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Sample records for acartia tonsa dana

  1. Predicting the Effects of Coastal Hypoxia on Vital Rates of the Planktonic Copepod Acartia tonsa Dana

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, David T.; Pierson, James J.; Roman, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a model predicting the effects of low environmental oxygen on vital rates (egg production, somatic growth, and mortality) of the coastal planktonic copepod Acartia tonsa. Hypoxic conditions can result in respiration rate being directly limited by oxygen availability. We hypothesized that A. tonsa egg production, somatic growth, and ingestion rates would all respond in a similar manner to low oxygen conditions, as a result of oxygen dependent changes in respiration rate. Rate data for A. tonsa egg production, somatic growth, and ingestion under low environmental oxygen were compiled from the literature and from supplementary experiments. The response of these rates to oxygen was compared by converting all to the analogous units in terms of oxygen utilization, which we termed analogous respiration rate. These analogous respiration rates, along with published measurements of respiration rates, were used to parameterize and evaluate the relationship between A. tonsa respiration rate and environmental oxygen. At 18°C, our results suggest that A. tonsa experiences sub-lethal effects of hypoxia below an oxygen partial pressure of 8.1 kPa (∼3.1 mg L−1 = 2.3 mL L−1). The results of this study can be used to predict the effects of hypoxia on A. tonsa growth and mortality as related to environmental temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Such predictions will be useful as a way to incorporate the effects of coastal hypoxia into population, community, or ecosystem level models that include A. tonsa. This approach can also be used to characterize the effects of hypoxia on other aquatic organisms. PMID:23691134

  2. Testing lagoonal sediments with early life stages of the copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana): An approach to assess sediment toxicity in the Venice Lagoon.

    PubMed

    Picone, Marco; Bergamin, Martina; Delaney, Eugenia; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2017-08-24

    The early-life stages of development of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa from egg to copepodite I is proposed as an endpoint for assessing sediment toxicity by exposing newly released eggs directly onto the sediment-water interface. A preliminary study of 5 sediment samples collected in the lagoon of Venice highlighted that the larval development rate (LDR) and the early-life stages (ELS) mortality endpoints with A. tonsa are more sensitive than the standard amphipod mortality test; moreover LDR resulted in a more reliable endpoint than ELS mortality, due to the interference of the sediment with the recovery of unhatched eggs and dead larvae. The LDR data collected in a definitive study of 48 sediment samples from the Venice Lagoon has been analysed together with the preliminary data to evaluate the statistical performances of the bioassay (among replicate variance and minimum significant difference between samples and control) and to investigate the possible correlation with sediment chemistry and physical properties. The results showed that statistical performances of the LDR test with A. tonsa correspond with the outcomes of other tests applied to the sediment-water interface (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryotoxicity test), sediments (Neanthes arenaceodentata survival and growth test) and porewater (S. purpuratus); the LDR endpoint did, however, show a slightly higher variance as compared with other tests used in the Lagoon of Venice, such as 10-d amphipod lethality test and larval development with sea urchin and bivalves embryos. Sediment toxicity data highlighted the high sensitivity and the clear ability of the larval development to discriminate among sediments characterized by different levels of contamination. The data of the definitive study evidenced that inhibition of the larval development was not affected by grain-size and the organic carbon content of the sediment; in contrast, a strong correlation between inhibition of the larval development

  3. Fate of the Black Sea Acartia clausi and Acartia tonsa (Copepoda) penetrating into the Marmara Sea through the Bosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubareva, Elena; Svetlichny, Leonid; Kideys, Ahmet; Isinibilir, Melek

    2008-01-01

    In October 2005 spatial distribution of live and dead Acartia clausi and Acartia tonsa was studied in the Black and Marmara Seas and near the Marmara Sea inlet of the Bosphorus, in order to understand their fate upon transportation between two seas. The morphometric characteristics in both species from all studied areas, and the decreased abundance of A. clausi and A. tonsa from the Black Sea towards the Marmara Sea indicate that the Marmara Sea Acartia populations are formed by recruitment from the Black Sea. We observed mass mortality of A. clausi in the Marmara Sea near the Prince Islands. The majority of carcasses (66% of total A. clausi numbers in the Marmara Sea) were found in the salinity gradient layer. Laboratory experiments showed that during a gradual salinity increase (3.5-4 h) from 18.9 (salinity of the Marmara Sea surface layers) to 39.8 (Marmara Sea salinity at depths >25 m) Acartia clausi began to die at a salinity of 30 and that all copepods were dead at 39.8. In comparison with A. clausi, Acartia tonsa was more tolerant to short-term salinity increase. Despite the high salinity tolerance of A. tonsa however, the abundance of this species was estimated to be very low in the offshore Marmara Sea. Respiration rate and frequency of jumps in A. tonsa were 1.3-1.5 and 1.77 times higher, respectively, than those in A. clausi.

  4. Temperature impact on the trophic transfer of fatty acids in the congeneric copepods Acartia tonsa and Acartia clausi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbrouck, Eva; Tiselius, Peter; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Cervin, Gunnar; Vanreusel, Ann; De Troch, Marleen

    2016-06-01

    Copepods of the genus Acartia occur worldwide and constitute an important link to higher trophic levels in estuaries. However, biogeographical shifts in copepod assemblages and colonization of certain European estuaries by the invader A. tonsa, both driven or enhanced by increasing ocean temperature, raise the pressure on autochthonous copepod communities. Despite the profound effect of temperature on all levels of biological organization, its impact on the fatty acid (FA) dynamics of Acartia species is understudied. As certain FAs exert a bottom-up control on the trophic structure of aquatic ecosystems, temperature-induced changes in FA dynamics of Acartia species may impact higher trophic levels. Therefore, this study documents the short-term temperature responses of A. tonsa and A. clausi, characterized by their warm- versus cold-water preference respectively, by analyzing the FA profiles of their membrane and storage lipids under 5 and 15 °C. Copepods that were fed an ad libitum diet of the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii (bloom conditions) under 15 °C increased their storage FA content substantially. Furthermore, the membrane FA composition of A. tonsa showed a more profound temperature response compared with A. clausi which might be linked with the eurythermal character of the former.

  5. Fully defined saltwater medium for cultivation of and toxicity testing with marine copepod Acartia tonsa

    SciTech Connect

    Kusk, K.O.; Wollenberger, L.

    1999-07-01

    The marine copepod Acartia tonsa and the food organism Rhodomonas salina were cultured in fully defined medium for 8 months without problems. Both organisms were also cultured in natural seawater and in a commercial salt mixture for at least two generations before the sensitivities of A. tonsa to bisphenol A, potassium dichromate, and 3,5-dichlorophenol in the three different media were compared and found to be at the same level. The defined medium may be used for cultivation and testing, thus avoiding unknown background contaminants.

  6. Experimental records of the effect of food patchiness and predation on egg production of Acartia tonsa

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Tiselius, P.; Verity, P.; Paffehofer, G.A. ); Jonsson, P.R. )

    1993-03-01

    The effects of predation and spatial patchiness in food distribution on egg production of the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa were investigated in the laboratory. A postexperiment egg production method was developed to override the decline in number of copepods due to predation. The copepods were able to remain in food patches about 41-47% of the time, and consequently egg production rates were higher than expected from the average food concentration. Predation by the calanoid copepod Labidocera aestiva tended to increase egg production rates of A. tonsa. The interaction of patchiness and predation resulted in relatively less time spent by A. tonsa in the food patches, probably as a consequence of conflict between hunger level and predation risk. 40 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Seasonality of the copepods Acartia hudsonica and Acartia tonsa in Narragansett Bay, RI, USA during a period of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Barbara K.; Costello, John H.; Van Keuren, D.

    2007-06-01

    Seasonality of species living at the boundaries of biogeographic zones may be more sensitive to climate change than in other regions. This is apparently the case for the ctenophore, Mnemiopsis leidyi, in Narragansett Bay, RI, which is the historical northern boundary of its distribution in the Northwest Atlantic. Seasonal advancement of population pulses of this ctenophore correlates with an increase in average annual temperatures of 1.2 °C over the last ˜50 years. Do other zooplankton in Narragansett Bay show evidence of altered phenologies? Here we examine patterns of seasonal succession of the copepod congeners, Acartia tonsa and Acartia hudsonica, for evidence of alteration over the period 1950-2004. A warming trend might be expected to limit springtime abundance of A. hudsonica, a temperate-boreal species that produces resting eggs in response to warm weather. Conversely, increasing temperatures could favor the summer dominant, A. tonsa, over its congener, allowing a shift to earlier appearance in spring, thus preserving the predator-free window that has previously allowed it a period of high production prior to ctenophore population pulses in late summer. Contrary to these predictions we found that A. hudsonica has become the dominant copepod of the congener pair. There has been no seasonal advancement of populations of A. tonsa, whose numbers have plummeted due to intensification of the predator-prey interaction with M. leidyi. In contrast, advancement of seasonal appearance of A. hudsonica is evident in sustained population increases earlier in spring (March rather than in May), although, as predicted, there is curtailment of its distribution in late spring. This latter shift is likely exacerbated by ctenophore predation. This study demonstrates the complexity of predicting individual species responses to climatic warming, even for species with well-known patterns of seasonal and geographic distribution.

  8. Comparison of the metabolism of Acartia clausi and A. tonsa: influence of temperature and salinity.

    PubMed

    Gaudy; Cervetto; Pagano

    2000-04-26

    In the Marseilles region (French Mediterranean coast), A. clausi is one of the most abundant copepod species of the Gulf of Fos while A. tonsa constitutes the almost exclusive copepod species of the Berre lagoon, a neighbouring semi-closed brackish area communicating with the gulf. As different ecophysiological capabilities to stand the various temperature, salinity and food conditions could explain why these two species do not coexist in the same environment, comparative experiments were performed on metabolism and feeding. The respiration and ammonia excretion of the two species were measured in different combinations of temperature (10, 15 and 20 degrees C) and salinity (15, 25 and 35 per thousand). For each temperature, at the salinity of 35 per thousand, respiration rates were less in A. clausi than in A. tonsa, the contrary being observed at the lowest salinity. At any temperature ammonia excretion was greater at the intermediate salinity in A. tonsa and least in A. clausi. In Acartia tonsa, Q(10) of respiration and excretion were minimum at the lowest salinity, while in A. clausi they were unaffected by salinity variation. The O:N atomic ratio (from respiration and ammonia excretion rates) was significantly more elevated in A. clausi (mean 21.2; range 13.6-28.7) than in A. tonsa (mean 11.3; range 4.2-25) suggesting a more proteinic oriented metabolism in the later. Feeding experiments where Dunaliella tertiolecta30 per thousand) or lagoon (<16 per thousand) salinity. The relationships between ingestion and food concentration in the two species were not significantly different. These different results are compared to other ecophysiological information concerning these Acartia species (survival tolerances, osmotic regulation, feeding behaviour) and are discussed in relation with the characteristics of their niches in the studied region.

  9. Changes in free amino acid content during naupliar development of the Calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Thomas Allan; Jørgensen, Niels Ole Gerslev; Drillet, Guillaume; Hansen, Benni Winding

    2017-08-01

    Changes in free amino acids (FAA) were investigated in the potentially important live feed and neritic copepod species Acartia tonsa during naupliar development. Total content of FAA in A. tonsa nauplii was around 17% of dry weight at first development stage, and declined to 6% for later stages. Relative to body-volume and biomass, the FAA content indicated possible volume-dependent changes. However, changes in FAA with osmolytic activity could not account for this decline in FAA content, but suggests that the decline reflected degradation of residual FAAs from the embryonic stage. Glutamic acid revealed the largest change in relative abundance during naupliar development and declined from 29.0% at first nauplius stage to 7.1% at later stages. The high FAA pool in early naupliar stages may be necessary for naupliar development due to an absence of feeding at first development stages. The high FAA content in early nauplii indicates that A. tonsa is a valuable source for nutritional energy for first-feeding fish larvae and should be further exploited for aquaculture purposes. Enhancements to FAA abundances in nauplii through manipulation of maternal diets could be of future interest, as copepod nauplii can contain a substantial pool of FAAs at first development stage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Long-term decline in the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in central Chesapeake Bay, USA: An indirect effect of eutrophication?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, David G.; Boynton, Walter R.; Roman, Michael R.

    2012-04-01

    A long-term abundance record of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in the Maryland portion of Chesapeake Bay was compiled from 1966 to 2002. A significant downward trend in the summertime abundance of Acartia tonsa was found in central Chesapeake Bay. We propose that environmental and food web changes occurred as the Chesapeake Bay became increasingly impacted by human activity which eventually led to the overall decline of A. tonsa. Environmental changes included a long-term rise in water temperature and the volume of hypoxic water during the summer. These changes occurred during the same time period as increases in chlorophyll a concentration, declines in the landings of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, and declines in abundance of the sea nettle Chrysaora quinquecirrha. A CUSUM analysis showed that each time-series experienced a change point during over the past 50 years. These changes occurred sequentially, with chlorophyll a concentration increasing beginning in 1969, water temperature and hypoxic volume increasing beginning in the early 1980s, more recent Maryland C. virginica landings begin declining in the early 1980s and A. tonsa and C. quinquecirrha declining starting in 1989. A stepwise regression analysis revealed that the reduction in A. tonsa abundance appeared to be most associated with a decreasing trend in C. quinquecirrha abundance, though only when trends in the two time-series were present. The drop in C. quinquecirrha abundance is associated with reduced predation on the ctenophore, Mnemiopsis leidyi, a key predator of A. tonsa. The long-term decline of A. tonsa has likely impacted trophic transfer to fish, particularly the zooplanktivorous bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). A time-series of bay anchovy juvenile index showed a negative trend and the CUSUM analysis revealed 1993 as its starting point. Total fisheries landings, excluding menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus), in Chesapeake Bay have also declined during the same period and this

  11. Factors affecting the elimination of PCBs in the marine copepod Acartia tonsa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, George B.; Wyman, Kevin D.; Peterson, William T.; Wurster, Charles F.

    1983-10-01

    The effects of feeding, egg laying, and fecal pellet production on the elimination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the marine copepod Acartia tonsa were studied in a series of experiments. Copepods were exposed to 14C-labelled Aroclor 1254 and allowed to depurate in clean seawater. Copepods fed during depuration eliminated PCBs more rapidly than unfed copepods whether or not the original PCB exposure medium had contained food. Both eggs and fecal pellets contained PCBs during depuration, with the weight specific concentration of PCB in the eggs (up to 407 ppm, dry weight) exceeding four times that in the females that produced them. Female copepods eliminated PCBs twice as rapidly as males, indicating that egg production is an important route for PCB elimination.

  12. Toxicity of trace metals to Acartia tonsa in the Elizabeth River and southern Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunda, W. G.; Tester, P. A.; Huntsman, S. A.

    1990-03-01

    Dissolved zinc and copper and free cupric ions were present at high concentrations in water from the Elizabeth River estuary (a polluted tributary of the southern Chesapeake Bay) when compared to values in nearby Hampton Roads and lower Chesapeake Bay. Zinc concentrations at three stations in the Elizabeth River ranged from 87 to 1550 nM compared to values of 3·1 to 16 nM at four stations in the southern Chesapeake Bay. Likewise, free cupric ion concentration ranged from 10 -11·6 to 10 -10·1 M at the Elizabeth River stations, but was appreciably lower (10 -12·3 to 10 -12·6 M) in samples from Hampton Roads and the lower bay. In bioassays conducted with the copepod Acartia tonsa, the survival of naupliar larvae was much lower in Elizabeth River samples, containing high levels of copper and zinc, than in samples from the Chesapeake Bay or Newport River estuary which contained much lower levels of these metals. Based on previous results in trace metal ion buffered media, measured free cupric ion concentrations and estimated free zinc ion concentrations appear to have been high enough in the Elizabeth River samples to account for at least some of the observed decrease in larval survival. Furthermore, the addition of chelators, EDTA and NTA, that complex and detoxify copper and zinc (as well as cadmium, nickel and lead) significantly increased larval survival in the Elizabeth River samples. These results strongly support the hypothesis that elevated levels of copper and zinc (and possibly other toxic trace metals) occur at sufficiently high concentrations in Elizabeth River water to adversely affect Acartia tonsa and other sensitive estuarine organisms.

  13. Cryptic diversity and comparative phylogeography of the estuarine copepod Acartia tonsa on the US Atlantic coast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Hare, Matthew P

    2011-06-01

    Unexpectedly strong geographic structures in many cosmopolitan species of marine holoplankton challenge the traditional view of their unrestrained dispersal and presumably high gene flow. We investigated cryptic lineage diversity and comparative phylogeography of a common estuarine copepod, Acartia tonsa, on the US Atlantic coast, using mitochondrial (mtCOI) and nuclear (nITS) gene markers. Three broadly sympatric lineages (F, S, X) were defined by genealogically concordant clades across both gene trees, strongly supporting recognition as reproductively isolated species. Limited dispersal seems to have had a major role in population differentiation of A. tonsa in general, with gene flow propensities rank ordered X > S > F. Geographic structure was found only at large scales (1000-2000 km) in X and S. Phylogeographic patterns in all three lineages were mostly concordant with previously recognized zoogeographic provinces but a large mid-Atlantic gap in the occurrence of lineage X, coupled with its presence in Europe, suggests possible nonindigenous origins. For lineage F, physiological adaptation to low-salinity environments is likely to have accentuated barriers to gene flow and allopatric differentiation at both regional and continental scales. Three allopatric F sublineages inferred a southern centre of origin and a stepwise northward diversification history at the continental scale. The most recently derived F sublineages, in the mid-Atlantic Bight, showed strong phylogeographic patterns at nITS albeit weaker at mtCOI. Applying a crustacean mtCOI molecular clock suggests that A. tonsa lineages diverged pre-Pleistocene but mid-Atlantic F lineage diversification may be post-Pleistocene.

  14. Toxicity of nickel in the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa: Nickel chloride versus nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, C; Vitiello, V; Casals, E; Puntes, V F; Iamunno, F; Pellegrini, D; Changwen, W; Benvenuto, G; Buttino, I

    2016-01-01

    Nickel compounds are widely used in industries and have been massively introduced in the environment in different chemical forms. Here we report the effect of two different chemical forms of nickel, NiCl2 and nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs), on the reproduction of the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa. The behavior of nickel nanoparticles was analyzed with different techniques and with two protocols. In the "sonicated experiment" (SON) NiNP solution was sonicated while in the "non-sonicated experiment" (NON-SON) the solution was vigorously shaken by hand. Final nominal concentrations of 5, 10 and 50mgL(-1) and 1, 5 and 10mgL(-1) NiNPs were used for the acute and semichronic tests, respectively. Nanoparticle size did not change over time except for the highest concentration of 50mgL(-1) NiNPs, in which the diameter increased up to 843nm after 48h. The concentration of Ni dissolved in the water increased with NP concentration and was similar for SON and NON-SON solutions. Our results indicate that sonication does not modify toxicity for the copepod A. tonsa. Mean EC50 values were similar for NON-SON (20.2mgL(-1)) and SON experiments (22.14mgL(-1)) in the acute test. Similarly, no differences occurred between the two different protocols in the semichronic test, with an EC50 of 7.45mgL(-1) and 6.97mgL(-1) for NON-SON and SON experiments, respectively. Acute and semichronic tests, conducted exposing A. tonsa embryos to NiCl2 concentrations from 0.025 to 0.63mgL(-1), showed EC50 of 0.164 and 0.039mgL(-1), respectively. Overall, A. tonsa is more sensitive to NiCl2 than NiNPs with EC50 being one order of magnitude higher for NiNPs. Finally, we exposed adult copepods for 4 days to NiCl2 and NiNPs (chronic exposure) to study the effect on fecundity in terms of daily egg production and naupliar viability. Egg production is not affected by either form of nickel, whereas egg viability is significantly reduced by 0.025mgL(-1) NiCl2 and by 8.5mgL(-1) NiNPs. At NiNP concentration

  15. Climatic Facilitation of the Colonization of an Estuary by Acartia tonsa

    PubMed Central

    Chaalali, Aurélie; Beaugrand, Grégory; Raybaud, Virginie; Goberville, Eric; David, Valérie; Boët, Philippe; Sautour, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Global change has become a major driving force of both terrestrial and marine systems. Located at the interface between these two realms, estuarine ecosystems are probably the place where both direct and indirect effects of human activities conspire together to affect biodiversity from phytoplankton to top predators. Among European estuarine systems, the Gironde is the largest estuary of Western Europe and many studies have provided evidence that it has been affected by a variety of anthropogenic stressors such as thermal and chemical pollution, physical alterations and exploitation, especially for maritime traffic. In such a context, species introduction is also a current major issue with the establishment of strong competitive species that could lead to ecosystem reorganization with potential decrease or even disappearance of native species. In the Gironde estuary, this hypothesis was proposed for the invasive shrimp species Palaemon macrodactylus as a decrease in the native species abundance was observed at the same time. Although species introduction often takes place via ballast water, the influence of climate-driven changes on the establishment of new species remains a key issue. The calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa, observed in the Gironde estuary for the first time in 1983, have since colonized most part of the estuary, reaching a level of abundance comparable to the dominant native species Eurytemora affinis. In this study, using both the concept of the ecological niche sensu Hutchinson (fundamental and realized niches) and statistical models, we reveal that the dynamics of the colonization of A. tonsa was facilitated by environmental conditions that have become closer to its environmental optimum with respect to temperature and salinity. PMID:24098656

  16. Acute silver toxicity in the euryhaline copepod Acartia tonsa: influence of salinity and food.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Mariana Saia; Bersano, José Guilherme Filho; Bianchini, Adalto

    2007-10-01

    The euryhaline copepod Acartia tonsa was exposed to silver (AgNO(3)) in either the absence or the presence of food (diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii; 2 x 10(4) cells/ml). Standard static-renewal toxicity tests that included a fixed photoperiod of 16: 8 h light:dark and temperature (20 degrees C) were run in three different salinities (5, 15, and 30 ppt) together with measurements of pH, ions (Na(+), Cl(-), K(+), SO(4)(2-), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+)), alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon, and total and dissolved (0.45 microm) silver concentrations in the experimental media. In the absence of food, the 48-h EC50 (concentration causing effect to 50% of the individuals tested) values based on total and dissolved silver concentrations were 11.6, 87.2, and 163.2 microg Ag/L and 7.1, 79.2, and 154.6 microg Ag/L at salinities 5, 15, and 30 ppt, respectively. In the presence of food, they were 62.1, 98.5, and 238.4 microg Ag/L and 48.4, 52.3, and 190.9 microg Ag/L, respectively. In all experimental conditions, most of the toxic silver fraction was in the dissolved phase, regardless of salinity or the presence of food in the water. In either the absence or the presence of food, acute silver toxicity was salinity dependent, decreasing as salinity increased. Data indicate that changes in water chemistry can account for the differences in acute silver toxicity in the absence of food, but not in the presence of food, suggesting that A. tonsa requires extra energy to cope with the stressful conditions imposed by acute silver exposure and ionoregulatory requirements in low salinities. These findings indicate the need for incorporation of both salinity and food (organic carbon) in a future biotic ligand model (BLM) version for estuarine and marine conditions, which could be validated and calibrated using the euryhaline copepod A. tonsa.

  17. Increased tolerance to oil exposure by the cosmopolitan marine copepod Acartia tonsa.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kamille Elvstrøm; Dinh, Khuong V; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2017-12-31

    Oil contamination is an environmental hazard to marine ecosystems, but marine organism tolerance to oil after many generations of exposure remains poorly known. We studied the effects of transgenerational oil exposure on fitness-related traits in a cosmopolitan neritic copepod, Acartia tonsa. Copepods were exposed to an oil compound, the PAH pyrene, at concentrations of 1, 10, 100 and 100+(the saturated pyrene concentration in seawater)nM over two generations and measured survival, sex ratio, size at maturity, grazing rate and reproductive success. Exposure to the pyrene concentration of 100+nM resulted in 100% mortality before adulthood in the first generation. At the pyrene concentration of 100nM, pyrene reduced grazing rate, increased mortality, reduced the size of females and caused lower egg production and hatching success. Importantly, we found strong evidence for increased tolerance to pyrene exposure in the second generation: the reduction in size at maturity of females was less pronounced in the second generation and survival, egg production and hatching success were recovered to control levels in the second generation. The increased tolerance of copepods to oil contamination may dampen the direct ecological consequences of a coastal oil spill, but it raises the concern whether a larger fraction of oil components accumulated in survived copepods, may be transferred up the food web. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The toxicity of the three antifouling biocides DCOIT, TPBP and medetomidine to the marine pelagic copepod Acartia tonsa.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Ida; Backhaus, Thomas; Blanck, Hans; Arrhenius, Åsa

    2016-07-01

    Copepods, the largest group of pelagic grazers, are at risk from exposure to antifouling biocides. This study investigated the toxicity of the antifouling biocides 4,5-dichloro-2-octyl-1,2-thiazol-3(2H)-one (DCOIT), triphenylborane pyridine (TPBP) and 4-[1-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole (medetomidine) to the copepod Acartia tonsa, using mortality and egg production as endpoints. The toxicity ranking for mortality was as follows: DCOIT (LC50 57 nmol l(-1)) = TPBP (LC50 56 nmol l(-1)) > medetomidine (LC50 241 nmol l(-1)). Egg production was more sensitive than mortality to TPBP (EC50 3.2 nmol l(-1)), while DCOIT and medetomidine inhibited egg production at roughly the same concentrations (72 and 186 nmol l(-1) respectively). Furthermore, TPBP seems to affect egg hatching directly which was not the case for DCOIT and medetomidine. DCOIT and medetomidine might pose an environmental risk as they have been reported to occur in different exposure scenarios or analytical surveys at concentrations only 2-3 times lower than the respective EC10. Reported environmental concentrations of TPBP are few but clearly lower than the EC10 values reported here, suggesting current risk of TPBP to copepods to be moderate.

  19. Acute and chronic toxicity of produced water from a North Sea oil production platform to the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa

    SciTech Connect

    Girling, A.E. )

    1989-08-01

    The routine operation of offshore oil production platforms results in the discharge to the sea of produced water after it has been separated from oil drawn from the reservoir. Discharge of produced water in the UK sector of the North Sea is given an exemption from the provisions of the 1971 Prevention of Oil Pollution Act providing the monthly average oil-in-water content measured twice per day does not exceed 40 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. To assess the toxic hazard to marine organisms of produced water discharged to the North Sea, within this exemption, Shell UK Exploration and Production has implemented a research program. Methods for determining the acute and chronic toxicity of produced water to the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa have been established and applied at Shell's Sittingbourne Research Centre to samples from the Shell/Esso Dunlin A platform. This paper describes the methods used to assess acute and chronic toxicity and the results of tests performed on a sample of produced water collected in February 1986. Tests were performed on subsamples of the bulk sample which: (a) were untreated (b) had been filtered and (c) biodegraded (i.e., organic substances present in the produced water were degraded by micro-organisms) and then filtered. The results of the tests are discussed in relation to the likely patterns of dilution offshore in the North Sea.

  20. Accumulation of polyunsaturated aldehydes in the gonads of the copepod Acartia tonsa revealed by tailored fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Nejstgaard, Jens C; Pohnert, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are released by several diatom species during predation. Besides other attributed activities, these oxylipins can interfere with the reproduction of copepods, important predators of diatoms. While intensive research has been carried out to document the effects of PUAs on copepod reproduction, little is known about the underlying mechanistic aspects of PUA action. Especially PUA uptake and accumulation in copepods has not been addressed to date. To investigate how PUAs are taken up and interfere with the reproduction in copepods we developed a fluorescent probe containing the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element that is essential for the activity of PUAs as well as a set of control probes. We developed incubation and monitoring procedures for adult females of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa and show that the PUA derived fluorescent molecular probe selectively accumulates in the gonads of this copepod. In contrast, a saturated aldehyde derived probe of an inactive parent molecule was enriched in the lipid sac. This leads to a model for PUAs' teratogenic mode of action involving accumulation and covalent interaction with nucleophilic moieties in the copepod reproductive tissue. The teratogenic effect of PUAs can therefore be explained by a selective targeting of the molecules into the reproductive tissue of the herbivores, while more lipophilic but otherwise strongly related structures end up in lipid bodies.

  1. Accumulation of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Gonads of the Copepod Acartia tonsa Revealed by Tailored Fluorescent Probes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Pohnert, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are released by several diatom species during predation. Besides other attributed activities, these oxylipins can interfere with the reproduction of copepods, important predators of diatoms. While intensive research has been carried out to document the effects of PUAs on copepod reproduction, little is known about the underlying mechanistic aspects of PUA action. Especially PUA uptake and accumulation in copepods has not been addressed to date. To investigate how PUAs are taken up and interfere with the reproduction in copepods we developed a fluorescent probe containing the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element that is essential for the activity of PUAs as well as a set of control probes. We developed incubation and monitoring procedures for adult females of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa and show that the PUA derived fluorescent molecular probe selectively accumulates in the gonads of this copepod. In contrast, a saturated aldehyde derived probe of an inactive parent molecule was enriched in the lipid sac. This leads to a model for PUAs' teratogenic mode of action involving accumulation and covalent interaction with nucleophilic moieties in the copepod reproductive tissue. The teratogenic effect of PUAs can therefore be explained by a selective targeting of the molecules into the reproductive tissue of the herbivores, while more lipophilic but otherwise strongly related structures end up in lipid bodies. PMID:25383890

  2. The turbidity front as a habitat for Acartia tonsa (Copepoda) in the Río de la Plata, Argentina-Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derisio, Carla; Braverman, Mara; Gaitán, Esteban; Hozbor, Constanza; Ramírez, Fernando; Carreto, José; Botto, Florencia; Gagliardini, Domingo A.; Acha, E. Marcelo; Mianzan, Hermes

    2014-01-01

    Acartia tonsa is one of the most abundant copepod species in estuaries worldwide. In the Río de la Plata, its highest densities appear to occur in an area of low quality food (detritus): the turbidity front (TF). The objective of this study was to understand how trophic and oceanographic drivers contribute to the high densities of A. tonsa in the Río de la Plata TF. The patterns of spatial distribution and density of this species were analyzed in relation to oceanographic and biological attributes of the system. The egg production rate (EPR) in the TF was evaluated as a measure of fitness, and a stable isotope analysis indicated the possible sources of organic matter in the species' diet. This study confirmed that the highest observed densities of A. tonsa were mostly associated with the TF, where high suspended matter and low Chl-a occur. Immediately offshore from the TF, decreased copepod densities and the maximum Chl-a values were found. Females close to the estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) had a lower EPR than those closer to the high Chl-a concentrations. Within the TF, A. tonsa apparently fed on detritus close to the ETM and phytoplankton close to the edge of the TF. The report includes a discussion of how retention processes, two layered flow and the life history strategy of A. tonsa could be contributing to the development of high densities (more than 10,000 ind m- 3) of this species in the inner estuarine zone, despite the poor quality of food available for development in that area. A. tonsa can live and prosper in areas with high turbidity and low chlorophyll concentrations. This trait exemplifies the plasticity of this species and helps explain why it is a key species in many worldwide estuaries.

  3. Egg production and hatching success of Calanus chilensis and Acartia tonsa in the northern Chile upwelling zone (23°S), Humboldt Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruz, Paula M.; Hidalgo, Pamela; Yáñez, Sonia; Escribano, Rubén; Keister, Julie E.

    2015-08-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ's) are expanding and intensifying as result of climate change, affecting Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems. Local effects of vertical movements of OMZ's that result from changes in upwelling intensity could reduce or expand the oxygenated surface layer that most zooplanktonic species inhabit in coastal areas. Using the copepods Calanus chilensis and Acartia tonsa as model organisms, an experimental test of the impact of different dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations (between 0.5 and 5 ml L- 1) on egg production and hatching success was carried out and compared with field estimations of egg production, female and egg abundance in Mejillones Bay (23°S). Abundance of C. chilensis was highly variability and no consistent pattern in egg production and hatching success was found across DO levels, whereas A. tonsa egg production had maximum values between 2.6 and 4.7 ml O2 L- 1 and hatching success was positively correlated with DO (r = 0.75). In the field, temperature was the main factor controlling the dynamics of both species, while Chl-a and DO were also correlated with C. chilensis and A. tonsa, respectively. Principal Component Analysis showed that abundances of both copepods were controlled by temperature, stratification, OMZ depth, and Ekman transport, which together explained more than 70% of the total variance and were the main factors that modulated the populations of C. chilensis and A. tonsa in the upwelling zone of northern Chile (23°S). The differential responses of C. chilensis and A. tonsa to changes in DO concentrations associated with vertical movements of the OMZ suggest that C. chilensis may be better adapted to hypoxic conditions than A. tonsa, however both species are successful and persistent all year-round. We suggest that physiological responses of copepods could be used to evaluate population dynamics affected by the shoaling of OMZ's and the repercussions to trophic food webs of eastern boundary current systems.

  4. Effects of methyltestosterone, letrozole, triphenyltin and fenarimol on histology of reproductive organs of the copepod Acartia tonsa.

    PubMed

    Watermann, Burkard T; Albanis, Triantafyllos A; Dagnac, Thierry; Gnass, Katarina; Ole Kusk, K; Sakkas, Vasilios A; Wollenberger, Leah

    2013-07-01

    The marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa was exposed to methyltestosterone (MET, 1.6-126 μg L(-1)), letrozole (LET, 10-1000 μg L(-1)), triphenyltin chloride (TPT, 0.0014-0.0088 μg L(-1) TPT-Sn) and fenarimol (FEN, 2.8-105 μg L(-1)) for 21 d covering a full life-cycle. All four compounds investigated are known to act as androgens in vertebrates. The digestive tract, musculature, nervous system, reproductive organs, gonad and accessory sexual glands were examined by light microscopy after routine staining and immune-labelling for detection of apoptosis and determination of proliferation activities. MET induced an inhibition of oogenesis, oocyte maturation and yolk formation, respectively, which was most pronounced at the lowest concentrations tested. In LET exposed males, spermatogenesis was enhanced with very prominent gamete stages; in some stages apoptosis occurred. The spermatophore was hypertrophied and displayed deformations. In females, LET induced a disorder of oogenesis and disturbances in yolk synthesis. TPT stimulated the male reproductive system at 0.0014 and 0.0035 μg TPT-SnL(-1), whereas inhibiting effects were observed in the female gonad at 0.0088 μg TPT-SnL(-1). In FEN exposed females proliferation of gametes was reduced and yolk formation showed irregular features at 2.8-105 μgL(-1). In FEN exposed males an elevated proliferation activity was observed. No pathological alterations in other organ systems, e.g. the digestive tract including the hindgut acting as respiratory organ, the nervous system, or the musculature were seen. This indicates that the effects on gonads might be caused rather by disturbance of endocrine signalling or interference with hormone metabolism than by general toxicity.

  5. The effects of power station entrainment passage on three species of marine planktonic crustacean, Acartia tonsa (Copepoda), Crangon crangon (Decapoda) and Homarus gammarus (Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Bamber, Roger N; Seaby, Richard M H

    2004-05-01

    Experiments have been undertaken exposing larval common shrimp (Crangon crangon) and lobster (Homarus gammarus) and adult copepods (Acartia tonsa) to the key stresses of entrainment within power-station cooling-water systems. The apparatus has enabled the testing of mechanical, thermal, chlorine and realistic pressure effects both alone and in combination, the range of stressors spanning the standard conditions found within a temperate coastal direct-cooled power station. Mechanical stresses affected only lobster larvae, pressure changes affected only the Acartia adults. Residual chlorine caused significant mortality of Acartia and shrimp larvae, but had no effect on lobster larvae even at 1 ppm. The temperature increment significantly affected all three species, with a synergistic effect on chlorine sensitivity in the shrimp larvae, but only temperatures higher than would be experienced in a normally-operating power station affected the copepods. The majority of individuals of each species would survive passage through a power-station system under normal conditions. It is notable that, within the species tested, generalizations from the responses of one species to those of another are not valid.

  6. Effects of salinity on egg and fecal pellet production, development and survival, adult sex ratio and total life span in the calanoid copepod, Acartia tonsa: a laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Majid; Esmaeili Fereidouni, Abolghasem; Agh, Naser; Jani Khalili, Khosrow

    2016-07-01

    The effects of salinity on the copepod, Acartia tonsa in terms of daily egg production rate (EPR), hatching success, fecal pellet production rate (FPR), naupliar development time and survival, sex ratio, and total life span were determined in laboratory conditions through three experiments. In experiment 1, EPR, hatching success, and FPR of individual females were monitored at salinities of 13, 20, 35 and 45 during short-periods (seven consecutive days). Results show EPR was affected by salinity with the highest outputs recorded at 20 and 35, respectively, which were considerably higher than those at 13 and 45. Mean FPR was also higher in 35 and 20. In experiment 2, the same parameters were evaluated over total life span of females (long-term study). The best EPR and FPR were observed in 35, which was statistically higher than at 13 and 20. In experiment 3, survival rates of early nauplii until adult stage were lowest at a salinity of 13. The development time increased with increasing of salinity. Female percentage clearly decreased with increasing salinity. Higher female percentages (56.7% and 52.2%, respectively) were significantly observed at two salinities of 13 and 20 compared to that at 35 (25%). Total longevity of females was not affected by salinity increment. Based on our results, for mass culture we recommend that a salinity of 35 be adopted due to higher reproductive performances, better feeding, and faster development of A. tonsa.

  7. Effect of 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (BP1) on early life-stage development of the marine copepod Acartia tonsa at different temperatures and salinities.

    PubMed

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Avdolli, Manola; Wollenberger, Leah

    2011-04-01

    Benzophenone (BP)-type ultraviolet (UV) filters are widely used in cosmetic and sunscreen products and can enter the aquatic environment. Therefore, we investigated the subchronic toxicity of 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (BP1) on the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in an early life-stage development study. Since developmental endpoints depend on environmental conditions, a preceding study of A. tonsa development was performed at three temperatures, four salinities, four light:dark regimes, six food densities, and four culture densities. Times elapsed until 50% of the population had reached a copepodite stage (DT(½) ) at the different conditions were calculated. The DT(½) values decreased from 296 h at 15°C to 89 h at 25°C and were also affected by salinity (126 h at 15‰ and 167 h at 30‰), whereas the light:dark regime and culture density influenced development only to a minor extent. BP1 was found acutely toxic at 2.6 mg/L (48-h median lethal concentration [LC50]). The toxicity of BP1 on early life-stage development was studied in combinations of three temperatures (15, 20, 25°C) and three salinities (15, 20, 25‰) using five toxicant concentrations between 0.051 and 2 mg/L in each scenario. Concentrations causing 10 and 50% inhibition of development (EC10 and EC50) were determined. Acartia tonsa was most resistant towards BP1 at 20°C where an EC50 of 1.1 mg/L was found, whereas EC50 values were significantly lower at 15°C (0.49 mg/L) and 25°C (0.77 mg/L), respectively. The EC50 also decreased with increasing salinity. Our results demonstrate that environmental conditions do influence toxicity test results; thus, they need to be considered carefully when developing test protocols as well as for environmental risk assessments of chemicals.

  8. Ecological effects of scrubber water discharge on coastal plankton: Potential synergistic effects of contaminants reduce survival and feeding of the copepod Acartia tonsa.

    PubMed

    Koski, Marja; Stedmon, Colin; Trapp, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    To meet the oncoming requirements for lower sulphur emissions, shipping companies can install scrubbers where the exhaust is sprayed with seawater and subsequently discharged to the sea. The discharge water has a pH around 3 and contains elevated concentrations of vanadium, nickel, lead and hydrocarbons. We investigated 1) the threshold concentrations of scrubber discharge water for survival, feeding and reproduction of the copepod Acartia tonsa, 2) whether the effects depend on the exposure route and 3) whether exposure to discharge water can be detected in field-collected organisms. A direct exposure to discharge water increased adult copepod mortality and reduced feeding at metal concentrations which were orders of magnitude lower than the lethal concentrations in previous single-metal studies. In contrast, reproduction was not influenced by dietary uptake of contaminants. Scrubber water constituents could have synergistic effects on plankton productivity and bioaccumulation of metals, although the effects will depend on their dilution in the marine environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cryptic diversity in the estuarine copepod Acartia tonsa: reproductive isolation and lineage-specific divergence in transcriptomic response to salinity stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plough, L. V.

    2016-02-01

    Discovery of the near ubiquity of cryptic species among planktonic taxa marks a major advance in marine science over the last two decades. However, little is known about the potential drivers of divergence among species, and particularly how cryptic taxa may respond differentially to environmental stress as climate change and ocean acidification proceed. Here we report results from experimental studies characterizing reproduction and transcriptomic response to stress in Acartia tonsa, a dominant estuarine copepod that exhibits three sympatric (but morphologically cryptic) lineages that sort by salinity along the US Atlantic coast (lineage F - fresh, S - saline, and X - intermediate). Pair crosses between F and S individuals collected from Chesapeake Bay at a common ambient salinity (13ppt) revealed that while inter-lineage (FxS) crosses produced eggs, only eggs from intra-lineage (FxF or SxS) crosses successfully hatched. Analysis of whether 'hybrid' eggs were fertilized and failed to develop or did not fertilize, which could indicate pre vs post-zygotic isolation, is ongoing. Exposing replicate groups of 2nd gen. lab-cultured F and S individuals to ambient and low salinity (7 ppt) stress produced very different patterns of gene expression measured with RNAseq. First, the dynamic range of expression was much greater in the S lineage overall (both salinities), with more differentially expressed genes (DEG's) in comparisons of low vs control salinity (232 vs 77 DEGs at 0.01 FDR level for S, and F respectively). Gene ontology analysis of DEG function revealed a more targeted response in F to ion stress (up and down regulation of genes involved in ion transport, catalytic activity, and binding) while the S lineage showed a more varied and general response (up-regulation of metabolism, nucleic acid synthesis, and general stress response). Overall, these experiments confirm reproductive isolation among two cryptic A. tonsa ineages and identify key differences in thier

  10. The occurrence of Acartia species and their environmental characteristics at three ports in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Hoon

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of Acartia copepods and their environmental characteristics to identify the existence and survival of foreign species at domestic ports in Korea. Copepods samples were collected seasonally, and temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen (DO), total suspended solids (TSS), and chlorophyll- a (chl- a) were measured at the seaports Incheon, Gwangyang, and Ulsan from 2007 to 2009. No foreign species was found and all of the Acartia copepods observed had been recorded in Korean waters previously. Acartia omorii, A. hongi, and A. pacifica were found at all three seaports, whereas portspecific species were found at Incheon ( A. sinjiensis) and Ulsan ( A. steueri, A. negligens, and A. danae). When chl- a and DO were not limited, eurythermal and euryhaline A. hongi, A. omorii, and A. hudsonica occurred at TSS concentrations between 38 and 183 mg·L-1, while warm-water copepods ( A. pacifica, A. ohtsukai, A. sinjiensis, and A. erythraea) occurred at TSS concentrations <80 mg·L-1. The seasonal distributions of A. omorii, A. hongi, and A. pacifica at the three seaports were most significantly explained by temperature, salinity, DO, and TSS, and not chl- a. The variation in A. hudsonica and A. sinjiensis at Incheon was explained mainly by temperature, DO, and TSS, whereas A. erythraea at Ulsan was influenced only by chl- a. The occurrence of Acartia copepods showed spatiotemporal variation as a result of species-specific preferences or tolerances in each port environment. Multiple regression analysis indicated that temperature, salinity, DO, and TSS were better predictors of the variation in Acartia species at the seaports during the study than chl- a when food was not limiting. These results indicated that the occurrence of Acartia copepods and related environmental characteristics are crucial information for differentiating foreign species from the native community and predicting the potential for foreign copepods to become established

  11. A Review of the Aquatic Biological Resources of the Atlantic Coastal Area Off Virginia Beach, Virginia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    K K Penilia avirostris x Podon polyphemoides x COPEPODA Acartia clausi x A. tonsa x x Caligus chelifer x Centropages hamatus x x C. typicus x x C...Euconchoecia chierchine x .4 COPEPODA Acartia sp. x A. clausi X A. danae X 4A. tonsa X *Anomalocera sp. X A. ornata x X_ A. patersonil x Calanus...Eurytemora sp. x E. americana x Labidocera sp. x x L. aestiva x x Mecynocera clausi x Metridia lecens x xINannocalanus mi or x x Oithona sp. x x x

  12. Multi-threaded Event Processing with DANA

    SciTech Connect

    David Lawrence; Elliott Wolin

    2007-05-14

    The C++ data analysis framework DANA has been written to support the next generation of Nuclear Physics experiments at Jefferson Lab commensurate with the anticipated 12GeV upgrade. The DANA framework was designed to allow multi-threaded event processing with a minimal impact on developers of reconstruction software. This document describes how DANA implements multi-threaded event processing and compares it to simply running multiple instances of a program. Also presented are relative reconstruction rates for Pentium4, Xeon, and Opteron based machines.

  13. Population dynamics of a dominant species (Pseudocalanus, Acartia and Temora) in the Gulf of Gdansk (southern Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierzbicka-Glowacka, L.; Janecki, M.; Lemieszek, A.; Jakacki, J.; Nowicki, A.

    2012-04-01

    1 - C3 and C4 - C5 and finally the adult stage - C6. The Baltic zooplankton is composed of microzooplankton, mezozooplankton and macroplankton with characteristic ichtyoplankton forms. The structure of mezozooplankton in the Gdansk Gulf mainly consisted of four taxa: copepoda, cladocera, rotatoria and meroplankton. The most important species in the Gdansk Gulf are copepoda: Acartia spp. (i.e. A. bifilosa, A. longiremis and A. tonsa), Temora longicornis, Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Centropages hamatus and cladocera: Bosmina coregoni maritime and Podon polyphemoides. Copepoda dominate numerically, while in the warm season Cladocera are subdominants. The study describes numerical simulations of the seasonal dynamics of Acartia spp., Temora longicornis and Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus in the southern Baltic Sea using a three-dimensional version of the coupled ecosystem-copepod model. In the case of the Baltic Sea, food concentration and temperature are the main factors controlling copepod development, and salinity is a masking factor. The surface water salinity of the southern Baltic is constant at 7-8 PSU. It is included in the present study. The simulated population dynamics were compared with observations at the Gulf of Gdansk. This work is supported by the Polish State Committee of Scientific Research [grant number: NN306 353239 and No. N N305 111636]. The partial support for this study was also provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBaltyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract no. POIG 01.01.02-22-011/09. Calculations were done at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk.

  14. 33 CFR 80.1110 - Dana Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dana Point Harbor, CA. 80.1110 Section 80.1110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1110 Dana Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from...

  15. 33 CFR 80.1110 - Dana Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dana Point Harbor, CA. 80.1110 Section 80.1110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1110 Dana Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from...

  16. 33 CFR 80.1110 - Dana Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dana Point Harbor, CA. 80.1110 Section 80.1110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1110 Dana Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1110 - Dana Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dana Point Harbor, CA. 80.1110 Section 80.1110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1110 Dana Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1110 - Dana Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dana Point Harbor, CA. 80.1110 Section 80.1110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1110 Dana Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from...

  19. X-15 with test pilot Bill Dana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    NASA research pilot Bill Dana is seen here next to the X-15 #3 rocket-powered aircraft after a flight. William H. Dana is Chief Engineer at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Formerly an aerospace research pilot at Dryden, Dana flew the F-15 HiDEC research aircraft and the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/F-16 aircraft. Dana flew the famed X-15 research airplane 16 times, reaching a top speed of 3,897 miles per hour and a peak altitude of 310,000 feet (almost 59 miles high). The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation made 3 X-15 aircraft for the program. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and canted horizontal surfaces on the tail to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52

  20. The "Dana Decision" and Its Impact Relative to On-Line Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.

    2012-01-01

    Dana College (Dana.edu) was dying. A corporation was willing to buy it. However, Dana did not teach in the main, 21st century technical skills which is true of most little liberal arts colleges. Dana's demise first came in cuts for faculty in terms of benefits (Manghan, K. 1/16/2009). The entrance of the federal government was an attempt to stop a…

  1. The "Dana Decision" and Its Impact Relative to On-Line Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.

    2012-01-01

    Dana College (Dana.edu) was dying. A corporation was willing to buy it. However, Dana did not teach in the main, 21st century technical skills which is true of most little liberal arts colleges. Dana's demise first came in cuts for faculty in terms of benefits (Manghan, K. 1/16/2009). The entrance of the federal government was an attempt to stop a…

  2. F-18 HARV research pilot Dana Purifoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dana D. Purifoy is an aerospace research pilot at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He joined NASA in August 1994. Purifoy is a former Air Force test pilot who served as a project pilot in the joint NASA/Air Force X-29 Forward Swept Wing research program conducted at Dryden from 1984 to 1991. His most recent assignment in the Air Force was flying U-2 aircraft as a test pilot at Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, CA. In addition to flying the X-29 at Dryden as an Air Force pilot, Purifoy also served as project pilot and joint test force director with the AFTI F-16 (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/F-16) program, also located at Dryden. Before his assignments as project pilot on the X-29 and AFTI/F-16 aircraft, Purifoy was chief of the Academics Systems Branch at the Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards. Prior to becoming a test pilot, he flew F-111 and F-16 aircraft in Great Britain and Germany. He has accumulated 3800 hours of flying time in his career. The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden on May 29, 1996. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  3. F-18 HARV research pilot Dana Purifoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dana D. Purifoy is an aerospace research pilot at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He joined NASA in August 1994. Purifoy is a former Air Force test pilot who served as a project pilot in the joint NASA/Air Force X-29 Forward Swept Wing research program conducted at Dryden from 1984 to 1991. His most recent assignment in the Air Force was flying U-2 aircraft as a test pilot at Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, CA. In addition to flying the X-29 at Dryden as an Air Force pilot, Purifoy also served as project pilot and joint test force director with the AFTI F-16 (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/F-16) program, also located at Dryden. Before his assignments as project pilot on the X-29 and AFTI/F-16 aircraft, Purifoy was chief of the Academics Systems Branch at the Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards. Prior to becoming a test pilot, he flew F-111 and F-16 aircraft in Great Britain and Germany. He has accumulated 3800 hours of flying time in his career. The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden on May 29, 1996. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  4. [Dana swimming crab growth Callinectes danae (Decapoda: Portunidae) from Margarita Island, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jesylén; Eslava, Nora; González, Leo Walter

    2011-12-01

    Callinectes danae is a common species captured with crab traps in nearby areas of coastal lagoons in Margarita Island. Although its considerable economic importance as a fishery resource, few studies have been done on population dynamics and its fishery potential in local coastal environments to support decision making in fishery administration. We present growth pattern details of Callinectes danae to better estimate its population size and exploitation feasibility. For this, we analyzed a total of 3 623 specimens that were monthly captured in crab pots by artisanal fishermen in Las Marites lagoon, from October 2007 to September 2008. The length-weight ratio was determined, and growth parameters estimated from both length and weight curves of the von Bertalanffy model. The general sex ratio showed no significant difference between males and females (chi2 = 0.04, p > 0.05). However, values of slopes b between males and females were significantly different (t(s) = 2.75, p < 0.05), as well as intercepts a (t(s) = 2.44, p < 0.05). Thus, the length-weight ratio was determined separately: W = 7.48e(-5)*L(2.98) for males and W = 1.21e(-4)*L(2.87) for females, indicating a negative allometric growth in both sexes. Growth parameters were established as: L(infinity) =134.80mm, W(infinity) = 166.04g and k = 0.86/yr for males; L(infinity) = 122.35mm, W(infinity) = 118.45g and k = 0.63/yr for females. Lifespan was estimated at 3.05 years for males and 4.24 years for females. We concluded that Callinectes danae is a species with short lifespan and moderately rapid growth. The coefficient of variation values (CV), of the phi-prime growth performance index (Ø'), showed a different growth pattern compared to those obtained in other regions. We propose that a management strategy will be the periodical review of the minimum capture size for fishing area, after the great variability found in growth parameters.

  5. Polypteridae (Actinopterygii: Cladistia) and DANA-SINEs insertions.

    PubMed

    Morescalchi, Maria Alessandra; Barucca, Marco; Stingo, Vincenzo; Capriglione, Teresa

    2010-06-01

    SINE sequences are interspersed throughout virtually all eukaryotic genomes and greatly outnumber the other repetitive elements. These sequences are of increasing interest for phylogenetic studies because of their diagnostic power for establishing common ancestry among taxa, once properly characterized. We identified and characterized a peculiar family of composite tRNA-derived short interspersed SINEs, DANA-SINEs, associated with mutational activities in Danio rerio, in a group of species belonging to one of the most basal bony fish families, the Polypteridae, in order to investigate their own inner specific phylogenetic relationships. DANA sequences were identified, sequenced and then localized, by means of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), in six Polypteridae species (Polypterus delhezi, P. ornatipinnis, P. palmas, P. buettikoferi P. senegalus and Erpetoichthys calabaricus) After cloning, the sequences obtained were aligned for phylogenetic analysis, comparing them with three Dipnoan lungfish species (Protopterus annectens, P. aethiopicus, Lepidosiren paradoxa), and Lethenteron reissneri (Petromyzontidae)was used as outgroup. The obtained overlapping MP, ML and NJ tree clustered together the species belonging to the two taxonomically different Osteichthyans groups: the Polypteridae, by one side, and the Protopteridae by the other, with the monotypic genus Erpetoichthys more distantly related to the Polypterus genus comprising three distinct groups: P. palmas and P. buettikoferi, P. delhezi and P. ornatipinnis and P. senegalus. In situ hybridization with DANA probes marked along the whole chromosome arms in the metaphases of all the Polypteridae species examined. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Dredged Materials on Zooplankton.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    VI. Biology of Acartia clausi and A. tonsa. Bull. Bingham Oceanogr. Coll., 15: 156-7 . "b Darby, 0. A., R. W. Alden III, J. H. Rule, C. H. Blair...block number) Elutriate bioassays with Acartia tonsa suggest that sediments from the Southern Branch lower reaches could significantly impact the...REFERENCES ..................................................... 15 -’ LIST OF TABLES Table 1 Multiple regression table for Acartia tonsa survival

  7. The influence of food quality on the nutritional acclimation of the copepod Acartia clausi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayzaud, P.; Tirelli, V.; Bernard, J. M.; Roche-Mayzaud, O.

    1998-06-01

    The influence of food quality on the nutritional metabolism of Acartia clausi was studied experimentally using four different diets: (1) diatom cells of Thalassiosira weissflogii, (2) detritus prepared from the same culture, (3) 50 : 50 mix on a protein basis of the two previous diets, and 4) dinoflagellate cells of Prorocentrum micans. For each trophic, ingestion, gut transit time, trypsin activity and Km (half saturation constant) were measured at limiting and saturating concentration. Assimilation rates were also estimated for both pure diatoms and mixed live-detrital cell diets. Ingestion followed a Holling type 2 response for diets 1 and 4, a linear one for detritus and an intermediate response for diet 3. Gut transit time displayed different adaptive changes with food regime depending on protein concentration. Trypsin activity was lower for detrital food and trypsin Km significantly decreased with increasing concentration of live diatoms. Assimilation rates were higher for live food than for mixed live-detrital food. Results illustrated that Acartia-type copepods optimize nitrogen or protein uptake. They suggest that besides chemoreception-mediated selectivity, internal controls by digestion and assimilation also regulate ingestion (feed-back).

  8. Effects of formaldehyde preservation on biometrical characters, biomass and biochemical composition of Acartia clausi (Copepoda, Calanoida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapiris, K.; Miliou, H.; Moraitou-Apostolopoulou, M.

    1997-03-01

    The effects of formaldehyde preservation on biometrical characters, biomass and biochemical composition of the marine copepod Acartia clausi were studied using the relevant values of fresh unpreserved animals as reference. Acartia were collected in the southern parts of Saronicos Gulf in early May (16.5°C) and late June (21°C). Formalin was found to cause significant shrinkage of cephalothorax length, abdomen length and total length. The sex of individuals, as well as the temperature of seawater at the time of collection seem to influence dimensional losses. Females and animals collected at 16.5°C presented heavier losses. Dry weight is drastically reduced after formaldehyde preservation. Final losses are more severe for females and animals collected at 21°C. Two of the measured biochemical constituents, carbohydrates and neutral lipids, seem to be unaffected by formaldehyde. DNA and RNA although initially affected seem to be stabilized towards the end of the experimental period (30 days). The other biochemical parameters, viz proteins, total lipids and sugars, are profoundly affected by preservation.

  9. Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) Prototype System User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sam Alessi; Dennis Keiser

    2012-10-01

    This document is a user manual for the Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) model. DANA provides an analysis of dairy anaerobic digestion technology and allows users to calculate biogas production, co-product valuation, capital costs, expenses, revenue and financial metrics, for user customizable scenarios, dairy and digester types. The model provides results for three anaerobic digester types; Covered Lagoons, Modified Plug Flow, and Complete Mix, and three main energy production technologies; electricity generation, renewable natural gas generation, and compressed natural gas generation. Additional options include different dairy types, bedding types, backend treatment type as well as numerous production, and economic parameters. DANA’s goal is to extend the National Market Value of Anaerobic Digester Products analysis (informa economics, 2012; Innovation Center, 2011) to include a greater and more flexible set of regional digester scenarios and to provide a modular framework for creation of a tool to support farmer and investor needs. Users can set up scenarios from combinations of existing parameters or add new parameters, run the model and view a variety of reports, charts and tables that are automatically produced and delivered over the web interface. DANA is based in the INL’s analysis architecture entitled Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems (GEMS) , which offers extensive collaboration, analysis, and integration opportunities and greatly speeds the ability construct highly scalable web delivered user-oriented decision tools. DANA’s approach uses server-based data processing and web-based user interfaces, rather a client-based spreadsheet approach. This offers a number of benefits over the client-based approach. Server processing and storage can scale up to handle a very large number of scenarios, so that analysis of county, even field level, across the whole U.S., can be performed. Server based databases allow dairy and digester

  10. Gonad morphology, oocyte development and spawning cycle of the calanoid copepod Acartia clausi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisfeld, Sonja M.; Niehoff, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    Information on gonad morphology and its relation to basic reproductive parameters such as clutch size and spawning frequency is lacking for Acartia clausi, a dominant calanoid copepod of the North Sea. To fill this gap, females of this species were sampled at Helgoland Roads from mid March to late May 2001. Gonad structure and oogenesis were studied using a combination of histology and whole-body-analysis. In addition, clutch size and spawning frequency were determined in incubation experiments, during which individual females were monitored at short intervals for 8 and 12 h, respectively. The histological analysis revealed that the ovary of A. clausi is w-shaped with two distinct tips pointing posteriorly. It is slightly different from that of other Acartia species and of other copepod taxa. From the ovary, two anterior diverticula extend into the head region, and two posterior diverticula extend to the genital opening in the abdomen. Developing oocytes change in shape and size, and in the appearance of the nucleus and the ooplasm. Based on these morphological characteristics, different oocyte development stages (OS) were identified. Mitotically dividing oogonia and young oocytes (OS 0) were restricted to the ovary, whereas vitellogenic oocytes (OS 1 4) were present in the diverticula. The development stage of the oocytes increased with distance to the ovary in both, anterior and posterior diverticula. Most advanced oocytes were situated ventrally, and their number varied between 1 and 18, at a median of 4. All oocyte development stages co-occur indicating that oogenesis in A. clausi is a continuous process. These morphological features reflect the reproductive traits of this species. In accordance with the low numbers of mature oocytes in the gonads, females usually produced small clutches of one to five eggs. Clutches were released throughout the entire observation period at intervals of 90 min (median) resulting in mean egg production rates of 18 28 eggs female

  11. X-15 #3 with test pilot Bill Dana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    NASA research pilot Bill Dana is seen here next to the X-15 #3 (56-6672) rocket-powered aircraft after a flight. William H. Dana is Chief Engineer at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Formerly an aerospace research pilot at Dryden, Dana flew the F-15 HIDEC research aircraft and the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/F-16 aircraft. Dana flew the famed X-15 research airplane 16 times, reaching a top speed of 3,897 miles per hour and a peak altitude of 306,900 feet (over 58 miles high). The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and movable horizontal stabilizers to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a

  12. 78 FR 1265 - Dana Holding Corporation; Power Technologies Group Division; Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Dana Holding Corporation; Power Technologies Group Division; Including... Technologies Group Division, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (subject firm). The worker group includes on-site leased... Company, Power Technologies Group Division, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, who were engaged in employment...

  13. Dana-Farber repository for machine learning in immunology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Lin, Hong Huang; Keskin, Derin B; Reinherz, Ellis L; Brusic, Vladimir

    2011-11-30

    The immune system is characterized by high combinatorial complexity that necessitates the use of specialized computational tools for analysis of immunological data. Machine learning (ML) algorithms are used in combination with classical experimentation for the selection of vaccine targets and in computational simulations that reduce the number of necessary experiments. The development of ML algorithms requires standardized data sets, consistent measurement methods, and uniform scales. To bridge the gap between the immunology community and the ML community, we designed a repository for machine learning in immunology named Dana-Farber Repository for Machine Learning in Immunology (DFRMLI). This repository provides standardized data sets of HLA-binding peptides with all binding affinities mapped onto a common scale. It also provides a list of experimentally validated naturally processed T cell epitopes derived from tumor or virus antigens. The DFRMLI data were preprocessed and ensure consistency, comparability, detailed descriptions, and statistically meaningful sample sizes for peptides that bind to various HLA molecules. The repository is accessible at http://bio.dfci.harvard.edu/DFRMLI/. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. X-15 test pilots - Thompson, Dana, and McKay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    NASA pilots Milton O. Thompson, William H. 'Bill' Dana, and John B. 'Jack' McKay are seen here in front of the #2 X-15 (56-6671) rocket-powered research aircraft. Among them, the three NASA research pilots made 59 flights in the X-15 (14 for Thompson, 16 for Dana, and 29 for McKay). The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of rated thrust (actual thrust reportedly climbed to 60,000 lb). North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and canted horizontal surfaces on the tail to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52 aircraft at 45,000 ft and a speed of about 500 mph. Depending on the mission, the rocket engine provided thrust for the first 80 to 120 sec of flight. The remainder of the

  15. HL-10 after landing with pilot Bill Dana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    This movie clip, running about 56 seconds, shows NASA pilot Bill Dana exiting the cockpit of the HL-10 and waving to his B-52 drop aircraft, just after landing on the dry lakebed at Edwards Air Force Base, California. A fleet of lifting bodies flown at the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from 1963 to l975 demonstrated the ability of pilots to maneuver (in the atmosphere) and safely land a wingless vehicle. These lifting bodies were basically designed so they could fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an aircraft at a pre-determined site. (In 1976 NASA renamed the FRC as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in honor of Hugh L. Dryden.) These unique research vehicles, with their unconventional aerodynamic shapes, were the M2-F1, M2-F2, M2-F3, HL-10, X-24A, and the X-24B. The information the lifting body program generated contributed to the database that led to development of the current space shuttle program as well as the X-33 and X-38 technology demonstrators. Aerodynamic lift -- essential to flight in the atmosphere -- was obtained from the shape of the vehicles rather than from wings on a normal aircraft. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. All but the M2-F1 were powered by the same type of XLR-11 rocket engine used in the famed Bell X-1 -- first aircraft to fly faster than the speed of sound. The M2-F1, a lightweight prototype, was unpowered. The success of the Dryden M2-F1 program led to the NASA development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA Ames and Langley research centers -- the M2-F2 and the HL-10, both built by the Northrop Corporation. The 'M' refers to 'manned' and 'F' refers to 'flight' version. 'HL' comes from 'horizontal landing' and '10' is for the tenth lifting body model to be investigated by Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The HL-10 was delivered to the FRC by Northrop

  16. Test pilots 1962 - Armstrong, Walker, Dana, Peterson, McKay, Thompson, Butchart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The research pilots at what in 1962 was called the Flight Research Center standing in front of the X-1E. They are (left to right) Neil Armstrong, Joe Walker, Bill Dana, Bruce Peterson, Jack McKay, Milt Thompson, and Stan Butchart. of the group, Armstrong, Walker, Dana, McKay and Thompson all flew the X-15. Bruce Peterson flew the M2-F2 and HL-10 lifting bodies, while Stan Butchart was the B-29 drop plane pilot for many of the D-558-II and X-1 series research aircraft.

  17. Molecular and microscopic evidence of viruses in marine copepods

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Darren S.; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Rosario, Karyna; Barbosa, Jorge G.; Greco, Anthony M.; Breitbart, Mya; Hewson, Ian

    2013-01-01

    As dominant members of marine mesozooplankton communities, copepods play critical roles in oceanic food webs and biogeochemical cycling. Despite the ecological significance of copepods, little is known regarding the causes of copepod mortality, and up to 35% of total copepod mortality cannot be accounted for by predation alone. Viruses have been established as ecologically important infectious agents in the oceans; however, viral infection has not been investigated in mesozooplankton communities. Here we used molecular and microscopic techniques to document viral infection in natural populations of the calanoid copepods Acartia tonsa (Dana) and Labidocera aestiva (Wheeler) in Tampa Bay, FL. Viral metagenomics revealed previously undocumented viruses in each species, named Acartia tonsa copepod circo-like virus (AtCopCV) and Labidocera aestiva copepod circo-like virus (LaCopCV). LaCopCV was found to be extremely prevalent and abundant in L. aestiva populations, with up to 100% prevalence in some samples and average viral loads of 1.13 × 105 copies per individual. LaCopCV transcription was also detected in the majority of L. aestiva individuals, indicating viral activity. AtCopCV was sporadically detected in A. tonsa populations year-round, suggesting temporal variability in viral infection dynamics. Finally, virus-like particles of unknown identity were observed in the connective tissues of A. tonsa and L. aestiva by transmission electron microscopy, demonstrating that viruses were actively proliferating in copepod connective tissue as opposed to infecting gut contents, parasites, or symbionts. Taken together, these results provide strong independent lines of evidence for active viral infection in dominant copepod species, indicating that viruses may significantly influence mesozooplankton ecology. PMID:23297243

  18. Comprehensive Condition Survey and Storm Waves, Circulation, and Sediment Study, Dana Point Harbor, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    to investigate wave, flow, sediment transport, and permeable breakwaters with rocky outcrop bottom at Dana Point Harbor, as a part of the harbor...current and sediment seepage through permeable breakwaters, and circulation in the harbor under combined wave, tide, and flow conditions. Permeable ...75 Figure 56. Sketch of wave transmission and flow penetration through a permeable structure

  19. Testing Mixture Models of Transitive Preference: Comment on Regenwetter, Dana, and Davis-Stober (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    This article contrasts 2 approaches to analyzing transitivity of preference and other behavioral properties in choice data. The approach of Regenwetter, Dana, and Davis-Stober (2011) assumes that on each choice, a decision maker samples randomly from a mixture of preference orders to determine whether "A" is preferred to "B." In contrast, Birnbaum…

  20. Mentoring Matters: Many Voices, Many Choices--Women Who Mentored and Inspired Dana Rodriguez

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mary G.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, the author traces the progress of one English teacher (Dana) from her days as a middle school student, to her university work, to her emergence as a teacher. The journey reveals that many mentors along the way contributed to the new teacher's sense of purpose, efficacy, and confidence. It is easy to limit one's thinking about the…

  1. 77 FR 51064 - Dana Holding Corporation, Power Technologies Group Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... Employment and Training Administration Dana Holding Corporation, Power Technologies Group Division, Including... Holding Corporation, Power Technologies Group Division, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (subject firm). The negative... competitive articles) in 2011 and 2012, loss of business with a firm that employed a worker group eligible to...

  2. Dana Awards for Undergraduate Education and Health Prompt Debate on the Proper Role of Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Liz

    1988-01-01

    The Charles A. Dana Foundation is trying to bring attention to innovations that improve the quality of undergraduate education and those that prevent disease and promote health. It is especially interested in ideas that can be copied on other campuses or in other communities or medical institutes. (MLW)

  3. Mentoring Matters: Many Voices, Many Choices--Women Who Mentored and Inspired Dana Rodriguez

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mary G.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, the author traces the progress of one English teacher (Dana) from her days as a middle school student, to her university work, to her emergence as a teacher. The journey reveals that many mentors along the way contributed to the new teacher's sense of purpose, efficacy, and confidence. It is easy to limit one's thinking about the…

  4. 76 FR 43348 - Dana Structural Manufacturing, LLC, Structures Division, Longview, TX; Leased Workers From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...; Leased Workers From Manpower Working On-Site at Dana Structural Manufacturing, LLC Structures Division... Solutions Group, including on-site workers from Career Personnel, Longview, Texas, separated from employment... date being one full year before the petition date. There were no leased workers from Career...

  5. Promoting Writing among Psychology Students and Faculty: An Interview with Dana S. Dunn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goddard, Perilou

    2002-01-01

    Perilou Goddard is a professor of psychology at Northern Kentucky University (NKU), where she teaches introductory and abnormal psychology as well as courses in writing in psychology and drug policy. She was chosen as NKU's outstanding professor in 1999. Dana S. Dunn is a professor of psychology and former chair of the Department of Psychology at…

  6. Promoting Writing among Psychology Students and Faculty: An Interview with Dana S. Dunn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goddard, Perilou

    2002-01-01

    Perilou Goddard is a professor of psychology at Northern Kentucky University (NKU), where she teaches introductory and abnormal psychology as well as courses in writing in psychology and drug policy. She was chosen as NKU's outstanding professor in 1999. Dana S. Dunn is a professor of psychology and former chair of the Department of Psychology at…

  7. 5. PILOTS KNIGHT, RUSHWORTH, ENGLE, THOMPSON, DANA, AND McKAY STANDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. PILOTS KNIGHT, RUSHWORTH, ENGLE, THOMPSON, DANA, AND McKAY STANDING AT THE NOSE OF X-15 NO. 66671. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Acute toxicity testing with the tropical marine copepod Acartia sinjiensis: optimisation and application.

    PubMed

    Gissi, F; Binet, M T; Adams, M S

    2013-11-01

    Globally there is limited toxicity data for tropical marine species, and there has been a call for further research and development in the area of tropical marine ecotoxicology. An increase in developmental pressures in northern tropical Australia is causing a higher demand for toxicity test protocols with ecologically relevant species. Copepods are a diverse group of zooplankton that are major components of marine food webs. The calanoid copepod Acartia sinjiensis is widely distributed across tropical and sub-tropical brackish to marine waters of Australia and was identified in a recent comprehensive review of marine tropical toxicity testing in Australia as a suitable test organism. Through a number of optimisation steps including feeding trials, changes to culture and test conditions; a 48-h acute toxicity test with A. sinjiensis was modified to become a highly reliable and reproducible standard test protocol. Control mobility was improved significantly, and the sensitivity of A. sinjiensis to copper (EC50 of 33µg/L), ammonia (EC50 of 10mg/L) and phenol (EC50 of 13mg/L) fell within the ranges of those reported previously, indicating that the modifications did not alter its sensitivity. In a comprehensive literature search we found that this species was the most sensitive to copper out of a range of marine copepods. The test was also successfully applied in toxicity assessments of four environmental samples: two produced formations waters (PFWs) and two mine tailing liquors (MTLs). The toxicity assessments utilised toxicity data from a suite of marine organisms (bacteria, microalgae, copepods, sea urchins, oysters, prawns, and fish). For the PFWs, which were predominantly contaminated with organic chemicals, A. sinjiensis was the most sensitive species (EC50 value 2-17 times lower than for any other test species). For the predominantly metal-contaminated mine tailing liquors, its sensitivity was similar to that of other test species used. The modified 48-h acute

  9. Experimental infection of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with marine Eubothrium sp. (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea): observations on the life cycle, aspects of development and growth of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Saksvik, M; Nylund, A; Nilsen, F; Hodneland, K

    2001-01-01

    The life cycle of marine Eubothrium sp. (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea), from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) was experimentally completed in one year and included only one intermediate host (Acartia tonsa Dana) (Copepoda: Calanoida). Adult cestodes were collected from farmed salmon, and ripe eggs released by the cestodes were fed to Acartia tonsa. Ingested eggs hatched in the gut and the larvae developed in the haemocoel of the copepod for 15 days at 16 degrees C. A total of 170 seawater-reared salmon were exposed to infected copepods and the total prevalence of Eubothrium sp. in the salmon after infection was 95.3%, with a mean intensity of 15.0 (range 1-87). The infected salmon were kept in the laboratory where the growth of the cestodes was studied for eleven months. Mean length of the cestodes increased with time, but a large variation among the cestodes was observed. Growth and maturation of the cestodes were dependent on host size and the number of worms present in the intestine. No evidence of mortality of Eubothrium sp. was observed during the experimental period.

  10. Forensic odontological observations in the victims of DANA air crash

    PubMed Central

    Obafunwa, John Oladapo; Ogunbanjo, Victor Olabode; Ogunbanjo, Ogunbiyi Babatunde; Soyemi, Sunday Sokunle; Faduyile, Francis Adedayo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Forensic odontology or forensic dentistry is that aspect of forensic science that uses the application of dental science for the identification of unknown human remains and bite marks. Deaths resulting from mass disasters such as plane crash or fire incidence have always been given mass burial in Nigeria. This was obviously due to the fact that Forensic Pathologists whose roles involve disaster victim identification were not available at that time. However, in the DANA air crash in Lagos in 2012, the Forensic pathologist and dental teams were invited for the first time to identify the victims. The objectives of this paper are to identify the extent of victims’ identification using Forensic odontology alone and its combination with DNA analysis. It also presents the pattern of fractures seen in the mandible and maxilla of the victims. Methods The bodies were dissected using following the standard protocol dissection. Prior to this all the victims had Dental Radiological Examination. The oral cavities were exposed after which the Odontology team was invited for photographing first, followed by dental charting. Fractures of the mandible, maxilla including the anatomical regions were all recorded and photographed. Dental prosthesis, restorations, crowns and bridge and other findings were also noted, recorded and compared with ante mortem records where available. Results A total of152 bodies were recovered from the crash site while 148 victims were eventually identified through a combination of DNA analysis and forensic odontology. This represented 97.4%. Forensic odontology was the primary identifier in 10%. There were no fingerprinting information in this country at present therefore, it could not be used. A total of 89 (60%) were males while females accounted for 59(40%). This gives a ratio of 1.5:1. Most of the victims were in the age group 30-49years; this represented 52% of the victims while the least involved age groups were victims above 60 years

  11. Forensic odontological observations in the victims of DANA air crash.

    PubMed

    Obafunwa, John Oladapo; Ogunbanjo, Victor Olabode; Ogunbanjo, Ogunbiyi Babatunde; Soyemi, Sunday Sokunle; Faduyile, Francis Adedayo

    2015-01-01

    Forensic odontology or forensic dentistry is that aspect of forensic science that uses the application of dental science for the identification of unknown human remains and bite marks. Deaths resulting from mass disasters such as plane crash or fire incidence have always been given mass burial in Nigeria. This was obviously due to the fact that Forensic Pathologists whose roles involve disaster victim identification were not available at that time. However, in the DANA air crash in Lagos in 2012, the Forensic pathologist and dental teams were invited for the first time to identify the victims. The objectives of this paper are to identify the extent of victims' identification using Forensic odontology alone and its combination with DNA analysis. It also presents the pattern of fractures seen in the mandible and maxilla of the victims. The bodies were dissected using following the standard protocol dissection. Prior to this all the victims had Dental Radiological Examination. The oral cavities were exposed after which the Odontology team was invited for photographing first, followed by dental charting. Fractures of the mandible, maxilla including the anatomical regions were all recorded and photographed. Dental prosthesis, restorations, crowns and bridge and other findings were also noted, recorded and compared with ante mortem records where available. A total of 152 bodies were recovered from the crash site while 148 victims were eventually identified through a combination of DNA analysis and forensic odontology. This represented 97.4%. Forensic odontology was the primary identifier in 10%. There were no fingerprinting information in this country at present therefore, it could not be used. A total of 89 (60%) were males while females accounted for 59(40%). This gives a ratio of 1.5:1. Most of the victims were in the age group 30-49 years; this represented 52% of the victims while the least involved age groups were victims above 60 years of age which accounted for

  12. Bill Dana in front of HL-10 after flight H-24-37

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-09-03

    NASA research pilot Bill Dana after his fourth free flight (1 glide and 3 powered) in the HL-10. This particular flight reached a maximum speed of Mach 1.45. Dana made a total of nine HL-10 flights (1 glide and 8 powered), and his lifting body experience as a whole included several car tow and 1 air tow flights in the M2-F1; 4 glide and 15 powered flights in the M2-F3; and 2 powered flights in the X-24B. He is wearing a pressure suit for protection against the cockpit depressurizing at high altitudes. The air conditioner box held by the ground crewman provides cool air to prevent overheating.

  13. Sperm storage and mating in the deep-sea squid Taningia danae Joubin, 1931 (Oegopsida: Octopoteuthidae).

    PubMed

    Hoving, Hendrik Jan T; Lipinski, Marek R; Videler, John J; Bolstad, Kat S R

    2010-01-01

    Spermatangium implantation is reported in the large oceanic squid Taningia danae, based on ten mated females from the stomachs of sperm whales. Implanted spermatangia were located in the mantle, head and neck (on both sides) or above the nuchal cartilage, under the neck collar and were often associated with incisions. These cuts ranged from 30 to 65 mm in length and were probably made by males, using the beak or arm hooks. This is the first time wounds facilitating spermatangium storage have been observed in the internal muscle layers (rather than external, as observed in some other species of squid). The implications of these observations for the mating behavior of the rarely encountered squid T. danae are discussed.

  14. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets Across Cancer Types | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Dana Farber Cancer Institute CTD2 Center focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  15. Dana Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Novel Oncogenes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Widespread recurrent copy number alterations are observed across the majority of human cancers, yet the specific targets of such amplified or deleted regions remain undefined. Here, the CTD2 Center at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute took a systematic approach using cDNA overexpression screening to identify and validate oncogenes residing in such amplified regions. In representative examples, these experiments have identified the adaptor proteins CRKL, GAB2, FRS2 and the TLOC and SKIL proteins as novel amplified oncogenes.

  16. Copepods from Warm-Core Ring 82-H.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    separately for each species except Lucicutia spp. and Acartia spp. where they are combined. Copepod species categories (female, male, copepodite) are...to prefer different regions and Acartia danae (0-90 m) and A. negligens (80-160 m) had little overlap. The Pleuromamma species did not show this...deeper, while others were found more or less evenly over the entire 160 m. mixed layer below thermocline both Acartia danae Acartia negligens

  17. Seasonal dynamics of Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Acartia spp. in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep) - numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierzbicka-Głowacka, L.; Bielecka, L.; Mudrak, S.

    2006-07-01

    A population dynamics model for copepods is presented describing a seasonal dynamics of Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Acartia spp. in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdansk Deep). The copepod model was coupled with an one-dimensional physical and biological upper layer model for nutrients (total inorganic nitrogen, phosphate), phytoplankton, microzooplankton and an early juvenile of herring as predator. In this model, mesozooplankton (herbivorous copepods) has been introduced as animals having definite patterns of growth in successive stages, reproduction and mortality. The populations are represented by 6 cohorts in different developmental stages, thus assuming, that recruitment of the next generation occurs after a fixed period of adult life. The copepod model links trophic processes and population dynamics, and simulates individual growth within cohorts and the changes in biomass between cohorts. The simulations of annual cycles of copepods contain one complete generation of Pseudocalanus and two generations of Acartia in the whole column water, and indicate the importance of growth of older stages of 6 cohorts each species to total population biomass. The peaks of copepods biomass, main, at the turn of June and July for Pseudocalanus and smaller, in July for Acartia, lag that phytoplankton by ca. two mouths due to growth of cohorts in successive stages and egg production by females. The numerical results show that the investigated species could not be the main factor limiting the spring phytoplankton bloom in the Gdansk Deep, because the initial development was slow for Acartia and faster for Pseudocalanus, but main development formed after the bloom, in both cases. However, the simulated microzooplankton biomass was enough high to conclude, in our opinion, that, in this case, it was major cause limiting phytoplankton bloom. Model presented here is a next step in understanding how the population dynamics of a dominant species in the southern Baltic Sea interact

  18. The importance of uptake from food for the bioaccumulation of PCB and PBDE in the marine planktonic copepod Acartia clausi.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Kerstin; Tiselius, Peter

    2010-07-15

    The accumulation of (14)C-labelled PCB 31, PCB 101, PCB 153 and PBDE 99 was investigated at the two lowest trophic levels of the pelagic food web. Accumulation was measured in the small phytoplankter Thalassiosira weissflogii (Coscinodiscophyceae: Thalassiosirales) and in the neritic zooplankter Acartia clausi (Copepoda: Calanoida) exposed to the substance either only via water or through ingestion of contaminated T. weissflogii. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for all four compounds were significantly higher in A. clausi feeding on contaminated phytoplankton than in animals exposed only via water. The logBAF for the PCBs increased linearly with the octanol-water partitioning coefficients (logK(OW)) in both the algae and the copepods, but with steeper slopes for feeding than non-feeding animals. Reported values for K(OW) for PBDEs vary by almost an order of magnitude and it was therefore not meaningful to calculate a logBAF-logK(OW) ratio for PBDE 99. It is clear that the nutritional status of the zooplankton affects the uptake of the compounds and that the bioaccumulation cannot be modelled as a passive partitioning between the organisms and the surrounding water. Small copepods are typical of coastal waters and point sources (both temporal and spatial) may be the rule for HOC releases into the sea. Thus, the pathways shown in this study are important and realistic.

  19. Feeding activity of the copepod Acartia hongi on phytoplankton and micro-zooplankton in Gyeonggi Bay, Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eun Jin; Ju, Se-Jong; Choi, Joong-Ki

    2010-06-01

    To improve our understanding of the trophic link between micro-zooplankton and copepods in Gyeonggi Bay, Yellow Sea, the diet composition, ingestion rates, and prey selectivity of Acartia hongi, known as the most abundant and widespread copepod species, was estimated by conducting in situ bottle incubation throughout the different seasons. The results showed that A. hongi preferentially grazed on ciliate and heterotrophic dinoflagellate of a size ranging from 20 to 100 μm rather than phytoplankton. Although micro-zooplankton comprised only an average 13.7% of the total carbon available in the natural prey pool, micro-zooplankton accounted for >70% of the total carbon ration ingested by A. hongi throughout the year, except for winter diatom blooming periods when A. hongi obtained about 60% of its carbon ration from phytoplankton. Our results demonstrated that A. hongi modified their diet composition and feeding rates in response to change in composition and size of prey available to them, and that A. hongi preferentially ingested micro-zooplankton over phytoplankton. Feeding activity of A. hongi could therefore affect the species composition and size structure of natural plankton communities in this study area, particularly the micro-zooplankton. Strongly selective feeding and high grazing pressure by A. hongi on micro-zooplankton shows the role of trophic coupling between copepods and the microbial food web in the pelagic ecosystem of Gyeonggi Bay.

  20. Molecular evidence for genetic subdivision of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana) populations.

    PubMed

    Zane, L; Ostellari, L; Maccatrozzo, L; Bargelloni, L; Battaglia, B; Patarnello, T

    1998-12-22

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana) is a key species in the Antarctic food web and occurs on a circumcontinental scale. Population genetic structure of this species was investigated by sequence analysis of the ND1 mitochondrial gene in four population samples collected at different geographical localities around the Antarctic continent. Results indicate the existence of significant genetic differences between samples, and we suggest that oceanographic barriers could be sufficiently strong and temporally stable to restrict gene flow between distinct areas. Moreover, our data indicate that Antarctic krill is not at mutation-drift equilibrium and that the species possibly has a low effective population size as compared to the census size.

  1. Embryonic development time of Penilia avirostris Dana, 1852 in a tropical bay in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J L; Marazzo, A

    2004-11-01

    Development time of embryos in the brood pouch of the cladoceran Penilia avirostris Dana, 1852, was estimated by collecting zooplankton daily for 15 days in surface water of Guanabara Bay, Brazil. Each day the maturity stage of embryos of 90 parthenogenic females was noted. Total development time (egg to birth) varied from 2 to 3 days, the immature phase (stages I to IV) being generally longer (2 days) than intermediate and mature phases (1 day, stages V to XII). Similar results were obtained from Bottrell's equation, which takes water temperature into account.

  2. Dana Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Resistance Mechanisms | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Resistance to targeted therapy is emerging as a bottleneck to achieving durable drug responses in cancer. The goal of the CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute is to identify mechanisms of resistance for both existing therapeutics as well as for emerging targets even prior to the identification of lead compounds. They aim to use this information to inform combinatorial treatments. In representative examples they have found that YAP1 leads to resistance after KRAS targeting and that PRKACA mediates resistance to HER2 therapy.

  3. High-resolution seismic-reflection data offshore of Dana Point, southern California borderland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Ryan, Holly F.; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection profiles in September 2006 in the offshore area between Dana Point and San Mateo Point in southern Orange and northern San Diego Counties, California. Reflection profiles were located to image folds and reverse faults associated with the San Mateo fault zone and high-angle strike-slip faults near the shelf break (the Newport-Inglewood fault zone) and at the base of the slope. Interpretations of these data were used to update the USGS Quaternary fault database and in shaking hazard models for the State of California developed by the Working Group for California Earthquake Probabilities. This cruise was funded by the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Catastrophic Hazards project. Seismic-reflection data were acquired aboard the R/V Sea Explorer, which is operated by the Ocean Institute at Dana Point. A SIG ELC820 minisparker seismic source and a SIG single-channel streamer were used. More than 420 km of seismic-reflection data were collected. This report includes maps of the seismic-survey sections, linked to Google Earth? software, and digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats.

  4. Population ecology of the blue crab Callinectes danae (Crustacea: Portunidae) in a Brazilian tropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marina S L C; Barreto, Aline V; Negromonte, Aurinete O; Schwamborn, Ralf

    2012-03-01

    This paper aims at describing the population ecology of the swimming crab Callinectes danae Smith, 1869 in one of the most productive estuaries of Brazil, the Santa Cruz Channel. These crabs were monthly collected from January to December/2009 at four stations along the channel, two in the upper and two in the lower estuary. A total of 2373 specimens of C. danae were collected during the study. Males had a larger average carapace width than non-ovigerous females (60.0 ± 15.6 mm and 52.9 ± 12.4 mm, respectively), an adaptation that gives greater protection for females during the copulation. Overall sex ratio did not differ significantly from 1:1. However, evaluating sex-ratio by sampling area, males and juveniles of both sexes occurred preferentially in the upper estuary (p < 0.05), while adult females, including ovigerous, inhabited the lower estuary, an area of major marine influence (p < 0.05). While juveniles look for estuarine waters due to the benefit from the shelter and abundance of food, ovigerous females migrate to areas of greater depth and higher salinity in order to provide a more favorable environment for embryonic and larval development and to enhance larval dispersal. Recruitment of juveniles was continuous along the year, but intensified from March to June and, with less intensity, from October to December.

  5. Test pilots 1962 - Thompson, McKay, Dana, Armstrong, Peterson, Butchart, Walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    A group photo of NASA research pilots at the front door of the Flight Research Center headquarters building. In the front row are (left to right) Milt Thompson, Jack McKay, and Bill Dana. All three flew the X-15, and Thompson and Dana were also involved in the lifting body flights. McKay was injured in a crash landing in X-15 #2. Although he recovered, the injuries eventually forced him to retire from research flying. In the back row (left to right) are Neil Armstrong, Bruce Peterson, Stanley Butchart, and Joe Walker. Armstrong and Walker also both flew the X-15. Soon after this photo was taken, Armstrong was selected as an astronaut, and seven years later became the first man to walk on the Moon. Walker made the highest flight in the X-15, reaching 354,200 feet. He then went on to fly the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle, and was killed on June 8, 1966 when his F-104N collided with the XB-70. Peterson made the first flight in the HL-10 lifting body, and was later badly injured in the crash of the M2-F2 lifting body. Butchart flew a wide range of research missions in the 1950s, and was the B-29 drop plane pilot for a number of rocket flight.

  6. Ultrastructure of the aortic diverticula of the adult dragonfly Sympetrum danae (Odonata: Anisoptera).

    PubMed

    Jensen, H

    1976-05-06

    The aorta of Sympetrum danae possesses two dorsal diverticula: one in the mesothorax and one in the metathorax. They are very similar in form and position. Each diverticulum has a dorsal valve through which blood is pumped from the wings down into the aorta. The wall of the aortic diverticula consists of two simple cell layers: an outer epidermis-like layer and an inner muscle layer. The nuclei of the muscle cells are situated close to the lumen of the diverticula. The mitochondria are evenly dispersed between the myofibrils and are often paired up on either side of the Z-band. The Z-bands are thick and fragmented. The length of the sarcomeres varies from 3.3 to 6.1 mu. The A-band length is about 3 mu. The myofibrils consist of thick (250 A) and thin (85 A) filaments. Each thick filament is surrounded by 9-12 thin filaments. The sarcoplasmic reticulum is well developed and separates the myofibrils with one or two layers. The T-tubules are flattened and branch irregularly like a two-dimensional tree between the lamellar myofibrils. Intercalated discs are observed. The peculiarities of the muscle of aortic diverticula in S. danae are discussed in relation to various muscles of other insects and arthropods.

  7. Seasonal dynamics of Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Acartia spp. in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep) - numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierzbicka-Głowacka, L.; Bielecka, L.; Mudrak, S.

    2006-12-01

    A population dynamics model for copepods is presented, describing the seasonal dynamics of Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Acartia spp. in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep). The copepod model was coupled with a one-dimensional physical and biological upper layer model for nutrients (total inorganic nitrogen, phosphate), phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and an early juvenile of herring as a predator. In this model, mesozooplankton (herbivorous copepods) has been introduced as an animal having definite patterns of growth in successive stages, reproduction and mortality. The populations are represented by 6 cohorts in different developmental stages, thus assuming that recruitment of the next generation occurs after a fixed period of adult life. The copepod model links trophic processes and population dynamics, and simulates individual growth within cohorts and the changes in biomass between cohorts. The simulations of annual cycles of copepods contain one complete generation of Pseudocalanus and two generations of Acartia in the whole column water, and indicate the importance of growth in the older stages of 6 cohorts of each species, to arrive at a total population biomass. The peaks of copepods' biomass are larger at the turn of June and July for Pseudocalanus and smaller in July for Acartia, lagging that of phytoplankton by ca. two mouths, due to the growth of cohorts in successive stages and egg production by females. The numerical results show that the investigated species could not be the main factor limiting the spring phytoplankton bloom in the Gdańsk Deep, because the initial development was slow for Acartia and faster for Pseudocalanus, but the main development formed after the bloom, in both cases. The phytoplankton bloom is very important in the diet of the adults of the copepods, but it is not particularly important for the youngest part of new generation (early nauplii). However, the simulated microzooplankton biomass was enough high to

  8. Influence of food quality on egg production and viability of the marine planktonic copepod Acartia omorii [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kyoungsoon; Jang, Min-Chul; Jang, Pung-Kuk; Ju, Se-Jong; Lee, Tea-Kyun; Chang, Man

    2003-06-01

    Egg production, egg viability and fecal pellet production were determined for individual Acartia omorii, which were fed diets of two species of diatoms ( Skeletonema costatum and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) and three species of dinoflagellates ( Scrippsiella trochoidea, Heterocapsa triquetra and Cochlodinium polykrikoides). Diets were analyzed for fatty acid content as an indicator of food quality. Depending on the diet, egg production of A. omorii varied over time, diminishing with some diets ( S. trochoidea, C. polykrikoides, P. tricornutum). This rate of reduction was much more rapid for a diet of C. polykrikoides, which caused egg production to decrease to ca. 2.4 eggs f -1 d -1 in only four days. As for all diets, egg viability was high at the beginning but with the C. polykrikoides and P. tricornutum diets, it rapidly decreased with time. Fecal pellet production also varied with time, depending on the diet. Egg production rate was closely correlated with fecal pellet production. There was no direct relationship between egg viability and egg production rate, but both egg production and viability were affected by the nutritional quality of food. Egg viability was also highly dependent on the composition of fatty acids in the eggs. Egg viability showed positive correlation with the ratio of ω3:ω6 groups among egg fatty acids, and negative correlation with the ratio of 20:5 ( n-3) : 22:6 ( n-3). While comparing several diets, egg production rate was higher on diets ( H. triquetra and S. trochoidea) containing ample amounts of essential fatty acids such as 18:4 ( n-3) and 22:6 ( n-3). The results suggest that fertility of A. omorii was dependent upon the quality of the food, and dinoflagellate diets, with the exception of C. polykrikoides, were preferable to diatom diets.

  9. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 83-107-1574, Dana Corporation, Fort Wayne, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, R.G.; Wallingford, K.M.

    1985-04-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples of cutting fluids and oils were analyzed at Dana Corporation, Fort Wayne, Indiana in May, 1983. The survey was requested by a company representative to evaluate the cause of dermatitis among machine-tool operators. A cutting fluid used at the facility was thought to be the cause of the dermatitis. Medical questionnaires were administered to 95 workers. Company dispensary records were reviewed. N-nitrosodimethylamine and triethanolamine were detected in new and used cutting fluid samples. Nickel, chromium, and zinc were detected in a sample of used cutting oil residue. Chloromethyl-phenol was found in two cutting fluid mix samples. The authors conclude that a health hazard exists at the facility. The skin problems appear to be related to exposure to cutting fluids and solvents in general, rather than a specific agent. Recommendations include using protective clothing, using waterless hand cleaners instead of solvents, and avoiding contact with chlorothene.

  10. Dryden Test Pilots 1990 - Smolka, Fullerton, Schneider, Dana, Ishmael, Smith, and McMurtry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    It was a windy afternoon on Rogers Dry Lake as the research pilots of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility gathered for a photo shoot. It was a special day too, the 30th anniversary of the first F-104 flight by research pilot Bill Dana. To celebrate, a fly over of Building 4800, in formation, was made with Bill in a Lockheed F-104 (826), Gordon Fullerton in a Northrop T-38, and Jim Smolka in a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 (841) on March 23, 1990. The F-18 (841), standing on the NASA ramp is a backdrop for the photo of (Left to Right) James W. (Smoke) Smolka, C. Gordon Fullerton, Edward T. (Ed) Schneider, William H. (Bill) Dana, Stephen D. (Steve) Ishmael, Rogers E. Smith, and Thomas C. (Tom) McMurtry. Smolka joined NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility in September 1985. He has been the project pilot on the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) research and F-15 Aeronautical Research Aircraft programs. He has also flown as a pilot on the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, as a co-project pilot on the F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control aircraft and the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft. Other aircraft he has flown in research programs are the F-16, F-111, F-104 and the T-38 as support. Fullerton, joined NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility in November 1986. He was project pilot on the NASA/Convair 990 aircraft to test space shuttle landing gear components, project pilot on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft, and project pilot on the B-52 launch aircraft, where he was involved in six air launches of the commercially developed Pegasus space launch vehicle. Other assignments include a variety of flight research and support activities in multi-engine and high performance aircraft such as, F-15, F-111, F-14, X-29, MD-11 and DC-8. Schneider arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research

  11. Dryden Test Pilots 1990 - Smolka, Fullerton, Schneider, Dana, Ishmael, Smith, and McMurtry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    It was a windy afternoon on Rogers Dry Lake as the research pilots of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility gathered for a photo shoot. It was a special day too, the 30th anniversary of the first F-104 flight by research pilot Bill Dana. To celebrate, a fly over of Building 4800, in formation, was made with Bill in a Lockheed F-104 (826), Gordon Fullerton in a Northrop T-38, and Jim Smolka in a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 (841) on March 23, 1990. The F-18 (841), standing on the NASA ramp is a backdrop for the photo of (Left to Right) James W. (Smoke) Smolka, C. Gordon Fullerton, Edward T. (Ed) Schneider, William H. (Bill) Dana, Stephen D. (Steve) Ishmael, Rogers E. Smith, and Thomas C. (Tom) McMurtry. Smolka joined NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility in September 1985. He has been the project pilot on the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) research and F-15 Aeronautical Research Aircraft programs. He has also flown as a pilot on the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, as a co-project pilot on the F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control aircraft and the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft. Other aircraft he has flown in research programs are the F-16, F-111, F-104 and the T-38 as support. Fullerton, joined NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility in November 1986. He was project pilot on the NASA/Convair 990 aircraft to test space shuttle landing gear components, project pilot on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft, and project pilot on the B-52 launch aircraft, where he was involved in six air launches of the commercially developed Pegasus space launch vehicle. Other assignments include a variety of flight research and support activities in multi-engine and high performance aircraft such as, F-15, F-111, F-14, X-29, MD-11 and DC-8. Schneider arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research

  12. Chesapeake Bay Low Freshwater Inflow Study. Phase II. MAP FOLIO. Biota Assessment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    Mnemiopsislei-dyiWinter (Ctenophone -Sea Walnut) 15 Maarenai Brachionis calyciflorus (Rotifer) 16 Callinectt Acartia clausi (Copepod) 17 Callinect4... Acartia tonsa (Copepod) 18 Alos sa Scottolana canadensis (Copepod) 19 Brevoorti Bosmina longirostris (Cladoceren) 20 fAnchoa mi Evadne tergestina

  13. Field, Lab and Modelling Study of Microscale Copepod Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    laboratory data, and forced with data gathered from the LUMIS and FishTV deployments (Jaffe and Franks, parent grant). APPROACH Acartia clausi , one of...A model for Acartia tonsa: effect of turbulence and consequences for the related physiological processes. J. Plankton Res. 18:2139-2177. PUBLICATIONS

  14. Stable carbon isotope ratios in Astrangia danae : evidence for algal modification of carbon pools used in calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, C. E.; McCarty, H. B.

    1982-06-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios have been measured in skeletons of the temperature shallow water scleractinian coral, Astrangia danae. δ13C values ranging from -5.42 to -7.30%. revealed the expected depletion of 13C in skeletal carbonate relative to sea water bicarbonate. Differences among the ratios could not be attributed to collection site and were not correlated to skeletal morphology. Values of δ13C were directly related to zooxanthellae density for all colonies, so that as zooxanthellae concentration increased, δ13C valued increased. Colonies maintained under high temperature conditions were offset from the normal, exhibiting ratios less enriched in 13C than similar colonies from natural conditions. These trends supported the models of Weber and Goreau in which the carbon pools used in calcification are modified by algal photosynthesis. Direct evidence of physiological differences between symbiotic and asymbiotic colonies of A. danae has also been provided.

  15. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets in KRAS Driven Lung Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  16. HL-10 on lakebed with Jerauld R. Gentry, Peter Hoag, John A. Manke, and Bill Dana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The four principal HL-10 pilots are seen here with the lifting body aircraft. They are, left to right; Air Force Major Jerauld R. Gentry, Air Force test pilot Peter Hoag, and NASA pilots John A. Manke and Bill Dana. All are wearing the pressure suits needed for flying above 50,000 feet. The HL-10 was one of five heavyweight lifting-body designs flown at NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC--later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, from July 1966 to November 1975 to study and validate the concept of safely maneuvering and landing a low lift-over-drag vehicle designed for reentry from space. Northrop Corporation built the HL-10 and M2-F2, the first two of the fleet of 'heavy' lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center. The contract for construction of the HL-10 and the M2-F2 was $1.8 million. 'HL' stands for horizontal landing, and '10' refers to the tenth design studied by engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. After delivery to NASA in January 1966, the HL-10 made its first flight on Dec. 22, 1966, with research pilot Bruce Peterson in the cockpit. Although an XLR-11 rocket engine was installed in the vehicle, the first 11 drop flights from the B-52 launch aircraft were powerless glide flights to assess handling qualities, stability, and control. In the end, the HL-10 was judged to be the best handling of the three original heavy-weight lifting bodies (M2-F2/F3, HL-10, X-24A). The HL-10 was flown 37 times during the lifting body research program and logged the highest altitude and fastest speed in the Lifting Body program. On Feb. 18, 1970, Air Force test pilot Peter Hoag piloted the HL-10 to Mach 1.86 (1,228 mph). Nine days later, NASA pilot Bill Dana flew the vehicle to 90,030 feet, which became the highest altitude reached in the program. Some new and different lessons were learned through the successful flight testing of the HL-10. These lessons, when combined with information from it's sister ship, the M2-F2/F3

  17. [Dana Point: what is new in the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension?].

    PubMed

    Olschewski, H

    2008-10-01

    The hemodynamic definition of pulmonary hypertension (PH) has not been evidence-based. Normal individuals have a pulmonary pressure of about 14 mm Hg. The respective normal range is up to 20 mm Hg. It was decided in Dana Point 2008 to introduce new thresholds for mean pulmonary arterial pressure with < 21 mm Hg = normal, 21 - 25 mm Hg = borderline, and > 25 mm Hg = manifest PH. Correspondingly, echocardiographic systolic tricuspid regurgitant velocity thresholds will be < 2.5 m/s = normal, 2.5 - 2.8 = borderline, > 2.8 m/s = manifest PH. Confirmation by right heart catheterization is mandatory as many false positive readings and patients with undetected diastolic filling disturbance can be expected, based on current literature. During exercise, PA pressure is strongly age-dependent. Therefore exercise values were left out of the definition. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is expected to gain importance for routine examinations in the next years, although currently right heart catheterization regains territory. Genetic analysis of BMPR2 gene represents an important option for patients with idiopathic PAH and their relatives. However, it is not suitable for screening in the general population. Follow-up examinations in patients with targeted therapy are very important for the definition of specific therapy goals in order to improve prognosis. Future IN VIVO tests of vessel properties and right heart function could improve our understanding and the development of new therapies.

  18. Juvenile development of Callinectes danae Smith, 1869 (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura, Portunidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Bolla, Eduardo A; Fransozo, Vivian; Negreiros-Fransozo, Maria Lucia

    2014-03-01

    The juvenile development of Callinectes danae was investigated from megalopae obtained in neuston samples at Ubatuba, São Paulo, Brazil. The individuals were raised in the laboratory under constant temperature (25 ± 1°C), filtered sea water from the collection location (35‰), and natural photoperiod. Newly hatched Artemia sp. nauplii were offered as food on a daily basis and ornamental-fish food was also provided for the juveniles from the 4th stage on. Twelve stages of the juvenile phase were obtained. The main morphological features that allowed recognition of the first juvenile stage were drawn and described. All the subsequent stages obtained were examined and measured, and the main changes in relation to the first stage were recorded. Sexual dimorphism becomes apparent from the fourth juvenile stage onwards. Some appendages and morphological features proved to be of great importance in the identification of species, including the number of segments of the antennal flagellum and the number of setae on the maxilla and on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd maxillipeds. These can probably be used for future comparisons and species identifications.

  19. An environmental forensic approach for tropical estuaries based on metal bioaccumulation in tissues of Callinectes danae.

    PubMed

    Bordon, Isabella C A C; Sarkis, Jorge E S; Andrade, Nathalia P; Hortellani, Marcos A; Favaro, Deborah I T; Kakazu, Mauricio H; Cotrim, Marycel E B; Lavradas, Raquel T; Moreira, Isabel; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann

    2016-01-01

    The blue crab Callinectes danae is distributed throughout the Atlantic coast and this study aimed to evaluate a environmental forensics approach that could be applied at tropical estuarine systems where this species is distributed, based on the metal concentrations in its tissues. For this purpose, blue crab samples were collected in 9 sites (distributed in 3 areas) along the Santos Estuarine System, state of São Paulo, Brazil. The concentrations of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in gills, hepatopancreas and muscle tissues. Sediment samples were collected and analyzed in these same sites. A data distribution pattern was identified during both sampling periods (August and December 2011). In order to validate this model, a new sampling campaign was performed in March 2013 at the Santos Estuarine System and also at Ilha Grande (state of Rio de Janeiro). These data were added to the previous database (composed of the August and December 2011 samples) and a discriminant analysis was applied. The results confirmed an environmental fingerprint for the Santos Estuarine System.

  20. Gill microsomal (Na+,K+)-ATPase from the blue crab Callinectes danae: Interactions at cationic sites.

    PubMed

    Masui, D C; Furriel, R P M; Silva, E C C; Mantelatto, F L M; McNamara, J C; Barrabin, H; Scofano, H M; Fontes, C F L; Leone, F A

    2005-12-01

    Euryhaline crustaceans tolerate exposure to a wide range of dilute media, using compensatory, ion regulatory mechanisms. However, data on molecular interactions occurring at cationic sites on the crustacean gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase, a key enzyme in this hyperosmoregulatory process, are unavailable. We report that Na+ binding at the activating site leads to cooperative, heterotropic interactions that are insensitive to K+. The binding of K+ ions to their high affinity sites displaces Na+ ions from their sites. The increase in Na+ ion concentrations increases heterotropic interactions with the K+ ions, with no changes in K0.5 for K+ ion activation at the extracellular sites. Differently from mammalian (Na+,K+)-ATPases, that from C. danae exhibits additional NH4+ ion binding sites that synergistically activate the enzyme at saturating concentrations of Na+ and K+ ions. NH4+ binding is cooperative, and heterotropic NH4+ ion interactions are insensitive to Na+ ions, but Na+ ions displace NH4+ ions from their sites. NH4+ ions also displace Na+ ions from their sites. Mg2+ ions modulate enzyme stimulation by NH4+ ions, displacing NH4+ ion from its sites. These interactions may modulate NH4+ ion excretion and Na+ ion uptake by the gill epithelium in euryhaline crustaceans that confront hyposmotic media.

  1. Contractions induced by sodium withdrawal in crab (Callinectes danae) muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Madeira, A C; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1983-05-01

    A study was made of the effects of Na removal on the resting tension of single muscle fibres of the crab Callinectes danae. Reduction of [Na]o (replacement with Li, Tris or choline) below a threshold value, typical for each fibre, induced spontaneous, local contractions randomly dispersed along the fibres; this was followed by propagated contractile waves and tension oscillations. Sustained contractures were occasionally seen at threshold [Na]o and were consistently observed when [Na]o was further reduced. The Na withdrawal contractions depended on [Ca]o and were abolished in Ca-free media; they were restored within seconds after the addition of Ca (3-12 mM) or Sr (15-25 mM), but not Ba (10-100 mM), to the media. Caffeine (0.2-1.0 mM) facilitated, whereas La (2-5 mM), procaine (1 mM) or lidocaine (10 mM) inhibited the Na-withdrawal contractions. It is concluded that increased Ca influx across the sarcolemma and release of stored Ca from the sarcoplasmic reticulum are involved in the contractions induced by Na-deficient solutions in crab fibres.

  2. Antinociceptive properties of extracts and two flavonoids isolated from leaves of Danae racemosa.

    PubMed

    Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Fathiazad, Fatemeh; Garjani, Alireza

    2007-12-01

    The antinociceptive properties of the hydro-methanolic extract (HME) and two flavonoids isolated from Danae racemosa have been investigated in several nociceptive rat models. The HME from D. racemosa (100-400 mgkg(-1), i.p.) produced significant dose-related inhibition of acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction. In the same dose range, the HME produced dose-related inhibition in both phases of a formalin-test. Treatment of animals with naloxone (5 mgkg(-1), i.p.) completely reversed the antinociceptive effect caused by morphine (5 mgkg(-1), s.c.) and the HME (200 mgkg(-1), i.p.) when assessed against the first phase of the formalin-test, but this effect was less significant for the HME in the second phase. Furthermore, when assessed via a hot-plate test, the HME (100-400 mgkg(-1), i.p.) caused a significant increase in response latency. The HME, given daily for to 7 consecutive days, develop tolerance, but did not induce cross-tolerance to morphine. These data demonstrate that the HME elicites pronounced antinociception against several pain models. The actions of the HME involve, at least in part, an interaction with the opioid system, but does not seem to be related with non-specific peripheral or central depressant actions. Finally, the active principle(s) responsible for the antinociceptive action of D. racemosa is likely to be partially related to the presence of quercetin and kaempferol.

  3. X-15 test pilots - Engle, Rushworth, McKay, Knight, Thompson, and Dana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The X-15 flight crew, left to right; Air Force Captain Joseph H. Engle, Air Force Major Robert A. Rushworth, NASA pilot John B. 'Jack' McKay, Air Force pilot William J. 'Pete' Knight, NASA pilot Milton O. Thompson, and NASA pilot Bill Dana. of their 125 X-15 flights, 8 were above the 50 miles that constituted the Air Force's definition of the beginning of space (Engle 3, Dana 2, Rushworth, Knight, and McKay one each). NASA used the international definition of space as beginning at 62 miles above the earth. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of rated thrust (actual thrust reportedly climbed to 60,000 lb). North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and canted horizontal surfaces on the tail to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large

  4. X-15 flight crew - Engle, Rushworth, McKay, Knight, Thompson, and Dana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The X-15 flight crew, left to right; Air Force Captain Joseph H. Engle, Air Force Major Robert A. Rushworth, NASA pilot John B. 'Jack' McKay, Air Force Major William J. 'Pete' Knight, NASA pilot Milton O. Thompson, and NASA pilot Bill Dana. These six pilots made 125 of the 199 total flights in the X-15. Rushworth made 34 flights (the most of any X-15 pilot); McKay flew 29 times; Engle, Knight, and Dana each flew 16 times; Thompson's total was 14. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of rated thrust (actual thrust reportedly climbed to 60,000 lb). North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and canted horizontal surfaces on the tail to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52

  5. Unambiguous detection of astaxanthin and astaxanthin fatty acid esters in krill (Euphausia superba Dana).

    PubMed

    Grynbaum, Marc David; Hentschel, Petra; Putzbach, Karsten; Rehbein, Jens; Krucker, Manfred; Nicholson, Graeme; Albert, Klaus

    2005-09-01

    HPLC atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)/MS, GC MS, HPLC diode array detection (DAD), and NMR were used for the identification of astaxanthin and astaxanthin fatty acid esters in krill (Euphausia superba Dana). Matrix solid phase dispersion was applied for the extraction of the carotenoids. This gentle and expeditious extraction technique for solid and viscous samples leads to distinct higher enrichment rates than the conventional liquid-liquid extraction. The chromatographic separation was achieved employing a C30 RP column that allows the separation of shape-constrained geometrical isomers. A methanol/tert-butylmethyl ether/water gradient was applied. (all-E) Astaxanthin and the geometrical isomers were identified by HPLC APCI/MS, by coelution with isomerized authentical standard, by UV spectroscopy (DAD), and three isomers were unambiguously assigned by microcoil NMR spectroscopy. In this method, microcoils are transversally aligned to the magnetic field and have an increased sensitivity compared to the conventional double-saddle Helmholtz coils, thus enabling the measurement on small samples. The carotenol fatty acid esters were saponified enzymatically with Lipase type VII from Candida rugosa. The fatty acids were detected by GC MS after transesterification, but also without previous derivatization by HPLC APCI/MS. C14:0, C16:0, C16:1, C18:1, C20:0, C20:5, and C22:6 were found in astaxanthin monoesters and in astaxanthin diesters. (all-E) Astaxanthin was identified as the main isomer in six fatty acid ester fractions by NMR. Quantitation was carried out by the method of internal standard. (13-cis) Astaxanthin (70 microg/g), 542 microg/g (all-E) astaxanthin, 36 microg/g unidentified astaxanthin isomer, 62 microg/g (9-cis) astaxanthin, and 7842 microg/g astaxanthin fatty acid esters were found.

  6. Potential earthquake faults offshore Southern California, from the eastern Santa Barbara Channel south to Dana Point

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Sorlien, C.C.; Sliter, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Urban areas in Southern California are at risk from major earthquakes, not only quakes generated by long-recognized onshore faults but also ones that occur along poorly understood offshore faults. We summarize recent research findings concerning these lesser known faults. Research by the U.S. Geological Survey during the past five years indicates that these faults from the eastern Santa Barbara Channel south to Dana Point pose a potential earthquake threat. Historical seismicity in this area indicates that, in general, offshore faults can unleash earthquakes having at least moderate (M 5-6) magnitude. Estimating the earthquake hazard in Southern California is complicated by strain partitioning and by inheritance of structures from early tectonic episodes. The three main episodes are Mesozoic through early Miocene subduction, early Miocene crustal extension coeval with rotation of the Western Transverse Ranges, and Pliocene and younger transpression related to plate-boundary motion along the San Andreas Fault. Additional complication in the analysis of earthquake hazards derives from the partitioning of tectonic strain into strike-slip and thrust components along separate but kinematically related faults. The eastern Santa Barbara Basin is deformed by large active reverse and thrust faults, and this area appears to be underlain regionally by the north-dipping Channel Islands thrust fault. These faults could produce moderate to strong earthquakes and destructive tsunamis. On the Malibu coast, earthquakes along offshore faults could have left-lateral-oblique focal mechanisms, and the Santa Monica Mountains thrust fault, which underlies the oblique faults, could give rise to large (M ??7) earthquakes. Offshore faults near Santa Monica Bay and the San Pedro shelf are likely to produce both strike-slip and thrust earthquakes along northwest-striking faults. In all areas, transverse structures, such as lateral ramps and tear faults, which crosscut the main faults, could

  7. Postglacial sedimentary record of the Southern California continental shelf and slope, Point Conception to Dana Point

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sommerfield, C.K.; Lee, H.J.; Normark, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    Sedimentary strata on the Southern California shelf and slope (Point Conception to Dana Point) display patterns and rates of sediment accumulation that convey information on sea-level inundation, sediment supply, and oceanic transport processes following the Last Glacial Maximum. In Santa Monica Bay and San Pedro Bay, postglacial transgression is recorded in shelf deposits by wave-ravinement surfaces dated at 13-11 ka and an upsection transition from coastal to shallow-marine sediment facies. Depositional conditions analogous to the modern environment were established in the bays by 8-9 ka. On the continental slope, transgression is evidenced in places by an increase in sediment grain size and accumulation rate ca. 15-10 ka, a consequence of coastal ravinement and downslope resedimentation, perhaps in conjunction with climatic increases in fluvial sediment delivery. Grain sizes and accumulation rates then decreased after 12-10 ka when the shelf flooded and backfilled under rising sea level. The Santa Barbara coastal cell contains the largest mass of postglacial sediment at 32-42 ?? 109 metric tons, most of which occurs between offshore Santa Barbara and Hueneme Canyon. The San Pedro cell contains the second largest quantity of sediment, 8-11 ?? 109 metric tons, much of which is present on the eastern Palos Verdes and outer San Pedro shelves. By comparison, the mass of sediment sequestered within the Santa Monica cell is smaller at ??6-8 ?? 109 metric tons. The postglacial sediment mass distribution among coastal cells reflects the size of local fluvial sediment sources, whereas intracell accumulation patterns reflect antecedent bathymetric features conducive for sediment bypass or trapping. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  8. Robert White, Bill Dana, Neil Armstrong and Joe Engle were on hand when astronaut wings were presented to the three NASA pilots who flew the X-15 into space.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-23

    Four of the five surviving X-15 pilots were on hand when astronaut wings were presented to the three NASA pilots who flew the X-15 rocket plane into space in the 1960s, Bill Dana, Joe Walker (deceased) and Jack McKay (deceased). From left, Robert White, Dana, Neil Armstrong, Joe Engle.

  9. Recent faulting in the Gulf of Santa Catalina: San Diego to Dana Point

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, H.F.; Legg, M.R.; Conrad, J.E.; Sliter, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    We interpret seismic-reflection profiles to determine the location and offset mode of Quaternary offshore faults beneath the Gulf of Santa Catalina in the inner California Continental Borderland. These faults are primarily northwest-trending, right-lateral, strike-slip faults, and are in the offshore Rose Canyon-Newport-Inglewood, Coronado Bank, Palos Verdes, and San Diego Trough fault zones. In addition we describe a suite of faults imaged at the base of the continental slope between Dana Point and Del Mar, California. Our new interpretations are based on high-resolution, multichannel seismic (MCS), as well as very high resolution Huntec and GeoPulse seismic-reflection profiles collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1998 to 2000 and MCS data collected by WesternGeco in 1975 and 1981, which have recently been made publicly available. Between La Jolla and Newport Beach, California, the Rose Canyon and Newport-Inglewood fault zones are multistranded and generally underlie the shelf break. The Rose Canyon fault zone has a more northerly strike; a left bend in the fault zone is required to connect with the Newport-Inglewood fault zone. A prominent active anticline at mid-slope depths (300-400 m) is imaged seaward of where the Rose Canyon fault zone merges with the Newport-Inglewood fault zone. The Coronado Bank fault zone is a steeply dipping, northwest-trending zone consisting of multiple strands that are imaged from south of the U.S.-Mexico border to offshore of San Mateo Point. South of the La Jolla fan valley, the Coronado Bank fault zone is primarily transtensional; this section of the fault zone ends at the La Jolla fan valley in a series of horsetail splays. The northern section of the Coronado Bank fault zone is less well developed. North of the La Jolla fan valley, the Coronado Bank fault zone forms a positive flower structure that can be mapped at least as far north as Oceanside, a distance of ??35 km. However, north of Oceanside, the Coronado Bank

  10. A preliminary assessment of metal bioaccumulation in the blue crab, Callinectes danae S., from the Sao Vicente Channel, Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bordon, Isabella C A C; Sarkis, Jorge E S; Tomás, Acácio R G; Souza, Marcelo R; Scalco, Allan; Lima, Mariana; Hortellani, Marcos A

    2012-04-01

    The concentrations of metals in tissues of Callinectes danae were evaluated, aiming to determine the bioaccumulation process of this species. Gills presented the highest mean concentrations for most metals, except for Hg (danae of this estuary.

  11. Observations of wild hunting behaviour and bioluminescence of a large deep-sea, eight-armed squid, Taningia danae.

    PubMed

    Kubodera, Tsunemi; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Mori, Kyoichi

    2007-04-22

    Our newly developed underwater high definition video camera system took the first live images of adults of the mesopelagic large squid, Taningia danae, between 240 and 940 m deep off Ogasawara Islands, western North Pacific. The resulting footage includes attacking and bioluminescence behaviours, and reveals that T. danae is far from the sluggish neutrally buoyant deep-sea squid previously suspected. It can actively swim both forward and backward freely by flapping its large muscular triangular fins and changes direction quickly through bending its flexible body. It can attain speeds of 2-2.5 ms(-1) (7.2-9 km h(-1)) when attacking bait rigs. They emitted short bright light flashes from their large arm-tip photophores before final assault, which might act as a blinding flash for prey as well as a means of measuring target distance in a dark deep-sea environment. They also emitted long and short glows separated by intervals while wandering around the double torch lights attached to the bait rig, suggestive of potential courtship behaviours during mating.

  12. Isolation and biological characterization of neurotoxic compounds from the sea anemone Lebrunia danae (Duchassaing and Michelotti, 1860).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, J; Cruz-Vazquez, Karina

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes two neurotoxic proteins obtained from the Caribbean sea anemone Lebrunia danae. To assess the neurotoxic activity of the venom of L. danae, several bioassays were carried out, and to evaluate the effect of the toxin, Median Lethal Doses (LD(50)) were determined in vivo using sea crabs (Ocypode quadrata) and Artemia salina nauplii with the crude extract of the proportion of 2.82 mg/m. The proteins with neurotoxic effects were isolated using low-pressure liquid chromatography. The fractions containing the neurotoxic activity were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and showed protein bands with an apparent molecular weight of 62.50 kDa (LdNt1) and 58 kDa (LdNt2). To demonstrate that these proteins were indeed responsible for the neurotoxic activity observed, we injected a small fraction of the purified protein into the third walking leg of a crab and observed the typical convulsions, paralysis and death provoked by neurotoxins. Hemolytic activity was also tested for 0.238 mg of crude extract; the hemolytic value was 39.5, 49.6 and 50.1% for cow, sheep and pig erythrocytes, respectively.

  13. Statement of Facts for 1987 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. Dana Barr, Plaintiff v. Kit Zuff, as Administrator of the Lorton Medium Security Facility, Defendant. MT-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its 16th annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides the material for a mock civil trial in which Dana Barr, a former corrections officer, brings suit against the Lorton Medium Security Facility for firing him on the basis of his status as Human…

  14. DFCI Gene Index Project: Interactive Data Maps for Plant, Animal, Protist, and Fungi Organisims from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

    DOE Data Explorer

    Funding for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) Gene Index Project ended and the database was taken down in July of 2014. However, this record links you to the "tombstone" page where you will find FTP addresses for the software tools and the data created.

  15. Purification and characterization of two endo-1,4-beta-xylanases from Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba Dana.

    PubMed

    Turkiewicz, M; Kalinowska, H; Zielinśka, M; Bielecki, S

    2000-11-01

    Two Euphausia superba Dana endo-1.4-beta-xylanases (A, and B), hydrolysing xylan in the same manner as the enzyme classified as EC 3.2.1.8, were isolated and purified. (2) The enzymes were distinguished by their molecular mass and charge, affinities towards the oat xylan (Km of 4.1 and 7.7 mg ml(-1), respectively), values of activation energy in oat xylan hydrolysis (35.5 and 42.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively), as well as the way in which they split the substrate. (3) In vitro they showed the same optimal temperature (37-40 degrees C), optimal pH (5.7-6.0), very low thermostability, and were stabilized and activated by Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions, as well as by some unidentified substances with molecular mass less than 17 kDa, present in crude extracts of krill.

  16. A new species of the palaemonid shrimp genus Palaemonella Dana, 1852 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea) from Okinawa Island, Ryukyu Islands, Japan.

    PubMed

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Yusuke

    2015-06-03

    The palaemonid shrimp genus Palaemonella Dana, 1852 is currently represented by 21 formally described species worldwide, of which 17 species are known from the Indo-West Pacific. In this study, a new species, P. okunoi, is described and illustrated on the basis of two ovigerous female specimens collected from coastal waters in Okinawa Island, Ryukyu Islands, Japan, at depths of 5-30 m. The new species closely resembles P. hachijo Okuno, 1999, but the shorter rostrum, more anteriorly located postrostral teeth on the carapace, the presence of a pair of submedian teeth on the fourth thoracic sternite and the less slender pereopods distinguish P. okunoi n. sp. from P. hachijo. The discovery of the present new species raises the number of Japanese species of Palaemonella to eight. An updated key to the Indo-West Pacific species of the genus is presented.

  17. Assessment of metal concentrations in muscles of the blue crab, Callinectes danae S., from the Santos Estuarine System.

    PubMed

    Bordon, Isabella C A C; Sarkis, Jorge E S; Tomás, Acácio R G; Scalco, Allan; Lima, Mariana; Hortellani, Marcos A; Andrade, Nathalia P

    2012-09-01

    This study determined the concentrations of eleven metals in the blue crab, Callinectes danae, from nine sites in the Santos Estuarine System of Sao Paulo State, Brazil. The results were compared to guidelines established in the United States, Europe and Brazil for the safety of human consumers. Muscles of blue crabs were removed by dissection and concentrations of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn Ni, Pb and Zn were determined. In general, the concentrations of metals were low, and the crabs were regarded as safe for human consumption. Crabs from a single site (site 4) exceeded the guidelines established by the United States and Europe, but not Brazil, for Pb, with a mean tissue concentration of 1.725 μg g(-1). With the exception of Al, Fe and Ni, significant differences were noted between sites in the concentrations of each metal in crab tissue.

  18. A new species of the hermit crab genus Paguristes Dana, 1851 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Diogenidae) from southwestern India.

    PubMed

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Reshmi, Rema; Kumar, Appukuttannair Biju

    2015-03-26

    A new species of the hermit crab genus Paguristes Dana, 1851 (Diogenidae), P. luculentus, is described and illustrated on the basis of three male specimens collected from off the Kerala State, southwestern India. It belongs to the species group characterized by the posterior lobes of the telson unarmed on the terminal margins, but the characteristic armature of the chelae and carpi of the chelipeds, consisting of a covering of numerous small corneous-tipped spines, and the presence of numerous small corneous-tipped or corneous spines on the mesial faces of the dactyli of the second pereopods immediately distinguish the new species from other congeneric species. The new species represents the ninth of the genus known from Indian waters.

  19. No evidence for induction or selection of mutant sodium channel expression in the copepod Acartia husdsonica challenged with the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense

    PubMed Central

    Finiguerra, Michael; Avery, David E; Dam, Hans G

    2014-01-01

    Some species in the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium spp. produce a suite of neurotoxins that block sodium channels, known as paralytic shellfish toxins (PST), which have deleterious effects on grazers. Populations of the ubiquitous copepod grazer Acartia hudsonica that have co-occurred with toxic Alexandrium spp. are better adapted than naïve populations. The mechanism of adaptation is currently unknown. We hypothesized that a mutation in the sodium channel could account for the grazer adaptation. We tested two hypotheses: (1) Expression of the mutant sodium channel could be induced by exposure to toxic Alexandrium fundyense; (2) in the absence of induction, selection exerted by toxic A. fundyense would favor copepods that predominantly express the mutant isoform. In the copepod A. hudsonica, both isoforms are expressed in all individuals in varying proportions. Thus, in addition to comparing expression ratios of wild-type to mutant isoforms for individual copepods, we also partitioned copepods into three groups: those that predominantly express the mutant (PMI) isoform, the wild-type (PWI) isoform, or both isoforms approximately equally (EI). There were no differences in isoform expression between individuals that were fed toxic and nontoxic food after three and 6 days; induction of mutant isoform expression did not occur. Furthermore, the hypothesis that mutant isoform expression responds to toxic food was also rejected. That is, no consistent evidence showed that the wild-type to mutant isoform ratios decreased, or that the relative proportion of PMI individuals increased, due to the consumption of toxic food over four generations. However, in the selected line that was continuously exposed to toxic food sources, egg production rate increased, which suggested that adaptation occurred but was unrelated to sodium channel isoform expression. PMID:25535562

  20. Determining the Advantages, Costs, and Trade-Offs of a Novel Sodium Channel Mutation in the Copepod Acartia hudsonica to Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST)

    PubMed Central

    Finiguerra, Michael; Avery, David E.; Dam, Hans G.

    2015-01-01

    The marine copepod Acartia hudsonica was shown to be adapted to dinoflagellate prey, Alexandrium fundyense, which produce paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). Adaptation to PSTs in other organisms is caused by a mutation in the sodium channel. Recently, a mutation in the sodium channel in A. hudsonica was found. In this study, we rigorously tested for advantages, costs, and trade-offs associated with the mutant isoform of A. hudsonica under toxic and non-toxic conditions. We combined fitness with wild-type: mutant isoform ratio measurements on the same individual copepod to test our hypotheses. All A. hudsonica copepods express both the wild-type and mutant sodium channel isoforms, but in different proportions; some individuals express predominantly mutant (PMI) or wild-type isoforms (PWI), while most individuals express relatively equal amounts of each (EI). There was no consistent pattern of improved performance as a function of toxin dose for egg production rate (EPR), ingestion rate (I), and gross growth efficiency (GGE) for individuals in the PMI group relative to individuals in the PWI expression group. Neither was there any evidence to indicate a fitness benefit to the mutant isoform at intermediate toxin doses. No clear advantage under toxic conditions was associated with the mutation. Using a mixed-diet approach, there was also no observed relationship between individual wild-type: mutant isoform ratios and among expression groups, on both toxic and non-toxic diets, for eggs produced over three days. Lastly, expression of the mutant isoform did not mitigate the negative effects of the toxin. That is, the reductions in EPR from a toxic to non-toxic diet for copepods were independent of expression groups. Overall, the results did not support our hypotheses; the mutant sodium channel isoform does not appear to be related to adaptation to PST in A. hudsonica. Other potential mechanisms responsible for the adaptation are discussed. PMID:26075900

  1. Determining the Advantages, Costs, and Trade-Offs of a Novel Sodium Channel Mutation in the Copepod Acartia hudsonica to Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST).

    PubMed

    Finiguerra, Michael; Avery, David E; Dam, Hans G

    2015-01-01

    The marine copepod Acartia hudsonica was shown to be adapted to dinoflagellate prey, Alexandrium fundyense, which produce paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). Adaptation to PSTs in other organisms is caused by a mutation in the sodium channel. Recently, a mutation in the sodium channel in A. hudsonica was found. In this study, we rigorously tested for advantages, costs, and trade-offs associated with the mutant isoform of A. hudsonica under toxic and non-toxic conditions. We combined fitness with wild-type: mutant isoform ratio measurements on the same individual copepod to test our hypotheses. All A. hudsonica copepods express both the wild-type and mutant sodium channel isoforms, but in different proportions; some individuals express predominantly mutant (PMI) or wild-type isoforms (PWI), while most individuals express relatively equal amounts of each (EI). There was no consistent pattern of improved performance as a function of toxin dose for egg production rate (EPR), ingestion rate (I), and gross growth efficiency (GGE) for individuals in the PMI group relative to individuals in the PWI expression group. Neither was there any evidence to indicate a fitness benefit to the mutant isoform at intermediate toxin doses. No clear advantage under toxic conditions was associated with the mutation. Using a mixed-diet approach, there was also no observed relationship between individual wild-type: mutant isoform ratios and among expression groups, on both toxic and non-toxic diets, for eggs produced over three days. Lastly, expression of the mutant isoform did not mitigate the negative effects of the toxin. That is, the reductions in EPR from a toxic to non-toxic diet for copepods were independent of expression groups. Overall, the results did not support our hypotheses; the mutant sodium channel isoform does not appear to be related to adaptation to PST in A. hudsonica. Other potential mechanisms responsible for the adaptation are discussed.

  2. Feeding of Acartia clausi and Pseudodiaptomus hessei (Copepoda: Calanoida) on natural particles in a tropical lagoon (Ebrié, Côte d'Ivoire)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, M.; Kouassi, E.; Saint-Jean, L.; Arfi, R.; Bouvy, M.

    2003-03-01

    Grazing of the copepods Acartia clausi and Pseudodiaptomus hessei on natural particles was studied from on board experiments during several 24 h time series performed between 1993 and 1997 in four sites of the Ebrié Lagoon (Côte d'Ivoire). Ingestion rates of both species increased linearly with food concentration until a concentration threshold (5.5×10 9 μm 3 l -1 for A. clausi and 5.2×10 9 mm 3 l -1 for P. hessei) beyond which the relation presented a plateau. Both species poorly selected the peak of available particles (range 3-6 mm equivalent spherical diameter, ESD) but A. clausi seek preferentially smaller particles (6-21 μm ESD) than P. hessei (9-33 μm ESD). When the proportion of the preferred particles in the food offered decreased, A. clausi extended its selectivity towards both smaller and larger particles whereas P. hessei extended its selectivity towards larger particles only. As a consequence of these patterns, the useful particle concentration (UPC) was higher for A. clausi than for P. hessei. In addition, the ratio of the UPC for the two species showed a positive relationship with the ratio of their respective biomass. The significance of these results for the adaptation capacities of the two species and for the ecosystem functioning are discussed. A. clausi which is more suited than P. hessei to exploit smaller particles (3-6 μm) which dominate the seston, has a food competitive advantage. The inadequacy between the seston food-size composition and the selective patterns of the two main zooplankton species of the Ebrié Lagoon explains that they could be food limited despite the high trophic level of the lagoon. It could also partly explain the low transfer efficiency between phytoplankton and zooplankton in this ecosystem.

  3. Vertical Migrations and Feeding Rhythms of Acartia clausi and Pseudodiaptomus hessei (Copepoda: Calanoida) in a Tropical Lagoon (Ebrié, Côte d'Ivoire)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouassi, E.; Pagano, M.; Saint-Jean, L.; Arfi, R.; Bouvy, M.

    2001-06-01

    Diel changes in vertical distribution and gut pigment contents of Acartia clausi and Pseudodiaptomus hessei were studied during several 24-h time series performed between 1993 and 1997 in four sites of the Ebrié Lagoon (Côte d'Ivoire). The sites differed by their morphology and their hydrological structure and by the vertical distribution of chlorophyll biomass. Both species showed classical diel vertical migrations (DVM). Copepodites and adult stages of P. hessei were almost benthic during the day and evenly distributed through the water column at night. The amplitude of DVM of A. clausi increased from copepodites I-III to adults. Copepodites and adults of A. clausi increased significantly their gut fluorescence at night, whereas those of P. hessei showed no clear diel feeding rhythm (DFR). These results suggest that A. clausi feed mostly at night on phytoplanktonic particles and P. hessei feed mostly on benthic algal particles during the day and on sestonic particles at night. No relationship was observed between DFR and DVM because both patterns occurred when food was either vertically homogeneous or vertically stratified. The daily average gut fluorescence of A. clausi increased with ambient chlorophyll concentration until around 12-15 μg l -1, whereas no relationship was found for P. hessei. The implication of these patterns on the adaptation capacities and the behaviour of the two species are discussed. The DVM of P. hessei should explain its rarity in the estuarine area. The comparison of our results with previous ones suggests an evolution of A. clausi DFR between 1981-1982 and 1996-1997, in relation to an intensification of eutrophication.

  4. First report of the presence of Acartia bispinosa Carl, 1907 (Copepoda, Calanoida) in a semi-enclosed Bay (Sharm El-Maya), northern Red Sea with some notes on its seasonal variation in abundance and body size

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M.; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The calanoid copepod, Acartia bispinosa Carl, 1907, is reported for the first time in the Red Sea, where it is found to be an important copepod in the mesozooplankton community structure of the Sharm El-Maya Bay. Female and male are fully redescribed and illustrated of as the mouthparts of this species have never previously been described and figured. Acartia bispinosa was collected in the plankton samples throughout the year and showed two peaks of abundance, a pronounced one in April (4234 individuals m-3), and second smaller peak during November (1784 individuals m-3). The average total length of females varied between 1.32 and 1.53 mm at the end of June and January respectively. For males, the average total length fluctuated between 1.07 and 1.16 mm at end of June and March respectively. Temperature showed an inverse relationship with the body length (P > 0.001) and seemed to be one of the prime factors affecting the body length of both sexes. PMID:25349502

  5. Taxonomic revision of New Guinea diving beetles of the Exocelina danae group, with the description of ten new species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae).

    PubMed

    Shaverdo, Helena; Sagata, Katayo; Balke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ten new species of Exocelina Broun, 1886 from New Guinea are described: Exocelina andakombensissp. n., Exocelina garainasp. n., Exocelina injiensissp. n., Exocelina kabwumensissp. n., Exocelina marawagasp. n., Exocelina posmanisp. n., Exocelina tekadusp. n., Exocelina variratasp. n., Exocelina wareagasp. n., and Exocelina woitapensissp. n. All of them together with five already described species are united into the newly defined Exocelina danae-group (with Exocelina miriae-subgroup), a polyphyletic complex of related species with lateral setation on the median lobe. In the light of newly available material, all previously described species of the Exocelina rivulus-group are considered to belong to a single species, Exocelina damantiensis (Balke, 1998), which is now placed into the Exocelina danae-group, and three new synonyms are therefore proposed: Exocelina madangensis (Balke, 2001) syn. n., Exocelina patepensis (Balke, 1998) syn. n., and Exocelina rivulus (Balke, 1998) syn. n. Exocelina tarmluensis (Balke, 1998) syn. n. is a junior synonym of Exocelina danae (Balke, 1998). Redescription of Exocelina atratus (Balfour-Browne, 1939) is provided based on its type material. An identification key to all known species of the group is provided, and important diagnostic characters are illustrated. Data on the species distribution are given, showing that whilst most species are local endemics, Exocelina damantiensis is extremely widely distributed.

  6. Taxonomic revision of New Guinea diving beetles of the Exocelina danae group, with the description of ten new species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae)

    PubMed Central

    Shaverdo, Helena; Sagata, Katayo; Balke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ten new species of Exocelina Broun, 1886 from New Guinea are described: Exocelina andakombensis sp. n., Exocelina garaina sp. n., Exocelina injiensis sp. n., Exocelina kabwumensis sp. n., Exocelina marawaga sp. n., Exocelina posmani sp. n., Exocelina tekadu sp. n., Exocelina varirata sp. n., Exocelina wareaga sp. n., and Exocelina woitapensis sp. n. All of them together with five already described species are united into the newly defined Exocelina danae-group (with Exocelina miriae-subgroup), a polyphyletic complex of related species with lateral setation on the median lobe. In the light of newly available material, all previously described species of the Exocelina rivulus-group are considered to belong to a single species, Exocelina damantiensis (Balke, 1998), which is now placed into the Exocelina danae-group, and three new synonyms are therefore proposed: Exocelina madangensis (Balke, 2001) syn. n., Exocelina patepensis (Balke, 1998) syn. n., and Exocelina rivulus (Balke, 1998) syn. n. Exocelina tarmluensis (Balke, 1998) syn. n. is a junior synonym of Exocelina danae (Balke, 1998). Redescription of Exocelina atratus (Balfour-Browne, 1939) is provided based on its type material. An identification key to all known species of the group is provided, and important diagnostic characters are illustrated. Data on the species distribution are given, showing that whilst most species are local endemics, Exocelina damantiensis is extremely widely distributed. PMID:27829789

  7. Responses of free radical metabolism to air exposure or salinity stress, in crabs (Callinectes danae and C. ornatus) with different estuarine distributions.

    PubMed

    Freire, Carolina A; Togni, Valéria G; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2011-10-01

    The swimming crabs Callinectes danae and C. ornatus are found in bays and estuaries, but C. danae is more abundant in lower salinities, while C. ornatus remains restricted to areas of higher salinity. Experimental crabs of both species were submitted to: air exposure (Ae, 3h), reimmersion in 33‰ (control) sea water (SW) (Ri, 1h) following air exposure; hyposaline (Ho, 10‰ for 2h) or hypersaline (He, 40‰ for 2h) SW, then return to control 33‰ SW (RHo and RHe, for 1h). Hemolymph was sampled for osmolality and chloride determinations. Activity of antioxidant enzymes [glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase, glutathione-S-transferase] and levels of carbonyl proteins and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) were evaluated in hepatopancreas, muscle, anterior and posterior gills. In Ho groups, hemolymph concentrations were lower in both species, compared to He groups. C. danae displayed higher control activities of GPX (hepatopancreas and muscle) and catalase (all four tissues) than C. ornatus. C. ornatus presented increased activities of catalase and GPX in Ae, Ri, and He groups. Increased TBARS was seen in C. ornatus tissues (He group). The more euryhaline species displayed higher constitutive activities of antioxidant enzymes, and the less euryhaline species exhibited activation of these enzymes when exposed to air or hyper-salinity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiological and behavioral effects of chemoreceptors located in different body parts of the swimming crab Callinectes danae.

    PubMed

    Aggio, Juan F; de Freitas, José C

    2007-04-01

    By perfusing their branchial chambers with filtered seawater, we have developed a preparation that allows us to maintain the swimming crab Callinectes danae outside water without any major effects on its cardiac activity. This in turn allowed us to selectively stimulate chemoreceptors located in different body parts, and specifically to discriminate between the receptors located in the branchial chambers and those located in the oral region (mainly in the mouthparts, antennules and antennae). We show that a taurine solution can evoke bradycardia when applied to the oral region or to a combination of the oral region and the branchial chambers. Although the precise localization of the oral region receptors involved remains to be determined, ablation experiments show that the olfactory organs (i.e., the antennules) are not involved. Finally, we show that although stimulating the pereiopods has no effect on the animals' cardiac activity it causes the animals to move, putatively to try to grasp a piece of food, a reaction not evoked by stimulating the gills or the oral regions. Our results lend support to the idea that chemoreceptors located in different parts of the body play different functional roles in decapod crustaceans.

  9. Growth of the peritrich epibiont Zoothamnium intermedium Precht, 1935 (Ciliophora, Peritrichia) estimated from laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Utz, L R P

    2008-05-01

    Peritrich ciliates are commonly found colonizing living substrates. Although this a well known phenomenon, biological aspects of this relationship need to be studied in more detail. Assessment of growth rates in peritrichs has been the subject of very few studies. Only species in the genera Carchesium Ehrenberg, 1830 and Vorticella Linnaeus, 1767 had their growth rates evaluated in the field and in the laboratory. In the present study, growth, colonization (colonies/host), and proliferation (zooids/colony) rates of the peritrich epibiont Zoothamnium intermedium Precht, 1935 attached to the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa Dana 1848 were evaluated in the laboratory in two food regimes: bacteria only, and algal based diet. Results showed that growth, colonization, and proliferation rates were similar for both diets. Maximum growth rates obtained for Z. intermedium was 0.85 and 0.83 per day, for bacteria and algae respectively. Maximum colonization rates were 0.5 per day for both diets, and the maximum proliferation rates were 0.44 and 0.42 per day for bacteria and algae respectively. These results demonstrate that Z. intermedium is able to grow at the same rate of other peritrichs on bacterial and algal based diets.

  10. Circumpolar connections between Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba Dana) populations: Investigating the roles of ocean and sea ice transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, S. E.; Murphy, E. J.; Watkins, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba Dana, has a heterogeneous circumpolar distribution in the Southern Ocean. Krill have a close association with sea ice which provides access to a critical food source and shelter, particularly in the early life stages. Advective modelling of transport pathways of krill have until now been on regional scales and have not taken explicit account of sea ice. Here we present Lagrangian modelling studies at the circumpolar scale that include interaction with sea ice. The advection scheme uses ocean velocity output from the Ocean Circulation and Climate Advanced Modelling (OCCAM) project model together with satellite-derived sea ice motion vectors to examine the potential roles of the ocean and sea ice in maintaining the observed circumpolar krill distribution. We show that the Antarctic Coastal Current is likely to be important in generating the large-scale distribution and that sea ice motion can substantially modify the ocean transport pathways, enhancing retention or dispersal depending upon location. Within the major krill region of the Scotia Sea, the effect of temporal variability in both the ocean and sea ice velocity fields is examined. Variability in sea ice motion increases variability of influx to South Georgia, at times concentrating the influx into pulses of arrival. This variability has implications for the ecosystem around the island. The inclusion of sea ice motion leads to the identification of source regions for the South Georgia krill populations additional to those identified when only ocean motion is considered. This study indicates that the circumpolar oceanic circulation and interaction with sea ice is important in determining the large-scale distribution of krill and its associated variability.

  11. Intracellular crystal-bearing vesicles in the epidermis of scleractinian corals, Astrangia danae (Agassiz) and Porites porites (Pallas).

    PubMed

    Hayes, R L; Goreau, N I

    1977-02-01

    Orthorhombic aragonitic crystals, embedded with a granular lipo-protein matrix and surrounded by a trilaminar membrane, are localized in the apical cytoplasm of epidermal cells of Scleractinian corals. Adult specimens of Astrangia danae (Agassiz) and settled planulae of Porites porites (Pallas) contain crystals averaging 0.7 mu by 0.1 mu by 0.3 mu within Golgi-derived vesicles. Short-term labelling with 45Ca reveals distribution of radioactivity amont a basic tissue fraction (92%) an acid tissue fraction (5%) and a skeletal fraction (3%). Identification of the primordial crystal population within membrane-bound visicles provides overwhelming evidence for the intracellular mode of calcification in Scleractinia. Moreover, it permits development of a novel concept of cellular regulation over these dynamic events. The membrane-bound vesicel is a miniature crystal fabrication station and a vehicle responsible for transportation of seed crystals and an organic matrix material to sites of discharge from the cell. The vesicle membrane becomes a probable locus of active transport and enzymatic activity as well as a physical barrier to be penetrated for release of vesicle contents into the extracellular milieu. Contact between the vesicle membrane and the plasmalemma would result in exocytosis and the onset of skeletogenesis. Principles governing crystal growth would prevail from then on. The released crystal becomes a nucleation catalyst and the organic matrix, a supply of ionic calcium for self-limiting crystallization. Crystals are produced by the organism spontaneously and continuously from shortly after larval attachment throughout the life of the polyp. Therefore, these membrane-bound vesicles signal the dynamic process by which initiation, differentiation, growth and limitation of the coral skeleton is regulated.

  12. Intermittent exposure to reduced oxygen levels affects prey size selection and consumption in swimming crab Thalamita danae Stimpson.

    PubMed

    Shin, P K S; Cheung, P H; Yang, F Y; Cheung, S G

    2005-01-01

    Portunid crabs Thalamita danae (carapace width: 46-56 mm) were exposed to low oxygen level (4.0 mg O2 l(-1)) and hypoxia (1.5 mg O2 l(-1)) for 6 h each day with three size classes (large: 15.0-19.9 mm, medium: 10.0-14.9 mm, small: 5.0-9.9 mm) of mussels Brachidontes variabilis offered as food. Consumption rate, prey size preference, and prey handling including breaking time, handling time, eating time and prey value, were studied during the time the crabs were exposed to reduced oxygen levels and results were compared with the crabs maintained at high oxygen level (8.0 mg O2 l(-1)) throughout the experiment. Consumption of mussels from all size classes was significantly higher at high oxygen level than at reduced oxygen levels. No mussel size preference was observed for crabs exposed to 4.0 or 8.0 mg O2 l(-1) but those crabs exposed to 1.5 mg O2 l(-1) preferred medium mussels. Both breaking time and handling time increased with mussel size but did not vary with oxygen level. Prey value of each mussel consumed (mg dry wt eaten crab(-1) s(-1)) was calculated by dividing the estimated dry weight of the mussel by the observed handling time. Mean prey value varied significantly with mussel size, with values obtained for large mussels being higher than small mussels at 4.0 and 8.0 mg O2 l(-1); the effect of oxygen level, however, was insignificant. In view of portunid crabs as major predators of mussels, results may help explain dominance of mussels in eutrophic harbours in Hong Kong.

  13. Gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase from the blue crab Callinectes danae: modulation of K+-phosphatase activity by potassium and ammonium ions.

    PubMed

    Masui, D C; Furriel, R P M; Mantelatto, F L M; McNamara, J C; Leone, F A

    2003-04-01

    The kinetic properties of a microsomal gill (Na(+),K(+))-ATPase from the blue crab Callinectes danae were analyzed using the substrate p-nitrophenylphosphate. The (Na(+),K(+))-ATPase hydrolyzed PNPP obeying cooperative kinetics (n=1.5) at a rate of V=125.4+/-7.5 U mg(-1) with K(0.5)=1.2+/-0.1 mmol l(-1); stimulation by potassium (V=121.0+/-6.1 U mg(-1); K(0.5)=2.1+/-0.1 mmol l(-1)) and magnesium ions (V=125.3+/-6.3 U mg(-1); K(0.5)=1.0+/-0.1 mmol l(-1)) was cooperative. Ammonium ions also stimulated the enzyme through site-site interactions (n(H)=2.7) to a rate of V=126.1+/-4.8 U mg(-1) with K(0.5)=13.7+/-0.5 mmol l(-1). However, K(+)-phosphatase activity was not stimulated further by K(+) plus NH(4)(+) ions. Sodium ions (K(I)=36.7+/-1.7 mmol l(-1)), ouabain (K(I)=830.3+/-42.5 micromol l(-1)) and orthovanadate (K(I)=34.0+/-1.4 nmol l(-1)) completely inhibited K(+)-phosphatase activity. The competitive inhibition by ATP (K(I)=57.2+/-2.6 micromol l(-1)) of PNPPase activity suggests that both substrates are hydrolyzed at the same site on the enzyme. These data reveal that the K(+)-phosphatase activity corresponds strictly to a (Na(+),K(+))-ATPase in C. danae gill tissue. This is the first known kinetic characterization of K(+)-phosphatase activity in the portunid crab C. danae and should provide a useful tool for comparative studies.

  14. The NEU1-selective sialidase inhibitor, C9-butyl-amide-DANA, blocks sialidase activity and NEU1-mediated bioactivities in human lung in vitro and murine lung in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sang W; Liu, Anguo; Liu, Zhenguo; Cross, Alan S; Verceles, Avelino C; Magesh, Sadagopan; Kommagalla, Yadagiri; Kona, Chandrababunaidu; Ando, Hiromune; Luzina, Irina G; Atamas, Sergei P; Piepenbrink, Kurt H; Sundberg, Eric J; Guang, Wei; Ishida, Hideharu; Lillehoj, Erik P; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2016-08-01

    Neuraminidase-1 (NEU1) is the predominant sialidase expressed in human airway epithelia and lung microvascular endothelia where it mediates multiple biological processes. We tested whether the NEU1-selective sialidase inhibitor, C9-butyl-amide-2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (C9-BA-DANA), inhibits one or more established NEU1-mediated bioactivities in human lung cells. We established the IC50 values of C9-BA-DANA for total sialidase activity in human airway epithelia, lung microvascular endothelia and lung fibroblasts to be 3.74 µM, 13.0 µM and 4.82 µM, respectively. In human airway epithelia, C9-BA-DANA dose-dependently inhibited flagellin-induced, NEU1-mediated mucin-1 ectodomain desialylation, adhesiveness for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and shedding. In lung microvascular endothelia, C9-BA-DANA reversed NEU1-driven restraint of cell migration into a wound and disruption of capillary-like tube formation. NEU1 and its chaperone/transport protein, protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA), were differentially expressed in these same cells. Normalized NEU1 protein expression correlated with total sialidase activity whereas PPCA expression did not. In contrast to eukaryotic sialidases, C9-BA-DANA exerted far less inhibitory activity for three selected bacterial neuraminidases (IC50 > 800 µM). Structural modeling of the four human sialidases and three bacterial neuraminidases revealed a loop between the seventh and eighth strands of the β-propeller fold, that in NEU1, was substantially shorter than that seen in the six other enzymes. Predicted steric hindrance between this loop and C9-BA-DANA could explain its selectivity for NEU1. Finally, pretreatment of mice with C9-BA-DANA completely protected against flagellin-induced increases in lung sialidase activity. Our combined data indicate that C9-BA-DANA inhibits endogenous and ectopically expressed sialidase activity and established NEU1-mediated bioactivities in human airway epithelia, lung microvascular

  15. Reproductive features of the swimming crab Callinectes danae(Crustacea, Portunoidea) on the subtropical coast of Brazil: a sampling outside the estuary.

    PubMed

    Andrade, L S; Antunes, M; Lima, P A; Furlan, M; Frameschi, I F; Fransozo, A

    2015-08-01

    The life cycle of the crab Callinectes danae is estuarine-dependent, and studies on aspects of their biology should also cover marine areas. The present study investigated the sexual maturity, as well as habitat preference by adults in different gonadal stages, and the crabs' reproductive periodicity outside the estuary. Three bays on the subtropical southeastern coast of Brazil were sampled monthly for two years. For each bay, six transects were established, four of them parallel to the beach line (5, 10, 15 and 20 m depth), as well as one transect in an exposed area, and another sheltered from the action of waves. The results showed that the pattern of spatio-temporal distribution of adults C. danae was similar in three bays, although the highest abundance was found in Ubatumirim. Females with developed gonads/ovigerous females were found in greater abundance than females with rudimentary/developing gonads, mainly in deeper transects. Although the areas sampled have different environmental characteristics, the reproductive pattern of the species did not change, showing continuous reproduction throughout, with more abundance of reproductive females on spring and summer. Males reached maturity at larger sizes than females in all three bays.

  16. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-07

    The goal of the Fall Removal Experiment 1987 was to determine the processes affecting the dependent and fate of low salinity coastal water and of biological material therein during fall when winds are mainly south-to westward. Five zooplankton taxa, Acartia tonsa, (A. tonsa) Paracalanus species (sp), Temora turbinata (T. turbinata), Oncaea sp, and Sagitta enflata were examined. Data on the distribution of all five taxa were presented, and distribution over time was also studied. The abundance of A. tonsa decreased tenfold over the 13 day sampling period, Paracalanus varied twofold and T. Turbinata showed little variability. The A. tonsa decrease was postulated to result from food abundance or predation, although the possible role of size distribution, water displacement and chlorophyll distribution will be examined in the future. A possible role of turbulence in zooplankton abundance is being examined. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Ecotoxicological evaluation of the risk posed by bisphenol A, triclosan, and 4-nonylphenol in coastal waters using early life stages of marine organisms (Isochrysis galbana, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Paracentrotus lividus, and Acartia clausi).

    PubMed

    Tato, Tania; Salgueiro-González, Noelia; León, Víctor M; González, Sergio; Beiras, Ricardo

    2017-09-23

    This study assessed the environmental risk on coastal ecosystems posed by three phenolic compounds of special environmental and human health concern used in plastics and household products: bisphenol A (BPA), triclosan (TCS) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP). These three chemicals are among the organic contaminants most frequently detected in wastewater. The most toxic compound tested was 4-NP, with 10% effective concentration at 11.1 μg L(-1) for Isochrysis galbana, 110.5 μg L(-1) for Mytilus galloprovincialis, 53.8 μg L(-1) for Paracentrotus lividus, and 29.0 μg L(-1) for Acartia clausi, followed by TCS (14.6 μg L(-1) for I. galbana, 149.8 μg L(-1) for M. galloprovincialis, 129.9 μg L(-1) for P. lividus, and 64.8 μg L(-1) for A. clausi). For all species tested, BPA was the less toxic chemical, with toxicity thresholds ranging between 400 and 1200 μg L(-1) except for A. clausi nauplii (186 μg L(-1)). The relatively narrow range of variation in toxicity considering the broad physiological differences among the biological models used point at non-selective mechanisms of toxicity for these aromatic organics. Microalgae, the main primary producers in pelagic ecosystems, showed particularly high susceptibility to the chemicals tested. When the toxicity thresholds experimentally obtained were compared to the maximum environmental concentrations reported in coastal waters, the risk quotients obtained correspond to very low or low risk for BPA and TCS, and from low to high for 4-NP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. K+-Phosphatase activity of gill (Na+, K+)-ATPase from the blue crab, Callinectes danae: low-salinity acclimation and expression of the alpha-subunit.

    PubMed

    Masui, D C; Furriel, R P M; Mantelatto, F L M; McNamara, J C; Leone, F A

    2005-04-01

    The kinetic properties of a microsomal gill (Na(+), K(+)) ATPase from the blue crab, Callinectes danae, acclimated to 15 per thousand salinity for 10 days, were analyzed using the substrate p-nitrophenylphosphate. The (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase hydrolyzed the substrate obeying Michaelian kinetics at a rate of V=102.9+/-4.3 U.mg(-1) with K(0.5)=1.7+/-0.1 mmol.L(-1), while stimulation by magnesium (V=93.7+/-2.3 U.mg(-1); K(0.5)=1.40+/-0.03 mmol.L(-1)) and potassium ions (V=94.9+/-3.5 U.mg(-1); K(0.5)=2.9+/-0.1 mmol.L(-1)) was cooperative. K(+)-phosphatase activity was also stimulated by ammonium ions to a rate of V=106.2+/-2.2 U. mg(-1) with K(0.5)=9.8+/-0.2 mmol.L(-1), following cooperative kinetics (n(H)=2.9). However, K(+)-phosphatase activity was not stimulated further by K(+) plus NH(4) (+) ions. Sodium ions (K(I)=22.7+/-1.7 mmol.L(-1)), and orthovanadate (K(I)=28.1+/-1.4 nmol.L(-1)) completely inhibited PNPPase activity while ouabain inhibition reached almost 75% (K(I)=142.0+/-7.1 micromol.L(-1)). Western blotting analysis revealed increased expression of the (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase alpha-subunit in crabs acclimated to 15 per thousand salinity compared to those acclimated to 33 per thousand salinity. The increase in (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity in C. danae gill tissue in response to low-salinity acclimation apparently derives from the increased expression of the (Na(+), K( (+) ))-ATPase alpha-subunit; phosphate-hydrolyzing enzymes other than (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase are also expressed. These findings allow a better understanding of the kinetic behavior of the enzymes that underlie the osmoregulatory mechanisms of euryhaline crustaceans. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Survival of Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia under Treatment with the Protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 00-01

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Jaimes-Reyes, Ethel Zulie; Arellano-Galindo, José; García-Jiménez, Xochiketzalli; Tiznado-García, Héctor Manuel; Sánchez-Jara, Berenice; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Ortíz-Torres, María Guadalupe; Ortíz-Fernández, Antonio; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Our aim in this paper is to describe the results of treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Mexican children treated from 2006 to 2010 under the protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) 00-01. The children were younger than 16 years of age and had a diagnosis of ALL de novo. The patients were classified as standard risk if they were 1–9.9 years old and had a leucocyte count <50 × 109/L, precursor B cell immunophenotype, no mediastinal mass, CSF free of blasts, and a good response to prednisone. The rest of the patients were defined as high risk. Of a total of 302 children, 51.7% were at high risk. The global survival rate was 63.9%, and the event-free survival rate was 52.3% after an average follow-up of 3.9 years. The percentages of patients who died were 7% on induction and 14.2% in complete remission; death was associated mainly with infection (21.5%). The relapse rate was 26.2%. The main factor associated with the occurrence of an event was a leucocyte count >100 × 109/L. The poor outcomes were associated with toxic death during induction, complete remission, and relapse. These factors remain the main obstacles to the success of this treatment in our population. PMID:25922837

  20. Environmental benefits and concerns on safety: communicating latest results on nanotechnology safety research-the project DaNa(2.0).

    PubMed

    Kühnel, D; Marquardt, C; Nau, K; Krug, H F; Paul, F; Steinbach, C

    2017-04-01

    The use of nanotechnology and advanced materials promises to revolutionise many areas of technology and improve our daily life. In that respect, many positive effects on the environment are expected, either directly, by developing new technologies for remediation, filtering techniques or energy generation, or indirectly, by e.g. saving resources due to lower consumption of raw materials, or lower energy and fuel consumption due to reduced weight of vehicles. However, such beneficial effects of new technologies are often confronted by concerns regarding the safety of novel substances or materials. During the past 10 years, great effort has been put into research on potential hazards of nanomaterials towards environmental organisms. As the methodology for reliable assessment of nanomaterials was immature, many studies reporting contradictory results have been published, hindering both risk assessment for nanomaterials, as well as the knowledge communication to all involved stakeholders. Thus, DaNa(2.0) serves as a platform to implement trusted knowledge on nanomaterials for an objective discussion.

  1. Survival of Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia under Treatment with the Protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 00-01.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Jaimes-Reyes, Ethel Zulie; Arellano-Galindo, José; García-Jiménez, Xochiketzalli; Tiznado-García, Héctor Manuel; Dueñas-González, María Teresa; Martínez Villegas, Octavio; Sánchez-Jara, Berenice; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Ortíz-Torres, María Guadalupe; Ortíz-Fernández, Antonio; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Our aim in this paper is to describe the results of treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Mexican children treated from 2006 to 2010 under the protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) 00-01. The children were younger than 16 years of age and had a diagnosis of ALL de novo. The patients were classified as standard risk if they were 1-9.9 years old and had a leucocyte count <50 × 10(9)/L, precursor B cell immunophenotype, no mediastinal mass, CSF free of blasts, and a good response to prednisone. The rest of the patients were defined as high risk. Of a total of 302 children, 51.7% were at high risk. The global survival rate was 63.9%, and the event-free survival rate was 52.3% after an average follow-up of 3.9 years. The percentages of patients who died were 7% on induction and 14.2% in complete remission; death was associated mainly with infection (21.5%). The relapse rate was 26.2%. The main factor associated with the occurrence of an event was a leucocyte count >100 × 10(9)/L. The poor outcomes were associated with toxic death during induction, complete remission, and relapse. These factors remain the main obstacles to the success of this treatment in our population.

  2. First results on the genetic diversity of the invasive signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana, 1852) in Europe using novel microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Froufe, E; Varandas, S; Teixeira, A; Sousa, R; Filipová, L; Petrusek, A; Edsman, L; Lopes-Lima, M

    2015-08-01

    The introduction of non-native crayfish in aquatic ecosystems is very common due to human activities (e.g. aquaculture, recreational and commercial fisheries). The signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana, 1852), is one of the most widespread invasive species in Europe. Although several important ecological and economic impacts of this species have been reported, its European population genetic characterisation has never been undertaken using nuclear markers. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop and characterise new microsatellite markers for signal crayfish that can be useful in future studies in its invaded range, since only five are available so far. In total, 93 individuals from four geographically distinct European populations (Portugal, Great Britain, Finland and Sweden) were scored for the new markers and for those previously described, with the Bayesian analysis revealing a clear distinction among populations. These markers are suitable for future studies of the population genetic structure of this important invasive species, by increasing information about the possible pathways of introduction and dispersal, and by giving insights about the most important vectors of introduction.

  3. Re-examination of the eastern Pacific and Atlantic material of Alpheus malleator Dana, 1852, with the description of Alpheus wonkimi sp. nov. (Crustacea, Decapoda, Alpheidae).

    PubMed

    Anker, Arthur; Pachelle, Paulo P G

    2013-01-01

    The bumpy-clawed snapping shrimp, Alpheus malleator Dana, 1852 (Alpheidae), is revised based on the recently collected and older museum material from the eastern Pacific (Panama, Ecuador), Caribbean (Panama, Puerto Rico, Trinidad & Tobago), Brazil (São Paulo), and West Africa (Cape Verde, Senegal, Guinea, Equatorial Guinea, Congo). The eastern Pacific material is assigned to A. wonkimi sp. nov., based on one morphological difference in the colour and thickness of the uropodal spiniform seta, as well as previously published molecular data. The Caribbean, Brazilian and West African material is considered to represent a single, widespread, morphologically variable, amphi-Atlantic taxon, A. malleator. Alpheus pugilator A. Milne-Edwards, 1878 is retained as ajunior synonym of A. malleator, whereas A. tuberculosus Osorio, 1892, A. malleator var. edentatus Zimmer, 1913 and A. belli Coutière, 1898, the latter two based on juvenile specimens, are tentatively placed in the synonymy of A. malleator. Illustrations, including colour photographs, are provided for A. wonkimi sp. nov. and A. malleator and their morphological variability is discussed and illustrated.

  4. PCBs, PBDEs and organochlorine pesticides in crabs Hepatus pudibundus and Callinectes danae from Santos Bay, State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, C A; Taniguchi, S; Cascaes, M J; Montone, R C

    2012-03-01

    The occurrence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) in crabs Hepatus pudibundus and Callinectesdanae was assessed from two different places inside of the Santos Bay and Moela Island near one of the most economically important metropolitan areas in Southern Brazil. Among POPs analyzed, ∑PCBs (222-923 ng g(-1)lipid weight) and ∑DDTs (154-410 ng g(-1)lw) exhibited the highest concentrations in the crabs. ∑HCHs ranged from 10.3 to 30.9 ng g(-1)lw and were found in all individuals. Other OCPs found in lower concentration was Mirex (7.6-41.6 ng g(-1)lw) and HCB (5.83-16.9 ng g(-1)lw). ∑PBDEs (24.1 ng g(-1)lw) were only found in one male individual from the species C. danae collected near to the submarine sewage of Santos. Male crabs showed higher POP concentrations than female crabs for those two species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation by the exogenous polyamine spermidine of Na,K-ATPase activity from the gills of the euryhaline swimming crab Callinectes danae (Brachyura, Portunidae).

    PubMed

    Silva, E C C; Masui, D C; Furriel, R P M; Mantelatto, F L M; McNamara, J C; Barrabin, H; Leone, F A; Scofano, H M; Fontes, C F L

    2008-04-01

    Euryhaline crustaceans rarely hyporegulates and employ the driving force of the Na,K-ATPase, located at the basal surface of the gill epithelium, to maintain their hemolymph osmolality within a range compatible with cell function during hyper-regulation. Since polyamine levels increase during the adaptation of crustaceans to hyperosmotic media, we investigate the effect of exogenous polyamines on Na,K-ATPase activity in the posterior gills of Callinectes danae, a euryhaline swimming crab. Polyamine inhibition was dependent on cation concentration, charge and size in the following order: spermine>spermidine>putrescine. Spermidine affected K(0.5) values for Na(+) with minor alterations in K(0.5) values for K(+) and NH(4)(+), causing a decrease in maximal velocities under saturating Na(+), K(+) and NH(4)(+) concentrations. Phosphorylation measurements in the presence of 20 microM ATP revealed that the Na,K-ATPase possesses a high affinity site for this substrate. In the presence of 10 mM Na(+), both spermidine and spermine inhibited formation of the phosphoenzyme; however, in the presence of 100 mM Na(+), the addition of these polyamines allowed accumulation of the phosphoenzyme. The polyamines inhibited pumping activity, both by competing with Na(+) at the Na(+)-binding site, and by inhibiting enzyme dephosphorylation. These findings suggest that polyamine-induced inhibition of Na,K-ATPase activity may be physiologically relevant during migration to fully marine environments.

  6. Reproductive ecology of the blue crab, Callinectes danae Smith, 1869 in the Conceição Lagoon system, Santa Catarina Isle, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Branco, J O; Masunari, S

    2000-02-01

    Abundance of ovigerous females, size of the first gonadal maturation and the possible migration, route of the blue crab Callinectes danae from the Conceição Lagoon system, Santa Catarina Isle, Brazil, are described. This lagoon is connected with the coastal area through a canal. A total of 1,124 crabs was caught during a 19 month sampling period. The reproduction and recruitment of juveniles occurred all year-round, with two peaks of abundance (February and September), correlated with the presence of ovigerous females (June and January). The mean carapace width at which the crabs attained gonadal maturity for the first time was 9.4 cm in males and 8.4 cm in females. The Conceição Lagoon is a growth, reproduction, and spawning area for the species. However, egg eclosion occurs outside the lagoon following migration of ovigerous females to the open sea. After hatching the eggs, some females return to the lagoon, but males stay there for most of their life cycle.

  7. Identification of selective inhibitors for human neuraminidase isoenzymes using C4,C7-modified 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA) analogues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Albohy, Amgad; Zou, Yao; Smutova, Victoria; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V; Cairo, Christopher W

    2013-04-11

    In the past two decades, human neuraminidases (human sialidases, hNEUs) have been found to be involved in numerous pathways in biology. The development of selective and potent inhibitors of these enzymes will provide critical tools for glycobiology, help to avoid undesired side effects of antivirals, and may reveal new small-molecule therapeutic targets for human cancers. However, because of the high active site homology of the hNEU isoenzymes, little progress in the design and synthesis of selective inhibitors has been realized. Guided by our previous studies of human NEU3 inhibitors, we designed a series of C4,C7-modified analogues of 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA) and tested them against the full panel of hNEU isoenzymes (NEU1, NEU2, NEU3, NEU4). We identified inhibitors with up to 38-fold selectivity for NEU3 and 12-fold selectivity for NEU2 over all other isoenzymes. We also identified compounds that targeted NEU2 and NEU3 with similar potency.

  8. A new species of Monstrilla Dana, 1849 (Copepoda: Monstrilloida: Monstrillidae) from Korea, including a key to species from the north-west Pacific.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimin; Chang, Cheon Young

    2016-10-11

    A new species of monstrilloid copepod belonging to the genus Monstrilla Dana, 1849 is recorded from South Korea. Specimens were obtained between May of 2012 and January of 2014 from inshore waters along the coasts of the East Sea, South Sea, and Jeju Island, using a light trap installed at quays and wharves overnight. Monstrilla ilhoii sp. nov. is characterized by a remarkable combination of a large body size (females about 3.8 mm long, males about 2.8 mm long), a polygonal ridge pattern (cuticular reticulation) over the entire body surface, and an antennule armature featuring a supernumerary spiniform seta (4d3) in females and a dagger-shaped distal spine (62) in both sexes. In other respects M. ilhoii sp. nov. most closely resembles M. lata Desai & Bal, 1963; both species have one and three setae on the endopodal and exopodal lobes, respectively, of female leg 5, a horseshoe-shaped male genital apparatus with marked undulations along the whole distal margin, and six setae on each caudal ramus in both sexes. This paper provides a description of the new species, taxonomic remarks on its morphological features, and differential diagnoses with respect to its allies. Scanning electron microscopy was used to document significant morphological microcharacters. The species of Monstrilla known from five sub-regions of the north-west Pacific are enumerated with the source references, and keys to the females and males of these species are provided.

  9. Long-term results of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium protocols for children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (1985-2000).

    PubMed

    Silverman, L B; Stevenson, K E; O'Brien, J E; Asselin, B L; Barr, R D; Clavell, L; Cole, P D; Kelly, K M; Laverdiere, C; Michon, B; Schorin, M A; Schwartz, C L; O'Holleran, E W; Neuberg, D S; Cohen, H J; Sallan, S E

    2010-02-01

    The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Consortium has been conducting multi-institutional clinical trials in childhood ALL since 1981. The treatment backbone has included 20-30 consecutive weeks of asparaginase during intensification and frequent vincristine/corticosteroid pulses during the continuation phase. Between 1985 and 2000, 1457 children aged 0-18 years were treated on four consecutive protocols: 85-01 (1985-1987), 87-01 (1987-1991), 91-01 (1991-1955) and 95-01 (1996-2000). The 10-year event-free survival (EFS)+/-s.e. by protocol was 77.9+/-2.8% (85-01), 74.2+/-2.3% (87-01), 80.8+/-2.1% (91-01) and 80.5+/-1.8% (95-01). Approximately 82% of patients treated in the 1980s and 88% treated in the 1990s were long-term survivors. Both EFS and overall survival (OS) rates were significantly higher for patients treated in the 1990s compared with the 1980s (P=0.05 and 0.01, respectively). On the two protocols conducted in the 1990s, EFS was 79-85% for T-cell ALL patients and 75-78% for adolescents (age 10-18 years). Results of randomized studies revealed that dexrazoxane prevented acute cardiac injury without adversely affecting EFS or OS in high-risk (HR) patients, and frequently dosed intrathecal chemotherapy was an effective substitute for cranial radiation in standard-risk (SR) patients. Current studies continue to focus on improving efficacy while minimizing acute and late toxicities.

  10. Modulation by ammonium ions of gill microsomal (Na+,K+)-ATPase in the swimming crab Callinectes danae: a possible mechanism for regulation of ammonia excretion.

    PubMed

    Masui, D C; Furriel, R P M; McNamara, J C; Mantelatto, F L M; Leone, F A

    2002-08-01

    The modulation by Na(+), K(+), NH(4)(+) and ATP of the (Na(+),K(+))-ATPase in a microsomal fraction from Callinectes danae gills was analyzed. ATP was hydrolyzed at high-affinity binding sites at a maximal rate of V=35.4+/-2.1 Umg(-1) and K(0.5)=54.0+/-3.6 nM, obeying cooperative kinetics (n(H)=3.6). At low-affinity sites, the enzyme hydrolyzed ATP obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics with K(M)=55.0+/-3.0 microM and V=271.5+/-17.2 Umg(-1). This is the first demonstration of a crustacean (Na(+),K(+))-ATPase with two ATP hydrolyzing sites. Stimulation by sodium (K(0.5)=5.80+/-0.30 mM), magnesium (K(0.5)=0.48+/-0.02 mM) and potassium ions (K(0.5)=1.61+/-0.06 mM) exhibited site-site interactions, while that by ammonium ions obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K(M)=4.61+/-0.27 mM). Ouabain (K(I)=147.2+/-7.microM) and orthovanadate (K(I)=11.2+/-0.6 microM) completely inhibited ATPase activity, indicating the absence of contaminating ATPase and/or neutral phosphatase activities. Ammonium and potassium ions synergistically stimulated the enzyme, increasing specific activities up to 90%, suggesting that these ions bind to different sites on the molecule. The presence of each ion modulates enzyme stimulation by the other. The modulation of (Na(+),K(+))-ATPase activity by ammonium ions, and the excretion of NH(4)(+) in benthic crabs are discussed.

  11. Na+, K+-ATPase activity in gill microsomes from the blue crab, Callinectes danae, acclimated to low salinity: novel perspectives on ammonia excretion.

    PubMed

    Masui, Douglas C; Mantelatto, Fernando L M; McNamara, John C; Furriel, Rosa P M; Leone, Francisco A

    2009-06-01

    This investigation provides an extensive characterization of the modulation by ATP, Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+) and NH(4)(+) of a gill microsomal (Na(+),K(+))-ATPase from Callinectes danae acclimated to 15 per thousand salinity. Novel findings are the lack of high-affinity ATP-binding sites and a 10-fold increase in enzyme affinity for K(+) modulated by NH(4)(+), discussed regarding NH(4)(+) excretion in benthic marine crabs. The (Na(+),K(+))-ATPase hydrolyzed ATP at a maximum rate of 298.7+/-16.7 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1) and K(0.5)=174.2+/-9.8 mmol L(-1), obeying cooperative kinetics (n(H)=1.2). Stimulation by sodium (V=308.9+/-15.7 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1), K(0.5)=7.8+/-0.4 mmol L(-1)), magnesium (299.2+/-14.1 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1), K(0.5)=767.3+/-36.1 mmol L(-1)), potassium (300.6+/-15.3 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1), K(0.5)=1.6+/-0.08 mmol L(-1)) and ammonium (V=345.1+/-19.0 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1), K(0.5)=6.0+/-0.3 mmol L(-1)) ions showed site-site interactions. Ouabain inhibited (Na(+),K(+))-ATPase activity with K(I)=45.1+/-2.5 micromol L(-1), although affinity for the inhibitor increased (K(I)=22.7+/-1.1 micromol L(-1)) in 50 mmol L(-1) NH(4)(+). Inhibition assays using ouabain plus oligomycin or ethacrynic acid suggest mitochondrial F(0)F(1)- and K(+)-ATPase activities, respectively. Ammonium and potassium ions synergistically stimulated specific activity up to 72%, inferring that these ions bind to different sites on the enzyme molecule, each modulating stimulation by the other.

  12. Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Timing of Relapse and Overall Survival for Children Treated on Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocols (2000-2010).

    PubMed

    Bona, Kira; Blonquist, Traci M; Neuberg, Donna S; Silverman, Lewis B; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Population-based evidence suggests that lower socioeconomic status (SES) negatively impacts the overall survival (OS) of children with leukemia; however, the relationships between SES and treatment-related mortality, relapse, and timing of relapse remain unclear. We examined OS, event-free survival (EFS) and cumulative incidence (CI) and timing of relapse by community-level poverty for 575 children aged 1-18 years with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated on consecutive phase III multicenter Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocols between 2000 and 2010. Children were categorized into high- and low-poverty areas for the analysis using aggregate U.S. Census data linked to zip code. Children living in high-poverty areas experienced a 5-year OS of 85% as compared with 92% for those in low-poverty areas (P = 0.02); poverty remained marginally significant (P = 0.07) after adjustment for immunophenotype, age, and white blood cell count. There were no differences detected in EFS or CI relapse by poverty area. However, 92% of the relapses observed in children from high-poverty areas occurred <36 months from complete remission, compared to 48% of those in children from low-poverty areas (P = 0.008). U.S. children with ALL living in high-poverty areas have a higher risk of early relapse when compared with those living in low-poverty areas despite uniform treatment. This may in part explain decreased OS observed in these children. This finding highlights disparities in childhood cancer outcomes by SES despite uniform treatment. Further investigations of the mechanistic pathways underlying this finding are needed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Late events in pediatric patients with Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone: the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    McLean, T W; Hertel, C; Young, M L; Marcus, K; Schizer, M A; Gebhardt, M; Weinstein, H J; Perez-Atayde, A; Grier, H E

    1999-01-01

    The outcome for 82 pediatric patients with Ewing sarcoma (ES) and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of bone is reported; the patients were treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and Children's Hospital (CH) in Boston, MA (USA) from 1971-1988. The charts of all patients with ES/PNET of bone treated during this period were reviewed for disease status, therapy, sites of relapse, information on second malignancies, and survival status. Eighty-two patients with ES/PNET of bone treated at DFCI/CH were identified. The 10-year event-free survival (EFS) rates were 12% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0, 27%) and 38% (95% CI 26, 51%) for patients with and without metastases, respectively (P = 0.002); the overall survival (OS) rates were 17% (95% CI 1, 33%) and 48% (95% CI 35, 61%) for patients with and without metastases (P = 0.001). Median follow-up for surviving patients is 10.2 years. Primary site in the pelvis also was associated with a poor outcome for patients with no metastatic disease (P = 0.006 OS, P = 0.03 EFS). Thirty-one patients survived in first remission at least 5 years from diagnosis, and of these, five experienced relapse of original disease, and five experienced secondary malignancies. Pediatric patients treated for ES/PNET of bone remain at risk for life-threatening events into the second decade of follow-up. After 5 years, the risk of second malignant neoplasm is at least as high as the risk of late relapse. Prolonged follow-up of patients with ES and PNET of bone is indicated.

  14. Taxonomic revision of the speckled crabs, genus Arenaeus Dana, 1851 (Brachyura: Portunidae) based on morphological and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Zupolini, Lucas L; Magalhães, Tatiana; Pileggi, Leonardo G; Mantelatto, Fernando L

    2017-06-06

    The family Portunidae Rafinesque, 1815 presents a series of taxonomic problems such as paraphyletic groups, synonymizations, and unresolved complexes of cryptic species. Arenaeus Dana, 1851, encompasses only two species with mirrored distributions along the coasts of the Americas. Despite of comprising two widespread species, there is a scarcity of information on their biology and ecology and on the relationships with other genera in the family. Because of the lack of studies comprising both species and the imprecise or erroneous taxonomic descriptions for the species of Arenaeus, we conducted a thorough taxonomic revision of the genus and used data from fragments of the 16S rRNA and the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes to investigate the validity of Arenaeus cribrarius (Lamarck, 1818) and Arenaeus mexicanus                 (Gerstaecker, 1856). A range of easily discernible and objective characteristics distinguish the species, including the number of rostral teeth, the number of carpal spines, and the presence of a spine on the epistome region. This last feature, although never properly addressed in the literature, was diagnostic in discriminating the taxa. Results of molecular analyses also supported the separate identity of the two species. Assemblages generated in COI analyses reflected no geographic pattern or geographic partitioning, suggesting that dispersion and gene flow could be sufficiently high to hinder genetic differentiation through the extensive distribution range of the Atlantic species, A. cribrarius. Furthermore, molecular results and morphological analyses may indicate a closer relationship among particular groups of portunids and Arenaeus. Morphology of the carapace and of the first male gonopods may be the most prominent characteristics supporting such view. We have shed light on the status of the genus Arenaeus and its members, clarified some taxonomical issues, and provide an identification key for the species.

  15. Man-induced hydrological changes, metazooplankton communities and invasive species in the Berre Lagoon (Mediterranean Sea, France).

    PubMed

    Delpy, Floriane; Pagano, Marc; Blanchot, Jean; Carlotti, François; Thibault-Botha, Delphine

    2012-09-01

    The Berre Lagoon has been under strong anthropogenic pressure since the early 1950s. The opening of the hydroelectric EDF power plant in 1966 led to large salinity drops. The zooplankton community was mainly composed of two common brackish species: Acartia tonsa and Brachionus plicatilis. Since 2006, European litigation has strongly constrained the input of freshwater, maintaining the salinity above 15. A study was performed between 2008 and 2010 to evaluate how these modifications have impacted the zooplankton community. Our results show that the community is more diverse and contains several coastal marine species (i.e., Centropages typicus, Paracalanus parvus and Acartia clausi). A. tonsa is still present but is less abundant, whereas B. plicatilis has completely disappeared. Strong predatory marine species, such as chaetognaths, the large conspicuous autochtonous jellyfish Aurelia aurita and the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, are now very common as either seasonal or permanent features of the lagoon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute and chronic temperature stress on copepod individuals and populations. Final report, November 1977-February 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, B.P.

    1983-10-01

    Temperature variation resulting from thermal discharges of two power plants affected temperature tolerances and densities of two copepod species, Eurytemora affinis and Acartia tonsa. Temperature tolerances were increased genetically (next generation) provided either ambient temperature or delta T was sufficiently high. Densities also varied with temperature but not always systematically. Other criteria used to assess the environmental influence of power plant were egg production and potentials for physiological and genetic adaptation.

  17. Psychrobacter proteolyticus sp. nov., a psychrotrophic, halotolerant bacterium isolated from the Antarctic krill Euphausia superba Dana, excreting a cold-adapted metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Denner, E B; Mark, B; Busse, H J; Turkiewicz, M; Lubitz, W

    2001-04-01

    An Antarctic marine bacterium (strain 116) excreting an extracellular cold-adapted metalloprotease was subjected to a detailed polyphasic taxonomic investigation. Strain 116 was previously isolated from the stomach of a specimen of the Antarctic krill Euphasia superba Dana and tentatively characterized as Sphingomonas paucimobilis 116. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that the strain is in fact related to species of the genus Psychrobacter, next to Psychrobacter glacincola (97.4% similarity). Sequence similarities between strain 116 and other Psychrobacter species ranged from 96.9% (with P. urativorans) to 95.4% (with P. immobilis). Key phenotypic characteristics as well as chemotaxonomic features of the bacterium were congruent with the description of the genus Psychrobacter i.e. cells were strictly aerobic, strongly oxidase-positive, psychrotrophic, halotolerant, gram-negative non-motile coccobacilli, with ubiquinone-8 as the main respiratory lipoquinone and 18:1 cis 9, 16:1 cis and 17:1 (omega8c being the predominant cellular fatty acids. The G+C content of the DNA was 43.6 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies showed that the relatedness between strain 116 and Psychrobacter glacinola is only 62.2%. Further differences were apparent in whole-cell SDS-PAGE protein pattern, cellular fatty acid profile and in a number of physiological and biochemical characteristics as well as in enzymatic activities. Tolerance to 5% bile salts, nitrate reduction, citrate utilization, acid production from carbohydrates, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, C4 esterase, C14 lipase and valine arylamidase were found to differentiate strain 116 from Psychrobacter glacincola. On the basis of this phenotypic and molecular evidences, strain 116, previously known as Sphingomonas paucimobilis 116, was recognized as a new species of the genus Psychrobacter for which the name Psychrobacter proteolyticus is proposed. Strain 116 has been deposited in the Collection de l'Institut Pasteur

  18. The ability of the branchiopod, Artemia salina, to graze upon harmful algal blooms caused by Alexandrium fundyense, Aureococcus anophagefferens, and Cochlodinium polykrikoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcoval, M. Alejandra; Pan, Jerónimo; Tang, Yingzhong; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2013-10-01

    We present experiments that examined the grazing and survivorship of zooplankton native (Acartia tonsa) and non-native (Artemia salina) to NY (USA) estuaries when exposed to blooms and cultures of the three harmful algae native to NY, Alexandrium fundyense, Aureococcus anophagefferens (strains CCMP 1850 and CCMP 1984) and Cochlodinium polykrikoides. During experiments with cultures of A. anophagefferens, clearance rates (CR) of A. salina were significantly greater than those of A. tonsa for both algal strains examined. A. salina fed on cultures of C. polykrikoides at higher rates than all phytoplankton species examined, including the control diet (Rhodomonas salina), and faster than rates of A. tonsa fed C. polykrikoides. During experiments with A. fundyense, A. salina actively grazed all cell concentrations (250-1500 cells ml-1) while A. tonsa did not feed at any concentration. Percent mortality of A. salina and A. tonsa fed A. fundyense for 48 h were 43 ± 7.7% and 72 ± 7.8%, respectively, percentages significantly higher than those of individuals fed all other algal diets. During 25 field experiments using natural blooms of the three HAB species performed across six NY estuaries, A. salina significantly (p < 0.05) reduced cell densities of A. anophagefferens, C. polykrikoides, and A. fundyense relative to the control treatments in all but one experiment. The sum of these findings demonstrates that a failure to graze these HABs by the indigenous copepod, A. tonsa, may permit blooms to occur. In addition, the ability of A. salina to graze these HABs at densities that were inhibitory to A. tonsa suggests that A. salina could, in some circumstances, be considered as a part of mitigation strategy for these events.

  19. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of cadmium in different marine trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Pavlaki, Maria D; Araújo, Mário J; Cardoso, Diogo N; Silva, Ana Rita R; Cruz, Andreia; Mendo, Sónia; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Calado, Ricardo; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium ecotoxicity and genotoxicity was assessed in three representative species of different trophic levels of marine ecosystems - the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa, the decapod shrimp, Palaemon varians and the pleuronectiform fish Solea senegalensis. Ecotoxicity endpoints assessed in this study were adult survival, hatching success and larval development ratio (LDR) for A. tonsa, survival of the first larval stage (zoea I) and post-larvae of P. varians, egg and larvae survival, as well as the presence of malformations in the larval stage of S. senegalensis. In vivo genotoxicity was assessed on adult A. tonsa, the larval and postlarval stage of P. varians and newly hatched larvae of S. senegalensis using the comet assay. Results showed that the highest sensitivity to cadmium is displayed by A. tonsa, with the most sensitive endpoint being the LDR of nauplii to copepodites. Sole eggs displayed the highest tolerance to cadmium compared to the other endpoints evaluated for all tested species. Recorded cadmium toxicity was (by increasing order): S. senegalensis eggs < P. varians post-larvae < P. varians zoea I < S. senegalensis larvae < A. tonsa eggs < A. tonsa LDR. DNA damage to all species exposed to cadmium increased with increasing concentrations. Overall, understanding cadmium chemical speciation is paramount to reliably evaluate the effects of this metal in marine ecosystems. Cadmium is genotoxic to all three species tested and therefore may differentially impact individuals and populations of marine taxa. As A. tonsa was the most sensitive species and occupies a lower trophic level, it is likely that cadmium contamination may trigger bottom-up cascading effects in marine trophic interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of three marine screening tests and four Oslo and Paris Commission procedures to evaluate toxicity of offshore chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Weideborg, M.; Vik, E.A.; Oefjord, G.D.; Kjoennoe, O.

    1997-02-01

    The results from the screening toxicity tests Artemia salina, Microtox{reg_sign}, and Mitochondria RET test were compared with those obtained from OSPAR (Oslo and Paris Commissions)-authorized procedures for testing of offshore chemicals (Skeletonema costatum, Acartia tonsa, Abra alba, and Corophium volutator). In this study 82 test substances (26 non-water soluble) were included. The Microtox test was found to be the most sensitive of the three screening tests. Microtox and Mitochondria RET test results showed good correlation with results from Acartia and Skeletonema testing, and it was concluded that the Microtox test was a suitable screening test as a base for assessment of further testing, especially regarding water-soluble chemicals. Sensitivity of Artemia salina to the tested chemicals was too low for it to be an appropriate bioassay organism for screening testing. A very good correlation was found between the results obtained with the Skeletonema and Acartia tests. The results indicated no need for more than one of the Skeletonema or Acartia tests if the Skeletonema median effective concentration or Acartia median lethal concentration was greater than 200 mg/L. The sediment-reworker tests (A. Alba or C. volutator) for chemicals that are likely to end up in the sediments (non-water soluble or surfactants) should be performed, independent of results from screening tests and other OSPAR species.

  1. Strain-related physiological and behavioral effects of Skeletonema marinoi on three common planktonic copepods.

    PubMed

    Md Amin, Roswati; Koski, Marja; Båmstedt, Ulf; Vidoudez, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Three strains of the chain-forming diatom Skeletonema marinoi, differing in their production of polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA) and nutritional food components, were used in experiments on feeding, egg production, hatching success, pellet production, and behavior of three common planktonic copepods: Acartia tonsa, Pseudocalanus elongatus, and Temora longicornis. The three different diatom strains (9B, 1G, and 7J) induced widely different effects on Acartia tonsa physiology, and the 9B strain induced different effects for the three copepods. In contrast, different strains induced no or small alterations in the distribution, swimming behavior, and turning frequency of the copepods. 22:6(n-3) fatty acid (DHA) and sterol content of the diet typically showed a positive effect on either egg production (A. tonsa) or hatching success (P. elongatus), while other measured compounds (PUA, other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids) of the algae had no obvious effects. Our results demonstrate that differences between strains of a given diatom species can generate effects on copepod physiology, which are as large as those induced by different algae species or groups. This emphasizes the need to identify the specific characteristics of local diatoms together with the interacting effects of different mineral, biochemical, and toxic compounds and their potential implications on different copepod species.

  2. Neuropsychological Outcomes of Standard Risk and High Risk Patients Treated for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Dana-Farber ALL Consortium Protocol 95-01 at 5 Years Post Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Waber, Deborah P.; Queally, Jennifer Turek; Catania, Lori; Robaey, Philippe; Romero, Ivonne; Adams, Heather; Alyman, Cheryl; Jandet-Brunet, Christine; Sallan, Stephen E.; Silverman, Lewis B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as High Risk patients may be more vulnerable to neurocognitive late effects because of the greater intensity of their therapy. We compared neuropsychological outcomes in children treated for Standard Risk (SR) or High Risk (HR) ALL on Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) Consortium ALL Protocol 95-01. We also evaluated their performance relative to normative expectations. Procedure Between 1996 and 2000, 498 children with newly diagnosed ALL were treated on Protocol 95-01, 298 of whom were eligible for neuropsychological follow-up. A feature of this protocol was modification of risk group criteria to treat more children as SR rather than HR patients, intended to minimize toxicities. Testing was completed at a median of 5.3 years post diagnosis for 211 patients (70.8%; ages 6 to 25 years; 45.5% male; 40% High Risk), all of whom were in continuous complete remission. Results Test scores for both groups were generally at or above normative expectation, with the exception of verbal working memory, processing complex visual information, and parent ratings of metacognitive skills. After adjusting for covariates, the SR group performed better on measures of IQ and academic achievement, working memory and visual learning. Effect sizes, however, were only in the small to moderate range. Conclusions HR patients exhibited neuropsychological deficits relative to SR patients, though the differences were modest in degree. Modification of the risk group criteria to treat more children on the SR protocol therefore likely afforded some benefit in terms of neurocognitive late effects. PMID:21721112

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida, talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. She gave a presentation to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (far right) about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Dana are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida, talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. She gave a presentation to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (far right) about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Dana are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  4. Grazers and vitamins shape chain formation in a bloom-forming dinoflagellate, Cochlodinium polykrikoides.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaodong; Lonsdale, Darcy J; Gobler, Christopher J

    2010-10-01

    Predators influence the phenotype of prey through both natural selection and induction. We investigated the effects of grazers and nutrients on chain formation in a dinoflagellate, Cochlodinium polykrikoides, which forms dense blooms and has deleterious effects on marine ecosystems around the world. Field populations of C. polykrikoides formed longer chains than laboratory cultures without grazers. In the field, chain length of C. polykrikoides was positively correlated with the abundance of the copepod Acartia tonsa. Chain length of C. polykrikoides increased when exposed to live females of A. tonsa or its fresh (<24 h post-isolation) exudates for 48 h. These results suggest that dissolved chemical cues released by A. tonsa induce chain formation in C. polykrikoides. Ingestion rate of A. tonsa on four-cell chains of C. polykrikoides was lower than on single cells, suggesting that chain formation may be an effective anti-grazing defense. Finally, nutrient amendment experiments demonstrated that vitamins (B(1), B(7), and B(12)) increased the chain length of C. polykrikoides both singly and collectively, while trace metals and inorganic nutrients did not, showing that vitamins may also influence chain formation in this species.

  5. Acute toxicity of eight oil spill response chemicals to temperate, boreal, and Arctic species.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Altin, Dag; Bonaunet, Kristin; Overjordet, Ida Beathe

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the acute toxicity of selected shoreline washing agents (SWA) and dispersants, and (2) assess interspecies differences in sensitivity to the products. Eight shoreline washing agents (Hela saneringsvæske, Bios, Bioversal, Absorrep K212, and Corexit 9580) and chemical dispersants (Corexit 9500, Dasic NS, and Gamlen OD4000) were tested on five marine species, algae Skeletonema costatum, planktonic copepod species Acartia tonsa (temperate species), Calanus finmarchicus (boreal species) and Calanus glacialis (Arctic species), and benthic amphipod Corophium volutator. For most products, A. tonsa was the most sensitive species, whereas C. volutator was the least sensitive; however, these species were exposed through different media (water/sediment). In general, all copepod species displayed a relatively similar sensitivity to all products. However, A. tonsa was somewhat more sensitive than other copepods to most of the tested products. Thus, A. tonsa appears to be a candidate species for boreal and Arctic copepods for acute toxicity testing, and data generated on this species may be used as to provide conservative estimates. The benthic species (C. volutator) had a different sensitivity pattern relative to pelagic species, displaying higher sensitivity to solvent-based SWA than to water-based SWA. Comparing product toxicity, the dispersants were in general most toxic while the solvent-based SWA were least toxic to pelagic species.

  6. Copepods' Response to Burgers' Vortex: Deconstructing Interactions of Copepods with Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Webster, D R; Young, D L; Yen, J

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the behavioral response of two marine copepods, Acartia tonsa and Temora longicornis, to a Burgers' vortex intended to mimic the characteristics of a turbulent vortex that a copepod is likely to encounter in the coastal or near-surface zone. Behavioral assays of copepods were conducted for two vortices that correspond to turbulent conditions with mean dissipation rates of turbulence of 0.009 and 0.096 cm(2) s(-3) (denoted turbulence level 2 and level 3, respectively). In particular, the Burgers' vortex parameters (i.e., circulation and rate of axial strain rate) were specified to match a vortex corresponding to the median rate of dissipation due to viscosity for each target level of turbulence. Three-dimensional trajectories were quantified for analysis of swimming kinematics and response to hydrodynamic cues. Acartia tonsa did not significantly respond to the vortex corresponding to turbulence level 2. In contrast, A. tonsa significantly altered their swimming behavior in the turbulence-level-3 vortex, including increased relative speed of swimming, angle of alignment of the trajectory with the axis of the vortex, ratio of net-to-gross displacement, and acceleration during escape, along with decreased turn frequency (relative to stagnant control conditions). Further, the location of A. tonsa escapes was preferentially in the core of the stronger vortex, indicating that the hydrodynamic cue triggering the distinctive escape behavior was vorticity. In contrast, T. longicornis did not reveal a behavioral response to either the turbulence level 2 or the level 3 vortex. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Nutritional status and diet composition affect the value of diatoms as copepod prey.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ruth H; Flynn, Kevin J

    2005-03-04

    The role of diatoms as key food for copepods at the base of pelagic food chains has been questioned recently on the grounds of toxicity. We show, using unialgal versus mixed algal diets of different nutritional status (i.e., nitrogen:carbon ratio) fed to Acartia tonsa, that diatoms per se are not toxic but that single-diatom diets are inadequate. Additionally, the nutritional state of the phytoplankton has a profound effect on copepod growth and growth efficiency. The ecological significance of laboratory demonstrations of diatom toxicity needs to be reconsidered.

  8. Species composition of Black Sea marine planktonic copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanova, A.; Altukhov, D.; Stefanova, K.; Arashkevich, E.; Kamburska, L.; Prusova, I.; Svetlichny, L.; Timofte, F.; Uysal, Z.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews the changes in the marine planktonic copepods of the Black Sea species' list from the beginning of taxonomic research to the present day. The study was based on the SESAME biological database, unpublished data, literature and data obtained during the course of the SESAME project. Comparisons were made with the Guidebook for Marine Fauna of the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov, which revealed changes both in the taxonomic status of some species and in the structure of the copepod community. The taxonomic status of two species (Acartia clausi small form and Centropages kroyeri pontica) and the nomenclature of two species (Oihona minuta and Calanus helgolandicus) have been changed. Three native species (Acartia margalefi, Oithona nana, and Paracartia latisetosa) have disappeared. Two non-indigenous copepods (Acartia tonsa and Oithona davisae) became established in the Black Sea ecosystem in the 1970s and 2000s, respectively. The success of their establishment was determined by biological features of the species and vulnerability of the native copepod community to invasions. It is highly probable that both species were introduced to the Black Sea by vessel ballast water. The hypothesis of "mediterranization" of the Black Sea fauna does not appear to hold true for zooplankton. Numerous claims of alien copepod species in the Black Sea remain largely unverified due to insufficient information. Data on newly discovered species of the Acartia genus are not authenticated. An updated list of marine planktonic copepods of the Black Sea is hereby presented.

  9. Copepod Behavior in ``Cryptic Blooms'' of Toxic Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    True, A. C.; Webster, D. R.; Weissburg, M. J.; Yen, J.

    2014-11-01

    Copepods,Acartia tonsa and Temora longicornis, were exposed to thin layers of exudates from the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (1 - 10,000 cells/mL) (i.e. models of ``cryptic blooms'' of toxic phytoplankton). Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to quantify the spatiotemporal structure of the layer allowing for correlation of behavioral responses with toxin levels. Both species explicitly avoided the exudate layer and the vicinity of the layer. Measures of path kinematics (swimming speed, turn frequency) by location (in-layer vs. out-of-layer) and exposure (pre-contact vs. post-contact) revealed some similarities, but also significant differences, in trends for each species. A. tonsa significantly increases swimming speed and swimming speed variability in the exudate layer and post-contact, whereas T. longicornis slightly increases both in-layer and slightly reduces both post-contact. Both species increase turn frequency in-layer and post-contact with increasing K. brevis exudate concentration. Path fracticality indicates that A. tonsatrajectories became more diffuse/sinuous and T. longicornis trajectories became more linear/ballistic (trending effects). Regression analyses revealed that the rate of change of behavior with increasing exudate concentration for A. tonsa was thrice to fifty times that of T. longicornis. Toxic K. brevis can essentially eliminate top-down grazer control ,another sinister means by which it gains a competitive advantage over the local phytoplankton taxa.

  10. Interannual differences in microplankton drive changes in the feeding and fecundity of Mnemiopsis leidyi in a Long Island estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Marianne E.; Lonsdale, Darcy J.

    2014-05-01

    The ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi forms seasonal population blooms, which exhibit interannual variation in abundance. Ctenophore egg production and gut contents were examined alongside plankton community structure to identify factors influencing recruitment of M. leidyi in Great South Bay, NY. Ctenophores contained three times as many prey items and produced twice as many eggs in 2008 during a brown tide (Aureococcus anophagefferens) than in 2009, a year without a brown tide. Gut contents demonstrated significant dependence on the copepod Acartia tonsa, which is known to switch from ambush to suspension feeding when flagellates are abundant. Microflagellate abundance was significantly greater in 2008 and corresponded positively with A. anophagefferens, potentially increasing the encounter rates between M. leidyi and A. tonsa by promoting suspension feeding in the latter. Despite the enhanced fecundity, however, ctenophore abundances were five times lower in 2008 and a mismatch was identified between optimum egg production by adults and sufficient microplanktonic prey (dinoflagellates and ciliates) abundance for their larvae, compared to 2009 when the two coincided. We propose that increased microflagellate abundance during the brown tide provided a benefit to ctenophore fecundity by enhancing their encounter rates with A. tonsa, but ultimately larval recruitment was limited by insufficient food availability.

  11. Habitat temperature is an important determinant of cholesterol contents in copepods

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, R. Patrick; Crockett, Elizabeth L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Effects of habitat and acclimation temperature on cholesterol contents were examined in oceanic and inshore species of copepods. The cholesterol content of five species of thermally acclimated copepods was determined, and nine species (representing six families) were sampled to assess the role of habitat temperature. The species selected have maximum habitat temperatures (and temperature tolerances) that vary at least twofold. Levels of dietary cholesterol required to achieve maximum growth were also studied at different acclimation temperatures in a eurythermal copepod. Both eggs and copepodites of Calanus finmarchicus had higher cholesterol levels at the warm acclimation temperature (16°C) than at the cooler temperature (6°C). Neither Acartia tonsa, Acartia hudsonica, Temora longicornis nor Eurytemora affinis altered cholesterol contents with acclimation temperature. Maximum growth rates were achieved at fourfold higher concentrations of dietary cholesterol in warm-acclimated Eurytemora affinis than in cold-acclimated animals. The most consistent trend is the positive relationship between cholesterol content and habitat temperature. Species residing in warmer habitats (e.g. Centropages typicus, Eurytemora affinis) had approximately twice the cholesterol of species living in colder waters (e.g. Calanus glacialis, Euchaeta norvegica). A similar pattern was observed for comparisons of species within genera (Calanus, Acartia and Centropages), with the species abundant at lower latitudes having more cholesterol than the northern congener. These data indicate that habitat temperature is an important determinant of cholesterol content, and cholesterol endows membranes with the stability required for a range of body temperatures. PMID:19088212

  12. Copepod Behavior in Thin Layers of Toxic Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; True, A. C.; Weissburg, M. J.; Yen, J.

    2016-02-01

    Cryptic blooms of toxic phytoplankton were modeled in a custom thin layer flume for behavioral assays with calanoid copepods. Acartia tonsa and Temora longicornis were exposed to thin layers of exudates from the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (1 - 10,000 cells/mL). Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to quantify the spatial structure of the layer allowing for correlation of behavioral responses with toxin levels. Both species explicitly avoided the exudate layer and the vicinity of the layer. Measures of path kinematics (swimming speed, turn frequency) by location (in-layer vs. out-of-layer) and exposure (pre-contact vs. post-contact) revealed some similarities, but also significant differences, in trends for each species. A. tonsa significantly increased swimming speed and swimming speed variability in the exudate layer and post-contact, whereas T. longicornis slightly increased both in-layer and slightly reduced both post-contact. Both species increased turn frequency in-layer and post-contact with increasing K. brevis exudate concentration. Path fractal geometry indicated that A. tonsa trajectories became more diffuse/sinuous and T. longicornis trajectories became more linear/ballistic (trending effects). Regression analyses revealed that the rate of change of behavior with increasing exudate concentration for A. tonsa was three to fifty times that of T. longicornis depending on the parameter considered. The results suggested that toxic K. brevis can essentially eliminate top-down grazer control, another sinister means by which it gains a competitive advantage over the local phytoplankton taxa.

  13. Rapid, storm-induced changes in the natural abundance of sup 15 N in a planktonic ecosystem, Chesapeake Bay, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, J.P.; McCarthy, J.J. ); Horrigan, S.G. )

    1991-12-01

    Samples of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), particulate nitrogen (PN), and two species of zooplankton were collected during two north-south transects of the Chesapeake Bay in the autumn of 1984 (27-28 September and 3-5 October). During the first transect, the natural abundance of {sup 15}N ({delta} {sup 15}N) in the major dissolved and planktonic pools of nitrogen suggested that the {delta}{sup 15}N of PN was largely determined by isotopic fractionation during uptake of NH{sub 4}{sup +} by phytoplankton. Averaged over the transect as a whole, the {delta}{sup 15}N of the herbivorous calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa was 4.1% higher than that of the PN, while the {delta}{sup 15}N of the carnivorous ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi was 6.4% higher than that of the PN. In the interval between the two transects, storm-induced mixing of the water column resulted in the injection of NH{sub 4}{sup +} into the surface layer of the bay. In combination with ancillary physical, chemical, and biological data, these changes in {delta}{sup 15}N provided estimates of the isotopic fractionation factor for NH{sub 4}{sup +} uptake by phytoplankton ({alpha} = 1.0065-1.0080) as well as the turnover time of nitrogen in Acartia tonsa (6.0-9.6 days). Despite the changes in {delta}{sup 15}N observed during this cruise, the relative distribution of {sup 15}N between trophic levels was preserved: during the second transect, the difference in {delta}{sup 15}N between Acartia tonsa and PN was 3.6%, and the difference in {delta}{sup 15}N between Mnemiopsis leidyi and PN was 7.3%. These results demonstrate that the natural abundance of {sup 15}N can change dramatically on a time scale of days, and that time-series studies of the natural abundance of {sup 15}N can be a useful complement to studies using tracer additions of {sup 15}N to document nitrogen transformations in planktonic ecosystems.

  14. Rapid, storm-induced changes in the natural abundance of 15N in a planktonic ecosystem, Chesapeake Bay, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, J. P.; Korrigan, S. G.; McCarthy, J. J.

    1991-12-01

    Samples of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), particulate nitrogen (PN) and two species of Zooplankton were collected during two north-south transects of the Chesapeake Bay in the autumn of 1984 (27-28 September and 3-5 October). During the first transect, the natural abundance of 15N ( δ15N) in the major dissolved and planktonic pools of nitrogen suggested that the δ15N of PN was largely determined by isotopic fractionation during uptake of NH 4+ by phytoplankton. Averaged over the transect as a whole, the δ15N of the herbivorous calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa was 4.1‰ higher than that of the PN, while the δ15N of the carnivorous ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi was 6.4‰ higher than that of the PN. In the interval between the two transects, storm-induced mixing of the water column resulted in the injection of NH 4+ into the surface layer of the bay. This perturbation in the estuarine nitrogen cycle resulted in marked changes in the δ15N of the major dissolved and planktonic pools of nitrogen in the bay. In combination with ancillary physical, chemical and biological data, these changes in δ15N provided estimates of the isotopic fractionation factor for NH 4+ uptake by phytoplankton ( α = 1.0065 -1.0080) as well as the turnover time of nitrogen in Acartia tonsa (6.0-9.6 days). Despite the changes in δ15N observed during this cruise, the relative distribution of 15N between trophic levels was preserved: during the second transect, the difference in δ15N between Acartia tonsa and PN was 3.6‰ and the difference in δ15N between Mnemiopsis leidyi and PN was 7.3‰. These results demonstrate that the natural abundance of 15N can change dramatically on a time scale of days and that time-series studies of the natural abundance of 15N can be a useful complement to studies using tracer additions of 15N to document nitrogen transformations in planktonic ecosystems.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida, takes part in the proposal for locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. The presentation was given to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other officials. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida, takes part in the proposal for locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. The presentation was given to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other officials. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  16. Evaluation of auxiliary tempering pump effectiveness at Chalk Point Steam Electric Station

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, L.C.; Holland, A.F.

    1989-08-01

    The effectiveness of auxiliary tempering pump operation at Chalk Point Steam Electric Station (SES) at reducing plant-induced mortality of aquatic biota was evaluated. Several Representative Important Species (RIS) and dominant benthic and zooplankton species were used in the evaluation as indicators of overall system-wide responses. Expected mortality with and without auxiliary pump operation was estimated using thermal tolerance data available from the scientific literature for blue crabs, white perch, striped bass, spot, Macoma balthica and Acartia tonsa. The evaluation led to the conclusion that the operation of auxiliary tempering pumps at Chalk Point SES increases plant-induced mortality of spot, white perch, striped bass, and zooplankton. Operation of the tempering pumps may reduce blue crab mortality slightly under certain circumstances, and Macoma balthica mortality is probably largely unaffected by their operation.

  17. Ecological-evaluation of organotin-contaminated sediment. Final report, March-June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1985-07-01

    A standard dredged material bioassay was conducted with high levels of organotins to assess the toxicity and bioavailability of organotins associated with sediment and to determine if this sediment would qualify for ocean disposal. This study concluded that high levels of organotins in sediments do not a priori indicate a significant adverse impact on the marine environment after ocean disposal. The sediment tested would qualify for ocean disposal under the present guidelines administered by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers. Particulate-phase tests were conducted with Acanthomysis sculpta (mysid), Citharichthys stigmaeus (flatfish), and Acartia tonsa (copepod). Solid-phase tests were conducted with A. sculpta, Macoma nasuta (clam), and Neanthes arenaceodentata (polychaete worm). The bioassay also included an estimate of the potential for bioaccumulation of cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, silver, pesticides, PCBs, petroleum hydrocarbons, and organotins. Survival was high in all particulate-phase and solid-phase tests.

  18. [Distribution of zooplankton during opposite tide fluxes in the lagoon complex of Chelem, Yucatan, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Escamilla, J B; Suárez-Morales, E; Gasca, R

    2001-03-01

    Zooplankton was surveyed in a tropical lagoon system of the northern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula in high tide, December (1998) and low tide, March 1999 (northerlies season). Zooplankton biomass was measured, zooplankters were counted, and copepods were identified and quantified. Despite the fact that both months were influenced by winds from the North, they showed a different salinity gradient which developed a particular structure of the zooplankton community. Biomass tended to be accumulated in certain areas apparently because of the high residence time of water in Chelem, the forcing effect of the northerlies, and of the tidal current. Biomass values suggest a relatively high secondary production when compared with other systems of the Yucatan Peninsula. The distribution of the copepods Acartia lilljeborgii and A. tonsa is related to saline conditions and tidal flow. The overall faunistic and hydrologic data suggest that even during a single climatic season, the zooplankton community shows strong changes due to mesoscale hydrological processes.

  19. Changes in zooplankton communities along a mercury contamination gradient in a coastal lagoon (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Patrícia Gonçalves; Marques, Sónia Cotrim; D'Ambrosio, Mariaelena; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando Costa; Azeiteiro, Ulisses Miranda; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo

    2013-11-15

    The main objective of this paper was to evaluate the impact of mercury on the zooplankton communities' structure and functioning and their bioaccumulation patterns along a contamination gradient in a temperate coastal lagoon. Our results demonstrated that total abundance was not negatively affected by Hg contamination, since the most contaminated areas presented the highest values, being the copepod Acartia tonsa the dominant species, which means that it is a very well adapted and tolerant species to mercury. Nevertheless, negative effects were observed in terms of species diversity, since the most contaminated areas presented the lowest values of species richness, evenness and heterogeneity. Moreover, the spatial mercury gradient was reflected on the bioaccumulation patterns of the zooplankton communities. This reinforces the idea that zooplankton can be considered as an important vehicle of mercury transfer through the food pelagic web since it constitutes a primordial food resource for several commercial fish species.

  20. Chemical comparison and acute toxicity of water accommodated fraction (WAF) of source and field collected Macondo oils from the Deepwater Horizon spill.

    PubMed

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Altin, Dag; Nordtug, Trond; Daling, Per S; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2015-02-15

    Two Source oils and five field collected oil residues from the Deepwater Horizon incident were chemically characterized. Water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of the Source oils and two of the field-weathered oils were prepared to evaluate the impact of natural weathering on the chemical composition and the acute toxicity of the WAFs. Toxicity test species representing different tropic levels were used (the primary producer Skeletonema costatum (algae) and the herbivorous copepod Acartia tonsa). The results suggest that the potential for acute toxicity is higher in WAFs from non-weathered oils than WAFs from the field weathered oils. The Source oils contained a large fraction of soluble and bioavailable components (such as BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylenes) and naphthalene), whereas in the surface collected oils these components were depleted by dissolution into the water column as the oil rose to the surface and by evaporative loss after reaching the sea surface.

  1. Copepods induce paralytic shellfish toxin production in marine dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Selander, Erik; Thor, Peter; Toth, Gunilla; Pavia, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Among the thousands of unicellular phytoplankton species described in the sea, some frequently occurring and bloom-forming marine dinoflagellates are known to produce the potent neurotoxins causing paralytic shellfish poisoning. The natural function of these toxins is not clear, although they have been hypothesized to act as a chemical defence towards grazers. Here, we show that waterborne cues from the copepod Acartia tonsa induce paralytic shellfish toxin (PST) production in the harmful algal bloom-forming dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum. Induced A. minutum contained up to 2.5 times more toxins than controls and was more resistant to further copepod grazing. Ingestion of non-toxic alternative prey was not affected by the presence of induced A. minutum. The ability of A. minutum to sense and respond to the presence of grazers by increased PST production and increased resistance to grazing may facilitate the formation of harmful algal blooms in the sea. PMID:16769640

  2. Karmitoxin: An Amine-Containing Polyhydroxy-Polyene Toxin from the Marine Dinoflagellate Karlodinium armiger.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Silas Anselm; Binzer, Sofie Bjørnholt; Hoeck, Casper; Meier, Sebastian; de Medeiros, Livia Soman; Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Place, Allen; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Hansen, Per Juel; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2017-04-05

    Marine algae from the genus Karlodinium are known to be involved in fish-killing events worldwide. Here we report for the first time the chemistry and bioactivity of a natural product from the newly described mixotrophic dinoflagellate Karlodinium armiger. Our work describes the isolation and structural characterization of a new polyhydroxy-polyene named karmitoxin. The structure elucidation work was facilitated by use of (13)C enrichment and high-field 2D NMR spectroscopy, where (1)H-(13)C long-range correlations turned out to be very informative. Karmitoxin is structurally related to amphidinols and karlotoxins; however it differs by containing the longest carbon-carbon backbone discovered for this class of compounds, as well as a primary amino group. Karmitoxin showed potent nanomolar cytotoxic activity in an RTgill-W1 cell assay as well as rapid immobilization and eventual mortality of the copepod Acartia tonsa, a natural grazer of K. armiger.

  3. Morphology of seahorse head hydrodynamically aids in capture of evasive prey.

    PubMed

    Gemmell, Brad J; Sheng, Jian; Buskey, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    Syngnathid fish (seahorses, pipefish and sea dragons) are slow swimmers yet capture evasive prey (copepods) using a technique known as the 'pivot' feeding, which involves rapid movement to overcome prey escape capabilities. However, this feeding mode functions only at short range and requires approaching very closely to hydrodynamically sensitive prey without triggering an escape. Here we investigate the role of head morphology on prey capture using holographic and particle image velocimetry (PIV). We show that head morphology functions to create a reduced fluid deformation zone, minimizing hydrodynamic disturbance where feeding strikes occur (above the end of the snout), and permits syngnathid fish to approach highly sensitive copepod prey (Acartia tonsa) undetected. The results explain how these animals can successfully employ short range 'pivot' feeding effectively on evasive prey. The need to approach prey with stealth may have selected for a head shape that produces lower deformation rates than other fish.

  4. Zooplankton changes associated with grazing pressure of northern quahogs ( Mercenaria mercenaria L.) in experimental mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Darcy J.; Cerrato, Robert M.; Caron, David A.; Schaffner, Rebecca A.

    2007-06-01

    Over the last three decades, the abundance of the bivalve Mercenaria mercenaria, a benthic suspension feeder, has declined dramatically in the Great South Bay, Long Island, NY. This decline undoubtedly has had significant impacts on planktonic dynamics in the estuary and may be a contributing factor to the appearance of blooms of Aureococcus anophagefferens (brown tides) that began in 1985. We conducted three, 300-L mesocosm experiments that manipulated clam abundance in seawater containing an inoculum of Aureococcus anophagefferens obtained from bloom water. Within a week, differences in phytoplankton and zooplankton composition emerged between control and experimental tanks. In two of three experiments, biomasses (μg C L -1) of brown tide and copepods, mostly Acartia tonsa, were lower in tanks with clams compared to controls while the opposite was found for ciliates. Redundancy analysis indicated that total clearance rate (L h -1) by Mercenaria mercenaria was the single best predictor of differences in the composition of the planktonic community. The analysis also showed that the reason for increased ciliate biomass associated with clams was lower than average brown tide biomass rather than reduction in predation pressure due to lower than average copepod biomass in these same tanks. And, although food (i.e., diatoms and dinoflagellates) limitation could have contributed to low copepod abundance in tanks with clam competitors, these copepod reductions may also have resulted from direct predatory impacts of clams on early life stages (eggs and nauplii) of Acartia tonsa. Our findings indicate a potentially complex trophic role for Mercenaria mercenaria in estuarine food webs.

  5. 33 CFR 110.93 - Dana Point Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Harbor, Calif. commencing at a point at latitude 33°27′36.2″ N., longitude 117°42′20.4″ W.; thence 016°20′ True for 612 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′42.1″ N., longitude 117°42′18.4″ W.; thence 106°20′ True for 85 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′41.8″ N., longitude 117°42′17.7″ W.; thence 196°20′ True...

  6. 33 CFR 110.93 - Dana Point Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Harbor, Calif. commencing at a point at latitude 33°27′36.2″ N., longitude 117°42′20.4″ W.; thence 016°20′ True for 612 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′42.1″ N., longitude 117°42′18.4″ W.; thence 106°20′ True for 85 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′41.8″ N., longitude 117°42′17.7″ W.; thence 196°20′ True...

  7. 33 CFR 110.93 - Dana Point Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Harbor, Calif. commencing at a point at latitude 33°27′36.2″ N., longitude 117°42′20.4″ W.; thence 016°20′ True for 612 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′42.1″ N., longitude 117°42′18.4″ W.; thence 106°20′ True for 85 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′41.8″ N., longitude 117°42′17.7″ W.; thence 196°20′ True...

  8. Transitioning the Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment (DANA) to Operational Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    descending by car to La Paz , Bolivia (3800 m; average PB = 487 mmHg) to continue acclimatizing at a lower altitude over three nights (ALT2-ALT4). On ALT4...Francesco Zaratti, Laboratorio de Fisica de la Atmosfera, Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz , Bolivia. We also want to express our appreciation to...and at 5260 m atop Mt Chacaltaya near La Paz , Bolivia. The study was performed according to the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the

  9. Transitioning the Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment (DANA) to Operational Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    McIntosh AR, Levine B: Brain activity patterns uniquely supporting visual feature integration after traumatic brain injury. Front Hum Neurosci 2011; 5...Brain activity patterns uniquely supporting visual feature integration after traumatic brain injury. Front Hum Neurosci 2011; 5: 164. 9. Cernich A...Security$ 9/12$:$14,600$armend$TSA$ agents.$ Intelligence$ Community$ NSA $ Environmental,$ Safety$and$Health$ Solutions$Division$ Direct$ $$ Thomas

  10. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Functional Annotation of Cancer Genomes Principal Investigator: William C. Hahn, M.D., Ph.D. The comprehensive characterization of cancer genomes has and will continue to provide an increasingly complete catalog of genetic alterations in specific cancers. However, most epithelial cancers harbor hundreds of genetic alterations as a consequence of genomic instability. Therefore, the functional consequences of the majority of mutations remain unclear.

  11. Potassium-induced contractures in crab (Callinectes danae) muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Leal-Cardoso, J H; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1984-01-01

    The contractures induced by 20-200 mM [K+]o in single crab muscle fibers were resolved into two components. The first component, consisting of single twitches or brief tetanic contractions, was associated with electrogenic membrane responses. The second occurred after spiking subsided with an amplitude that increased linearly with the [K+]o between 20 and 90 mM. The amplitude and time course of the contractures elicited by a given [K+]o differed markedly between different fibers. Contracture reproducibility of a single fiber was best when 90 mM [K+]o was used. The K-induced contractures were abolished after brief (3 min) exposure of the fibers to a calcium-free solution and were greatly depressed by 8 mM procaine. The data suggest that the contractures require both Ca2+-influx across the sarcolemma and release of Ca2+ stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  12. Decadal changes in zooplankton abundance and phenology of Long Island Sound reflect interacting changes in temperature and community composition.

    PubMed

    Rice, Edward; Stewart, Gillian

    2016-09-01

    Between 1939 and 1982, several surveys indicated that zooplankton in Long Island Sound, NY (LIS) appeared to follow an annual cycle typical of the Mid-Atlantic coast of North America. Abundance peaked in both early spring and late summer and the peaks were similar in magnitude. In recent decades, this cycle appeared to have shifted. Only one large peak tended to occur, and summer copepod abundance was consistently reduced by ∼60% from 1939 to 1982 levels. In other Mid-Atlantic coastal systems such a dramatic shift has been attributed to the earlier appearance of ctenophores, particularly Mnemiopsis leidyi, during warmer spring months. However, over a decade of surveys in LIS have consistently found near-zero values in M. leidyi biomass during spring months. Our multiple linear regression model indicates that summer M. leidyi biomass during this decade explains <25% of the variation in summer copepod abundance. During these recent, warmer years, summer copepod community shifts appear to explain the loss of copepod abundance. Although Acartia tonsa in 2010-2011 appeared to be present all year long, it was no longer the dominant summer zooplankton species. Warmer summers have been associated with an increase in cyanobacteria and flagellates, which are not consumed efficiently by A. tonsa. This suggests that in warming coastal systems multiple environmental and biological factors interact and likely underlie dramatic alterations to copepod phenology, not single causes.

  13. Effect of advection on variations in zooplankton at a single location near Cabo Nazca, Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S L; Brink, K H; Santander, H; Cowles, T J; Huyer, A

    1980-04-01

    Temporal variations in the biomass and species composition of zooplankton at a single midshelf station in an upwelling area off Peru can be explained to a large extent by onshore-offshore advection in the upper 20 m of the water column. During periods of strong or sustained near-surface onshore flow, peaks in biomass of zooplankton were observed at midshelf and typically oceanic species of copepod were collected. In periods of offshore flow at the surface, a copepod capable of migrating into oxygen-depleted layers deeper than 30 m was collected. A simple translocation model of advection applied to the cross-shelf distribution of Paracalanus parvus suggests that the fluctuations in P. pavus observed in the midshelf time-series were closely related to onshore-offshore flow in the upper 20 m. Fluctuations in abundance of the numerically dominant copepod, Acartia tonsa, were apparently affected by near surface flow also. The population age-structure suggests that A. tonsa was growing at maximal rates, due in part to its positive feeding response to the dinoflagellate/diatom assemblage of phytoplankton.

  14. Lipid nanocapsules as a new delivery system in copepods: Toxicity studies and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Stancheva, Stefka; Souissi, Anissa; Ibrahim, Ali; Barras, Alexandre; Spriet, Corentin; Souissi, Sami; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the potential of lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as a delivery system of small hydrophobic molecules, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) - pyrene, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, in the copepod Acartia tonsa. The LNCs were produced by a phase inversion process with a nominal size of 50 nm. These nanocapsules were obtained without organic solvent and with pharmaceutically acceptable excipients. The PAHs-LNCs displayed a stable monodisperse size distribution and a good stability in sea water for 7 days. By using fluorescent LNCs, it was possible to evidence LNCs ingestion by the copepods using confocal laser scanning microscopy. While blank LNCs are not toxic to copepods at tested concentrations, PAH-loaded LNCs were found to be very toxic on A. tonsa with a high mortality rate reaching 95% after 72 h exposure to 200 nM pyrene-loaded LNCs. On the other hand, when acetone is used to dissolve an equivalent concentration of PAHs in sea water, the copepod mortality is 10 times lower than using LNCs as nano-delivery system. This confirms the efficiency of using LNCs to deliver molecules directly in the gut or copepod carapace. The small size and non toxicity of these delivery nano-systems make them suitable for drug delivery to copepods.

  15. Mesozooplankton assemblages and their relationship with environmental variables: a study case in a disturbed bay (Beagle Channel, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Biancalana, Florencia; Dutto, M Sofía; Berasategui, Anabela A; Kopprio, Germán; Hoffmeyer, Mónica S

    2014-12-01

    This study focused on the seasonal and spatial analysis of the mesozooplankton community in a human-impacted subantarctic bay in Argentina and aimed to detect assemblages associated with environmental variability. Mesozooplankton samples and environmental data were obtained in the Ushuaia Bay (UB) seasonally, from August 2004 to June 2005, and spatially, from coastal (more polluted), middle (less influenced) and open sea water (free polluted) sampling stations. Remarkable seasonal changes on the mesozooplankton community were observed. Nitrogenated nutrients, chlorophyll a, salinity and temperature were the prevailing environmental conditions likely associated with the different mesozooplankton assemblages found in the bay. The copepods Eurytemora americana, Acartia tonsa, Podon leuckarti and Nematoda were particularly observed on the northwest coast of the bay, characterized by the highest level of urban pollution, eutrophicated by sewage and freshwater inputs from the Encerrada Bay which is connected to it. The stations situated in the northeast area, mostly influenced by freshwater input from rivers and glacier melting, showed low mesozooplankton abundances and an important contribution of adventitious plankton. The copepods Ctenocalanus citer, Clausocalanus brevipes and Drepanopus forcipatus were mostly observed at the stations located near the Beagle Channel, characterized by open sea and free polluted waters. Our findings suggest that the variations observed in the mesozooplankton assemblages in the UB seem to be modulated by environmental variables associated with the anthropogenic influence, clearly detected on the coast of the bay. Certain opportunistic species such as A. tonsa and E. americana could be postulated as potential bioindicators of water quality in subantarctic coastal ecosystems.

  16. The Influence of Individual Variability on Zooplankton Population Dynamics under Different Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, R.; Liu, H.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how biological components respond to environmental changes could be insightful to predict ecosystem trajectories under different climate scenarios. Zooplankton are key components of marine ecosystems and changes in their dynamics could have major impact on ecosystem structure. We developed an individual-based model of a common coastal calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa to examine how environmental factors affect zooplankton population dynamics and explore the role of individual variability in sustaining population under various environmental conditions consisting of temperature, food concentration and salinity. Total abundance, egg production and proportion of survival were used to measure population success. Results suggested population benefits from high level of individual variability under extreme environmental conditions including unfavorable temperature, salinity, as well as low food concentration, and selection on fast-growers becomes stronger with increasing individual variability and increasing environmental stress. Multiple regression analysis showed that temperature, food concentration, salinity and individual variability have significant effects on survival of A. tonsa population. These results suggest that environmental factors have great influence on zooplankton population, and individual variability has important implications for population survivability under unfavorable conditions. Given that marine ecosystems are at risk from drastic environmental changes, understanding how individual variability sustains populations could increase our capability to predict population dynamics in a changing environment.

  17. Interactions between Zooplankton and Crude Oil: Toxic Effects and Bioaccumulation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Wambaugh, Zoe; Wang, Zucheng; Hyatt, Cammie; Liu, Zhanfei; Buskey, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted ship-, shore- and laboratory-based crude oil exposure experiments to investigate (1) the effects of crude oil (Louisiana light sweet oil) on survival and bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in mesozooplankton communities, (2) the lethal effects of dispersant (Corexit 9500A) and dispersant-treated oil on mesozooplankton, (3) the influence of UVB radiation/sunlight exposure on the toxicity of dispersed crude oil to mesozooplankton, and (4) the role of marine protozoans on the sublethal effects of crude oil and in the bioaccumulation of PAHs in the copepod Acartia tonsa. Mortality of mesozooplankton increased with increasing oil concentration following a sigmoid model with a median lethal concentration of 32.4 µl L−1 in 16 h. At the ratio of dispersant to oil commonly used in the treatment of oil spills (i.e. 1∶20), dispersant (0.25 µl L−1) and dispersant- treated oil were 2.3 and 3.4 times more toxic, respectively, than crude oil alone (5 µl L−1) to mesozooplankton. UVB radiation increased the lethal effects of dispersed crude oil in mesozooplankton communities by 35%. We observed selective bioaccumulation of five PAHs, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene and benzo[b]fluoranthene in both mesozooplankton communities and in the copepod A. tonsa. The presence of the protozoan Oxyrrhis marina reduced sublethal effects of oil on A. tonsa and was related to lower accumulations of PAHs in tissues and fecal pellets, suggesting that protozoa may be important in mitigating the harmful effects of crude oil exposure in copepods and the transfer of PAHs to higher trophic levels. Overall, our results indicate that the negative impact of oil spills on mesozooplankton may be increased by the use of chemical dispersant and UV radiation, but attenuated by crude oil-microbial food webs interactions, and that both mesozooplankton and protozoans may play an important role in fate of PAHs in marine environments. PMID:23840628

  18. Interactions between zooplankton and crude oil: toxic effects and bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Wambaugh, Zoe; Wang, Zucheng; Hyatt, Cammie; Liu, Zhanfei; Buskey, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    We conducted ship-, shore- and laboratory-based crude oil exposure experiments to investigate (1) the effects of crude oil (Louisiana light sweet oil) on survival and bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in mesozooplankton communities, (2) the lethal effects of dispersant (Corexit 9500A) and dispersant-treated oil on mesozooplankton, (3) the influence of UVB radiation/sunlight exposure on the toxicity of dispersed crude oil to mesozooplankton, and (4) the role of marine protozoans on the sublethal effects of crude oil and in the bioaccumulation of PAHs in the copepod Acartia tonsa. Mortality of mesozooplankton increased with increasing oil concentration following a sigmoid model with a median lethal concentration of 32.4 µl L(-1) in 16 h. At the ratio of dispersant to oil commonly used in the treatment of oil spills (i.e. 1∶20), dispersant (0.25 µl L(-1)) and dispersant-treated oil were 2.3 and 3.4 times more toxic, respectively, than crude oil alone (5 µl L(-1)) to mesozooplankton. UVB radiation increased the lethal effects of dispersed crude oil in mesozooplankton communities by 35%. We observed selective bioaccumulation of five PAHs, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene and benzo[b]fluoranthene in both mesozooplankton communities and in the copepod A. tonsa. The presence of the protozoan Oxyrrhis marina reduced sublethal effects of oil on A. tonsa and was related to lower accumulations of PAHs in tissues and fecal pellets, suggesting that protozoa may be important in mitigating the harmful effects of crude oil exposure in copepods and the transfer of PAHs to higher trophic levels. Overall, our results indicate that the negative impact of oil spills on mesozooplankton may be increased by the use of chemical dispersant and UV radiation, but attenuated by crude oil-microbial food webs interactions, and that both mesozooplankton and protozoans may play an important role in fate of PAHs in marine environments.

  19. Relative sensitivity of one freshwater and two marine acute toxicity tests as determined by testing 30 offshore E & P chemicals.

    PubMed

    Sverdrup, Line E; Fürst, Charlotte S; Weideborg, Mona; Vik, Eilen A; Stenersen, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Acute toxicity of 30 offshore E & P (Exploration and Production) chemicals was measured using the three standard test organisms Daphnia magna (freshwater cladoceran), Acartia tonsa (marine copepod) and Skeletonema costatum (marine diatom alga). Test chemicals included 20 water-soluble and 10 (partially) non-soluble products. For 22 out of the 30 chemicals, the difference in sensitivity between the three tests varied within one order of magnitude. A very good correlation was found between the two marine tests (r = 0.96, P < 0.01, n = 30), and a correlation coefficient of r = 0.78 (P < 0.01, n = 30) was found between D. magna and both A. tonsa and S. costatum, individually. When the comparison of D. magna and A. tonsa sensitivity was based only on the water-soluble chemicals, a significantly higher correlation was obtained (r = 0.84, n = 20), indicating that the sample preparation method used for the (partially) non-soluble chemicals (the water accommodated fraction (WAF) method) induces additional variation between tests performed with different test media. (Partially) non-soluble chemicals are characterised by phase separation or precipitation at the concentrations used for testing. In a WAF-based test, each test concentration/exposure level is prepared separately, and following mixing and separation, only the water phase is used for testing. Toxicity is related to the amount of substance originally added to the mixing vessels. For 25 of the 30 chemicals, D. magna was found to be less sensitive than the marine copepod by a factor >2. The generally higher sensitivity of the marine toxicity tests compared to the Daphnia test emphasise the importance of using marine data for environmental hazard classification as well as for environmental risk assessment purposes.

  20. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods.

  1. Algal Toxins Alter Copepod Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A.; Waggett, Rebecca J.; Place, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod’s feeding appendages–a “sampling beating” that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration “grazing beating” that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod’s grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod’s feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  2. Grazers and phytoplankton growth in the oceans: an experimental and evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Simona; Knoll, Andrew H; Giordano, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The taxonomic composition of phytoplankton responsible for primary production on continental shelves has changed episodically through Earth history. Geological correlations suggest that major changes in phytoplankton composition correspond in time to changes in grazing and seawater chemistry. Testing hypotheses that arise from these correlations requires experimentation, and so we carried out a series of experiments in which selected phytoplankton species were grown in treatments that differed with respect to the presence or absence of grazers as well as seawater chemistry. Both protistan (Euplotes sp.) and microarthropod (Acartia tonsa) grazers changed the growth dynamics and biochemical composition of the green alga Tetraselmis suecica, the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp., increasing the specific growth rate and palatability of the eukaryotic algae, while decreasing or leaving unchanged both parameters in the cyanobacteria. Synechococcus (especially) and Thalassiosira produced toxins effective against the copepod, but ciliate growth was unaffected. Acartia induced a 4-6 fold increase of Si cell quota in the diatom, but Euplotes had no similar effect. The differential growth responses of the eukaryotic algae and cyanobacteria to ciliate grazing may help to explain the apparently coeval radiation of eukaryophagic protists and rise of eukaryotes to ecological prominence as primary producers in Neoproterozoic oceans. The experimental results suggest that phytoplankton responses to the later radiation of microarthropod grazers were clade-specific, and included changes in growth dynamics, toxin synthesis, encystment, and (in diatoms) enhanced Si uptake.

  3. Seasonal variation in the copepod community structure from a tropical Amazon estuary, Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, André; Leite, Natália da R; Silva, João G S; Pereira, Luci C C; Costa, Rauquírio M da

    2009-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the seasonal variation of copepod community structure during the months of July, September and November 2003 (dry season) and January, March and May 2004 (rainy season) in the Curuçá estuary, northern Brazil. Samples were collected during neap tides via gentle 200microm mesh net tows from a small powerboat. Measurements of surface water conductivity were accomplished in situ using an electronic conductivimeter and salinity was later obtained through the transformation of the conductivity values. Salinity varied seasonally from 7.2 +/- 0.1 to 39.2 +/- 1.8 (mean +/- standard deviation) and was influenced mainly by differences in the amount of rainfall between the studied sampling seasons. In total, 30 Copepoda taxa were identified and Acartia tonsa comprised the most representative species throughout the entire studied period followed by Acartia lilljeborgii, Subeucalanus pileatus and Paracalanus quasimodo. In the present study, the density values, ecological indexes and copepod species dominance presented a clear seasonal pattern, showing that the studied area may be considered seasonally heterogeneous in relation to the investigated parameters.

  4. Relationships between copepod community structure, rainfall regimes, and hydrological variables in a tropical mangrove estuary (Amazon coast, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, André; Pereira, Luci Cajueiro Carneiro; da Costa, Rauquírio Marinho

    2015-03-01

    The influence of rainfall and hydrological variables on the abundance and diversity of the copepod community was investigated on a monthly basis over an annual cycle in the Taperaçu mangrove estuary. In general, the results show that there were no clear spatial or tidal patterns in any biological variables during the study period, which was related to the reduced horizontal gradient in abiotic parameters, determined mainly by the morphological and morphodynamic features of the estuary. Nevertheless, seasonal and monthly trends were recorded in both the hydrological data and the abundance of the dominant copepod species. In particular, Pseudodiaptomus marshi (6,004.6 ± 22,231.6 ind m-3; F = 5.0, p < 0.05) and Acartia tonsa (905.6 ± 2,400.9 ind m-3; F = 14.6, p < 0.001) predominated during the rainy season, whereas Acartia lilljeborgii (750.8 ± 808.3 ind m-3; U = 413.0, p < 0.01) was the most abundant species in the dry season. A distinct process of succession was observed in the relative abundance of these species, driven by the shift in the rainfall regime, which affected hydrological, in particular salinity, and consequently the abundance of copepod species. We suggest that this may be a general pattern governing the dynamics of copepod populations in the estuaries of the Brazilian Amazonian region.

  5. Fatty acid profiling reveals seasonal and spatial shifts in zooplankton diet in a temperate estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. M. M.; Azeiteiro, U. M.; Pardal, M. A.; De Troch, M.

    2012-08-01

    Fatty acids composition of copepod and cladoceran species and their possible food sources was investigated in the Mondego estuary (southern Europe) in order to explain the seasonal variation of the small copepods Acartia clausi, Acartia tonsa, Copidodiaptomus numidicus, Temora longicornis and the freshwater cladoceran Daphnia longispina. A total of 12 zooplankton species (7 marine, 2 estuarine and 3 freshwater species) were studied. A multivariate analysis revealed a clear seasonal distribution of zooplankton species in terms of fatty acids composition and abundance, with winter and spring zooplankton species showing maximal concentrations and diversity of total fatty acids. These findings underline the role of lipids as storage during the colder seasons in a highly variable environment like an estuary. Estuarine and freshwater species showed a more diverse array of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids rather than marine species, except for Centropages typicus. Fatty acids markers of trophic position indicated the presence of two trophic levels: copepod species were primarily omnivorous, whereas cladocerans showed to be herbivorous. Our results suggest that feeding patterns of plankton change spatially and temporally, reflecting the shifts in dominance between diatoms and flagellates as well as between dinoflagellates/diatoms and small animals.

  6. Grazers and Phytoplankton Growth in the Oceans: an Experimental and Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ratti, Simona; Knoll, Andrew H.; Giordano, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The taxonomic composition of phytoplankton responsible for primary production on continental shelves has changed episodically through Earth history. Geological correlations suggest that major changes in phytoplankton composition correspond in time to changes in grazing and seawater chemistry. Testing hypotheses that arise from these correlations requires experimentation, and so we carried out a series of experiments in which selected phytoplankton species were grown in treatments that differed with respect to the presence or absence of grazers as well as seawater chemistry. Both protistan (Euplotes sp.) and microarthropod (Acartia tonsa) grazers changed the growth dynamics and biochemical composition of the green alga Tetraselmis suecica, the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp., increasing the specific growth rate and palatability of the eukaryotic algae, while decreasing or leaving unchanged both parameters in the cyanobacteria. Synechococcus (especially) and Thalassiosira produced toxins effective against the copepod, but ciliate growth was unaffected. Acartia induced a 4-6 fold increase of Si cell quota in the diatom, but Euplotes had no similar effect. The differential growth responses of the eukaryotic algae and cyanobacteria to ciliate grazing may help to explain the apparently coeval radiation of eukaryophagic protists and rise of eukaryotes to ecological prominence as primary producers in Neoproterozoic oceans. The experimental results suggest that phytoplankton responses to the later radiation of microarthropod grazers were clade-specific, and included changes in growth dynamics, toxin synthesis, encystment, and (in diatoms) enhanced Si uptake. PMID:24204815

  7. Comparison of different DNA-extraction techniques to investigate the bacterial community of marine copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Petra; Gerdts, Gunnar; Boersma, Maarten; Wiltshire, Karen H.; Wichels, Antje

    2010-12-01

    Marine zooplanktic organisms, such as copepods, are usually associated with large numbers of bacteria. Some of these bacteria live attached to copepods’ exoskeleton, while others prevail in their intestine and faecal pellets. Until now, general conclusions concerning the identity of these bacteria are problematic since the majority of previous studies focused on cultivable bacteria only. Hence, to date little is known on whether copepod genera or species harbour distinct bacterial populations and about the nature of this association. To shed more light on these copepod/bacteria consortia, the focus of this study was the development and evaluation of a suitable approach to extract bacterial DNA from different North Sea copepod genera. Furthermore, the bacterial DNA was analysed by PCR-DGGE and subsequent sequencing of excised bands. The result of this work was an appropriate extraction method for batches of ten to one copepod specimens and offered first insights as to which bacteria are attached to the copepods Acartia sp . and Temora sp . from Helgoland Roads (German Bight) and a laboratory-grown Acartia tonsa culture. It revealed the prevalence of Alphaproteobacteria.

  8. Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria Support Copepod Reproduction and Development in the Baltic Sea

    PubMed Central

    Hogfors, Hedvig; Motwani, Nisha H.; Hajdu, Susanna; El-Shehawy, Rehab; Holmborn, Towe; Vehmaa, Anu; Engström-Öst, Jonna; Brutemark, Andreas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that summer cyanobacterial blooms cannot be efficiently utilized by grazers due to low nutritional quality and production of toxins; however the evidence for such effects in situ is often contradictory. Using field and experimental observations on Baltic copepods and bloom-forming diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacteria, we show that cyanobacteria may in fact support zooplankton production during summer. To highlight this side of zooplankton-cyanobacteria interactions, we conducted: (1) a field survey investigating linkages between cyanobacteria, reproduction and growth indices in the copepod Acartia tonsa; (2) an experiment testing relationships between ingestion of the cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena (measured by molecular diet analysis) and organismal responses (oxidative balance, reproduction and development) in the copepod A. bifilosa; and (3) an analysis of long term (1999–2009) data testing relationships between cyanobacteria and growth indices in nauplii of the copepods, Acartia spp. and Eurytemora affinis, in a coastal area of the northern Baltic proper. In the field survey, N. spumigena had positive effects on copepod egg production and egg viability, effectively increasing their viable egg production. By contrast, Aphanizomenon sp. showed a negative relationship with egg viability yet no significant effect on the viable egg production. In the experiment, ingestion of N. spumigena mixed with green algae Brachiomonas submarina had significant positive effects on copepod oxidative balance, egg viability and development of early nauplial stages, whereas egg production was negatively affected. Finally, the long term data analysis identified cyanobacteria as a significant positive predictor for the nauplial growth in Acartia spp. and E. affinis. Taken together, these results suggest that bloom forming diazotrophic cyanobacteria contribute to feeding and reproduction of zooplankton during summer and create a favorable growth

  9. Bloom-forming cyanobacteria support copepod reproduction and development in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Hogfors, Hedvig; Motwani, Nisha H; Hajdu, Susanna; El-Shehawy, Rehab; Holmborn, Towe; Vehmaa, Anu; Engström-Öst, Jonna; Brutemark, Andreas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that summer cyanobacterial blooms cannot be efficiently utilized by grazers due to low nutritional quality and production of toxins; however the evidence for such effects in situ is often contradictory. Using field and experimental observations on Baltic copepods and bloom-forming diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacteria, we show that cyanobacteria may in fact support zooplankton production during summer. To highlight this side of zooplankton-cyanobacteria interactions, we conducted: (1) a field survey investigating linkages between cyanobacteria, reproduction and growth indices in the copepod Acartia tonsa; (2) an experiment testing relationships between ingestion of the cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena (measured by molecular diet analysis) and organismal responses (oxidative balance, reproduction and development) in the copepod A. bifilosa; and (3) an analysis of long term (1999-2009) data testing relationships between cyanobacteria and growth indices in nauplii of the copepods, Acartia spp. and Eurytemora affinis, in a coastal area of the northern Baltic proper. In the field survey, N. spumigena had positive effects on copepod egg production and egg viability, effectively increasing their viable egg production. By contrast, Aphanizomenon sp. showed a negative relationship with egg viability yet no significant effect on the viable egg production. In the experiment, ingestion of N. spumigena mixed with green algae Brachiomonas submarina had significant positive effects on copepod oxidative balance, egg viability and development of early nauplial stages, whereas egg production was negatively affected. Finally, the long term data analysis identified cyanobacteria as a significant positive predictor for the nauplial growth in Acartia spp. and E. affinis. Taken together, these results suggest that bloom forming diazotrophic cyanobacteria contribute to feeding and reproduction of zooplankton during summer and create a favorable growth

  10. Seasonality in the Mesozooplankton Community of Delaware Bay, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickline, A.; Cohen, J.

    2016-02-01

    Zooplankton communities in temperate estuaries undergo seasonal shifts in abundance and species composition, though the physical/biological mechanisms behind these shifts vary among systems. Delaware Bay is a well-mixed estuary on the mid-Atlantic coast with predictable seasonal variation in environmental conditions and circulation. To understand factors influencing mesozooplankton community dynamics in this system, we conducted seasonal sampling at 16 stations over the estuary's salinity range in 2014-2015. Sampling paralleled the last similar investigation into Delaware Bay zooplankton, conducted in the early 1950s. Biomass, measured as dry weight and totaled for all stations, was low in late summer and high in spring and fall. Bio-volume, measured either as displacement volume or calculated from ZooScan processing to exclude detritus, also showed a similar pattern. Across seasons, the mesozooplankton community was dominated by copepods, representing over 60% of the relative abundance at each station. Acartia tonsa was the dominant calanoid species in summer and fall, with abundances up to 7,353 ind. m-3, which is similar to the 1950s. In spring, Centropages hamatus and C. typicus were dominant at densities up to 2,550 ind. m-3 throughout the estuary, which is an increase from the 1950s. Environmental data suggest the seasonal shift in dominance from neritic Centropages to estuarine Acartia could be driven by increased stratification of the estuary during periods of high river discharge in spring, creating a two-layer system with a bottom advection current fed by the coastal ocean, bringing coastal species into the estuary. As river discharge decreases, the advection current is reduced, creating a well-mixed estuary and allowing Acartia to dominante. As river discharge is ultimately determined by precipitation, which is predicted to increase during winter with climate change in this region, the phenology of mesozooplankton species dynamics could shift as well.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Nelson are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Congressman Dave Weldon and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Nelson are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Congressman Dave Weldon and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Florida Congressman Tom Feeney talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Feeney are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Congressman Dave Weldon; and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Florida Congressman Tom Feeney talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Feeney are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Congressman Dave Weldon; and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (left front) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right front) leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson (at left) is Congressman Tom Feeney. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (left front) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right front) leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson (at left) is Congressman Tom Feeney. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (left foreground) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) look deep in conversation as they leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson is Congressman Tom Feeney and Center Director Jim Kennedy. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (left foreground) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) look deep in conversation as they leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson is Congressman Tom Feeney and Center Director Jim Kennedy. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. On the left is Center Director Jim Kennedy. On the right are U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and U.S. Representative Ric Keller . Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and Congressman Dave Weldon.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. On the left is Center Director Jim Kennedy. On the right are U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and U.S. Representative Ric Keller . Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and Congressman Dave Weldon.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After talking to the media, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (left) speaks to Congressman Dave Weldon (center) and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney (right). O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After talking to the media, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (left) speaks to Congressman Dave Weldon (center) and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney (right). O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (center) makes a point while talking to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Congressman Tom Feeney, Congressman Dave Weldon, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (center) makes a point while talking to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Congressman Tom Feeney, Congressman Dave Weldon, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA and government officials are gathered to hear about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration. At the far end is NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe. He is flanked, on the left, by Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; and on the right by U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon and U.S. Representative Ric Keller. In the foreground, at left, is Center Director Jim Kennedy. At right is Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA and government officials are gathered to hear about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration. At the far end is NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe. He is flanked, on the left, by Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; and on the right by U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon and U.S. Representative Ric Keller. In the foreground, at left, is Center Director Jim Kennedy. At right is Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - U.S. Representative Ric Keller talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Keller are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; Congressman Dave Weldon; and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - U.S. Representative Ric Keller talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Keller are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; Congressman Dave Weldon; and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Dave Weldon talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Weldon are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; at right is O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Dave Weldon talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Weldon are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; at right is O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Jim Kennedy makes a presentation to NASA and other officials about the benefits of locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. At the far left is Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Jim Kennedy makes a presentation to NASA and other officials about the benefits of locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. At the far left is Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe discusses the presentation about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Florida Congressman Tom Feeney, Congressman Dave Weldon, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe discusses the presentation about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Florida Congressman Tom Feeney, Congressman Dave Weldon, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (center) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe are deep in conversation as they leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson at left is Congressman Tom Feeney. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (center) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe are deep in conversation as they leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson at left is Congressman Tom Feeney. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Dave Weldon listens to a presentation about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Congressman Tom Feeney, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Dave Weldon listens to a presentation about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Congressman Tom Feeney, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  10. Ocean Acidification Affects the Phyto-Zoo Plankton Trophic Transfer Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Gemma; Flynn, Kevin J.; Lindeque, Penelope K.

    2016-01-01

    The critical role played by copepods in ocean ecology and biogeochemistry warrants an understanding of how these animals may respond to ocean acidification (OA). Whilst an appreciation of the potential direct effects of OA, due to elevated pCO2, on copepods is improving, little is known about the indirect impacts acting via bottom-up (food quality) effects. We assessed, for the first time, the chronic effects of direct and/or indirect exposures to elevated pCO2 on the behaviour, vital rates, chemical and biochemical stoichiometry of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa. Bottom-up effects of elevated pCO2 caused species-specific biochemical changes to the phytoplanktonic feed, which adversely affected copepod population structure and decreased recruitment by 30%. The direct impact of elevated pCO2 caused gender-specific respiratory responses in A.tonsa adults, stimulating an enhanced respiration rate in males (> 2-fold), and a suppressed respiratory response in females when coupled with indirect elevated pCO2 exposures. Under the combined indirect+direct exposure, carbon trophic transfer efficiency from phytoplankton-to-zooplankton declined to < 50% of control populations, with a commensurate decrease in recruitment. For the first time an explicit role was demonstrated for biochemical stoichiometry in shaping copepod trophic dynamics. The altered biochemical composition of the CO2-exposed prey affected the biochemical stoichiometry of the copepods, which could have ramifications for production of higher tropic levels, notably fisheries. Our work indicates that the control of phytoplankton and the support of higher trophic levels involving copepods have clear potential to be adversely affected under future OA scenarios. PMID:27082737

  11. Egg production of Eurytemora affinis—Effect of k-strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirche, H.-J.

    1992-10-01

    The number of eggs found in egg sacs of Eurytemora affinis in the Schlei, a mesohaline fjord in the Western Baltic, was determined between January and August, and female prosome length measured. Prosome length at 25°C was only half that at 0°C and was significantly correlated with mean temperature during development. Clutch size increased from lower winter values to a maximum in April and thereafter sharply decreased to a minimum at the end of July. The correlation between clutch size and body size was stronger than that between clutch size and temperature at collection. From calculations using regressions of body size and clutch size with temperature, a curve was derived for female fecundity at satiating food levels with a minimum at 12°C and increased values at both lower and higher temperatures. Depending on the length-weight conversion applied, P/B for egg production was 0·01 to 0·02 day -1 in winter and 0·43 to 0·51 day -1 at the temperature maximum in summer. Reproductive production is similar to somatic production of larval stages at low temperatures, but increases faster with increasing temperatures. The considerably smaller fecundity and weight specific egg production rate of E. affinis may be the reason why it is outnumbered by Acartia tonsa in the summer in many locations. Seasonal partitioning of the biotope by the two species is maintained by k-strategy at lower temperatures with E. affinis carrying few large eggs, and r-strategy in summer with A. tonsa depositing many small eggs.

  12. Ocean Acidification Affects the Phyto-Zoo Plankton Trophic Transfer Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Gemma; Flynn, Kevin J; Lindeque, Penelope K

    2016-01-01

    The critical role played by copepods in ocean ecology and biogeochemistry warrants an understanding of how these animals may respond to ocean acidification (OA). Whilst an appreciation of the potential direct effects of OA, due to elevated pCO2, on copepods is improving, little is known about the indirect impacts acting via bottom-up (food quality) effects. We assessed, for the first time, the chronic effects of direct and/or indirect exposures to elevated pCO2 on the behaviour, vital rates, chemical and biochemical stoichiometry of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa. Bottom-up effects of elevated pCO2 caused species-specific biochemical changes to the phytoplanktonic feed, which adversely affected copepod population structure and decreased recruitment by 30%. The direct impact of elevated pCO2 caused gender-specific respiratory responses in A.tonsa adults, stimulating an enhanced respiration rate in males (> 2-fold), and a suppressed respiratory response in females when coupled with indirect elevated pCO2 exposures. Under the combined indirect+direct exposure, carbon trophic transfer efficiency from phytoplankton-to-zooplankton declined to < 50% of control populations, with a commensurate decrease in recruitment. For the first time an explicit role was demonstrated for biochemical stoichiometry in shaping copepod trophic dynamics. The altered biochemical composition of the CO2-exposed prey affected the biochemical stoichiometry of the copepods, which could have ramifications for production of higher tropic levels, notably fisheries. Our work indicates that the control of phytoplankton and the support of higher trophic levels involving copepods have clear potential to be adversely affected under future OA scenarios.

  13. Mesozooplankton Grazing on Picocyanobacteria in the Baltic Sea as Inferred from Molecular Diet Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Motwani, Nisha H.; Gorokhova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Our current knowledge on the microbial component of zooplankton diet is limited, and it is generally assumed that bacteria-sized prey is not directly consumed by most mesozooplankton grazers in the marine food webs. We questioned this assumption and conducted field and laboratory studies to examine picocyanobacteria contribution to the diets of Baltic Sea zooplankton, including copepods. First, qPCR targeting ITS-1 rDNA sequence of the picocyanobacteria Synechococcus spp. was used to examine picocyanobacterial DNA occurrence in the guts of Baltic zooplankton (copepods, cladocerans and rotifers). All field-collected zooplankton were found to consume picocyanobacteria in substantial quantities. In terms of Synechococcus quantity, the individual gut content was highest in cladocerans, whereas biomass-specific gut content was highest in rotifers and copepod nauplii. Moreover, the gut content in copepods was positively related to the picocyanobacteria abundance and negatively to the total phytoplankton abundance in the water column at the time of sampling. This indicates that increased availability of picocyanobacteria resulted in the increased intake of this prey and that copepods may rely more on picoplankton when food in the preferred size range declines. Second, a feeding experiments with a laboratory reared copepod Acartia tonsa fed a mixture of the picocyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris and microalga Rhodomonas salina confirmed that copepods ingested Synechococcus, even when the alternative food was plentiful. Finally, palatability of the picocyanobacteria for A. tonsa was demonstrated using uptake of 13C by the copepods as a proxy for carbon uptake in feeding experiment with 13C-labeled S. bacillaris. These findings suggest that, if abundant, picoplankton may become an important component of mesozooplankton diet, which needs to be accounted for in food web models and productivity assessments. PMID:24260175

  14. Short-term variability on mesozooplankton community in a shallow mixed estuary (Bahía Blanca, Argentina): Influence of tidal cycles and local winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, María C.; Piccolo, María C.; Hoffmeyer, Mónica S.

    2012-10-01

    The short-term dynamics of zooplankton in coastal ecosystems are strongly influenced by physical processes such as tides, riverine runoff and winds. In this study, we investigated the short-term changes of the representative taxa within mesozooplankton in relation to the semidiurnal tidal cycles. Also, we evaluated the influence of local winds on this short-term variability. Sampling was carried out bimonthly from December 2004 to April 2006 in a fixed point located in the inner zone of the Bahía Blanca Estuary, Argentina. Mesozooplankton samples were taken by pumps during 14-h tidal cycles at 3-h intervals, from surface and bottom. Vertical profiles of temperature and salinity as well as water samples to determine suspended particulate matter were acquired at each sampling date. All data concerning winds were obtained from a meteorological station and water level was recorded with a tide gauge. Holoplankton dominated numerically on meroplankton and adventitious fraction. Concerning holoplanktonic abundance, the highest values were attained by the calanoid copepods Acartia tonsa and Eurytemora americana. Meroplankton occurred mainly as barnacle larvae while benthic harpacticoids and Corophium sp. dominated the adventitious component. Semidiurnal tide was the main influence on the A. tonsa variability. However, noticeable differences in the abundance pattern as function of wind intensity were detected. Meroplankton abundance did not show a clear variation along the tidal cycle. Distributional pattern of harpacticoids seemed to be mainly modulated by velocity asymmetries in the tidal currents, in the same way as suspended particulate matter. However, the Corophium sp. distribution indicated probable behavioural responses associated with tides. The obtained results show how variable the mesozooplankton community structure can be over short-term time scales in mesotidal temperate estuaries. This variability should be taken into account for any zooplankton monitoring

  15. Toxicological effects of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on marine planktonic organisms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chao; Vitiello, Valentina; Pellegrini, David; Wu, Changwen; Morelli, Elisabetta; Buttino, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dot nanoparticles (QDs) are proposed as novel materials for photovoltaic technologies, light emitting devices, and biomedical applications. In this study we investigated the effect of CdSe/ZnS QDs on the growth rate of four microalgae: the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the cryptophyte Rhinomonas reticulata, the prymnesiophyte Isochrysis galbana and the green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta. In addition we analyzed the effect of QDs on the copepod Acartia tonsa. A classical acute test (48-h) with embryos was carried out to evaluate naupliar survival. Moreover, a 4-day chronic test with adult copepods was conducted to evaluate their fecundity (embryos f(-1)day(-1)) and egg hatching success. QDs in the range from 1 to 4nM gradually inhibited the growth rate of P. tricornutum, I. galbana, R. reticulata and D. tertiolecta with an EC50 of 1.5, 2.4, 2.5 and 4.2nM, respectively. Acute tests with A. tonsa (QD concentration tested from 0.15 to 1.5nM) showed an increased naupliar mortality in response to QD treatment, exhibiting an EC50 of 0.7nM. Chronic test showed no negative effect on egg production, except on the last two days at the highest QD concentration (2.5nM). No significant reduction of the percentage of egg hatching success was recorded during the exposure. Toxicity assessment of QDs was also investigated at the molecular level, studying heat shock protein 70 gene expression (hsp 70). Our results indicate that hsp70 was upregulated in adults exposed 3 days to 0.5nM QDs. Overall, these results suggest that species unable to swim along the water column, like P. tricornutum and early hatched copepods, could be more exposed to toxic effects of QDs which tend to aggregate and settle in seawater.

  16. Influence of top-down control in the plankton food web on vertical carbon flux: a mesocosm study in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J.; Steinberg, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of predation on carbon export in planktonic food webs are poorly known, but likely play a key role in the biological pump. Gelatinous zooplankton (GZ) dominate the zooplankton community in the Chesapeake Bay during summer months, exerting considerable top-down control on the planktonic food web. The medusa Chrysaora quinquecirrha preys upon the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, which in turn is a major predator of the omnivorous copepod Acartia tonsa. This trophic cascade is known to significantly affect copepod abundance in Chesapeake Bay, but the resulting changes to particulate organic carbon (POC) flux are unknown. We hypothesized that additions or exclusions of GZ predators would result in changes in both total POC flux and the composition of exported particles (e.g., phytoplankton aggregates, fecal pellets). We conducted mesocosm experiments in the York River tributary of Chesapeake Bay during summer and fall, 2015 to quantify the cascading effects of GZ blooms on POC flux. The mesocosms contained a natural assemblage of phytoplankton and microzooplankton, and A. tonsa copepods, and received one of four treatments of GZ: 1) a control with no GZ added, 2) addition of ctenophores, 3) addition of medusae, and 4) addition of both ctenophores and medusae. POC flux from each mesocosm was measured over multiple 2-day experimental runs and grazing rates of GZ on each other and on copepods were calculated. There were no significant differences in total POC flux between treatments, but the composition of both the final zooplankton assemblage and exported organic matter differed between treatments. As a result of grazing on copepods by ctenophores, treatments which included GZ had lower final copepod abundances and a corresponding decrease in flux of copepod fecal pellets. We discuss how this change in composition of exported material as a result of cascading trophic interactions may affect the efficiency of the biological pump and benthic processes.

  17. Discriminating zooplankton assemblages in neritic and oceanic waters: a case for the northeast coast of India, Bay of Bengal.

    PubMed

    Rakhesh, M; Raman, A V; Sudarsan, D

    2006-02-01

    Zooplankton species distribution and abundance data at 17 locations in the inshore (10-30 m), shelf (50-200 m) and oceanic (2,500-2,800 m) regions off northeast India (Bay of Bengal) during January 1999-April 2001 revealed 112 taxa represented by 30 divergent groups. Copepods (58 species) dominated (87%) the population numerically. In general zooplankton diversity (Margalef richness d, Shannon-Wiener H', Pielou's evenness J') increased in the direction of the open sea relative to coastal locations with a concomitant decrease both in abundance (ind m(-3)) and biomass (dry mass m(-3)). Based on multivariate analyses, it was possible to distinguish the zooplankton community into different assemblages according to their location (e.g., inshore, shelf, oceanic) and seasonality. While Acrocalanus sp., Oithona sp., Corycaeus danae, Euterpina acutifrons, Paracalanus sp., and Acartia sp. were found characterizing the coastal locations, Oncaea venusta was the discriminating species for shelf waters. In oceanic areas, there was a clear dominance of Labidocera sp., Candacia sp., Euchaeta rimana, Centropages calaninus, Copilia mirabilis and Corycella gibbula. The investigations revealed that changes in zooplankton community structure across water bodies could be associated with differing salinity. During November 1999 (post-monsoon), when salinity in the coastal waters was relatively low (26-28.9 PSU), the zooplankton community consisted of mainly Acrocalanus sp., Salpa, Corycaeus danae, Oikopleura sp., Acartia sp., Evadne tergestina, and Creseis sp. In January 2000 (salinity 32.4-34.1), additionally Corycella gibbula, Labidocera sp., Centropages sp., Microsetella sp., Euterpina acutifrons, Canthocalanus pauper, and Oncaea venusta represented the population discriminating the assemblage from others. In May 2000 (pre-monsoon) when salinity was highest (34.7-35.3), Oithona sp., Paracalanus sp., and Acrocalanus gibber were found important. Chaetognaths formed a distinct group

  18. Copepod behavior in thin layers of attractive and deterrent chemical cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, M.; Webster, D. R.; Weissburg, M. J.; Yen, J.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the oceanographic distribution of mobile zooplankton can be attributed, at least in part, to foraging and aggregative behaviors. A laboratory system was developed to test the cues that induce these behaviors. The system mimics thin layer structure in the ocean, and the research has focused on calanoid copepods, specifically Temora longicornis and Acartia tonsa. Responses are directly observed as copepod cultures are subjected to different attractive and deterrent chemical cues, such as phytoplankton (food) and harmful algal bloom metabolites. Behaviors are quantified using three behavioral markers: proportional residence time in the thin layer, swimming speed, and turn frequency. These three markers are measured using video-based observation, which quantifies path kinematics and swimming behavior. Previous experiments have shown that attractive chemical exudates elicite behaviors such as increased swimming speed and excited area-restricted search behavior. Thus, understanding how zooplankton behave in response to chemicals from toxic species will extend our understanding of zooplankton interaction with thin layers and the potential consequences for population dynamics, nutrient cycling, and biodiversity in coastal and pelagic ecosystems.

  19. Copepod Trajectory Characteristics in Thin Layers of Toxic Algal Exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; True, A. C.; Weissburg, M. J.; Yen, J.

    2013-11-01

    Recently documented thin layers of toxic phytoplankton (``cryptic blooms'') are modeled in a custom flume system for copepod behavioral assays. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements quantify the spatiotemporal structure of the chemical layers ensuring a close match to in situ bloom conditions and allowing for quantification of threshold dissolved toxin levels that induce behavioral responses. Assays with the copepods Acartia tonsa (hop-sinker) and Temora longicornis (cruiser) in thin layers of toxic exudates from the common dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (cell equivalent ~ 1 - 10,000 cells/mL) examine the effects of dissolved toxic compounds and copepod species on swimming trajectory characteristics. Computation of parameters such as swimming speed and the fractal dimension of the two-dimensional trajectory (F2D) allows for statistical evaluation of copepod behavioral responses to dissolved toxic compounds associated with harmful algal blooms (HABs). Changes in copepod swimming behavior caused by toxic compounds can significantly influence predator, prey, and mate encounter rates by altering the fracticality (``diffuseness'' or ``volume-fillingness'') of a copepod's trajectory. As trophic mediators linking primary producers and higher trophic levels, copepods can significantly influence HAB dynamics and modulate large scale ecological effects through their behavioral interactions with toxic blooms.

  20. Influence of UVB radiation on the lethal and sublethal toxicity of dispersed crude oil to planktonic copepod nauplii.

    PubMed

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Harvey, Tracy E; Connelly, Tara L; Baca, Sarah; Buskey, Edward J

    2016-06-01

    Toxic effects of petroleum to marine zooplankton have been generally investigated using dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons and in the absence of sunlight. In this study, we determined the influence of natural ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the lethal and sublethal toxicity of dispersed crude oil to naupliar stages of the planktonic copepods Acartia tonsa, Temora turbinata and Pseudodiaptomus pelagicus. Low concentrations of dispersed crude oil (1 μL L(-1)) caused a significant reduction in survival, growth and swimming activity of copepod nauplii after 48 h of exposure. UVB radiation increased toxicity of dispersed crude oil by 1.3-3.8 times, depending on the experiment and measured variables. Ingestion of crude oil droplets may increase photoenhanced toxicity of crude oil to copepod nauplii by enhancing photosensitization. Photoenhanced sublethal toxicity was significantly higher when T. turbinata nauplii were exposed to dispersant-treated oil than crude oil alone, suggesting that chemical dispersion of crude oil may promote photoenhanced toxicity to marine zooplankton. Our results demonstrate that acute exposure to concentrations of dispersed crude oil and dispersant (Corexit 9500) commonly found in the sea after oil spills are highly toxic to copepod nauplii and that natural levels of UVB radiation substantially increase the toxicity of crude oil to these planktonic organisms. Overall, this study emphasizes the importance of considering sunlight in petroleum toxicological studies and models to better estimate the impact of crude oil spills on marine zooplankton. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates: Evidence that the Adaptive Value of Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates is Concentration Dependent.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Karen A; Widder, Edith A

    2017-03-01

    Three major hypotheses have been proposed to explain why dinoflagellate bioluminescence deters copepod grazing: startle response, aposematic warning, and burglar alarm. These hypotheses propose dinoflagellate bioluminescence (A) startles predatory copepods, (B) warns potential predators of toxicity, and (C) draws the attention of higher order visual predators to the copepod's location. While the burglar alarm is the most commonly accepted hypothesis, it requires a high concentration of bioluminescent dinoflagellates to be effective, meaning the bioluminescence selective advantage at lower, more commonly observed, dinoflagellate concentrations may result from another function (e.g. startle response or aposematic warning). Therefore, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate copepod grazing (Acartia tonsa) on bioluminescent dinoflagellates (during bioluminescent and nonbioluminescent phases, corresponding to night and day, respectively) at different concentrations (10, 1000, and 3000 cells mL(-1) ), on toxic (Pyrodinium bahamense var. bahamense) and nontoxic (Lingulodinium polyedrum) bioluminescent dinoflagellates, and in the presence of nonluminescent diatoms (Thalassiosira eccentrica). Changes in copepod ingestion rates, clearance rates, and feeding preferences as a result of these experimental factors, particularly during the mixed trails with nonluminescent diatoms, indicate there is a concentration threshold at which the burglar alarm becomes effective and below which dinoflagellate bioluminescence functions as an aposematic warning.

  2. Ingestion and sublethal effects of physically and chemically dispersed crude oil on marine planktonic copepods.

    PubMed

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Baca, Sarah; Hyatt, Cammie; Buskey, Edward J

    2014-08-01

    Planktonic copepods play a key function in marine ecosystems, however, little is known about the effects of dispersants and chemically dispersed crude oil on these important planktonic organisms. We examined the potential for the copepods Acartia tonsa, Temora turbinata and Parvocalanus crassirostris to ingest crude oil droplets and determined the acute toxicity of the dispersant Corexit(®) 9500A, and physically and chemically dispersed crude oil to these copepods. We detected ingestion of crude oil droplets by adults and nauplii of the three copepod species. Exposure to crude oil alone (1 µL L(-1), 48 h) caused a reduction of egg production rates (EPRs) by 26-39 %, fecal pellet production rates (PPRs) by 11-27 %, and egg hatching (EH) by 1-38 % compared to the controls, depending on the species. Dispersant alone (0.05 µL L(-1), 48 h) produced a reduction in EPR, PPR and EH by 20-35, 12-23 and 2-11 %, respectively. Dispersant-treated crude oil was the most toxic treatment, ~1.6 times more toxic than crude oil alone, causing a reduction in EPR, PPR and EH by 45-54, 28-41 and 11-31 %, respectively. Our results indicate that low concentrations of dispersant Corexit 9500A and chemically dispersed crude oil are toxic to marine zooplankton, and that the ingestion of crude oil droplets by copepods may be an important route by which crude oil pollution can enter marine food webs.

  3. Association of Vibrio cholerae with plankton in coastal areas of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lizárraga-Partida, M L; Mendez-Gómez, E; Rivas-Montaño, A M; Vargas-Hernández, E; Portillo-López, A; González-Ramírez, A R; Huq, A; Colwell, R R

    2009-01-01

    The El Niño event of 1997/1998 provided an opportunity to carry out a field experiment in which the relationship of sea surface temperature and the association of Vibrio cholerae with marine plankton could be assessed in Mexican coastal and estuarine areas. Plankton samples were collected from May 1997 through June 1999. Sites included the Mexican ports of Veracruz, Coatzacoalcos and Frontera in the Gulf of Mexico and Ensenada, Guaymas, Mazatlán, Manzanillo, Acapulco and Oaxaca in the Pacific Ocean. Sampling was also accomplished during two oceanographic cruises in the Yucatan channel of the Caribbean Sea. Bacteriological analyses for V. cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 were carried out. Also, the taxonomic structure of the plankton populations was determined. Vibrio cholerae O1 was detected only in Veracruz samples collected during April, May and June 1999, when La Niña climatic conditions prevailed. It is concluded that V. cholerae O1 in Mexico derives from its marine and estuarine origin and not from sewage contamination. The significant number of Acartia tonsa copepodites and V. cholerae copepodite-positive samples suggests a significant role of this copepod in the occurrence and distribution of V. cholerae in coastal areas of Mexico.

  4. Evaluation of antibiotics as a methodological procedure to inhibit free-living and biofilm bacteria in marine zooplankton culture.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Vanessa O; Macedo, Alexandre J; Muxagata, Erik

    2016-01-01

    There is a problem with keeping culture medium completely or partially free from bacteria. The use of prokaryotic metabolic inhibitors, such as antibiotics, is suggested as an alternative solution, although such substances should not harm non-target organisms. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments in inhibiting free-living and biofilm bacteria and their half-life in artificial marine environment using the copepod Acartia tonsa as bioindicador of non-harmful antibiotic combinations. Regarding to results, the application of 0.025 g L-1 penicillin G potassium + 0.08 g L-1 streptomycin sulphate + 0.04 g L-1 neomycin sulphate showed great potential for use in marine cultures and scientific experiments without lethal effects to non-target organisms. The effect of this combination starts within the first six hours of exposure and reduces up to 93 % the bacterial density, but the half-life is short, requiring replacement. No adverse changes in water quality were observed within 168 hours of exposure. As a conclusion, we can infer that this treatment was an effective procedure for zooplankton cultures and scientific experiments with the aim of measuring the role of free-living and biofilm in the marine community.

  5. Mortality and LC50 values for several stages of the marine copepod Tigriopus brevicornis (Müller) exposed to the metals arsenic and cadmium and the pesticides atrazine, carbofuran, dichlorvos, and malathion.

    PubMed

    Forget, J; Pavillon, J F; Menasria, M R; Bocquené, G

    1998-07-01

    The toxicity of three insecticides (carbofuran, dichlorvos, malathion), an herbicide (atrazine), and two metals (arsenic and cadmium) to ovigerous females, copepodids, and nauplii of Tigriopus brevicornis was determined by 96-h semistatic (or static-renewal) bioassays. Freshly prepared aqueous stock solutions of these pesticides and metals were diluted to appropriate concentrations. Mortalities were recorded and test solutions were changed completely each day up to 96 h. The rate of mortality was analyzed for linear regressions, and LC50 values were determined by probit analysis. LC50 values for ovigerous T. brevicornis females were 153.2 micrograms liter-1 for atrazine, 59.9 micrograms liter-1 for carbofuran, 47.9 micrograms liter-1 for cadmium, 27.5 micrograms liter-1 for arsenic, 24.3 micrograms liter-1 for malathion, and 4.6 micrograms liter-1 for dichlorvos. Comparison of the overall toxicities of these pesticides and metals indicated that dichlorvos was the most toxic substance to T. brevicornis, followed by malathion, arsenic, cadmium, carbofuran, and atrazine. Available LC50 data indicate that marine copepods are more sensitive to pollutants than Daphnia magna, Acartia tonsa, and Tisbe battagliai, or as sensitive as the mysid Mysidopsis bahia.

  6. Selected alternatives to conventional chlorination. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garey, J.F.

    1980-10-01

    This study was jointly funded by EPRI and five electric utility companies in New England (New England Power, Northeast Utilities, United Illuminating, Vermont Yankee Nuclear, and Public Service of New Hampshire). Previous investigations had identified three major areas for further study: continuous low-level chlorination, dechlorination, and condenser biofouling control. Continuous low-level chlorination, studied at two locations, one on open coastal water and the other in an industrialized estuarine area, showed that 0.1 ppM total residual oxidant (TRO) prevented attachment of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) to concrete surfaces. Chronic bioassays showed that 0.075 ppM TRO reduced biofouling by indigenous organisms; 0.1 ppM TRO slightly increased mortalities of the Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia) but had no effect on the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Dechlorination investigations showed that threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia), larval bay scallops (Argopecten irradians), and the copepod Acartia tonsa exposed to water chlorinated to 0.5 ppM TRO for 10, 100, and 1000 seconds, followed by dechlorination with sodium thiosulfate, all suffered significant toxic effects. Condenser tube biofouling studies showed that there was a strong correlation between condenser performance and condenser tube biofouling; biofilm induction varied inversely with ambient water temperature, but orientation of the tubes had no effect on biofilm formation; and all chemicals tested (mono-, di-, and trisodium phosphate; Polident; and TRO at 0.1 ppM) reduced but did not remove biofilms.

  7. The diatom-produced polyunsaturated aldehydes can induce trophic cascades in the planktonic food web in productive coastal waters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzè, G.; Stoecker, D. K.; Pierson, J. J.; Lavrentyev, P.

    2016-02-01

    Allelopathy is wide spread among marine phytoplankton, including diatoms that produce cytotoxic secondary metabolites such as polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA). Most published PUA studies focused on the reproduction and development of specific marine invertebrates under laboratory conditions. In this study, we examined the effect of PUA on the trophic interactions between the copepod Acartia tonsa and natural microplankton collected from the Chesapeake Bay and the Virginia coastal waters. A set of bottle incubation experiments was conducted using the environmentally realistic concentrations of dissolved 2E, 4E-heptadienal and 2E, 4E-octadienal. Although PUA did not change phytoplankton growth, microzooplankton growth was affected at the species-specific level and their community herbivory rates declined. At the same time, the rates of copepod herbivory and predation on ciliates increased in the PUA treatments. These preliminary results suggest that production of cytotoxic compounds by diatoms may be a defense mechanism primarily against microzooplankton. The cascading effects induced by PUA can alter the composition and dynamics of microbial plankton communities, which in turn could have strong implication for the carbon cycling in productive coastal ecosystems.

  8. Food quality affects secondary consumers even at low quantities: an experimental test with larval European lobster.

    PubMed

    Schoo, Katherina L; Aberle, Nicole; Malzahn, Arne M; Boersma, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    The issues of food quality and food quantity are crucial for trophic interactions. Although most research has focussed on the primary producer-herbivore link, recent studies have shown that quality effects at the bottom of the food web propagate to higher trophic levels. Negative effects of poor food quality have almost exclusively been demonstrated at higher food quantities. Whether these negative effects have the same impact at low food availability in situations where the majority if not all of the resources are channelled into routine metabolism, is under debate. In this study a tri-trophic food chain was designed, consisting of the algae Rhodomonas salina, the copepod Acartia tonsa and freshly hatched larvae of the European lobster Homarus gammarus. The lobster larvae were presented with food of two different qualities (C:P ratios) and four different quantities to investigate the combined effects of food quality and quantity. Our results show that the quality of food has an impact on the condition of lobster larvae even at very low food quantities. Food with a lower C:P content resulted in higher condition of the lobster larvae regardless of the quantity of food. These interacting effects of food quality and food quantity can have far reaching consequences for ecosystem productivity.

  9. Tests for oil/dispersant toxicity: In situ laboratory assays

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.A.; Coelho, G.M.; Aurand, D.V.

    1995-12-31

    As part of its readiness program in oil spill response, the Marine Pollution Control Unit (MPCU), Department of Transport, U.K. conducts annual field trials in the North Sea, approximately 30 nautical miles from the southeast coast of England. The trials take the form of controlled releases of crude oil or Medium Fuel/Gas Oil mix (MFO), with and without the application of Corexit 9527 dispersant. In 1994 and 1995 the authors conducted a series of in situ toxicity bioassays in association with these spills with included 48h LC50 tests for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae, a 48 h oyster (C. gigas) embryonic development test and two full life-cycle assays using the copepods Acartia tonsa and Tisbe battagliai. Tests were also conducted in the Chesapeake Bay laboratory using estuarine species including the copepod Eurytemora affinis and the inland silverside Menidia beryllina. Here, the authors report on the results of these assays, together with 1996 in situ toxicity data resulting from Norwegian field trials in the northern North Sea.

  10. Diel vertical behavior of Copepoda community (naupliar, copepodites and adults) at the boundary of a temperate estuary and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. M. M.; Pardal, M. A.; Marques, S. C.; Mendes, S.; Fernández-Gómez, M. J.; Galindo-Villardón, M. P.; Azeiteiro, U. M.

    2012-02-01

    Despite a growing interest in diel vertical migration as a research topic, there are few studies in southern European marine coastal systems. This study determined the main structuring hydrological and physical factors at different temporal scales in copepod assemblage distribution patterns. Seasonal, tidal, lunar and diel vertical migrations accomplished by horizontal movements were examined on the main copepod fraction of the Mondego estuary, Portugal. Seasonal samples were conducted hourly at the mouth of the estuary, during diel cycles (25 h), both over neap and spring tides, at the bottom and surface, using a 63 μm and 335 μm mesh size nets. Simultaneously, four sites inside the estuary were sampled during flood tide to evaluate and compare copepods species' distribution along the estuary. Species life cycles were also categorized. Spring-spring tide best expresses the stable part of copepod-environment dynamics. Acartia tonsa and Oithona nana were distributed mainly at the bottom during ebb tides. A clear resident estuarine performance was noticeable in O. nana proving the estuarine preferences of the species. Neritic species showed preferences by saline waters, whereas the resident species were found mainly at estuarine areas. Copepodites stages showed a similar distribution pattern as estuarine species, avoiding leaving the estuary. In contrast nauplii and Oithona plumifera showed higher densities at surface flood tides. Indeed, vertical migrations accomplished by horizontal movements were mainly influenced by depth and tidal cycles, whereas day and night were not ecologically significant.

  11. Prey Detection and Prey Capture in Copepod Nauplii

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Eleonora; Andersen Borg, Christian Marc; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Copepod nauplii are either ambush feeders that feed on motile prey or they produce a feeding current that entrains prey cells. It is unclear how ambush and feeding-current feeding nauplii perceive and capture prey. Attack jumps in ambush feeding nauplii should not be feasible at low Reynolds numbers due to the thick viscous boundary layer surrounding the attacking nauplius. We use high-speed video to describe the detection and capture of phytoplankton prey by the nauplii of two ambush feeding species (Acartia tonsa and Oithona davisae) and by the nauplii of one feeding-current feeding species (Temora longicornis). We demonstrate that the ambush feeders both detect motile prey remotely. Prey detection elicits an attack jump, but the jump is not directly towards the prey, such as has been described for adult copepods. Rather, the nauplius jumps past the prey and sets up an intermittent feeding current that pulls in the prey from behind towards the mouth. The feeding-current feeding nauplius detects prey arriving in the feeding current but only when the prey is intercepted by the setae on the feeding appendages. This elicits an altered motion pattern of the feeding appendages that draws in the prey. PMID:23144712

  12. Marine microalgae attack and feed on metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Terje; Poulsen, Louise K; Moldrup, Morten; Daugbjerg, Niels; Juel Hansen, Per

    2012-01-01

    Free-living microalgae from the dinoflagellate genus Karlodinium are known to form massive blooms in eutrophic coastal waters worldwide and are often associated with fish kills. Natural bloom populations, recently shown to consist of the two mixotrophic and toxic species Karlodinium armiger and Karlodinium veneficum have caused fast paralysis and mortality of finfish and copepods in the laboratory, and have been associated with reduced metazooplankton biomass in-situ. Here we show that a strain of K. armiger (K-0688) immobilises the common marine copepod Acartia tonsa in a density-dependent manner and collectively ingests the grazer to promote its own growth rate. In contrast, four strains of K. veneficum did not attack or affect the motility and survival of the copepods. Copepod immobilisation by the K. armiger strain was fast (within 15 min) and caused by attacks of swarming cells, likely through the transfer and action of a highly potent but uncharacterised neurotoxin. The copepods grazed and reproduced on a diet of K. armiger at densities below 1000, cells ml−1, but above 3500 cells ml−1 the mixotrophic dinoflagellates immobilised, fed on and killed the copepods. Switching the trophic role of the microalgae from prey to predator of copepods couples population growth to reduced grazing pressure, promoting the persistence of blooms at high densities. K. armiger also fed on three other metazoan organisms offered, suggesting that active predation by mixotrophic dinoflagellates may be directly involved in causing mortalities at several trophic levels in the marine food web. PMID:22513533

  13. Marine microalgae attack and feed on metazoans.

    PubMed

    Berge, Terje; Poulsen, Louise K; Moldrup, Morten; Daugbjerg, Niels; Juel Hansen, Per

    2012-10-01

    Free-living microalgae from the dinoflagellate genus Karlodinium are known to form massive blooms in eutrophic coastal waters worldwide and are often associated with fish kills. Natural bloom populations, recently shown to consist of the two mixotrophic and toxic species Karlodinium armiger and Karlodinium veneficum have caused fast paralysis and mortality of finfish and copepods in the laboratory, and have been associated with reduced metazooplankton biomass in-situ. Here we show that a strain of K. armiger (K-0688) immobilises the common marine copepod Acartia tonsa in a density-dependent manner and collectively ingests the grazer to promote its own growth rate. In contrast, four strains of K. veneficum did not attack or affect the motility and survival of the copepods. Copepod immobilisation by the K. armiger strain was fast (within 15 min) and caused by attacks of swarming cells, likely through the transfer and action of a highly potent but uncharacterised neurotoxin. The copepods grazed and reproduced on a diet of K. armiger at densities below 1000, cells ml(-1), but above 3500 cells ml(-1) the mixotrophic dinoflagellates immobilised, fed on and killed the copepods. Switching the trophic role of the microalgae from prey to predator of copepods couples population growth to reduced grazing pressure, promoting the persistence of blooms at high densities. K. armiger also fed on three other metazoan organisms offered, suggesting that active predation by mixotrophic dinoflagellates may be directly involved in causing mortalities at several trophic levels in the marine food web.

  14. Towards an internationally harmonized test method for reproductive and developmental effects of endocrine disrupters in marine copepods.

    PubMed

    Kusk, K Ole; Wollenberger, Leah

    2007-02-01

    New and updated methods to detect and characterize endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are urgently needed for the purpose of environmental risk assessment since these substances are often not detected using existing chronic toxicity tests. Numerous reports on the effects of EDCs on crustacean development and reproduction have been published and the development of life-cycle tests with crustaceans has been prioritized within the OECD work program for endocrine disrupter testing and assessment. As a result, Sweden, and Denmark initiated a proposal for development of a full life-cycle test with marine copepods (Acartia tonsa, Nitocra spinipes, Tisbe battagliai, and Amphiascus tenuiremis). The present paper gives an overview on the endocrine system of crustaceans with special emphasis on development and reproduction, which are targets for endocrine disruption, and reviews available methods for detecting effects on development and reproduction in calanoid and harpacticoid copepods. A draft OECD guideline Copepod Development and Reproduction Test has been developed, and a pre-validation of this draft guideline was completed in 2005. An updated draft guideline, taking into account the results of the pre-validation, is now under validation in an international ring-test, which is running till the end of 2006.

  15. DNA Barcoding of Zooplankton in the Hampton Roads Area: A Biodiversity Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo, A.; Rodríguez, Á. E.; Gibson, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    The study of zooplankton biodiversity and distribution is crucial to understand oceanic ecosystems and anticipate the effects of climate change. Previously, identification of zooplankton relied in morphological identification employed by expert taxonomists. DNA barcoding, a technique that uses the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Cytochrome Oxidase 1 (CO1) gene is widely used for taxonomic identification. Thus, this molecular technique will be used to begin a detailed characterization of zooplankton diversity, abundance and community structure in the Hampton Roads Area (HRA). Stations 1 (Jones Creek) and 3 (lower Chesapeake Bay) were sampled in June 19, 2015. Stations 1, 2 (James River), and 3 were sampled in September 2015. Zooplankton samples were collected in triplicates with a 0.5m, 200 µm mesh net. Physical parameters (dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature and, water transparency) were measured. Species identified as Opistonema oglinum (Atlantic Thread Herring) and Paracalanus parvus copepods were found at station 3; Anchoa mitchilli and Acartia tonsa copepods were found at stations 1 and 3. This study indicates that mtDNA-CO1 barcoding is suitable to identify zooplankton to the species level and helps validate DNA barcoding as a faster, more accurate taxonomic approach. The long term objective of this project is to provide a comprehensive assessment of zooplankton in the HRA and to generate a reference record for broad monitoring programs; vital for a better understanding and management of ecologically and commercially important species.

  16. Characterization of the current biological communities within the Nanticoke River in the vicinity of the Vienna SES

    SciTech Connect

    Stroup, C.F.; Brindley, A.; Kazyak, P.F.

    1991-07-01

    Pursuant to a utility's intent to file for permission to build a generating station along the Nanticoke River, Maryland, a field program was conducted to update characterizations of major aquatic biota of the river in proximity to the existing power plant and a potential intake/discharge location. This characterization sampled five stations on the Nanticoke River, spanning 14 miles from Chapter Point to Riverton, between July 1988 and October 1989. During the study period, the juvenile and adult fish community was dominated by white perch, Atlantic menhaden, bay anchovy, hogchoker, and spot. Spring ichthyoplankton was composed of white perch, striped bass, yellow perch, and alosids, while summer ichthyoplankton was dominated by naked gobies and bay anchovy. Acartia tonsa, Eurytemora affinis and Bosmina longirostris dominated zooplankton samples. The phytoplankton community was composed primarily of diatoms, green algae, and monads. Polychaetes and crustaceans were the dominant macrobenthic taxa, with molluscs contributing to total abundance primarily during spring recruitment. The final report presents the results of fish, ichthyoplankton, zooplankton, and benthic surveys conducted between July 1988 and October 1989 in the middle portion of the Nanticoke River, Maryland. During the dry conditions of 1988, aquatic communities were dominated by estuarine species, while the lower saline environment of 1989 resulted in the presence of more freshwater species.

  17. Experimental Investigation of 3-D flow fields around the mouth of the Dwarf Seahorse during attacks on planktonic prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmell, Brad; Buskey, Edward; Sheng, Jian

    2009-11-01

    Copepods are an important planktonic food source for fish species. High predation has led to the development of effective escape responses with short reaction times (less than 2 ms), maximum escape velocities of over 500 body lengths per second and shear sensitivity as low as 1.5s-1. Using high speed digital holography (2 kfps), we measure 3-D distributions of velocity generated by a dwarf seahorse (Hippocampus zosterae) during attacks on its copepod prey, Acartia tonsa. It is found that successful attacks often produce smaller or even no detectable hydrodynamic disturbances around the strike zone, when compared to unsuccessful attempts. In this paper, we will provide quantitative characterization of this ``low-flow'' zone. Further, to elucidate the role of a possible geometrical advantage of the seahorse's head in minimizing its bow wave, high-speed time resolved PIV measurements are conducted in a low-speed water tunnel. On-going analysis will provide insights and implications in understanding the dynamics of flows around the stagnation point at high Reynolds number flow. Sponsored by NSF.

  18. Host-Specific and pH-Dependent Microbiomes of Copepods in an Extensive Rearing System

    PubMed Central

    Skovgaard, Alf; Castro-Mejia, Josue Leonardo; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are to an increasing extent cultivated as feed for mariculture fish larvae with variable production success. In the temperate climate zone, this production faces seasonal limitation due to changing abiotic factors, in particular temperature and light. Furthermore, the production of copepods may be influenced by biotic factors of the culture systems, such as competing microorganisms, harmful algae, or other eukaryotes and prokaryotes that may be non-beneficial for the copepods. In this study, the composition of bacteria associated with copepods was investigated in an extensive outdoor copepod production system. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that bacteria were primarily found attached to the exoskeleton of copepods although a few bacteria were also found in the gut as well as internally in skeletal muscle tissue. Through 16S rRNA gene-targeted denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, a clear difference was found between the microbiomes of the two copepod species, Acartia tonsa and Centropages hamatus, present in the system. This pattern was corroborated through 454/FLX-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of copepod microbiomes, which furthermore showed that the abiotic parameters pH and oxygen concentration in rearing tank water were the key factors influencing composition of copepod microbiomes. PMID:26167852

  19. Toxicity and phototoxicity of water-accommodated fraction obtained from Prestige fuel oil and Marine fuel oil evaluated by marine bioassays.

    PubMed

    Saco-Alvarez, Liliana; Bellas, Juan; Nieto, Oscar; Bayona, Josep María; Albaigés, Joan; Beiras, Ricardo

    2008-05-15

    Acute toxicity and phototoxicity of heavy fuel oil extracted directly from the sunken tanker Prestige in comparison to a standard Marine fuel oil were evaluated by obtaining the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) and using mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryogenesis bioassays, and copepod Acartia tonsa and fish Cyprinodon variegatus survival bioassays. Aromatic hydrocarbon (AH) levels in WAF were measured by gas chromatography. Prestige WAF was not phototoxic, its median effective concentrations (EC50) were 13% and 10% WAF for mussel and sea urchin respectively, and maximum lethal threshold concentrations (MLTC) were 12% and 50% for copepod and fish respectively. Marine WAF resulted phototoxic for mussel bioassay. EC50s of Marine WAF were 50% for sea urchin in both treatments and 20% for mussel under illumination. Undiluted Marine WAF only caused a 20% decrease in mussel normal larvae. Similar sensitivities were found among sea urchins, mussels and copepods, whilst fish were less sensitive. Unlike Marine WAF, Prestige WAF showed EC50 values at dilutions below 20%, and its toxicity was independent of lighting conditions. The differences in toxicity between both kinds of fuel could not be explained on the basis of total AH content.

  20. Food Quality Affects Secondary Consumers Even at Low Quantities: An Experimental Test with Larval European Lobster

    PubMed Central

    Schoo, Katherina L.; Aberle, Nicole; Malzahn, Arne M.; Boersma, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    The issues of food quality and food quantity are crucial for trophic interactions. Although most research has focussed on the primary producer – herbivore link, recent studies have shown that quality effects at the bottom of the food web propagate to higher trophic levels. Negative effects of poor food quality have almost exclusively been demonstrated at higher food quantities. Whether these negative effects have the same impact at low food availability in situations where the majority if not all of the resources are channelled into routine metabolism, is under debate. In this study a tri-trophic food chain was designed, consisting of the algae Rhodomonas salina, the copepod Acartia tonsa and freshly hatched larvae of the European lobster Homarus gammarus. The lobster larvae were presented with food of two different qualities (C∶P ratios) and four different quantities to investigate the combined effects of food quality and quantity. Our results show that the quality of food has an impact on the condition of lobster larvae even at very low food quantities. Food with a lower C∶P content resulted in higher condition of the lobster larvae regardless of the quantity of food. These interacting effects of food quality and food quantity can have far reaching consequences for ecosystem productivity. PMID:22442696

  1. Hydrodynamics and energetics of jumping copepod nauplii and copepodids.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Navish; Andersen, Anders; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Within its life cycle, a copepod goes through drastic changes in size, shape and swimming mode. In particular, there is a stark difference between the early (nauplius) and later (copepodid) stages. Copepods inhabit an intermediate Reynolds number regime (between ~1 and 100) where both viscosity and inertia are potentially important, and the Reynolds number changes by an order of magnitude during growth. Thus we expect the life stage related changes experienced by a copepod to result in hydrodynamic and energetic differences, ultimately affecting the fitness. To quantify these differences, we measured the swimming kinematics and fluid flow around jumping Acartia tonsa at different stages of its life cycle, using particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry. We found that the flow structures around nauplii and copepodids are topologically different, with one and two vortex rings, respectively. Our measurements suggest that copepodids cover a larger distance compared to their body size in each jump and are also hydrodynamically quieter, as the flow disturbance they create attenuates faster with distance. Also, copepodids are energetically more efficient than nauplii, presumably due to the change in hydrodynamic regime accompanied with a well-adapted body form and swimming stroke.

  2. Assimilation and regeneration of trace elements by marine copepods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.-X.; Reinfelder, J.R.; Lee, B.-G.; Fisher, N.S.

    1996-01-01

    Assimilation efficiencies (AE) of five trace elements (Am, Cd, Co, Se, and Zn) and carbon by neritic copepods (Acartia tonsa and Temora longicornis) feeding at different food concentrations and on different food types (diatoms, green algae, flagellates, dinoflagellates, and Fe oxides) were measured with radiotracer techniques. Food concentration had little influence on AEs of C, Cd, Co, and Se within a range of 16-800 ?? C liter-1. AEs of Am and Zn were highest at low food concentrations (16-56 ??g C liter-1) but remained relatively constant when food levels exceeded 160 ??g C liter-1. Different algal diets had no major influence on AEs, which generally were in the order Cd > Se > Zn > Co > Am. Metals (Cd, Co, and Zn) were assimilated from Fe oxides with 50% less efficiency than from algal cells. Element regeneration into the dissolved phase was a significant route for the release of ingested elements by copepods and increased with increased food concentration. Element regeneration rates for Cd, Se, and Zn were comparable to the regeneration rates of major nutrients such as P (30-70% daily). Retention half-times of elements in decomposing fecal pellets ranged from 10 d (Am). The efficient assimilation and regeneration of Cd, Se, and Zn can significantly lengthen the residence time of these elements in ocean surface waters.

  3. Predation by the Dwarf Seahorse on Copepods: Quantifying Motion and Flows Using 3D High Speed Digital Holographic Cinematography - When Seahorses Attack!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmell, Brad; Sheng, Jian; Buskey, Ed

    2008-11-01

    Copepods are an important planktonic food source for most of the world's fish species. This high predation pressure has led copepods to evolve an extremely effective escape response, with reaction times to hydrodynamic disturbances of less than 4 ms and escape speeds of over 500 body lengths per second. Using 3D high speed digital holographic cinematography (up to 2000 frames per second) we elucidate the role of entrainment flow fields generated by a natural visual predator, the dwarf seahorse (Hippocampus zosterae) during attacks on its prey, Acartia tonsa. Using phytoplankton as a tracer, we recorded and reconstructed 3D flow fields around the head of the seahorse and its prey during both successful and unsuccessful attacks to better understand how some attacks lead to capture with little or no detection from the copepod while others result in failed attacks. Attacks start with a slow approach to minimize the hydro-mechanical disturbance which is used by copepods to detect the approach of a potential predator. Successful attacks result in the seahorse using its pipette-like mouth to create suction faster than the copepod's response latency. As these characteristic scales of entrainment increase, a successful escape becomes more likely.

  4. Does gender really matter in contaminant exposure? A case study using invertebrate models.

    PubMed

    McClellan-Green, Patricia; Romano, Jocelyn; Oberdörster, Eva

    2007-05-01

    Exposure to contaminants in the environment is indiscriminate and multiple species/populations of all sexes are potentially at risk. In this paper we examine the current information available on gender specific differences in invertebrates following exposure to environmental contaminants. Because of their close association with the environment and diversity of habitats, invertebrates are uniquely at risk for adverse responses to pollutants. Since 97% of all animal species are invertebrates, it would be impossible to cover each of the phyla in this review. Instead, this paper discusses major invertebrate species including insects (Periplaneta americana, Panorpa vulgaris, Lycosa hilaris, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.), and Drosophilia melanogaster), nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans), crustaceans (Streptocephalus dichotomus, Amphiascus tenuiremis, Microarthridion littorale, Tisbe bulbisetosa, Acartia tonsa, and Palaemonetes pugio), mollusks (Pinctada fucata martensii, Ilyanassa obsoleta, Nucella lapillus, Hinia reticulata, Thais clavigera, and Mercenaria mercenaria), corals (Euphyllia ancora and Montipara capitata), and echinoderms (Asterias rubens) that have been used in studies examining the differences between males and females. Our discussion focuses on gender differences that occur in both toxicokinetic mechanisms (uptake and elimination, metabolism and physiology) and other toxicological endpoints (survival and behavior as well as morphology and development). It will become evident that the endocrine systems of invertebrates have many traits and/or pathways that are comparable to those observed in higher organisms. Yet the sensitivity of some elements of the invertebrate endocrine system, e.g., disruption of neuropeptide hormone signaling following TBT exposure, highlights the uniqueness of their systems and their potential for disruption.

  5. First evidences of sexual selection by mate choice in marine zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Sara; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Sexual selection is potentially important in marine zooplankton, presumably the most abundant metazoans on earth, but it has never been documented. We examine the conditions for sexual selection through mate choice and describe mating preferences in relation to size in a marine zooplankter, the pelagic copepod Acartia tonsa. Males produce spermatophores at a rate (~1 day(-1)) much lower than known female encounter rates for most of the year and the decision to mate a particular female thus implies lost future opportunities. Female egg production increases with female size, and males mating larger females therefore sire more offspring per mating event. Similarly, females encounter males more frequently than they need to mate. Large males produce larger spermatophores than small males and the offspring production of female increases with the size of the spermatophore she receives. Additionally, large spermatophores allow females to fertilize eggs for a longer period. Thus, mating with large males reduces the female's need for frequent matings and she may sire sons that produce more offspring because size is heritable in copepods. Finally, we show that both males and females mate preferentially with large partners. This is the first demonstration of sexual selection by mate choice in a planktonic organism.

  6. Dana Farber Cancer Institute: Mapping the Function of Rare Oncogenic Variants | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Although some oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are recurrently mutated at high frequency, the majority of somatic sequence alterations found in cancers occur at low frequency, and the functional consequences of the majority of these mutated alleles remain unknown. We are developing a scalable systematic approach to interrogate the function of cancer-associated gene variants. Read the abstract: Kim et al., 2016

  7. A transcriptome resource for Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana) exposed to short-term stress.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maria João F; Lago-Leston, Asuncion; Anjos, Antonio; Duarte, Carlos M; Agusti, Susana; Serrão, Ester A; Pearson, Gareth A

    2015-10-01

    Euphausia superba is a keystone species in Antarctic food webs. However, the continued decrease in stock density raises concerns over the resilience and adaptive potential of krill to withstand the current rate of environmental change. We undertook a transcriptome-scale approach (454 pyrosequencing) as a baseline for future studies addressing the physiological response of krill to short-term food shortage and natural UV-B stress. The final assembly resulted in a total of 26,415 contigs, 39.8% of which were putatively annotated. Exploratory analyses indicate an overall reduction in protein synthesis under food shortage while UV stress resulted in the activation of photo-protective mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Barriers to Care for Transgender People: A Conversation With Dana Hines, PhD, MSN, RN

    PubMed Central

    Biederman, Donna J.; Hines, Dana

    2016-01-01

    A public health nurse talks about her career trajectory, her entry into nursing research, and her research career in transgender health. Transgender people encounter many health and social disparities, yet medical and nursing professionals are often ill-prepared to care for this population of individuals. The nursing profession is well known for its contributions to population health and for developing nursing-led interventions to improve the health outcomes of marginalized populations. Hines urges nursing to take a more active stance in transgender health and is leading this effort by example. PMID:27587944

  9. Ovarian Cancer Training Program at the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Biochemistry lab courses. Consulting experience 2001 Celera Genomics , South San Francisco, CA Curation of proteins for Celera’s proprietary PantherTM...aims to characterize the MIS specific Smads, and target genes for MIS :•.: "Comparative Genomics to Correct Human Lung Hypophasia" Program Project, PI...instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information

  10. Ovarian Cancer Training Program at the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    essential for maintenance of rapid rates of cell division and is thus an interesting target for therapeutic intervention in malignant diseases . The...currently in preparation. New Fellow- (2004-) Dr. John Miao is working on the role of Hepsin- a desmosomal junction associated protein that whose...analysis showed that hepsin co-localizes with desmoplakin at the cell membrane, where it is linked to keratin filaments at desmosomal junctions

  11. Comprehensive Condition Survey and Storm Waves, Circulation, and Sedimentation Study, Dana Point Harbor, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Extreme Wave Height Distribution at Location 6 Figure 4-1 Sketch of Wave Transmission and Flow Penetration through a Permeable Structure Figure 4-2...Forcing Figure 4-7 Comparisons between Simulated and Measured Currents at the Inside and Outside ADCP Stations with Different Permeable Breakwater...Segments Figure 4-8 Simulated Depth Averaged Current Fields for Non- Permeable Breakwaters Figure 4-9 Simulated Depth Averaged Current Fields with a

  12. Habitat shifts and spatial distribution of the intertidal crab Neohelice ( Chasmagnathus ) granulata Dana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casariego, Agustina Mendez; Alberti, Juan; Luppi, Tomás; Daleo, Pedro; Iribarne, Oscar

    2011-08-01

    Intertidal zones of estuaries and embayments of the SW Atlantic are dominated by the semiterrestrial burrowing grapsid crab, Neohelice ( Chasmagnathus) granulata, and characterized by extensive mud flats surrounded by salt marshes. In this work we examined spatial patterns of distribution of N. granulata during two years to explain their movement patterns. The results of the population sampling showed segregation by sex and size throughout the intertidal, with seasonal variations in densities and different condition indices for adults and juveniles at the different zones. The comparison of seasonal activity (ambulatory activity outside burrows) between marshes and mudflats shows that short term (e.g. daily) variations in activity were controlled by tides. Crabs were active at high tides but increased their activity on days with higher tidal amplitude. Seasonal activity showed that at both areas, females remain with low activity except for a peak in winter, while males showed the highest activity during summer in the mudflat zone, but not so in the marsh. This pattern can be the response to differences in stress tolerance, suggesting that high temperatures are limiting the performance of adult crabs during summer, especially at the marsh where physical conditions can be more critical. The spatial size segregation can be explained by differential mortality in each zone (estimated with tethered crabs), and by the juvenile movement between these zones (estimated with movement traps). Juvenile mortality is higher at the mudflat, while adult mortality is higher in the marsh. Smaller juveniles moved to the marsh, where the mortality is lower, and the larger juveniles moved towards the mudflat. This mortality is due almost exclusively to cannibalism, so our results suggest that this movement of different size classes between zones is controlled, at least in part, by intraspecific predation.

  13. Integrative Tumor Board: a Case Report and Discussion from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Weidong; Ott, Mary Jane; Kennedy, Stacy; Mathay, Maria B.; Doherty-Gilman, Anne M.; Dean-Clower, Elizabeth; Hayes, Carolyn M.; Rosenthal, David S.

    2010-01-01

    A 34-year-old female carrying a BRCA1 gene and a significant family history was diagnosed with T1c, N1 breast cancer. The tumor was estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER-2/Neu negative. The patient received dose-dense chemotherapy with Adriamycin and Cytoxan followed by Taxol, and left breast irradiation. Later, a bilateral S-GAP flap reconstruction with right prophylactic mastectomy and left mastectomy were performed. During her treatment, the patient had an integrative medicine consultation and was seen by a team of healthcare providers specializing in integrative therapies including integrative nutrition, therapeutic massage, acupuncture, and yoga. Each modality contributed unique benefit in her care that led to a satisfactory outcome of the patient. A detailed discussion regarding her care from each modality is presented. The case elucidates the need of integrative approaches for cancer patients in a conventional medical setting. PMID:19815593

  14. Wave glider observations of surface winds and currents in the core of Typhoon Danas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitarai, S.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of surface winds and currents is essential to understand oceanic responses to tropical cyclones. We used a new platform, a Wave Glider (Liquid Robotics) to observe air-sea processes during a typhoon, equivalent to a category 4-hurricane, at peak strength, near Okinawa, Japan. Surface winds showed strong asymmetry in both speed and direction, faster fore than aft. Rotations of surface winds and currents were not coupled; currents rotated clockwise in the wake of the typhoon eye after passage of rapid wind rotations. Wind work was mostly done ahead of the eye, amplifying prior inertial motions with a phase shift. Wind-induced energy was nearly balanced with an increase in estimated kinetic energy of the upper ocean current, relative to prior inertial oscillations. This study provides a newer, more complete view of actual atmosphere-ocean interactions in a typhoon.

  15. Gas chromatographic investigation of volatile nitrogen containing bases of Antarctic krill Euphausia superba Dana.

    PubMed

    Svetlova, N I; Golovnya, R V; Zhuravleva, I L; Grigorieva, D N; Samusenko, A L

    1985-01-01

    The composition of the volatile nitrogen-containing bases of fresh-caught Antarctic krill E. superba has been investigated by gas chromatography. The analysis was carried out on three packed columns with Apiezon L, Triton X-305, PEG-1000 and one glass capillary column with Triton X-305. The components were identified by standardless gas chromatographic method with a special computer program. No less than 63 compounds have been found and 54 compounds have been identified, among these primary, secondary and tertiary aliphatic amines as well as heterocyclic bases. The presence of 5 compounds has been confirmed by GC/MS technique. Analysis with the help of a specific flame-photometric detector has shown the presence of 9 bi-functional nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  16. Project DANA: multiagent simulation and fuzzy rules for international crisis detection--can we forestall wars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozien, Roger F.; Colautti, Andre

    1999-11-01

    Assessing the conflicting potential of an international situation is very important in the exercise of Defence duty. Mastering a formal method allowing the detection of risky situations is a necessity. Our aim was to develop a highly operational method twinned with a computer simulation tool which can explore a huge number of potential war zones, and can test many hypotheses with high accuracy within reasonable time. We use a multi-agents system to describe an international situation. The agent coding allows us to give computer existence to very abstract concepts such as: a government, the economy, the armed forces, the foreign policy... We give to these agents fuzzy rules of behavior, those rules represent human expertise. In order to yardstick our model we used the Falklands war to make our first simulations. The main distortion between the historical reality and our simulations comes from our fuzzy controller which causes a great loss of information. We are going to change it to a more efficient one in order to fit the historical reality. Agent coding with fuzzy rules allows human experts to keep close to their statements and expertise, and they can handle this kind of tool quite easily.

  17. Reliability Assessment of the Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment (DANA) in Extreme Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Management of Sport -Related Concussion ?," Journal of Athletic Training, Vol. 40, No. 3 (2005), pp. 139-152. 28. S. P. Broglio, M. S. Ferrara, S. N...Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery identified a need to enhance existing battlefield concussion assessment and requested the development of a...ANAM Lacks Utility as a Diagnostic or Screening Tool for Concussion More Than 10 Days Following Injury," Military Medicine, Vol. 177, No. 2 (2012

  18. ELECTRICAL STUDIES ON THE COMPOUND EYE OF LIGIA OCCIDENTALIS DANA (CRUSTACEA: ISOPODA)

    PubMed Central

    Ruck, Philip; Jahn, Theodore L.

    1954-01-01

    The ERG of the compound eye in freshly collected Ligia occidentalis, in response to high intensity light flashes of ⅛ second or longer duration, begins with a negative on-effect quickly followed by an early positive deflection, rapidly returns to the baseline during illumination, and ends with a positive off-effect. As the stimulus intensity is decreased the early positivity progressively decreases and the rapid return to the baseline is replaced by a slowing decline of the negative on-effect. Responses were recorded with one active electrode subcorneally situated in the illuminated eye, the reference electrode in the dark eye. The dark-adapted eye shows a facilitation of the amplitude and rates of rise and fall of the on-effect to a brief, high intensity light stimulus. This facilitation may persist for more than 2 minutes. Following light adaptation under conditions in which the human eye loses sensitivity by a factor of almost 40,000 the Ligia eye loses sensitivity by a factor of only 3. The flicker fusion frequency of the ERG may be as high as 120/second with a corneal illumination of 15,000 foot-candles. Bleeding an otherwise intact animal very rapidly results in a decline of amplitude, change of wave form, and loss of facilitation in the ERG. When the eye is deganglionated without bleeding the animal the isolated retina responds in the same manner as the intact eye. Histological examination of the Ligia receptor layer showed that each ommatidium contains three different retinula cell types, each of which may be responsible for a different aspect of the ERG. PMID:13174786

  19. Plankton dynamics and zooplankton carcasses in a mid-latitude estuary and their contributions to the local particulate organic carbon pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesecke, R.; Vallejos, T.; Sanchez, M.; Teiguiel, K.

    2017-01-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive aquatic ecosystems in coastal areas. Their productivity is linked to the formation of fronts generating mixing and retention of nutrients that can be used by autotrophs. Estuaries exhibit strong thermoclines and haloclines that may significantly affect zooplankton survival, while producing carcasses that could act as an alternative pathway of particulate organic carbon recycling. We investigated the in situ abundance of dead mero- and holozooplankton along the Valdivia River estuary, south-central Chile, during contrasting fresh water discharge conditions (summer, winter and spring), including the potential contribution of zooplankton carcasses to the particulate organic carbon standing stock along the estuary. Zooplankton samples were collected at four stations along the estuary during high tide at the surface, in the pycnocline and below the pycnocline. During autumn and winter the zooplankton community was mostly dominated by copepods, while during summer barnacle nauplii outnumbered copepods fourfold on average. During this study 29.5%±1.8% S.E. of the net-captured zooplankton community, including Acartia tonsa, Paracalanus spp., Oikopleura spp., copepod nauplii, Podon spp. and barnacle nauplii, appeared to have been dead at collection. Highest overall mortality occurred in winter (44±3.1% S.E.), with lower mortality during spring (26±3.8% S.E.) and summer (19±2.7% S.E.). The instantaneous mortality of copepods (Paracalanus spp. and A. tonsa) and copepod naupliar stages was always greater at the surface, associated with brackish water, while dead barnacle nauplii were usually distributed homogenously in the water column. The zooplankton carcass standing stock averaged 0.2 mg C m-3 (in spring and winter) contributing to 0.03-0.22% of the POC produced in the estuary, while in summer carcasses reached up to 2.99 mg C m-3 with a contribution up to 0.87% of the POC. The summer contribution is linked to the presence of

  20. Biochemical and toxicological effects of organic (herbicide Primextra(®) Gold TZ) and inorganic (copper) compounds on zooplankton and phytoplankton species.

    PubMed

    Filimonova, Valentina; Gonçalves, Fernando; Marques, João C; De Troch, Marleen; Gonçalves, Ana M M

    2016-08-01

    In Europe, mainly in the Mediterranean region, an intensive usage of pesticides was recorded during the past 30 years. According to information from agricultural cooperatives of the Mondego valley (Figueira da Foz, Portugal), Primextra(®) Gold TZ is the most used herbicide in corn crop fields and one of the 20 best-selling herbicides in Portugal. Copper is mainly used in pesticide formulations. This study aims to determine the ecotoxicological and biochemical (namely fatty acid profiles) effects of the herbicide Primextra(®) Gold TZ and the metal copper on marine plankton. The organisms used in this study are three planktonic species: the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, the estuarine copepod Acartia tonsa and nauplii of the marine brine shrimp Artemia franciscana. Fatty acids (FAs) are one of the most important molecules transferred across the plant-animal interface in aquatic food webs and can be used as good indicators of stress. The conducted lab incubations show that T. weissflogii is the most sensitive species to the herbicide followed by A. tonsa (EC50=0.0078mg/L and EC50=0.925mg/L, respectively), whereas the copepod was the most sensitive species to the metal followed by T. weissflogii (EC50=0.234mg/L and EC50=0.383mg/L, respectively). A. franciscana was the most tolerant organism both to the herbicide and to the metal (EC50=20.35mg/L and EC50=18.93mg/L, respectively). Changes in the FA profiles of primary producer and primary consumers were observed, with the increase of saturated FA and decrease of unsaturated FA contents, especially of highly unsaturated FAs that can be obtained mainly from food and therefore are referred to as 'essential FA'. The study suggests that discharges of Primextra(®) Gold TZ or other pesticides mainly composed by copper may be a threat to plankton populations causing changes in the FA contents and thus in their nutritive value, with severe repercussions for higher trophic levels and thus the entire food web

  1. Feeding preference and daily ration of 12 dominant copepods on mono and mixed diets of phytoplankton, rotifers, and detritus in a tropical coastal water.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, L; Jyothibabu, R; Arunpandi, N; Anjusha, A; Parthasarathi, S; Pandiyarajan, R S

    2017-09-11

    Results of the experimental studies on the feeding habit and daily ration (DR) of 12 dominant copepods from a tropical coastal water (off Kochi, Southwest coast of India) on different food items (phytoplankton, rotifers, and detritus) are presented. Even though, all species of copepods consumed all types of food items in the experiments, they showed noticeable feeding preferences, having important ecological implications. Calanoid Paracalanus parvus and Acrocalanus gracilis consumed phytoplankton and rotifers equally in mono diets (74-89% of DR) and mixed diets (53-82% of DR), which indicated their ability to shift their diet in natural environment based on the availability of food items. Calanoid Acartia erythraea and A. danae consumed more phytoplankton (DR 83 and 72%, respectively) than rotifers (DR 51 and 46%, respectively) in mono diets, and in mixed diets, their consumption was high in phytoplankton combined food mixtures (P + R DR and P + D DR) rather than the R + D food type, indicated their preference for mixed diets of phytoplankton. Similarly, Calanoid Temora turbinata, Pseudodiaptomus serricaudatus, and Centropages tenuiremis preferred a herbivorous diet as evidenced by their high ingestion rate on phytoplankton mono (70 to 87% to their DR) and mixed diets (58 to 80% of DR). On the other hand, Cyclopoid Oithona similis and Poecilostomatoid Corycaeus danae preferred a carnivorous diet, consuming more rotifers (> 80% of DR) than phytoplankton (18-20% of DR) and detritus (5-6% of DR). Harpacticoids Macrosetella gracilis and Euterpina acutifrons equally preferred phytoplankton (78-92% of DR) and detritus (65-89% of DR). The study showed that the dominant copepods in the coastal waters off Kochi occupy different trophic niches available in the environment, which may be applicable in other similar environments as well.

  2. The Kinematics of Swimming and Relocation Jumps in Copepod Nauplii

    PubMed Central

    Andersen Borg, Christian Marc; Bruno, Eleonora; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Copepod nauplii move in a world dominated by viscosity. Their swimming-by-jumping propulsion mode, with alternating power and recovery strokes of three pairs of cephalic appendages, is fundamentally different from the way other microplankters move. Protozoans move using cilia or flagella, and copepodites are equipped with highly specialized swimming legs. In some species the nauplius may also propel itself more slowly through the water by beating and rotating the appendages in a different, more complex pattern. We use high-speed video to describe jumping and swimming in nauplii of three species of pelagic copepods: Temora longicornis, Oithona davisae and Acartia tonsa. The kinematics of jumping is similar between the three species. Jumps result in a very erratic translation with no phase of passive coasting and the nauplii move backwards during recovery strokes. This is due to poorly synchronized recovery strokes and a low beat frequency relative to the coasting time scale. For the same reason, the propulsion efficiency of the nauplii is low. Given the universality of the nauplius body plan, it is surprising that they seem to be inefficient when jumping, which is different from the very efficient larger copepodites. A slow-swimming mode is only displayed by T. longicornis. In this mode, beating of the appendages results in the creation of a strong feeding current that is about 10 times faster than the average translation speed of the nauplius. The nauplius is thus essentially hovering when feeding, which results in a higher feeding efficiency than that of a nauplius cruising through the water. PMID:23115647

  3. How much crude oil can zooplankton ingest? Estimating the quantity of dispersed crude oil defecated by planktonic copepods.

    PubMed

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Connelly, Tara L; Buskey, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated and quantified defecation rates of crude oil by 3 species of marine planktonic copepods (Temora turbinata, Acartia tonsa, and Parvocalanus crassirostris) and a natural copepod assemblage after exposure to mechanically or chemically dispersed crude oil. Between 88 and 100% of the analyzed fecal pellets from three species of copepods and a natural copepod assemblage exposed for 48 h to physically or chemically dispersed light crude oil contained crude oil droplets. Crude oil droplets inside fecal pellets were smaller (median diameter: 2.4-3.5 μm) than droplets in the physically and chemically dispersed oil emulsions (median diameter: 6.6 and 8.0 μm, respectively). This suggests that copepods can reject large crude oil droplets or that crude oil droplets are broken into smaller oil droplets before or during ingestion. Depending on the species and experimental treatments, crude oil defecation rates ranged from 5.3 to 245 ng-oil copepod(-1) d(-1), which represent a mean weight-specific defecation rate of 0.026 μg-oil μg-Ccopepod(1) d(-1). Considering a dispersed crude oil concentration commonly found in the water column after oil spills (1 μl L(-1)) and copepod abundances in high productive coastal areas, copepods may defecate ∼ 1.3-2.6 mg-oil m(-3) d(-1), which would represent ∼ 0.15%-0.30% of the total dispersed oil per day. Our results indicate that ingestion and subsequent defecation of crude oil by planktonic copepods has a small influence on the overall mass of oil spills in the short term, but may be quantitatively important in the flux of oil from surface water to sediments and in the transfer of low-solubility, toxic petroleum hydrocarbons into food webs after crude oil spills in the sea. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Fine-scale vertical distribution of coastal and offshore copepods in the Golfo de Arauco, central Chile, during the upwelling season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Leonardo R.; Troncoso, Victor A.; Figueroa, Dante R.

    2007-11-01

    In order to understand the mechanism by which zooplankters from different origins co-occur during the upwelling season within Golfo de Arauco, one of the most productive areas in central Chile, we assessed short term variations in the vertical distribution of the most abundant copepod species. Fine-scale, day and night vertical zooplankton sampling was done with a pump over 12 days in summer. The water column in the gulf consisted of three layers: Equatorial Subsurface Water of low dissolved oxygen content in the deeper part of the water column, strong temperature and oxygen gradients at mid-depth (15-25 m), and a layer of warmer, more oxygenated, less saline water at the surface. Copepods within the gulf originated from offshore, from the continental shelf, and from the coastal area. Most taxa showed distinctive vertical distributions. Three copepod groups were identified by their mean weighted depths of residence. One group included shallow residents found above the thermocline/oxycline ( Acartia tonsa, Centropages brachiatus, Corycaeus sp., Paracalanus parvus, Oncaea sp.). A second group was comprised by species distributed at or below the thermocline/oxycline ( Oithona sp., Oncaea conifera, Lucicutia sp., Metridia sp., Heterorhabdus papilliger). The third group was composed of vertical migrators that crossed the thermocline/oxycline ( Calanus chilensis, Calanoides patagoniensis, Aetideus armatus, Pleuromamma piseki). In spite of their different vertical distribution ranges, the most abundant and frequent copepod species ( P. parvus, C. chilensis, C. patagoniensis, C. brachiatus) share a common capacity to withstand wide ranges of oxygen concentration and temperature. This characteristic, along with the capacity to vary their life strategies under different environmental conditions, seems to facilitate the maintenance of large numbers of copepods in coastal waters along the Humboldt Current.

  5. Intermittency in processing explains the diversity and shape of functional grazing responses.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Kai W

    2012-08-01

    Central to theoretical studies of trophic interactions is the formulation of the consumer response to varying food availability. Response functions, however, are only rarely derived in mechanistic ways. As a consequence, the uncertainty in the functional representation of feeding remains large, as, e.g., evident from the ongoing debate on the usage of Ivlev, or Holling type I, II, and III functions in aquatic ecosystem models. Here, I refer to the work of Sjöberg in Ecol Model 10:215-225 (1980) who proposed to apply elements of the queuing theory developed in operational research to plankton-plankton interactions. Within this frame, food item processing is subdivided into two major stages which may operate with variable synchronicity. Asynchronous phasing of the two stages enhances the probability of long total processing times. This phenomenon is here termed feeding intermittency. Intermittency is assumed to determine the functional form of grazing kinetics, for which a novel grazing function containing a "shape" parameter is derived. Using this function, I evaluate the hypotheses that intermittency is influenced by (1) patchiness in the prey field (e.g., related to turbulence), and (2) the ratio of actual prey size to optimal prey size. Evidence for the first hypothesis arises from explaining reported variations in clearance rates of Acartia tonsa under different turbulence regimes. Further model applications to ingestion data for rotifers, copepods, and ciliates support the view that an increasing food size enhances intermittency and, this way, affects functional grazing responses. In the application to ciliate grazing, a possible prey density effect appears, possibly due to an intermittent activation of a feeding sub-stage. Queueing theory offers mechanistic explanations for transitions between Holling I-, II-, and Ivlev-type grazing. In doing so for variable prey size ratios, it may also refine size-based ecosystem models which are increasingly emerging in

  6. Distribution and transport of bay anchovy ( Anchoa mitchilli) eggs and larvae in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, E. W.; Houde, E. D.

    2004-07-01

    Mechanisms and processes that influence small-scale depth distribution and dispersal of bay anchovy ( Anchoa mitchilli) early-life stages are linked to physical and biological conditions and to larval developmental stage. A combination of fixed-station sampling, an axial abundance survey, and environmental monitoring data was used to determine how wind, currents, time of day, physics, developmental stage, and prey and predator abundances interacted to affect the distribution and potential transport of eggs and larvae. Wind-forced circulation patterns altered the depth-specific physical conditions at a fixed station and significantly influenced organism distributions and potential transport. The pycnocline was an important physical feature that structured the depth distribution of the planktonic community: most bay anchovy early-life stages (77%), ctenophores (72%), copepod nauplii (>76%), and Acartia tonsa copepodites (69%) occurred above it. In contrast, 90% of sciaenid eggs, tentatively weakfish ( Cynoscion regalis), were found below the pycnocline in waters where dissolved oxygen concentrations were <2.0 mg l -1. The day-night cycle also influenced organism abundances and distributions. Observed diel periodicity in concentrations of bay anchovy and sciaenid eggs, and of bay anchovy larvae >6 mm, probably were consequences of nighttime spawning (eggs) and net evasion during the day (larvae). Diel periodicity in bay anchovy swimbladder inflation also was observed, indicating that larvae apparently migrate to surface waters at dusk to fill their swimbladders. Overall results suggest that wind-forced circulation patterns, below-pycnocline dissolved oxygen conditions, and diel changes in vertical distribution of larvae and their copepod prey have important implications for potential transport of bay anchovy early-life stages.

  7. Methylmercury Bioaccumulation, Transformation, and Trophic Transfer in Marine Plankton Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. S.; Fisher, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have quantified the bioconcentration of methylmercury (MeHg) in marine phytoplankton from seawater, even though this is by far the largest bioaccumulation step in aquatic organisms. Aquatic animals acquire MeHg mainly from dietary exposure and it is important to evaluate the bioaccumulation of this compound in planktonic organisms that form the base of marine food webs. We used a gamma-emitting radioisotope, 203Hg, to assess the rate and extent of MeHg uptake in marine diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, cryptophytes chlorophytes, and cyanobacteria held in unialgal cultures under varying temperature, light and nutrient conditions. For experimental conditions in which cells were exposed to MeHg at 300 pM, the uptake rates in all species ranged from 0.001 to 0.034 atto-mol MeHg µm-2 cell surface h-1 and reached steady state within 2 d. Volume concentration factors (VCFs) ranged from 0.3 to 40 x 105 for the different species. Temperature, light and nutrient conditions had no direct effect on cellular MeHg uptake but ultimately affected growth of the cells, resulting in greater suspended particulate matter and associated MeHg. VCFs strongly correlated with cell surface area to volume ratios in all species. Nearly 40 % of the MeHg was released into the air from coccolithophore cultures within 4 d, but <10 % from other algal cultures. Assimilation efficiencies of MeHg from different phytoplankton diets in a marine copepod (Acartia tonsa) ranged from 74 to 92%, directly proportional to the cytoplasmic partitioning of MeHg in the phytoplankton cells. MeHg uptake in copepods from the aqueous phase was low and modeling shows that nearly all the MeHg acquired by this zooplankter is from diet. Herbivorous zooplankton can be an important link from phytoplankton at the base of the food web to fish higher in the food chain.

  8. Methyl mercury uptake by diverse marine phytoplankton and trophic transfer to zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. S.; Fisher, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    While it is well known that methylmercury (MeHg) biomagnifies in aquatic food chains, few studies have quantified its bioaccumulation in marine phytoplankton from seawater, even though that is overwhelmingly the largest bioaccumulation step. Aquatic animals acquire MeHg mainly from dietary exposure and it is important to evaluate the bioaccumulation of this compound in planktonic organisms that form the base of marine food webs. We used a gamma-emitting radioisotope, 203Hg, to assess the rate and extent of MeHg uptake in marine diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, cryptophytes chlorophytes, and cyanobacteria held in unialgal cultures under varying temperature and light conditions. For experimental conditions in which the dissolved MeHg was at 300 pM, the uptake rates in all species ranged from 0.004 to 0.75 amol Hg μm-3 cell volume d-1 and reached steady state within 2 d. Volume concentration factors (VCFs) ranged from 0.4 to 60 x 105 for the different species. Temperature and light conditions had no direct effect on cellular MeHg uptake but ultimately affected growth of the cells, resulting in greater suspended particulate matter and associated MeHg. VCFs strongly correlated with cell surface area to volume ratios in all species. Assimilation efficiencies of MeHg from phytoplankton food (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Dunaliella tertiolecta and Rhodomonas salina) in a marine copepod grazer (Acartia tonsa) ranged from 74 to 92%, directly proportional to the cytoplasmic partitioning of MeHg in the phytoplankton cells. MeHg uptake in copepods from the aqueous phase was low and modeling shows that nearly all the MeHg acquired by this zooplankter is from diet. Herbivorous zooplankton can be an important link from phytoplankton at the base of the food web to fish higher in the food chain.

  9. Multiple vs. single phytoplankton species alter stoichiometry of trophic interaction with zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Plum, Christoph; Hüsener, Matthias; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Despite the progress made in explaining trophic interactions through the stoichiometric interplay between consumers and resources, it remains unclear how the number of species in a trophic group influences the effects of elemental imbalances in food webs. Therefore, we conducted a laboratory experiment to test the hypothesis that multispecies producer assemblages alter the nutrient dynamics in a pelagic community. Four algal species were reared in mono- and polycultures under a 2 x 2 factorial combination of light and nutrient supply, thereby contrasting the stoichiometry of trophic interactions involving single vs. multiple producer species. After 9 d, these cultures were fed to the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa, and we monitored biomass, resource use, and C:N:P stoichiometry in both phyto- and zooplankton. According to our expectations, light and N supply resulted in gradients of phytoplankton biomass and nutrient composition (C:N:P). Significant net diversity effects for algal biomass and C:N:P ratios reflected the greater responsiveness of the phytoplankton polyculture to altered resource supply compared to monocultures. These alterations of elemental ratios were common, and were partly triggered by changes in species frequency in the mixtures and partly by diversity-related changes in resource use. Copepod individual biomass increased under high light (HL) and N-reduced (-N) conditions, when food was high in C:N but low in C:P and N:P, whereas copepod growth was obviously P limited, and copepod stoichiometry was not affected by phytoplankton elemental composition. Correspondingly, copepod individual biomass reflected significant net diversity effects: compared to expectations- derived from monocultures, copepod individuals feeding on algal polycultures remained smaller than predicted under HL and N-sufficient (+N) conditions but grew larger than predicted under HL, -N and low light +N conditions. In conclusion, multiple producer species altered the

  10. The chronic toxicity of molybdate to marine organisms. I. Generating reliable effects data.

    PubMed

    Heijerick, D G; Regoli, L; Stubblefield, W

    2012-07-15

    A scientific research program was initiated by the International Molybdenum Association (IMOA) which addressed identified gaps in the environmental toxicity data for the molybdate ion (MoO(4)(2-)). These gaps were previously identified during the preparation of EU-REACH-dossiers for different molybdenum compounds (European Union regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical substances; EC, 2006). Evaluation of the open literature identified few reliable marine ecotoxicological data that could be used for deriving a Predicted No-Effect Concentration (PNEC) for the marine environment. Rather than calculating a PNEC(marine) using the assessment factor methodology on a combined freshwater/marine dataset, IMOA decided to generate sufficient reliable marine chronic data to permit derivation of a PNEC by means of the more scientifically robust species sensitivity distribution (SSD) approach (also called the statistical extrapolation approach). Nine test species were chronically exposed to molybdate (added as sodium molybdate dihydrate, Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O) according to published standard testing guidelines that are acceptable for a broad range of regulatory purposes. The selected test organisms were representative for typical marine trophic levels: micro-algae/diatom (Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Dunaliella tertiolecta), macro-alga (Ceramium tenuicorne), mysids (Americamysis bahia), copepod (Acartia tonsa), fish (Cyprinodon variegatus), echinoderms (Dendraster exentricus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) and molluscs (Mytilus edulis, Crassostrea gigas). Available NOEC/EC(10) levels ranged between 4.4 mg Mo/L (blue mussel M. edulis) and 1174 mg Mo/L (oyster C. gigas). Using all available reliable marine chronic effects data that are currently available, a HC(5,50%) (median hazardous concentration affecting 5% of the species) of 5.74(mg Mo)/L was derived with the statistical extrapolation approach, a value that can be used for national and

  11. Laboratory-Scale Internal Wave Apparatus for Studying Copepod Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Webster, D. R.; Haas, K. A.; Yen, J.

    2016-02-01

    Internal waves are ubiquitous features in coastal marine environments and have been observed to mediate vertical distributions of zooplankton in situ. Internal waves create fine-scale hydrodynamic cues that copepods and other zooplankton are known to sense, such as fluid density gradients and velocity gradients (quantified as shear deformation rate). The role of copepod behavior in response to cues associated with internal waves is largely unknown. The objective is to provide insight to the bio-physical interaction and the role of biological versus physical forcing in mediating organism distributions. We constructed a laboratory-scale internal wave apparatus to facilitate fine-scale observations of copepod behavior in flows that replicate in situ conditions of internal waves in two-layer stratification. Two cases were chosen with density jump of 1 and 1.5 sigma-t units. Analytical analysis of the two-layer system provided guidance to the target forcing frequency needed to generate a standing internal wave with a single dominate frequency of oscillation. Flow visualization and signal processing of the interface location were used to quantify the wave characteristics. The results show a close match to the target wave parameters. Marine copepod (mixed population of Acartia tonsa, Temora longicornis, and Eurytemora affinis) behavior assays were conducted for three different physical arrangements: (1) no density stratification, (2) stagnant two-layer density stratification, and (3) two-layer density stratification with internal wave motion. Digitized trajectories of copepod swimming behavior indicate that in the control (case 1) the animals showed no preferential motion in terms of direction. In the stagnant density jump treatment (case 2) copepods preferentially moved horizontally, parallel to the density interface. In the internal wave treatment (case 3) copepods demonstrated orbital trajectories near the density interface.

  12. Origin of resources and trophic pathways in a large SW Atlantic estuary: An evaluation using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botto, Florencia; Gaitán, Esteban; Mianzan, Hermes; Acha, Marcelo; Giberto, Diego; Schiariti, Agustín; Iribarne, Oscar

    2011-03-01

    The Río de la Plata (34° 36' S, 55° 58' W; Argentina and Uruguay) estuary, one of the most important South American estuarine environments, is characterized by weak seasonal freshwater discharge, low tidal amplitude (<1 m), a wide and permanent connection to the sea, and a salt-wedge regime. Using stable isotope analysis, we explored the relative importance of the different sources of primary production in the food web. Our results show that phytoplankton and macrodetritus from terrestrial salt and freshwater marshes both contribute to the food web of the Río de la Plata estuary. On the basis of the sampled species, we identified four trophic levels. The clam Mactra isabelleana, the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa, and the opossum shrimp Neomysis americana are the primary consumers. The rays Atlantoraja castelnaui and Squatina guggenheim and the shark Galeorhinus galeus are the top predators. The Río de la Plata food web shows an important input of nutrients derived from phytoplankton. Rays, sharks, and predatory gastropods reveal an important contribution of C4 plants (likely Spartina spp.). However, production derived from C3 plants is also important for some species. The fishes Brazilian menhaden, Brevoortia aurea; the stripped weakfish Cynoscion guatucupa; and the whitemouth croaker, Micropogonias furnieri, showed differences in their isotopic signatures as juveniles and adults, indicating different food sources, and they were therefore treated as different components of the food web. Our data suggest that detritus from salt and freshwater marshes is reaching the Río de la Plata estuary and can be an important allocthonous source of energy to this environment.

  13. The reaction of European lobster larvae (Homarus gammarus) to different quality food: effects of ontogenetic shifts and pre-feeding history.

    PubMed

    Schoo, Katherina L; Aberle, Nicole; Malzahn, Arne M; Schmalenbach, Isabel; Boersma, Maarten

    2014-02-01

    Young larval stages of many organisms represent bottlenecks in the life-history of many species. The high mortality commonly observed in, for example, decapod larvae has often been linked to poor nutrition, with most studies focussing on food quantity. Here, we focus instead on the effects of quality and have investigated its effects on the nutritional condition of lobster larvae. We established a tri-trophic food chain consisting of the cryptophyte Rhodomonas salina, the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa and larvae of the European lobster Homarus gammarus. In a set of experiments, we manipulated the C:N:P stoichiometry of the primary producers, and accordingly those of the primary consumer. In a first experiment, R. salina was grown under N- and P-limitation and the nutrient content of the algae was manipulated by addition of the limiting nutrient to create a food quality gradient. In a second experiment, the effect on lobster larvae of long- and short-term exposure to food of varying quality during ontogenetic development was investigated. The condition of the lobster larvae was negatively affected even by subtle N- and P-nutrient limitations of the algae. Furthermore, younger lobster larvae were more vulnerable to nutrient limitation than older ones, suggesting an ontogenetic shift in the capacity of lobster larvae to cope with low quality food. The results presented here might have substantial consequences for the survival of lobster larvae in the field, as, in the light of future climate change and re-oligotrophication of the North Sea, lobster larvae might face marked changes in temperature and nutrient conditions, thus significantly altering their condition and growth.

  14. Effect of ocean acidification on the nutritional quality of phytoplankton for copepod reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, M.; Cochlan, W. P.; Kimmerer, W.; Carpenter, E. J.

    2016-02-01

    Phytoplankton are the oceans' primary producers of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which provide marine organisms with nutrients needed for health and reproduction. It is hypothesized that future ocean acidification (OA) conditions could change the availability of phytoplankton PUFAs for ecologically significant predators such as copepods, affecting their reproductive success. Three species of phytoplankton (Rhodomonas salina, Skeletonema marinoi, Prorocentrum micans) were cultured under present-day (400ppm CO2, pH 8.1) and predicted future (1000ppm CO2, pH 7.8) oceanic conditions. For four days, female Acartia tonsa copepods were fed a phytoplankton mixture from either the present-day or predicted-future treatment. To assess changes in phytoplankton PUFA content, fatty acid profiles were analyzed via capillary gas chromatography. Copepod egg production (EP), hatching success (HS), and egg viability (EV) were determined to assess copepod reproductive success. Fatty acid analysis shows essential PUFAs comprise a smaller percentage of total fatty acids in phytoplankton cultured under high pCO2 (Rho 21.5%; Ske 14.1%; Pro 14.4%) compared to those cultured under present-day pCO2 (Rho 28.8%, Ske 32.7%, Pro 39.3%). Copepod reproduction data demonstrate that females fed phytoplankton cultured under high pCO2 have significantly lower EP (μ=14.3 eggs female-1), HS (μ=35.8%), and EV (μ=12.5%) compared to reproductive success of females fed phytoplankton cultured under present-day CO2 (EP μ=27.0 eggs female-1; HS μ=91.5%; EV μ=96.6%). This study demonstrates that OA can change the nutritional quality of primary producers, which can affect the reproductive success of fundamental secondary consumers.

  15. Ocean acidification-induced food quality deterioration constrains trophic transfer.

    PubMed

    Rossoll, Dennis; Bermúdez, Rafael; Hauss, Helena; Schulz, Kai G; Riebesell, Ulf; Sommer, Ulrich; Winder, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Our present understanding of ocean acidification (OA) impacts on marine organisms caused by rapidly rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) concentration is almost entirely limited to single species responses. OA consequences for food web interactions are, however, still unknown. Indirect OA effects can be expected for consumers by changing the nutritional quality of their prey. We used a laboratory experiment to test potential OA effects on algal fatty acid (FA) composition and resulting copepod growth. We show that elevated CO(2) significantly changed the FA concentration and composition of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, which constrained growth and reproduction of the copepod Acartia tonsa. A significant decline in both total FAs (28.1 to 17.4 fg cell(-1)) and the ratio of long-chain polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids (PUFA:SFA) of food algae cultured under elevated (750 µatm) compared to present day (380 µatm) pCO(2) was directly translated to copepods. The proportion of total essential FAs declined almost tenfold in copepods and the contribution of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) tripled at high CO(2). This rapid and reversible CO(2)-dependent shift in FA concentration and composition caused a decrease in both copepod somatic growth and egg production from 34 to 5 eggs female(-1) day(-1). Because the diatom-copepod link supports some of the most productive ecosystems in the world, our study demonstrates that OA can have far-reaching consequences for ocean food webs by changing the nutritional quality of essential macromolecules in primary producers that cascade up the food web.

  16. Differential effects of nutrient-limited primary production on primary, secondary or tertiary consumers.

    PubMed

    Malzahn, Arne M; Hantzsche, Florian; Schoo, Katherina L; Boersma, Maarten; Aberle, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional imbalances between predator and prey are the rule rather than the exception at the lower end of food webs. We investigated the role of different grazers in the propagation of nutritionally imbalanced primary production by using the same primary producers in a three-trophic-level food chain and a four-trophic-level food chain experimental setup. The three-trophic-level food chain consisted of a classic single-cell primary producer (Rhodomonas salina), a metazoan grazer (the copepod Acartia tonsa) and a top predator (the jellyfish Gonionemus vertens), while we added a protozoan grazer (Oxyrrhis marina) as primary consumer to the food chain to establish the four-trophic-level food chain. This setup allowed us to investigate how nutrient-limitation effects change from one trophic level to another, and to investigate the performance of two components of our experimental food chains in different trophic positions. Stoichiometry and fatty acid profiles of the algae showed significant differences between the nutrient-depleted [no N and no P addition (-P), respectively] and the nutrient-replete (f/2) treatments. The differences in stoichiometry could be traced when O. marina was the first consumer. Copepods feeding on these flagellates were not affected by the nutritional imbalance of their prey in their stoichiometry, their respiration rates nor in their developmental rates. In contrast, when copepods were the primary consumer, those reared on the -P algae showed significantly higher respiration rates along with significantly lower developmental rates. In neither of our two experimental food chains did the signals from the base of the food chains travel up to jelly fish, our top predator.

  17. High-performance thin-layer chromatography for quantification of 1-octacosanol in Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana).

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenfang; Liu, Daicheng; Su, Shupeng

    2015-01-01

    1-Octacosanol is a straight-chain aliphatic 28-carbon fatty alcohol with well-known anti-fatigue function. In this study, 1-octacosanol was extracted from Antarctic krill for the first time. Separation of 1-octacosanol was achieved using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with a mobile phase consisting of petroleum ether/ethyl acetate/toluene (4 : 1 : 0.05, v/v/v) on precoated silica gel GF254 high-performance TLC plates. The separated 1-octacosanol was quantified using spectrodensitometry with distilled water/bromothymol blue/sodium hydroxide (100 : 0.1 : 0.7, v/w/w) as a chromogenic system. The high-performance TLC method was validated with respect to specificity, linearity, intra- and interplate variation. The stability of the 1-octacosanol-chromogen complex and recovery of 1-octacosanol were also evaluated. Containing ~10.6 µg/mg 1-octacosanol, Antarctic krill is potentially a rich and renewable source of 1-octacosanol. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest): Dungeness crab. [Cancer magister dana

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, G.B.; Armstrong, D.A.; Heun, T.W.

    1986-08-01

    The Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) is found off the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and southern British Columbia, as well as in the estuarine waters of this geographic area. It is a shellfish highly prized and sought after by both commercialand sport fishermen. In Washington and Oregon, only male crabs may be retained by sport and commercial fishermen. Commercial crab catches are highly variable from year to year, but the catches from Washington and Oregon follow a very similar pattern. The highest sport catches take place on low tides ranging from -0.60 to -0.74 m. Dungeness crab go through a life cycle that involves several metamorphic stages: zoea, megalops, postlarval crab, and adult crab. Hatching success decreases as water temperature increases from 10 to 17/sup 0/C; the optimal temperature for larval crabs is between 10 and 14/sup 0/C. Salinity is not as important to egg development and hatching as temperature, but optimum hatching occurs at about 15 ppt.

  19. Latest research results on the effects of nanomaterials on humans and the environment: DaNa - Knowledge Base Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, C.; Kühnel, D.; Richter, V.; Krug, H. F.; Mathes, B.; Steinbach, C.; Nau, K.

    2013-04-01

    Nanotechnology is considered one of the key technologies of the 21st century. The success of this fascinating technology is based on its versatility. It will bring about fundamental changes of basic research as well as of many sectors of industry and also of daily life from electronics to the health care system. However, consumers often miss reliable and understandable information on nanomaterials and all aspects of this versatile technology. A huge body of data on the potential hazards of nanoobjects towards human and environmental health already exists, but is either not easily accessible for a broad audience or presented unprocessable for nonexperts. But risk communication is an essential and thus integral component of risk management. For that purpose, the DaNa-Project aims at filling this gap by collecting and evaluating scientific results in an interdisciplinary approach with scientists from different research areas, such as human and environmental toxicology, biology, physics, chemistry, and sociology. Research findings from the field of human and environmental nanotoxicology are being prepared and presented together with material properties and possible applications for interested laymen and stakeholders. For the evaluation of literature a "Literature Criteria Checklist" has been developed as well as a Standard Operation Procedure template (SOP) based on careful scientific practice.

  20. Written Corrective Feedback in L2 Writing: Connors & Lunsford (1988); Lunsford & Lunsford (2008); Lalande (1982) Dana Ferris

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Written corrective feedback (CF) has been the most heavily researched topic in second language (L2) writing over the past 20 years. As a recent research timeline article in this journal (Ferris 2012; see also Bitchener & Ferris 2012) shows, studies of error correction in student writing have crossed disciplines (composition and rhetoric,…

  1. Ziziphora tenuior L. essential oil from Dana Biosphere Reserve (Southern Jordan); Chemical characterization and assessment of biological activities.

    PubMed

    Abu-Darwish, M S; Cabral, C; Gonçalves, M J; Cavaleiro, C; Cruz, M T; Paoli, M; Tomi, F; Efferth, T; Salgueiro, L

    2016-12-24

    Ziziphora tenuior L. (Lamiaceae) is a medicinal plant in Jordan, which is included in various antimicrobial, antiseptic, expectorant and wound healing preparations. It is used for the treatment of cough, stomach ache, dysentery, fever, uterus infection, gut inflammation and painful menstruation. The aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the chemical composition of the essential oil of Z. tenuior originated from southern Jordan and its antifungal effects against several yeasts. Concomitantly, the mechanisms behind the anti-fungal activity against Candida albicans were also disclosed. Since the Z. tenuior traditional uses are related with inflammatory-associated conditions, the putative anti-inflammatory activity of the oil was also unveiled. Importantly, the potential toxicity of pharmacologically active concentrations was screened in different types of mammalian cells. Z. tenuior essential oil, isolated by hydrodistillation, was analyzed by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Antifungal activity was evaluated against yeasts, dermatophytes and Aspergillus strains. Germ tube inhibition and biofilm formation assays were evaluated using C. albicans. Assessment of cell viability was made by the MTT assay using different types of mammalian cells, including hepatocytes, keratinocytes and macrophages. The in vitro anti-inflammatory potential of the oil was evaluated by measuring nitric oxide production using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophages. Oxygen-containing monoterpenes are the main oil compounds: pulegone (46.8%), p-menth-3-en-8-ol (12.5%), isomenthone (6.6%) and 8-hydroxymenthone (6.2%). The highest antifungal activity was against Cryptococcus neoformans, with a MIC value of 0.16µL/mL. The oil revealed an important inhibitory effect on germ tube formation with a filamentation inhibition rate higher than 80% at 0.16µL/mL. The amount of the attached biomass was reduced. Importantly, concentrations devoid of toxicity on several mammalian cell types still displayed anti-inflammatory activity (0.16 and 0.32µL/mL). These findings add significant information to the pharmacological activity of Z. tenuior, thus justifying and reinforcing the use of this plant in traditional medicine. Additionally, the antifungal and anti-inflammatory potential of the oil at non-toxic concentrations, opens new avenues for its further exploitation, for instance in health-care product development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An endo-(1----3)-beta-glucanase and a collagenolytic serine proteinase from Euphausia superba Dana (Antarctic krill).

    PubMed

    Turkiewicz, M; Kalinowska, H; Galas, E

    1991-01-01

    Two digestive enzymes from Antarctic krill: an endo-(1----3)-beta-glucanase and a serine proteinase which specifically cleaves native collagen were characterized with regard to their specificity and accommodation to acting at low temperatures. Their presence in the crustacean digestive apparatus proves that krill is an omnivorous organism, and this fact should be considered in estimations of its biomass stock.

  3. Written Corrective Feedback in L2 Writing: Connors & Lunsford (1988); Lunsford & Lunsford (2008); Lalande (1982) Dana Ferris

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Written corrective feedback (CF) has been the most heavily researched topic in second language (L2) writing over the past 20 years. As a recent research timeline article in this journal (Ferris 2012; see also Bitchener & Ferris 2012) shows, studies of error correction in student writing have crossed disciplines (composition and rhetoric,…

  4. Redescription of poorly known species of Ceratothoa Dana, 1852 (Crustacea, Isopoda, Cymothoidae), based on original type material

    PubMed Central

    Hadfield, Kerry A.; Bruce, Niel L.; Smit, Nico J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Due to the difficulty in accurately identifying cymothoids, these parasitic isopods are often incorrectly named or confused with other species. Within the genus Ceratothoa, a number of recent studies have aimed at clarifying some of the problematic species; however, several of the less studied species still require revision. This paper redescribes, from type material, several poorly known Ceratothoa species including Ceratothoa angulata, Ceratothoa capri, Ceratothoa carinata, Ceratothoa collaris, Ceratothoa gilberti, Ceratothoa gobii, Ceratothoa guttata, Ceratothoa italica, Ceratothoa oestroides, and Ceratothoa verrucosa, further resolving taxonomic uncertainties within the genus. PMID:27408544

  5. Gastrin/cholecystokinin-like immunoreactive peptides in the Dungeness crab, Cancer magister (Dana): immunochemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Larson, B A; Vigna, S R

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize a gastrin/cholecystokinin-like immunoreactant (G/CCK-LI) extractable from the crab, Cancer magister. G/CCK-LI was extracted best in boiling water and was found mainly in the stomach, hemolymph and carapace. A relatively large immunoreactive peptide in the stomach and apparently smaller forms in the hemolymph and carapace were separated by Sephadex G-50 fractionation. Anion-exchange chromatography further fractionated the stomach form into three major peaks. The crab material cross-reacted with three antisera specific for the common C-terminus of gastrin/CCK, but cross-reacted much less with three antisera directed against other portions of the gastrin molecule. Partially purified crab stomach G/CCK-LI inhibited the binding of labeled CCK to mouse brain G/CCK receptors but not to rat pancreatic CCK receptors. The crab peptide did not stimulate rat gastric acid or rat pancreatic amylase secretion. These results indicate that the crab peptides are structurally similar to, but distinguishable from, the bioactive C-terminal amino acid sequence common to gastrins and CCKs.

  6. Bioaccumulation of trace elements in dominant mesozooplankton group inhabiting in the coastal regions of Indian Sundarban mangrove wetland.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Bhaskar Deb; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Tseng, Li-Chun; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Rakshit, Dibyendu; Mitra, Soumita

    2014-10-15

    Mesozooplankton (Body size 20-200 μm) along with the surface water were collected from coastal regions of Sundarban, northeastern part of Bay of Bengal considering three seasons, namely premonsoon, monsoon and postmonsoon. Samples were analyzed for community structure and the dominant copepod species were further analyzed for trace metal concentration. In total, 50 copepods were identified (22 families and 43 genera). The dominant mesozooplankton species included 9 copepods and an epipelagic chaetognath, exhibited both spatial and seasonal variations. Metal concentration exhibited considerable inter-specific variations for the copepods and the mean concentrations were: Fe, 1350.2-51118.3 μg/g; Al, 647.2-73019.1 μg/g; Ni, 32.4-110.3 μg/g; Mn, 122.8-1066.5 μg/g; Pb, 0.04-97.5 μg/g; Pb, 10.6-97.5 μg/g; Cd, 4.2-21.6 μg/g; Cu, 17.4-145.1 μg/g; Zn, 225.7-1670.9 μg/g; Cr, 21.7-194.3 μg/g; Co, 1.32-111.1 μg/g. Metal concentrations showed the following order: Sagitta bedoti>Coryceas danae>Oithona sp.>Eucalanus subcrassus>Labidocera euchaeta>Paracalanus parvus>Acartiella tortaniformis>Acartia spinicauda>Pseudocalanus serricaudatus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assimilation and retention of selenium and other trace elements from crustacean food by juvenile striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, Stephen B.; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Stewart, Robin

    2002-01-01

     Estimates of the assimilation and retention of trace elements from food by fish are useful for linking toxicity with the biogeochemical cycling of these elements through aquatic food webs. Here we use pulse-chase radiotracer techniques to estimate the assimilation and retention of Se and four trace metals, Ag, Am, Zn, and Cd, by 43- and 88-d-old juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis, from crustacean food. Brine shrimp nauplii, Artemia franciscana, or adult copepods,Acartia tonsa, were fed radiolabeled diatoms and then fed to juvenile striped bass. Assimilation efficiencies (AEs ± SD) for 43-d-old fish were 18 ± 2%, 6 ± 1%, 23 ± 4%, 33 ± 3%, and 23 ± 2% for Ag, Am, Cd, Se, and Zn, respectively. For 88-d-old fish, the AEs were 28 ± 1%, 42 ± 5%, and 40 ± 5% for Cd, Se, and Zn, respectively. The higher AEs in the older fish may result from longer gut passage times for larger fish. The 44-d-old fish excreted 5 ± 0.8%, 4 ± 2.0%, 7 ± 0.3%, 9 ± 0.4%, and 1.3 ± 0.9% of the Ag, Am, Cd, Se, and Zn, respectively, they ingested from food per day, whereas the 88-d-old fish excreted 3 ± 1.0%, 8 ± 0.5%, and 3 ± 0.5% of the assimilated Cd, Se, and Zn per day, respectively. Predictions of steady state Se concentrations in juvenile striped bass tissues made using a biokinetic model and the measured AE and efflux rates ranged from 1.8 to 3.0 mg Se g-1dry wt for muscle tissue and 6.8 to 11.6 mg Se g-1 dry wt for gut tissue. These predictions agreed well with average values of 2.1 and 13 mg Se g-1 dry wt measured independently in North San Francisco Bay, where elevated Se concentrations are of concern. The model results imply that the planktonic food web, including juvenile striped bass, does not transfer Se as efficiently to top consumers as does the benthic food web.

  8. A three-dimensional biophysical model of Karenia brevis dynamics on the west Florida shelf: A look at physical transport and potential zooplankton grazing controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, Scott P.; Dieterle, Dwight A.; He, Ruoying; Kirkpatrick, Gary J.; Lester, Kristen M.; Steidinger, Karen A.; Vargo, Gabriel A.; Walsh, John J.; Weisberg, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    The development of accurate predictive models of toxic dinoflagellate blooms is of great ecological importance, particularly in regions that are most susceptible to their detrimental effects. This is especially true along the west Florida shelf (WFS) and coast, where episodic bloom events of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis often wreak havoc on the valuable commercial fisheries and tourism industries of west Florida. In an effort to explain the dynamics at work within the maintenance and termination phases of a red tide, a simple three-dimensional coupled biophysical model was used in the analysis of the October 1999 red tide offshore Sarasota, Florida. Results of the numerical experiments indicate that: (1) measured and modeled flowfields were capable of transporting the observed offshore inoculum of K. brevis to within 16 km of the coastal boundary; (2) background concentrations (1000 cells L -1) of K. brevis could grow to a red tide of over 2×10 6 cells L -1 in little more than a month, assuming an estuarine initiation site with negligible offshore advection, no grazing losses, negligible competition from other phytoplankton groups, and no nutrient limitation; (3) maximal grazing pressure could not prevent the initiation of a red tide or cause its termination, assuming no other losses to algal biomass and a zooplankton community ingestion rate similar to that of Acartia tonsa; and (4) the light-cued ascent behavior of K. brevis served as an aggregational mechanism, concentrating K. brevis at the 55 μE m -2 s -1 isolume when mean concentrations of K. brevis exceeded 100,000 cells L -1. Further improvements in model fidelity will be accomplished by the future inclusion of phytoplankton competitors, disparate nutrient availability and limitation schemes, a more realistic rendering of the spectral light field and the attendant effects of photo-inhibition and compensation, and a mixed community of vertically-migrating proto- and metazoan grazers. These model

  9. The effects of dietary silver on larval growth in the echinoderm Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Brix, Kevin V; Gillette, Phillip; Pourmand, Ali; Capo, Tom R; Grosell, Martin

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the euryhaline copepod Acartia tonsa is extremely sensitive to dietborne silver (Ag) exposure, with a 20 % inhibition (EC(20)) of survival occurring when copepods are fed algae with 1.6 μg g(-1) dry weight (dw) Ag, corresponding to a waterborne Ag concentration of 0.46 μg l(-1) Ag. In contrast, 43 μg l(-1) Ag is required to elicit similar effects in copepods exposed to Ag by way of water. In the current study, we investigated whether another planktonic marine organism might also be sensitive to dietary Ag. Specifically, we tested larvae of the echinoderm, Lytechinus variegatus in an 18-day study in which larvae were continuously exposed to Ag-laden algae (Isochrysis galbana). After 7 days of exposure, no significant effects were observed on larval growth up to the highest concentration tested (10.68 μg g(-1) dw Ag in algae after exposure to 3.88 μg l(-1) waterborne Ag). After 18 days, significant effects were observed in all Ag treatments resulting in a lowest-observable effect concentration of 0.68 μg g(-1) dw Ag in algae and corresponding waterborne Ag concentration of 0.05-0.07 μg l(-1) Ag (depending on background Ag [see Results]). However, the dose-response relationship was quite flat with a similar level of growth inhibition (approximately 15 %) in all Ag treatments, resulting in an EC(20) of >10.68 μg g(-1) dw Ag in algae (>3.88 μg l(-1) Ag in water). This flat dose-response relationship is characteristic of dietary metal (silver, copper, cadmium, nickel, and zinc) toxicity to copepods as well, although the effect is slightly more robust (approximately 20-30 % inhibition of survival or reproduction). We conclude that echinoderm larvae may be similar to copepods in their sensitivity to dietary Ag, although a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the apparent flat dose-response relationships is clearly needed.

  10. Systematic status of the caridean families Gnathophyllidae Dana and Hymenoceridae Ortmann (Crustacea: Decapoda): a further examination based on molecular and morphological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zhibin; Li, Xinzheng; Kou, Qi; Chan, Tinyam; Chu, Kahou; Huang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The four palaemonoid (sub)families Anchistioididae, Gnathophyllidae, Hymenoceridae, and Pontoniinae are similar in morphology, and all live in marine habitats. Their systematic relationships are controversial. In this study, we used sequences from a mitochondrial ribosomal gene (16S rRNA) and three nuclear genes (H3, NaK, and enolase) to explore the phylogenetic relationships of these four taxa. Our tree based on 43 species belonging to 28 genera shows that Gnathophyllidae and Hymenoceridae are nested within Pontoniinae. This result is consistent with evidence from larval morphology. The defining characteristics of Gnathophyllidae and Hymenoceridae, a vestigial or missing mandibular incisor process and a broadened third maxilliped, can also be found in Pontoniinae; conversely, on the basis of published species descriptions, gnathophyllids and hymenocerids meet most of the defining characteristics of Pontoniinae. The peculiar form of the third maxilliped in gnathophyllids and hymenocerids might be the result of adaptive evolution, as these particular features are also present in pontoniines. According to our phylogenetic tree, Anchistioididae are more remote from Pontoniinae, which is consistent with the distinct morphological differences in the pleopods. The pontoniine genera analyzed (together with Gnathophyllidae and Hymenoceridae) are divided into two clades. The members of Clade I exhibit primordial characteristics similar to those of the Palaemoninae, and might be direct descendants of the ancestor of the Pontoniinae; members of Clade II are more specialized.

  11. First species of Leptochelia Dana, 1849 (Crustacea: Tanaidacea) from the Eastern Pacific, with an annotated checklist and identification keys for the genus.

    PubMed

    Jarquín-González, Jani; García-Madrigal, María Del Socorro; Carrera-Parra, Luis Fernando

    2015-02-24

    Forty three species of leptocheliids are known worldwide. In the American region only eight species have been described from the Western Atlantic, while for the Eastern Pacific none have been described, suggesting that the diversity of this family has been severely underestimated in this region. Here we describe the first species of Leptochelia from the Eastern Pacific, Leptochelia mexicana n. sp., which is characterized by the males having a spiniform seta on the second segment of uropodal endopod, a novel feature for the genus. In addition, the first annotated checklist and a taxonomic key with illustrations for Leptochelia species are included. The list includes the type locality, type depository, distribution, habitat and, in some cases, remarks.

  12. Tolerance to Elevated Temperature and Ocean Acidification of the Larvae of the Solitary Corals Fungia fungites (Linnaues, 1758) and Lithophyllon repanda (Dana, 1846).

    PubMed

    Baria, Maria Vanessa B; Kurihara, Haruko; Harii, Saki

    2015-10-01

    Increase in atmospheric CO₂is the main driver of global climate change and is projected to elevate sea surface temperature by at least 2°C and to decrease oceanic pH by 0.3 to 0.4 units by the end of the century. These factors seriously threaten coral reef ecosystems worldwide. In Okinawa, solitary corals are an important feature of the coral community structure. While previous studies on the effects of ocean warming (OW), ocean acidification (OA) and its combination on larval survival focused on colonial coral species, the present study assessed the effect of high temperature on larvae from solitary corals. In this study, we examined the influence of OW (control = 28°C; control +3 = 31°C; control + 6 = 34°C) and OA (control, pCO₂= 400 to 500 μatm; medium, pCO₂= 1000 to 1300 μatm; high, pCO₂= 1700 to 2200 μatm) on the larval survival of two solitary corals, Fungia fungites and Lithophyllon repanda for eight days. Results showed that F. fungites was neither affected by OW, OA, nor its combination. Similarly, survival of L. repanda was not affected by OA however it was significantly affected by temperature. Temperature tolerance varies between species; L. repanda (+3°C above ambient) has lower tolerance than F. fungites (+6°C above ambient). This observation suggests that fungiid larvae had higher tolerance to elevated temperature stress relative to other scleractinian corals. With the projected increase in OW and OA in the future, fungiidsmay retain good potential to widely disperse and successfully recruit to natal and other neighbouring reefs.

  13. Department of Education: Efforts by the Office for Civil Rights To Resolve Asian-American Complaints. Report to the Honorable Dana Rohrabacher, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horinko, Larry; And Others

    With the Department of Education's staff remaining stable during a period of increased civil rights complaints, this study examined the Department's Office of Civil Rights (OCR) investigations of discrimination cases involving Asian-Americans. In particular the evaluation looked at 13 specific cases, timeliness and outcomes for fiscal years…

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of the bass yabby Trypaea australiensis Dana 1852, (Crustacea; Decapoda; Callianassidae) - a new gene order for the Decapoda.

    PubMed

    Gan, Huan You; Gan, Han Ming; Lee, Yin Peng; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Bass yabby Trypaea australiensis was obtained from a partial genome scan using the MiSeq sequencing system. The T. australiensis mitogenome is 16,821 bp in length (70.25% A + T content) made up of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a putative 1977 bp non-coding AT-rich region. This Trypaea mitogenome sequence is the 5th for the family Callianassidae and represents a new gene order for the Decapoda involving protein-coding, rRNA and tRNA genes and the control region.

  15. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Genome-wide shRNA Screens with DEMETER Inferred Gene Effects | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In this study RNA interference (RNAi) screens were performed on 285 cell lines and combined with 216 lines previously screened, which were then analyzed together with DEMETER to discover genetic dependencies across the entire pool of cell lines. Read the abstract

  16. ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES (OCS) AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) IN SEDIMENTS AND CRABS (Chasmagnathus granulata, DANA, 1851) FROM MANGROVES OF GUANABARA BAY, RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Alexandre Santos; Torres, João Paulo Machado; Meire, Rodrigo Ornellas; Neves, Rafael Curcio; Couri, Márcia Souto; Serejo, Cristiana Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Organochlorinated compounds, seven indicator PCB congeners, DDT and its main metabolites, were determined in sediment and crab (Chasmagnathus granulata) samples collected from mangrove areas near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Samples were analysed according to the FAO/SIDA protocols using continuous non-polar solvent extraction and a conventional GC-ECD apparatus. The highest levels of total PCB congeners and total DDT metabolites in sediments (184.16 and 37.40 ng.g−1d.w. respectively) and crab eggs (570.62 and 98.22 ng.g−1d.w. respectively) were found at impacted mangroves. The higher PCB congeners than DDT metabolites levels suggesting a stronger industrial impact in this area. The results indicate that the population density of crab is negatively affected by sediment contamination that is reflected basically by the organochlorine content in the female eggs. The organochlorine concentration in eggs is more significant to evaluate or estimate an impact of these pollutants upon C. granulata population than the organochlorine concentration in sediment samples. PMID:18485446

  17. Organochlorine pesticides (OCs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediments and crabs (Chasmagnathus granulata, Dana, 1851) from mangroves of Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Alexandre Santos; Torres, João Paulo Machado; Meire, Rodrigo Ornellas; Neves, Rafael Curcio; Couri, Márcia Souto; Serejo, Cristiana Silveira

    2008-08-01

    Organochlorinated compounds, seven indicator PCB congeners, DDT and its main metabolites, were determined in sediment and crab (Chasmagnathus granulata) samples collected from mangrove areas near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Samples were analysed according to the FAO/SIDA protocols using continuous non-polar solvent extraction and a conventional GC-ECD apparatus. The highest levels of total PCB congeners and total DDT metabolites in sediments (184.16 and 37.40 ng g(-1)d.w. respectively) and crab eggs (570.62 and 98.22 ng g(-1)d.w. respectively) were found at impacted mangroves. The higher PCB congeners than DDT metabolites levels suggesting a stronger industrial impact in this area. The results indicate that the population density of crab is negatively affected by sediment contamination that is reflected basically by the organochlorine content in the female eggs. The organochlorine concentration in eggs is more significant to evaluate or estimate an impact of these pollutants upon C. granulata population than the organochlorine concentration in sediment samples.

  18. Weekly high-dose methotrexate and doxorubicin for osteosarcoma: the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/the Children's Hospital--study III.

    PubMed

    Goorin, A M; Perez-Atayde, A; Gebhardt, M; Andersen, J W; Wilkinson, R H; Delorey, M J; Watts, H; Link, M; Jaffe, N; Frei, E

    1987-08-01

    Weekly high-dose methotrexate with leucovorin rescue and vincristine (HDMTX) and doxorubicin was administered as adjuvant postoperative therapy to 46 patients with a diagnosis of conventional high-grade nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of an extremity between July 1976 and December 1981. The primary lesions were managed by wide or radical amputation (26 patients) or by limb-sparing resection in 20 selected patients. The margins of the resections were retrospectively classified as marginal in three, wide in 16, and radical in one. The 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43%, 74%) and overall survival is 78% (95% CI, 65%, 91%). The RFS for patients initially having a limb resection procedure is 55% (95% CI, 32%, 77%) compared with 62% (95% CI, 43%, 81%) for those initially having amputations (P = .52). Using multivariate analysis, the only significant prognostic variables that predicted RFS of greater than or equal to 3 years, were the presence of moderate to marked lymphocytic infiltration of the primary tumor (P less than .002), primary site outside of the proximal humerus (P less than .005), and the absence of a predominance of osteoblastic pattern in the primary tumor (P less than .03).

  19. Quantum Optoelectronics. Summaries of the Papers Presented at the Topical Meeting at Dana Point, California on 15-17 March 1995. Technical Digest Series, Volume 14.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-17

    Dimensional Semiconductors QThE Poster, Novel Semiconductor Materials and Structures, and Micro and Vertical Cavity Physics and Applications....Photonic Bandgaps Microcavity Physics and Applications, New Materials for Quantum Optoelectronics, Quantum Dots, Physics and Applications of Low

  20. The Dana Farber consortium protocol (DFCP) vs. classic Hyper-CVAD for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in patients <50 Y. Single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Alabdulwahab, Amal S; Elsayed, Hussein G; Sherisher, Mohamed A; Zeeneldin, Ahmed; Alghamdi, Khalofa; Elbjeirami, Wafaa M

    2017-09-01

    The use of intensive pediatric protocols for the treatment of ALL is being extended to older adults. Analysis of the efficacy and toxicity results of pediatric DFCP vs. classic Hyper-CVAD protocol for the treatment of patients with ALL < 50 Y. A retrospective single center comparative analysis of DFCP & classic Hyper-CVAD for first line treatment of patients with ALL < 50 Y. 73 patients were included, 43 received DFCP and 30 received Hyper-CVAD protocol. CR rate was 90.7% for DFCP vs. 83.7 for Hyper-CVAD (p 0.7). 3 Y Leukemia free survival was 57.4% (70.9% for DFCP vs. 41.6% Hyper-CVAD P 0.1) while 3Y OS was 62.6%% for the whole group, 72.6% DFCP vs. 48.5% Hyper-CVAD, P 0.04. Those with age <21 Y, had significantly longer 3 Y LFS and OS (P 0.04, 0.02, respectively). pancreatitis occurred in 5 patients with DFCP and it was related to Asparginase and in 1 patient on Hyper-CVAD related to gall stones. Osteonecrosis affected 5 patients on DFCP. pediatric protocols are feasible in patients younger than 50 Y and they are more active than classic adult protocols. Although modifications of adult protocols may improve their results, this had to be investigated in randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Community Structure and Standing Stock of Epibenthic Zooplankton at Five Sites in Grays Harbor, Washington

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    particularly Eurytemora americana and Acartia clausi . Density and standing crop were somewhat higher at the DODJM 1473 EJITION OF I NOV 65 IS...Eurytemora americana and Acartia clausi . Density and standing crop were somewhat higher at the 0.0-m tidal elevations than at +2.1-r, except at the Marsh...Eurytemora americansa and such. coastal marine forms as Acartia clausi . However, the harpacticoid Leimia vaga, which was dominant in the 0.0-n collection at

  2. 75 FR 45095 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Terephthalate (PET) Film from Dana Mermelstein South Korea (A-580-807) (3rd Review). (202) 482-1391. Stainless.... Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings Dana Mermelstein from South Korea (A-580-813) (3rd Review)....

  3. 75 FR 53664 - Initiation of Five-Year (“Sunset”) Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... South Korea Polyethylene Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391. Terephthalate (PET) Film (3rd Review). A-588... Review). A-580-813 731-TA-563 South Korea Stainless Steel Dana Mermelstein, (202) 492-1391....

  4. 75 FR 67081 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    .... Department contact Antidumping duty proceedings \\1\\ Solid Urea from Russia (A-821-801) (3rd Review)....... Dana Mermelstein; (202) 482-1391. Solid Urea from Ukraine (A-823-801) (3rd Review)...... Dana...

  5. 75 FR 74685 - Initiation of Five-Year (“Sunset”) Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ............ Russia Solid Urea (3rd Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391. Review). A-823-801 731-TA-340-H......... Ukraine Solid Urea (3rd Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391. Review). Filing Information As a courtesy, we...

  6. Checklist of copepods from Gulf of Nicoya, Coronado Bay and Golfo Dulce, Pacific coast of Costa Rica, with comments on their distribution.

    PubMed

    Morales-Ramírez, A

    1996-12-01

    also observed, but the separation of the species was not so evident. Outer stations were represented by oceanic species like Paracalanus aculeatus, Pleuromamma gracilis, Lucicutia ovalis, Candacia catula, Euchaeta wolfendeni and Oncaea mediterranea, while the inner station, located at the upper part of the Gulf, was more characterized by a mixed copepod group, with both neritic species like Pseudodiaptomus wrigthi, Acartia danae, A. clausi, Canthocalanus pauper as well as oceanic species like Scolicithricella marginata, Saphirina nicromaculata or Oncaea conifera. Two species of Coryceaus, C. flaccus and C. speciosus, were identified in the outer stations of Golfo Dulce, while C. brehmi was found in inner stations of Gulf of Nicoya. The majority of copepods found are typical of the east Pacific. This paper constitutes an additional work about the copepods in the Gulf of Nicoya and the first report of copepod species for Coronado Bay and Golfo Dulce.

  7. 75 FR 30777 - Initiation of Five-Year (“Sunset”) Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Product Department contact A-405-803 731-TA-1084 Finland Carboxymethyl- Dana Mermelstein cellulose. (202) 482-1391. A-201-834 731-TA-1085 Mexico Carboxymethyl- Dana Mermelstein cellulose. (202) 482-1391. A-421-811 731-TA-1086 Netherlands...... Carboxymethyl- Dana Mermelstein cellulose. (202) 482-1391....

  8. 76 FR 67412 - Initiation of Five-Year (“Sunset”) Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Steel Butt-Weld Dana Mermelstein (202) 482-1391. Pipe Fittings (2nd Review). A-557-809 731-TA-866 Malaysia Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Dana Mermelstein (202) 482-1391. Pipe Fittings (2nd Review). A-565-801 731-TA-867 Philippines......... Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Dana Mermelstein (202) 482-1391. Pipe...

  9. Seasonality in autotrophic mesoplankton in a coastal upwelling-mud bank environment along the southwest coast of India and its ecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnan, C.; Jyothibabu, R.; Manoj Kumar, T. M.; Balachandran, K. K.; Arunpandi, N.; Jagadeesan, L.

    2017-08-01

    the dominant copepods present in the study region during the Southwest Monsoon (Temora turbinata, Oithona similis, Pseudodiaptomus serricaudatus and Centropages tenuiremis) were smaller in size than those present during the Pre-Southwest Monsoon period (Acartia danae, A. erythraea, and Centropages orsini). The ecological implication of the present observation is that the smaller-sized copepods grazing on larger phytoplankton during the Southwest Monsoon (upwelling) period cause sloppy feeding and lead to inefficient grazing of the larger diatom stock, eventually facilitating frequent phytoplankton blooms along the southwest coast of India.

  10. An Overview of Ecological Processes in the Rio de la Plata Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acha, M.; Mianzan, H.

    2005-05-01

    The Rio de la Plata, one of the most important estuarine environments in South America, is characterized by a salt-wedge regime. Large extension and shallow water depth make the estuary highly susceptible to atmospheric forcing. The estuary is a highly productive area, which sustain important artisanal and coastal fisheries in Uruguay and Argentina, mainly based on the whitemouth croaker, Micropogonias furnieri. The main goal of this paper is to summarize recent knowledge on this system, integrating physical, chemical and biological studies. This estuary is characterized by strong vertical salinity stratification, with marine waters (saltier and denser) penetrating deeper into the estuary along the bottom, while fresh waters advance ocean-ward on the surface, forming a salt wedge. The upstream reach of the salt wedge defines a bottom salinity fronts, whose location is controlled by the topography, a submerged shoal called Barra del Indio and at the opposite area, the convergence between the estuarine and marine waters define a surface salinity front. The convergence of water masses and the strong picnoclines at the head of the salt wedge produce the accumulation and retention of plankton, including the eggs of those fishes that concentrate here to spawn (e.g. Micropogonias furnieri and Brevoortia aurea) and even debris. High turbidity constrains here photosynthetic production and food chains are probably detritus based, supporting high densities of Acartia tonsa (Copepoda) and Neomysis americana (Mysid), both omnivorous species that complete its entire life-cycle within the estuary. In agreement, heterotophic microzooplankton is abundant. Moreover, high deposition of suspended matter support dense beds of the deposit feeding clams Mactra isabelleana. As soon as the water become less turbid, an extremely high chlorophyll signal is observed. The largest portion of the salt wedge regime (more than 200 km) is characterized by dense plankton aggregations below the

  11. Regenerated Fe is tasty!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuester, J.; Twining, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    phytoplankton. In an experiment using the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana as prey and regrowth organism and the copepod Acartia tonsa as grazer, ~45% of regenerated Fe was taken up in the regrowth phase within 30 minutes. After 24 hours almost all regenerated Fe was taken up by T. pseudonana. In contrast, only ~10% and ~60% of inorganic Fe was associated with T. pseudonana cells after 0.5 and 24 hours, respectively. Furthermore, inorganic Fe adsorbed strongly to the frustule of T. pseudonana. At 0.5 hours almost 60% of cell-associated Fe was adsorbed in the inorganic uptake experiment. In contrast, experiments with regenerated Fe showed that all cell associated Fe was taken up after 30 min. These results indicate that copepod grazing produces readily bioavailable Fe.Results from additional experiments probing the effects of grazer taxonomy and chemical composition of prey on the bioavailability of regenerated Fe will be presented as well.

  12. Retraction: 'Genotyping of CYP2C19 polymorphisms and its clinical validation in the ethnic Arab population', by T. Tayeb, Dana H. Bakheet, Khaled Zaza, Salma M. Wakil and Nduna Dzimiri.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The above article from the Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, published online on 14 February 2015 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), and in Volume 67, pp. 972-979, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Professor David Jones, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation by the Research Advisory Council at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, because the manuscript (including all of its content and authorship) was published without obtaining clearance from the Office of Research Affairs. Reference Tayeb HT et al. Genotyping of CYP2C19 polymorphisms and its clinical validation in the ethnic Arab population. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society, Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology.

  13. Reply to "Comment on: Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge, by Meinen and Luther" by Dana K. Savidge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    Savidge (2016) raises a concern about how the spatial averaging embodied in our Gulf Stream analysis of vertical coherence (Meinen and Luther, 2016) might contribute to the low coherence found. This response addresses the concerns raised in the Savidge (2016) short comment.

  14. Reply to "Comment on: Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge, by Meinen and Luther" by Dana K. Savidge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-05-01

    Savidge (2016) raises a concern about how the spatial averaging embodied in our Gulf Stream analysis of vertical coherence (Meinen and Luther, 2016) might contribute to the low coherence found. This response addresses the concerns raised in the Savidge (2016) short comment.

  15. Reply to "Comment on 'Cosmic-ray-driven reaction and greenhouse effect of halogenated molecules: Culprits for atmospheric ozone depletion and global climate change' by Dana Nuccitelli et al."

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Q.-B.

    2014-04-01

    In the Comment by Nuccitelli et al., they make many false and invalid criticisms of the CFC-warming theory in my recent paper, and claim that their anthropogenic forcings including CO2 would provide a better explanation of the observed global mean surface temperature (GMST) data over the past 50 years. First, their arguments for no significant discrepancy between modeled and observed GMST changes and for no pause in recent global warming contradict the widely accepted fact and conclusion that were reported in the recent literature extensively. Second, their criticism that the key data used in my recent paper would be "outdated" and "flawed" is untrue as these data are still used in the recent or current literature including the newest (2013) IPCC Report and there is no considerable difference between the UK Met Office HadRCUT3 and HadRCUT4 GMST datasets. The use of even more recently computer-reconstructed total solar irradiance data (whatever have large uncertainties) for the period prior to 1976 would not change any of the conclusions in my paper, where quantitative analyses were emphasized on the influences of humans and the Sun on global surface temperature after 1970 when direct measurements became available. For the latter, the solar effect has been well shown to play only a negligible role in global surface temperature change since 1970, which is identical to the conclusion made in the 2013 IPCC Report. Third, their argument that the solar effect would not play a major role in the GMST rise of 0.2°C during 1850-1970 even contradicts the data and conclusion presented in a recent paper published in their Skeptical Science by Nuccitelli himself. Fourth, their comments also indicate their lack of understandings of the basic radiation physics of the Earth system as well as of the efficacies of different greenhouse gases in affecting global surface temperature. Their listed "methodological errors" are either trivial or non-existing. Fifth, their assertion that "the climate system takes centuries to millennia to fully equilibrate" is lack of scientific basis. Finally, their model calculations including an additional fitting parameter do not reduce the discrepancy with observed GMST data even after their adjustments. Instead, their modeled results give a sharp GMST rise over the past 16 years, which obviously disagrees with the observed data.

  16. Feasibility of growing hardwood species on a borrow pit amended with either fertilizer and lime or sewage sludge. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous research on other sites showed that 15 tons/A of dried sewage sludge followed by subsoiling is sufficient to promote rapid growth of pines and sweetgum on borrow pits. During the past year, data have been obtained from this experiment showing that 30 tons/A of sewage sludge, well incorporated and followed by subsoiling, will promote very rapid first-year growth of green ash, yellow poplar, sycamore, and sawtooth oak. Loblolly pine and sweetgum also grew well as in previous studies. In most cases, seedlings of these species grew significantly faster with sewage sludge than with 1000 lbs./Aof 10-10-10 fertilizer and 2 tons/A of lime. Yellow poplar and sycamore grew the faster of all species, attaining heights during the first growing season of 134 and 209 cms, respectively. Sweetgum, green ash, and sawtooth oak all attained heights over 100 cms.

  17. Noctiluca and copepods grazing on the phytoplankton community in a nutrient-enriched coastal environment along the southwest coast of India.

    PubMed

    Arunpandi, N; Jyothibabu, R; Jagadeesan, L; Gireeshkumar, T R; Karnan, C; Naqvi, S W A

    2017-07-01

    The relative grazing impact of Noctiluca scintillans (hereafter referred only Noctiluca) and copepods (Acrocalanus gracilis, Paracalanus parvus, Acartia danae and Oithona similis) on the phytoplankton community in an upwelling-mudbank environment along the southwest coast India is presented here. This study was carried out during the Pre-Southwest Monsoon (April-May) to the Late Southwest Monsoon (August) period in 2014. During the sampling period, large hydrographical transformation was evident in the study area (off Alappuzha, Southwest coast of India); warmer Pre-Southwest Monsoon water column condition got transformed into cooler and nitrate-rich hypoxic waters during the Southwest Monsoon (June-August) due to intense coastal upwelling. Copepods were present in the study area throughout the sampling period with a noticeable increase in their abundance during the Southwest Monsoon. On the other hand, the first appearance of Noctiluca in the sampling location was during the Early Southwest Monsoon (mid-June) and thereafter their abundance increased towards the Peak Southwest Monsoon. The grazing experiments carried out as per the food removal method showed noticeable differences in the feeding preferences of Noctiluca and copepods, especially on the different size fractions of phytoplankton. Noctiluca showed the highest positive electivity for the phytoplankton micro-fraction (av. 0.49 ± 0.04), followed by nano-fraction (av. 0.17 ± 0.04) and a negative electivity for the pico-fraction (av. -0.66 ± 0.06). In total ingestion of Noctiluca, micro-fraction contribution (83.7%) was significantly higher compared to the nano- (15.7%) and pico-fractions (0.58%). On the other hand, copepods showed the highest positive electivity for the phytoplankton nano-fraction (av. 0.38 ± 0.04) followed by micro- (av. -0.17 ± 0.05) and pico-fractions (av. -0.35 ± 0.05). Similarly, in total ingestion of copepods, nano-fraction (69.7%) was the highest followed by micro

  18. 33 CFR 165.1125 - Southern California Annual Firework Events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... local agencies. Table 1 to § 165.1125 1. Cambria American Legion Post Fourth of July Fireworks Sponsor... fireworks display. 3. Fourth of July Fireworks, City of Dana Point Sponsor City of Dana Point, CA. Event.... Increases to a 1,000-foot radius upon commencement of the fireworks display. 4. Fourth of July Fireworks...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1125 - Southern California Annual Firework Events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... local agencies. Table 1 to § 165.1125 1. Cambria American Legion Post Fourth of July Fireworks Sponsor... fireworks display. 3. Fourth of July Fireworks, City of Dana Point Sponsor City of Dana Point, CA. Event.... Increases to a 1,000-foot radius upon commencement of the fireworks display. 4. Fourth of July Fireworks...

  20. 33 CFR 165.1125 - Southern California Annual Firework Events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... local agencies. Table 1 to § 165.1125 1. Cambria American Legion Post Fourth of July Fireworks Sponsor... fireworks display. 3. Fourth of July Fireworks, City of Dana Point Sponsor City of Dana Point, CA. Event.... Increases to a 1,000-foot radius upon commencement of the fireworks display. 4. Fourth of July Fireworks...

  1. 78 FR 20935 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ...-09-1603P)........ Anderson, Mayor, City of Golden Lantern, Dana Point, 33282 Golden Dana Point, CA...- Unincorporated areas The Honorable David Rice, Monroe County February 18, 2013 125129 1286). of Monroe County... (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas The Honorable David Rice, Monroe County February 4, 2013...

  2. Exploring Urban Literacy & Developmental Education. CRDEUL Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundell, Dana Britt, Ed.; Higbee, Jeanne L., Ed.

    This collection of papers includes: "Introduction: Why Should We Discuss 'Urban Literacy' in Developmental Education?" (Dana Britt Lundell and Jeanne L. Higbee); "History of the Center for Research on Developmental Education and Urban Literacy: 1996-2002" (Dana Britt Lundell); "The Traveling City: The Hudson's Store, Urban…

  3. 76 FR 61087 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... People's Republic of Julia Hancock, (202) 482-1394. China (A-570-806) (3rd Review). Stainless Steel Butt... Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391 Malaysia (A-557-809) (2nd Review). Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391. the Philippines (A-565-801...

  4. How Do We Know What Information Sharing Is Really Worth? Exploring Methodologies to Measure the Value of Information Sharing and Fusion Efforts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    default/files/2010_ITACG_Report_ Final_30Nov10.pdf Rhodes, William, Meg Chapman, Michael Shively, Christina Dyous, Dana Hunt, and Kristin Wheeler...Christina Dyous, Meg Chapman, Michael Shively, Dana Hunt, and Kristin Wheeler, Evaluation of the Multijurisdictional Task Forces (MJTFs), Phase II, MJTF

  5. 76 FR 31587 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Sunset Reviews. Department contact Antidumping Duty Proceedings Light-Walled Rectangular Welded Carbon... Steel Wire Rod from India (A-533-808) Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391. (3rd Review). Welded Carbon...-583-815) ( 3rd Review). Welded Carbon Steel Pipe & Tube from Thailand Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391...

  6. Ethical Elders: Campus Role Models for Moral Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddell, Debora L.; Cooper, Diane L.; Healy, Margaret A.; Stewart, Dafina Lazarus

    2010-01-01

    Dana is a graduate assistant in the second year of a master's program in student personnel. In a class discussion of assistantship issues, Dana reveals that he has decided not to enforce the university's policy of "writing up" all underage students who are in a residence hall room where alcohol is present. He says that in his opinion the punitive…

  7. Circular harmonic filters for the recognition of marine microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Hamz, Victor Antonio; Alvarez-Borrego, Josué

    1997-01-01

    We present an application of circular-harmonic filters (CHF s) for the recognition of planktonic microorganisms. CHF s discriminated both genera Acartia and Calanus . The symmetry of genus Acartia permitted discrimination to the species and sex levels, whereas the asymmetry of the genus Calanus permitted discrimination only to the generic level. The differences among organisms of different sex of the genus Calanus could not be detected by these particular CHF s. More research needs to be carried out with more complex CHF s to enhance their performance and to permit the implementation of an automated optodigital system to identify and count marine microorganisms.

  8. Prospective evaluation of 2 acute graft-versus-host (GVHD) grading systems: a joint Société Française de Greffe de Moëlle et Thérapie Cellulaire (SFGM-TC), Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), and International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry (IBMTR) prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Cahn, Jean-Yves; Klein, John P.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Milpied, Noël; Blaise, Didier; Antin, Joseph H.; Leblond, Véronique; Ifrah, Norbert; Jouet, Jean-Pierre; Loberiza, Fausto; Ringden, Olle; Barrett, A. John; Horowitz, Mary M.; Socié, Gérard

    2005-01-01

    The most commonly used grading system for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) was introduced 30 years ago by Glucksberg; a revised system was developed by the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry (IBMTR) in 1997. To prospectively compare the 2 classifications and to evaluate the effect of duration and severity of aGVHD on survival, we conducted a multicenter study of 607 patients receiving T-cell-replete allografts, scored weekly for aGVHD in 18 transplantation centers. Sixty-nine percent of donors were HLA-identical siblings and 28% were unrelated donors. The conditioning regimen included total body irradiation in 442 (73%) patients. The 2 classifications performed similarly in explaining variability in survival by aGVHD grade, although the Glucksberg classification predicted early survival better. There was less physician bias or error in assigning grades with the IBMTR scoring system. With either system, only the maximum observed grade had prognostic significance for survival; neither time of onset nor progression from an initially lower grade of aGVHD was associated with survival once maximum grade was considered. Regardless of scoring system, aGVHD severity accounted for only a small percentage of observed variation in survival. Validity of these results in populations receiving peripheral blood transplants or nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens remains to be tested. (Blood. 2005;106:1495-1500) PMID:15878974

  9. Prospective evaluation of 2 acute graft-versus-host (GVHD) grading systems: a joint Société Française de Greffe de Moëlle et Thérapie Cellulaire (SFGM-TC), Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), and International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry (IBMTR) prospective study.

    PubMed

    Cahn, Jean-Yves; Klein, John P; Lee, Stephanie J; Milpied, Noël; Blaise, Didier; Antin, Joseph H; Leblond, Véronique; Ifrah, Norbert; Jouet, Jean-Pierre; Loberiza, Fausto; Ringden, Olle; Barrett, A John; Horowitz, Mary M; Socié, Gérard

    2005-08-15

    The most commonly used grading system for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) was introduced 30 years ago by Glucksberg; a revised system was developed by the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry (IBMTR) in 1997. To prospectively compare the 2 classifications and to evaluate the effect of duration and severity of aGVHD on survival, we conducted a multicenter study of 607 patients receiving T-cell-replete allografts, scored weekly for aGVHD in 18 transplantation centers. Sixty-nine percent of donors were HLA-identical siblings and 28% were unrelated donors. The conditioning regimen included total body irradiation in 442 (73%) patients. The 2 classifications performed similarly in explaining variability in survival by aGVHD grade, although the Glucksberg classification predicted early survival better. There was less physician bias or error in assigning grades with the IBMTR scoring system. With either system, only the maximum observed grade had prognostic significance for survival; neither time of onset nor progression from an initially lower grade of aGVHD was associated with survival once maximum grade was considered. Regardless of scoring system, aGVHD severity accounted for only a small percentage of observed variation in survival. Validity of these results in populations receiving peripheral blood transplants or nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens remains to be tested.

  10. School Improvement Change Grant Community Survey, Final Report. A Report to Toluca Community Unit School District #2, El Paso Community Unit School District #375, Lowpoint-Washburn Community Unit School District #21, Minonk-Dana-Rutland Community Unit School District #108, and Roanoke-Benson Community Unit School District #60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Patricia A.; And Others

    This report presents the results of a collaborative study undertaken by five rural, unit school districts in Illinois to provide data to be used in planning for school improvement. Information was gathered from on-site visits by teams of constituents from other districts and through a survey of perceptions of local community persons regarding…

  11. Oxidative Stress Increases the Blood Brain Barrier Permeability Resulting in Increased Incidence of Brain Metastasis in BRCA Mutation Carriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    grant 3/5/2013https://secure.bidmc.harvard.edu/ owa /,DanaInfo=email.caregroup.org,SSL+?ae=Item&t=IP... -g 250 Q. Q) "tii 200 -~ ~ C/) !::’ 150...mice, as indicated. Page 3 of 9Progress report for BC102246 DOD grant 3/5/2013https://secure.bidmc.harvard.edu/ owa /,DanaInfo=email.caregroup.org,SSL+?ae...secure.bidmc.harvard.edu/ owa /,DanaInfo=email.caregroup.org,SSL+?ae=Item&t=IP... Figure 2 A ~ E 0 li) ~ 0 -15 :.c c (j) 0 0:: -() w ~ (l) I B ~ :i 0

  12. E-20168

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-04-25

    NASA research pilot Bill Dana stands in front of the HL-10 Lifting Body following his first glide flight on April 25, 1969. Dana later retired as Chief Engineer at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, (called the NASA Flight Research Center in 1969). Prior to his lifting body assignment, Dana flew the X-15 research airplane. He flew the rocket-powered aircraft 16 times, reaching a top speed of 3,897 miles per hour and a peak altitude of 310,000 feet (almost 59 miles high).

  13. Zooplankton Responses to Thin Layers: Integrating Behavior and Physiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-30

    the food source . Perception over longer distances did not seem to occur. Our results suggested that Acartia could take advantage of thin-layers...variable food source : a simple foraging-strategy model. 6 Lougee, L. 2000. The effect of haloclines on the vertical distribution and migration of

  14. Monitoring Bloom Dynamics of a Common Coastal Bioluminescent Ctenophore

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Graham, W.M., F. Pages, and W.M. Hamner. (2001). A physical context for gelatinous zooplankton aggregations: a review. Hydrobiologia, 451: 199-212... zooplankton per cubic meter and shows a preponderance of the copepod, Acartia, throughout the year, with the greatest abundance between January and

  15. [METACERCERIAE OF BRACHYPHALLUS CRENARUS RUDOLPHI, 1802 (TREMATODA: HENIURIDAE) IN PLANKTON CRUSTACEANS FROM THE PROSTOR GULF (ITURUP ISLAND, RUSSIA)].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, S G; Frenkel, S E; Gordeev, I I

    2016-01-01

    Samples of Zooplankton collected in waters of the Prostor Gulf (Iturup Island) were examined. Metacercariae of Brachyphallus crenatus were found in copepods Pseudocalanus newmani and Acartia longiremis. This is the first record of the second intermediate hosts of this species in the North Pacific.

  16. Workplace/Women's Place: An Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Dana

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Paula England); "Introduction to the Study of Women and Work" (Dana Dunn); "Gender Culture and Socialization" (Rita Mae Kelly); "Parental Influence and Women's Careers" (Sue Joan Mendelson Freeman); "Shortchanging Girls: Gender Socialization in…

  17. 78 FR 13857 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ...; Advance Notification of Sunset Reviews AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration... Rectangular Pipe and Tube from Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391. Turkey (A-489-815) (1st Review). Polyethylene...

  18. ARC-2007-ACD07-0073-008

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-14

    Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) and P.I. at NASA Ames Research Center - Calibration of Polychromix Near Infra Red Spectrometer outside of N-240A (EEL) with (l to r)) Kim Ennico, Dana Lynch, and Diane Wooden

  19. ARC-2007-ACD07-0073-006

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-14

    Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) and P.I. at NASA Ames Research Center - Calibration of Polychromix Near Infra Red Spectrometer outside of N-240A (EEL) with (l to r)) Kim Ennico, Dana Lynch, and Diane Wooden

  20. Researchers Identify Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... study with Matthew Vander Heiden, MD, PhD , of MIT and Dana-Farber. “Detecting the disease earlier in ... the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT. Their experiments showed that mice with newly formed ...

  1. NASA's Kepler Spacecraft Discovers Its First Rocky Planet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-10

    Animation narrated by Natalie Batalha, describing the location of Kepler-10b and the possible molten landscape. New Field-of-View animation by Marco Librero and new Kepler-10b animation by Dana Berry.

  2. 21. General view from the southwest, c.1862 Photocopied from an ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. General view from the southwest, c.1862 Photocopied from an advertisement, 'Whitney's Improved Fire-Arms,' Dana Scrapbook v. 61, p. 68, NHCHSL. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  3. ARC-2009-ACD09-0054-009

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-09

    Yuri's Night 2009 held at the California Acaemy of Sciences in San Francisco, California Ames's (l-r) Dana Bolles and Davis Morse speak with a news person as Peter Worden Ames Center Director looks on)

  4. Workplace/Women's Place: An Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Dana

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Paula England); "Introduction to the Study of Women and Work" (Dana Dunn); "Gender Culture and Socialization" (Rita Mae Kelly); "Parental Influence and Women's Careers" (Sue Joan Mendelson Freeman); "Shortchanging Girls: Gender Socialization in…

  5. Which Genes Drive Cancers? - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Associate Professor of Medicine at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, William Hahn, describes the method his lab has developed to tease apart the crucial driver mutations from passenger mutations in ovarian cancer.

  6. Banquet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Dana; Maher, Dennis

    2006-10-01

    Banquet with speaker Dana Dunn and a performance by actor and professor Dennis Maher: ``QED, selections from the play by Peter Parnell based on the writings of Richard Feynman and Tuva or Bust! by Feynman and Leighton.''

  7. 75 FR 5037 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... Department contact Magnesium Metal from the People's Republic Jennifer Moats; (202) 482- of China (A-570-896). 5047. Magnesium Metal from Russia (A-821-819)... Dana Mermelstein; (202) 482- 1391. Countervailing Duty...

  8. 75 FR 53637 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391. 570-836) (3rd Review). Porcelain-On-Steel Cooking Ware from Taiwan (A- Dana...-814) (3rd Review). Porcelain-On-Steel Cooking Ware from the Jennifer Moats, (202) 482-5047....

  9. 75 FR 43612 - Pipeline Safety: Request for Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... regulations. Dominion's request includes a technical analysis. This request can be found at Regulations.gov... at dana.register@dot.gov . Technical: Joshua Johnson by telephone at 816-329-3825; or, e-mail at...

  10. 75 FR 55848 - Pipeline Safety: Request for Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... pipeline safety regulations. Dominion's request includes a technical analysis. This request can be found at... telephone at 202-366-0490; or, e-mail at dana.register@dot.gov . Technical: Joshua Johnson by telephone at...

  11. Flight Director Portrait - Bryan Austin with Lead EVA Console OPS- for Texas A&M Alumni Magazine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-27

    JSC2002-00546 (February 2002) --- Bryan P. Austin, lead flight director for STS-109, and Dana Weigel, lead EVA officer, pose near their respective consoles in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center.

  12. The talitrid amphipods of Tonga (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Talitridae).

    PubMed

    Lowry, J K; Bopiah, Arundathi

    2013-01-01

    One new genus and four species of talitrid amphipods are described from Tonga: Platorchestia ano sp. nov.; Talorchestia spinipalma (Dana, 1852); Tongorchestia pangaimotu gen. nov., sp. nov.; T. towneri sp. nov.

  13. 75 FR 78731 - Proposed Information Collection; OMB Control Number 1018-0115, Application for Training, National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... for Training, National Conservation Training Center AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... information about this IC, contact Dana Dennison, National Conservation Training Center, at (304) 876-7481... Service National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, provides natural...

  14. Libraries in Vermont: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/vermont.html Libraries in Vermont To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. Burlington University of Vermont Dana Medical Library 81 Colchester Avenue Burlington, VT 05405-0068 802- ...

  15. [Reaction of the uterine wall on IUD of abnormal positioning and size].

    PubMed

    Nesit, V

    1973-05-01

    The reliability of an IUD was examined in 9 women 1-7 days prior to hysterectomy or supracervical amputation of the uterus. An extra large Dana, Dana super, or Dana cor was inserted. All the women complained of hypogastric pains; in 2 cases, the IUD was removed after only a few hours. After the surgery, the uterus was prepared for histological verification of the effects of the IUD. Significant deformation of the uterine wall was found, especially in the region of the cervix and corpus uteri. This was particularly marked with the Dana super, which also caused a rotary deformation. There were changes seen in the IUD itself as well. The results show that an excessively large or incorrectly positioned IUD will cause pronounced deformation of the corpus, uterine cavity and of the cervix with subsequent pains, staining, and expulsion.

  16. Oceanic Chemistry and Biology Group (ONR Code 422CB) Program Science Report, FY 81,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    and T. Pommeranz (1980), "Volume scatter- - ing strength predictions for Antarctic - krill ( Euphausia superba Dana)." - Meeresforsch, 28:48-55. (d) C...460 (1980). Greenlaw, C. F., R. K. Johnson, and T. Pommeranz. "Volume scattering strength predictions for Antarctic - krill ( Euphausia superba Dana...83 to study the biology and physics of a "superswarm" (over 10 million tons) of adult krill ( Euphausia superba ) recently discovered by Shulenberger

  17. Zebrafish Model of NF1 for Structure-Function Analysis, Mechanisms of Glial Tumorigenesis, and Chemical Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Biology” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Thomas Look, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02115-6013 REPORT DATE...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Office of Grants and Contracts 450 Brookline Avenue, BP3 Boston, MA 02215-5450 9...tumor suppressor linked cancers of MPNST and glioma have been completely updated to make them optimal for the structure function studies. We established

  18. Zebrafish Models of BCR-ABL-Induced Leukemogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02115 REPORT DATE: October 2005 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research...NUMBER Sf. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Dana-Farber Cancer Institute...stable transgenic zebrafish models for BCR-ABL induced leukemia will establish the necessary groundwork that will be valuable in conducting future

  19. Vibrational Energy in Molecules and Nanoparticles: Applications to Energetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-30

    postdoctoral associate at Berkeley D. Alexei Lagutchev, postdoctoral associate E. Rusty Conner, graduate student F. Nak -Hyun Seong, postdoctoral...Zhaohui Wang, Jeffrey A. Carter, Alexei Lagutchev, Yee Kan Koh, Nak -Hyun Seong, David G. Cahill and Dana D. Dlott, Science. 317, pp. 787-790. 14...Lagutchev, Ying Fang, Nak -Hyun Seong, David G. Cahill and Dana D. Dlott, AIP Conf. Proc. 955, pp. 1221- 1224. 17. "Nonresonant Background Suppression in

  20. Butterflies: Photonic Crystals on the Wing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-22

    Coliadinae), Eronia leda, Colotis danae, and Pieris rapae rapae (all Pierinae), respectively. The left and right column of the photographs are taken...phylogenetic tree: Colias electo belongs to the Coliadinae, Eronia leda and Colotis danae belong to the Colotis group, and Pieris rapae rapae to the Pierini...the droplet is brought into contact with a piece of wing (here of a large white, Pieris brassicae ). 3 Fig. 4. Electron microscopic photographs

  1. Cost Benefit and Capability Analysis of Sea-Base Connectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    resulting in the value seen in Table 9. 64 Dana S. Partos and James S. Kurtz, Center for Naval...Analyses of Alternatives,” Center for Naval Analysis (CNA), CRM D0005604.A4/1Rev, August 2002 . 66 Partos , et al., “Cost-Benefit Methodology.” 67 Navy...accessed April 2009). Partos , Dana S. and Kurtz, James S., Center for Naval Analysis, “Cost-Benefit Methodology for Seabasing and Expeditionary

  2. Variable tolerance to copper in two species from San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, S.N.; Cain, D.J.; Ho, K.; Hutchinson, A.

    1983-01-01

    In static toxicity experiments, tolerance to soluble Cu of the bivalve, Macoma balthica, and the copepod, Acartia clausi, varied substantially among populations sampled within San Francisco Bay. Intraspecific tolerance differed ten-fold or more for both species over relatively small distances, suggesting geographical isolation of populations is not a prerequisite for the development of intraspecific differences in tolerance by aquatic organisms.In static toxicity experiments, tolerance to soluble Cu of the bivalve, Macoma balthica, and the copepod, Acartia clausi, varied substantially among populations sampled within San Francisco Bay. Intraspecific tolerance differed ten-fold or more for both species over relatively small distances, suggesting geographical isolation of populations is not a prerequisite for the development of intraspecific differences in tolerance by aquatic organisms. Refs.

  3. Environmental Assessment for Boston Harbor Maintenance Dredging, Boston, Massachusetts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    1) daily activities in terms of schooling and burrowing, (2) their food source, and (3) reproductive habitat. Most of the daily activites of the...bloassay indicated no toxicity to the copepod, Acartia clausi, and therefore, should not be a problem. Few studies on the reproductive habitat of sand lances...Burns, K. A. and J. M. Teal. 1973. Hydrocarbons in the Peglagic Sargassum Community. Deep Sea Research. 20:207-211. Butman, B. 1973. Hydrography and

  4. Performance on the Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment across controlled environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Haran, F Jay; Dretsch, Michael N; Bleiberg, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive assessment tools (NCAT) are commonly used to screen for changes in cognitive functioning following a mild traumatic brain injury and to assist with a return to duty decision. As such, it is critical to determine if performance on the Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment (DANA) is adversely affected by operationally-relevant field environments. Differences in DANA performance between a thermoneutral environment and three simulated operationally-relevant field environments across the thermal stress continuum were calculated for 16 healthy U.S. Navy service members. Practice effects associated with brief test-retest intervals were calculated within each environmental condition. There were no significant differences between the simulated environmental conditions suggesting that performance on the DANA Brief is not impacted by thermal stress. Additionally, there were no significant differences in performance within each simulated environmental condition associated with repeated administrations.

  5. Application of Advanced Material for Turbomachinery and Rocket Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    CriveIlli- Visconti and G. A. Cooper, "Mechanical Properties of a New Carbon Fiber Material," Nature, 221 754-755 (1969). 5. K. M. Prewo, J. J. Brennan...technolagie moteur ant 6t6 r~alia~es at ont subi des essais d’endurance aur moteur dana des conditions repr~sentatives d~une utili- sation op~rationnelle. Le...Le d~veloppement dun moteur de masse minimale n~ceasite une action conjugu~e dana lea domaines suivants: - A~rodynamique et cycle Ther-modynamique

  6. Research Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serig, Dan, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This research review is dedicated to the memory of William Safire (1929-2009). A visionary leader, Safire brought other visionaries, researchers, educators, artists, and policymakers together to explore the confluence of arts education and neuroscience. He fostered the new field of neuroeducation in his work as chair of The Dana Foundation in…

  7. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy PRINCIPAL FLOOR PLAN, CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy PRINCIPAL FLOOR PLAN, CHAMBER PLAN, ORIGINAL DRAWINGS, HENRY AUSTIN, ARCHITECT Restricted: Permission for use must be obtained in writing from Beinecke Rare Book Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. - James Dwight Dana House, 24 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  8. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dana Redford, Acting Director, Management Analysis and Services Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  9. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 11:00 a.m.-6:00... and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dana Redford, Acting...

  10. Why We Got Serious about Interdisciplinary Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Dana; Kelner, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When Tom Kelner, a 7th grade social studies teacher, realized that under the Common Core standards he'd be responsible for strengthening students' reading, writing, and research skills in his social studies classes, first he panicked. Then he approached Dana Haring, an English language arts teacher on his 7th grade team, and asked if they could…

  11. Why We Got Serious about Interdisciplinary Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Dana; Kelner, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When Tom Kelner, a 7th grade social studies teacher, realized that under the Common Core standards he'd be responsible for strengthening students' reading, writing, and research skills in his social studies classes, first he panicked. Then he approached Dana Haring, an English language arts teacher on his 7th grade team, and asked if they could…

  12. "Cancer-Related Fatigue: A Systematic and Meta-Analytic Review of Nonpharmacological Therapies for Cancer Patients:" Correction to Kangas, Bovbjerg, and Montgomery (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Maria; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2009-01-01

    Reports an error in "Cancer-related fatigue: A systematic and meta-analytic review of non-pharmacological therapies for cancer patients" by Maria Kangas, Dana H. Bovbjerg and Guy H. Montgomery (Psychological Bulletin, 2008[Sep], Vol 134[5], 700-741). The URL to the Supplemental Materials for the article is listed incorrectly in two places in the…

  13. 2004 NASA Dryden Research Pilots

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-10

    2004 NASA Dryden Research Pilots. Left to Right: Edwin W. Lewis, Jr., David A. Wright (Director of Flight Operations), William Frederick Brockett, Frank Batteas, Craig R. Bomben, Richard G. Ewers, James W. Smolka, Douglas H. Baker, C. Gordon Fullerton (Chief Pilot), James Barrilleaux, Martin J. Trout, and Mark Pestana. (not pictured: Dana Purifoy)

  14. Nurturing Human Potential in the Context of Schooling: The Legacy of Seymour B. Sarason

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Rhona S.

    2012-01-01

    Seymour Bernard Sarason was born to Jewish immigrant parents on January 12, 1919, in Brooklyn, New York. He died on January 28, 2010, in New Haven, Connecticut, at the age of 91. He obtained his undergraduate degree in 1939 from Dana College in Newark (now Rutgers University), and earned his doctorate in clinical psychology in 1942 from Clark…

  15. Focus on Collaborative Learning. Classroom Practices in Teaching English, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Jeff; And Others

    Written by English teachers considered successful in directing collaborative learning, this collection of essays focuses on the effective use of collaborative learning in the English language arts classroom. The essays and their authors are, as follows: (1) "None of Us Is as Smart as All of Us" (Dana Herreman); (2) "Collaborative…

  16. Women in IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Today, female students outnumber males on campus, earn a higher number of BA degrees, and surpass men in completing advanced degrees. So there is a certain irony in the fact that executive roles on campus are still dominated by men--and IT is no exception. "Campus Technology" asked three women (Pam McQuesten, Dana Hoover, and Jill Albin-Hill)…

  17. ARC-2007-ACD07-0073-048

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-14

    Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) and P.I. at NASA Ames Research Center - Total Luminance Photometer lens and electronics units on shake table in N-2444 EEL Laboratory with (l) Gi Kojima (bk - middle) Damon Flansburg (r) Dana Lynch

  18. ARC-2007-ACD07-0073-052

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-14

    Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) and P.I. at NASA Ames Research Center - Total Luminance Photometer lens and electronics units on shake table in N-2444 EEL Laboratory: Gi Kojima, Dana Lynch and Lynn Hofland check electronics. Data analyzer is the foreground.

  19. 40 CFR 52.1832 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 52.1832 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... letter to Douglas M. Skie, EPA, dated May 11, 1988, Dana K. Mount, Director, Division of Environmental Engineering stated: * * * We are submitting this letter to allow EPA to continue to process our current SIP...

  20. How Schools Can Help: California Teachers Recall the Wildfires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Dana; Madueno, Marcelina; Atlas, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article draws from and builds on the experience of schools in San Diego County following the forest fires that wrought havoc on the area last October. Three teachers (Dana Riggs, Marcelina Madueno and Miriam Atlas) provide a moving account of the personal experiences of their students, who lived through the fires. Their recollections…

  1. Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    IL-12 and IFNγ. In addition, fusion cells expressed CCR7 necessary for the migration of cells to sites of T cell traffic in the draining lymph...Conclusions Our clinical protocol has received approval by the FDA, NCI/CTEP (distributor of IL-12) and Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. We have also

  2. Astro Camp Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Stennis Space Center's new Astro Camp Plus camp kicked off June 19 for teens ages 13-15. The new camp delves more deeply into the science, math and technology concepts introduced in the center's popular Astro Camp series. Campers including Jasmyne White (left) and Dana Yingst, both of Slidell, La., learn how NASA uses 'podcasting' to broadcast video, and made their own podcasts.

  3. Governor's Conference on Drug Dependence and Abuse. An Occasional Paper of the Honors College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliken, William G.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Following Governor Milliken's address, Dr. Dana Farnsworth defines the problem in terms of who's involved, to what extent, and with which drugs. His presentation focuses primarily on the motives of affluent young people who experiment with or become dependent upon hallucinogens, marihuana and amphetamines. He deals extensively with the drastically…

  4. Framing Your Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrell, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    St. Paul's School in New Hampshire, the Orchard School in Indiana, Chestnut Hill Academy in Pennsylvania, and Dana Hall School in Massachusetts are like most independent schools--they have qualities that are distinctive and extraordinary. Line up their mission statements, however, and the schools sound almost interchangeable. They're all on a…

  5. 78 FR 70041 - Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ...) 919- 707-6025. EIS No. 20130345, Final EIS, DOE, LA, Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration..., Draft EIS, USFS, AZ, Programmatic--Revision of the Coronado National Forest Land and Resource Management..., USFS, CA, Blacksmith Forest Health Project, Comment Period Ends: 01/06/2014, Contact: Dana Walsh 530...

  6. Exposed: Phallic Protections, Shame and Damaged Parental Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cregeen, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Using ideas derived from Dana Birksted-Breen ("Phallus, penis and mental space," "International Journal of Psycho-Analysis," 77: 649-57, 1996), this article explores the clinical experience with "Tommy," a young boy who suffered multiple traumas and neglect. Birksted-Breen describes a phallic state of mind, which, amongst other things, serves to…

  7. Reading, Language Arts and Literacy. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Kathy, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on reading, language arts, and literacy from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: "PT3 Facilitates Technology Use in Preservice Teacher Reading Courses" (Dana Arrowood and Michele Maldonado); "PT3 Technology Enhanced Lesson Plans for the Elementary School"…

  8. Chronicle of Higher Education. Volume 51, Number 10, October 29, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "Chronicle of Higher Education" presents an abundant source of news and information for college and university faculty members and administrators. This October 29, 2004 issue of "Chronicle of Higher Education" includes the following articles: (1) "A Job-Hunting Guru Comes up Short" (Zimbleman, Dana A.); (2) "Distinctive Words That are Seldom Heard…

  9. Silent Ship Research Applications and Operation. Volume 2. Unclassified Papers. Proceedings of a Conference Held at SACLANTCEN on 2-4 October 1984

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-15

    Franqais doivent donc faire face a cdes diffi- cult6,s techniques et 6conomiques croissantes . La pfiche thoni~re dana son ensemble, confront~e a -,Ine...ralson de 1Prnportance economique de la p~che 4 la senne tcurnainte, I’P’tude de lincilence des bruitsades bateaux sur leurs rfesultats a paru

  10. "Cancer-Related Fatigue: A Systematic and Meta-Analytic Review of Nonpharmacological Therapies for Cancer Patients:" Correction to Kangas, Bovbjerg, and Montgomery (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Maria; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2009-01-01

    Reports an error in "Cancer-related fatigue: A systematic and meta-analytic review of non-pharmacological therapies for cancer patients" by Maria Kangas, Dana H. Bovbjerg and Guy H. Montgomery (Psychological Bulletin, 2008[Sep], Vol 134[5], 700-741). The URL to the Supplemental Materials for the article is listed incorrectly in two places in the…

  11. ARC-2009-ACD09-0054-005

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-09

    Yuri's Night 2009 held at the California Acaemy of Sciences in San Francisco, California from left in blue NASA jacket Mark Leon, Pete Worden, Lew Braxton, and Dana Bolles of Ames look over the the NASA Ames robotics team the Cheesy Poofs robot)

  12. Collaborating on Global Priorities: Science Education for Everyone--Any Time and Everywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Building on the key ideas from Dana Zeidler's paper I expand the conversation from the standpoint that the challenges facing humanity and the capacity of Earth to support life suggest that changes in human lifestyles are a priority. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to educate all humans about some of the science-related grand challenges, such…

  13. 77 FR 39218 - Initiation of Five-Year (“Sunset”) Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ...).... Dana Mermelstein (202) 482-1391. A-822-804 731-TA-873 Belarus Steel Concrete David Goldberger (202) 482... (202) 482-5047. A-570-860 731-TA-874 China Steel Concrete David Goldberger (202) 482-4136. Reinforcing Bars (2nd Review). A-560-811 731-TA-857 Indonesia Steel Concrete David Goldberger (202)...

  14. Longitude - critical examination of a bestselling book (German Title: Längengrad - Kritische Betrachtung eines Bestsellers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühning, Felix

    The history of longitude determination at sea in connection with John Harrison's clock constructions was widely disseminated by Dana Sobel's novel. It is shown that this novel, however, is very inaccurate and even flawed in its basic concept and in many details. This contribution traces the true historical courses and yields distinct insights in the history of the longitude problem.

  15. New Mexico Math Pathways Taskforce Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Higher Education Department, 2016

    2016-01-01

    In April 2015 New Mexico faculty, Dana Center staff, and New Mexico Higher Education (NMHED) co-presented the need for better math pathways statewide. Faculty from 6 institutions (New Mexico State University, New Mexico Highlands University, Dine College, Eastern New Mexico University, El Paso Community College, and San Juan College) participated…

  16. Middle School Concept Helps High-Poverty Schools Become High-Performing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picucci, Ali Callicoatte; Brownson, Amanda; Kahlert, Rahel; Sobel, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The results of a study conducted by the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin for the U.S. Department of Education during the 2001-02 school year showed that elements of the middle school concept can lead to improved student performance, even in high-poverty schools. This article describes common elements of the middle school…

  17. The V-22 Osprey: A Case Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    ILl 7 A: APPENDIX C ES•. • _ITRIO TECHNOLOGY COALITION HOUSE: CURT WELDON, PA. JAMES SAXTON, NJ PETE GEREN, TX . CARLOS MOORHEAD, CA DAVE MARTIN, NY...CA JOE MCDADE, PA ROD CHANDLER, WA JOHN MURTHA, PA DON RITTER, PA LANE EVANS, IL DANA ROHRASACHER, CA ALBERT BUSTAMANTE , TX JOE KOLTER. PA SOLOMON

  18. Handbook of Cross-Cultural and Multicultural Personality Assessment. Personality and Clinical Psychology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana, Richard H., Ed.

    This collection of papers includes: (1) "An Assessment-Intervention Model for Research and Practice with Multicultural Populations" (Richard H. Dana); (2) "An Africentric Perspective for Clinical Research and Practice" (Edward F. Morris); (3) "Myths about the Null Hypothesis and the Path to Reform" (Robert G.…

  19. Teaching as if Life Matters: The Promise of a New Education Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhl, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    What would it be like to teach as if life matters? To move beyond the typical regimen of classroom exercises, homework, and standardized tests and to guide students through life's most important lessons? Dissatisfied with traditional educational models, Christopher Uhl and Dana L. Stuchul asked themselves these questions. What they discovered will…

  20. NCTE Goes to LA: The Literature of California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Lenora

    1987-01-01

    Presents an overview of the language and literature of California, and particularly of Los Angeles. Describes the social context and work of the following writers: Bret Harte, Henry Dana Jr., Jack London, Ambrose Bierce, Gertrude Atherton, Helen Hunt Jackson, Frank Norris, John Steinbeck, Mary Austin, and others. Also discusses minority literature…

  1. Supporting the Research Process through Expanded Library Data Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Minglu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe how the authors gained a better understanding of the variety of library users' data needs, and how gradually some new data services were established based on current capabilities. Design/methodology/approach: This paper uses a case study of the new data services at the John Cotton Dana Library, at…

  2. Ethnographic Research and Globalization: A Discussion of Joseph Tobin's Model of Video-Cued Multivocal Ethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Joseph Tobin made an impact on the field of comparative education in 2009 when he used a unique form of ethnography to illuminate the effects of world-wide forces, such as modernization, on schools in specific countries. Earlier, in 1989, he published "Preschool in Three Cultures" with co-authors David Wu and Dana Davidson. The…

  3. JPRS Report, East Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-07

    HUNGARY Licensing of Use of Secret Service M eans, M ethods ........................................................................... 9 Text of Interim...Elections [DANAS 6 Feb] ......................................................... 23 MILITARY HUNGARY Soviet Troop Removal Status Report; Disagreements on...Discussed [HOSPODARSKE NOVINY 16 Mar] ................... 31 HUNGARY W est G rants Loans to Country

  4. Special Librarian to Knowledge Counselor in the Year 2006.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Considers how four historical events have influenced the world for information professionals and the view these events offer of the future: (1) invention of the Gutenberg printing press; (2) invention of the transistor; (3) success of the railroad; and (4) a statement by John Cotton Dana, first president of the Special Libraries Association. (9…

  5. NON-RESIDENTIAL ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS PESTICIDE USE AS A PREDICTOR OF CHILDREN'S URINARY METABOLITE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NON-RESIDENTIAL ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE USE AS A PREDICTOR OF CHILDREN'S URINARY METABOLITE LEVELS.
    Julie A. Baker, Pauline Mendola, Dana Barr, Debra Walsh, John Creason, and Larry Needham. (University at Buffalo, US Environmental Protection Agency, and Centers for Disease ...

  6. Languages with Efficient Zero-Knowledge PCPs are in SZK

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-24

    Akavia, Oded Goldreich, Shafi Goldwasser, and Dana Moshkovitz. On basing one- way functions on np-hardness. In Proceedings of the 38th Annual ACM...Preliminary version in FOCS’86. 1 [GOVW12] Sanjam Garg, Rafail Ostrovsky, Ivan Visconti , and Akshay Wadia. Resettable statis- tical zero knowledge

  7. Materials to Engineer the Immune System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. 4Department of Medical Oncology and Cancer Vaccine Center, Dana -Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA. 5Department of...recognition of viral infection. Nat. Immunol. 7, 131–137 (2006). 12. J. J. O’Shea, R. Visconti , Type 1 IFNs and regulation of TH1 responses: Enigmas

  8. Waves at Navigation Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-30

    channels, ports and harbors, and coastal beaches . It conducts basic research on the coupling of wave and flow models to calculate waves and...TX; Matagorda Bay, TX; Hilo Harbor, HI; Kikiaola Harbor, HI; Dana Point Harbor, CA; Pillar Point Harbor, CA (Figure 3); Ocean Beach , CA; Noyo

  9. 78 FR 45935 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... footer of www.regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dana Moat, Training Specialist... (EMI) provides a wide variety of training to emergency management personnel throughout the country. The EMI Independent Study (IS) Program is part of the FEMA training program authorized under section 611(f...

  10. NON-RESIDENTIAL ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS PESTICIDE USE AS A PREDICTOR OF CHILDREN'S URINARY METABOLITE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NON-RESIDENTIAL ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE USE AS A PREDICTOR OF CHILDREN'S URINARY METABOLITE LEVELS.
    Julie A. Baker, Pauline Mendola, Dana Barr, Debra Walsh, John Creason, and Larry Needham. (University at Buffalo, US Environmental Protection Agency, and Centers for Disease ...

  11. The Current Women Superintendents in Texas: Still in the Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Pauline; Davenport, Marie

    2010-01-01

    The superintendent is the highest ranking administrator in a school district (Katz, 2005). Despite increasing trends of women advancing in the fields of business and government, the superintendent position in school districts still has relatively few women (Brunner & Grogan, 2007; Dana & Bourisaw, 2006; Glass, 2000; Grogan & Brunner,…

  12. Nurturing Human Potential in the Context of Schooling: The Legacy of Seymour B. Sarason

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Rhona S.

    2012-01-01

    Seymour Bernard Sarason was born to Jewish immigrant parents on January 12, 1919, in Brooklyn, New York. He died on January 28, 2010, in New Haven, Connecticut, at the age of 91. He obtained his undergraduate degree in 1939 from Dana College in Newark (now Rutgers University), and earned his doctorate in clinical psychology in 1942 from Clark…

  13. STS-114 Mission Support - Photograph EVA Tile Repair Procedures for Contingency

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-31

    JSC2005-E-30949 (2005) --- NASA engineers Dana Weigel and Lora Bailey, along with astronauts David Wolf and Joe Tanner and other engineers evaluate techniques to eliminate or trim protruding gap fillers as a possible contingency plan for an STS-114 extravehicular activity (EVA). Photo credit: NASA Note: This image does not appear on public sites

  14. Quieting the Teacher Wars: What History Reveals about an Embattled Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Dana

    2015-01-01

    This article is excerpted from Marshall Project staff writer and author, Dana Goldstein's 2014 book, "The Teacher Wars: A History of America's Most Embattled Profession." It begins by describing Goldstein's experience traveling as an education reporter in the late 2000s and the incredible amount of political scrutiny under which the…

  15. Astro Camp Plus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-19

    Stennis Space Center's new Astro Camp Plus camp kicked off June 19 for teens ages 13-15. The new camp delves more deeply into the science, math and technology concepts introduced in the center's popular Astro Camp series. Campers including Jasmyne White (left) and Dana Yingst, both of Slidell, La., learn how NASA uses 'podcasting' to broadcast video, and made their own podcasts.

  16. TRANSGENERATIONAL EFFECTS OF DEHP IN THE MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    TITLE: Transgenerational Effects of Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate in the Male Rat. AUTHORS (ALL): Gray, Leon Earl1; Barlow, Norman J2; Furr, Johnathan R1; Brock, John 3; Silva, Manori J3; Barr, Dana B3; Ostby, Joseph S1

    SPONSOR NAME:

    INSTITUTIONS (AL...

  17. Evaluation in Geographic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana G., Ed.

    This second yearbook of the National Council for Geographic Education presents recent thinking about the formulation and assessment of the educational outcomes of geography. Dana G. Kurfman overviews "Evaluation Developments Useful in Geographic Education" relating evaluation to decision making, objectives, data gatherings, and data…

  18. Statement of Facts for 1983 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. The Case of Vickers v. Hearst. No. MT-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides material for a civil case over an automobile accident. After drinking heavily at a party hosted by Sandy Hearst, Dana Ivy ran a stop sign and struck the car of Terry Vickers, causing him to sustain a broken…

  19. 78 FR 39256 - Initiation of Five-Year (“Sunset”) Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ......... China Laminated Woven Sacks Jennifer Moats (1st Review). (202) 482-5047 C-570-917 701-TA-450....... China Laminated Woven Sacks Dana Mermelstein (1st Review). (202) 482-1391 A-570-875 731-TA-990....... China Non-Malleable Cast Jennifer Moats Iron Pipe Fittings (202) 482-5047 (2nd Review). A-570-925...

  20. Statement of Facts for 1983 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. The Case of Vickers v. Hearst. No. MT-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides material for a civil case over an automobile accident. After drinking heavily at a party hosted by Sandy Hearst, Dana Ivy ran a stop sign and struck the car of Terry Vickers, causing him to sustain a broken…

  1. Land Based Environmental Monitoring at Johnston Island - Disposal of Herbicide Orange

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    the laboratory and the lower contaminated portion of the tube discarded before removal of the Chromosorb 102 granules . Because the pumps were turned...Edwards) x Platypodia eydouxi (A. Mimne-Ldwards) X x Psaudoliomiera speciosa (Dana) K ?X Tetratia glaberrima ( Herbal ) x Tetratia avp. X j-; --. 1 75 TABLE

  2. The Spillover Effects of Military Communities on the Need for Health Care Safety-Net Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    California Health Interview Survey.” http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu/shic-county.html UNC Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research...D. Kallich, and Dana Goldman . 2000. “Providing Managed Care Options for a Large Population: Evaluating the CHAMPUS Reform Initiative.”. Military

  3. Astro Camp Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Stennis Space Center's new Astro Camp Plus camp kicked off June 19 for teens ages 13-15. The new camp delves more deeply into the science, math and technology concepts introduced in the center's popular Astro Camp series. Campers including Jasmyne White (left) and Dana Yingst, both of Slidell, La., learn how NASA uses 'podcasting' to broadcast video, and made their own podcasts.

  4. Exposed: Phallic Protections, Shame and Damaged Parental Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cregeen, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Using ideas derived from Dana Birksted-Breen ("Phallus, penis and mental space," "International Journal of Psycho-Analysis," 77: 649-57, 1996), this article explores the clinical experience with "Tommy," a young boy who suffered multiple traumas and neglect. Birksted-Breen describes a phallic state of mind, which, amongst other things, serves to…

  5. 78 FR 33063 - Initiation of Five-Year (“Sunset”) Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Review). A-821-817 731-TA-991....... Russia Silicon Metal (2nd Dana Mermelstein Review). (202) 482-1391 A... (202) 482-5047 (2nd Review). A-823-812 731-TA-962....... Ukraine Carbon and Certain Jennifer Moats...

  6. 78 FR 25422 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Review). 482-5047. Silicon Metal from Russia (A-821-817) (2nd Dana Mermelstein (202) Review). 482-1391... Review). 482-5047. Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Jennifer Moats (202) Ukraine (A-823-812...

  7. Defining Developmental Education: Theory, Research, & Pedagogy. NADE Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higbee, Jeanne L., Ed.; Dwinell, Patricia L., Ed.

    This monograph presents seven papers on the research, and pedagogical aspects of developmental education and implications for a definition of developmental education. After an introductory paper by the editors, the papers are: (1) "The New Science: Connections with Developmental Education" (Dana D. Darby); (2) "Issues Affecting the Definition of…

  8. Culture vs. Entertainment: Challenging Pleasures or Easy Comforts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gioia, Dana

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an excerpt from a speech delivered by Dana Gioia, poet, critic, and chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, at the Stanford University commencement on June 17, 2007. In this speech, Gioia communicates his concerns about the diminished role of the arts in contemporary North American culture and the failure of school…

  9. The Validity of the Air Traffic Selection and Training (AT-SAT) Test Battery in Operational Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    The Validity of the Air Traffic Selection and Training (AT-SAT) Test Battery in Operational Use Dana Broach Cristina L. Byrne Carol A. Manning...7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization Report No. Broach D, Byrne CL, Manning CA, Pierce L, McCauley D, Bleckley MK 9...variables attenuate predictor- criterion relationships ( Barrett , Caldwell, & Alexander, 1989; Barrett , Alexander, & Doverspike, 1992; Beier

  10. Framing Your Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrell, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    St. Paul's School in New Hampshire, the Orchard School in Indiana, Chestnut Hill Academy in Pennsylvania, and Dana Hall School in Massachusetts are like most independent schools--they have qualities that are distinctive and extraordinary. Line up their mission statements, however, and the schools sound almost interchangeable. They're all on a…

  11. Partners | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Awardees and Affiliated Institutions Agilent Technologies, Inc., Cambridge, MA Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Biomedical Hosting LLC, Arlington, MA Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Cambridge, MA Brown University, Providence, RI Cell Signaling Technology, Danvers, MA Chang Gung University, Molecular Medicine Research Center, Taoyuan City, Taiwan Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Fluidigm Corp., Cambridge, MA

  12. Collaborating on Global Priorities: Science Education for Everyone--Any Time and Everywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Building on the key ideas from Dana Zeidler's paper I expand the conversation from the standpoint that the challenges facing humanity and the capacity of Earth to support life suggest that changes in human lifestyles are a priority. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to educate all humans about some of the science-related grand challenges, such…

  13. TRANSGENERATIONAL EFFECTS OF DEHP IN THE MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    TITLE: Transgenerational Effects of Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate in the Male Rat. AUTHORS (ALL): Gray, Leon Earl1; Barlow, Norman J2; Furr, Johnathan R1; Brock, John 3; Silva, Manori J3; Barr, Dana B3; Ostby, Joseph S1

    SPONSOR NAME:

    INSTITUTIONS (AL...

  14. Ethnographic Research and Globalization: A Discussion of Joseph Tobin's Model of Video-Cued Multivocal Ethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Joseph Tobin made an impact on the field of comparative education in 2009 when he used a unique form of ethnography to illuminate the effects of world-wide forces, such as modernization, on schools in specific countries. Earlier, in 1989, he published "Preschool in Three Cultures" with co-authors David Wu and Dana Davidson. The…

  15. Evaluation in Geographic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana G., Ed.

    This second yearbook of the National Council for Geographic Education presents recent thinking about the formulation and assessment of the educational outcomes of geography. Dana G. Kurfman overviews "Evaluation Developments Useful in Geographic Education" relating evaluation to decision making, objectives, data gatherings, and data…

  16. A Conversation with Uri Treisman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treisman, Uri

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Uri Treisman, professor of mathematics and public affairs at The University of Texas at Austin and the director of the Charles A. Dana Center, has deep and active roots in mathematics and mathematics education. Dr. Treisman is well known for his early work at the University of California at Berkeley, where he developed the Calculus Workshop…

  17. Neuroscience Workshops for Fifth-Grade School Children by Undergraduate Students: A University-School Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Judith G.; Feldman, Marissa; Lin, Edward; Mahoney, Margaret; Sjoblom, Chelsea

    2006-01-01

    The National Science Education Standards recommend that science be taught using inquiry-based approaches. Inspired by the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, we examined whether undergraduate students could learn how to conduct field research by teaching elementary school children basic neuroscience concepts in interactive workshops. In an…

  18. [Detection and distribution of "rutinase+, an enzyme hydrolyzin; rutoside].

    PubMed

    Plouvier, V

    1978-01-30

    125 species were investigated for rutinase. A high enzyme activity was found only in a few genera: Fagopyrum, Rhamnus, Berchemia, Sophora, Datisca and Danae. Lower activity was detected in several Lichens (Parmeliaceae) and diverse plants but is lacking in some specimens. In a number of species containing 3- or 7-rutinosides, no enzyme able to hydrolyse the latter seems to be present.

  19. The Foreign Language Classroom: New Techniques. Report of Central States Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Alan, Ed.; And Others

    The summary of the 1983 Central States Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages includes these papers: "A Look at Our Profession: Common Concerns, Common Dreams" (Mary Finocchiaro's keynote address to the 1982 Central States Conference); "Traversing the Language 'Gateway': The Passport Lesson" (Dana Carton); "Personal Growth Through…

  20. Great Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2013-01-01

    Like the best teachers in any subject, Dana Hamant is a consummate student. In his 31 years as a music instructor, he has attended every single annual Music Educators Association conference in his home state of Kansas and missed only two Kansas Bandmasters Association conferences. (He is also a frequent attendee at NAfME and other professional…

  1. Maize Genetics and Genomics Database

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 2007 report for MaizeGDB lists the new hires who will focus on curation/outreach and the genome sequence, respectively. Currently all sequence in the database comes from a PlantGDB pipeline and is presented with deep links to external resources such as PlantGDB, Dana Farber, GenBank, the Arizona...

  2. Teaching as if Life Matters: The Promise of a New Education Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhl, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    What would it be like to teach as if life matters? To move beyond the typical regimen of classroom exercises, homework, and standardized tests and to guide students through life's most important lessons? Dissatisfied with traditional educational models, Christopher Uhl and Dana L. Stuchul asked themselves these questions. What they discovered will…

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original negative in possession of LSA Associates, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative in possession of LSA Associates, Irvine, California) Dana Privett, Photographer, August 1982 WEST (REAR), LOOKING EAST - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Boyd Tenant House, Southeast of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (original negative in possession of LSA Associates, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative in possession of LSA Associates, Irvine, California) Dana Privett, Photographer, August 1982 EAST (FRONT), LOOKING WEST - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Boyd Tenant House, Southeast of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  5. 78 FR 732 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the... and Prevention, and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dana Redford,...

  6. Annual reports can help recruitment. Three examples target medical staff.

    PubMed

    Botvin, J D

    2000-01-01

    Some annual reports become outstanding as recruiting tools. The winners in this category are: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Mass., first place; New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y., second place; and Holy Name Hospital, Teaneck, N.J., third place.

  7. 76 FR 45775 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... the People's Republic Julia Hancock, (202) 482- of China (A-570-835) (3rd Review). 1394. Fresh Garlic from the People's Republic of Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482- China (A-570-831) (3rd Review). 1391. Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium from David Goldberger, (202) 482- Russia (A-821-807) (3rd Review)....

  8. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy ORIGINAL FRONT AND SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy ORIGINAL FRONT AND SIDE ELEVATIONS, c. 1849 ARCHITECT, HENRY AUSTIN Restricted: Permission for use must be obtained in writing from Beinecke Rare Book Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. - James Dwight Dana House, 24 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the…

  10. Great Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2013-01-01

    Like the best teachers in any subject, Dana Hamant is a consummate student. In his 31 years as a music instructor, he has attended every single annual Music Educators Association conference in his home state of Kansas and missed only two Kansas Bandmasters Association conferences. (He is also a frequent attendee at NAfME and other professional…

  11. The Current Women Superintendents in Texas: Still in the Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Pauline; Davenport, Marie

    2010-01-01

    The superintendent is the highest ranking administrator in a school district (Katz, 2005). Despite increasing trends of women advancing in the fields of business and government, the superintendent position in school districts still has relatively few women (Brunner & Grogan, 2007; Dana & Bourisaw, 2006; Glass, 2000; Grogan & Brunner,…

  12. Work and Family Policies: The New Strategic Plan. Research Report Number 949.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, James L., Ed.; And Others

    These 38 presentations are the highlights of the Conference Board's Work and Family Conference. An "Introduction" (Dana Friedman) is followed by "The Future Is Not What It Was, and Why Companies Care" (William Lee, Reuben Mark), which consists of introductory remarks and responses to an interview. "The Diversity of…

  13. STS-134 Flight Controllers on Console, Orbit 3, Flight Director Rick Labrode

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-23

    JSC2011-E-047737 (23 May 2011) --- Flight directors Dana Weigel (foreground) and Dina Contella, along with astronauts Dan Tani and Michael Foale, both STS-134/ULF-6 spacecraft communicators (CAPCOM), monitor data at their consoles in the space station flight control room in the Mission Control Center at NASA's Johnson Space Center during flight day eight activities. Photo credit: NASA

  14. Evolving Workforce Demographics: Federal Agency Action and Reaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    That represents a projected surplus of "George Silvestri and John l[ukasiewicz, "’ Ocupational employment projections," Monthly Labor Review, November...Myths," Supervisory Management, Se4ptember 199, ,and D)ana l’riet, "Fmplohees Upgrade Basic Skills," the Washington Post , July 27, 1992. "U.S

  15. JPRS Report, East Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-25

    5 19 24 Manolic 56 - 10 27 17 Rajic 56 - 12 26 18 Vrdoljak 53 - 14 29 18 Gotovac 48 - 7 17 35 Mazar 44 - 6 20 36 Boljkovac 44 - 15 27 29...opinion of Serbs in Croatia by Tudjman (29 percent) and Simo Rajic (25 percent). Simo Rajic’s 12 percent decline was a natural event, which the DANAS

  16. Development of a 37K high-density oligo-nucleotide microarray for rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have constructed a rainbow trout high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using all the available tentative consensus (TC) sequences from the Rainbow Trout Gene Index database (The Computational Biology and Functional Genomics Lab., Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Heal...

  17. Joint Authorship: Faculty Members from Six Institutions Collaborate to Measure Writing Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleniewski, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Southeastern Massachusetts is home to six public institutions of higher education. In 2003, at the invitation of Bridgewater President Dana Mohler-Faria, five of them joined together to form a regional collaborative called CONNECT. (The original members were Bridgewater State College, Bristol, Cape Cod and Massasoit community colleges, and the…

  18. Parsimonious Testing of Transitive or Intransitive Preferences: Reply to Birnbaum (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.; Guo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Birnbaum raised important challenges to testing transitivity. We summarize why an approach based on counting response patterns does not solve these challenges. Foremost, we show why parsimonious tests of transitivity require at least 5 choice alternatives. While the approach of Regenwetter, Dana, and Davis-Stober achieves high power with modest…

  19. Evaluation of Resins Cured by Ultraviolet Radiation and in Conjunction with Fiber Optic Systems for Use in the Field Repair of Composite Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    indicating that either lack of molecular mobility due to crosslinking or termination reactions dominate the system. This observation precludes the...Dana Granville and Seth Ghiorse of the Composites Development Division of HTL . High intensity UV lamps were loaned by Arthur Kaplan of Natick Research

  20. X-15 pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    X-15 Pilots, Left to Right: Air Force pilot William J. 'Pete' Knight, Air Force Major Robert A. Rushworth, Air Force Captain Joseph H. Engle, NASA pilot Milton O. Thompson, NASA pilot Bill Dana, and NASA pilot John B. 'Jack' McKay.

  1. Chronicle of Higher Education. Volume 51, Number 10, October 29, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "Chronicle of Higher Education" presents an abundant source of news and information for college and university faculty members and administrators. This October 29, 2004 issue of "Chronicle of Higher Education" includes the following articles: (1) "A Job-Hunting Guru Comes up Short" (Zimbleman, Dana A.); (2) "Distinctive Words That are Seldom Heard…

  2. Understanding Influences on Writing Instruction: Cases of Two Kindergarten Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthey, Sarah J.; Kang, Grace

    2017-01-01

    The study focused on two kindergarten teachers who were observed and interviewed throughout one school year. The contrasting cases demonstrate how two teachers drew upon their experiences with teaching writing and professional development (PD) with differing outcomes for their instruction and underlying beliefs about writing. Dana, an experienced…

  3. Neuroscience Workshops for Fifth-Grade School Children by Undergraduate Students: A University-School Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Judith G.; Feldman, Marissa; Lin, Edward; Mahoney, Margaret; Sjoblom, Chelsea

    2006-01-01

    The National Science Education Standards recommend that science be taught using inquiry-based approaches. Inspired by the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, we examined whether undergraduate students could learn how to conduct field research by teaching elementary school children basic neuroscience concepts in interactive workshops. In an…

  4. feature - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    "Cancer is a disease of the genome," noted Lynda Chin, M.D., professor of dermatology, Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. "And understanding the impact of genomic changes in the proteome is critically important for converting genomic knowledge into something that a clinician can use on their patients."

  5. Culture vs. Entertainment: Challenging Pleasures or Easy Comforts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gioia, Dana

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an excerpt from a speech delivered by Dana Gioia, poet, critic, and chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, at the Stanford University commencement on June 17, 2007. In this speech, Gioia communicates his concerns about the diminished role of the arts in contemporary North American culture and the failure of school…

  6. Can the Climate of an Organization be Modified and Managed to Ensure Organizational Excellence?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-30

    the management team. In Megatrends, Author John Naisbitt quotes Rene McPherson, Chairman of the Dana Corporation , "Until we believe that the expert...Organizational Excellence: Stimulatin Quality and Communicatin & Value, (Lexington: D.C. Heath and Company, 1987), p. 179. 3. Thomas J. Peters and

  7. How Schools Can Help: California Teachers Recall the Wildfires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Dana; Madueno, Marcelina; Atlas, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article draws from and builds on the experience of schools in San Diego County following the forest fires that wrought havoc on the area last October. Three teachers (Dana Riggs, Marcelina Madueno and Miriam Atlas) provide a moving account of the personal experiences of their students, who lived through the fires. Their recollections…

  8. Handbook of Cross-Cultural and Multicultural Personality Assessment. Personality and Clinical Psychology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana, Richard H., Ed.

    This collection of papers includes: (1) "An Assessment-Intervention Model for Research and Practice with Multicultural Populations" (Richard H. Dana); (2) "An Africentric Perspective for Clinical Research and Practice" (Edward F. Morris); (3) "Myths about the Null Hypothesis and the Path to Reform" (Robert G.…

  9. Special Librarian to Knowledge Counselor in the Year 2006.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Considers how four historical events have influenced the world for information professionals and the view these events offer of the future: (1) invention of the Gutenberg printing press; (2) invention of the transistor; (3) success of the railroad; and (4) a statement by John Cotton Dana, first president of the Special Libraries Association. (9…

  10. Women in IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Today, female students outnumber males on campus, earn a higher number of BA degrees, and surpass men in completing advanced degrees. So there is a certain irony in the fact that executive roles on campus are still dominated by men--and IT is no exception. "Campus Technology" asked three women (Pam McQuesten, Dana Hoover, and Jill Albin-Hill)…

  11. Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    Copper Content in Synthetic Copper Carbonate: A Statistical Comparison of Experimental and Expected Results by H. Gamsjäger and W. Preis Re: article by D. Sheeran The author replies The Amateur Mineral Chemist by Dana Martin Morong More on Double Replacement by George B. Kauffman Re: article by R. B. Martin

  12. Targeting Breast Cancers Featuring Activating Mutations in PIK3CA by Generating a Lethal Dose of PIP3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-06-1-0341 TITLE: Targeting Breast Cancers Featuring...ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02115 REPORT DATE...2006 – 31 Jan 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Breast Cancers Featuring Activating Mutations in PIK3CA by Generating a

  13. Targeting Breast Cancers Featuring Activating Mutations in PIK3CA by Generating a Lethal Dose of PIP3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    2003). Frequent monoallelic deletion of PTEN and its reciprocal associatioin with PIK3CA amplification in gastric carcinoma. Int J Cancer 104, 318-327...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0341 TITLE: Targeting Breast Cancers Featuring...ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02115 REPORT DATE: February 2008 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual Summary

  14. Supporting the Research Process through Expanded Library Data Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Minglu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe how the authors gained a better understanding of the variety of library users' data needs, and how gradually some new data services were established based on current capabilities. Design/methodology/approach: This paper uses a case study of the new data services at the John Cotton Dana Library, at…

  15. X-15 pilots

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-02

    X-15 Pilots, Left to Right: Air Force pilot William J. "Pete" Knight, Air Force Major Robert A. Rushworth, Air Force Captain Joseph H. Engle, NASA pilot Milton O. Thompson, NASA pilot Bill Dana, and NASA pilot John B. "Jack" McKay.

  16. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy ORIGINAL FRONT AND SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy ORIGINAL FRONT AND SIDE ELEVATIONS, c. 1849 ARCHITECT, HENRY AUSTIN Restricted: Permission for use must be obtained in writing from Beinecke Rare Book Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. - James Dwight Dana House, 24 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy PRINCIPAL FLOOR PLAN, CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy PRINCIPAL FLOOR PLAN, CHAMBER PLAN, ORIGINAL DRAWINGS, HENRY AUSTIN, ARCHITECT Restricted: Permission for use must be obtained in writing from Beinecke Rare Book Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. - James Dwight Dana House, 24 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. E-21539

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-06-18

    The four principal HL-10 pilots are seen here with the lifting body aircraft. They are, left to right; Air Force Major Jerauld R. Gentry, Air Force test pilot Peter Hoag, and NASA pilots John A. Manke and Bill Dana. All are wearing the pressure suits needed for flying above 50,000 feet.

  19. Research Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serig, Dan, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This research review is dedicated to the memory of William Safire (1929-2009). A visionary leader, Safire brought other visionaries, researchers, educators, artists, and policymakers together to explore the confluence of arts education and neuroscience. He fostered the new field of neuroeducation in his work as chair of The Dana Foundation in…

  20. A new carbon-rich phase (COPS) in Antarctic micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engrand, C.; Maurette, M.; Kurat, G.; Brandstatter, F.; Perreau, M.

    1993-01-01

    The contemporary flux of micrometeorites with sizes greater than 50 microns reaching the Earth's surface each year (about 20,000 tons/a) is much greater than the value of approximately 100 tons/a reported for conventional meteorites up to masses of approximately 10,000 tons. Moreover, on the average, Antarctic micrometeorites contain at least as much carbon as does Orgueil, the most C-rich meteorite. Micrometeorites are thus responsible for most of the carbon accreted by the Earth. In this paper we report SEM observations of a new C-rich 'dirty magnetite' phase observed as tiny inclusions in both melted and unmelted micrometeorites. This phase, which is enriched in C, O, P, S, Fe, frequently shows Ni contents in excess of 0.2 percent, strongly suggestive of an 'extraterrestrial' origin. We also discovered this 'COPS' phase in the fusion crust of Murchison. It appears likely that COPS is a product of meteoroid reprocessing during frictional heating in the Earth's atmosphere and/or its fast 'weathering' in the upper atmosphere. Upon 'catalyzed' hydrolysis this phase might have facilitated the functioning of micrometeorites as 'micro-chondritic-reactors' for the synthesis of prebiotic molecules on the early Earth.