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Sample records for acanthus ebracteatus vahl

  1. Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. Ethanol Extract Enhancement of the Efficacy of the Collagen Scaffold in Wound Closure: A Study in a Full-Thickness-Wound Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Somchaichana, Jutamas; Bunaprasert, Tanom; Patumraj, Suthiluk

    2012-01-01

    Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. is a Thai herb that is effective in wound healing. We sought to quantitatively determine whether or not the combined application of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. and a collagen scaffold will increase wound closure and angiogenesis. Balb/c mice (body weight: 22–25 g) were anesthetized with sodium thiopental. The dorsal skin incision measuring 1.5 × 1.5 cm was made and then deepened using scissors to produce a full-thickness incision down to the level of the panniculus carnosus. The size of the wound was approximately 10% of the total body surface area. The collagen sheet was implanted onto the wound. Animals were divided into 4 major groups as follows: wound with normal saline (W-NSS), wound treated with 0.3 g/kg BW of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. extract (W-AE (0.3 g/kg.bw)), wound implanted with collagen scaffold (W-Coll), and wound implanted with collagen scaffold and treated with 0.3 g/kg BW of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. (W-Coll-AE combination). On day 14, the W-Coll-AE group showed decreased wound areas and increased capillary vascularity (CV) when compared to the other 3 groups, W-NSS, W-AE0.3, and W-Coll. In the present study, the combination of AE0.3 with collagen showed the best effect on skin angiogenesis and promoted wound closure with less neutrophil infiltration. PMID:23093862

  2. Phytochemical and pharmacological potential of Acanthus ilicifolius

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharya; Aeri, Vidhu

    2013-01-01

    Acanthus ilicifolius (Acanthaceae) has received considerable attention due to its wide range of secondary metabolites and its traditional usage in Indian and Chinese system of medicine. This plant is reported to be a mangrove. Mangrove survives in the most hostile environment with fluctuating tidal and saline regime. Hence, these plants are considered to be rich sources of steroids, triterpenoids, saponins, flavonoids, alkaloids, and tannins. Present review article is an attempt to cover recent developments in phytochemical and pharmacological potential of drug. Traditionally, the plant has been used for dyspepsia, paralysis, asthsma, headache, rheumatism, and skin diseases. The plant is known as ‘Krishnasaireyaka’ or ‘Karimkurunji’, is one of the 9 plants equated to the drug ‘Sahachara,’ which is used in Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatic complaints. The plant has not been explored to its full potential. The review will be a good reference tool for investigators who wish to work on natural compounds with free radical scavenging activity to combat diseases associated with stress. PMID:23559819

  3. Antimicrobial activity of Acanthus ilicifolius: Skin infection pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Govindasamy, Chinnavenkataraman; Arulpriya, Mani

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antimicrobial activity of Acanthus ilicifolius against the skin infecting bacterial and fungal pathogens. Through the literature survey, the mangrove plant Acanthus ilicifolius was used in skin infection diseases and have potential anti-inflammatory activity. Methods Antimicrobial activity of the leaf extracts was tested using agar well diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were carried out. Results Among the different extracts, chloroform extract showed maximum activity against the bacterial pathogens methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Trichophyton rubrum. Methanol and acetone extracts showed maximum activity against Staphylococcus epidermis and Lactobacillus plantarum respectively. Chloroform extracts showed the lowest MIC (0.5 mg/mL) and MBC (2 mg/mL) values against the skin pathogens compared with other extracts. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of resins, steroids, tannins, glycosides, sugars, carbohydrates, saponins, sterols, terpenoids, phenol, alkaloids, cardiac glycosides and catechol. Conclusions Further, the separation of potential compounds from the crude extracts will be useful for control the skin infection pathogens.

  4. Toxicity of cadmium and zinc to encystment and in vitro excystment of Parorchis acanthus (Digenea: Philophthalmidae).

    PubMed

    Morley, N J; Crane, M; Lewis, J W

    2001-01-01

    The toxicity of cadmium, zinc and cadmium/zinc mixtures at concentrations ranging from 1000 to 50000 microg/l were investigated against cercariae and metacercariae of Parorchis acanthus obtained from the dog whelk Nucella lapillus. Cercarial encystment at concentrations of 25000 microg/l or higher was significantly impaired by all test metals; however, at lower concentrations only zinc demonstrated toxicity. Mixtures of cadmium and zinc had a synergistic effect compared with single metal toxicity but only at 50000 microg/l. Excystment in vitro was only significantly affected by cercariae exposed to cadmium/zinc mixtures whilst encysting. Twenty-four h exposures of fully formed cysts had no effect on excystment in vitro. Effects on in vitro excystment rates over a 2 h period demonstrated widespread effects for cercariae-exposed P. acanthus. No effects were evident on excystment rates of cyst-exposed parasites. PMID:11197767

  5. Anticancer activity of Aristolochia ringens Vahl. (Aristolochiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Akindele, Abidemi James; Wani, Zahoor; Mahajan, Girish; Sharma, Sadhana; Aigbe, Flora Ruth; Satti, Naresh; Adeyemi, Olufunmilayo Olaide; Mondhe, Dilip Manikrao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and sustained focus is on the discovery and development of newer and better tolerated anticancer drugs especially from plants. The sulforhodamine B (SRB) in vitro cytotoxicity assay, sarcoma-180 (S-180) ascites and solid tumor, and L1210 lymphoid leukemia in vivo models were used to investigate the anticancer activity of root extracts of Aristolochia ringens Vahl. (Aristolochiaceae; 馬兜鈴 mǎ dōu líng). AR-A001 (IC50 values of 20 μg/mL, 22 μg/mL, 3 μg/mL, and 24 μg/mL for A549, HCT-116, PC3, and THP-1 cell lines, respectively), and AR-A004 (IC50 values of 26 μg/mL, 19.5 μg/mL, 12 μg/mL, 28 μg/mL, 30 μg/mL, and 22 μg/mL for A549, HCT-116, PC3, A431, HeLa, and THP-1, respectively), were observed to be significantly active in vitro. Potency was highest with AR-A001 and AR-A004 for PC3 with IC50 values of 3 μg/mL and 12 μg/mL, respectively. AR-A001 and AR-A004 produced significant (p < 0.05–0.001) dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth in the S-180 ascites model with peak effects produced at the highest dose of 120 mg/kg. Inhibition values were 79.51% and 89.98% for AR-A001 and AR-A004, respectively. In the S-180 solid tumor model, the inhibition of tumor growth was 29.45% and 50.50% for AR-A001 (120 mg/kg) and AR-A004 (110 mg/kg), respectively, compared to 50.18% for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 20 mg/kg). AR-A001 and AR-A004 were also significantly active in the leukemia model with 211.11% and 155.56% increase in mean survival time (MST) compared to a value of 211.11% for 5-FU. In conclusion, the ethanolic (AR-A001) and dichloromethane:methanol (AR-A004) root extracts of AR possess significant anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26151007

  6. A generalized pollination system in the tropics: bats, birds and Aphelandra acanthus

    PubMed Central

    Muchhala, Nathan; Caiza, Angelica; Vizuete, Juan Carlos; Thomson, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims A number of different types of flower-visiting animals coexist in any given habitat. What evolutionary and ecological factors influence the subset of these that a given plant relies on for its pollination? Addressing this question requires a mechanistic understanding of the importance of different potential pollinators in terms of visitation rate (pollinator ‘quantity’) and effectiveness at transferring pollen (pollinator ‘quality’) is required. While bat-pollinated plants typically are highly specialized to bats, there are some instances of bat-pollinated plants that use other pollinators as well. These generalized exceptions tend to occur in habitats where bat ‘quantity’ is poor due to low or fluctuating bat densities. Methods Aphelandra acanthus occurs in tropical cloud forests with relatively high densities of bat visitors, yet displays a mix of floral syndrome characteristics, suggesting adaptation to multiple types of pollinators. To understand its pollination system better, aspects of its floral phenology and the ‘quantity’ and ‘quality’ components of pollination by its floral visitors are studied here. Key Results Flowers were found to open and senesce throughout the day and night, although anther dehiscence was restricted to the late afternoon and night. Videotaping reveals that flowers are visited nocturnally by bats and moths, and diurnally by hummingbirds. Analysis of pollen deposition shows that bats regularly transfer large amounts of conspecific pollen, while hummingbirds occasionally transfer some pollen, and moths rarely do so. Conclusions Hummingbirds and bats were comparable in terms of pollination ‘quantity’, while bats were the most effective in terms of ‘quality’. Considering these components together, bats are responsible for approx. 70 % of A. acanthus pollination. However, bats also transferred remarkably large amounts of foreign pollen along with the conspecific grains (three of four grains

  7. Seagrass as the main food source of Neaxius acanthus (Thalassinidea: Strahlaxiidae), its burrow associates, and of Corallianassa coutierei (Thalassinidea: Callianassidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, Dominik; Asmus, Harald; Vonk, Jan Arie

    2008-09-01

    Burrows of the thalassinidean shrimps Neaxius acanthus and Corallianassa coutierei are striking aspects in tropical seagrass beds of the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia. Burrow construction, behaviour, burrow type and associated commensal community were investigated to clarify the ecological role and food requirements of these shrimps and their commensals. Gut content analysis and stable-isotope data were used to unravel the food sources and the trophic interactions among the commensal community. Individuals of Neaxius acanthus were caught on Bone Batang Island. In narrow aquaria filled with sediment they constructed burrows resembling those found in the field. During burrow construction and maintenance only little sediment was brought to the surface, most was sorted and compacted to create a distinct lining. Maintenance work by single shrimps typically took about 5 min, after which the shrimp walked up to the entrance and rested for a similar period of time. There were no differences in behaviour between day and night. Intrasexual encounters inside the burrow were characterised by a high level of aggression and all resulted in one participant being driven out of the burrow. Intersexual encounters led to coexistence with both animals taking turns in burrow maintenance and guarding the entrance. Offered seagrass leaves were pulled underground, cut into pieces and eventually integrated into the lining. Burrows of Corallianassa coutierei resembled a deep U-shape. Chambers branching off halfway down and at the deepest point contained seagrass fragments. All steep parts of the burrow were lined similar to burrows of N. acanthus. No commensals were found associated with Corallianassa coutierei. However, burrows of Neaxius acanthus in the field typically contained a pair of shrimps, up to 8 individuals of the commensal bivalve Barrimysia cumingii and large numbers of gammarid amphipods. Other animals found associated with the burrow were the goby Austrolethops wardi, a

  8. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Development of microsatellite markers for two nonviviparous mangrove species, Acanthus ilicifolius and Lumnitzera racemosa.

    PubMed

    Geng, Q F; Lian, C L; Tao, J M; Hogetsu, T

    2008-03-01

    Eight and nine of microsatellite loci were isolated from two nonviviparous mangrove species, Acanthus ilicifolius and Lumnitzera racemosa, respectively. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to eight in A. ilicifolius and two to nine in L. racemosa. The observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.200 to 0.875 in A. ilicifolius and from 0.025 to 0.350 in L. racemosa. These loci would be effective for analysing genetic diversity and population genetic structure of these two mangrove species. PMID:21585797

  9. Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl: From Traditional Usage to Pharmacological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Pearl Majorie; Yong, Yoke Keong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl belongs to the family of Verbenaceae and is commonly known as Gervao, Brazilian tea, verbena cimarrona, rooter comb, or blue porter weed. It is one of the important plants with high medicinal and nutraceutical benefits. S. jamaicensis contains various medicinal properties in traditional and folk medicinal systems, with cures for several diseases. Objective. The objective of this review paper is to collect information concerning the morphology, distribution, traditional usage, phytochemical compositions, biological activities, and safety data of S. jamaicensis. Materials and Methods. The information was obtained from literature search through electronic databases such as PubMed and Google Scholar on S. jamaicensis. Results and Conclusion. The high medicinal properties of this plant, for instance, antimicrobial and antifungal effect as the main activities, but verbascoside as the main active chemical component, make it a valuable source of the medicinal compound. This review paper summarizes all information concerning the morphology, distribution, traditional usage, phytochemical compositions, pharmacological activities, and toxicological studies of S. jamaicensis. PMID:26925152

  10. Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl: From Traditional Usage to Pharmacological Evidence.

    PubMed

    Liew, Pearl Majorie; Yong, Yoke Keong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl belongs to the family of Verbenaceae and is commonly known as Gervao, Brazilian tea, verbena cimarrona, rooter comb, or blue porter weed. It is one of the important plants with high medicinal and nutraceutical benefits. S. jamaicensis contains various medicinal properties in traditional and folk medicinal systems, with cures for several diseases. Objective. The objective of this review paper is to collect information concerning the morphology, distribution, traditional usage, phytochemical compositions, biological activities, and safety data of S. jamaicensis. Materials and Methods. The information was obtained from literature search through electronic databases such as PubMed and Google Scholar on S. jamaicensis. Results and Conclusion. The high medicinal properties of this plant, for instance, antimicrobial and antifungal effect as the main activities, but verbascoside as the main active chemical component, make it a valuable source of the medicinal compound. This review paper summarizes all information concerning the morphology, distribution, traditional usage, phytochemical compositions, pharmacological activities, and toxicological studies of S. jamaicensis. PMID:26925152

  11. Taxonomic significance of leaf micromorphology in some selected taxa of Acanthaceae (Peninsular Malaysia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurul-Aini, C. A. C.; Noraini, T.; Latiff, A.; Amirul-Aiman, A. J.; Ruzi, A. R.; Idris, S.

    2014-09-01

    Comparative leaf micromorphology study was conducted in eight taxa of Acanthaceae from Peninsular Malaysia. Eight chosen taxa were Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl, A. ilicifolius L., A. volubilis Wall, A. montanus T. Anderson, Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees, Asystasia gangetica subsp. micrantha (Nees) Ensermu, Chroesthes longifolia (Wight) B. Hansen and Peristrophe roxburghiana (Schult.) Bremek. The objective of this study was to identify the leaf micromorphological characteristics that can be used in species identification and also as supportive data in classification. The procedures involved such as dehydration, critical point drying, gold coated and examination under scanning electron microscope. Findings in this study have demonstrated the similarities and variations in leaf micromorphological characteristics such as in type of epicuticular waxes, cuticular ornamentations, stomata characteristics and in the presence of trichomes. Six types of epicuticular waxes and five types of trichomes were observed. Variations in cuticular ornamentations and stomata structure can be used to differentiate species. One diagnostic character was found and proven to be very useful to identify Acanthus via the presence of simple trichomes (short-conicle like). In conclusion, the results of this study have shown that leaf micromorphological characteristics have taxonomic significance that can be useful in classifications and identification especially at species level.

  12. Phytochemical composition of the essential oil of different populations of Stachys lavandulifolia Vahl

    PubMed Central

    Pirbalouti, Abdollah Ghasemi; Mohammadi, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the chemical variability in inflorescences of wild populations of Stachys lavandulifolia Vahl (S. lavandulifolia) collected throughout two provinces (Isfahan and Chaharmahal va Bakhtiary), Southwest Iran. Methods The essential oils of S. lavandulifolia Vahl from seven locations were obtained by hydro-distillation and analysed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results The results revealed that distinct differences in the content of compounds depending on region of sample collection. The main constituents of the essential oils were α-thujone (0.3%-32.3%), α-pinene (trace to 37.3%), myrcene (0.5%-15.9%), β-phellandrene (1.1%-37.9%), germacrene D (0.4%-11.3%), Δ-cadinene (trace to 11.6%) and 1, 4-methano-1 H-indene (trace to 10.1%). Conclusions The results of the present study indicated that essential oil components of S. lavandulifolia Vahl can be varied with genetic (ecotype), environmental conditions and geographic origin. In general, the essential oils of various populations of S. lavandulifolia Vahl were rich in monoterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids. PMID:23593591

  13. The feeding habits of Austrolethops wardi, a gobiid fish inhabiting burrows of the thalassinidean shrimp Neaxius acanthus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung Liu, Ha Trieu; Kneer, Dominik; Asmus, Harald; Ahnelt, Harald

    2008-09-01

    The feeding habit of Austrolethops wardi (Gobiidae) in the seagrass beds of Barrang Lompo and Bone Batang Island in the Spermonde Archipelago, South West Sulawesi, Indonesia, was investigated through gut content analysis. The feeding preferences of this species are very similar on both islands: A. wardi, a burrow associate of Neaxius acanthus, was found to feed almost exclusively on seagrass (which was found in 100% of the investigated stomachs and made up >94% of food items). However, seagrass epiphytes (<5% of food items) and animal food (<1% of food items) occurred in the guts as well, the latter predominantly in terms of copepods and to a lesser degree in other small invertebrates. These results indicate that animal food is of little importance for A. wardi. Some specimens even contained no parts of animal food.

  14. [Morphology and anatomy of the fruit and seed in development of Guarea macrophylla Vahl. (Meltaceae)].

    PubMed

    Dias Pinto, Daniela; Mourio, Káthia S M; de Souza, Luiz A; Moscheta, Ismar S

    2003-01-01

    Morphology and anatomy of the fruit and seed in development of Guarea macrophylla Vahl. were studied in flowers and fruits collected in secondary forests of Maringá, Paraná, Brazil. Pericarp originates from the wall of the ovary and is constituted of epidermic exocarp, parenchymatous mesocarp with brachysclereids and fibrous and lignified endocarp. The seed develops from the hemianatropous, bitegmic and crassinucellate ovule and it is classified as an exotegmic and exalbuminous one. Exotesta and mesotesta constitute the red sarcotesta, with oily content. PMID:15916178

  15. Evaluation of Chemopreventive Effects of Acanthus ilicifolius against Azoxymethane-Induced Aberrant Crypt Foci in the Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Almagrami, Amel A.; Alshawsh, Mohammed A.; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Shwter, Abdrabuh; Salem, Sameer D.; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acanthus ilicifolius, a mangrove medicinal plant, is traditionally used to treat a variety of diseases. The aim of this research is to assess the chemoprotective outcomes of A. ilicifolius ethanolic extract against azoxymethane (AOM) induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Methodology/Principal Findings In our study, rats were arranged in to five groups. Rats in the normal control group were given subcutaneous injections of normal saline once weekly for 2 weeks. The AOM control, reference and treatment groups were given subcutaneous injection of AOM, 15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for 2 weeks each. The reference group was treated with 35 mg/kg 5-Fluorouracil via intraperitoneal injection once weekly for 8 weeks, and the treatment groups were administered by gavage with 250 and 500 mg/kg A. ilicifolius extract daily for 8 weeks. Both normal and AOM control groups received the vehicle; 10% Tween-20 only. Rats treated with 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg of A. ilicifolius extracts showed a decrease in the mean number of ACF by 65% and 53%, respectively. Those fed with A. ilicifolius showed significantly decreased multiplicity of ACF formations when compared with the results from the AOM control group. The 250 mg/kg A. ilicifolius treatment group showed significant decreases in lipid peroxidation MDA levels when compared with the AOM control group. In immunohistochemistry staining, the proliferating nuclear cell antigen (PCNA)-positive cells were significantly higher in the AOM control group than in the A. ilicifolius-treated groups. RT-PCR showed that A. ilicifolius caused a change in the regulation of apoptosis-related genes expression. Conclusion/Significance The results of the current study show that AOM-treated rats receiving oral exposure to A. ilicifolius demonstrated a significant decrease in the number of ACF in the colon when compared to AOM-treated rats receiving vehicle only. A ilicifolius may be an effective herbal approach for the

  16. Environmental heterogeneity explains the genetic structure of Continental and Mediterranean populations of Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl.

    PubMed

    Temunović, Martina; Franjić, Jozo; Satovic, Zlatko; Grgurev, Marin; Frascaria-Lacoste, Nathalie; Fernández-Manjarrés, Juan F

    2012-01-01

    Tree species with wide distributions often exhibit different levels of genetic structuring correlated to their environment. However, understanding how environmental heterogeneity influences genetic variation is difficult because the effects of gene flow, drift and selection are confounded. We investigated the genetic variation and its ecological correlates in a wind-pollinated Mediterranean tree species, Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl, within a recognised glacial refugium in Croatia. We sampled 11 populations from environmentally divergent habitats within the Continental and Mediterranean biogeographical regions. We combined genetic data analyses based on nuclear microsatellite loci, multivariate statistics on environmental data and ecological niche modelling (ENM). We identified a geographic structure with a high genetic diversity and low differentiation in the Continental region, which contrasted with the significantly lower genetic diversity and higher population divergence in the Mediterranean region. The positive and significant correlation between environmental and genetic distances after controlling for geographic distance suggests an important influence of ecological divergence of the sites in shaping genetic variation. The ENM provided support for niche differentiation between the populations from the Continental and Mediterranean regions, suggesting that contemporary populations may represent two divergent ecotypes. Ecotype differentiation was also supported by multivariate environmental and genetic distance analyses. Our results suggest that despite extensive gene flow in continental areas, long-term stability of heterogeneous environments have likely promoted genetic divergence of ashes in this region and can explain the present-day genetic variation patterns of these ancient populations. PMID:22905171

  17. Environmental Heterogeneity Explains the Genetic Structure of Continental and Mediterranean Populations of Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl

    PubMed Central

    Temunović, Martina; Franjić, Jozo; Satovic, Zlatko; Grgurev, Marin; Frascaria-Lacoste, Nathalie; Fernández-Manjarrés, Juan F.

    2012-01-01

    Tree species with wide distributions often exhibit different levels of genetic structuring correlated to their environment. However, understanding how environmental heterogeneity influences genetic variation is difficult because the effects of gene flow, drift and selection are confounded. We investigated the genetic variation and its ecological correlates in a wind-pollinated Mediterranean tree species, Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl, within a recognised glacial refugium in Croatia. We sampled 11 populations from environmentally divergent habitats within the Continental and Mediterranean biogeographical regions. We combined genetic data analyses based on nuclear microsatellite loci, multivariate statistics on environmental data and ecological niche modelling (ENM). We identified a geographic structure with a high genetic diversity and low differentiation in the Continental region, which contrasted with the significantly lower genetic diversity and higher population divergence in the Mediterranean region. The positive and significant correlation between environmental and genetic distances after controlling for geographic distance suggests an important influence of ecological divergence of the sites in shaping genetic variation. The ENM provided support for niche differentiation between the populations from the Continental and Mediterranean regions, suggesting that contemporary populations may represent two divergent ecotypes. Ecotype differentiation was also supported by multivariate environmental and genetic distance analyses. Our results suggest that despite extensive gene flow in continental areas, long-term stability of heterogeneous environments have likely promoted genetic divergence of ashes in this region and can explain the present-day genetic variation patterns of these ancient populations. PMID:22905171

  18. Stachys lavandulifolia Vahl. and its Relation With Marmazad Activities in Traditional Manuscripts

    PubMed Central

    Minae, Bagher; Sardari, Mehdi; Sharifi, Hossein; Sedigh Rahim Abadi, Massih; Sadeghpour, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Context: In modern phytotherapy, Stachys lavandulifolia Vahl., a type of Stachys also known as Mountain Tea (Chay-e-Kouhi) has been widely studied based on its botanical and therapeutic characteristics over the recent decades. Evidence Acquisition: The present study investigated morphology, botanical characteristics, and some therapeutic activities of this plant and compares them with those of Marmazad, as the traditional equivalent of Stachys in traditional iranian medicine (TIM), to evaluate the similarities between Stachys and Marmazad. Results: In this study by exploring morphology, botanical properties and therapeutic activities of Stachys from modern botany and Marmazad in TIM, comparing them and considering similarities between those botanical properties and some of therapeutic activities this outcome was drawn that what had been known as Marmazad in TIM nowadays is equal to Stachys or Chay-e-Kouhi in modern botany. Conclusions: The achieved findings from this comparison between botanical characteristics and therapeutic activities of Stachys based on modern researches and those of Marmazad by referring to traditional manuscripts revealed significant similarities between them. Also, there were some applications mentioned for Marmazad in TIM which could help new researchers in modern phytotherapy to deal with those dimensions of this herb which are not worked out yet. PMID:26734474

  19. Chemical Diversity and Antimicrobial Activity of Salvia multicaulis Vahl Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Layal; Stien, Didier; Ouaini, Naïm; Eparvier, Véronique; El Beyrouthy, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The chemical compositions and antimicrobial activities of the essential oils (EOs) of aerial parts of Salvia multicaulis Vahl, collected during the same week from two different Lebanese regions, were investigated. The EOs were obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus and characterized by GC and GC/MS analyses. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of these EOs were determined against one Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacteria, one yeast, and five dermatophytes using the broth microdilution technique. One EO was notably active against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and all of the Trichophyton species tested. Nerolidol was found to be the major compound in the active oil; nerolidol was also absent from the inactive oil. This study demonstrated that nerolidol shows antimicrobial activity and therefore significantly contributes to the antimicrobial potential of the oil. The chemical diversity of worldwide S. multicaulis EOs was analyzed, revealing that the EOs of this study belong to two different chemotypes found in the literature. The nerolidol chemotype appears to be restricted to Lebanon, and it can be used as antimicrobial agent against external bacterial and fungal infections. PMID:27038067

  20. EASTERN DODDER (CUSCUTA MONOGYNA VAHL.) SEED GERMINATION AFFECTED BY SOME HERBACEOUS DISTILLATES.

    PubMed

    Movassaghi, M; Hassannejad, S

    2015-01-01

    Eastern dodder (Cuscuta monogyna Vahl.) is one of the noxious parasitic weeds that infected many ornamental trees in green spaces and gardens. Our purpose is to find natural inhibitors for prevention of its seed germination. In order to reach this aim, laboratory studies were conducted by using of herbaceous distillates of Dracocephalum moldavica, Nasturtium officinalis, Malva neglecta, Mentha piperita, Mentha pulegium, Rosa damascene, Ziziphora tenuior, and Urtica dioica on seed germination of C. monogyna. Z. tenuior distillate stimulated C. monogyna seed germination, whereas others reduced this parasitic weed's seed germination. D. moldavica caused maximum inhibition on weed seed germination. Seedling growth of C. monogyna was more affected than its seed germination. All of these herbaceous distillates reduced C. monogyna seedling length so that the latter decreased from 28.2 mm in distilled water to 4.5, 3.97, 3.85, 3.67, 3.1, 2.87, 2.57, 1.9, and 1.17 in M. pulegium, M. piperita, F. officinalis, Z. tenuior, N. officinalis, M. neglecta, R. damascene, U. dioica and D. moldavica, respectively. By using these medicinal plants distillates instead of herbicides, the parasitic weed seedling length and host plant infection will reduce. PMID:27145591

  1. α -Mangostin from Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume Demonstrates Anti-Ulcerogenic Property: A Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam M A; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Mohan, Syam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed Elhassan Taha, Manal; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Hadi, A Hamid A; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Loke Fai, Mun; Rahmani, Mawardi; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal

    2013-01-01

    Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume is an Asian herbal medicine with versatile ethnobiological properties including treatment of gastric ulcer. This study evaluated the antiulcerogenic mechanism(s) of α -mangostin (AM) in a rat model of ulcer. AM is a prenylated xanthone derived through biologically guided fractionation of C. arborescens. Rats were orally pretreated with AM and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol. Following treatment, ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological and immunohistochemical analyses, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and nonprotein sulfhydryl groups (NP-SH) were evaluated. The anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitory effect, and antioxidant activity of AM were also investigated in vitro. AM (10 and 30 mg/kg) inhibited significantly (P < 0.05) ethanol-induced gastric lesions by 66.04% and 74.39 %, respectively. The compound induces the expression of Hsp70, restores GSH levels, decreases lipid peroxidation, and inhibits COX-2 activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AM showed an effective in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The efficacy of the AM was accomplished safely without presenting any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the antioxidant properties and the potent anti-H. pylori, in addition to activation of Hsp70 protein, may contribute to the gastroprotective activity of α -mangostin. PMID:23634169

  2. α-Mangostin from Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume Demonstrates Anti-Ulcerogenic Property: A Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sidahmed, Heyam M. A.; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed Elhassan Taha, Manal; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Loke Fai, Mun; Rahmani, Mawardi; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal

    2013-01-01

    Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume is an Asian herbal medicine with versatile ethnobiological properties including treatment of gastric ulcer. This study evaluated the antiulcerogenic mechanism(s) of α-mangostin (AM) in a rat model of ulcer. AM is a prenylated xanthone derived through biologically guided fractionation of C. arborescens. Rats were orally pretreated with AM and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol. Following treatment, ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological and immunohistochemical analyses, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and nonprotein sulfhydryl groups (NP-SH) were evaluated. The anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitory effect, and antioxidant activity of AM were also investigated in vitro. AM (10 and 30 mg/kg) inhibited significantly (P < 0.05) ethanol-induced gastric lesions by 66.04% and 74.39 %, respectively. The compound induces the expression of Hsp70, restores GSH levels, decreases lipid peroxidation, and inhibits COX-2 activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AM showed an effective in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The efficacy of the AM was accomplished safely without presenting any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the antioxidant properties and the potent anti-H. pylori, in addition to activation of Hsp70 protein, may contribute to the gastroprotective activity of α-mangostin. PMID:23634169

  3. Chemical diversity among the essential oils of wild populations of Stachys lavandulifolia VAHL (Lamiaceae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Yaqub; Hossein Mirjalili, Mohammad; Nazeri, Vahideh

    2013-02-01

    The variation of the essential-oil composition among ten wild populations of Stachys lavandulifolia VAHL (Lamiaceae), collected from different geographical regions of Iran, was assessed by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses, and their intraspecific chemical variability was determined. Altogether, 49 compounds were identified in the oils, and a relatively high variation in their contents was found. The major compounds of the essential oils were myrcene (0.0-26.2%), limonene (0.0-24.5%), germacrene D (4.2-19.3%), bicyclogermacrene (1.6-18.0%), δ-cadinene (6.5-16.0%), pulegone (0.0-15.1%), (Z)-hex-3-enyl tiglate (0.0-15.1%), (E)-caryophyllene (0.0-12.9), α-zingiberene (0.2-12.2%), and spathulenol (1.6-11.1%). For the determination of the chemotypes and the chemical variability, the essential-oil components were subjected to cluster analysis (CA). The five different chemotypes characterized were Chemotype I (germacrene D/bicyclogermacrene), Chemotype II (germacrene D/spathulenol), Chemotype III (limonene/δ-cadinene), Chemotype IV (pulegone), and Chemotype V (α-zingiberene). The high chemical variation among the populations according to their geographical and bioclimatic distribution imposes that conservation strategies of populations should be made appropriately, taking into account these factors. The in situ and ex situ conservation strategies should concern all populations representing the different chemotypes. PMID:23418173

  4. Antimicrobial activities of the methanol extract, fractions and compounds from Ficus polita Vahl. (Moraceae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many plants of the family Moraceae are used in the treatment of infectious diseases. Ficus polita Vahl., an edible plant belonging to this family is used traditionally in case of dyspepsia, infectious diseases, abdominal pains and diarrhea. The present work was designed to assess the antimicrobial activity of the methanol extract from the roots of F. polita (FPR), as well as that of its fractions (FPR1-5) and two of the eight isolated compounds, namely euphol-3-O-cinnamate (1) and (E)-3,5,4'-trihydroxy-stilbene-3,5-O-β-D-diglucopyranoside (8). Methods The liquid microdilution assay was used in the determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimal microbicidal concentration (MMC), against seven bacterial and one fungal species. Results The results of the MIC determination showed that the crude extract, fractions FPR1, FPR2 and compound 8 were able to prevent the growth of the eight tested microorganisms. Other samples showed selective activity. The lowest MIC value of 64 μg/ml for the crude extract was recorded on 50% of the studied microbial species. The corresponding value for fractions of 32 μg/ml was obtained on Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans ATCC strains. The MIC values recorded with compound 8 on the resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 strain was equal to that of chloramphenicol used as reference antibiotic. Conclusion The obtained results highlighted the interesting antimicrobial potency of F. polita as well as that of compound 8, and provided scientific basis for the traditional use of this taxon in the treatment of microbial infections. PMID:21269424

  5. Phytochemical analysis of Convolvulus hystrix Vahl and its biological effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Rezq, A M; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Refai, Mohamed Y; Kumosani, Taha A; Moselhy, Said S

    2015-04-01

    "Convolvulus hystrix Vahl" is a plant that has been known to Ancient Egyptians and to Arabs and its root was used traditionally as a purgative. Our attention was directed to the root bark as we observed that the largest part of the plant is deeply impeded underground. The work plan involved testing experimental animals for the influence of aqueous root bark extract on carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolisms as reflected on the growth and relevant laboratory metabolic assessment parameters. Proximate analysis showed high percentages of moisture (85%) and total lipids (7.2%) and surprising amounts of elements such as barium, strontium, rhodium and tellurium (1.7 mg, 3.1 mg, 8 mg and 9.1 mg/g ash, respectively). Random serum glucose value showed a significant decrease in the treated female group (p < 0.05). Serum total proteins of treated female group were found to be increased significantly (p < 0.001), while it was found to be decreased in the relevant treated male group (p < 0.01), together with a significant decrease in blood urea nitrogen (p < 0.05), with a significant increase in the serum creatinine (p < 0.05). Concerning serum fat metabolic parameters, a significant decrease in the serum triglycerides and high-density lipoproteins (p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively) were found. We concluded that the presence of huge amount of polyphenolics such as tannins is responsible for the overall results documented as growth retarding and antinutritional factors. The results were motivating and pointed out to the possible opening of vast areas of research in the field of natural products. We recommend a series of biochemical and pharmacological studies concerning different parts of the plant as well. PMID:23315089

  6. Acaricidal effect of an isolate from Hoslundia opposita vahl against Amblyomma variegatum (Acari: Ixodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Annan, Kofi; Jackson, Nora; Dickson, Rita A.; Sam, George H.; Komlaga, Gustav

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hoslundia opposita Vahl. (Lamiaceae), a common local shrub in Ghana, is traditionally known not only for its pharmacological benefits but also for its insecticidal properties. Its acaricidal property, however, has not been investigated. Objective: To test the acaricidal effects of the crude extract and fractions of H. opposita leaves as well as to isolate and characterize the acaricidal principles. Materials and Methods: The crude methanolic extract, pet. ether, ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions of the leaves of H. opposita were tested against the larvae of the cattle tick, Amblyomma variegatum, using the Larval Packet Test. A bioassay-guided isolation was carried out to identify the acaricidal principle obtained from the ethyl acetate fraction. Results: The active principle was characterised as ursolic acid, a triterpene previously isolated from the leaves of the same plant. The extract and fractions were less potent than the control, malathion (LC50 1.14 × 10-4 mg/ml). Among the plant samples however the crude methanolic extract exhibited the highest effect against the larvae (LC50 5.74 × 10-2 mg/ml), followed by the ethyl acetate fraction (LC50 8.10 × 10-2 mg/ml). Ursolic acid, pet. ether and aqueous fractions however showed weak acaricidal effects with LC50 values of 1.13 mg/ml, 8.96 × 10-1 mg/ml and 1.44 mg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: Ursolic acid was not as potent as the crude methanolic extract and the ethyl acetate fraction from which it was isolated. The overall acaricidal effect of H. opposita may have been due to synergy with other principles having acaricidal properties. PMID:22022167

  7. Establishment and analysis of in vitro biomass from Salvia corrugata Vahl. and evaluation of antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Angela; Fraternale, Daniele; Schito, Anna Maria; Parricchi, Anita; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Ricci, Donata; Giacomini, Mauro; Ruffoni, Barbara; De Tommasi, Nunziatina

    2016-02-01

    Demethylfruticuline A and fruticuline A, the most abundant compounds from the surface extract of Salvia corrugata Vahl., have shown antibacterial, antitumor and cytotoxic activities. In order to obtain these icetexane diterpenes from in vitro cultures of S. corrugata, protocols were developed for callus production, micropropagation and shoot regeneration. Analysis of the regenerated shoots showed the presence of both icetexanes, micropropagated plants contained only fruticuline A, while the callus contained trace amounts of both diterpenes. The yield of fruticuline A was higher in the methanolic extract of regenerated shoots than in those of fresh leaves and fresh shoot tips. In addition to these diterpenes, the regenerated shoot and micropropagated plant extracts afforded seven other diterpenes, one icetexane and six abietanes, identified by UV, IR, 1D- and 2D-NMR and HR-MS analysis. Five compounds (19-acetoxy-7α-hydroxyroyleanone, 7β,20-epoxy-11,12,19-trihydroxyabieta-8,11,13-triene, 7,20-dihydrofruticuline A, 7β-acetoxy-20-hydroxy-19,20-epoxyroyleanone, 7β-ethoxy-6β,20:19,20-diepoxyroyleanone) were previously undescribed. Although the crude plant surface extract did not possess any antibacterial activity, methanolic extracts of in vitro tissues and two compounds, namely 7β-acetoxy-20-hydroxy-19,20-epoxyroyleanone and 7β-ethoxy-6β,20:19,20-diepoxyroyleanone, isolated in suitable amounts, were active in varying degrees against multidrug resistant clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, displaying MIC values ranging from 32, 64 to 128μg/mL. PMID:26753532

  8. Comparative hypoglycemic activities of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of four medicinal plants (Acanthus montanus, Asystasia gangetica, Emilia coccinea and Hibiscus rosasinensis) in Type I diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Ojiako, Okey Alphonsus; Chikezie, Paul Chidoka; Ogbuji, Agomuo Chizaramoku

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study ascertained the capacities of crude aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Acanthus montanus (ACMO), Asystasia gangetica (ASGA), Emilia coccinea (EMCO), and Hibiscus rosasinensis (HIRO), as well as their combinatorial formulations to ameliorate hyperglycemia in Type I diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Hyperglycemia was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of alloxan monohydrate in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution (pH = 7.4) dosage = 120 mg/kg; bw. Individual hyperglycemic rats (HyGR) received separate doses of either 20 mg/kg bw/24 h of ACMO, ASGA, EMCO or HIRO, as well as their combinatorial formulations (AAEH) for 14 days. Preparation of aqueous extracts (AQx) and ethanolic extracts (ETHx) of the four herbal samples was according to standard methods. Blood samples were drawn from 12 h post-fasted rats at regular intervals of 24 h for 14 days and measured for fasting blood glucose concentration (FBGC) using the glucose oxidase spectrophotometric method. Results: Cumulatively, ETHx of the herbal samples exhibited the greater capacity to lower FBGC in HyGR than that of the AQx. ETHx of AAEH exhibited the highest capacity to lower FBGC in HyGR by 53.55 ± 1.04%, whereas AQx of EMCO exhibited the lowest capacity to lower FBGC, which corresponded to 36.19 ± 0.88%. Conclusion: The study showed that ETHx of the herbal samples were comparatively more potent than the corresponding AQx as agents of glycemic control and for the management of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, the combination of the herbal extracts synergistically improved the therapeutic potentials of the individual herbal extracts. PMID:26401413

  9. Nuclear and mitochondrial genome instability induced by senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl.) aqueous extract in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Silva, C R; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Leitão, A C; Pádula, M

    2014-01-01

    Cassia angustifolia Vahl. (senna) is commonly used in self-medication and is frequently used to treat intestine constipation. A previous study involving bacteria and plasmid DNA suggested the possible toxicity of the aqueous extract of senna (SAE). The aim of this study was to extend the knowledge concerning SAE genotoxicity mechanisms because of its widespread use and its risks to human health. We investigated the impact of SAE on nuclear DNA and on the stability of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wt, ogg1, msh6, and ogg1msh6) strains, monitoring the formation of petite mutants. Our results demonstrated that SAE specifically increased Can(R) mutagenesis only in the msh6 mutant, supporting the view that SAE can induce misincorporation errors in DNA. We observed a significant increase in the frequency of petite colonies in all studied strains. Our data indicate that SAE has genotoxic activity towards both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. PMID:25501195

  10. Comprehensive phenological description of essential-oil chemotypes of Salvia lavandulifolia Vahl grown under the same environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Usano-Alemany, Jaime; Palá-Paúl, Jesús; Herráiz-Peñalver, David

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive description of diverse essential-oil chemical profiles was conducted with twelve individual plants of Salvia lavandulifolia Vahl (Spanish sage) gathered from wild populations and grown under identical culture conditions. Whereas the chemical polymorphism within species of aromatic plants is well known, both the statistical significance of the differences in the chemical composition and the setting of chemical profiles have been scarcely studied. Remarkably different essential-oil chemical profiles were described for the wild-growing plants, which remained different during the three years of cultivation, even when acute situations of water stress occurred. Different patterns of representative compounds throughout the phenological cycle of the species were also reported, with 1,8-cineole being the main oil compound described (contents of up to 75.2%). The Mahalanobis distance was used as a separation parameter, to assign a significance level to a single-compound chemotype. The phytochemical heterogeneity of some wild populations of Spanish sage was proved. Furthermore, some concrete genotypes presented high percentages of the following volatile compounds: limonene, 1,8-cineole, trans-caryophyllene, spathulenol, and viridiflorol. PMID:25491340

  11. Piperidine alkaloids from Piper retrofractum Vahl. protect against high-fat diet-induced obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and activating AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Jin; Lee, Myoung-Su; Jo, Keunae; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-07-22

    The fruits of Piper retrofractum Vahl. have been used for their anti-flatulent, expectorant, antitussive, antifungal, and appetizing properties in traditional medicine, and they are reported to possess gastroprotective and cholesterol-lowering properties. However, their anti-obesity activity remains unexplored. The present study was conducted to isolate the anti-obesity constituents from P. retrofractum Vahl. and evaluate their effects in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Piperidine alkaloids from P. retrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, were isolated as the anti-obesity constituents through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) transactivation assay. The molecular mechanism was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myocytes. PRPA treatment activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and PPARδ protein and also regulated the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins. In the animal model, oral PRPA administration (50, 100, or 300mg/kg/day for 8weeks) significantly reduced HFD-induced body weight gain without altering the amount of food intake. Fat pad mass was reduced in the PRPA treatment groups, as evidenced by reduced adipocyte size. In addition, elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total lipid, leptin, and lipase were suppressed by PRPA treatment. PRPA also protected against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver by decreasing hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Consistent with the in vitro results, PRPA activated AMPK signaling and altered the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins in liver and skeletal muscle. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that PRPAs attenuate HFD-induced obesity by activating AMPK and PPARδ, and regulate lipid metabolism, suggesting their potential anti-obesity effects. PMID:21741367

  12. Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. protect against high-fat diet-induced obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and activating AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung Jin; Lee, Myoung-Su; Jo, Keunae; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, are isolated as the anti-obesity constituents. {yields} PRPA administration significantly reduces body weight gain without altering food intake and fat pad mass. {yields} PRPA reduces high-fat diet-induced triglyceride accumulation in liver. {yields} PRPAs attenuate HFD-induced obesity by activating AMPK and PPAR{delta}, and regulate lipid metabolism, suggesting their potential anti-obesity effects. -- Abstract: The fruits of Piperretrofractum Vahl. have been used for their anti-flatulent, expectorant, antitussive, antifungal, and appetizing properties in traditional medicine, and they are reported to possess gastroprotective and cholesterol-lowering properties. However, their anti-obesity activity remains unexplored. The present study was conducted to isolate the anti-obesity constituents from P. retrofractum Vahl. and evaluate their effects in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Piperidine alkaloids from P. retrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, were isolated as the anti-obesity constituents through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) transactivation assay. The molecular mechanism was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myocytes. PRPA treatment activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and PPAR{delta} protein and also regulated the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins. In the animal model, oral PRPA administration (50, 100, or 300 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks) significantly reduced HFD-induced body weight gain without altering the amount of food intake. Fat pad mass was reduced in the PRPA treatment groups, as evidenced by reduced adipocyte size. In addition, elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total lipid, leptin, and lipase were suppressed by PRPA treatment. PRPA also

  13. Haematological parameters of alloxan-induced diabetic rats treated with leaf essential oil of Hoslundia opposita (Vahl)

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, N.O.; Akolade, J.O.; Usman, L.A.; Oloyede, O.B.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of leaf essential oil of Hoslundia opposita (Vahl) on the haematological parameters of alloxan-induced diabetic rats was investigated. Forty-eight albino rats (Rattus norvegicus), of average weight 132.5 g, were randomly selected into normal and diabetic groups, each with four sub-groups. The rats were treated with 110 and 220 mg/kg body weight (b. wt.) of the essential oil. 14.2 mg/kg body weight of metformin (Glucophage) was used as a reference drug. All treatments were administered, intraperitoneally, once a day for four days. Haematological parameters like haemoglobin (HGB), red blood cell (RBC) count, white blood cell (WBC) count, percentage lymphocytes (LYM) and neutrophils (NEU) were analysed. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the erythrocyte indices of all the normal (non-diabetic) rats, both treated and untreated. However, there was a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the WBC count and a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in the lymphocyte (LYM) percentages of the normal (non-diabetic) rats administered with higher dose of the essential oil. The results also revealed a significant reduction (p < 0.05) and a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the RBC counts of untreated diabetic rats and diabetic rats administered 110 mg/kg b. wt. of the oil respectively. A significant increase (p < 0.05) in the LYM of diabetic untreated rats was also observed, while administration of metformin and 110 mg/kg b. wt. Hoslundia opposita leaf essential oil (HOLEO) to diabetic rats significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the LYM percentages to values within range of the normal control animals. Overall, administration of the oil has significant ameliorative effect on alloxan-induced anaemia in diabetic state and this may be of immense benefits in the management of type 2 diabetes and its associated haematological complications.

  14. Nematode parasites infecting the starry batfish Halieutaea stellata (Vahl) (Lophiiformes: Ogcocephalidae) from the East and South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Zhao, W-T; Guo, Y-N; Zhang, L-P

    2016-05-01

    The starry batfish Halieutaea stellata (Vahl) is a small, benthic fish found in Indo-West Pacific Oceans. However, our present knowledge of the helminth parasites of this fish is still fragmentary. In this study, a total of 29 fish collected from the East and South China Sea were examined to determine the prevalence, intensity and species composition of helminth parasites in H. stellata. Using morphological and molecular approaches, four species of nematodes were found parasitic in this fish host, including the adults and fourth-stage larvae of Raphidascaroides nipponensis Yamaguti 1941; adults and third-stage larvae of Raphidascaris lophii (Wu 1949), third- and fourth-stage larvae of Hysterothylacium larval type IV-A of Shamsi, Gasser & Beveridge 2013 and third-stage larvae of Hysterothylacium amoyense (Hsü 1993). Halieutaea stellata represents a new host record for the three last-named nematodes. Raphidascaroides nipponensis with the highest prevalence (82.5%) and intensity (mean = 13.5) of infection was considered as the dominant parasite species in H. stellata. The detailed morphology of the different developmental stages of the four nematode species was studied using light and scanning electron microscopy. All nematode species were also genetically characterized by sequencing and analysing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA. This study provides further data on the occurrence of nematode parasites in H. stellata and also contributes to facilitate an accurate and rapid diagnosis of the infection by these little-known nematodes. PMID:25917527

  15. A natural plant growth promoter calliterpenone from a plant Callicarpa macrophylla Vahl improves the plant growth promoting effects of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPRs).

    PubMed

    Maji, Deepamala; Barnawal, Deepti; Gupta, Aakansha; King, Shikha; Singh, A K; Kalra, A

    2013-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of calliterpenone, a natural plant growth promoter from a shrub Callicarpa macrophylla Vahl., in enhancing the growth and yield promoting effects of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPRs), in menthol mint (Mentha arvensis L).This study is based on our previous results indicating the microbial growth promotion by calliterpenone and assumption that application of calliterpenone along with PGPRs will improve the population of PGPRs resulting in higher impacts on plant growth and yield. Of the 15 PGPRs (identified as potent ones in our laboratory), 25 μl of 0.01 mM calliterpenone (8.0 μg/100 ml) was found to be useful in improving the population of nine PGPRs in culture media. The five selected strains of PGPRs exhibiting synergy with calliterpenone in enhancing growth of maize compared to PGPR or calliterpenone alone were selected and tested on two cultivars (cvs. Kosi and Kushal) of M. arvensis. Of the five strains, Bacillus subtilis P-20 (16S rDNA sequence homologous to Accession No NR027552) and B. subtilis Daz-26 (16SrDNA sequence homologuos to Accession No GU998816) were found to be highly effective in improving the herb and essential oil yield in the cultivars Kushal and Kosi respectively when co-treated with calliterpenone. The results open up the possibilities of using a natural growth promoter along with PGPRs as a bio-agri input for sustainable and organic agriculture. PMID:23271460

  16. A (-)-norephedrine-based molecularly imprinted polymer for the solid-phase extraction of psychoactive phenylpropylamino alkaloids from Khat (Catha edulis Vahl. Endl.) chewing leaves.

    PubMed

    Atlabachew, Minaleshewa; Torto, Nelson; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Redi-Abshiro, Mesfin; Chigome, Samuel; Mothibedi, Kediemetse; Combrinck, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was prepared using (-)-norephedrine as the template, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker and chloroform as the porogen. The MIP was used as a selective sorbent in the molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MIP-SPE) of the psychoactive phenylpropylamino alkaloids, norephedrine and its analogs, cathinone and cathine, from Khat (Catha edulis Vahl. Endl.) leaf extracts prior to HPLC-DAD analysis. The MIP was able to selectively extract the alkaloids from the aqueous extracts of Khat. Loading, washing and elution of the alkaloids bound to the MIP were evaluated under different conditions. The clean baseline of the Khat extract obtained after MIP-SPE confirmed that a selective and efficient sample clean-up was achieved. Good recoveries (90.0-107%) and precision (RSDs 2.3-3.2%) were obtained in the validation of the MIP-SPE-HPLC procedure. The content of the three alkaloids in Khat samples determined after treatment with MIP-SPE and a commercial Isolute C18 (EC) SPE cartridge were in good agreement. These findings indicate that MIP-SPE is a reliable method that can be used for sample pre-treatment for the determination of Khat alkaloids in plant extracts or similar matrices and could be applicable in pharmaceutical, forensic and biomedical laboratories. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26531856

  17. An Antioxidant Extract of the Insectivorous Plant Drosera burmannii Vahl. Alleviates Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress and Hepatic Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghate, Nikhil Baban; Chaudhuri, Dipankar; Das, Abhishek; Panja, Sourav; Mandal, Nripendranath

    2015-01-01

    Free iron typically leads to the formation of excess free radicals, and additional iron deposition in the liver contributes to the oxidative pathologic processes of liver disease. Many pharmacological properties of the insectivorous plant Drosera burmannii Vahl. have been reported in previous studies; however, there is no evidence of its antioxidant or hepatoprotective potential against iron overload. The antioxidant activity of 70% methanolic extract of D. burmannii (DBME) was evaluated. DBME showed excellent DPPH, hydroxyl, hypochlorous, superoxide, singlet oxygen, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite radical and hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity. A substantial iron chelation (IC50 = 40.90 ± 0.31 μg/ml) and supercoiled DNA protection ([P]50 = 50.41 ± 0.55 μg) were observed. DBME also displayed excellent in vivo hepatoprotective activity in iron-overloaded Swiss albino mice compared to the standard desirox treatment. Administration of DBME significantly normalized serum enzyme levels and restored liver antioxidant enzymes levels. DBME lowered the raised levels of liver damage parameters, also reflected from the morphological analysis of the liver sections. DBME also reduced liver iron content by 115.90% which is also seen by Perls' staining. A phytochemical analysis of DBME confirms the presence of various phytoconstituents, including phenols, flavonoids, carbohydrates, tannins, alkaloids and ascorbic acid. Alkaloids, phenols and flavonoids were abundantly found in DBME. An HPLC analysis of DBME revealed the presence of purpurin, catechin, tannic acid, reserpine, methyl gallate and rutin. Purpurin, tannic acid, methyl gallate and rutin displayed excellent iron chelation but exhibited cytotoxicity toward normal (WI-38) cells; while DBME found to be non-toxic to the normal cells. These findings suggest that the constituents present in DBME contributed to its iron chelation activity. Additional studies are needed to determine if DBME can be used as a treatment for

  18. Ecophysiological Competence of Populus alba L., Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl., and Crataegus monogyna Jacq. Used in Plantations for the Recovery of Riparian Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanera, Jose A.; Martínez-Chacón, Maria F.

    2007-12-01

    In many semi-arid environments of Mediterranean ecosystems, white poplar ( Populus alba L.) is the dominant riparian tree and has been used to recover degraded areas, together with other native species, such as ash ( Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl.) and hawthorn ( Crataegus monogyna Jacq.). We addressed three main objectives: (1) to gain an improved understanding of some specific relationships between environmental parameters and leaf-level physiological factors in these riparian forest species, (2) to compare the leaf-level physiology of these riparian species to each other, and (3) to compare leaf-level responses within native riparian plots to adjacent restoration plots, in order to evaluate the competence of the plants used for the recovery of those degraded areas. We found significant differences in physiological performance between mature and young white poplars in the natural stand and among planted species. The net assimilation and transpiration rates, diameter, and height of white poplar plants were superior to those of ash and hawthorn. Ash and hawthorn showed higher water use efficiency than white poplar. White poplar also showed higher levels of stomatal conductance, behaving as a fast-growing, water-consuming species with a more active gas exchange and ecophysiological competence than the other species used for restoration purposes. In the restoration zones, the planted white poplars had higher rates of net assimilation and water use efficiency than the mature trees in the natural stand. We propose the use of white poplar for the rapid restoration of riparian vegetation in semi-arid Mediterranean environments. Ash and hawthorn can also play a role as accompanying species for the purpose of biodiversity.

  19. An Antioxidant Extract of the Insectivorous Plant Drosera burmannii Vahl. Alleviates Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress and Hepatic Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Das, Abhishek; Panja, Sourav; Mandal, Nripendranath

    2015-01-01

    Free iron typically leads to the formation of excess free radicals, and additional iron deposition in the liver contributes to the oxidative pathologic processes of liver disease. Many pharmacological properties of the insectivorous plant Drosera burmannii Vahl. have been reported in previous studies; however, there is no evidence of its antioxidant or hepatoprotective potential against iron overload. The antioxidant activity of 70% methanolic extract of D. burmannii (DBME) was evaluated. DBME showed excellent DPPH, hydroxyl, hypochlorous, superoxide, singlet oxygen, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite radical and hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity. A substantial iron chelation (IC50 = 40.90 ± 0.31 μg/ml) and supercoiled DNA protection ([P]50 = 50.41 ± 0.55 μg) were observed. DBME also displayed excellent in vivo hepatoprotective activity in iron-overloaded Swiss albino mice compared to the standard desirox treatment. Administration of DBME significantly normalized serum enzyme levels and restored liver antioxidant enzymes levels. DBME lowered the raised levels of liver damage parameters, also reflected from the morphological analysis of the liver sections. DBME also reduced liver iron content by 115.90% which is also seen by Perls’ staining. A phytochemical analysis of DBME confirms the presence of various phytoconstituents, including phenols, flavonoids, carbohydrates, tannins, alkaloids and ascorbic acid. Alkaloids, phenols and flavonoids were abundantly found in DBME. An HPLC analysis of DBME revealed the presence of purpurin, catechin, tannic acid, reserpine, methyl gallate and rutin. Purpurin, tannic acid, methyl gallate and rutin displayed excellent iron chelation but exhibited cytotoxicity toward normal (WI-38) cells; while DBME found to be non-toxic to the normal cells. These findings suggest that the constituents present in DBME contributed to its iron chelation activity. Additional studies are needed to determine if DBME can be used as a treatment for

  20. Next Generation Sequencing and Transcriptome Analysis Predicts Biosynthetic Pathway of Sennosides from Senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl.), a Non-Model Plant with Potent Laxative Properties

    PubMed Central

    Rama Reddy, Nagaraja Reddy; Mehta, Rucha Harishbhai; Soni, Palak Harendrabhai; Makasana, Jayanti; Gajbhiye, Narendra Athamaram; Ponnuchamy, Manivel; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-01-01

    Senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl.) is a world’s natural laxative medicinal plant. Laxative properties are due to sennosides (anthraquinone glycosides) natural products. However, little genetic information is available for this species, especially concerning the biosynthetic pathways of sennosides. We present here the transcriptome sequencing of young and mature leaf tissue of Cassia angustifolia using Illumina MiSeq platform that resulted in a total of 6.34 Gb of raw nucleotide sequence. The sequence assembly resulted in 42230 and 37174 transcripts with an average length of 1119 bp and 1467 bp for young and mature leaf, respectively. The transcripts were annotated using NCBI BLAST with ‘green plant database (txid 33090)’, Swiss Prot, Kyoto Encylcopedia of Genes & Genomes (KEGG), Cluster of Orthologous Gene (COG) and Gene Ontology (GO). Out of the total transcripts, 40138 (95.0%) and 36349 (97.7%) from young and mature leaf, respectively, were annotated by BLASTX against green plant database of NCBI. We used InterProscan to see protein similarity at domain level, a total of 34031 (young leaf) and 32077 (mature leaf) transcripts were annotated against the Pfam domains. All transcripts from young and mature leaf were assigned to 191 KEGG pathways. There were 166 and 159 CDS, respectively, from young and mature leaf involved in metabolism of terpenoids and polyketides. Many CDS encoding enzymes leading to biosynthesis of sennosides were identified. A total of 10,763 CDS differentially expressing in both young and mature leaf libraries of which 2,343 (21.7%) CDS were up-regulated in young compared to mature leaf. Several differentially expressed genes found functionally associated with sennoside biosynthesis. CDS encoding for many CYPs and TF families were identified having probable roles in metabolism of primary as well as secondary metabolites. We developed SSR markers for molecular breeding of senna. We have identified a set of putative genes involved in various

  1. Ionic Liquid-Based Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction of Forsythosides from the Leaf of Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl and Subsequent Separation and Purification by High-Speed Counter-Current Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yinshi; Hou, Zhiguang; Liu, Zhengbo; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    An ionic liquid-based ultrasonic-assisted extraction (ILUAE) method was developed for the extraction of the two forsythosides, namely forsythosides I and A from the leaf of Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl. Three kinds of l-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids with different alkyl chain and anion were investigated. The results indicated that ionic liquids showed remarkable effects on the extraction yields of forsythosides. In addition, several ILUAE ultrasonic parameters, such as the solvent concentration, solvent to solid ratio and extraction time have been optimized. Under these optimal conditions (e.g., with 0.6 M [C6MIM]Br, solvent to solid ratio of 15 mL/g and extraction time of 10 min), this approach gained the highest extraction yields of forsythoside I (0.89%) and forsythoside A (10.74%). Meanwhile, forsythosides in the ILUAE extract were separated and purified successfully through the high-speed counter-current chromatography with a two-phase solvent system consisting of ethyl acetate-ethanol-acetic acid-water (4 : 1 : 0.25 : 6, v/v). 5.4 mg of forsythoside I and 59.7 mg of forsythoside A were obtained from 120 mg of the prepurified sample in one-step separation, with the purity of 96.1 and 97.9%, respectively, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Their structures were identified by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and (13)C NMR. PMID:27165571

  2. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

  3. New phenyl derivatives from endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavipes AIL8 derived of mangrove plant Acanthus ilicifolius.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhi-Qiang; Lin, Xiuping; Wang, Yizhu; Wang, Junfeng; Zhou, Xuefeng; Yang, Bin; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xianwen; Wang, Yi; Liu, Yonghong

    2014-06-01

    Two new aromatic butyrolactones, flavipesins A (1) and B (2), two new natural products (3 and 4), and a known phenyl dioxolanone (5) were isolated from marine-derived endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavipes. The structures of compounds 1-5 were elucidated by 1D- and 2D-NMR and MS analysis, the absolute configurations were assigned by optical rotation and CD data, and the stereochemistry of 1 was determined by X-ray crystallography analysis. 1 demonstrated lower MIC values against Staphylococcus aureus (8.0 μg/mL) and Bacillus subtillis (0.25 μg/mL). 1 also showed the unique antibiofilm activity of penetration through the biofilm matrix and kills live bacteria inside mature S. aureus biofilm. PMID:24704337

  4. Prairiegrass (Bromus catharticus Vahl) production and nutritive value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reliable supply of herbage is a crucial feature of forage-based livestock systems. Forage resources with winter-active growth habits can help extend the growing season in early spring and late autumn in regions with mild winter conditions, while drought and heat tolerant plants help meet herbage ...

  5. Bar-HRM for Authentication of Plant-Based Medicines: Evaluation of Three Medicinal Products Derived from Acanthaceae Species

    PubMed Central

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Madesis, Panagiotis; de Boer, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are used as a popular alternative to synthetic drugs, both in developed and developing countries. The economic importance of the herbal and natural supplement industry is increasing every year. As the herbal industry grows, consumer safety is one issue that cannot be overlooked. Herbal products in Thai local markets are commonly sold without packaging or labels. Plant powders are stored in large bags or boxes, and therefore buying local herbal products poses a high risk of acquiring counterfeited, substituted and/or adulterated products. Due to these issues, a reliable method to authenticate products is needed. Here DNA barcoding was used in combination with High Resolution Melting analysis (Bar-HRM) to authenticate three medicinal Acanthaceae species (Acanthus ebracteatus, Andrographis paniculata and Rhinacanthus nasutus) commonly used in Thailand. The rbcL barcode was selected for use in primers design for HRM analysis to produce standard melting profiles of the selected species. Melting data from the HRM assay using the designed rbcL primers showed that the three chosen species could be distinguished from each other. HRM curves of all fifteen test samples indicated that three of tested products did not contain the indicated species. Two closely related species (A. paniculata and R. nasutus), which have a high level of morphological similarity, were interchanged with one another in three tested products. Incorrect information on packaging and labels of the tested herbal products was the cause of the results shown here. Morphological similarity among the species of interest also hindered the collection process. The Bar-HRM method developed here proved useful in aiding in the identification and authentication of herbal species in processed samples. In the future, species authentication through Bar-HRM could be used to promote consumer trust, as well as raising the quality of herbal products. PMID:26011474

  6. Bar-HRM for Authentication of Plant-Based Medicines: Evaluation of Three Medicinal Products Derived from Acanthaceae Species.

    PubMed

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Madesis, Panagiotis; de Boer, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are used as a popular alternative to synthetic drugs, both in developed and developing countries. The economic importance of the herbal and natural supplement industry is increasing every year. As the herbal industry grows, consumer safety is one issue that cannot be overlooked. Herbal products in Thai local markets are commonly sold without packaging or labels. Plant powders are stored in large bags or boxes, and therefore buying local herbal products poses a high risk of acquiring counterfeited, substituted and/or adulterated products. Due to these issues, a reliable method to authenticate products is needed. Here DNA barcoding was used in combination with High Resolution Melting analysis (Bar-HRM) to authenticate three medicinal Acanthaceae species (Acanthus ebracteatus, Andrographis paniculata and Rhinacanthus nasutus) commonly used in Thailand. The rbcL barcode was selected for use in primers design for HRM analysis to produce standard melting profiles of the selected species. Melting data from the HRM assay using the designed rbcL primers showed that the three chosen species could be distinguished from each other. HRM curves of all fifteen test samples indicated that three of tested products did not contain the indicated species. Two closely related species (A. paniculata and R. nasutus), which have a high level of morphological similarity, were interchanged with one another in three tested products. Incorrect information on packaging and labels of the tested herbal products was the cause of the results shown here. Morphological similarity among the species of interest also hindered the collection process. The Bar-HRM method developed here proved useful in aiding in the identification and authentication of herbal species in processed samples. In the future, species authentication through Bar-HRM could be used to promote consumer trust, as well as raising the quality of herbal products. PMID:26011474

  7. Evaluation of wound healing, antioxidant and antimicrobial efficacy of Jasminum auriculatum Vahl. leaves

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Mittal; Satish, Sardana; Anima, Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To validate the ethno-therapeutic claim of the traditionally used plant Jasminum auriculatum (J. auriculatum) in skin diseases, by evaluating its wound healing potential along with its antioxidant and antimicrobial properties; so as to understand their role in wound healing. Materials and Methods: Excision and incision wound models were used to evaluate the wound healing activity on albino rats. The wound healing potential was assessed by measuring rate of wound contraction, epithelialization period, hydroxyproline content, skin breaking strength and histopathological parameters. Reference standard drug was Nitrofurazone ointment. The antioxidant activity was determined using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The antimicrobial activity was determined by agar well diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration by serial dilution method. Results: Higher rate of wound contraction (83.66±0.50% on 15th day), decrease in the period of epithelialization (17.83±1.6days), higher skin breaking strength (170.71±1.52g), higher collagen content and favourable histopathological changes revealed that topical application of ointment containing successive ethanolic extract (S.E.E) of J. auriculatum leaves has the most potent wound healing ability compared to control group in both the models studied. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of successive ethanolic extract was found to be 33.39µg/ml. Successive ethanolic extract was found to be most effective against Pseudomonas auregenosa having a zone of inhibition 16.65±0.6mm and the minimum inhibitory concentration was 0.78mg/ml. Conclusion: The data of this study indicate that successive ethanolic extract of the leaves exhibit potent wound healing, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. This justifies the ethno-medicinal use of plant for the treatment of wound and microbial infections. PMID:27462552

  8. The effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Stachys lavandulifolia vahl on pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Lobat; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Samani, Roya Ansari; Asgari, Azam

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Stachys lavandulifolia is commonly used for many health problems including anxiety. A couple of reports indicate that this plant might have an abortifacient effect on pregnant women. Here we examined this effect on pregnant mice. Materials and methods: Incremental doses of 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg of the extracts or normal saline (control group) were injected intraperitoneally to the pregnant mice between 7th to 12th days of pregnancy. On day 16, uterine tubes were resected and absorbed fetuses were counted. Results: Our study showed that the different average of absorbed fetuses between treated and control groups is significant (P < 0.05). S. lavandulifolia changes the activity level of hypothalamus-pituitary gland-gonad axis due to flavonoid compounds. Also, S. lavandulifolia decreases progesterone concentration resulting in a significant difference between treated and control groups (P < 0.05) and gives rise to failure in fetus survival and consequently, abortion. The length and weight of fetuses decreased in treated groups and there was a significant difference between treated and control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Owing to the possible abortive effect of Stachys lavandulifolia, it is highly recommended to use it cautiously during pregnancy.

  9. Effect of fire on a monodominant floating mat of Cyperus giganteus Vahl in a neotropical wetland.

    PubMed

    Rocha, M; Santos Júnior, C C; Damasceno-Júnior, G A; Pott, V J; Pott, A

    2015-01-01

    The rhizomatous Cyperus giganteus, abundant in the Pantanal wetland, can dominate extense floodable areas as monodominant communities. The Jacadigo lake has a large area of C. giganteus, where we performed an evaluation on community structure during two months in 2010, before it was hit by a wildfire which top-killed the vegetation, compared to ten months post-fire. We utilized 40 plots of 1m × 1m, along permanent trails, assessing two strata: the upper, near the inflorescence of adult plants, and the lower, close to the water level. Our results show that fire does not affect dominance of C. giganteus, as it maintained the same cover as before fire; species richness is not much altered either - 28 before fire and 34 thereafter. Fire changed the floristic composition, due to the annual variation of species and the ability of some plants to colonize gaps and to regrow after fire from underground organs and seeds. The stratification of the vegetation with characteristic species of upper and lower strata was similar after fire. PMID:25945628

  10. Fingerprinting of Plumbagin in lic>Drosera burmannii Vahl using High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, V; Basnett, Hema; Kumar, A Cendil; Yoganarasimhan, S N

    2008-11-01

    HPTLC fingerprinting profile of the alcohol and aqueous extracts of Drosera burmannii is described. Seven components have been detected in the alcohol extract. Further, plumbagin, an useful antifertility agent, was also detected by comparison with the reference standard. The aqueous extract revealed two spots with no spot corresponding to plumbagin. PMID:21369446

  11. Hybrid analysis (barcode-high resolution melting) for authentication of Thai herbal products, Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall.ex Nees

    PubMed Central

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Suwannapoom, Chatmongkon; Khamyong, Nuttaluck; Pintakum, Danupol; Lamphun, Santisuk Na; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Osathanunkul, Kitisak; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Andrographis paniculata Nees is a medicinal plant with multiple pharmacological properties. It has been used over many centuries as a household remedy. A. paniculata products sold on the markets are in processed forms so it is difficult to authenticate. Therefore buying the herbal products poses a high-risk of acquiring counterfeited, substituted and/or adulterated products. Due to these issues, a reliable method to authenticate products is needed. Materials and Methods: High resolution melting analysis coupled with DNA barcoding (Bar-HRM) was applied to detect adulteration in commercial herbal products. The rbcL barcode was selected to use in primers design for HRM analysis to produce standard melting profile of A. paniculata species. DNA of the tested commercial products was isolated and their melting profiles were then generated and compared with the standard A. paniculata. Results: The melting profiles of the rbcL amplicons of the three closely related herbal species (A. paniculata, Acanthus ebracteatus and Rhinacanthus nasutus) are clearly separated so that they can be distinguished by the developed method. The method was then used to authenticate commercial herbal products. HRM curves of all 10 samples tested are similar to A. paniculata which indicated that all tested products were contained the correct species as labeled. Conclusion: The method described in this study has been proved to be useful in aiding identification and/or authenticating A. paniculata. This Bar-HRM analysis has allowed us easily to determine the A. paniculata species in herbal products on the markets even they are in processed forms. SUMMARY We propose the use of DNA barcoding combined with High Resolution Melting analysis for authenticating of Andrographis paniculata products.The developed method can be used regardless of the type of the DNA template (fresh or dried tissue, leaf, and stem).rbcL region was chosen for the analysis and work well with our samplesWe can easily

  12. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by Warscewiczia coccinea (Vahl) Kl. (Rubiaceae) ethanol extract.

    PubMed

    Quintero, A; Fabbro, R; Maillo, M; Barrios, M; Milano, M B; Fernández, A; Williams, B; Michelangeli, F; Rangel, H R; Pujol, F H

    2011-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to search for natural products capable of inhibiting hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication. The research design, methods and procedures included testing hydro-alcoholic extracts (n = 66) of 31 species from the Venezuelan Amazonian rain forest on the cell line HepG2 2.2.15, which constitutively produces HBV. The main outcomes and results were as follows: the species Euterpe precatoria, Jacaranda copaia, Jacaranda obtusifolia, Senna silvestris, Warscewiczia coccinea and Vochysia glaberrima exerted some degree of inhibition on HBV replication. The leaves of W. coccinea showed a significant antiviral activity: 80% inhibition with 100 µg mL⁻¹ of extract. This extract also exerted inhibition on covalently closed circular deoxyribonucleic acid (cccDNA) production and on HIV-1 replication in MT4 cells (more than 90% inhibition with 50 µg mL⁻¹ of extract). Initial fractionation using organic solvents of increasing polarity and water showed that the ethanol fraction was responsible for most of the antiviral inhibitory activities of both the viruses. It was concluded that Warscewiczia coccinea extract showed inhibition of HBV and HIV-1 replication. Bioassay-guided purification of this fraction may allow the isolation of an antiviral compound with inhibitory activity against both viruses. PMID:21827337

  13. Evidence of the gastroprotective and anti- Helicobacter pylori activities of β-mangostin isolated from Cratoxylum arborescens (vahl) blume

    PubMed Central

    Sidahmed, Heyam Mohamed Ali; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Dehghan, Firouzeh; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose β-Mangostin (BM) from Cratoxylum arborescens demonstrated various pharmacological activities such as anticancer and anti-inflammatory. In this study, we aimed to investigate its antiulcer activity against ethanol ulcer model in rats. Materials and methods BM was isolated from C. arborescens. Gastric acid output, ulcer index, gross evaluation, mucus production, histological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid–Schiff staining and immunohistochemical localization for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and Bax proteins were investigated. Possible involvement of reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, prostaglandin E2, antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes, radical scavenging, nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds, and anti-Helicobacter pylori were investigated. Results BM showed antisecretory activity against the pylorus ligature model. The pretreatment with BM protect gastric mucosa from ethanol damaging effect as seen by the improved gross and histological appearance. BM significantly reduced the ulcer area formation, the submucosal edema, and the leukocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control. The compound showed intense periodic acid–Schiff staining to the gastric mucus layer and marked amount of alcian blue binding to free gastric mucus. BM significantly increased the gastric homogenate content of prostaglandin E2 glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds. The compound inhibited the lipid peroxidation revealed by the reduced gastric content of malondialdehyde. Moreover, BM upregulate HSP70 expression and downregulate Bax expression. Furthermore, the compound showed interesting anti-H. pylori activity. Conclusion Thus, it could be concluded that BM possesses gastroprotective activity, which could be attributed to the antisecretory, mucus production, antioxidant, HSP70, antiapoptotic, and anti-H. pylori mechanisms. PMID:26834460

  14. The dietary wood betony, Stachys lavandulifolia Vahl extract as a growth promoter and immune enhancer in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami Babaheydari, S; Paykan Heyrati, F; Akhlaghi, M; Dorafshan, S

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of wood betony (WB), Stachys lavandulifolia extract on growth performance and some immune responses in common carp, Cyprinus carpio. Different concentrations of the WB extract 0, 2, 4 and 8% (g per 100 g of diet) were added to commercial diet. Each treatment was randomly assigned to triplicate groups of fish having average initial weight of 44 ± 0.62 g for 10 weeks. The results showed that final weight, food conversion ratio, specific growth rate and condition factor were significantly improved by WB in a dose dependent manner, where the best growth parameters were achieved in the group of fish receiving the highest concentration of WB (P<0.05). Feeding fish at 2 and 4% W/W by WB in the diet improved lysozyme activity, ACH50 and IgM levels significantly in comparison to the control (P<0.05). Group of fish fed on 4% WB in the diet had the best levels of the immune characteristics (P<0.05). Based on the results of this study, it is recommended to feed common carp with WB to improve growth and non-specific immunity. PMID:27175131

  15. In vitro effects of anthocyanin extracts from Justicia secunda Vahl on the solubility of haemoglobin S and membrane stability of sickle erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mpiana, Pius T.; Ngbolua, KotoTe Niwa N.; Bokota, Matthieu T.; Kasonga, Teddy K.; Atibu, Emmanuel K.; Tshibangu, Damien S. T.; Mudogo, Virima

    2010-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease or drepanocytosis is caused by the polymerisation of abnormal haemoglobin S when oxygen tension decreases. This lead to the changes in the shape of red blood cells and anaemia. It has also been postulated that the red cells of patients with sickle cell disease contain a higher than normal concentration of calcium ions. These ions are bound to membrane proteins resulting in dehydration and loss of red blood cell deformability and cell-to-cell adherence. Anthocyanins extracted from some Congolese plants used in traditional medicine against sickle cell disease have recently been shown to have anti-sickling activity in vitro. Justicia secunda is a plant used in Congo by Jehovah’s Witnesses, well known for their refusal of blood transfusions, against anaemia. Materials and Methods Emmel, Itano and osmotic fragility tests were used to test the effect of anthocyanin extracts from Justicia secunda leaves on haemoglobin S solubility and sickle cell membrane stability. Results Anthocyanins from Justicia secunda were found to possess anti-sickling activity. Treated SS red blood cells recovered a normal, classical biconcave form with a radius of 3.3±0.3 μm, similar to that of normal erythrocytes. The solubility of deoxyhaemoglobin S increased and the osmotic fragility of drepanocytes decreased upon treatment with anthocyanin extracts. Conclusion These findings suggest that anthocyanin extracts play a role in both stabilising the red blood cell membrane and inhibiting polymerisation of haemoglobin S. This provides a possible molecular basis for earlier reports on the anti-sickling properties of anthocyanins from some Congolese plants and their use in the management of sickle cell disease by Congolese traditional healers. PMID:20967165

  16. Dietary-flavonoid-rich flowers of Rumex nervosus Vahl: Liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry profiling and in vitro anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Desta, Kebede Taye; Kim, Gon-Sup; Hong, Gyeong Eun; Kim, Yun-Hi; Lee, Won Sup; Lee, Soo Jung; Jin, Jong Sung; Abd El-Aty, A M; Shin, Ho-Chul; Shim, Jae-Han; Shin, Sung Chul

    2015-10-01

    Rumex nervosus is a plant species found widely in Eastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In addition to its uses in traditional medicinal, the plant shows various biological activities, such as antiviral, antibacterial, and antioxidant activity. In this study, nine flavonols, six flavones, three flavanones, and one flavanol were characterized from the flowers of R. nervosus using liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and literature data. Validation data indicated that the determination coefficients (R(2) ) were ≥ 0.9914. The limits of detection and quantification were in the ranges of 0.15-1.24 and 0.50-4.13 mg/L, respectively. Recoveries at 10 and 50 mg/L were 71.1-110.2 and 65.4-115.1%, with relative standard deviations of 7.4-40.1 and 2.1-13.0%, respectively. Quercetin 3-O-rhamnoside (10) was the dominant component, contributing 30.8% of total flavonoids (1003.0 ± 26.2 mg/kg fresh flower sample), whereas luteolin 6-C-glucoside (3) was the lowest yielding compound (0.1%). The 19 flavonoids identified were characterized for the first time. In vitro anti-inflammatory studies showed that this mixture can suppress the production of inflammatory mediators, including inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, kappa B inhibitor, and interleukin-1β, by down-regulating the nuclear factor-kappa B and mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways. The results of this study may provide information for processing R. nervosus as a potential source of functional food. PMID:26223370

  17. Antioxidant activities and liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry characterization and quantification of the polyphenolic contents of Rumex nervosus Vahl leaves and stems.

    PubMed

    Desta, Kebede Taye; Lee, Won Sup; Lee, Sung Joong; Kim, Yun-Hi; Kim, Gon-Sup; Lee, Soo Jung; Kim, Soo Taek; Abd El-Aty, A M; Warda, Mohamad; Shin, Ho-Chul; Shim, Jae Han; Shin, Sung Chul

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, four compounds, viz. chlorogenic acid, catechin, orientin, and apigenin-O-acetylglycoside among 18 polyphenol compounds (17 flavonoids and one hydroxycinnamic acid derivative) were characterized for the first time in Rumex nervosus leaves and stems by using liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Method validation in terms of determination coefficient, limits of detection, and quantification were ≥ 0.9979, 0.68-1.61, and 2.27-5.38 mg/L, respectively. Accuracy, expressed as percent recovery for two spiking levels (10 and 50 mg/L), were in the range 78.9-110.6% with the exception of caffeic acid. The relative standard deviations were 1-17%. The total polyphenol content was higher by approximately two times in the leaf (1073 mg/kg fresh sample) than in the stem (519.86 mg/kg fresh sample). The antioxidant effects increased in a dose-dependent manner, and the scavenging activities, investigated by measuring 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) scavenging activity, ferrous ions chelating activity, superoxide anion radical scavenging activity, and ferric reducing antioxidant power activity, were significant (p < 0.05) using low concentrations of the leaf extract. Overall, the present study suggests that different parts of R. nervosus have great potential for producing a range of extracts with potential applications in medicine. PMID:26899192

  18. Shrimp burrow in tropical seagrass meadows: An important sink for litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, Jan Arie; Kneer, Dominik; Stapel, Johan; Asmus, Harald

    2008-08-01

    The abundance, burrow characteristics, and in situ behaviour of the burrowing shrimps Neaxius acanthus (Decapoda: Strahlaxiidae) and Alpheus macellarius (Decapoda: Alpheidae) were studied to quantify the collection of seagrass material, to identify the fate of this collected material, and to determine the importance of these burrowing crustaceans in the nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) cycling of two tropical seagrass meadows on Bone Batang, South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Alpheus macellarius harvested 0.70 g dry weight (DW) burrow -1 d -1 seagrass material, dominantly by active cutting of fresh seagrass leaves. Neaxius acanthus collected 1.66 g DW burrow -1 d -1, mainly detached leaves which floated past the burrow opening. The A. macellarius and N. acanthus communities together collected in their burrows an amount of seagrass leaf material corresponding to more than 50% of the leaf production in the meadows studied. The crustacean species studied might therefore fulfil an important function in the nutrient cycling of tropical meadows. In the burrow most of the collected material is shredded into pieces. The burrows of both species had special chambers which serve as a storage for seagrass leaf material. Neaxius acanthus incorporated most of the material into the burrow wall lining, which is made of small sediment particles and macerated seagrass leaves. Phosphate concentrations measured in N. acanthus burrows compared with pore-water and water-column concentrations suggests that a substantial amount of the seagrass material undergoes decomposition in the burrows. Oxygen levels measured in these water bodies are indicative for a possible exchange of water between the burrow and its surroundings, most likely supported by the shrimps irrigating their burrows. By collecting leaf material in their burrows, nutrients that are otherwise lost from the seagrass meadow associated with detached leaves and leaf fragments carried away in the water column, are maintained in the

  19. Helminths of shorebirds from the Texas Gulfcoast. I. Digenetic trematodes from the long-billed curlew, Numenius americanus.

    PubMed

    Dronen, N O; Badley, J E

    1979-08-01

    Trematodes found in 10 Numenius americanus from the Galveston area included Pelmatostomum americanum sp. n. (Echinostomatidae) from the intestine; Paratrema numenii gen. et sp. n. (Philophthalmidae) from the Bursa Fabricii and lower intestine; and the following previously known species, all representing new host records: Maritrema arenaria and Probolocorphye glandulosa (Microphallidae); Lyperosomum oswaldoi and L. sinuosum (Dicrocoeliidae); Cyclocoelum obscurum (Cyclocoelidae); Himasthla rhigedana (Echinostomatidae); and Parorchis acanthus (Philophthalmidae). New taxa are diagnosed and H. rhigedana is redescribed. PMID:512758

  20. 75 FR 18232 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of 15 Caribbean Species

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    .... mirabilis (no common name), chupacallos (Pleodendron macranthum), Vahl's boxwood or diablito de tres cuernos...), palo de nigua (Cornutia obovata), palo de Ram n (Banara vanderbiltii), uvillo (Eugenia haematocarpa... mature. B. Endangered means any species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a...

  1. STOCKPILED PRAIRIEGRASS PROVIDES HIGH-QUALITY FALL GRAZING FOR LAMBS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New varieties of prairiegrass (Bromus catharticus Vahl. = B. willdenowii Kunth.) exhibit improved persistence over ‘Matua’ under USA growing conditions, but animal performance data is lacking. We evaluated performance of lambs grazing stockpiled ‘Dixon’ prairiegrass on West Virginia hill pasture in...

  2. Stockpiled Prairie Grass For Fall-Grazing Lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New varieties of prairiegrass (Bromus catharticus Vahl. = B. willdenowii Kunth.) exhibit improved persistence over 'Matua' under USA growing conditions, but animal performance data is lacking. Therefore, we evaluated performance of lambs grazing fall-stockpiled 'Dixon' prairiegrass on a West Virgin...

  3. Phylogenetic relationships among Acanthaceae: evidence from noncoding trnL-trnF chloroplast DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    McDade, L A; Moody, M L

    1999-01-01

    We used sequence data from the intron and spacer of the trnL-trnF chloroplast region to study phylogenetic relationships among Acanthaceae. This region is more variable than other chloroplast loci that have been sequenced for members of Acanthaceae (rbcL and ndhF), is more prone to length mutations, and is less homoplasious than these genes. Our results indicate that this region is likely to be useful in addressing phylogenetic questions among but not within genera in these and related plants. In terms of phylogenetic relationships, Elytraria (representing Nelsonioideae) is more distantly related to Acanthaceae sensu stricto (s.s.) than Thunbergia and Mendoncia. These last two genera are strongly supported as sister taxa. Molecular evidence does not support monophyly of Acanthaceae s.s., although there is strong morphological evidence for this relationship. There is strong support for monophyly of four major lineages within Acanthaceae s.s.: the Acanthus, Barleria, Ruellia, and Justicia lineages as here defined. The last three of these comprise a strongly supported monophyletic group, and there is weaker evidence linking the Ruellia and Justicia lineages as closest relatives. Within the Acanthus lineage, our results confirm the existence of monophyletic lineages representing Aphelandreae and Acantheae. Lastly, within the Justicia lineage, we develop initial hypotheses regarding the definition of sublineages; some of these correspond to earlier ideas, whereas others do not. All of these hypotheses need to be tested against more data. PMID:21680347

  4. Molecular Cytogenetics in Digenean Parasites: Linked and Unlinked Major and 5S rDNAs, B Chromosomes and Karyotype Diversification.

    PubMed

    García-Souto, Daniel; Pasantes, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Digenetic trematodes are the largest group of internal metazoan parasites, but their chromosomes are poorly studied. Although chromosome numbers and/or karyotypes are known for about 300 of the 18,000 described species, molecular cytogenetic knowledge is mostly limited to the mapping of telomeric sequences and/or of major rDNA clusters in 9 species. In this work we mapped major and 5S rDNA clusters and telomeric sequences in chromosomes of Bucephalus minimus, B. australis, Prosorhynchoides carvajali (Bucephaloidea), Monascus filiformis (Gymnophalloidea), Parorchis acanthus (Echinostomatoidea), Cryptocotyle lingua (Opisthorchioidea), Cercaria longicaudata, Monorchis parvus (Monorchioidea), Diphterostomum brusinae, and Bacciger bacciger (Microphalloidea). Whilst single major and minor rDNA clusters were mapped to different chromosome pairs in B. minimus and P. acanthus, overlapping signals were detected on a single chromosome pair in the remaining taxa. FISH experiments using major rDNA and telomeric probes clearly demonstrated the presence of highly stretched NORs in most of the digenean taxa analyzed. B chromosomes were detected in the B. bacciger samples hosted by Ruditapes decussatus. Although the cercariae specimens obtained from Donax trunculus, Tellina tenuis, and R. decussatus were in agreement with B. bacciger, their karyotypes showed striking morphological differences in agreement with the proposed assignation of these cercariae to different species of the genus Bacciger. Results are discussed in comparison with previous data on digenean chromosomes. PMID:26680763

  5. Validation of anticonvulsant and sedative activity of six medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Bum, E Ngo; Taiwe, G S; Nkainsa, L A; Moto, F C O; Seke Etet, P F; Hiana, I R; Bailabar, T; Rouyatou; Seyni, Papa; Rakotonirina, A; Rakotonirina, S V

    2009-03-01

    Acanthus montanus, Alchornea laxiflora, Hyptis spicigera, Microglossa pyrifolia, Piliostigma reticulatum, and Voacanga africana were evaluated with respect to anticonvulsant and sedative activity in mice using animal models (maximal electroshock (MES), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), isonicotinic hydrazide acid (INH), picrotoxin (PIC), and strychnine (STR)-induced convulsions or turning behavior and diazepam-induced sleep). Acanthus montanus protected 66.6% of mice against MES-, PIC-, and STR-induced convulsions and 83.3% of mice from PTZ-induced convulsions. Alchornea laxiflora protected 75% and 87.5% of mice in the STR and NMDA tests, respectively, at a dose of 120 mg/kg. Hyptis spicigera protected 100 and 87.5% of mice against STR- and PTZ-induced convulsions, respectively, at a dose of 160 mg/kg. Microglossa pyrifolia protected 50% to 100% of mice against convulsions. Piliostigma reticulatum protected 62.5% to 100% of mice against convulsions and turning behavior. Voacanga africana protected 62.5% to 87.5% of mice against convulsions and turning behavior. All of the plants except A. laxiflora also exerted sedative activity by strongly increasing the total duration of sleep induced by diazepam. PMID:19162225

  6. Lignans from Arnica species.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas J; Stausberg, Sabine; Raison, Jeanette Von; Berner, Matthias; Willuhn, Günter

    2006-05-10

    From four Arnica species (A. angustifolia Vahl ssp. attenuata (Greene) Maguire, A. lonchophylla Greene ssp. lonchophylla Maguire (flowerheads), A. chamissonis Less. ssp. foliosa (Nutt.) Maguire, A. montana L. (roots and rhizomes)) a total of twelve lignans of the furofuran-, dibenzylbutyrolactone- and dibenzylbutyrolactol-type were isolated. No report on lignans as constituents of Arnica species exists so far. Besides the known pinoresinol, epipinoresinol, phillygenin, matairesinol, nortrachelogenin and nortracheloside, six dibenzylbutyrolactol derivatives with different stereochemistry and substitution at C-9 were isolated and their structures elucidated by NMR spectroscopic and mass spectral analysis. PMID:16644542

  7. Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Jhon J; Ochoa, Veronica J; Ocampo, Saul A; Muñoz, John F

    2006-01-01

    Background The antimicrobial activity and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Bixa orellana L., Cecropia peltata L., Cinchona officinalis L., Gliricidia sepium H.B. & K, Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, Justicia secunda Vahl., Piper pulchrum C.DC, P. paniculata L. and Spilanthes americana Hieron were evaluated against five bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus β hemolític, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli), and one yeast (Candida albicans). These plants are used in Colombian folk medicine to treat infections of microbial origin. Methods Plants were collected by farmers and traditional healers. The ethanol, hexane and water extracts were obtained by standard methods. The antimicrobial activity was found by using a modified agar well diffusion method. All microorganisms were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). MIC was determined in the plant extracts that showed some efficacy against the tested microorganisms. Gentamycin sulfate (1.0 μg/ml), clindamycin (0.3 μg/ml) and nystatin (1.0 μg/ml) were used as positive controls. Results The water extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed a higher activity against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli than gentamycin sulfate. Similarly, the ethanol extracts of all species were active against Staphylococcus aureus except for Justicia secunda. Furthermore, Bixa orellana L, Justicia secunda Vahl. and Piper pulchrum C.DC presented the lowest MICs against Escherichia coli (0.8, 0.6 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively) compared to gentamycin sulfate (0.9 8g/ml). Likewise, Justicia secunda and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed an analogous MIC against Candida albicans (0.5 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively) compared to nystatin (0.6 μg/ml). Bixa orellana L, exhibited a better MIC against Bacillus cereus (0.2 μg/ml) than gentamycin sulfate (0.5 μg/ml). Conclusion This in vitro study corroborated the

  8. [Relative adscriptions of components in the effective fractions of Yinqiao decoction and its composing individual herbs].

    PubMed

    Shi, Yue; Shi, Ren-bing

    2007-02-01

    HPLC and LC-MS/MS were used to establish a comprehensive HPLC analytical method of Yinqiao decoction and identify the chemical constituents of the whole and individual herbs of Yinqiao decoction. YWG-C18 (250 mm x4. 6 mm ID, 10 microm) column was used; the mobile phase was composed of acetonitrile (A) and water ( B, with 3% acetic acid) with gradient elution; the flow rate was 1. 0 mL x min(-1) and the column temperature was set up at 25 degrees C. The detection wavelength was 280 nm. The chromatographic fingerprints of Yinqiao Decoction showed 30 main peaks. Peak 2, 14, 15, 17 were from Lonicera japonica Thunb, peak 3, 12, 13, 24 were from Fosythia suspense (Thunb) Vahl, peak 19, 25, 26, 27 were from Arctium lappa L. , peak 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 18, 28 were from Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch, peak 20, 21 were from Mentha haplocalyx Briq. , peak 22, 23 were from Schizonepeta tenuifolia Briq. , peak 1 presented in the chromatograms of Lonicera japonica Thunb, Fosythia suspense (Thunb) Vahl, Mentha haplocalyx Briq. , Schizonepeta tenuifolia Briq. and Platycodon grandiflorum (Jacq. ) A. DC. , peak 7 presented in the chromatograms of Fosythia suspense (Thunb) Vahl and Glycine max (L. ) Merr. , peak 16 presented in the chromatograms of Mentha haplocalyx Briq. and Schizonepeta tenuifolia Briq. , peak 29 presented in the chromatograms of the herbs except Mentha haplocalyx Briq. and Platycodon grandiflorum (Jacq. ) A. DC. , peak 30 presented in the chromatograms of the herbs except Platycodon grandiflorum (Jacq. ) A. DC. , peak 4 was not identified, maybe it was a new constituent produced during decoction. By comparison of the standards isolated and MS spectra, 14 peaks were identified as 2 ( chlorogenic acid) , 9 ( liquiritin ) , 10 ( 4'-O-[ beta-D-apiofuranosyl (1--> 2 ) -beta-D-glucopyranosyl] liquiritigenin), 12 (forsythiaside), 13 (rutin), 14 (4,5-O-dicaffeoylquiniic acid), 15 (3, 5-O-dicaffeoylquiniic acid ), 16 ( 4-0- [ beta-D-apiofuranosyl ( 1 -->2 ) -beta

  9. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  10. A new ketosteroid from red alga Acanthophora spicifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Dayong; Guo, Shuju; Fan, Xiao

    2011-05-01

    A new ketosteroid, along with six known steroids, was isolated from the ethanolic extracts of red alga Acanthophora spicifera (Vahl.) Boergesen. The structures, identified using chemical and spectroscopic methods including 2D NMR, were: (1) 22-hydroxy-5α-cholest-3,6-dione, (2) 6-hydroxycholest-4-ene-3-one, (3) cholest-4-ene-3,6-dione, (4) cholest-5-ene-3β-ol, (5) 5α-cholestane-3,6-dione, (6) β-Sitosterol and (7) Saringosterol. The MTT method was used to test the cytotoxicity of the compounds against the human cancer cell lines, HCT-8, Bel-7402, BGC-823, A549 and HELA. Compounds 1, 2, 3 and 5 showed moderate cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines.

  11. Chemical composition and antigerminative activity of the essential oils from five Salvia species.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Laura; Roscigno, Graziana; Mancini, Emilia; De Falco, Enrica; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2010-02-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils of Salvia africana L., Salvia elegans Vahl, Salvia greggii A. Gray, Salvia mellifera Green and Salvia munzii Epling, cultivated in Eboli (Salerno, Southern Italy), was studied by means of GC and GC-MS analyses. In all, 88 compounds were identified, 54 for S. africana, accounting for 95.4% of the total oil, 55 for S. elegans (92.9%), 50 for S. greggii (96.9%), 54 for S. mellifera (90.4%) and 47 for S. munzii (97.5%), respectively. In S. africana,the amount of monoterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids is very similar. For other species, the monoterpenoid percentage is greater than the amount of sesquiterpenoids. The oils of S. elegans, S. greggii and S. munzii were active inhibitors of germination and radical elongation of Raphanus sativus L. and Lepidium sativum L. PMID:20335942

  12. Dissimilar phloem loading in leaves with symplasmic or apoplasmic minor-vein configurations.

    PubMed

    van Bel, A J; Gamalei, Y V; Ammerlaan, A; Bik, L P

    1992-03-01

    Plant species were selected on the basis of abundant or no symplasmic continuity between sieveelement-companion-cell (SE-CC) complexes and adjacent cells in the minor veins. Symplasmic continuity and discontinuity are denoted, respectively, as symplasmic and apoplasmic minor-vein configurations. Discs of predarkened leaves from which the lower epidermis had been removed, were exposed to (14)CO2. After 2 h of subsequent incubation, phloem loading in control discs and discs treated with p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid (PCMBS) was recorded by autoradiography. Phloem loading was strongly suppressed by PCMBS in minor veins with symplasmically isolated SE-CC complexes (Centaurea, Impatiens, Ligularia, Pelargonium, Pisum, Symphytum). No significant inhibition of phloem loading by PCMBS was observed in minor veins containing sieve elements with abundant symplasmic connections (Epilobium, Fuchsia, Hydrangea, Oenothera, Origanum, Stachys). Phloem loading in minor veins with both types of SE-CC complex (Acanthus) had apoplasmic features. The results provide strong evidence for coincidence between the mode of phloem loading and the minor-vein configuration. The widespread occurrence of a symplasmic mode of phloem loading is postulated. PMID:24186781

  13. Metal (Pb, Zn and Cu) uptake and tolerance by mangroves in relation to root anatomy and lignification/suberization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Jiang, Zhao-Yu; Liu, Yong; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Mei-Lin; Sun, Cui-Ci; Sun, Fu-Lin; Fei, Jiao; Wang, You-Shao

    2014-06-01

    Metal pollution has been widely reported in mangrove wetlands; however, the mechanisms involved in metal detoxification by mangroves are still poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the possible function of root anatomy and lignification/suberization on metal uptake and tolerance in seedlings of six species of mangroves. The results revealed that the three rhizophoraceous species (Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Poir, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu & Yong and Rhizophora stylosa Griff) consistently exhibited higher metal tolerances than the three pioneer species (Aegiceras corniculatum (Linn.) Blanco, Acanthus ilicifolius L. and Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Viern.). Moreover, metal-tolerant species often exhibited a thick exodermis with high lignification and suberization. The tolerance indices of the mangroves were found to be positively correlated with the amounts of lignin and suberin deposition within the exodermal cell walls. The observed metal uptake by the excised roots further illustrated that a lignified/suberized exodermis directly delayed the entry of metals into the roots, and thereby contributed to a higher tolerance to heavy metals. In summary, the present study proposes a barrier property of the lignified/suberized exodermis in dealing with the stresses of heavy metals, such that the mangroves which possessed more extensive lignification/suberization within the exodermis appeared to exhibit higher metal tolerance. PMID:24965807

  14. Radical scavenging potentials of single and combinatorial herbal formulations in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ojiako, Okey A.; Chikezie, Paul C.; Ogbuji, Agomuo C.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are involved in deleterious/beneficial biological processes. The present study sought to investigate the capacity of single and combinatorial herbal formulations of Acanthus montanus, Emilia coccinea, Hibiscus rosasinensis, and Asystasia gangetica to act as superoxide radicals (SOR), hydrogen peroxide (HP), nitric oxide radical (NOR), hydroxyl radical (HR), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical antagonists using in vitro models. The herbal extracts were single herbal formulations (SHfs), double herbal formulations (DHfs), triple herbal formulations (THfs), and a quadruple herbal formulation (QHf). The phytochemical composition and radical scavenging capacity index (SCI) of the herbal formulations were measured using standard methods. The flavonoids were the most abundant phytochemicals present in the herbal extracts. The SCI50 defined the concentration (μg/mL) of herbal formulation required to scavenge 50% of the investigated radicals. The SHfs, DHfs, THfs, and QHf SCI50 against the radicals followed the order HR > SOR > DPPH radical > HP > NOR. Although the various herbal formulations exhibited ambivalent antioxidant activities in terms of their radical scavenging capabilities, a broad survey of the results of the present study showed that combinatorial herbal formulations (DHfs, THfs, and QHf) appeared to exhibit lower radical scavenging capacities than those of the SHfs in vitro. PMID:27114938

  15. Biological activities and chemical constituents of some mangrove species from Sundarban estuary: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Simlai, Aritra; Roy, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This review represents the studies performed on some beneficial mangrove plants such as Ceriops decandra, Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Excoecaria agallocha, Sarcolobus globosus, Sonneratia caseolaris and Acanthus ilicifolius from the Sundarban estuary spanning India and Bangladesh with regard to their biological activities and chemical investigations till date. Sundarban is the largest single chunk of mangrove forest in the world. The forest is a source of livelihood to numerous people of the region. Several of its plant species have very large applications in the traditional folk medicine; various parts of these plants are used by the local people as cure for various ailments. Despite such enormous potential, remarkably few reports are available on these species regarding their biological activities and the active principles responsible for such activities. Though some chemical studies have been made on the mangrove plants of this estuary, reports pertaining to their activity-structure relationship are few in number. An attempt has been made in this review to increase the awareness for the medicinal significance as well as conservation and utilization of these mangrove species as natural rich sources of novel bioactive agents. PMID:24347925

  16. Mapping the distribution of mangrove species in the Core Zone of Mai Po Marshes Nature Reserve, Hong Kong, using hyperspectral data and high-resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mingming; Zhang, Yuanzhi; Wang, Zongming; Song, Kaishan; Ren, Chunying

    2014-12-01

    Mangrove species compositions and distributions are essential for conservation and restoration efforts. In this study, hyperspectral data of EO-1 HYPERION sensor and high spatial resolution data of SPOT-5 sensor were used in Mai Po mangrove species mapping. Objected-oriented method was used in mangrove species classification processing. Firstly, mangrove objects were obtained via segmenting high spatial resolution data of SPOT-5. Then the objects were classified into different mangrove species based on the spectral differences of HYPERION image. The classification result showed that in the top canopy, Kandelia obovata and Avicennia marina dominated Mai Po Marshes Natural Reserve, with area of 196.8 ha and 110.8 ha, respectively, Acanthus ilicifolius and Aegiceras corniculatum were mixed together and living at the edge of channels with an area of 11.7 ha. Additionally, mangrove species shows clearly zonations and associations in the Mai Po Core Zone. The overall accuracy of our mangrove map was 88% and the Kappa confidence was 0.83, which indicated great potential of using hyperspectral and high-resolution data for distinguishing and mapping mangrove species.

  17. Blood glucose level and lipid profile of alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations.

    PubMed

    Ojiako, Okey A; Chikezie, Paul C; Ogbuji, Agomuo C

    2016-04-01

    The current study sought to investigate the capacities of single and combinatorial herbal formulations of leaf extracts of Acanthus montanus, Asystasia gangetica, Emilia coccinea, and Hibiscus rosasinensis to reverse hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in alloxan-induced diabetic male rats. Phytochemical composition of the herbal extracts, fasting plasma glucose concentration (FPGC), and serum lipid profile (SLP) of the rats were measured by standard methods. The relative abundance of phytochemicals in the four experimental leaf extracts was in the following order: flavonoids > alkaloids > saponins > tannins. Hyperglycemic rats (HyGR) treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of reduced FPGC compared with the untreated HyGR and were normoglycemic (FPGC < 110.0 mg/dL). Similarly, HyGR treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of readjustments in their SLPs. Generally, HyGR treated with triple herbal formulations (THfs) exhibited the highest atherogenic index compared with HyGR treated with single herbal formulations (SHfs), double herbal formulations (DHfs), and quadruple herbal formulation (QHf). The display of synergy or antagonism by the composite herbal extracts in ameliorating hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia depended on the type and number of individual herbal extract used in constituting the experimental herbal formulations. Furthermore, the capacities of the herbal formulations (SHfs, DHfs, THfs, and QHf) to exert glycemic control and reverse dyslipidemia did not follow predictable patterns in the animal models. PMID:27114943

  18. Radical scavenging potentials of single and combinatorial herbal formulations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ojiako, Okey A; Chikezie, Paul C; Ogbuji, Agomuo C

    2016-04-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are involved in deleterious/beneficial biological processes. The present study sought to investigate the capacity of single and combinatorial herbal formulations of Acanthus montanus, Emilia coccinea, Hibiscus rosasinensis, and Asystasia gangetica to act as superoxide radicals (SOR), hydrogen peroxide (HP), nitric oxide radical (NOR), hydroxyl radical (HR), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical antagonists using in vitro models. The herbal extracts were single herbal formulations (SHfs), double herbal formulations (DHfs), triple herbal formulations (THfs), and a quadruple herbal formulation (QHf). The phytochemical composition and radical scavenging capacity index (SCI) of the herbal formulations were measured using standard methods. The flavonoids were the most abundant phytochemicals present in the herbal extracts. The SCI50 defined the concentration (μg/mL) of herbal formulation required to scavenge 50% of the investigated radicals. The SHfs, DHfs, THfs, and QHf SCI50 against the radicals followed the order HR > SOR > DPPH radical > HP > NOR. Although the various herbal formulations exhibited ambivalent antioxidant activities in terms of their radical scavenging capabilities, a broad survey of the results of the present study showed that combinatorial herbal formulations (DHfs, THfs, and QHf) appeared to exhibit lower radical scavenging capacities than those of the SHfs in vitro. PMID:27114938

  19. Stem cells and progenitor cells in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Haller, Hermann; de Groot, Kirsten; Bahlmann, Ferdinand; Elger, Marlies; Fliser, Danilo

    2005-11-01

    Stem cells and progenitor cells are necessary for repair and regeneration of injured renal tissue. Infiltrating or resident stem cells can contribute to the replacement of lost or damaged tissue. However, the regulation of circulating progenitor cells is not well understood. We have analyzed the effects of erythropoietin on circulating progenitor cells and found that low levels of erythropoietin induce mobilization and differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells. In an animal model of 5/6 nephrectomy we could demonstrate that erythropoietin ameliorates tissue injury. Full regeneration of renal tissue demands the existence of stem cells and an adequate local "milieu," a so-called stem cell niche. We have previously described a stem cell niche in the kidneys of the dogfish, Squalus acanthus. Further analysis revealed that in the regenerating zone of the shark kidney, stem cells exist that can be induced by loss of renal tissue to form new glomeruli. Such animal models improve our understanding of stem cell behavior in the kidney and may eventually contribute to novel therapies. PMID:16221168

  20. Modulation of Cox-1, 5-, 12- and 15-Lox by popular herbal remedies used in southern Italy against psoriasis and other skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Bader, Ammar; Martini, Francesca; Schinella, Guillermo R; Rios, Jose L; Prieto, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Acanthus mollis (Acanthaceae), Achillea ligustica, Artemisia arborescens and Inula viscosa (Asteraceae) are used in Southern Italy against psoriasis and other skin diseases that occur with an imbalanced production of eicosanoids. We here assessed their in vitro effects upon 5-, 12-, 15-LOX and COX-1 enzymes as well as NFκB activation in intact cells as their possible therapeutic targets. All methanol crude extracts inhibited both 5-LOX and COX-1 activities under 200 µg/mL, without significant effects on the 12-LOX pathway or any relevant in vitro free radical scavenging activity. NFκB activation was prevented by all extracts but A. mollis. Interestingly, A. ligustica, A. arborescens and A. mollis increased the biosynthesis of 15(S)-HETE, an anti-inflammatory eicosanoid. A. ligustica (IC50 =49.5 µg/mL) was superior to Silybum marianum (IC50 =147.8 µg/mL), which we used as antipsoriatic herbal medicine of reference. Its n-hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions had also inhibitory effects on the LTB4 biosynthesis (IC50 s=9.6, 20.3 and 68 µg/mL, respectively) evidencing that the apolar extracts of A. ligustica are promising active herbal ingredients for future phytotherapeutical products targeting psoriasis. PMID:25278440

  1. Discrimination of mangrove species in Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve, Perak using in-situ measurement of hyperspectral leaf reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Beh Boon; Keat, Sim Chong; Syahreza, Saumi; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; San, Lim Hwee

    2015-04-01

    Studies of mangrove species's reflectance characteristic are important in order to have a deep understanding of mangrove vegetation. In this paper, the significant wavelengths which can be used to separate the six mangrove species at Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve (MMFR), Perak were examined. The investigated mangrove species comprise of Rhizophora apiculata, Acrostichum aurem, Acrostichum speciosum, Acanthus ilicifolius, Ceriops tagal and Sonneratia ovata. In-situ spectral reflectance data of six mangrove species's leaf were obtained using ASD FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer and were statistically tested using SPSS program. First, wavelengths which exhibited significant differences (P value<0.05) among the mean reflectance of six mangrove species were identified using a series of one way ANOVA. Second, the identified wavelengths were further analyzed using canonical stepwise discriminant analysis and 26 significant wavelengths were obtained which can be utilized to distinguish among the six mangrove species. In conclusion, each mangrove species in MMFR have it own unique reflectance properties and these characteristic enable the mangrove species can be discriminated among each other under proper analysis and data extraction.

  2. Blood glucose level and lipid profile of alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations

    PubMed Central

    Ojiako, Okey A.; Chikezie, Paul C.; Ogbuji, Agomuo C.

    2015-01-01

    The current study sought to investigate the capacities of single and combinatorial herbal formulations of leaf extracts of Acanthus montanus, Asystasia gangetica, Emilia coccinea, and Hibiscus rosasinensis to reverse hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in alloxan-induced diabetic male rats. Phytochemical composition of the herbal extracts, fasting plasma glucose concentration (FPGC), and serum lipid profile (SLP) of the rats were measured by standard methods. The relative abundance of phytochemicals in the four experimental leaf extracts was in the following order: flavonoids > alkaloids > saponins > tannins. Hyperglycemic rats (HyGR) treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of reduced FPGC compared with the untreated HyGR and were normoglycemic (FPGC < 110.0 mg/dL). Similarly, HyGR treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of readjustments in their SLPs. Generally, HyGR treated with triple herbal formulations (THfs) exhibited the highest atherogenic index compared with HyGR treated with single herbal formulations (SHfs), double herbal formulations (DHfs), and quadruple herbal formulation (QHf). The display of synergy or antagonism by the composite herbal extracts in ameliorating hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia depended on the type and number of individual herbal extract used in constituting the experimental herbal formulations. Furthermore, the capacities of the herbal formulations (SHfs, DHfs, THfs, and QHf) to exert glycemic control and reverse dyslipidemia did not follow predictable patterns in the animal models. PMID:27114943

  3. Biological activities and chemical constituents of some mangrove species from Sundarban estuary: An overview.

    PubMed

    Simlai, Aritra; Roy, Amit

    2013-07-01

    This review represents the studies performed on some beneficial mangrove plants such as Ceriops decandra, Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Excoecaria agallocha, Sarcolobus globosus, Sonneratia caseolaris and Acanthus ilicifolius from the Sundarban estuary spanning India and Bangladesh with regard to their biological activities and chemical investigations till date. Sundarban is the largest single chunk of mangrove forest in the world. The forest is a source of livelihood to numerous people of the region. Several of its plant species have very large applications in the traditional folk medicine; various parts of these plants are used by the local people as cure for various ailments. Despite such enormous potential, remarkably few reports are available on these species regarding their biological activities and the active principles responsible for such activities. Though some chemical studies have been made on the mangrove plants of this estuary, reports pertaining to their activity-structure relationship are few in number. An attempt has been made in this review to increase the awareness for the medicinal significance as well as conservation and utilization of these mangrove species as natural rich sources of novel bioactive agents. PMID:24347925

  4. Modulation of Cox-1, 5-, 12- and 15-Lox by Popular Herbal Remedies Used in Southern Italy Against Psoriasis and Other Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Ammar; Martini, Francesca; Schinella, Guillermo R; Rios, Jose L; Prieto, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Acanthus mollis (Acanthaceae), Achillea ligustica, Artemisia arborescens and Inula viscosa (Asteraceae) are used in Southern Italy against psoriasis and other skin diseases that occur with an imbalanced production of eicosanoids. We here assessed their in vitro effects upon 5-, 12-, 15-LOX and COX-1 enzymes as well as NFκB activation in intact cells as their possible therapeutic targets. All methanol crude extracts inhibited both 5-LOX and COX-1 activities under 200 µg/mL, without significant effects on the 12-LOX pathway or any relevant in vitro free radical scavenging activity. NFκB activation was prevented by all extracts but A. mollis. Interestingly, A. ligustica, A. arborescens and A. mollis increased the biosynthesis of 15(S)-HETE, an anti-inflammatory eicosanoid. A. ligustica (IC50 = 49.5 µg/mL) was superior to Silybum marianum (IC50 = 147.8 µg/mL), which we used as antipsoriatic herbal medicine of reference. Its n-hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions had also inhibitory effects on the LTB4 biosynthesis (IC50s = 9.6, 20.3 and 68 µg/mL, respectively) evidencing that the apolar extracts of A. ligustica are promising active herbal ingredients for future phytotherapeutical products targeting psoriasis. © 2014 The Authors. Phytotherapy Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25278440

  5. Crustal Magnetization and Magnetic Petrology in Basalts - What Can We Learn from Scientific Drillings?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rock magnetic and magneto-mineralogical data from scientific drillings contribute to our understanding of the growth history and tectonic evolution of volcanic structures and allows for an improved interpretation of magnetic anomaly data. Such data are not only important for the magnetic structure of volcanic buildings and spreading ridges on Earth but may also provide basic data for the interpretation of extraterrestrial magnetic anomalies like on Mars. Crustal magnetization of basalts is well studied since decades and in general, the amplitude of magnetic anomalies is mainly related to the induced and remanent magnetization. Direct measurements of the magnetic field and measurements of magnetic properties of oceanic and continental crust have indicated that the crustal magnetization is very complex and depends on different factors like e.g. magma composition, cooling rate, age and hydrothermal alteration. Generally a high oxygen fugacity (above the NNO buffer) and a low Ti/(Ti+Fe) ratio of the basaltic melt are suggested as a precondition for high concentration of magnetic minerals and therefore high primary TRM. High temperature subsolidus reactions and hydrothermal alteration as e.g. observed in the strongly magnetic basalts from the Stardalur drill core, Iceland, seems to increase NRM intensity and magnetic susceptibility due to creation of small, secondary magnetite (Vahle et al. 2007). Probably the increase occurred after the extinction of the hydrothermal system because active high-temperature (>150 °C) geothermal areas like the Krafla caldera, NE-Iceland, often show distinct magnetic lows in aeromagnetic anomaly maps suggesting a destruction of magnetic minerals by hydrothermal activity (Oliva-Urcia et al. 2011). The destruction explains the significant magnetization loss, which is seen in many local magnetic anomaly lows within the oceanic crust and volcanic islands like Iceland or Hawaii. Borehole and core magnetic susceptibility measurements in

  6. Pb uptake and tolerance in the two selected mangroves with different root lignification and suberization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Wang, You-Shao; Liu, Yong; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Mei-Lin; Sun, Cui-Ci

    2015-10-01

    Metal pollution has been widely reported in mangrove wetlands; however, the mechanisms involved in metal detoxification by mangroves are still poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the possible function of root lignification/suberization on Pb uptake and tolerance in mangroves. Two mangroves, Acanthus ilicifolius and Rhizophora stylosa with different root lignification/suberization were selected as plant materials; the former exhibits a thin exodermis and low lignification/suberization, while the latter possesses a thick exodermis and high lignification/suberization. A pot trial with addition of Pb was conducted to investigate the differences in Pb uptake and tolerance between the two mangroves. The experiment of rhizobox was designed to explore Pb dynamics and availabilities in the rhizosphere soils, besides, the ability of Pb uptake by the excised roots and X-ray analysis for Pb distribution within roots were also detected. The results revealed that R. stylosa exhibited relatively higher Pb tolerance together with less Pb accumulations when compared to A. ilicifolius. For both species, lower proportion of exchangeable and Carbonate Pb and higher higher Fe-Mn oxides Pb were observed in the rhizosphere zone when compared to the respective non-rhizosphere zone. The results from metal uptake by the excised roots and X-ray analysis clearly showed that the thick lignified/suberized exodermis of R. stylosa could more efficiently delay Pb entering into the roots, leading to less Pb accumulation. In summary, the present study proposes a barrier property of the lignified/suberized exodermis in dealing with the stresses of Pb. PMID:25956982

  7. Prospects of apicultural entrepreneurship in coastal districts of eastern India: a melissopalynological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Debasis; Bhattacharya, Swapan; Ferguson, David K; Bera, Subir

    2014-01-01

    A melissopalynological analysis of fifty-one natural honey samples (twenty four spring, fifteen summer and twelve winter) collected during 2010-2011 from two east-coastal districts (20(0)20/ to 22(0)11/ N, 82(0)39/ to 87(0)01/ E) of Orissa, India was performed. Out of 37 unifloral samples found 25 were contributed by Apis cerana indica, seven by A. dorsata and the remaining five by A. florea. Out of 14 multifloral samples five were contributed by A. cerana indica, five by A. dorsata and the remaining four by A. florea. Principal component analysis confirmed the palynological classification of the unifloral honey samples. Eighty-two bee-plant taxa belonging to forty four families were recovered. The predominant nectariferous taxa of the spring season were Acanthus ilicifolius, Avicennia marina, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, Cocos nucifera, Eucalyptus globulus, Phoenix paludosa, Pongamia pinnata, Prosopis juliflora, Sonneratia apetala and Syzygium cumini. In the summer the predominant nectariferous taxa were Borassus flabellifer, C. nucifera, E. globulus, Syzygium cumini, Terminalia arjuna, Aegiceras corniculatum, P. paludosa and Sonneratia apetala while those of the winter were Brassica nigra, Coriandrum sativum, Zizyphus jujuba, Alstonia scholaris, E. globulus and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Very low (<0.09) HDE/P for 98% of the samples and absence of toxic palynotaxa assure that these honeys are suitable for human consumption. Quite extended honey flow period with spring and summer as best forage seasons for the honeybees and occurrence of 82% of these honeys with APC Group II, III and IV justify the sustainability of the present study area for establishing moderate to large-scale apicultural entrepreneurship. This should improve the socio-economic status of the people of this region. PMID:24740144

  8. Prospects of Apicultural Entrepreneurship in Coastal Districts of Eastern India: A Melissopalynological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Debasis; Bhattacharya, Swapan; Ferguson, David K.; Bera, Subir

    2014-01-01

    A melissopalynological analysis of fifty-one natural honey samples (twenty four spring, fifteen summer and twelve winter) collected during 2010–2011 from two east-coastal districts (20020/ to 22011/ N, 82039/ to 87001/ E) of Orissa, India was performed. Out of 37 unifloral samples found 25 were contributed by Apis cerana indica, seven by A. dorsata and the remaining five by A. florea. Out of 14 multifloral samples five were contributed by A. cerana indica, five by A. dorsata and the remaining four by A. florea. Principal component analysis confirmed the palynological classification of the unifloral honey samples. Eighty-two bee-plant taxa belonging to forty four families were recovered. The predominant nectariferous taxa of the spring season were Acanthus ilicifolius, Avicennia marina, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, Cocos nucifera, Eucalyptus globulus, Phoenix paludosa, Pongamia pinnata, Prosopis juliflora, Sonneratia apetala and Syzygium cumini. In the summer the predominant nectariferous taxa were Borassus flabellifer, C. nucifera, E. globulus, Syzygium cumini, Terminalia arjuna, Aegiceras corniculatum, P. paludosa and Sonneratia apetala while those of the winter were Brassica nigra, Coriandrum sativum, Zizyphus jujuba, Alstonia scholaris, E. globulus and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Very low (<0.09) HDE/P for 98% of the samples and absence of toxic palynotaxa assure that these honeys are suitable for human consumption. Quite extended honey flow period with spring and summer as best forage seasons for the honeybees and occurrence of 82% of these honeys with APC Group II, III and IV justify the sustainability of the present study area for establishing moderate to large-scale apicultural entrepreneurship. This should improve the socio-economic status of the people of this region. PMID:24740144

  9. In vitro anti-hepatoma activity of fifteen natural medicines from Canada.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Liu, Li-Teh; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2002-08-01

    Fifteen crude drugs, Stellaria media Cyrill. (Caryophyllaceae), Calendula officinalis L. (Compositae), Achillea millefolium L. (Compositae), Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae), Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae), Borago officinalis L. (Boraginaceae), Satureja hortensis L. (Labiatae), Coptis groenlandica Salisb. (Ranunculaceae), Cassia angustifolia Vahl. (Leguminosae), Origanum majorana L. (Labiatae), Centella asiatica L. (Umbelliferae), Caulophyllum thalictroides Mich. (Berberidaceae), Picea rubens Sargent. (Pinaceae), Rhamnus purshiana D.C. (Rhamnaceae) and Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae), which have been used as folk medicine in Canada, were evaluated for their anti-hepatoma activity on five human liver-cancer cell lines, i.e. HepG2/C3A, SK-HEP-1, HA22T/VGH, Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5. The samples were examined by in vitro evaluation for their cytotoxicity. The results showed that the effects of crude drugs on hepatitis B virus genome-containing cell lines were different from those against non hepatitis B virus genome-containing cell lines. C. groenlandica was observed to be the most effective against the growth of all five cell lines and its chemotherapeutic values will be of interest for further studies. PMID:12203264

  10. Chemical composition of essential oils from four Vietnamese species of piper (piperaceae).

    PubMed

    Hieu, Le D; Thang, Tran D; Hoi, Tran M; Ogunwande, Isiaka A

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils from four Piper species, Piper retrofractum Vahl., P. boehmeriaefolium (Miq.) C. DC., P. sarmentosum Roxb., and P. maclurei Merr., were analysed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nineteen to sixty-four compounds representing 92.0%-98.4% of the total contents were identified in the oil samples. The major constituents identified in P. retrofractum leaf oil were benzyl benzoate (14.4%), myrcene (14.4%), bicycloelemene (9.9%), bicyclogermacrene (7.0%) and β-caryophyllene (5.3%). On the other hand, the main constituents of P. boehmeriaefolium were α-copaene (28.3%), α-pinene (7.4%) and 1, 8-cineole (5.7%). P. sarmentosum showed a very different chemical profile characterized mainly by aromatic compounds and devoid of monoterpene hydrocarbons. The major constituents were benzyl benzoate (49.1%), benzyl alcohol (17.9%), 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid phenylmethyl ester (10.0%) and 2-butenyl-benzene (7.9%). The leaf of P. maclurei was characterized by higher amount of (E)-cinnamic acid (37.4%) and (E)-nerolidol (19.4%). Moreover, (Z)-9-octadecanoic acid methyl ester (28.0%), (E)-cinnamyl acetate (17.2%), phytol (12.2%) and (E)-cinnamaldehyde (8.8%) were the major compounds identified in the stem oil. PMID:24712088

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of 81 Chinese Herb Extracts and Their Correlation with the Characteristics of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Liang; Zhang, Dan-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS) is the primary contributor of the overproduction of nitric oxide and its inhibitors have been actively sought as effective anti-inflammatory agents. In this study, we prepared 70% ethanol extracts from 81 Chinese herbs. These extracts were subsequently evaluated for their effect on nitrogen oxide (NO) production and cell growth in LPS/IFNγ-costimulated and unstimulated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells by Griess reaction and MTT assay. Extracts of Daphne genkwa Sieb.et Zucc, Caesalpinia sappan L., Iles pubescens Hook.et Arn, Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl, Zingiber officinale Rosc, Inula japonica Thunb., and Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort markedly inhibited NO production (inhibition > 90% at 100 μg/mL). Among active extracts (inhibition > 50% at 100 μg/mL), Rubia cordifolia L., Glycyrrhiza glabra L., Iles pubescens Hook.et Arn, Nigella glandulifera Freyn et Sint, Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi, and Scutellaria barbata D. Don displayed no cytotoxicity to unstimulated RAW246.7 cells while increasing the growth of LPS/IFNγ-costimulated cells. By analyzing the correlation between their activities and their Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) characteristics, herbs with pungent flavor displayed potent anti-inflammatory capability. Our study provides a series of potential anti-inflammatory herbs and suggests that herbs with pungent flavor are candidates of effective anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24696703

  12. Physical and Chemical Properties of Some Imported Woods and their Degradation by Termites

    PubMed Central

    Shanbhag, Rashmi R.; Sundararaj, R.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of physical and chemical properties of 20 species of imported wood on degradation of the wood by termites under field conditions was studied. The wood species studied were: Sycamore maple, Acer pseudoplatanus L. (Sapindales: Sapindaceae) (from two countries), Camphor, Dryobalanops aromatic C.F.Gaertner (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), Beech, Fagus grandifolia Ehrhart (Fagales: Fagaceae), F. sylvatica L. (from two countries), Oak, Quercus robur L., Ash, Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl (Lamiales: Oleaceae), F. excelsior L., Padauk, Pterocarpus soyauxii Taubert (Fabales: Fabaceae), (from two countries), Jamba, Xylia dolabrifiormis Roxburgh, Shorea laevis Ridley (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), S. macoptera Dyer, S. robusta Roth, Teak, Tectona grandis L.f. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) (from five countries), and rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis Müller Argoviensis (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae) from India. The termites present were: Odontotermes horni (Wasmann) (Isoptera: Termitidae), O. feae, O. wallonensis, and O. obeus (Rambur). A significant conelation was found between density, cellulose, lignin, and total phenolic contents of the wood and degradation by termites. The higher the density of the wood, the lower the degradation. Similarly, higher amount of lignin and total phenolic contents ensured higher resistance, whereas cellulose drives the termites towards the wood. PMID:23906349

  13. An experimental model to study the effects of a senna extract on the blood constituent labeling and biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical in rats

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Deise Elizabeth; Pereira, Marcia Oliveira; Bernardo, Luciana Camargo; Carmo, Fernanda Santos; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cassia angustifolia Vahl (senna) is a natural product that contains sennosides, which are active components that affect the intestinal tract and induce diarrhea. Authors have shown that senna produces DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) lesions in Escherichia coli cultures and can act as an antifungal agent. Natural drugs can alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m (99mTc) and can affect the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. In this work, we have evaluated the influence of a senna extract on the radiolabeling of blood constituents and on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4) in Wistar rats. Twelve animals were treated with senna extract for 7 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from the animals and the radiolabeling procedure was carried out. The senna extract did not modify the radiolabeling of the blood constituents. A biodistributional assay was performed by administering Na99mTcO4 and determining its activity in different organs and in blood. The senna extract altered the biodistribution of Na99mTcO4 in the thyroid, liver, pancreas, lungs and blood. These results are associated with properties of the chemical substances present in the aqueous senna extract. Although these assays were performed in animals, our findings suggest that caution should be exercised when nuclear medicine examinations using Na99mTcO4 are conducted in patients who are using senna extract. PMID:21552677

  14. A Comprehensive and System Review for the Pharmacological Mechanism of Action of Rhein, an Active Anthraquinone Ingredient.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Luo, Guangwen; Chen, Dahui; Xiang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Rhein is a major medicinal ingredient isolated from several traditional Chinese medicines, including Rheum palmatum L., Aloe barbadensis Miller, Cassia angustifolia Vahl., and Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. Rhein has various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant, antifibrosis, hepatoprotective, and nephroprotective activities. Although more than 100 articles in PubMed are involved in the pharmacological mechanism of action of rhein, only a few focus on the relationship of crosstalk among multiple pharmacological mechanisms. The mechanism of rhein involves multiple pathways which contain close interactions. From the overall perspective, the pathways which are related to the targets of rhein, are initiated by the membrane receptor. Then, MAPK and PI3K-AKT parallel signaling pathways are activated, and several downstream pathways are affected, thereby eventually regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. The therapeutic effect of rhein, as a multitarget molecule, is the synergistic and comprehensive result of the involvement of multiple pathways rather than the blocking or activation of a single signaling pathway. We review the pharmacological mechanisms of action of rhein by consulting literature published in the last 100 years in PubMed. We then summarize these pharmacological mechanisms from a comprehensive, interactive, and crosstalk perspective. In general, the molecular mechanism of action of drug must be understood from a systematic and holistic perspective, which can provide a theoretical basis for precise treatment and rational drug use. PMID:27582705

  15. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C.

    2016-01-01

    Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots) are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond.) Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L.) Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd.) Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants. PMID:27069489

  16. Comparative study of the assay of Artemia salina L. and the estimate of the medium lethal dose (LD50 value) in mice, to determine oral acute toxicity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Logarto Parra, A; Silva Yhebra, R; Guerra Sardiñas, I; Iglesias Buela, L

    2001-09-01

    Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), the brine shrimp larva, is an invertebrate used in the alternative test to determine toxicity of chemical and natural products. In this study the Medium Lethal Concentrations (LC50 value) of 20 plant extracts, Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F. (Aloeaceae), Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae); Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Ex Nees) Stapf (Poaceae); Datura stramonium L. (Solanaceae); Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (Acanthaceae); Musa x paradisiaca L. (Musaceae); Ocimum basilicum L.; O. gratissimum L.; O. tenuiflorum L. (Lamiaceae); Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae); Piper auritum Kunth (Piperaceae); Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae); Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae); Senna alata (L.) Roxb. (Fabaceae); Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl (Verbenaceae); and Thuja occidentalis L. (Cupressaceae), were determined using Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), with the objective of relating the results to the LD50 values reported in mice (tested at three concentrations: 10, 100, and 1000 microg/mL, for each extract). We found good correlation between the in vivo and the in vitro tests (r = 0.85 p < 0.05), and this method is a useful tool for predicting oral acute toxicity in plant extracts. PMID:11695884

  17. Solvent-enhanced headspace sorptive extraction in the analysis of the volatile fraction of matrices of vegetable origin.

    PubMed

    Sgorbini, Barbara; Budziak, Dilma; Cordero, Chiara; Liberto, Erica; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Sandra, Pat; Bicchi, Carlo

    2010-07-01

    The solvent-enhanced headspace sorptive extraction technique aims at modifying PDMS polarity using a solvent to increase its concentration capability. In solvent-enhanced headspace sorptive extraction, a PDMS tubing closed at both ends by small glass stoppers and filled with an organic solvent is suspended in the sample headspace for a fixed time. After sampling, the sampled analytes are recovered from the PDMS tubing by thermal desorption and online transferred to a GC-flame ionization detector or GC-MS system for analysis. Cyclohexane, iso-octane, ethyl acetate, acetone, acetonitrile and methanol were tested as PDMS modifiers to sample the volatile fractions of sage (Salvia lavandulifolia Vahl.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) and roasted coffee. Ethyl acetate was found to be the most effective PDMS modifier for all matrices investigated; although to a lesser extent, cyclohexane also increased component recoveries with sage and thyme. Acetone, acetonitrile and methanol did not increase PDMS recovery, while isooctane was excluded because of its interaction with the polymer. The results show that solvent-modified PDMS extends the range of sampled headspace components with different polarities, increases the recovery of many of them, improves sensitivity in trace analysis, speeds up recovery and gives repeatability comparable with that of unmodified PDMS. PMID:20549665

  18. Isolation and Identification of a Flavone Apigenin from Marine Red Alga Acanthophora spicifera with Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    El Shoubaky, Gihan A.; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M.; Mansour, Mohamed H.; Salem, Essam A.

    2016-01-01

    Physicochemical investigation of the red alga Acanthophora spicifera (Vahl) Borgesen, collected from Al-Shoaiba coast, Red Sea, Saudi Arabia, led to the isolation of a flavone from the algal tissue with acetone. Preparative chromatography on silica gel thin-layer chromatography was used for the separation of the flavone and eluted with the methanol:chloroform:ethyl acetate (1:7:2) solvent system. The physicochemical analyses infrared, mass spectra, and ultraviolet spectra in addition to shift reagents (NaOMe, NaOAc, NaOAc + H3BO3, AlCl3, and AlCl3 + HCl) were used for the identification and elucidation of the structure of the flavone compound (4,5,7-trihydroxy flavonoids). The flavone compound was identified as apigenin bycomparing its physicochemical data with those in the literature. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of apigenin were evaluated. Apigenin showed promising analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the hot plate test and writhing test in mice as well as tail-immersion tests and carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation in rats. It is concluded that apigenin possesses potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative activities, which might be due to the inhibition of PGE2 as well as proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. PMID:26917974

  19. The content of lignan glycosides in Forsythia flowers and leaves.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Magdalena; Klimek, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative determination of lignan glucosides in flowers and leaves of three taxons of Forsythia Vahl was performed using the HPLC method. The main lignan compound in the flowers of F. suspensa appeared to be (+)-pinoresinol beta-D-glucopyranoside, whereas in the leaves of this species phillyrin was the predominant lignan. The content of (+)-pinoresinol beta-D-glucopyranoside in F. suspensa flowers amounted to 4.3-7% and that of phillyrin did not reach 1%. The inverse ratio of (+)-pinoresinol beta-D-glucopyranoside to phillyrin occurred in the leaves of F. suspensa, which contained up to 4.3% of phillyrin and 1.6% and less (+)-pinoresinol beta-D-glucopyranoside. The flowers of F. viridissima and F. x intermedia were rich in arctiin: 5.5-10.2% and up to 11.5%, respectively. The leaves of these two species contained less arctiin: up to 4.3% in F. viridissima and up to 2.3% in F. x intermedia. The flowers showed the highest level of lignans at the phase of buds, it decreased during the blooming time. PMID:15575593

  20. A Comprehensive and System Review for the Pharmacological Mechanism of Action of Rhein, an Active Anthraquinone Ingredient

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hao; Luo, Guangwen; Chen, Dahui; Xiang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Rhein is a major medicinal ingredient isolated from several traditional Chinese medicines, including Rheum palmatum L., Aloe barbadensis Miller, Cassia angustifolia Vahl., and Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. Rhein has various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant, antifibrosis, hepatoprotective, and nephroprotective activities. Although more than 100 articles in PubMed are involved in the pharmacological mechanism of action of rhein, only a few focus on the relationship of crosstalk among multiple pharmacological mechanisms. The mechanism of rhein involves multiple pathways which contain close interactions. From the overall perspective, the pathways which are related to the targets of rhein, are initiated by the membrane receptor. Then, MAPK and PI3K-AKT parallel signaling pathways are activated, and several downstream pathways are affected, thereby eventually regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. The therapeutic effect of rhein, as a multitarget molecule, is the synergistic and comprehensive result of the involvement of multiple pathways rather than the blocking or activation of a single signaling pathway. We review the pharmacological mechanisms of action of rhein by consulting literature published in the last 100 years in PubMed. We then summarize these pharmacological mechanisms from a comprehensive, interactive, and crosstalk perspective. In general, the molecular mechanism of action of drug must be understood from a systematic and holistic perspective, which can provide a theoretical basis for precise treatment and rational drug use. PMID:27582705

  1. Physical and chemical properties of some imported woods and their degradation by termites.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Rashmi R; Sundararaj, R

    2013-01-01

    The influence of physical and chemical properties of 20 species of imported wood on degradation of the wood by termites under field conditions was studied. The wood species studied were: Sycamore maple, Acer pseudoplatanus L. (Sapindales: Sapindaceae) (from two countries), Camphor, Dryobalanops aromatic C.F.Gaertner (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), Beech, Fagus grandifolia Ehrhart (Fagales: Fagaceae), F. sylvatica L. (from two countries), Oak, Quercus robur L., Ash, Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl (Lamiales: Oleaceae), F. excelsior L., Padauk, Pterocarpus soyauxii Taubert (Fabales: Fabaceae), (from two countries), Jamba, Xylia dolabrifiormis Roxburgh, Shorea laevis Ridley (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), S. macoptera Dyer, S. robusta Roth, Teak, Tectona grandis L.f. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) (from five countries), and rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis Müller Argoviensis (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae) from India. The termites present were: Odontotermes horni (Wasmann) (Isoptera: Termitidae), O. feae, O. wallonensis, and O. obeus (Rambur). A significant conelation was found between density, cellulose, lignin, and total phenolic contents of the wood and degradation by termites. The higher the density of the wood, the lower the degradation. Similarly, higher amount of lignin and total phenolic contents ensured higher resistance, whereas cellulose drives the termites towards the wood. PMID:23906349

  2. Analysis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids and evaluation of some biological activities of Algerian Senecio delphinifolius (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Tidjani, Soukaina; Okusa, Philippe N; Zellagui, Amar; Banuls, Laetitia Moreno Y; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre; Rhouati, Salah

    2013-04-01

    Although Senecio species are known as sources of potentially toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), some species of this genus are traditionally used as remedies, notably in Algeria. In this paper, the evaluation of biological activities and the analysis of PAs of Algerian specimens of Senecio delphinifolius Vahl are reported. The n-butanolic extract of the herb showed a weak antibacterial effect against Escherichia coli with a MIC of 1 mg/mL, but was inactive against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The n-butanolic extracts of the roots, stems and herb showed a modest antioxidant activity, scavenging the free radical DPPH with respective IC50 values of 55.3, 50.2 and 13.3 microg/mL. A cytotoxic effect against a series of human tumor cell lines was observed with the n-butanolic extract from stems (IC50 ranging between 34 and 88 microg/mL). The herb of the evaluated sample contains 140 ppm of PAs (senecionine, seneciphylline, integerrimine, senkirkine) and PA-related alkaloids (dehydrosenkirkine and neosenkirkine). As the major PAs belong to the toxic series (1,2-unsaturation in the pyrrolizidine cycle and macrocyclic diester), the use of S. delphinifolius should be discouraged in traditional medicine. PMID:23738446

  3. Composition of essential oils in subterranean organs of three species of Valeriana L.

    PubMed

    Samaneh, Ekhteraei Tousi; Tayebeh, Radjabian; Hassan, Ebrahimzadeh; Vahid, Niknam

    2010-11-01

    Essential oils from the subterranean organs of three species of Valeriana L. from Iran (Valeriana sisymbriifolia Vahl, Valeriana alliariifolia Adams and Valeriana officinalis L.) belonging to Valerianaceae family have been obtained by hydrodistillation and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to discern the differences and similarities between the volatile chemical compositions of these species. More than 100 components were identified in essential oils of the studied plants (Supplementary Table S1--online only). The principal common constituents of the three species of Valeriana were spathulenol, limonene, γ-terpinene, vulgarone B and p-cymene. The main essential oil ingredients were α-selinene (7.83%) in V. sisymbriifolia, limonene (3.53%) in V. alliariifolia and spathulenol (13.33%), α-campholenal (11.48%), vulgarone B (8.38%) and valerenal (8.32%) in V. officinalis plants. Ageratochromene (precocene II), a chromene substance with antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal and antijuvenile hormonal activities, was found at high levels (35.59% and 36.58%) in the essential oils of V. sisymbriifolia plants. PMID:21104529

  4. Morphoanatomical and phytochemical studies of Salvia lachnostachys (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Erbano, Marianna; Ehrenfried, Carlos Augusto; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Dos Santos, Elide Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Salvia lachnostachys Benth., Lamiaceae, is a endemic species from southern Brazil. The essential oil of its leaves and flowers is mainly constituted by aliphatic compounds, such as dodecanoic acid, with sesquiterpenes as minor constituents. This work evaluated the morphology, anatomy, microchemistry, and phytochemistry of S. lachnostachys to provide advanced knowledge of Brazilian plants with medicinal potential. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used in the anatomical and microchemical studies. Compounds were isolated by chromatographic techniques, identified by analysis of their NMR spectra and compared with published data. S. lachnostachys can be distinguished from other related species mainly by its petiolate leaves, terminal inflorescence, persistent bracts, and villous-glandular corolla. The stem and leaves of S. lachnostachys display anatomical characteristics common to the family Lamiaceae. However, this species can be distinguished from other family members by the morphology and the presence of eglandular and glandular trichomes, as well as the organization of the vascular bundles of the petiole. The phytochemical results revealed that S. lacnostachys produces oleanolic and ursolic acids in addition to the diterpene fruticuline A, which is a rare compound, previously found only in Salvia fruticulosa Benth. and S. corrugata Vahl. Ursolic and oleanolic acids are bioactive triterpenes that exhibit antiatherosclerotic, anticancer, antihypertensive, antinflammatory, antileukemic, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antiproliferative, and antiviral activities, and fruticuline A has antibacterial activity. PMID:22972766

  5. Changes in polyamines, auxins and peroxidase activity during in vitro rooting of Fraxinus angustifolia shoots: an auxin-independent rooting model.

    PubMed

    Tonon, G; Kevers, C; Gaspar, T

    2001-07-01

    Among shoots of Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl raised in vitro, 76% rooted after culture on root induction medium for 5 days in darkness followed by culture on root expression medium for 15 days in light. The addition of 20.7 microM indole-butyric acid (IBA) to the root induction medium did not significantly increase the rooting percentage (88%). Putrescine, spermidine, cyclohexylamine (CHA) and aminoguanidine (AG) enhanced rooting up to 100% (98.66% for AG), when applied during root induction in the absence of IBA, otherwise these compounds inhibited rooting, as did spermine and difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) + difluoromethylarginine (DFMA). The root induction phase was characterized by a temporary increase in endogenous free indole-acetic acid (IAA) and putrescine concentrations during root induction, whereas the root expression phase was characterized by increased peroxidase activity and low concentrations of polyamines. These changes were specifically associated with the rooting process and did not depend on the presence of exogenous IBA, because application of exogenous IBA enhanced the amount of IAA in the cuttings but did not affect rooting or the pattern of changes in polyamines and peroxidase. The effects of CHA, AG and DFMO + DFMA on endogenous concentrations of auxins and polyamines highlight the close relationship between the effects of IAA and putrescine in root induction and suggest that polyamine catabolism has an important role in root formation and elongation. PMID:11446994

  6. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo safety profile of the Indian traditional medicinal plant Grewia tiliaefolia.

    PubMed

    Dicson, Sheeja Malar; Samuthirapandi, Muniasamy; Govindaraju, Archunan; Kasi, Pandima Devi

    2015-10-01

    Grewia tiliaefolia Vahl., is a subtropical tree used in Ayurvedic formulations and also by tribal communities in India for treatment of wounds, urinary infection and skin diseases. Despite of its medicinal use, the plant has not been previously tested for its safety. This study evaluated the toxicological profile of the methanolic extract of G. tiliaefolia leaves (MEGT) through in vitro (cytotoxic, mutagenic, genotoxic) and in vivo (acute and sub-acute) studies. In vitro assays conclude that there is no significant (p<0.05) level of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity at the tested concentrations (250-2000 μg/ml) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ames assay in the tested Salmonella typhimurium strains revealed no significant (p<0.05) increase in the mutagenic index both in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. Alternatively, no change in mortality, physiological, behavioural, haematological and biochemical parameters were observed under in vivo acute (250, 500, 1000, 2000 mg/kg b.w) and sub-acute (100, 200, 1000 mg/kg b.w) toxicity studies in Wistar rats. Histopathological examinations of the animals did not reveal any treatment related changes and showed normal architecture, even at the highest concentration (1000 mg/kg b.w) following 28 days treatment. Overall, the results show that MEGT is non-toxic at the tested concentrations and is safe to be used as herbal medicine. PMID:26188119

  7. Morphological and molecular characterization of Raphidascaris (Ichthyascaris) lophii (Wu, 1949) (Nematoda, Anisakidae) from marine fishes from China, with a key to the species of the subgenus Ichthyascaris.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Liu, Bao-Chen; Li, Liang

    2012-09-01

    The little known ascaridoid nematode Raphidascaris (Ichthyascaris) lophii (Wu, 1949) is redescribed and illustrated based on newly collected specimens from the five different marine fishes: Lophius litulon (Jordan) (Lophiiformes: Lophiidae), Lophiomus setigerus (Vahl) (Lophiiformes: Lophiidae), Antennarius hispidus (Bloch et Schneider) (Lophiiformes: Antennaridae), Zeus faber Linnaeus (Zeiformes: Zeidae) and Ostichthys japonicus (Cuvier) (Beryciformes: Holocentridae) from the East and South China Sea. This species differs from all congeners in the subgenus Ichthyascaris by the length of the ventricular appendix (0.52-0.98 mm long), the number and arrangement of caudal papillae (26-32 pairs of precloacal, 3-4 pairs of paracloacal and 8-11 pairs of postcloacal) and the length of the spicules (0.49-0.88 mm long, representing 3.08-4.70% of body length). In addition, nematodes collected from these five different fishes have been characterized using molecular methods by sequencing and analysing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of ribosomal DNA. No variation in size and nucleotide polymorphisms is detected within the target sequence among all samples analysed. These data contribute to facilitate an accurate diagnosis of this poorly known nematode. An identification key to the species of the subgenus Ichthyascaris is also provided. PMID:22875681

  8. Potential mechanisms of hypocholesterolaemic effect of Thai spices/dietary extracts.

    PubMed

    Duangjai, Acharaporn; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2011-02-01

    Several Thai spices/dietary ingredients were previously shown to have hypocholesterolaemic effects. These studies were mostly conducted in animal models in which the mechanisms of action were not yet well-established. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the potential mechanism of hypocholesterolaemic action of 12 selected plants, namely Hibiscus sabdariffa L., Moringa oleifera Lam., Cucurbita moschata Duchesne, Ananas comosus (L.) Merr., Zingiber officinale, Morus alba L., Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze, Piper nigrum L., Alpinia galanga (L.) Willd., Curcuma zedoaria Rose, Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettst. and Piper retrofractum Vahl., widely used as spices and ingredients in various types of Thai food. The extract of P. nigrum at 100 µg mL(-1) was found to be the most effective cholesterol uptake inhibitor whereas those of A. galanga and C. sinensis effectively inhibited pancreatic lipase activity with IC50 values of 8.99±3.41 and 12.36±1.23 µg mL(-1), respectively. The potency of extracts from H. sabdariffa, M. oleifera and C. moschata at 100 µg mL(-1) were found to be similar to 0.4 µg mL(-1) pravastatin in inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase and possibly reduced cholesterol biosynthesis. This study also demonstrated that several of the tested plants possessed multiple sites of action that were possibly responsible for their cholesterol-lowering effect in the in vivo model. PMID:20623425

  9. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-01-01

    Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots) are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond.) Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L.) Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd.) Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants. PMID:27069489

  10. Forest pathology in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forests are characterised by a high degree of endemism, including pathogens as well as their hosts. With the exceptions of koa (Acacia koa Gray), possibly maile (Alyxia oliviformis Gaud.), and, in the past, sandalwood (Santalum spp.), forest species are of little commercial value. On the other hand, these forests are immensely important from a cultural, ecological, and evolutionary standpoint. Forest disease research was lacking during the mid-twentieth century, but increased markedly with the recognition of ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha Gaud.) decline in the 1970s. Because many pathogens are themselves endemic, or are assumed to be, having evolved with their hosts, research emphasis in natural areas is on understanding host-parasite interactions and evolutionary influences, rather than disease control. Aside from management of native forests, attempts at establishing a commercial forest industry have included importation of several species of pine, Araucaria, and Eucalyptus as timber crops, and of numerous ornamentals. Diseases of these species have been introduced with their hosts. The attacking of native species by introduced pathogens is problematic - for example, Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr.) Que??l. on koa and mamane (Sophora chrysophylla (Salisb.) Seem.). Much work remains to be done in both native and commercial aspects of Hawaiian forest pathology.

  11. Medicinal plants use in central Togo (Africa) with an emphasis on the timing

    PubMed Central

    Tchacondo, Tchadjobo; Karou, Simplice D.; Agban, Amégninou; Bako, Mamouda; Batawila, Komlan; Bawa, Moctar L.; Gbeassor, Mensavi; de Souza, Comlan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Plant-based remedies continue to play a key role in the health care of people in Togo; however, there is a lack of published data in medicinal plants and medical practices of the people in the country. Objective: This study was aimed at documenting the plant utilization in the Tem folk medicine in the central region of Togo. Materials and Methods: An ethnobotanical survey was conducted with traditional healers in the central region of Togo using a semi-structured questionnaire. Results: This study demonstrated that local specialists in the central region of Togo tend to agree with each other in terms of the plants used to treat diabetes (ICF = 0.38), infertility, and abdominal pains (ICF = 0.33), but cite a much more diverse groups of plants to treat problems related to arterial hypertension, sickle cell disease, and abscess. They use 144 herbal concoctions made of 72 plants, distributed among 36 botanical families. The Euphorbiaceae family with eight species was best represented in terms of the number of species. The species with the highest use value were Khaya senegalensis (Desr.) A. Juss. (Meliaceae) (UV = 0.36), Anthocleista djalonensis A. Chev. (Gentianaceae) (UV = 0.27), Trichilia emetica Vahl (Meliaceae) (UV = 0.25), and Sarcocephalus latifolius (Sm.) E. A. Bruce (Rubiaceae) (UV = 0.21). They also rely on the timing in the plant processing and the administration of herbal remedies. Conclusion: All these findings are based on empirical observations; laboratory screenings are needed to check the effectiveness of these plants. PMID:22518081

  12. Comparing the Sexual Reproductive Success of Two Exotic Trees Invading Spanish Riparian Forests vs. a Native Reference

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A widely accepted hypothesis in invasion ecology is that invasive species have higher survival through the early stages of establishment than do non-invasive species. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the sexual reproductive success of the invasive trees Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle and Robinia pseudoacacia L. is higher than that of the native Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl., all three species coexisting within the riparian forests of Central Spain. We compared different stages of the early life cycle, namely seed rain, seed infestation by insects, seed removal by local fauna, seed germination under optimal conditions and seedling abundance between the two invasive trees and the native, in order to assess their sexual reproductive success. The exotic species did not differ from the native reference (all three species displaying high seed rain and undergoing seed losses up to 50% due to seed removal by the local fauna). Even if the exotic R. pseudoacacia showed a high percentage of empty and insect-parasited seeds along with a low seedling emergence and the exotic A. altissima was the species with more viable seeds and of higher germinability, no differences were found regarding these variables when comparing them with the native F. angustifolia. Unsuitable conditions might have hampered either seedling emergence and survival, as seedling abundance in the field was lower than expected in all species -especially in R. pseudoacacia-. Our results rather suggest that the sexual reproductive success was not higher in the exotic trees than in the native reference, but studies focusing on long-term recruitment would help to shed light on this issue. PMID:27529695

  13. Comparing the Sexual Reproductive Success of Two Exotic Trees Invading Spanish Riparian Forests vs. a Native Reference.

    PubMed

    Cabra-Rivas, Isabel; Castro-Díez, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    A widely accepted hypothesis in invasion ecology is that invasive species have higher survival through the early stages of establishment than do non-invasive species. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the sexual reproductive success of the invasive trees Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle and Robinia pseudoacacia L. is higher than that of the native Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl., all three species coexisting within the riparian forests of Central Spain. We compared different stages of the early life cycle, namely seed rain, seed infestation by insects, seed removal by local fauna, seed germination under optimal conditions and seedling abundance between the two invasive trees and the native, in order to assess their sexual reproductive success. The exotic species did not differ from the native reference (all three species displaying high seed rain and undergoing seed losses up to 50% due to seed removal by the local fauna). Even if the exotic R. pseudoacacia showed a high percentage of empty and insect-parasited seeds along with a low seedling emergence and the exotic A. altissima was the species with more viable seeds and of higher germinability, no differences were found regarding these variables when comparing them with the native F. angustifolia. Unsuitable conditions might have hampered either seedling emergence and survival, as seedling abundance in the field was lower than expected in all species -especially in R. pseudoacacia-. Our results rather suggest that the sexual reproductive success was not higher in the exotic trees than in the native reference, but studies focusing on long-term recruitment would help to shed light on this issue. PMID:27529695

  14. Evaluation of In Vitro Antioxidant Potential of Cordia retusa

    PubMed Central

    Amudha, Murugesan; Rani, Shanmugam

    2016-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the antioxidant potential, total flavonoid and phenolic content in extracts of aerial parts of Cordia retua (Vahl.) Masam. The samples such as ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts were tested using six in vitro models such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, nitric oxide radical, iron chelating, hydroxyl radical, superoxide radical scavenging activity and total antioxidant activity to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant potential of C. retusa by spectrophotometrically. Total flavonoid and phenolic content in samples were estimated using aluminum chloride colorimetric and Folin-Ciocalteu method. The results were analyzed statistically by the regression method. Half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the ethanol extract was found to be 596 μg/ml for DPPH, 597 μg/ml for nitric oxide radical, 554 μg/ml for iron chelating, 580 μg/ml for hydroxyl radical, 562 μg/ml for superoxide radical and 566 μg/ml for total antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, the total flavonoid content and total phenolic content of the ethanol extract were found to be 2.71 mg gallic acid equivalent per gram of extract and 1.86 mg quercetin equivalent per gram of extract, respectively. In all the testing, a significant correlation existed between concentrations of the extract and percentage inhibition of free radicals. The results of the present comprehensive analysis demonstrated that C. retusa possess potent antioxidant activity, high flavonoid and phenolic content. The antioxidant property may be related to the polyphenols and flavonoids present in the extract. These results clearly indicated that C. retusa is effective against free radical mediated diseases as a natural antioxidant. PMID:27168685

  15. A quantitative documentation of the composition of two powdered herbal formulations (antimalarial and haematinic) using ethnomedicinal information from ogbomoso, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogunkunle, Adepoju Tunde Joseph; Oyelakin, Tosin Mathew; Enitan, Abosede Oluwaseyi; Oyewole, Funmilayo Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The safety of many African traditional herbal remedies is doubtful due to lack of standardization. This study therefore attempted to standardize two polyherbal formulations from Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria, with respect to the relative proportions (weight-for-weight) of their botanical constituents. Information supplied by 41 local herbal practitioners was statistically screened for consistency and then used to quantify the composition of antimalarial (Maloff-HB) and haematinic (Haematol-B) powdered herbal formulations with nine and ten herbs, respectively. Maloff-HB contained the stem bark of Enantia chlorantha Oliv. (30.0), Alstonia boonei De Wild (20.0), Mangifera indica L. (10.0), Okoubaka aubrevillei Phelleg & Nomand (8.0), Pterocarpus osun Craib (4.0), root bark of Calliandra haematocephala Hassk (10.0), Sarcocephalus latifolius (J. E. Smith) E. A. Bruce (8.0), Parquetina nigrescens (Afz.) Bullock (6.0), and the vines of Cassytha filiformis L. (4.0), while Haematol-B was composed of the leaf sheath of Sorghum bicolor Moench (30.0), fruit calyx of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (20.0), stem bark of Theobroma cacao L. (10.0), Khaya senegalensis (Desr.) A. Juss (5.5), Mangifera indica (5.5), root of Aristolochia ringens Vahl. (7.0), root bark of Sarcocephalus latifolius (5.5), Uvaria chamae P. Beauv. (5.5), Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides (Lam.) Zepern & Timler (5.5), and seed of Garcinia kola Heckel (5.5). In pursuance of their general acceptability, the two herbal formulations are recommended for their pharmaceutical, phytochemical, and microbial qualities. PMID:24701246

  16. Transcriptome Profiling of Beach Morning Glory (Ipomoea imperati) under Salinity and Its Comparative Analysis with Sweetpotato

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Julio; Baisakh, Niranjan; Brandt, Steven R.; Villordon, Arthur; La Bonte, Don

    2016-01-01

    The response and adaption to salt remains poorly understood for beach morning glory [Ipomoea imperati (Vahl) Griseb], one of a few relatives of sweetpotato, known to thrive under salty and extreme drought conditions. In order to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying salt tolerance of a Convolvulaceae member, a genome-wide transcriptome study was carried out in beach morning glory by 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 286,584 filtered reads from both salt stressed and unstressed (control) root and shoot tissues were assembled into 95,790 unigenes with an average length of 667 base pairs (bp) and N50 of 706 bp. Putative differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified as transcripts overrepresented under salt stressed tissues compared to the control, and were placed into metabolic pathways. Most of these DEGs were involved in stress response, membrane transport, signal transduction, transcription activity and other cellular and molecular processes. We further analyzed the gene expression of 14 candidate genes of interest for salt tolerance through quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and confirmed their differential expression under salt stress in both beach morning glory and sweetpotato. The results comparing transcripts of I. imperati against the transcriptome of other Ipomoea species, including sweetpotato are also presented in this study. In addition, 6,233 SSR markers were identified, and an in silico analysis predicted that 434 primer pairs out of 4,897 target an identifiable homologous sequence in other Ipomoea transcriptomes, including sweetpotato. The data generated in this study will help in understanding the basics of salt tolerance of beach morning glory and the SSR resources generated will be useful for comparative genomics studies and further enhance the path to the marker-assisted breeding of sweetpotato for salt tolerance. PMID:26848754

  17. Composition and Biological Activity of Volatile Oil from Salviajudaica and S. multicaulis from Jordan.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Fatma U; Kasabri, Violet; Al-Jaber, Hala I; Abu-Irmaileh, Barakat E; Al-Qudah, Mahmoud A; Abazaa, Ismail F

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the composition of the hydro-distilled essential oil of Salvia judaica Boiss. and S. multicaulis Vahl. (Lamiaceae) from Jordan by GC and GC-MS and to report the actual composition of their fresh leaves and flowers using SPME (Solid Phase Micro-Extraction).Their dual alpha-amylase/alpha glucosidase and pancreatic lipase inhibitory activities as well as their anti-proliferative potential were screened. The aroma profile of the leaves, flowers, and flowers at pre-flowering stages of S. judaica, obtained through SPME was composed of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (87.7 %, 71.8 %, and 86.2 %, respectively) while the hydro-distilled oil of the dry leaves was rich in oxygenated sesquiterpenes (50.8%). Fresh leaves of S. multicaulis were rich in oxygenated monoterpenes (58.1%), while monoterpene hydrocarbons dominated the blooming flowers (57.2%) and the flowers at the pre-flowering stage (64.7%). The hydro-distilled oil of the dry leaves was rich in oxygenated monoterpenes (77.6%). With doxorubicin as a positive control, no anti-proliferative activity was observed against colorectal cancer cell lines HT29, HCT116, and SW620 using SRB assay for either Salvia spp. In vitro enzymatic starch digestion was evaluated with Acarbose (IC50: 0.2 ± 0.0 µg /mL) as the reference drug. The respective IC50 (mg/mL) values of S. judaica and S. multicaulis aqueous extracts were 4.9 ± 0.4 and 10.3 ± 0.9. Modulation of pancreatic lipase activity (PL) was determined by colorimetry and compared with Orlistat (IC50 : 0.11 ± 0.0 µg/mL). PL-IC50 values (µg/mL) obtained for S. judaica and S. multicaulis were 108.5±6.4 and 31.8 ± 0.8, respectively. PMID:27396212

  18. In vitro selection of an effective fungicide against Armillaria mellea and control of white root rot of grapevine in the field.

    PubMed

    Aguín, Olga; Mansilla, J Pedro; Sainz, María J

    2006-03-01

    Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr) Kummer is an aggressive pathogen which causes white root rot in a wide range of hosts. Most chemicals tested so far against Armillaria, both in vitro and in the field, have not been effective in reducing fungal growth and/or preventing plant decline and mortality. In the present work the effects of four DMI (sterol demethylation inhibitor) fungicides, cyproconazole, hexaconazole, propiconazole and tetraconazole, and another six downwardly mobile systemic chemicals, azoxystrobin, cubiet (copper bis(ethoxy-dihydroxy-diethylamino)sulfate), fosetyl-Al, potassium phosphite, sodium tetrathiocarbonate (STTC) and 2-(thiocyanomethylthio)benzothiazole (TCMTB), on the mycelial growth of A. mellea were compared and evaluated; the product yielding the best results in in vitro experiments was selected to determine its efficacy in preventing decline and mortality of grapevines in the field. Best results on in vitro fungal growth reduction were obtained with the four azoles tested, in particular with cyproconazole and hexaconazole, achieving 67-72% mycelial growth inhibition at the lowest dose. Results obtained in the field showed that a dose of 50 mg AI litre(-1) of cyproconazole once or twice a year was efficient in controlling the disease even in vines seriously affected by the pathogen. However, further research is required to study minimum effective doses, residual effects and the convenience of the application of annual dressings in damaged vineyards, so as to gradually reduce the pathogen inoculum potential in soil and control the disease while reducing chemical residues in the plant and preventing development of fungal resistance. PMID:16475239

  19. Medicinal Plants Used in Mali for the Treatment of Malaria and Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Haidara, Mahamane; Bourdy, Geneviève; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Braca, Alessandra; Traore, Korotoumou; Giani, Sergio; Sanogo, Rokia

    2016-03-01

    Today, ethno-pharmacology is a very important resource in order to discover new therapies for the current diseases. Moreover, another good justification for the ethno-pharmacological approach is to obtain new, effective, less expensive and simple therapies, limiting at the same time the cost of pharmaceutical research. Two major anti-malarial drugs widely used today, i.e. quinine and artemisinin, came respectively from Peruvian and Chinese ancestral treatments reported in the traditional medicines. In this contest, there is an urgent need for the discovery of new drugs, due to the critical epidemiological situation of this disease and to the growth of resistances. In Mali, malaria and liver diseases remain one of the leading public health problems. Many medicinal plants are often used, in local traditional medicine, for the treatment at the same time of malaria and liver diseases, including hepatic syndromes, jaundice, hepatitis and other hepatic disorders. Moreover, in the local language Bamanan, the word "Sumaya" is used both for malaria and some liver diseases. In addition, we noted that some of the improved traditional phytomedicines produced by the Department of Traditional Medicine are prescribed by modern doctors both for malaria and liver diseases. In this review, pharmacological, toxicological and phytochemical data on Argemone mexicana L. (Papaveraceae), Cochlospermum tinctorium Perr. ex A. Rich (Cochlospermaceae), Combretum micranthum G.Don (Combretaceae), Entada africana Guillet Perr. (Mimosaceae), Erythrina senegalensis A. DC (Fabaceae), Mitragyna inermis (Willd) Kuntze (Rubiaceae), Nauclea latifolia Smith syn. Sarcocephalus latifolius (Smith) Bruce (Rubiaceae), Securidaca longepedunculata Fresen (Polygalaceae), Trichilia emetica Vahl. (Meliaceae), and Vernonia colorata (Willd) Drake (Asteraceae) are reported. Some of the collected data could be used to improve the actual herbal drugs and to propose new phytomedicines for the management of malaria and

  20. Size-dependent changes in leaf and wood chemical traits in two Caribbean rainforest trees.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adam R; Thomas, Sean C

    2013-12-01

    Tree functional traits and their link to patterns of growth and demography are central to informing trait-based analyses of forest communities, and mechanistic models of forest dynamics. However, few data are available on how functional traits in trees vary through ontogeny, particularly in tropical species; and less is known about how patterns of size-dependent changes in traits may differ across species of contrasting life-history strategies. Here we describe size-dependent variation in seven leaf functional traits and four wood chemical traits, in two Dominican rainforest tree species (Dacryodes excelsa Vahl. and Miconia mirabilis (Aubl.) L.O. Williams), ranging from small saplings to the largest canopy trees. With one exception, all traits showed pronounced variation with tree size (diameter at breast height, DBH). Leaf mass per area (LMA), thickness and tissue density increased monotonically with DBH in both species. Leaf area, leaf nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) ratios also varied significantly with DBH; however, these patterns were unimodal, with peak trait values preceding the DBH at reproductive onset in both species. Size-dependent changes in leaf structural traits (LMA and leaf thickness) were generally similar in both species, while traits associated with leaf-level investment in C gain (leaf area, leaf C : N ratio) showed contrasting ontogenetic trends between species. Wood starch concentration varied with DBH in both species, also showing unimodal patterns with peaks preceding size at reproductive onset. Wood C concentration increased linearly with DBH in both species, though significantly only in M. mirabilis. Size-dependent patterns in wood chemical traits were similar between both species. Our data demonstrate pronounced variation in functional traits through tree ontogeny, probably due to a combination of environmental factors and shifts in resource allocation. Such ontogenetic variation is comparable in magnitude with interspecific

  1. A Quantitative Documentation of the Composition of Two Powdered Herbal Formulations (Antimalarial and Haematinic) Using Ethnomedicinal Information from Ogbomoso, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogunkunle, Adepoju Tunde Joseph; Oyelakin, Tosin Mathew; Enitan, Abosede Oluwaseyi; Oyewole, Funmilayo Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The safety of many African traditional herbal remedies is doubtful due to lack of standardization. This study therefore attempted to standardize two polyherbal formulations from Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria, with respect to the relative proportions (weight-for-weight) of their botanical constituents. Information supplied by 41 local herbal practitioners was statistically screened for consistency and then used to quantify the composition of antimalarial (Maloff-HB) and haematinic (Haematol-B) powdered herbal formulations with nine and ten herbs, respectively. Maloff-HB contained the stem bark of Enantia chlorantha Oliv. (30.0), Alstonia boonei De Wild (20.0), Mangifera indica L. (10.0), Okoubaka aubrevillei Phelleg & Nomand (8.0), Pterocarpus osun Craib (4.0), root bark of Calliandra haematocephala Hassk (10.0), Sarcocephalus latifolius (J. E. Smith) E. A. Bruce (8.0), Parquetina nigrescens (Afz.) Bullock (6.0), and the vines of Cassytha filiformis L. (4.0), while Haematol-B was composed of the leaf sheath of Sorghum bicolor Moench (30.0), fruit calyx of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (20.0), stem bark of Theobroma cacao L. (10.0), Khaya senegalensis (Desr.) A. Juss (5.5), Mangifera indica (5.5), root of Aristolochia ringens Vahl. (7.0), root bark of Sarcocephalus latifolius (5.5), Uvaria chamae P. Beauv. (5.5), Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides (Lam.) Zepern & Timler (5.5), and seed of Garcinia kola Heckel (5.5). In pursuance of their general acceptability, the two herbal formulations are recommended for their pharmaceutical, phytochemical, and microbial qualities. PMID:24701246

  2. Insecticidal and larvicidal activities of medicinal plant extracts against mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Mahapatra, Anita; Bagavan, Asokan; Elango, Gandhi

    2010-11-01

    In recent years, use of environment friendly and biodegradable natural insecticides of plant origin have received renewed attention as agents for vector control because they are rich in bioactive chemicals, active against a limited number of species including specific target insects, and biodegradable. The present study was carried out to evaluate the adulticidal, repellent, and larvicidal activity of crude hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of eight plants, viz. Aristolochia indica L., Cassia angustifolia Vahl, Diospyros melanoxylon Roxb., Dolichos biflorus L., Gymnema sylvestre (Retz) Schult, Justicia procumbens L., Mimosa pudica L., and Zingiber zerumbet L., were tested against adult and early fourth instar larvae of Culex gelidus Theobald and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). The effective adult mortality was observed in methanol extract of A. indica, ethyl acetate extract of D. biflorus, and ethyl acetate and hexane extract of Z. zerumbet against C. gelidus and C. quinquefasciatus (LD(50) =37.75, 78.56, 129.44, 86.13, 80.06, 112.42, 53.83, and 46.61; LD(90) =166.83, 379.14, 521.50, 289.83, 328.18, 455.72, 181.15, and 354.50 ppm, respectively). Complete protections for 150 min were found in hexane and methanol extract of A. indica and Z. zerumbet at 1,000 ppm against mosquito bites. The highest larval mortality was found in the hexane extract of Z. zerumbet, ethyl acetate extract of D. biflorus, and methanol extracts of A. indica against C. gelidus (LC(50) =26.48, 33.02, and 12.47 ppm; LC(90) =127.73, 128.79, and 62.33 ppm) and against C. quinquefasciatus (LC(50) =69.18, 34.76, and 25.60 ppm; LC(90) =324.40, 172.78, and 105.52 ppm), respectively, after 24 h. The plant extracts are potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of the Japanese encephalitis vector, C. gelidus, and lymphatic filariasis vector, C. quinquefasciatus. PMID:20689968

  3. Efficacy of an Iranian herbal preparation (Lax-Asab) in treating functional constipation: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Bagheri, Masood; Ghojazadeh, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Functional constipation is a common clinical complaint of patients with unsatisfactory treatment outcome. We designed this study to evaluate the efficiency of a traditional herbal preparation (Lax-Asab) in treating chronic constipation. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, participants with chronic constipation (n = 48) were randomly selected to receive either the Lax-Asab powder (n = 24) or placebo (n = 24) on alternative days for 4 weeks. The Lax-Asab powder contains equal amounts of Cassia angustifolia Vahl. (狹葉番瀉葉 xiá yè fān xiè yè), Mentha piperita L. (胡椒薄荷 hú jiāo bò hé), Zingiber officinale Rosc. (生薑 shēng jiāng), Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (甘草 gān cǎo). A total of 40 patients completed the study. We determined the severity of constipation based on defecation frequency (per week) and defecation difficulties. Of the total of 48 patients who participated, 40 completed the trial [24 men (60%), mean age, 21.0 ± 4.2 years; 16 women (40%), mean age, 20.1 ± 4.3 years]. The mean of weekly defecation frequency increased in both groups; from 1.8 ± 0.41 to 4.8 ± 1.12 times in patients who received Lax-Asab and from 1.7 ± 0.44 to 2.2 ± 0.61 times in patients who received placebo. A time–treatment interaction showed that this increase was significantly higher in the intervention group. Defecation difficulties improved significantly more in patients who received Lax-Asab than patients who received placebo. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups with regard to the side effects observed. This study confirms the efficacy and tolerability of an Iranian herbal preparation, Lax-Asab, in treating patients with chronic functional constipation. PMID:26151027

  4. Sundew plant, a potential source of anti-inflammatory agents, selectively induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells through upregulation of p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio.

    PubMed

    Ghate, N B; Das, A; Chaudhuri, D; Panja, S; Mandal, N

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide cancer incidences are remarkable despite the advancement in cancer drug discovery field, highlighting the need for new therapies focusing on cancer cell and its microenvironment, including inflammation. Several species of Drosera (family: Droseraceae) are used in various traditional as well as homeopathic systems of medicine. Drosera burmannii Vahl. is also enlisted in French Pharmacopoeia in 1965 for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, including chronic bronchitis, asthma and whooping cough. The present study is designed to substantiate the potential of D. burmannii in in vitro anticancer activity and its relation with anti-inflammatory property. In vitro anticancer study revealed that DBME is inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7 cells without affecting the viability of other malignant and non-malignant cells. DBME induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells by suppressing the expression of cyclin A1, cyclin B1 and Cdk-1 and increasing the expression of p53, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio leading to activation of caspases and PARP degradation. Presence of caspase-8 (Z-IETD-fmk) and caspase-9 (Z-LEHD-fmk) inhibitors alone did prevent the apoptosis partially while apoptosis prevention was significantly observed when used in combination, suggesting vital role of caspases in DBME-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. DBME also downregulated LPS-induced increased expression of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α along with suppression on intracellular ROS production that confirms the potential of DBME as anti-inflammatory extract. GCMS analysis revealed the presence of four major compounds hexadecanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid, hexadecen-1-ol, trans-9 and 1-tetradecanol along with some other fatty acid derivatives and carotenoids (Beta-doradecin) in DBME. These findings confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of DBME, which is already listed in French Pharmacopeia in 1965. Here we have additionally reported the anti-breast cancer activity of DBME and its relation to the

  5. Optical properties of bud scales and protochlorophyll(ide) forms in leaf primordia of closed and opened buds.

    PubMed

    Solymosi, Katalin; Böddi, Béla

    2006-08-01

    The transmission spectra of bud scales of 14 woody species and the 77 K fluorescence emission spectra of the innermost leaf primordia of closed and opened buds of 37 woody species were studied. Pigment concentrations were determined in some species. Bud scales had low transmittance between 400 and 680 nm with a local minimum around 680 nm. Transmittance increased steeply above 680 nm and was > 80% in the 700-800 nm spectral region. Significant protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) accumulation was observed in leaf primordia of tightly packed, closed buds with relatively thick, dark bud scales. In common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and Hungarian ash (Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl.), the innermost leaf primordia of the closed buds contained protochlorophyll (Pchl) and Pchlide (abbreviated as Pchl(ide)), but no chlorophyll. We observed Pchl(ide) forms with emission maxima at 633, 643 and 655 nm in these leaves. Complete transformation of Pchlide(655) (protochlorophyllide form with maximum emission at 655 nm) into Chlide(692) (chlorophyllide form with maximum emission at 692 nm) occurred after irradiation for 10 s. The innermost leaf primordia of the buds of four species (flowering ash (Fraxinus ornus L.), horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.), tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima P. Mill.) and common walnut (Juglans regia L.)) contained Pchl(ide)(633), Pchl(ide)(643) and Pchlide(655) as well as an emission band at 688 nm corresponding to a chlorophyll form. The Pchlide(655) was fully photoactive in these species. The outermost leaf primordia of these four species and the innermost leaf primordia of 28 other species contained all of the above described Pchl(ide) forms in various ratios but in small amounts. In addition, Chl forms were present and the main bands in the fluorescence emission spectra were at 690 or 740 nm, or both. The results indicate that Pchl(ide) accumulation occurs in leaf primordia in near darkness inside the tightly closed buds, where the bud scales and

  6. Sundew plant, a potential source of anti-inflammatory agents, selectively induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells through upregulation of p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio

    PubMed Central

    Ghate, NB; Das, A; Chaudhuri, D; Panja, S; Mandal, N

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide cancer incidences are remarkable despite the advancement in cancer drug discovery field, highlighting the need for new therapies focusing on cancer cell and its microenvironment, including inflammation. Several species of Drosera (family: Droseraceae) are used in various traditional as well as homeopathic systems of medicine. Drosera burmannii Vahl. is also enlisted in French Pharmacopoeia in 1965 for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, including chronic bronchitis, asthma and whooping cough. The present study is designed to substantiate the potential of D. burmannii in in vitro anticancer activity and its relation with anti-inflammatory property. In vitro anticancer study revealed that DBME is inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7 cells without affecting the viability of other malignant and non-malignant cells. DBME induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells by suppressing the expression of cyclin A1, cyclin B1 and Cdk-1 and increasing the expression of p53, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio leading to activation of caspases and PARP degradation. Presence of caspase-8 (Z-IETD-fmk) and caspase-9 (Z-LEHD-fmk) inhibitors alone did prevent the apoptosis partially while apoptosis prevention was significantly observed when used in combination, suggesting vital role of caspases in DBME-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. DBME also downregulated LPS-induced increased expression of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α along with suppression on intracellular ROS production that confirms the potential of DBME as anti-inflammatory extract. GCMS analysis revealed the presence of four major compounds hexadecanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid, hexadecen-1-ol, trans-9 and 1-tetradecanol along with some other fatty acid derivatives and carotenoids (Beta-doradecin) in DBME. These findings confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of DBME, which is already listed in French Pharmacopeia in 1965. Here we have additionally reported the anti-breast cancer activity of DBME and its relation to the

  7. Assortative mating and differential male mating success in an ash hybrid zone population

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Pierre R; Klein, Etienne K; Austerlitz, Frédéric; Fernández-Manjarrés, Juan F; Frascaria-Lacoste, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    Background The structure and evolution of hybrid zones depend mainly on the relative importance of dispersal and local adaptation, and on the strength of assortative mating. Here, we study the influence of dispersal, temporal isolation, variability in phenotypic traits and parasite attacks on the male mating success of two parental species and hybrids by real-time pollen flow analysis. We focus on a hybrid zone population between the two closely related ash species Fraxinus excelsior L. (common ash) and F. angustifolia Vahl (narrow-leaved ash), which is composed of individuals of the two species and several hybrid types. This population is structured by flowering time: the F. excelsior individuals flower later than the F. angustifolia individuals, and the hybrid types flower in-between. Hybrids are scattered throughout the population, suggesting favorable conditions for their local adaptation. We estimate jointly the best-fitting dispersal kernel, the differences in male fecundity due to variation in phenotypic traits and level of parasite attack, and the strength of assortative mating due to differences in flowering phenology. In addition, we assess the effect of accounting for genotyping error on these estimations. Results We detected a very high pollen immigration rate and a fat-tailed dispersal kernel, counter-balanced by slight phenological assortative mating and short-distance pollen dispersal. Early intermediate flowering hybrids, which had the highest male mating success, showed optimal sex allocation and increased selfing rates. We detected asymmetry of gene flow, with early flowering trees participating more as pollen donors than late flowering trees. Conclusion This study provides striking evidence that long-distance gene flow alone is not sufficient to counter-act the effects of assortative mating and selfing. Phenological assortative mating and short-distance dispersal can create temporal and spatial structuring that appears to maintain this hybrid

  8. Improving the flash flood frequency analysis applying dendrogeomorphological evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Villanueva, V.; Ballesteros, J. A.; Bodoque, J. M.; Stoffel, M.; Bollschweiler, M.; Díez-Herrero, A.

    2009-09-01

    .) influenced by flash flood events were sampled using an increment borer. For each tree sampled, additional information were recorded including the geographical position (GPS measure), the geomorphological situation based on a detailed geomorphological map, the social position within neighbouring trees, a description of the external disturbances and information on tree diameter, tree height and the position of the cores extracted. 265 cores were collected. In the laboratory, the 265 samples were analyzed using the standard methods: surface preparation, counting of tree rings as well as measuring of ring widths using a digital LINTAB positioning table and TSAP 4.6 software. Increment curves of the disturbed trees were then crossdated with a reference chronology in order to correct faulty tree-ring series derived from disturbed samples and to determine initiation of abrupt growth suppression or release. The age of the trees in this field site is between 50 and 100 years old. In the field most of the trees were tilted (93 %) and showed exposed roots (64 %). In the laboratory, growth suppressions were detected in 165 samples. Based on the number of trees showing disturbances, the intensity of the disturbance and the spatial distribution of the trees in the field, seven well represented events were dated for the last 50 years: 2005, 2000, 1996, 1976, 1973, 1966 and 1963. The second field site was a reach of 2 km length along the Arenal River, where the stream is channelized. Here stumps from previously felled trees could be analyzed directly in the field. 100 Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. and Fraxinus angustifolia (Vahl.) cross sections were investigated in order to date internal wounds. Different carpenter tools, sanding paper and magnifying glasses were used to count tree rings and to date the wounds in the field. In addition to the dating in the field, 22 cross sections were sampled and analyzed in the laboratory using the standard methods. The age of the trees ranges between 30