinical score was 2.89 ± 0.26 compared to 3.92 ± 0.08 for the vehicle control. In addition, the corneal level of viable bacteria in the peptide treated animals was significantly lower with a difference of 4 log10 colony counts, compared to 7.7 log10 cells recovered in the control. In parallel, recruitment of inflammatory cells was reduced by half compared to that found in the untreated eyes. Similar results were obtained when esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 was applied prior to induction of keratitis. Overall, our findings highlight esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 as an attractive candidate for the development of novel topical pharmaceuticals against Pseudomonas keratitis. PMID:25086859

  11. Colletotrichum truncatum species complex: Treatment considerations and review of the literature for an unusual pathogen causing fungal keratitis and endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Squissato, Victoria; Yucel, Yeni H.; Richardson, Susan E.; Alkhotani, Alaa; Wong, David T.; Nijhawan, Navdeep; Chan, Clara C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Colletotrichum truncatum species complex fungal keratitis and endophthalmitis in an 87-year-old immunocompetent male in whom oral triazole antifungals were contraindicated. The patient had recently returned from 4 months in Jamaica with a one month history of progressively increasing pain and inflammation in his left eye. Corneal samples grew a filamentous fungus and internal transcribed spacer sequencing polymerase chain reaction confirmed the presence of C. truncatum species complex. Samples showed no microbial growth. PMID:26137437

  12. Efficacy of Caltropis procera and Ficus sycomorus extracts in treating MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus)-keratitis in rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Waiel F.; Salem, Wesam M. A.; Haridy, Mohie A. M.; Hassan, Ne'mat H.

    2015-01-01

    MRSA-induced keratitis in rabbit was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of F. sycomorus leaves and C. procera latex extracts. Within the 6 rabbit groups tested, group 1 received sterilized saline, while other groups (2 to 6) received 100 μl of intrastromal injections of 1.5×103 colony forming unit (cfu) ml-1 of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). After 12 hours, groups 3 to 6 also received chloramphenicol, aqueous extract of C. procera latex, aqueous and alcoholic extracts of F. sycomorus leaves, respectively 3 times daily for 12 successive days. The tested extracts inhibited MRSA growth in vitro (i.e. on culture medium). Colony counts in cornea discs from groups 3 to 6 were significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.001) compared to group 2 (untreated). Clinical signs of keratitis were observed on group 2 until the end of experiment. In groups 3 to 6, gradual recovery was observed and signs disappeared by the 12th DPI (days post inoculation). Only mild symptoms persisted in group 5 (aqueous extract of leaves). In group 3 and 5, cornea, iris, ciliary body and conjunctiva showed mild leukocytic infiltration and depigmentation of melanin cells while recovery of cornea and iris was observed in groups 4 and 6. In conclusion, the used extracts have potential therapeutic effects on MRSA-induced keratitis in rabbit. PMID:26648824

  13. Long-term Outcomes of Amniotic Membrane Transplantation in Contact Lens-Induced Pseudomonas Keratitis with Impending Corneal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadpour, Mehrdad; Sabet, Fatemeh Alsadat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the anatomical and visual outcomes of double layered amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) in eyes with advanced Pseudomonas keratitis leading to Descemetocele formation. Methods: This prospective interventional case series included 6 eyes of 6 female patients with pseudomonas keratitis caused by contact lens-induced infection who underwent double layered AMT. Surgery was performed after the ulcers were found to be poorly responsive to antibiotics, and severe thinning or Descemetocele had developed. All patients underwent a complete examination pre- and postoperatively, as well as anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) and pachymetry or Orbscan after the procedure. Results: Mean follow-up period was 24 months. There was neither frank corneal perforation nor a need for emergent corneal transplantation in any of the eyes. All patients had visual acuity of hand motions before the procedure which improved to 20/50 to 20/30 three months after surgery. No surgical or postoperative complication occurred in this series. Conclusion: Double layered AMT may result in acceptable anatomical outcomes in patients with advanced Pseudomonas keratitis with Descemetocele formation and can eliminate the need for emergent corneal transplantation. PMID:27195083

  14. 77 FR 7228 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00023

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00023 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road.... Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416....

  15. 76 FR 35936 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00020

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00020 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement...

  16. 78 FR 39821 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport...

  17. 78 FR 39822 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This... Deadline Date: 03/25/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  18. A New Method to Predict the Epidemiology of Fungal Keratitis by Monitoring the Sales Distribution of Antifungal Eye Drops in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Marlon Moraes; de Angelis, Rafael; Lima, Acacio Souza; Viana de Carvalho, Glauco Dreyer; Ibrahim, Fuad Moraes; Malki, Leonardo Tannus; de Paula Bichuete, Marina; de Paula Martins, Wellington; Rocha, Eduardo Melani

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Fungi are a major cause of keratitis, although few medications are licensed for their treatment. The aim of this study is to observe the variation in commercialisation of antifungal eye drops, and to predict the seasonal distribution of fungal keratitis in Brazil. Methods Data from a retrospective study of antifungal eye drops sales from the only pharmaceutical ophthalmologic laboratory, authorized to dispense them in Brazil (Opthalmos) were gathered. These data were correlated with geographic and seasonal distribution of fungal keratitis in Brazil between July 2002 and June 2008. Results A total of 26,087 antifungal eye drop units were sold, with a mean of 2.3 per patient. There was significant variation in antifungal sales during the year (p<0.01). A linear regression model displayed a significant association between reduced relative humidity and antifungal drug sales (R2 = 0.17,p<0.01). Conclusions Antifungal eye drops sales suggest that there is a seasonal distribution of fungal keratitis. A possible interpretation is that the third quarter of the year (a period when the climate is drier), when agricultural activity is more intense in Brazil, suggests a correlation with a higher incidence of fungal keratitis. A similar model could be applied to other diseases, that are managed with unique, or few, and monitorable medications to predict epidemiological aspects. PMID:22457787

  19. Selective Requirement of the Shikimate Pathway of Legionella pneumophila for Intravacuolar Growth within Human Macrophages but Not within Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Snake C.; Price, Christopher T. D.; Santic, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila utilizes the Dot/Icm type IV translocation system to proliferate within a vacuole in a wide variety of natural amoebal hosts and in alveolar macrophages of the human accidental host. Although L. pneumophila utilizes host amino acids as the main sources of carbon and energy, it is not known whether de novo synthesis of amino acids by intravacuolar L. pneumophila contributes to its nutrition. The aroB and aroE genes encode enzymes for the shikimate pathway that generates the aromatic amino acids Phe, Trp, and Tyr. Here we show the aroB and aroE mutants of L. pneumophila to be defective in growth in human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs) but not in Acanthamoeba spp. The aroB and aroE mutants are severely attenuated in intrapulmonary proliferation in the A/J mouse model of Legionnaires' disease, and the defect is fully complemented by the respective wild-type alleles. The two mutants grow normally in rich media but do not grow in defined media lacking aromatic amino acids, and the growth defect is rescued by inclusion of the aromatic amino acids, which are essential for production of the pyomelanin pigment. Interestingly, supplementation of infected hMDMs with the three aromatic amino acids or with Trp alone rescues the intramacrophage defect of the aroE but not the aroB mutant. Therefore, the shikimate pathway of L. pneumophila is differentially required for optimal growth within human macrophages, which are auxotrophic for Trp and Phe, but is dispensable for growth within the Acanthamoeba spp. that synthesize the aromatic amino acids. PMID:25847958

  20. Antiviral treatment and other therapeutic interventions for herpes simplex virus epithelial keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmus, Kirk R

    2015-01-01

    Background Eye disease due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) commonly presents as epithelial keratitis which, though usually self-limiting, may persist or progress without treatment. Objectives To compare the relative effectiveness of antiviral agents, interferon, and corneal debridement in the treatment of HSV epithelial keratitis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 12), PubMed (January 1946 to 31 December 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to 31 December 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to 31 December 2014), System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (OpenGrey) (January 1995 to 31 December 2014), BIOSIS (January 1926 to 5 May 2014), Scopus (January 1966 to 31 December 2014), Japan Science and Technology Institute (J-Global) (January 1975 to 31 December 2014), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (January 1979 to 31 December 2014), British Library’s Electronic Table of Contents (Zetoc) (January 1993 to 7 May 2014). We looked for trials listed on the the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en), Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (www.fda.gov/), National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) (www.evidence.nhs.uk) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) (www.ema.europa.eu/ema/) as of 31 December 2014. There were no language or date restrictions in the search for trials. We also culled literature digests and conference proceedings as of 15 April 2014. There were no language or date restrictions in the search for trials. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of HSV dendritic or geographic epithelial keratitis were included that reported the proportion of

  1. Impaired Fas-Fas Ligand Interactions Result in Greater Recurrent Herpetic Stromal Keratitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiao-Tang; Keadle, Tammie L.; Hard, Jessicah; Herndon, John; Potter, Chloe A.; Del Rosso, Chelsea R.; Ferguson, Thomas A.; Stuart, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection of the cornea leads to a potentially blinding condition termed herpetic stromal keratitis (HSK). Clinical studies have indicated that disease is primarily associated with recurrent HSK following reactivation of a latent viral infection of the trigeminal ganglia. One of the key factors that limit inflammation of the cornea is the expression of Fas ligand (FasL). We demonstrate that infection of the cornea with HSV-1 results in increased functional expression of FasL and that mice expressing mutations in Fas (lpr) and FasL (gld) display increased recurrent HSK following reactivation compared to wild-type mice. Furthermore, both gld and lpr mice took longer to clear their corneas of infectious virus and the reactivation rate for these strains was significantly greater than that seen with wild-type mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that the interaction of Fas with FasL in the cornea restricts the development of recurrent HSK. PMID:26504854

  2. Clinical Presentation and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Contact Lens Associated Microbial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Hesam; Ghaderpanah, Mahboubeh; Rasoulinejad, Seyed Ahmad; Montazeri, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In recent years, the number of contact lens wearers has dramatically increased in Iran, particularly in youngsters. The purpose of current study was to assess the clinical presentation and antibiotic susceptibility of contact lens related microbial keratitis in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran. Methodology. A cross-sectional investigation of 26 patients (33 eyes) with contact lens induced corneal ulcers who were admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Ahwaz City, from June 2012 to June 2013 was done. In order to study microbial culture and susceptibility of corneal ulcers, all of them were scraped. Results. Eight samples were reported as sterile. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (80%) in positive cultures was the most widely recognized causative organism isolated. This is followed by Staphylococcus aureus 12% and Enterobacter 8%. The results showed that 84% of the microorganism cases were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, while imipenem, meropenem, and ceftazidime were the second most effective antibiotics (76%). Conclusion. Results of current study show the importance of referring all contact lens wearers with suspected corneal infection to ophthalmologists for more cure. The corneal scraping culture and contact lens solution should be performed to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:26770828

  3. Aberrant connexin26 hemichannels underlying keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome are potently inhibited by mefloquine

    PubMed Central

    Levit, Noah A.; Sellitto, Caterina; Wang, Hong-Zhan; Li, Leping; Srinivas, Miduturu; Brink, Peter R.; White, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is an ectodermal dysplasia caused by dominant mutations of connexin26 (Cx26). Loss of Cx26 function causes non-syndromic sensorineural deafness, without consequence in the epidermis. Functional analyses have revealed that a majority of KID-causing mutations confer a novel expansion of hemichannel activity, mediated by connexin channels in a non-junctional configuration. Inappropriate Cx26 hemichannel opening is hypothesized to compromise keratinocyte integrity and epidermal homeostasis. Pharmacological modulators of Cx26 are needed to assess the pathomechanistic involvement of hemichannels in the development of hyperkeratosis in KID syndrome. We have used electrophysiological assays to evaluate small molecule analogs of quinine for suppressive effects on aberrant hemichannel currents elicited by KID mutations. Here, we show that mefloquine inhibits several mutant hemichannel forms implicated in KID syndrome when expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes (IC50≈16µM), using an extracellular divalent cation, zinc (Zn++), as a non-specific positive control for comparison (IC50≈3µM). Furthermore, we used freshly isolated transgenic keratinocytes to show that micromolar concentrations of mefloquine attenuated increased macroscopic membrane currents in primary mouse keratinocytes expressing human Cx26-G45E, a mutation causing a lethal form of KID syndrome. PMID:25229253

  4. Fungal keratitis secondary to Scedosporium apiospermum infection and successful treatment with surgical and medical intervention.

    PubMed

    Kepez Yildiz, Burcin; Hasanreisoglu, Murat; Aktas, Zeynep; Aksu, Gulsah; Kocak, Burcak Comert; Akata, Fikret

    2014-04-01

    To report a rare case of severe fungal keratitis caused by Scedosporium apiospermum, which was treated with a penetrating tectonic keratoplasty and aggressive medical treatment. A 62-year-old woman with a history of soil contamination of the right eye while planting vegetables presented with a severe corneal abscess and ocular pain. The patient received medical treatment and underwent tectonic keratoplasty. Both corneal scrapings and the corneal button were evaluated microscopically. The samples were sent for aerobic and anaerobic bacterial and fungal cultures. Microbiological examinations showed S. apiospermum. The isolate was sensitive to amphoterycine B, caspofungin, voriconazole, and resistant to fluconazole. No clinical improvement was achieved with topical voriconazole, vancomycin, ceftazidime, and systemic voriconazole. A penetrating tectonic keratoplasty and lensectomy with continuation of anti-fungal therapy achieved satisfactory results. A fungal etiology should be suspected in a progressive and untreatable corneal abscess. Microbiological investigation is very important in early diagnosis. Despite early diagnosis and aggressive treatment, in selected cases removing the infected tissue surgically is vital in preserving the ocular globe and vision. PMID:23612853

  5. Aberrant connexin26 hemichannels underlying keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome are potently inhibited by mefloquine.

    PubMed

    Levit, Noah A; Sellitto, Caterina; Wang, Hong-Zhan; Li, Leping; Srinivas, Miduturu; Brink, Peter R; White, Thomas W

    2015-04-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is an ectodermal dysplasia caused by dominant mutations of connexin26 (Cx26). Loss of Cx26 function causes nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness, without consequence in the epidermis. Functional analyses have revealed that a majority of KID-causing mutations confer a novel expansion of hemichannel activity, mediated by connexin channels in a nonjunctional configuration. Inappropriate Cx26 hemichannel opening is hypothesized to compromise keratinocyte integrity and epidermal homeostasis. Pharmacological modulators of Cx26 are needed to assess the pathomechanistic involvement of hemichannels in the development of hyperkeratosis in KID syndrome. We have used electrophysiological assays to evaluate small-molecule analogs of quinine for suppressive effects on aberrant hemichannel currents elicited by KID mutations. Here, we show that mefloquine (MFQ) inhibits several mutant hemichannel forms implicated in KID syndrome when expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes (IC50∼16 μM), using an extracellular divalent cation, zinc (Zn(++)), as a nonspecific positive control for comparison (IC50∼3 μM). Furthermore, we used freshly isolated transgenic keratinocytes to show that micromolar concentrations of MFQ attenuated increased macroscopic membrane currents in primary mouse keratinocytes expressing human Cx26-G45E, a mutation that causes a lethal form of KID syndrome. PMID:25229253

  6. The Effects of Silicone Hydrogel Lens Wear on the Corneal Epithelium and Risk for Microbial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Danielle M.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies using animal models and human clinical trials have demonstrated that the use of low oxygen transmissible contact lens materials produce corneal epithelial surface damage resulting in increased Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) adhesion and raft-mediated internalization into surface corneal epithelial cells. These findings led to the testable clinical predictions that: (1) microbial keratitis (MK) risk is expected to be greatest during the first 6 months of wear; (2) there is no difference between 6 and 30 night extended wear; and (3) that wear of hyper-oxygen transmissible lenses would reduce the reported incidence of infection. Subsequent epidemiological studies have confirmed the first two predictions; however, increased oxygen transmissibility with silicone hydrogel (SiHy) lens wear has not altered the overall incidence of MK. In this review, more recent clinical and basic studies that investigate epithelial alterations and bacterial adhesion to corneal epithelial cells following wear of SiHy lenses with and without concomitant exposure to chemically preserved multipurpose solutions (MPS) will be examined. The collective results of these studies demonstrate that even in the absence of lens-related hypoxia, MPS induce ocular surface changes during SiHy lens wear which are associated with a pathophysiological increase in PA adherence and internalization in the corneal epithelium, and therefore, predict an increased risk for PA-MK. In addition, new data supporting an interactive role for inflammation in facilitating PA adherence and internalization in the corneal epithelium will also be discussed. PMID:23266590

  7. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in patients with autosomal dominant keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, F; Pearce, W G; MacDonald, I M; Walter, M A

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disorder chiefly characterized by corneal opacification and vascularization and by foveal hypoplasia. Aniridia (shown recently to result from mutations in the PAX6 gene) has overlapping clinical findings and a similar pattern of inheritance with ADK. On the basis of these similarities, we used a candidate-gene approach to investigate whether mutations in the PAX6 gene also result in ADK. Significant linkage was found between two polymorphic loci in the PAX6 region and ADK in a family with 15 affected members in four generations (peak LOD score = 4.45; theta = .00 with D11S914), consistent with PAX6 mutations being responsible for ADK. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing revealed a mutation in the PAX6 exon 11 splice-acceptor site. The predicted consequent incorrect splicing results in truncation of the PAX6 proline-serine-threonine activation domain. The SeyNeu mouse results from a mutation in the Pax-6 exon 10 splice-donor site that produces a PAX6 protein truncated from the same point as occurs in our family with ADK. Therefore, the SeyNeu mouse is an excellent animal model of ADK. The finding that mutations in PAX6 underlie ADK, along with a recent report that mutations in PAX6 also underlie Peters anomaly, implicates PAX6 broadly in human anterior segment malformations. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7668281

  8. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in patients with autosomal dominant keratitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; MacDonald, I.M.; Walter, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disorder chiefly characterized by corneal opacification and vascularization and by foveal hypoplasia. Aniridia (shown recently to result from mutations in the PAX6 gene) has overlapping clinical findings and a similar pattern of inheritance with ADK. On the basis of these similarities, we used a candidate-gene approach to investigate whether mutations in the PAX6 gene also result in ADK. Significant linkage was found between two polymorphic loci in the PAX6 region and ADK in a family with 15 affected members in four generations (peak LOD score = 4.45; {theta} = .00 with D11S914), consistent with PAX6 mutations being responsible for ADK. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing revealed a mutation in the PAX6 exon 11 splice-acceptor site. The predicted consequent incorrect splicing results in truncation of the PAX6 proline-serine-threonine activation domain. The Sey{sup Neu} mouse results from a mutation in the Pax-6 exon 10 splice-donor site that produces a PAX6 protein truncated from the same point as occurs in our family with ADK. Therefore, the Sey{sup Neu} mouse is an excellent animal model of ADK. The finding that mutations in PAX6 also underlie Peters anomaly implicates PAX6 broadly in human anterior segment malformations. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Development of a new oxygen consumption rate assay in cultures of Acanthamoeba (Protozoa: Lobosea) and its application to evaluate viability and amoebicidal activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heredero-Bermejo, I; Criado-Fornelio, A; Soliveri, J; Díaz-Martín, J A; Matilla-Fuentes, J; Sánchez-Arias, J A; Copa-Patiño, J L; Pérez-Serrano, J

    2015-08-01

    A new fluorometric method has been developed for measuring the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of Acanthamoeba cultures in microplates and for screening molecules with amoebicidal activity against this microorganism. The use of a biofunctional matrix (containing an oxygen-sensitive fluorogenic probe) attached to the microplate wells allowed continuous measurement of OCR in the medium, hence assessment of amoebic growth. The new OCR method applied to cell viability yielded a linear relationship and monitoring was much quicker than with indirect viability assays previously used. In addition, two drugs were tested in a cytotoxicity assay monitored by the new OCR viability test. With this procedure, the standard amoebicidal drug chlorhexidine digluconate showed an IC50 of 3.53 + 1.3 mg/l against Acanthamoeba polyphaga and 3.19 + 1.2 mg/l against Acanthamoeba castellanii, whereas a cationic dendrimer [G1Si(NMe3+)4] showed an IC50 of 6.42 + 1.3 mg/l against A. polyphaga. These data agree with previous studies conducted in our laboratory. Therefore, the new OCR method has proven powerful and quick for amoebicidal drug screening and is likely to be applied in biochemical studies concerning protozoa respiration and metabolism. PMID:25956947

  10. AkF ¯ chiral gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan-Liang; Shrock, Robert

    2015-11-01

    We study asymptotically free chiral gauge theories with an SU (N ) gauge group and chiral fermions transforming according to the antisymmetric rank-k tensor representation, Ak≡[k ]N , and the requisite number, nF ¯, of copies of fermions in the conjugate fundamental representation, F ¯ ≡[1] ¯ N , to render the theories anomaly-free. We denote these as AkF ¯ theories. We take N ≥2 k +1 so that nF ¯≥1 . The A2F ¯ theories form an infinite family with N ≥5 , but we show that the A3F ¯ and A4F ¯ theories are only asymptotically free for N in the respective ranges 7 ≤N ≤17 and 9 ≤N ≤11 , and that there are no asymptotically free AkF ¯ theories with k ≥5 . We investigate the types of ultraviolet to infrared evolution for these AkF ¯ theories and find that, depending on k and N , they may lead to a non-Abelian Coulomb phase, or may involve confinement with massless gauge-singlet composite fermions, bilinear fermion condensation with dynamical gauge and global symmetry breaking, or formation of multifermion condensates that preserve the gauge symmetry. We also show that there are no asymptotically free, anomaly-free SU (N ) SkF ¯ chiral gauge theories with k ≥3 , where Sk denotes the rank-k symmetric representation.

  11. Inhibition of TREM-1 and Dectin-1 Alleviates the Severity of Fungal Keratitis by Modulating Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qiuchan; Wu, Minhao; Jiang, Huaili; Lin, Xiaolei; Sun, Yifang; Huang, Xi; Yuan, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore the possibility that inhibiting triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) and Dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-1(Dectin-1) could modulate the innate immune response and alleviate the severity of corneal fungal keratitis. Method TREM-1 and Dectin-1 expression was detected in fungus-infected human corneal specimens by real-time PCR. C57BL/6 (B6) mice were injected with Aspergillus fumigatus and divided into 4 groups that received subconjunctival injections of PBS and IgG as a control (group I), mTREM-1/IgG fusion protein (group II), the soluble β-glucan antagonist laminarin (group III), or mTREM-1/Fc and laminarin (group IV). Corneal virulence was evaluated based on clinical scores. TREM-1 and Dectin-1 mRNA levels were assayed using real-time PCR. The distribution patterns of TREM-1, Dectin-1 and cellular infiltrates in fungus-infected corneas were examined by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, changes in T Helper Type1 (Th1)-/ T Helper Type1 (Th2)- type cytokines and proinflammatory cytokines were measured. Results The expression of TREM-1 and Dectin-1 increased significantly and correlated positively with the progression of fungal keratitis. Most infiltrated cells were neutrophils and secondarily macrophages in infected cornea. The clinical scores decreased after interfering with TREM-1 and Dectin-1 expression in infected mouse corneas. Levels of Th1-type cytokines including interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-18 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were decreased in the cornea, while the levels of Th2-type cytokines, including IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10, showed obvious increases. Conclusion TREM-1 and Dectin-1 function concurrently in the corneal innate immune response by regulating inflammatory cytokine expression in fungal keratitis. Inhibition of TREM-1 and Dectin-1 can alleviate the severity of corneal damage by downregulating the excessive inflammatory response. PMID:26963514

  12. Clinical investigation of combined therapy influence over Keratitis Herpetica Dendritica with He-Ne laser, Pandavir, and Acycovir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koev, K.; Tanev, V.; Avramov, L.; Borisova, E.

    2007-03-01

    The main goal of this study is to investigate the treatment effect of combined therapy over Keratitis Herpetica Dendritica applying drugs Pandavir and Acycovir in combination with He-Ne laser irradiation. The current survey includes 75 patients with Keratitis Herpetica Dendritica that are divided in three groups. The first group of 25 patients is treated with Acycovir. The second group, which includes 24 patients, is treated with Pandavir and Acycovir. In the third group that consists from 26 patients, besides the abovementioned combination of drugs is applied low-level laser therapy using He-Ne laser, emitted at 632,8 nm wavelength, with power density 0,3 mW/cm2 and light exposure used - 3 minutes. The flourescein reaction was monitored every day to detect the eye recovery. We observe earliest answer reaction to the treatment applied in the group of He-Ne laser& Pandavir&Acycovir, revealing as inflammation suppression and perifocal edema disappearance in the group treated. Eyes treated only with Acycovir present mean time of improvement (MTI), as the flourescein colorization disappearance and epithelization setting in for 9,3+/-1,2 days is observed. Similar results were obtained on the eyes treated in double combination, Pandavir and Acycovir, with MTI - 8,2+/-1,1 days. The best effect was obtained by the triple combination: Pandavir, Acycovir and He-Ne laser (statistically proved), with the mean time of improvement 6,2+/-1,3 days. The combined laser treatment shows significant additional effect on the recovery rate. The combined treatment with He-Ne laser, Pandavir and Acycovir is revealed as an efficient method for eye therapy of Keratitis Herpetica Dendritica.

  13. Root Cause Analysis of the Fusarium Keratitis Epidemic of 2004–2006 and Prescriptions for Preventing Future Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A root cause analysis of the Fusarium keratitis epidemic of 2004–2006 was performed. Methods: Three US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) documents were analyzed. Poisson and case-control studies were performed on outbreak data from Singapore. Irreversible thermochromic labels were applied to cartons of contact lens solution bottles, which were then subjected to elevated temperatures. Results: The 1997 FDA guidance document concerning storage temperatures of contact lens care products predicted temperature-related solution instability. Bausch & Lomb (B&L) requested FDA approval for ReNu with MoistureLoc, claiming that it was substantially equivalent to other products. FDA Form 483 stated that cases of ReNu-related Fusarium keratitis from Asia had not been reported, the removal of the product from the Asian markets was unreported, and B&L had not performed biocidal testing on samples associated with Asian cases. The outbreak in Singapore could have been recognized after only 3 cases (Pr = .0067). The cause of the Singapore outbreak could have been determined after the recognition of only 3 (P = .0429), 5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–126.0), or 15 cases (95% CI, 1.60–14.1). Thermochromic labels can irreversibly change color when exposed to elevated temperatures, thus warning of potential antimicrobial failure. Conclusions: The worldwide Fusarium keratitis epidemic of 2004–2006 could, theoretically, have been prevented entirely, recognized much earlier, or mitigated by much more rigorous oversight by the FDA, by strict adherence by B&L to FDA guidelines and requirements, by the application of basic statistical methods, and/or by the use of temperature indication technology. The lessons learned from a root cause analysis of this pharmacologic catastrophy may help avert or mitigate future epidemics. PMID:20126495

  14. 40 CFR Appendixes A-K to Part 51 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false A Appendixes A-K to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Appendixes A-K to Part 51...

  15. 40 CFR Appendixes A-K to Part 51 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false A Appendixes A-K to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Appendixes A-K to Part 51...

  16. 40 CFR Appendixes A-K to Part 51 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false A Appendixes A-K to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Appendixes A-K to Part 51...

  17. 40 CFR Appendixes A-K to Part 51 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false A Appendixes A-K to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Appendixes A-K to Part 51...

  18. 46 CFR 7.180 - Kotzebue Sound, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Kotzebue Sound, AK. 7.180 Section 7.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.180 Kotzebue Sound, AK. A line drawn from Cape Espenberg Light to latitude 66°52′ N. longitude 163°28′ W.;...

  19. 46 CFR 7.180 - Kotzebue Sound, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Kotzebue Sound, AK. 7.180 Section 7.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.180 Kotzebue Sound, AK. A line drawn from Cape Espenberg Light to latitude 66°52′ N. longitude 163°28′ W.;...

  20. 46 CFR 7.180 - Kotzebue Sound, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Kotzebue Sound, AK. 7.180 Section 7.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.180 Kotzebue Sound, AK. A line drawn from Cape Espenberg Light to latitude 66°52′ N. longitude 163°28′ W.;...

  1. 46 CFR 7.180 - Kotzebue Sound, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Kotzebue Sound, AK. 7.180 Section 7.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.180 Kotzebue Sound, AK. A line drawn from Cape Espenberg Light to latitude 66°52′ N. longitude 163°28′ W.;...

  2. 46 CFR 7.180 - Kotzebue Sound, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Kotzebue Sound, AK. 7.180 Section 7.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.180 Kotzebue Sound, AK. A line drawn from Cape Espenberg Light to latitude 66°52′ N. longitude 163°28′ W.;...

  3. 76 FR 43824 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Talkeetna, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... revise Class E airspace at Talkeetna, AK (76 FR 27619). Interested parties were invited to participate in... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revision of Class E Airspace; Talkeetna, AK AGENCY:...

  4. 77 FR 60660 - Proposed Establishment Class E Airspace; Kasigluk, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment Class E Airspace; Kasigluk, AK...: This action proposes to establish Class E airspace at Kasigluk Airport, Kasigluk, AK, to...

  5. 76 FR 66854 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Nuiqsut, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register to revise Class E airspace at Nuiqsut, AK (76 FR 49386). Interested..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Nuiqsut, AK AGENCY:...

  6. 76 FR 8625 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Savoonga, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Federal Register to amend Class E airspace at Savoonga, AK (75 FR 77574). Interested parties were invited... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revision of Class E Airspace; Savoonga, AK AGENCY:...

  7. 76 FR 8627 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Class E airspace at Platinum AK (75 FR 77572). Interested parties were invited to participate in this... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum, AK AGENCY:...

  8. 40 CFR Appendixes A-K to Part 51 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false A Appendixes A-K to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Appendixes A-K to Part 51...

  9. Therapeutic Use of Soluble Fas Ligand Ameliorates Acute and Recurrent Herpetic Stromal Keratitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rogge, Megan; Yin, Xiao-Tang; Godfrey, Lisa; Lakireddy, Priya; Potter, Chloe A.; Del Rosso, Chelsea R.; Stuart, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study was designed to test the therapeutic value of soluble FasL (sFasL) in an acute model of herpetic stromal keratitis (HSK) and, more importantly, a recurrent model of HSK using BALB/c, BALB-lpr, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) mice. Methods Mice were infected either acutely with the KOS strain of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) or latently with the McKrae strain of HSV-1. Acutely infected mice as well as ultraviolet-B (UV-B) reactivated mice (recurrent infection) were treated with sFasL, or soluble TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (sTRAIL), or BSA daily or 3 times/wk by using either a combination of subconjunctival injection and topical ointment, or with topical ointment alone. These mice then were evaluated for corneal opacity and neovascularization for 6 weeks. Results Following acute and recurrent HSV-1 infection, wild-type BALB/c mice treated with sFasL displayed significantly reduced incidence of corneal opacity and neovascularization compared to the control animals. However, BALB-lpr mice, which are deficient in Fas+ inflammatory cells, displayed no such differences in ocular disease, as expected. Latently infected NIH mice treated with sFasL displayed similar results. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the corneal inflammatory infiltrate in those treated with sFasL was significantly less than in sTRAIL- or BSA-treated mice. Furthermore, corneas from sFasL-treated mice displayed relatively more cells undergoing apoptosis. Conclusions This study provides evidence that sFasL treatment has potential therapeutic benefit in reducing inflammatory infiltrate and neovascularization in primary and recurrent forms of HSK, and that it does so by augmenting the restriction of Fas+ inflammatory cells mediated by membrane FasL. PMID:26444718

  10. Efficacy of VIP as Treatment for Bacteria-Induced Keratitis Against Multiple Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains

    PubMed Central

    Carion, Thomas W.; McWhirter, Cody R.; Grewal, Daiyajot K.; Berger, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) treatment in regulating inflammation following bacterial keratitis induced by the P. aeruginosa strain 19660. However, in the current study we assessed whether disease outcome is specific to 19660 or if VIP treatment is effective against multiple P. aeruginosa strains. Methods B6 mice received daily IP injections of VIP from −1 through 5 days post injection (p.i.). Control mice were similarly injected with PBS. Corneal infection was induced using PA 19660, PAO1 or KEI 1025. Disease response was documented and bacterial plate counts and myeloperoxidase assays were performed. Expression of select inflammatory mediators as well as enzymes associated with lipid mediator production was assessed after VIP treatment. KEI 1025 was characterized by cytotoxicity and invasion assays and then confirmed for ExoS/ExoU expression. Results VIP treatment converted the susceptible response to resistant for the three P. aeruginosa strains tested. Disease response was significantly reduced with no corneal perforation. Anti-inflammatory mediators were enhanced after VIP treatment, while pro-inflammatory molecules were reduced compared to controls. Furthermore, VIP reduced inflammatory cell persistence in the cornea after infection with each of the P. aeruginosa strains. Conclusions VIP treatment is effective at ameliorating disease pathogenesis for multiple P. aeruginosa strains, both cytotoxic and invasive. This study is also the first to indicate a possible role for VIP regarding lipid mediator expression in the eye. In addition, the clinical isolate, KEI 1025, was characterized as an invasive strain. Overall, this study strengthens the preclinical development of VIP as a therapeutic agent for ocular infectious disease. PMID:26513498

  11. Bacterial Keratitis in a Tertiary Eye Centre in Iran: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Firoozeh; Hashemian, Mohammad Nasser; Khosravi, Amir; Moradi, Golnaz; Bamdad, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the characteristics and laboratory findings of 182 patients with bacterial keratitis diagnosed at Farabi Eye Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, data were collected on demographics, risk factors, location, size and depth of the ulcer, height of the hypopyon, uncorrected visual acuity, results of smear and culture tests, and antibiotic sensitivity of cultured bacteria. Results: There were 110 (60.4%) males and 72 (39.6%) females with an average age of 56.0 ± 2.3 years. Ocular trauma (17.6%) and positive history of corneal surgery (14.3%) were major risk factors. The mean age of contact lens users was 22.5 ± 7.7 years. Sixty patients (33%) used topical antibiotics, 21 (11.5%) patients utilized topical steroid, and 26 (14.3%) cases used both topical antibiotic and steroid at presentation. Culture results were, 81 (44.5%) cases were Gram-positive, 63 (34.6%) were Gram-negative, 10 (5.5%) were mixed bacteria and in 28 (15.4%) cases had detected growth. The isolated bacterial species from the corneal ulcers were less resistant to ceftazidime (6%) and amikacin (6%). The majority of patients were treated with medical therapy; however, 81 cases (44.5%) received at least one surgical procedure. Conclusion: Among the patients with bacterial corneal ulcers, trauma was the most common risk factor. Over-the-counter antibiotic and steroid were commonly used in the majority of patients. The most common bacteria isolated were Gram-positives, and they were less resistant to ceftazidime and amikacin. Penetrating keratoplasty was the most common surgical procedure in patient who required surgery. PMID:25949085

  12. Prevention of Herpes Simplex Virus Induced Stromal Keratitis by a Glycoprotein B-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Adalbert; Dirks, Miriam; Kasper, Maren; Buch, Anna; Dittmer, Ulf; Giebel, Bernd; Wildschütz, Lena; Busch, Martin; Goergens, Andre; Schneweis, Karl E.; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M.; Sodeik, Beate; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Roggendorf, Michael; Bauer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of acyclovir (ACV) and multidrug-resistant strains in patients with corneal HSV-1 infections leading to Herpetic Stromal Keratitis (HSK) is a major health problem in industrialized countries and often results in blindness. To overcome this obstacle, we have previously developed an HSV-gB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2c) that proved to be highly protective in immunodeficient NOD/SCID-mice towards genital infections. In the present study, we examined the effectivity of mAb 2c in preventing the immunopathological disease HSK in the HSK BALB/c mouse model. Therefore, mice were inoculated with HSV-1 strain KOS on the scarified cornea to induce HSK and subsequently either systemically or topically treated with mAb 2c. Systemic treatment was performed by intravenous administration of mAb 2c 24 h prior to infection (pre-exposure prophylaxis) or 24, 40, and 56 hours after infection (post-exposure immunotherapy). Topical treatment was performed by periodical inoculations (5 times per day) of antibody-containing eye drops as control, starting at 24 h post infection. Systemic antibody treatment markedly reduced viral loads at the site of infection and completely protected mice from developing HSK. The administration of the antiviral antibody prior or post infection was equally effective. Topical treatment had no improving effect on the severity of HSK. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mAb 2c proved to be an excellent drug for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections and for prevention of HSK and blindness. Moreover, the humanized counterpart (mAb hu2c) was equally effective in protecting mice from HSV-induced HSK when compared to the parental mouse antibody. These results warrant the future development of this antibody as a novel approach for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections in humans. PMID:25587898

  13. Antiviral treatment and other therapeutic interventions for herpes simplex virus epithelial keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmus, Kirk R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Eye disease due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) commonly presents as epithelial keratitis. Objectives To compare the relative effectiveness of antiviral agents, interferon, and corneal débridement in the treatment of acute HSV epithelial keratitis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4), MEDLINE (January 1950 to October 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2010), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2010), Zetoc (British Library’s Electronic Table of Contents), System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (openSIGLE), Biosciences Information Service (BIOSIS), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), Japan Information Center of Science and Technology (JICST-EPlus), and China Academic Journals database (CAJ) via China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) with citations confirmed using China/Asia On Demand (COAD). There were no language or date restrictions in the search for trials. All databases except CNKI and COAD were last searched on 27 October 2010, CNKI and COAD were searched on 1 April 2010. We also searched literature digests, conference proceedings and reference lists. Selection criteria Of 152 eligible studies,106 comparative treatment trials involving 5872 eyes with dendritic or geographic epithelial keratitis were analysed for corneal healing over two weeks. Data collection and analysis Interventions were compared at 14 days after trial enrolment by calculating a risk ratio (RR) that was adjusted with indirect RR, assessed by an inconsistency index (I2) and supplemented by a seven-day RR and a hazard ratio (HR). Main results Idoxuridine, though uncertainly better in healing outcome than control because of few trials with 14-day follow up, allowed earlier corneal re-epithelialisation. Vidarabine resulted in a significantly better outcome than placebo in one trial (RR

  14. 78 FR 14185 - Safety Zone; MODU KULLUK; Kiliuda Bay, Kodiak Island, AK to Captains Bay, Unalaska Island, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: ] Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; MODU KULLUK; Kiliuda Bay, Kodiak Island, AK to Captains Bay, Unalaska Island, AK AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule....

  15. Structure, Subunit Topology, and Actin-binding Activity of the Arp2/3 Complex from Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, R. Dyche; Stafford, Walter F.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    The Arp2/3 complex, first isolated from Acanthamoeba castellani by affinity chromatography on profilin, consists of seven polypeptides; two actinrelated proteins, Arp2 and Arp3; and five apparently novel proteins, p40, p35, p19, p18, and p14 (Machesky et al., 1994). The complex is homogeneous by hydrodynamic criteria with a Stokes' radius of 5.3 nm by gel filtration, sedimentation coefficient of 8.7 S, and molecular mass of 197 kD by analytical ultracentrifugation. The stoichiometry of the subunits is 1:1:1:1:1:1:1, indicating the purified complex contains one copy each of seven polypeptides. In electron micrographs, the complex has a bilobed or horseshoe shape with outer dimensions of ∼13 × 10 nm, and mathematical models of such a shape and size are consistent with the measured hydrodynamic properties. Chemical cross-linking with a battery of cross-linkers of different spacer arm lengths and chemical reactivities identify the following nearest neighbors within the complex: Arp2 and p40; Arp2 and p35; Arp3 and p35; Arp3 and either p18 or p19; and p19 and p14. By fluorescent antibody staining with anti-p40 and -p35, the complex is concentrated in the cortex of the ameba, especially in linear structures, possibly actin filament bundles, that lie perpendicular to the leading edge. Purified Arp2/3 complex binds actin filaments with a Kd of 2.3 μM and a stoichiometry of approximately one complex molecule per actin monomer. In electron micrographs of negatively stained samples, Arp2/3 complex decorates the sides of actin filaments. EDC/NHS cross-links actin to Arp3, p35, and a low molecular weight subunit, p19, p18, or p14. We propose structural and topological models for the Arp2/3 complex and suggest that affinity for actin filaments accounts for the localization of complex subunits to actinrich regions of Acanthamoeba. PMID:9015304

  16. Zero order delivery of itraconazole via polymeric micelles incorporated in situ ocular gel for the management of fungal keratitis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Munmun; Kumar, Manish; Pathak, Kamla

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the role of amphiphilic block copolymer-based polymeric micelles of itraconazole for the management of fungal keratitis to overcome the limitations of the conventional dosage form. The polymeric micelles were made using pluronics above critical micelle concentration. Itraconazole-loaded polymeric micelles prepared by rotary evaporation method were characterized and the optimized micellar formulation (M5) was selected on the basis of least micelle size (79.99 nm), maximum entrapment efficiency (91.32%±1.73%) and in vitro permeation (90.28%±0.31%) in 8h, that best fitted zero-order kinetics. M5 was developed as pH sensitive in situ gel and characterized for various parameters. The optimized in situ gel (F5) proved to be superior in its ex vivo transcorneal permeation when compared with Itral(®) eye drop and pure drug suspension, exhibiting 41.45%±0.87% permeation with zero-order kinetics (r(2)=0.994) across goat cornea. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical polymeric micelles entrapped in the gel matrix. A spectrum of tests revealed hydration capability, non-irritancy, and histologically safe gel formulation that had appropriate handling characteristics. Conclusively, a controlled release pH-sensitive ocular formulation capable of carrying drug to the anterior segment of the eye via topical delivery was successfully developed for the treatment of fungal keratitis. PMID:25889081

  17. Treatment of keratitis-ichthyosis- deafness (KID) syndrome in children: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viraat; Sun, Grace; Dickman, Meghan; Khuu, Phuong; Teng, Joyce M C

    2015-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare hereditary cornification disorder resulting from mutations in connexin 26, a protein important for intercellular communication. In addition to the characteristic clinical triad of congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, keratitis, and erythrokeratoderma, affected individuals also suffer from chronic bacterial and fungal infections and have an increased risk of benign and malignant cutaneous tumors. Treatments with antibiotics, antifungals, and systemic retinoids have been reported with variable response. Ocular and skeletal toxicity from prolonged exposure to systemic retinoids is a major concern especially in children. We report a case of a 7-year-old boy with KID syndrome complicated by frequent infections who responded well to acitretin 0.5-1.0 mg/kg/day. The patient had significant improvement of the hyperkeratosis on the scalp, trunk, and extremities within 4 weeks after initiating treatment. The patient has been on treatment for over a year without notable ocular, skeletal, or laboratory side effects. A review of the literature focusing on therapeutic options for KID syndrome and concerns about safety and tolerability is presented. PMID:25546246

  18. Expression of IL-8, IL-6 and IL-1β in Tears as a Main Characteristic of the Immune Response in Human Microbial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Santacruz, Concepcion; Linares, Marisela; Garfias, Yonathan; Loustaunau, Luisa M.; Pavon, Lenin; Perez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra; Jimenez-Martinez, Maria C.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal infections are frequent and potentially vision-threatening diseases, and despite the significance of the immunological response in animal models of microbial keratitis (MK), it remains unclear in humans. The aim of this study was to describe the cytokine profile of tears in patients with MK. Characteristics of ocular lesions such as size of the epithelial defect, stromal infiltration, and hypopyon were analyzed. Immunological evaluation included determination of interleukine (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in tear samples obtained from infected eyes of 28 patients with MK and compared with their contralateral non-infected eyes. Additionally, frequency of CD4+, CD8+, CD19+ and CD3−CD56+ cells was also determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with MK, and compared with 48 healthy controls. Non-significant differences were observed in the size of the epithelial defect, stromal infiltration, and hypopyon. Nevertheless, we found an immunological profile apparently related to MK etiology. IL-8 > IL-6 in patients with bacterial keratitis; IL-8 > IL-6 > IL-1β and increased frequency of circulating CD3−CD56+ NK cells in patients with gram-negative keratitis; and IL-8 = IL-6 > IL-1β in patients with fungal keratitis. Characterization of tear cytokines from patients with MK could aid our understanding of the immune pathophysiological mechanisms underlying corneal damage in humans. PMID:25741769

  19. A case of Beauveria bassiana keratitis confirmed by internal transcribed spacer and LSU rDNA D1–D2 sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ligozzi, M; Maccacaro, L; Passilongo, M; Pedrotti, E; Marchini, G; Koncan, R; Cornaglia, G; Centonze, A R; Lo Cascio, G

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of fungal keratitis due to Beauveria bassiana in a farmer with Fuchs' dystrophy, treated with amphotericin B. Surgery with penetrating keratoplasty was necessary to resolve the lesions. Susceptibility testing and molecular sequencing permitted the identification and treatment of this rare aetiological agent of invasive fungal disease. PMID:25356350

  20. DVC-FISH and PMA-qPCR techniques to assess the survival of Helicobacter pylori inside Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Mesonero, Laura; Moreno, Yolanda; Alonso, José Luis; Ferrús, M Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are ubiquitous microorganisms commonly found in water. They can act as Trojan Horses for some amoeba-resistant bacteria (ARB). Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria, suggested to be transmitted through water, which could belong to the ARB group. In this work, a co-culture assay of H. pylori and Acanthamoeba castellanii, one of the most common FLA, was carried out to identify the presence and survival of viable and potentially infective forms of the bacteria internalized by the amoeba. Molecular techniques including FISH, DVC-FISH, qPCR and PMA-qPCR were used to detect the presence of internalized and viable H. pylori. After 24 h in co-culture and disinfection treatment to kill extra-amoebic bacteria, viable H. pylori cells were observed inside A. castellanii. When PMA-qPCR was applied to the co-culture samples, only DNA from internalized H. pylori cells was detected, whereas qPCR amplified total DNA from the sample. By the combined DVC-FISH method, the viability of H. pylori cells in A. castellanii was observed. Both specific techniques provided evidence, for the first time, that the pathogen is able to survive chlorination treatment in occurrence with A. castellanii and could be very useful methods for performing further studies in environmental samples. PMID:26342651

  1. The TOM Complex of Amoebozoans: the Cases of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the Slime Mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Buczek, Dorota; Stobienia, Olgierd; Karachitos, Andonis; Antoniewicz, Monika; Slocinska, Małgorzata; Makałowski, Wojciech; Kmita, Hanna

    2015-07-01

    Protein import into mitochondria requires a wide variety of proteins, forming complexes in both mitochondrial membranes. The TOM complex (translocase of the outer membrane) is responsible for decoding of targeting signals, translocation of imported proteins across or into the outer membrane, and their subsequent sorting. Thus the TOM complex is regarded as the main gate into mitochondria for imported proteins. Available data indicate that mitochondria of representative organisms from across the major phylogenetic lineages of eukaryotes differ in subunit organization of the TOM complex. The subunit organization of the TOM complex in the Amoebozoa is still elusive, so we decided to investigate its organization in the soil amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. They represent two major subclades of the Amoebozoa: the Lobosa and Conosa, respectively. Our results confirm the presence of Tom70, Tom40 and Tom7 in the A. castellanii and D. discoideum TOM complex, while the presence of Tom22 and Tom20 is less supported. Interestingly, the Tom proteins display the highest similarity to Opisthokonta cognate proteins, with the exception of Tom40. Thus representatives of two major subclades of the Amoebozoa appear to be similar in organization of the TOM complex, despite differences in their lifestyle. PMID:26074248

  2. Survival of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in the presence of Acanthamoeba castellanii and its dependence on Pho regulon

    PubMed Central

    Chekabab, Samuel Mohammed; Daigle, France; Charette, Steve J; Dozois, Charles M; Harel, Josée

    2012-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are involved in outbreaks of food-borne illness and transmitted to humans through bovine products or water contaminated by cattle feces. Microbial interaction is one of the strategies used by pathogenic bacteria to survive in the environment. Among protozoa, the free-living amoebae are known to host and protect several water-borne pathogens. In this study, the interaction between EHEC and the predacious protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii was investigated. Using monoculture and cocultures, growth of both organisms was estimated for 3 weeks by total and viable cell counts. The numbers of EHEC were significantly higher when cultured with amoebae than without, and less EHEC shifted into a viable but nonculturable state in the presence of amoebae. Using several mutants, we observed that the Pho regulon is required for EHEC growth when cocultured with amoebae. In contrast, the Shiga toxins (Stx) were not involved in this association phenotype. Cocultures monitored by electron microscopy revealed a loss of the regular rod shape of EHEC and the secretion of multilamellar vesicles by the amoebae, which did not contain bacteria. As the interaction between A. castellanii and EHEC appears beneficial for bacterial growth, this supports a potential role for protozoa in promoting the persistence of EHEC in the environment. PMID:23233434

  3. A Dual Role for Corneal Dendritic Cells in Herpes Simplex Keratitis: Local Suppression of Corneal Damage and Promotion of Systemic Viral Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kai; Harris, Deshea L.; Yamaguchi, Takefumi; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hamrah, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    The cornea is the shield to the foreign world and thus, a primary site for peripheral infections. However, transparency and vision are incompatible with inflammation and scarring that may result from infections. Thus, the cornea is required to perform a delicate balance between fighting infections and preserving vision. To date, little is known about the specific role of antigen-presenting cells in viral keratitis. In this study, utilizing an established murine model of primary acute herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 keratitis, we demonstrate that primary HSV keratitis results in increased conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and macrophages within 24 hours after infection. Local depletion of cDCs in CD11c-DTR mice by subconjuntival diphtheria toxin injections, led to increased viral proliferation, and influx of inflammatory cells, resulting in increased scarring and clinical keratitis. In addition, while HSV infection resulted in significant corneal nerve destruction, local depletion of cDCs resulted in a much more severe loss of corneal nerves. Further, local cDC depletion resulted in decreased corneal nerve infection, and subsequently decreased and delayed systemic viral transmission in the trigeminal ganglion and draining lymph node, resulting in decreased mortality of mice. In contrast, sham depletion or depletion of macrophages through local injection of clodronate liposomes had neither a significant impact on the cornea, nor an effect on systemic viral transmission. In conclusion, we demonstrate that corneal cDCs may play a primary role in local corneal defense during viral keratitis and preserve vision, at the cost of inducing systemic viral dissemination, leading to increased mortality. PMID:26332302

  4. Reversible Nerve Damage and Corneal Pathology in Murine Herpes Simplex Stromal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hongmin; Rowe, Alexander M.; Lathrop, Kira L.; Harvey, Stephen A. K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) shedding from sensory neurons can trigger recurrent bouts of herpes stromal keratitis (HSK), an inflammatory response that leads to progressive corneal scarring and blindness. A mouse model of HSK is often used to delineate immunopathogenic mechanisms and bears many of the characteristics of human disease, but it tends to be more chronic and severe than human HSK. Loss of blink reflex (BR) in human HSK is common and due to a dramatic retraction of corneal sensory nerve termini in the epithelium and the nerve plexus at the epithelial/stromal interface. However, the relationship between loss of BR due to nerve damage and corneal pathology associated with HSK remains largely unexplored. Here, we show a similar retraction of corneal nerves in mice with HSK. Indeed, we show that much of the HSK-associated corneal inflammation in mice is actually attributable to damage to the corneal nerves and accompanying loss of BR and can be prevented or ameliorated by tarsorrhaphy (suturing eyelids closed), a clinical procedure commonly used to prevent corneal exposure and desiccation. In addition, we show that HSK-associated nerve retraction, loss of BR, and severe pathology all are reversible and regulated by CD4+ T cells. Thus, defining immunopathogenic mechanisms of HSK in the mouse model will necessitate distinguishing mechanisms associated with the immunopathologic response to the virus from those associated with loss of corneal sensation. Based on our findings, investigation of a possible contribution of nerve damage and BR loss to human HSK also appears warranted. IMPORTANCE HSK in humans is a potentially blinding disease characterized by recurrent inflammation and progressive scarring triggered by viral release from corneal nerves. Corneal nerve damage is a known component of HSK, but the causes and consequences of HSK-associated nerve damage remain obscure. We show that desiccation of the corneal surface due to nerve damage and

  5. Specific NFκB subunit activation and kinetics of cytokine induction in adenoviral keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Rajaiya, Jaya; Sadeghi, Neda

    2009-01-01

    revealed that transactivation of IL-8 occurred with binding by the NFκB p65 homodimer or NFκB p65/p50 heterodimer as early as 1 h post infection, whereas MCP-1 expression was dependent upon the NFκB cREL but not the p65 subunit, and occurred 4 h after IL-8 induction. Finally, knockdown of NFκB p65 by short interfering RNA abrogated IL-8 but not MCP-1 expression after adenoviral infection. Conclusion The kinetics of NFκB subunit activation are partly responsible for the observed pattern of acute inflammation in the adenoviral-infected cornea. MAPKs differentially regulate chemokine expression in adenoviral keratitis by differential and time-dependent activation of specific NFκB subunits. PMID:20038977

  6. Interleukin 17 Regulates Mer Tyrosine Kinase–Positive Cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cui; McClellan, Sharon A.; Barrett, Ronald; Hazlett, Linda D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if IL-17 regulates Mer tyrosine kinase–positive (MerTK+) cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis. Methods. Interleukin 17 was tested in normal and infected cornea of susceptible C57BL/6 and resistant BALB/c mice. The latter were treated with recombinant mouse (rm) IL-17; both groups were treated with IL-17 neutralizing antibody. Mice were infected, and clinical score, PCR, ELISA, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) assays tested expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators and polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocyte (PMN) infiltrate. Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) protein levels were assessed in both mouse strains, while MerTK+ cells were examined by immunostaining and cell sorting before and after IL-17 neutralization. Results. The IL-17 mRNA and protein were higher in C57BL/6 versus BALB/c cornea after infection. The rmIL-17 treatment of BALB/c mice modified proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators, but clinical score and MPO assay revealed no differences. However, only BALB/c mice treated with IL-17 neutralizing antibody showed increased disease, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 2, and MPO levels. Fas and FasL protein levels, elevated earlier in BALB/c versus C57BL/6 mice, correlated with significantly more MerTK+ cells in BALB/c cornea at 3 days after infection. Neutralization of IL-17 in C57BL/6 mice elevated MerTK+ cells, while similar treatment of BALB/c mice significantly decreased them. Conclusions. These data provide evidence that IL-17 expression is higher in C57BL/6 versus BALB/c cornea after infection and that the latter group has more MerTK+ cells. Exogenous rmIL-17 failed to shift the disease response in resistant mice, but its neutralization resulted in worsened disease and reduced MerTK+ cells. Neutralization of IL-17 in C57BL/6 mice increased MerTK+ cells but did not dramatically shift the disease response. PMID:25298414

  7. 78 FR 55772 - Alaska Disaster Number AK-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster Number AK-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... information in the original declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance...

  8. 75 FR 3641 - Television Broadcasting Services; Anchorage, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Anchorage, AK AGENCY: Federal Communications... broadcasting. 0 For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal Communications Commission amends 47...

  9. The EINSTEIN-VARIĆAK Correspondence on Relativistic Rigid Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Tilman

    2008-09-01

    The historical significance of the problem of relativistic rigid rotation is reviewed in light of recently published correspondence between Einstein and the mathematician Vladimir Varićak from the years 1909 to 1913.

  10. A masquerader? Paecilomyces must be distinguished from Penicillium in fungal keratitis: a report of two contrasting cases.

    PubMed

    Sheybani, Arsham; Nguyen, Alexander T; Harocopos, George; Lubniewski, Anthony J; Huang, Andrew J W

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical outcomes of two contrasting cases of fungal keratitis due to Paecilomyces spp. The first case involving a 58-year-old woman was complicated by an initial laboratory misidentification as Penicillium and consequently a delay in treatment with an optimised antifungal regimen. The patient had a protracted clinical course that required a total of four penetrating keratoplasties. However, an accurate diagnosis was promptly made in the second case, a 46-year-old woman, which resulted in a satisfactory outcome after penetrating keratoplasty. Our principal aim was to highlight a diagnostic challenge relating to the accurate microbial identification of Paecilomyces spp. This can be difficult given its morphological similarity to Pencillium, and confusion over the two genera has resulted in misdiagnoses reported previously. Our report aims to raise awareness of this potential laboratory misidentification, which can affect clinical decision-making in guiding antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26286907

  11. Potential role of nuclear receptor ligand all-trans retinoic acids in the treatment of fungal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yan; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Hong; Bi, Miao-Miao; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Wen-Song

    2015-01-01

    Fungal keratitis (FK) is a worldwide visual impairment disease. This infectious fungus initiates the primary innate immune response and, later the adaptive immune response. The inflammatory process is related to a variety of immune cells, including macrophages, helper T cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and Treg cells, and is associated with proinflammatory, chemotactic and regulatory cytokines. All-trans retinoic acids (ATRA) have diverse immunomodulatory actions in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. These retinoids regulate the transcriptional levels of target genes through the activation of nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid receptor α (RAR α), retinoic acid receptor γ (RAR γ), and retinoid X receptor α (RXR α) are expressed in the cornea and immune cells. This paper summarizes new findings regarding ATRA in immune and inflammatory diseases and analyzes the perspective application of ATRA in FK. PMID:26309886

  12. Heavy chain of Acanthamoeba myosine IB is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Korn, E.D.; Hammer, J.A. III

    1987-10-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii myosins IA and IB demonstrate the catalytic properties of a myosin and can support analogues of contractile and motile activity in vitro, but their single, low molecular weight heavy chains, roughly globular shapes, and inabilities to self-assemble into filaments make them structurally atypical myosins. The authors present the complete amino acid sequence of the 128-kDa myosin IB heavy chain, which they deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene and which reveals that the polypeptide is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences. Specifically, the amino-terminal approx. 76 kDa of amino acid sequence is highly similar to the globular head sequences of conventional myosins. By contrast, the remaining approx. 51 kDa of sequence shows no similarity to any portion of conventional myosin sequences, contains regions that are rich in glycine, proline, and alanine residues, and lacks the distinctive sequence characteristics of an ..cap alpha..-helical, coiled-coil structure. They conclude, therefore, that the protein is composed of a myosin globular head fused not to the typical coiled-coil rod-like myosin tail structure but rather to an unusual carboxyl-terminal domain. These results support the conclusion that filamentous myosin is not required for force generation and provide a further perspective on the structural requirements for myosin function. Finally, they find a striking conservation of intron/exon structure between this gene and a vertebrate muscle myosin gene. They discuss this observation in relation to the evolutionary origin of the myosin IB gene and the antiquity of myosin gene intron/exon structure.

  13. The effect of different environmental conditions on the encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Iftikhar, Hira; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2013-09-01

    In this study, Acanthamoeba castellanii was cultivated under different stress conditions to induce possible encystation. The morphological and histological properties were analysed by light and electron microscopy as well as cyst-specific staining. The findings revealed that cysts prepared through liquid medium using higher osmolarity as a trigger (10% glucose with 50mM magnesium chloride for 72 h) are similar to cysts prepared using non-nutrient agar (nutrient deprivation as a trigger in plating assays for 14 days), as determined by SDS-resistance, cyst-specific Calcofluor white staining and transmission electron microscopy. Using liquid medium assay, A. castellanii encystation was studied by exposing trophozoites to media lacking growth ingredients (phosphate buffered saline or distilled water), inappropriate temperatures (4-45°C), pH (3-9), artificial light-dark cycles, 5% CO2, and microaerophilic conditions. Optimal encystation was observed when cells were incubated in PBS with 50mM MgCl2 and 10% glucose at 24-30°C at pH 7. Increasing temperature over 37°C or pH 9 adversely affected encystation, while light-dark cycles, 5% CO2 and microaerophilic conditions had no effect on encystation of A. castellanii. None of the aforementioned conditions had any effect on the viability of A. castellanii, as determined by Trypan blue exclusion assay. A complete knowledge of encystation in A. castellanii is crucial to our understanding of the biology of these ecologically and medically important organisms. PMID:23769934

  14. The abundant free-living amoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga, increases the survival of Campylobacter jejuni in milk and orange juice

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Jenny; Berglund, Petra Griekspoor; Olsen, Björn; Ellström, Patrik; Axelsson-Olsson, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni is a common cause of human bacterial diarrhea in most parts of the world. Most C. jejuni infections are acquired from contaminated poultry, milk, and water. Due to health care costs and human suffering, it is important to identify all possible sources of infection. Unpasteurized milk has been associated with several outbreaks of C. jejuni infection. Campylobacter has been identified on fresh fruit, and other gastrointestinal pathogens such as Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7 and Cryptosporidium have been involved in fruit juice outbreaks. C. jejuni is sensitive to the acidic environment of fruit juice, but co-cultures with the amoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga, have previously been shown to protect C. jejuni at low pH. Methods To study the influence of A. polyphaga on the survival of C. jejuni in milk and juice, the bacteria were incubated in the two products at room temperature and at 4°C with the following treatments: A) C. jejuni preincubated with A. polyphaga before the addition of product, B) C. jejuni mixed with A. polyphaga after the addition of product, and C) C. jejuni in product without A. polyphaga. Bacterial survival was assessed by colony counts on blood agar plates. Results Co-culture with A. polyphaga prolonged the C. jejuni survival both in milk and juice. The effect of co-culture was most pronounced in juice stored at room temperature. On the other hand, A. polyphaga did not have any effect on C. jejuni survival during pasteurization of milk or orange juice, indicating that this is a good method for eliminating C. jejuni in these products. Conclusion Amoebae-associated C. jejuni in milk and juice might cause C. jejuni infections. PMID:26387556

  15. Tracking amino acid's uptake into the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii by stable-isotope labelling and Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    The capacity of pathogens to acquire nutrients from their host cells is one of the most fundamental aspects of infection biology. Hence, measuring the patterns of nutrients' uptake by pathogens is essential for understanding the interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells. In this study, we optimized a technique that allows fast and non-destructive measurement of the amino acid Phenylalanine (Phe) acquired by the trophozoite stage of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii (A. castellanii) as they engage with individual human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19). ARPE-19 host cells were pre-saturated with Deuterated Phe (L-Phe(D8)) to replace the native substrate Phe (L-Phe). The uptake of L-Phe(D8) by A. castellanii trophozoites was measured by Raman microspectroscopy. This approach allowed us to characterize the uptake patterns of this essential amino acid into A. castellanii trophozoites at a single cell level. At 24 hours post infection (PI) A. castellanii trophozoites are capable of salvaging L-Phe(D8) from host cells. The uptake pattern was time-dependent during the first 24 hours of infection and complete substitution with L-Phe(D8) in all parasites was detected at 48 hours PI. On the other hand, isolated A. castellanii trachyzoites (grown without host cells) did not show significant uptake for L-Phe(D8) from the media; only achieved an uptake ratio of 16-18% of L-Phe(D8) from the culture medium after 24 hours. These findings demonstrate the potential of combining Raman microspectroscopy and stable isotope labelling approaches to elucidate the role of metabolism in mediating A. castellanii interaction with host cells.

  16. Descemet’s scroll in syphilitic interstitial keratitis: a case report with anterior segment evaluation and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kasetsuwan, Ngamjit; Reinprayoon, Usanee; Chantaren, Patchima

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To present a case of syphilitic interstitial keratitis with Descemet’s scrolls, as well as its characteristic findings in an anterior segment investigation in relation to the histopathologic findings from a literature review. Case presentation A case report of a 64-year-old woman with syphilitic infection presented with band keratopathy and retrocorneal scrolls. Slit-lamp photography, confocal microscopy, anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), and ultrasound biomicroscopy were performed. Four previous reports were reviewed to describe the pathogenesis, natural history, and histopathologic and immunohistologic findings of the Descemet’s scroll. Results The spectacle-corrected visual acuity was 20/50 and 20/30 in the right and left eyes, respectively. The scrolls appeared as a translucent web extending from Descemet’s membrane into the anterior chamber. Confocal microscopy showed decreased endothelial cell density, pleomorphism, polymegathism, and hyperreflective fibrocellular rods with central hollow. The AS-OCT and ultrasound biomicroscopy showed rod-shaped retrocorneal scrolls. The corneal thickness was 494 microns, as measured by AS-OCT. The corneal lesion remained stable during the 6-year follow-up period without the need for keratoplasty, while the previous literature reported spontaneous and postoperative corneal decompensation. Conclusion We present a case of syphilitic interstitial keratitis with rare Descemet’s scrolls featuring relatively good visual acuity. Although we did not obtain the corneal tissue for examination, the anterior segment investigation provides insight into the underlying histopathology and natural disease history. The central hollow and cellular component seen during confocal microscopy might correspond to the amorphous core and the abnormal endothelial cells in the histopathologic findings. Failure to detect the corneal endothelium due to stromal opacity in these cases is possible, however, compromised

  17. Cooccurrence of Free-Living Amoebae and Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Hospital Water Networks, and Preferential Growth of Mycobacterium avium in Acanthamoeba lenticulata

    PubMed Central

    Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Kartalija, Marinka; Bai, Xiyuan; Jackson, Mary; Gibbs, Sara; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Iseman, Michael D.; Reynolds, Paul R.; McDonnell, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung and other diseases due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing. NTM sources include potable water, especially in households where NTM populate pipes, taps, and showerheads. NTM share habitats with free-living amoebae (FLA) and can grow in FLA as parasites or as endosymbionts. FLA containing NTM may form cysts that protect mycobacteria from disinfectants and antibiotics. We first assessed the presence of FLA and NTM in water and biofilm samples collected from a hospital, confirming the high prevalence of NTM and FLA in potable water systems, particularly in biofilms. Acanthamoeba spp. (genotype T4) were mainly recovered (8/17), followed by Hartmannella vermiformis (7/17) as well as one isolate closely related to the genus Flamella and one isolate only distantly related to previously described species. Concerning mycobacteria, Mycobacterium gordonae was the most frequently found isolate (9/17), followed by Mycobacterium peregrinum (4/17), Mycobacterium chelonae (2/17), Mycobacterium mucogenicum (1/17), and Mycobacterium avium (1/17). The propensity of Mycobacterium avium hospital isolate H87 and M. avium collection strain 104 to survive and replicate within various FLA was also evaluated, demonstrating survival of both strains in all amoebal species tested but high replication rates only in Acanthamoeba lenticulata. As A. lenticulata was frequently recovered from environmental samples, including drinking water samples, these results could have important consequences for the ecology of M. avium in drinking water networks and the epidemiology of disease due to this species. PMID:23475613

  18. Related giant viruses in distant locations and different habitats: Acanthamoeba polyphaga moumouvirus represents a third lineage of the Mimiviridae that is close to the megavirus lineage.

    PubMed

    Yoosuf, Niyaz; Yutin, Natalya; Colson, Philippe; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Pagnier, Isabelle; Robert, Catherine; Azza, Said; Klose, Thomas; Wong, Jimson; Rossmann, Michael G; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-01-01

    The 1,021,348 base pair genome sequence of the Acanthamoeba polyphaga moumouvirus, a new member of the Mimiviridae family infecting Acanthamoeba polyphaga, is reported. The moumouvirus represents a third lineage beside mimivirus and megavirus. Thereby, it is a new member of the recently proposed Megavirales order. This giant virus was isolated from a cooling tower water in southeastern France but is most closely related to Megavirus chiliensis, which was isolated from ocean water off the coast of Chile. The moumouvirus is predicted to encode 930 proteins, of which 879 have detectable homologs. Among these predicted proteins, for 702 the closest homolog was detected in Megavirus chiliensis, with the median amino acid sequence identity of 62%. The evolutionary affinity of moumouvirus and megavirus was further supported by phylogenetic tree analysis of conserved genes. The moumouvirus and megavirus genomes share near perfect orthologous gene collinearity in the central part of the genome, with the variations concentrated in the terminal regions. In addition, genomic comparisons of the Mimiviridae reveal substantial gene loss in the moumouvirus lineage. The majority of the remaining moumouvirus proteins are most similar to homologs from other Mimiviridae members, and for 27 genes the closest homolog was found in bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes supported gene acquisition from diverse bacteria after the separation of the moumouvirus and megavirus lineages. Comparative genome analysis of the three lineages of the Mimiviridae revealed significant mobility of Group I self-splicing introns, with the highest intron content observed in the moumouvirus genome. PMID:23221609

  19. Related Giant Viruses in Distant Locations and Different Habitats: Acanthamoeba polyphaga moumouvirus Represents a Third Lineage of the Mimiviridae That Is Close to the Megavirus Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Yoosuf, Niyaz; Yutin, Natalya; Colson, Philippe; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Pagnier, Isabelle; Robert, Catherine; Azza, Said; Klose, Thomas; Wong, Jimson; Rossmann, Michael G.; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-01-01

    The 1,021,348 base pair genome sequence of the Acanthamoeba polyphaga moumouvirus, a new member of the Mimiviridae family infecting Acanthamoeba polyphaga, is reported. The moumouvirus represents a third lineage beside mimivirus and megavirus. Thereby, it is a new member of the recently proposed Megavirales order. This giant virus was isolated from a cooling tower water in southeastern France but is most closely related to Megavirus chiliensis, which was isolated from ocean water off the coast of Chile. The moumouvirus is predicted to encode 930 proteins, of which 879 have detectable homologs. Among these predicted proteins, for 702 the closest homolog was detected in Megavirus chiliensis, with the median amino acid sequence identity of 62%. The evolutionary affinity of moumouvirus and megavirus was further supported by phylogenetic tree analysis of conserved genes. The moumouvirus and megavirus genomes share near perfect orthologous gene collinearity in the central part of the genome, with the variations concentrated in the terminal regions. In addition, genomic comparisons of the Mimiviridae reveal substantial gene loss in the moumouvirus lineage. The majority of the remaining moumouvirus proteins are most similar to homologs from other Mimiviridae members, and for 27 genes the closest homolog was found in bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes supported gene acquisition from diverse bacteria after the separation of the moumouvirus and megavirus lineages. Comparative genome analysis of the three lineages of the Mimiviridae revealed significant mobility of Group I self-splicing introns, with the highest intron content observed in the moumouvirus genome. PMID:23221609

  20. Bioadhesive sulfacetamide sodium microspheres: evaluation of their effectiveness in the treatment of bacterial keratitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Sensoy, Demet; Cevher, Erdal; Sarici, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Mesut; Ozdamar, Akif; Bergişadi, Nazan

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare bioadhesive sulfacetamide sodium (SA) microspheres to increase their residence time on the ocular surface and to enhance their treatment efficacy on ocular keratitis. Microspheres were fabricated by spray drying method using mixture of polymers such as pectin, polycarbophil and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) at different ratios. The particle size and distribution, morphological characteristics, thermal behavior, encapsulation efficiency, mucoadhesion and in vitro drug release studies on formulations have been investigated. After optimisation studies, SA-loaded polycarbophil microsphere formulation with polymer:drug ratio of 2:1 was found to be the most suitable for ocular application and used in in vivo studies. In vivo studies were carried out on New Zealand male rabbit eyes with keratitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Sterile microsphere suspension in light mineral oil was applied to infected eyes twice a day. Plain SA suspension was used as a positive control. On 3rd and 6th days of the antimicrobial therapy, the eyes were examined in respect to clinical signs of infection (blepharitis, conjunctivitis, iritis, corneal oedema and corneal infiltrates) which are the main symptoms of bacterial keratitis and then cornea samples were counted microbiologically. The rabbit eyes treated with microspheres demonstrated significantly lower clinical scores than those treated with SA alone. A significant decrease in the number of viable bacteria in eyes treated with microspheres was observed in both infection models when compared to those treated with SA alone. In conclusion, in vitro and in vivo studies showed that SA-loaded microspheres were proven to be highly effective in the treatment of ocular keratitis. PMID:19223014

  1. 75 FR 34624 - Revocation of Class D and E Airspace; Big Delta, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... airspace at Big Delta, AK (75 FR 17322). Controlled airspace serving Allen Army Airfield was revised in... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revocation of Class D and E Airspace; Big Delta, AK... Class D and E airspace at Big Delta, AK, to eliminate duplicated controlled airspace serving Allen...

  2. N, N′-Olefin Functionalized Bis-Imidazolium Gold(I) Salt Is an Efficient Candidate to Control Keratitis-Associated Eye Infection

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Tapastaru; Roymahapatra, Gourisankar; Porto, William F.; Seth, Saikat; Ghorai, Sudipta; Saha, Suman; Sengupta, Jayangshu; Franco, Octávio L.; Dinda, Joydev; Mandal, Santi M.

    2013-01-01

    Keratitis treatment has become more complicated due to the emergence of bacterial or fungal pathogens with enhanced antibiotic resistance. The pharmaceutical applications of N-heterocyclic carbene complexes have received remarkable attention due to their antimicrobial properties. In this paper, the new precursor, 3,3′-(p-phenylenedimethylene) bis{1-(2- methyl-allyl)imidazolium} bromide (1a) and its analogous PF6 salt (1b) were synthesized. Furthermore, silver(I) and gold(I) -N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes [Ag2LBr2/Au2LBr2; 2a/3a], [(Ag2L2)(PF6)2/(Au2L2)(PF6)2; 2b/3b] were developed from their corresponding ligands. All compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activities against multiple keratitis-associated human eye pathogens, including bacteria and fungi. Complexes 2a and 3a showed highest activity, and the effectiveness of 3a was also studied, focusing eradication of pathogen biofilm. Furthermore, the structures of 1a, 2a and 3b were determined using single crystal X-ray analysis, 2b and 3a were optimized theoretically. The mechanism of action of 3a was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and docking experiments, suggesting that its target is the cell membrane. In summary, 3a may be helpful in developing antimicrobial therapies in patients suffering from keratitis-associated eye infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. PMID:23554886

  3. Temperature Instability of ReNu with MoistureLoc: A New Theory to Explain the Worldwide Fusarium Keratitis Epidemic of 2004–2006

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, John D.; Warwar, Ronald E.; Elder, B. Laurel; Northern, William I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose A 2006 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspection of Bausch & Lomb’s (B&L's) Greenville, South Carolina, manufacturing site indicated that B&L failed to regulate storage and transport temperatures of their products. The present study investigated the effect of storage temperature on the ability of contact lens solutions to inhibit growth of Fusarium species. Methods Six contact lens solutions were studied: ReNu with MoistureLoc (ReNu ML), ReNu MultiPlus, Complete Moistureplus, AQuify, Clear Care, and OPTI-FREE RepleniSH. Two bottles of each solution were separately stored at room temperature and 60°C for 4 weeks, serially diluted, then tested for their ability to inhibit growth of 11 Fusarium isolates (7 of which were associated with the keratitis epidemic). Results ReNu ML demonstrated the greatest decline in efficacy after 60°C storage. Clear Care and ReNu MultiPlus performed the best. Regarding the keratitis epidemic isolates only, the ReNu ML bottle stored at room temperature allowed growth in 27 of 84 combinations vs 67 of 84 combinations with the 60°C stored bottle. Conclusions When exposed to prolonged temperature elevation, ReNu ML loses its in vitro fungistatic activity to a much greater extent than other products. Improper temperature control of ReNu ML may have contributed to the Fusarium keratitis epidemic of 2004–2006. PMID:19277227

  4. Alphabetical Index of Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection ) Back To Top K Kala-azar (Leishmaniasis, Leishmania Infection) Keratitis ( Acanthamoeba Infection) Back To Top L Leishmaniasis (Kala-azar, Leishmania Infection) Lice Infestation (Body, Head, or Pubic Lice, ...

  5. Effects of single-base substitutions within the acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA promoter on transcription and on binding of transcription initiation factor and RNA polymerase I

    SciTech Connect

    Kownin, P.; Bateman, E.; Paule, M.R.

    1988-02-01

    Single-point mutations were introduced into the promoter region of the Acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA gene by chemical mutagen treatment of a single-stranded clone in vitro, followed by reverse transcription and cloning of the altered fragment. The promoter mutants were tested for transcription initiation factor (TIF) binding by a template commitment assay plus DNase I footprinting and for transcription by an in vitro runoff assay. Point mutations within the previously identified TIF interaction region (between -20 and -47, motifs A and B) indicated that TIF interacts most strongly with a sequence centered at -29 and less tightly with sequences upstream and downstream. Some alterations of the base sequence closer to the transcription start site (and outside the TIF-protected site) also significantly decrease specific RNA synthesis in vitro. These were within the region which is protected from DNAse I digestion by polymerase I, but these mutations did not detectably affect the binding of polymerase to the promoter.

  6. A ribosomal protein gene cluster is encoded in the mitochondrial DNA of Dictyostelium discoideum: UGA termination codons and similarity of gene order to Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, M; Pi, M; Kurihara, M; Morio, T; Tanaka, Y

    1998-04-01

    We sequenced a region of about 14.5 kb downstream from the ribosomal protein L11 gene (rpl11) in the mitochondrial DNA (54+/-2 kb) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Sequence analysis revealed that eleven ribosomal protein genes and six open reading frames (ORFs) formed a cluster arranged in the order: rpl11-orf189-rps12-rps7-rpl2-rps19-+ ++orf425-orf1740-rpl16-rpl14-orf188- rps14-rps8-rpl6-rps13-orf127-orf796. This order was very similar to that of homologous genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial DNA. The N-terminal region of ORF425 and the C-terminal region of ORF1740 had partial similarities to the S3 ribosomal protein of other organisms. The termination codons of rpl16 and orf188 were UGA, which has not hitherto been found in genes encoded in D. discoideum mitochondrial DNA. PMID:9560439

  7. Novel Biotinylated Lipid Prodrugs of Acyclovir for the Treatment of Herpetic Keratitis (HK): Transporter Recognition, Tissue Stability and Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Earla, Ravinder; Sirimulla, Suman; Bailey, Jake Brain; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Biotinylated lipid prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV) were designed to target the sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) on the cornea to facilitate enhanced cellular absorption of ACV. Methods All the prodrugs were screened for in vitro cellular uptake, interaction with SMVT, docking analysis, cytotoxicity, enzymatic stability and antiviral activity. Results Uptake of biotinylated lipid prodrugs of ACV (B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV) was significantly higher than biotinylated prodrug (B-ACV), lipid prodrugs (R-ACV and 12HS-ACV) and ACV in corneal cells. Transepithelial transport across rabbit corneas indicated the recognition of the prodrugs by SMVT. Average Vina scores obtained from docking studies further confirmed that biotinylated lipid prodrugs possess enhanced affinity towards SMVT. All the prodrugs studied did not cause any cytotoxicity and were found to be safe and non-toxic. B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV were found to be relatively more stable in ocular tissue homogenates and exhibited excellent antiviral activity. Conclusions Biotinylated lipid prodrugs demonstrated synergistic improvement in cellular uptake due to recognition of the prodrugs by SMVT on the cornea and lipid mediated transcellular diffusion. These biotinylated lipid prodrugs appear to be promising drug candidates for the treatment of herpetic keratitis (HK) and may lower ACV resistance in patients with poor clinical response. PMID:23657675

  8. 77 FR 6463 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwigillingok, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ...-2011-0881 was published in the Federal Register (77 FR 6), amending controlled airspace at Kwigillingok... published in the Federal Register on January 3, 2012 (77 FR 6), (FR Doc. 2011-33566), is corrected as... Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwigillingok, AK AGENCY: Federal...

  9. 77 FR 5 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kipnuk, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend controlled airspace at Kipnuk, AK (76 FR... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in...

  10. 76 FR 60714 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Northway, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register to revise Class E airspace at Northway, AK (76 FR 45475...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389...; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034;...

  11. 78 FR 5128 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Savoonga, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... modify controlled airspace at Savoonga, AK (77 FR 61304). Interested parties were invited to participate... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR,...

  12. 75 FR 32269 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Wainwright, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... rulemaking in the Federal Register to revise Class E airspace at Wainwright, AK (75 FR 11480). Interested...; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  13. 76 FR 65944 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Tatitlek, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... to establish Class E airspace at Tatitlek, AK (76 FR 49388). Interested parties were invited to... not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec....

  14. Ak-Chin Indian Community Biomass Feasiiblity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Moser, RCM Digesters, Inc.; Mark Randall, Daystar Consulting, LLC; Leonard S. Gold, Ak-Chin Energy Services & Utility Strategies Consulting Group

    2005-12-31

    Study of the conversion of chicken litter to biogas for the production of energy. There was an additional requirement that after extracting the energy from the chicken litter the nutrient value of the raw chicken litter had to be returned to the Ak-Chin Farms for use as fertilizer in a form and delivery method acceptable to the Farm.

  15. 78 FR 4586 - Environmental Impact Statement: Kake Access, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Kake Access, AK ACTION: Notice of intent... issuing this notice to advise the public that FHWA will prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS... Meetings will be held in the early Spring of 2013 to receive oral and written comments on...

  16. 77 FR 6 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwigillingok, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp... controlled airspace at Kwigillingok, AK (76 FR 54151). Interested parties were invited to participate in this... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation...

  17. 76 FR 75447 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Emmonak, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend controlled airspace at Emmonak, AK (76 FR... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  18. 75 FR 33165 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Galena, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1... airspace at Galena, AK (75 FR 17892). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory...

  19. 78 FR 8962 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kasigluk, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... rulemaking to modify controlled airspace at Kasigluk, AK (77 FR 60660). Interested parties were invited to... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034..., 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The...

  20. 75 FR 62459 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Unalakleet, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Federal Register to revise Class E airspace at Unalakleet, AK (75 FR 32865). Interested parties were...; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The incorporation by reference in 14...

  1. 76 FR 43823 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Yakutat, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revision of Class E Airspace; Yakutat, AK AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action revises Class E airspace...

  2. 76 FR 8626 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Shungnak, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revision of Class E Airspace; Shungnak, AK AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action revises Class E airspace...

  3. 76 FR 8624 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Barrow, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... revise Class E airspace at Barrow, Alaska (75 FR 71046). Interested parties were invited to participate..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revision of Class E Airspace; Barrow, AK AGENCY:...

  4. 78 FR 59622 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Akutan, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) standard instrument approach procedures at..., Akutan, AK (78 FR 45477). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  5. 75 FR 11905 - Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Fairbanks, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... or interests therein, from other willing sellers in other national wildlife refuges in Alaska, or to... Fish and Wildlife Service Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Fairbanks, AK AGENCY: U.S. Fish and... Wildlife Refuge final environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  6. 76 FR 66178 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Umiat, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register to revise Class E airspace at Umiat, AK (76 FR 49387... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in...

  7. 78 FR 16399 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Unalakleet, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... / Friday, March 15, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation... (NPRM) to modify controlled airspace at Unalakleet, AK (77 FR 27149). Interested parties were invited to... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of...

  8. 78 FR 45849 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Gustavus, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend controlled airspace at Gustavus, AK (78 FR 31871... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2....

  9. Strain-dependent production of interleukin-17/interferon-γ and matrix remodeling–associated genes in experimental Candida albicans keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yanli; Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Hongxia; Chen, Hao; Song, Wengang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the role of genetic background in determining the development or prognosis of experimental fungal keratitis by comparing the disease courses and related molecules of experimental Candida albicans in two common mouse strains. Methods After intrastromal inoculation of 1×105 C. albicans blastospores into corneas of Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice, all mice developed typical keratitis. The disease was monitored using a slit lamp microscope and scored for comparison of symptoms. At desired time points, blood was collected and corneal homogenates were prepared for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurement of interferon (IFN)γ or interleukin (IL)17. Other corneas were processed for histological evaluation, pathogen load measurement, or total RNA extraction, the last of which was subjected to reverse transcription in conjunction with real-time PCR to measure genes of interest in terms of collagens, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs). Results The infected corneas from the two strains presented different manifestations. Corneal transparency was less affected in Balb/c mice than in C57BL/6 mice, and Balb/c corneas contained fewer pathogens than C57BL/6 corneas during the measured period (10 days). In both strains, keratitis started to resolve around days 7–10, but C57BL/6 mice healed slower than Balb/c mice as indicated by disease presentation, histology, and pathogen burden assay. By day 7 post infection, pseudohyphae were rare but cellular infiltration remained intensive in both strains. The surface of the Balb/c corneas remained relatively intact and smooth, and C57BL/6 corneal lesions produced open erosion areas. Perforation was never seen in the current study setting. In both sera and corneas, IL17 expression increased earlier than IFNγ, and C57BL/6 mice produced higher IL17 levels and lower IFNγ levels than Balb/c mice. Compared with C57BL/6 mice, Balb/c corneas produced more MMP

  10. [Para-aminobenzoic acid in therapy of experimental keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus in rabbits: the therapeutic effect and decrease of infectious titer].

    PubMed

    Akberova, S I; Leont'eva, N A; Stroeva, O G; Galegov, G A

    1996-01-01

    Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) in low concentrations exerted an antiherpetic effect with a good therapeutic result in rabbits with experimental keratoconjunctivitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) (experimental group). In group 2 (control) 0.9% NaCl solution was used as placebo. The animals were infected by instillation of HSV-1 on the cornea predissected with a bifurcation needle. The severity of keratitis was assessed in scores after A. A. Kasparov et al. PABA and placebo were administered starting from day 3 postinfection as subconjunctival injections and then instillations. In experimental group (5 rabbits, 10 eyes) the degree of keratitis reduced from 3.0 +/- 0.2 to 1.7 +/- 0.1 points within the first 4 days. Complete epithelialization was over by day 4.4 +/- 0.4, clinical cure was attained by days 12-13. In control group (6 rabbits, 12 eyes) erosion of the cornea and severity of keratitis increased from 2.9 +/- 0.07 to 3.8 +/- 0.2 points by day 4 postinoculation after placebo was started, after which it reduced; epithelialization was over by day 8.2 +/- 0.3, clinical cure by days 13-14. Infective titer in the cornea was determined in VERO cell culture from the degree of virus-induced cytopathogenic effect and expressed in lgTCE50. On day 13 this parameter was reliably higher in the control group in comparison with the experimental (3.2 vs. 1.8), this confirming the virucidal effect of PABA. PMID:9019907

  11. An Improvement of the Efficacy of Moxifloxacin HCl for the Treatment of Bacterial Keratitis by the Formulation of Ocular Mucoadhesive Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Dandagi, Panchaxari Mallappa; Belekar, Amit Manohar; Mastiholimath, Vinayak Shivamurthy; Gadad, Anand Panchakshari; Sontake, Vivek Wamanrao; Salian, Prashant Sanjivrao

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare novel ocular mucoadhesive microspheres of Moxifloxacin HCl to increase its residence time on the ocular surface and to enhance its therapeutic efficacy in ocular bacterial keratitis. Microspheres were fabricated with different grades of Methocel and Sodium CMC as polymers. Microspheres were evaluated for their particle size, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, mucoadhesion, antimicrobial efficacy, and in vitro drug release studies. In vivo studies were carried out for the promising formulation on eyes of albino rabbits by inducing bacterial keratitis. A sterile microspheres suspension in light mineral oil was applied to infected eyes twice a day. A marketed conventional eye drop was used as a positive control. Eyes were examined daily for improvement of clinical signs of bacterial keratitis by an ophthalmologist. The average particle size of microspheres was found to be less than 80 μm. Methocel microspheres were found to have a smoother surface than Sodium CMC. Entrapment efficiency was enhanced with an increased polymer concentration and viscosity. The formulation containing Methocel K100M with a drug: polymer ratio of 1:2 exerted longer corneal and conjunctival mucoadhesion time of 8.45±0.15 h and 9.40±0.53 h respectively. In vitro release of Moxifloxacin HCl from microspheres was retarded with increased viscosity and concentration of polymers, and was controlled by diffusion as well as polymer relaxation. All formulations showed comparable antimicrobial activity in comparison with conventional marketed eye drops. The formulation containing Methocel K100M with a drug: polymer ratio of 1:2 was found to be a promising formulation and was used for the in vivo studies. The in vivo studies revealed that microspheres demonstrated significantly lower clinical scores and reduced the total duration of therapy than the marketed Moxifloxacin HCl eye drops. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that ocular mucoadhesive microspheres of

  12. An Improvement of the Efficacy of Moxifloxacin HCl for the Treatment of Bacterial Keratitis by the Formulation of Ocular Mucoadhesive Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Dandagi, Panchaxari Mallappa; Belekar, Amit Manohar; Mastiholimath, Vinayak Shivamurthy; Gadad, Anand Panchakshari; Sontake, Vivek Wamanrao; Salian, Prashant Sanjivrao

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare novel ocular mucoadhesive microspheres of Moxifloxacin HCl to increase its residence time on the ocular surface and to enhance its therapeutic efficacy in ocular bacterial keratitis. Microspheres were fabricated with different grades of Methocel and Sodium CMC as polymers. Microspheres were evaluated for their particle size, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, mucoadhesion, antimicrobial efficacy, and in vitro drug release studies. In vivo studies were carried out for the promising formulation on eyes of albino rabbits by inducing bacterial keratitis. A sterile microspheres suspension in light mineral oil was applied to infected eyes twice a day. A marketed conventional eye drop was used as a positive control. Eyes were examined daily for improvement of clinical signs of bacterial keratitis by an ophthalmologist. The average particle size of microspheres was found to be less than 80 μm. Methocel microspheres were found to have a smoother surface than Sodium CMC. Entrapment efficiency was enhanced with an increased polymer concentration and viscosity. The formulation containing Methocel K100M with a drug: polymer ratio of 1:2 exerted longer corneal and conjunctival mucoadhesion time of 8.45±0.15 h and 9.40±0.53 h respectively. In vitro release of Moxifloxacin HCl from microspheres was retarded with increased viscosity and concentration of polymers, and was controlled by diffusion as well as polymer relaxation. All formulations showed comparable antimicrobial activity in comparison with conventional marketed eye drops. The formulation containing Methocel K100M with a drug: polymer ratio of 1:2 was found to be a promising formulation and was used for the in vivo studies. The in vivo studies revealed that microspheres demonstrated significantly lower clinical scores and reduced the total duration of therapy than the marketed Moxifloxacin HCl eye drops. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that ocular mucoadhesive microspheres of

  13. Tacrolimus (FK506) Suppresses TREM-1 Expression at an Early but Not at a Late Stage in a Murine Model of Fungal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiuhua; Lin, Binwu; Huang, Xi; Zhong, Jing; Li, Weihua; Lin, Xiaolei; Sun, Yifang; Yuan, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy and mechanism of tacrolimus(FK506), which is a novel macrolide immunosuppressant, in inhibiting triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) expression in a murine keratitis model induced by Aspergillus fumigatus. Method TREM-1 was detected in 11 fungus-infected human corneas by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). RAW264.7 macrophages were divided into four groups, which received treatment with zymosan (100 µg/ml), zymosan (100 µg/ml) + mTREM-1/Fc protein (1 µg/ml), or zymosan (100 µg/ml) + FK506 (20 µM) or negative-control treatment. After this treatment, the expression of TREM-1, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) was assayed using qRT-PCR and ELISA. The mouse model of fungal keratitis was created by intrastromal injection with Aspergillus fumigatus, and the mice were divided into 2 groups: group A received vehicle eye drops 4 times each day, and group B received 4 doses of FK506 eye drops each day. Corneal damage was evaluated by clinical scoring and histologic examination,and myeloperoxidase (MPO) protein levels were also detected by ELISA. The expression of TREM-1, IL-1β and TNFα was then determined at different time points using qRT-PCR and ELISA. Results TREM-1 expression dramatically increased in the human corneas with fungal keratitis. In contrast, FK506 reduced the expression of TREM-1, IL-1β and TNFα in RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated with zymosan. In the mouse model, at day 1 post-infection, the corneal score of the FK506-treated group was lower than that of the control, and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) infiltration was diminished. TREM-1, IL-1β and TNFα expression was significantly reduced at the same time point. However, the statistically significant differences in cytokine expression, clinical scores and infiltration disappeared at 5 days post-infection. Conclusions FK506 may inhibit the inflammation induced by fungi and alleviate the severity of corneal

  14. Antibacterial susceptibility patterns for microbial isolates associated with infectious keratitis in horses: 63 cases (1986-1994).

    PubMed

    Moore, C P; Collins, B K; Fales, W H

    1995-10-01

    Seventy-three aerobic bacterial isolates were cultured from 64 eyes of 63 horses with infectious keratitis. Forty-two (58%) of the organisms isolated initially were gram-positive (g+, 10 genera) and 31 (42%) were gram-negative (g-, 5 genera). After local antimicrobial treatment, repeat cultures from samples obtained from 15 eyes of hospitalized horses yielded 21 secondary bacterial isolates. Staphylococci spp and Streptococci spp were the most common g(+) isolates and accounted for 79% of g(+) organisms isolated initially. Antibiograms revealed ticarcillin to be the most efficacious antibiotic tested on g(+) organisms, with 28 of 30 (93%) being susceptible. Of commercially available topical ophthalmic antibiotics tested on g(+) organisms, erythromycin was the most efficacious, with 32 of 35 (91%) isolates being susceptible. Pseudomonas spp, Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter spp accounted for 68% of g(-) organisms isolated initially. Gentamicin, tobramycin, polymyxin B, and neomycin were highly effective in vitro against initial g(-) isolates. Chloramphenicol was ineffective against g(+) and g(-) organisms isolated initially. A significantly (P < 0.05) higher frequency of g(-) organisms was noticed on repeat cultures after intensive topical antimicrobial treatments as compared to organisms isolated at initial examination. Pseudomonas organisms isolated from second cultures were resistant to gentamicin, but susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Overall, secondary g(-) isolates were more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, neomycin, tobramycin, or amikacin than to gentamicin. Fungi were isolated in 24 of 63 (38%) horses in the study. Twenty-five filamentous fungi and 2 yeasts were identified from 24 eyes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7559027

  15. Phylogenetic diversity and microsphere array-based genotyping of human pathogenic Fusaria, including isolates from the multistate contact lens-associated U.S. keratitis outbreaks of 2005 and 2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2005-06, outbreaks of Fusarium keratitis associated with soft contact lens use occurred in multiple U.S. states and Puerto Rico. A case-control study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed a significant association between infections and the use of one particula...

  16. Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, Jeffrey

    2012-06-30

    In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (“Air Products”) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace “topgas” generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporation’s Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

  17. Tsukamurella hongkongensis sp. nov. and Tsukamurella sinensis sp. nov., isolated from patients with keratitis, catheter-related bacteraemia and conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jade L L; Tang, Ying; Wong, Samson S Y; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Huang, Yi; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Choi, Garnet K Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Three bacterial strains, HKU51T, HKU52T and HKU53, were isolated from a conjunctival swab, corneal scraping and blood culture of three patients in Hong Kong with conjunctivitis, keratitis and catheter-related bacteraemia, respectively. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, aerobic, catalase-positive, non-sporulating and non-motile bacilli. The three strains had unique biochemical profiles that were distinguishable from those of closely related species of the genus Tsukamurella. Fatty acids, mycolic acids, cell-wall sugars and peptidoglycan analyses showed that they were typical of members of Tsukamurella. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 100 % sequence identity between HKU52T and HKU53, and the two strains shared 99.5 % sequence identity with Tsukamurella sunchonensis JCM 15929T and Tsukamurella pseudospumae JCM 13375T; HKU51T shared 99.6 % sequence identity with Tsukamurella pulmonis CCUG 35732T. The DNA G+C contents of strains HKU51T, HKU52T and HKU53 were 70.9 ± 2.2, 71.3 ± 2.1 and 71.2 ± 2.3 mol% (mean ± sd; n = 3), respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization confirmed that the novel strains were distinct from other known species of the genus Tsukamurella ( ≤ 50.1 ± 3.7 % DNA-DNA relatedness); two of the isolates, HKU52T and HKU53, represented the same species ( ≥ 94.6 ± 5.6 % DNA-DNA relatedness), while the third isolate, HKU51T, represented another species. The novel species Tsukamurella hongkongensis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate strains HKU52T and HKU53, with HKU52T ( = JCM 30715T = DSM 100208T) as the type strain; whilst another novel species, Tsukamurella sinensis sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate the third isolate, HKU51T ( = JCM 30714T = DSM 100207T), which is designated the type strain. PMID:26530900

  18. A bifunctional Delta12,Delta15-desaturase from Acanthamoeba castellanii directs the synthesis of highly unusual n-1 series unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sayanova, Olga; Haslam, Richard; Guschina, Irina; Lloyd, David; Christie, William W; Harwood, John L; Napier, Johnathan A

    2006-12-01

    The free-living soil protozoon Acanthamoeba castellanii synthesizes a range of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the balance of which can be altered by environmental changes. We have isolated and functionally characterized in yeast a microsomal desaturase from A. castellanii, which catalyzes the sequential conversion of C(16) and C(18) Delta9-monounsaturated fatty acids to di- and tri-unsaturated forms. In the case of C(16) substrates, this bifunctional A. castellanii Delta12,Delta15-desaturase generated a highly unusual fatty acid, hexadecatrienoic acid (16:3Delta(9,12,15)(n-1)). The identification of a desaturase, which can catalyze the insertion of a double bond between the terminal two carbons of a fatty acid represents a new addition to desaturase functionality and plasticity. We have also co-expressed in yeast the A. castellanii bifunctional Delta12,Delta15-desaturase with a microsomal Delta6-desaturase, resulting in the synthesis of the highly unsaturated C(16) fatty acid hexadecatetraenoic acid (16:4Delta(6,9,12,15)(n-1)), previously only reported in marine microorganisms. Our work therefore demonstrates the feasibility of the heterologous synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the n-1 series. The presence of a bifunctional Delta12,Delta15-desaturase in A. castellanii is also considered with reference to the evolution of desaturases and the lineage of this protist. PMID:16950768

  19. Establishment and Validation of Whole-Cell Based Fluorescence Assays to Identify Anti-Mycobacterial Compounds Using the Acanthamoeba castellanii - Mycobacterium marinum Host-Pathogen System

    PubMed Central

    Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Harrison, Christopher; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; McKinney, John; Scapozza, Leonardo; Hilbi, Hubert; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is considered to be one of the world’s deadliest disease with 2 million deaths each year. The need for new antitubercular drugs is further exacerbated by the emergence of drug-resistance strains. Despite multiple recent efforts, the majority of the hits discovered by traditional target-based screening showed low efficiency in vivo. Therefore, there is heightened demand for whole-cell based approaches directly using host-pathogen systems. The phenotypic host-pathogen assay described here is based on the monitoring of GFP-expressing Mycobacterium marinum during infection of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. The assay showed straight-forward medium-throughput scalability, robustness and ease of manipulation, demonstrating its qualities as an efficient compound screening system. Validation with a series of known antitubercular compounds highlighted the advantages of the assay in comparison to previously published macrophage-Mycobacterium tuberculosis-based screening systems. Combination with secondary growth assays based on either GFP-expressing D. discoideum or M. marinum allowed us to further fine-tune compound characterization by distinguishing and quantifying growth inhibition, cytotoxic properties and antibiotic activities of the compounds. The simple and relatively low cost system described here is most suitable to detect anti-infective compounds, whether they present antibiotic activities or not, in which case they might exert anti-virulence or host defense boosting activities, both of which are largely overlooked by classical screening approaches. PMID:24498207

  20. Francisella tularensis type A Strains Cause the Rapid Encystment of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Survive in Amoebal Cysts for Three Weeks post Infection

    SciTech Connect

    El-Etr, S H; Margolis, J; Monack, D; Robison, R; Cohen, M; Moore, E; Rasley, A

    2009-07-28

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia, has recently gained increased attention due to the emergence of tularemia in geographical areas where the disease has been previously unknown, and the organism's potential as a bioterrorism agent. Although F. tularensis has an extremely broad host range, the bacterial reservoir in nature has not been conclusively identified. In this study, the ability of virulent F. tularensis strains to survive and replicate in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii was explored. We observe that A. castellanii trophozoites rapidly encyst in response to F. tularensis infection and that this rapid encystment phenotype (REP) is caused by factor(s) secreted by amoebae and/or F. tularensis into the co-culture media. Further, our results indicate that in contrast to LVS, virulent strains of F. tularensis can survive in A. castellanii cysts for at least 3 weeks post infection and that induction of rapid amoeba encystment is essential for survival. In addition, our data indicate that pathogenic F. tularensis strains block lysosomal fusion in A. castellanii. Taken together, these data suggest that the interactions between F. tularensis strains and amoeba may play a role in the environmental persistence of F. tularensis.