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Sample records for acc oxidase aco

  1. A novel phylogeny and morphological reconstruction of the PIN genes and first phylogeny of the ACC-oxidases (ACOs)

    PubMed Central

    Clouse, Ronald M.; Carraro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The PIN and ACO gene families present interesting questions about the evolution of plant physiology, including testing hypotheses about the ecological drivers of their diversification and whether unrelated genes have been recruited for similar functions. The PIN-formed proteins contribute to the polar transport of auxin, a hormone which regulates plant growth and development. PIN loci are categorized into groups according to their protein length and structure, as well as subcellular localization. An interesting question with PIN genes is the nature of the ancestral form and location. ACOs are members of a superfamily of oxygenases and oxidases that catalyze the last step of ethylene synthesis, which regulates many aspects of the plant life cycle. We used publicly available PIN and ACO sequences to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Third codon positions of these genes in monocots have a high GC content, which could be historical but is more likely due to a mutational bias. Thus, we developed methods to extract phylogenetic information from nucleotide sequences while avoiding this convergent feature. One method consisted in using only A-T transformations, and another used only the first and second codon positions for serine, which can only take A or T and G or C, respectively. We also conducted tree-searches for both gene families using unaligned amino acid sequences and dynamic homology. PIN genes appear to have diversified earlier than ACOs, with monocot and dicot copies more mixed in the phylogeny. However, gymnosperm PINs appear to be derived and not closely related to those from primitive plants. We find strong support for a long PIN gene ancestor with short forms subsequently evolving one or more times. ACO genes appear to have diversified mostly since the dicot-monocot split, as most genes cluster into a small number of monocot and dicot clades when the tree is rooted by genes from mosses. Gymnosperm ACOs were recovered as closely related and derived. PMID

  2. An ACC Oxidase Gene Essential for Cucumber Carpel Development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiming; Sun, Jinjing; Li, Shuai; Cui, Qingzhi; Zhang, Huimin; Xin, Fengjiao; Wang, Huaisong; Lin, Tao; Gao, Dongli; Wang, Shenhao; Li, Xia; Wang, Donghui; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xu, Zhihong; Huang, Sanwen

    2016-09-01

    Sex determination in plants gives rise to unisexual flowers that facilitate outcrossing and enhance genetic diversity. In cucumber and melon, ethylene promotes carpel development and arrests stamen development. Five sex-determination genes have been identified, including four encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and a transcription factor gene CmWIP1 that corresponds to the Mendelian locus gynoecious in melon and is a negative regulator of femaleness. ACC oxidase (ACO) converts ACC into ethylene; however, it remains elusive which ACO gene in the cucumber genome is critical for sex determination and how CmWIP1 represses development of female flowers. In this study, we discovered that mutation in an ACO gene, CsACO2, confers androecy in cucumber that bears only male flowers. The mutation disrupts the enzymatic activity of CsACO2, resulting in 50% less ethylene emission from shoot tips. CsACO2 was expressed in the carpel primordia and its expression overlapped with that of CsACS11 in female flowers at key stages for sex determination, presumably providing sufficient ethylene required for proper CsACS2 expression. CmACO3, the ortholog of CsACO2, showed a similar expression pattern in the carpel region, suggesting a conserved function of CsACO2/CmACO3. We demonstrated that CsWIP1, the ortholog of CmWIP1, could directly bind the promoter of CsACO2 and repress its expression. Taken together, we propose a presumably conserved regulatory module consisting of WIP1 transcription factor and ACO controls unisexual flower development in cucumber and melon. PMID:27403533

  3. A fifth member of the tomato 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase gene family harbours a leucine zipper and is anaerobically induced.

    PubMed

    Sell, Simone; Hehl, Reinhard

    2005-02-01

    Using the leucine zipper domain of a small anaerobically induced bZIP transcription factor in a yeast two hybrid screen, anaerobically induced genes were identified. One peptide corresponds to an anaerobically induced IDS4-like protein that maybe involved in G-protein signaling. Surprisingly, another interacting peptide corresponds to a novel anaerobically induced 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase, designated ACO5. ACO5 harbours a leucine zipper and transcription is mainly induced in fruits and to a lesser extend in leaves. The role of ACO5 in the low oxygen response of tomato is discussed. PMID:16040352

  4. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase Activity Limits Ethylene Biosynthesis in Rumex palustris during Submergence

    PubMed Central

    Vriezen, Wim H.; Hulzink, Raymond; Mariani, Celestina; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Submergence strongly stimulates petiole elongation in Rumex palustris, and ethylene accumulation initiates and maintains this response in submerged tissues. cDNAs from R. palustris corresponding to a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase gene (RP-ACO1) were isolated from elongating petioles and used to study the expression of the corresponding gene. An increase in RP-ACO1 messenger was observed in the petioles and lamina of elongating leaves 2 h after the start of submergence. ACC oxidase enzyme activity was measured in homogenates of R. palustris shoots, and a relevant increase was observed within 12 h under water with a maximum after 24 h. We have shown previously that the ethylene production rate of submerged shoots does not increase significantly during the first 24 h of submergence (L.A.C.J. Voesenek, M. Banga, R.H. Thier, C.M. Mudde, F.M. Harren, G.W.M. Barendse, C.W.P.M. Blom [1993] Plant Physiol 103: 783–791), suggesting that under these conditions ACC oxidase activity is inhibited in vivo. We found evidence that this inhibition is caused by a reduction of oxygen levels. We hypothesize that an increased ACC oxidase enzyme concentration counterbalances the reduced enzyme activity caused by low oxygen concentration during submergence, thus sustaining ethylene production under these conditions. Therefore, ethylene biosynthesis seems to be limited at the level of ACC oxidase activity rather than by ACC synthase in R. palustris during submergence. PMID:10482674

  5. Postharvest Analysis of Lowland Transgenic Tomato Fruits Harboring hpRNAi-ACO1 Construct

    PubMed Central

    Behboodian, Bita; Mohd Ali, Zainon; Ismail, Ismanizan; Zainal, Zamri

    2012-01-01

    The plant hormone, ethylene, is an important regulator which involved in regulating fruit ripening and flower senescence. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was employed to silence the genes involved in ethylene biosynthetic pathway. This was achieved by blocking the expression of specific gene encoding the ACC oxidase. Initially, cDNA corresponding to ACO1 of lowland tomato cultivar (MT1), which has high identity with ACO1 of Solanum lycopersicum in GenBank, was cloned through RT-PCR. Using a partial coding region of ACO1, one hpRNAi transformation vector was constructed and expressed ectopically under the 35S promoter. Results showed that transgenic lines harboring the hpRNA-ACO1 construct had lower ethylene production and a longer shelf life of 32 days as compared to 10 days for wild-type fruits. Changes in cell wall degrading enzyme activities were also investigated in cases where the transgenic fruits exhibited reduced rates of firmness loss, which can be associated with a decrease in pectin methylesterase (PME) and polygalacturonase (PG) activities. However, no significant change was detected in both transgenic and wild-type fruits in terms of β-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity and levels of total soluble solid, titratable acid and ascorbic acid. PMID:22919320

  6. ACC oxidase and miRNA 159a, and their involvement in fresh fruit bunch yield (FFB) via sex ratio determination in oil palm.

    PubMed

    Somyong, Suthasinee; Poopear, Supannee; Sunner, Supreet Kaur; Wanlayaporn, Kitti; Jomchai, Nukoon; Yoocha, Thippawan; Ukoskit, Kittipat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Tragoonrung, Somvong

    2016-06-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineesis Jacq.) is the most productive oil-bearing crop, yielding more oil per area than any other oil-bearing crops. However, there are still efforts to improve oil palm yield, in order to serve consumer and manufacturer demand. Oil palm produces female and male inflorescences in an alternating cycle. So, high sex ratio (SR), the ratio of female inflorescences to the total inflorescences, is a favorable trait in term of increasing yields in oil palm. This study aims to understand the genetic control for SR related traits, such as fresh fruit bunch yield (FFB), by characterizing genes at FFB quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on linkage 10 (chromosome 6) and linkage 15 (chromosome 10). Published oil palm sequences at the FFB QTLs were used to develop gene-based and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. We used the multiple QTL analysis model (MQM) to characterize the relationship of new markers with the SR traits in the oil palm population. The RNA expression of the most linked QTL genes was also evaluated in various tissues of oil palm. We identified EgACCO1 (encoding aminocyclopropane carboxylate (ACC) oxidase) at chromosome 10 and EgmiR159a (microRNA 159a) at chromosome 6 to be the most linked QTL genes or determinants for FFB yield and/or female inflorescence number with a phenotype variance explained (PVE) from 10.4 to 15 % and suggest that these play the important roles in sex determination and differentiation in oil palm. The strongest expression of EgACCO1 and the predicted precursor of EgmiR159a was found in ovaries and, to a lesser extent, fruit development. In addition, highly normalized expression of EgmiR159a was found in female flowers. In summary, the QTL analysis and the RNA expression reveal that EgACCO1 and EgmiR159a are the potential genetic factors involved in female flower determination and hence would affect yield in oil palm. However, to clarify how these genetic factors regulate female flower determination, more investigation

  7. Characterization of transcriptional profiles of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to ethylene, auxin, wounding, cold and different photoperiods during ripening in banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2008-12-01

    The ripening-specific genes MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata ACC synthase1) and MA-ACO1 (M. acuminata ACC oxidase 1) are regulated in response to a wide variety of factors. Here, we have studied the differential transcript accumulation pattern and protein levels of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to ethylene, auxin, wounding and low temperature in preclimacteric banana fruit. We have shown that exogenous application of ethylene and auxin induced the expression of MA-ACS1, while MA-ACO1 showed marginal expression following ethylene treatment in preclimacteric stage. Auxin did not induce MA-ACO1 expression. Thus, auxin-treated banana fruits showed lower ethylene production rate as compared to ethylene-treated fruits. Conversely, wounding and cold treatment down-regulated the expression of both the genes and thus inhibited ethylene production. Furthermore, we have detected a GCC-box putative ethylene-responsive element (ERE)- and an auxin-responsive element (ARE)-specific DNA-binding activity in the banana pulp and studied the ethylene and auxin responsive characteristics of the GCC-box and ARE (TGTCTC) containing synthetic promoter fragments. In addition, we have detected an enhanced ethylene production rate and expression level of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes along with a strong GCC-box-specific DNA-binding activity following exposure to constant dark period for 8d at the preclimacteric stage. Together, our study provides interesting information about the regulation of expression of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to various factors during ripening in banana fruit, which may have physiological relevance concerning ethylene biosynthesis during post-harvest conditions. PMID:18554749

  8. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Konrad

    Die adaptive Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung (ACC, Adaptive Cruise Control) ist eine Weiterentwicklung der konventionellen Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung, die eine konstante Fahrgeschwindigkeit einstellt. ACC überwacht mittels eines Radarsensors den Bereich vor dem Fahrzeug und passt die Geschwindigkeit den Gegebenheiten an. ACC reagiert auf langsamer vorausfahrende oder einscherende Fahrzeuge mit einer Reduzierung der Geschwindigkeit, sodass der vorgeschriebene Mindestabstand zum vorausfahrenden Fahrzeug nicht unterschritten wird. Hierzu greift ACC in Antrieb und Bremse ein. Sobald das vorausfahrende Fahrzeug beschleunigt oder die Spur verlässt, regelt ACC die Geschwindigkeit wieder auf die vorgegebene Sollgeschwindigkeit ein (Bild 1). ACC steht somit für eine Geschwindigkeitsregelung, die sich dem vorausfahrenden Verkehr anpasst.

  9. ACC Study Guide Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Community Coll., TX. Rio Grande Campus.

    Ten one-page instructional guides designed to assist Austin Community College (ACC) students in using the library and in writing research papers are presented in this series. The titles of the guides are: (1) "The Media Collection (We have more than books in the LRC)"; (2) "Encyclopedias"; (3) "Finding Books"; (4) "Finding a Dictionary or…

  10. Characterization and expression profiles of MaACS and MaACO genes from mulberry (Morus alba L.)*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-ying; Lü, Rui-hua; Li, Jun; Zhao, Ai-chun; Wang, Xi-ling; Diane, Umuhoza; Wang, Xiao-hong; Wang, Chuan-hong; Yu, Ya-sheng; Han, Shu-mei; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Mao-de

    2014-01-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) are encoded by multigene families and are involved in fruit ripening by catalyzing the production of ethylene throughout the development of fruit. However, there are no reports on ACS or ACO genes in mulberry, partly because of the limited molecular research background. In this study, we have obtained five ACS gene sequences and two ACO gene sequences from Morus Genome Database. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of MaACO1 and MaACO2 showed that their amino acids are conserved compared with ACO proteins from other species. MaACS1 and MaACS2 are type I, MaACS3 and MaACS4 are type II, and MaACS5 is type III, with different C-terminal sequences. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) expression analysis showed that the transcripts of MaACS genes were strongly expressed in fruit, and more weakly in other tissues. The expression of MaACO1 and MaACO2 showed different patterns in various mulberry tissues. MaACS and MaACO genes demonstrated two patterns throughout the development of mulberry fruit, and both of them were strongly up-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and ethephon. PMID:25001221

  11. Characteristics of Rural Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) – A Survey of Medicare ACOs with Rural Presence.

    PubMed

    Salako, Abiodun; Zhu, Xi; MacKinney, A Clinton; Ullrich, Fred; Mueller, Keith

    2015-05-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are groups of health care providers, principally physicians and hospitals, who develop a new entity that contracts to provide coordinated care to assigned patients with the goal of improving quality of care while controlling costs. Section 3022 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 created the Medicare Shared Savings Program (SSP). The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) implements this program and has approved SSP contracts in five cycles since 2011, including some that participated in a special demonstration project that provided advance payment (as a forgivable loan). A new ACO Investment Model (AIM) program starts in 2015 that provides initial investment capital and variable monthly payments to ACO participants in rural and underserved areas who may not have access to the capital needed for successful ACO formation and operation. CMS also contracted with 32 organizations under a special demonstration project, "Pioneer ACOs" (as of November 16, 2014, there were 19 remaining).8 At the time of the research reported in this brief, there were 455 Medicare ACOs (Pioneer and SSP). While there is growing literature about ACOs, much remains to be learned about ACO development in rural areas. A previous RUPRI Center policy brief 2 examined the formation of four rural ACOs. The authors found that prior experience with risk sharing and provider integration facilitated ACO formation. This brief expands on the earlier brief by describing the findings of a survey of 27 rural ACOs, focusing on characteristics important to their formation and operation. Prospective rural ACO participants can draw from the experiences of predecessors, and the survey findings can inform policy discussions about ACO formation and operation. Key Findings from 27 Respondents. (1) Sixteen rural ACOs were formed by pre-existing integrated delivery networks. (2) Physician groups played a more prominent role than other participant

  12. Including Language Access into Medicaid ACO Design.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Rachel; Morris, Lisa; Ferguson, Warren

    2016-09-01

    Quality health care relies upon communication in a patient's preferred language. Language access in health care occurs when individuals are: (1) Welcomed by providers regardless of language ability; and (2) Offered quality language services as part of their care. Federal law generally requires access to health care and quality language services for deaf and Limited English Proficient (LEP) patients in health care settings, but these patients still find it hard to access health care and quality language services.Meanwhile, several states are implementing Medicaid Accountable Care Organization (ACO) initiatives to reduce health care costs and improve health care quality. Alternative payment methods used in these initiatives can give Accountable Care Organizations more flexibility to design linguistically accessible care, but they can also put ACOs at increased financial risk for the cost of care. If these new payment methods do not account for differences in patient language needs, ACO initiatives could have the unintended consequence of rewarding ACOs who do not reach out to deaf and LEP communities or offer quality language services.We reviewed public documents related to Medicaid ACO initiatives in six states. Some of these documents address language access. More could be done, however, to pay for language access efforts. This article describes Medicaid ACO initiatives and explores how different payment tools could be leveraged to reward ACOs for increased access to care and quality language services. We find that a combination of payment tools might be helpful to encourage both access and quality. PMID:27587453

  13. Evaluating Performance Portability of OpenACC

    SciTech Connect

    Sabne, Amit J; Sakdhnagool, Putt; Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Accelerator-based heterogeneous computing is gaining momentum in High Performance Computing arena. However, the increased complexity of the accelerator architectures demands more generic, high-level programming models. OpenACC is one such attempt to tackle the problem. While the abstraction endowed by OpenACC offers productivity, it raises questions on its portability. This paper evaluates the performance portability obtained by OpenACC on twelve OpenACC programs on NVIDIA CUDA, AMD GCN, and Intel MIC architectures. We study the effects of various compiler optimizations and OpenACC program settings on these architectures to provide insights into the achieved performance portability.

  14. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  15. Super ACO FEL oscillation at 300 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Renault, E.; Nahon, L.; Couprie, M. E.

    2000-05-01

    Some recent improvements, involving both the optical cavity mirrors and the positron beam dynamics in the storage ring, have allowed us to achieve a laser oscillation at 300 nm on the Super ACO Storage Ring FEL. The Super ACO storage ring is operated at 800 MeV which is the nominal energy for the usual synchrotron radiation users, and the highest energy for a storage ring FEL. The lasing at 300 nm could be kept during 2 h per injection, with a stored current ranging between 30 and 60 mA. The FEL characteristics are presented here. The longitudinal stability and the FEL optics behaviour are also discussed.

  16. Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS): A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Tho, Nguyen Van; Park, Hye Yun; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-04-01

    Asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) is characterized by persistent airflow limitation with several features usually associated with asthma and several features usually associated with COPD. ACOS may be a special phenotype of a spectrum of chronic obstructive airway diseases, in which asthma and COPD are at the two opposite ends. The prevalence of ACOS varies considerably due to differing criteria being applied for diagnosis. Patients with ACOS utilize a large proportion of medical resources. They are associated with more frequent adverse outcomes than those with asthma or COPD alone. ACOS is currently a diagnostic challenge for physicians because there are no specific biomarkers to differentiate ACOS from asthma or COPD. The approach to diagnosing ACOS depends on the population from which the patient originated. The management of ACOS should be individualized to ensure the most effective treatment with minimal side effects. In this paper, we review the diagnostic criteria of ACOS used in previous studies, propose practical approaches to diagnosing and managing ACOS and raise some research questions related to ACOS. PMID:26450153

  17. ACC Effectiveness Review, 1999-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Roslyn, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These newsletters on Institutional Effectiveness (IE) at Austin Community College (ACC) in Texas include the following articles: (1) "The 'Fast Track'...Students Say It Works!" (2) "Are Students Successfully Completing Distance Learning Courses at ACC?" (3) "Tracking Transfers"; (4) "Math Pilot: Study Skills Attached Labs"; (5)…

  18. Differential expression of two 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase genes in broccoli after harvest.

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, B J; Downs, C G; Davies, K M

    1995-01-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.) floral tissues rapidly differentiate and grow before harvest and then senesce rapidly after harvest. Associated with this postharvest deterioration is an increase in ethylene production by florets. Two cDNA clones having high nucleotide identity to sequences encoding 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase were isolated from senescing florets. The cDNAs, ACC Ox1 and ACC Ox2, apparently encode mRNAs from different genes. ACC Ox1 transcripts were found at low levels in whole florets at the time of harvest and increased markedly in abundance after harvest. ACC Ox1 transcript abundance also increased in sepals after harvest and in excised yellowing leaves. Transcripts corresponding to ACC Ox2 were found exclusively within the reproductive structures. These ACC Ox2 transcripts were absent at harvest but started to increase in abundance within 2 h of harvest and then accumulated to high levels. Hormone treatment did not alter the abundance of ACC Ox1 transcripts, whereas ACC Ox2 transcripts increased in abundance after treatment with abscisic acid and propylene. Wounding did not affect the levels of ACC Ox1 or Ox2 transcripts after harvest. At harvest, individual broccoli florets were closed and remained unpollinated. We propose a model whereby the rapid increase in ACC Ox1 and Ox2 transcript abundance after harvest contributes to increased ethylene production by florets. This ethylene may regulate aspects of postharvest senescence, in particular chlorophyll loss. PMID:7610162

  19. Perspectives of bacterial ACC deaminase in phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Muhammad; Saleem, Muhammad; Hussain, Sarfraz

    2007-08-01

    Phytoremediation of contaminated soil and water environments is regulated and coordinated by the plant root system, yet root growth is often inhibited by pollutant-induced stress. Prolific root growth could maximize rates of hyperaccumulation of inorganic contaminants or rhizodegradation of organic pollutants, and thus accelerate phytoremediation. Accelerated ethylene production in response to stress induced by contaminants is known to inhibit root growth and is considered as a major limitation in improving phytoremediation efficiency. Recent work shows that bacterial 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase regulates ethylene levels in plants by metabolizing its precursor ACC into alpha-ketobutyric acid and ammonia. Plants inoculated with ACC deaminase bacteria or transgenic plants that express bacterial ACC deaminase genes can regulate their ethylene levels and consequently contribute to a more extensive root system. Such proliferation of roots in contaminated soil can lead to enhanced uptake of heavy metals or rhizodegradation of xenobiotics. PMID:17573137

  20. A Compilation of Redshifts and Velocity Dispersions for ACO Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, Mitchell F.; Rood, Herbert J.

    1999-11-01

    We present a compilation of redshifts for 1572 Abell, Corwin, & Olowin (ACO) clusters, referenced to both the heliocentric and cosmic background radiation reference frames, and 395 velocity dispersions corrected to the reference frame of the cluster, available from the literature as of 1998 December. We present an additional list of 81 ACO clusters with published redshifts which are probably those of galaxies or groups superimposed on, or near, the ACO cluster position.

  1. EXPRESSION OF TURKEY TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND ACYL COA OXIDASE IN DIFFERENT TISSUES AND GENETIC POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several transcription factors are involved in regulating lipid metabolism in various animal tissues. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma and PPAR alpha regulate both lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. Gene fragments for PPAR gamma, PPAR alpha, and acyl CoA oxidase (ACO) have b...

  2. 1-MCP EFFECTS ON ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY AND GENE EXPRESSION OF ACC-SYNTHASE AND ACC-OXIDASE IN COTTON FLOWERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton remains an important cash crop for farmers in the southern United States. When temperatures rise above 32oC the in vivo fertilization efficiency of cotton is reduced resulting in decreased seed production and potentially decreased yields. Under stress, the plant hormone ethylene is manufact...

  3. Orsay free electron laser activities on the storage rings ACO and super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bazin, C.; Bergher, M.; Billardon, M.; Elleaume, P.; Ortega, J. M.; Petroff, Y.; Prazeres, R.; Velghe, M.

    1989-10-01

    The main results obtained on the free electron laser and on optical harmonic generation with the storage ring ACO at Orsay in France are reviewed. A specific magnetic device, generally called an undulator, allows one to collect coherent light. In the free electron laser case, the undulator radiation is stored and amplified in an optical cavity. Tunable light was obtained in the visible range. For optical harmonic generation, external laser light is emitted in the undulator area, generating coherent harmonic radiation. Experimentally, 350, 177 and 107 nm wavelengths were obtained with a Nd-YAG laser. New experiments are planned with the Super-ACO storage ring, and preliminary experiments with the optical klystron are given.

  4. ACC Study Guide Series (Revised Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Katherine; And Others

    Designed for the beginning college student who needs to search for information, prepare written assignments, or take tests, the ACC (Austin Community College) Study Guide Series comprises 17 one-page study guides. Printed on card stock with colored headings, the guides are highlighted with cartoon illustrations and are intended to provide…

  5. Cost-outcomes focus is essential for ACO success.

    PubMed

    Greenspun, Harry; Bercik, William

    2013-02-01

    To succeed under value-based payment, accountable care organizations (ACOs) must be able to link, analyze, and compare clinical and administrative data from across their constituent organizations. ACOs require a precise costing methodology, such as activity-based costing, to be able to manage costs effectively and gain critical insight into which service lines are delivering value from a clinical and financial standpoint. To support informed strategic decision-making, ACOs also require ready access to integrated patient encounter data to be able to perform the sophisticated modeling of predictive analytics. PMID:23413676

  6. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS): structured literature review and physician insights

    PubMed Central

    Ding, B.; Enstone, A

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To understand the key characteristics of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome (ACOS) and to identify evidence gaps relating to the identification, treatment and management of ACOS patients. Methods: A structured literature review and 1-hour telephone interviews with specialist respiratory physicians were conducted (n=10; China, France, Germany, Japan and the USA). Results: All 10 physicians used the term ACOS in clinical practice. ACOS was not clearly defined in the literature. Prevalence of ACOS among adult patients with COPD or asthma ranged from 12–55%. ACOS patients had severe disease, with increased exacerbations and hospitalisations compared to some asthma and COPD patients. ACOS represented a clinical challenge due to a lack of evidence-based guidelines distinguishing between asthma, COPD and ACOS. Published data quantifying ACOS costs were limited. Conclusions: There is a need for consensus evidence-based guidance to facilitate earlier diagnosis and to optimise the management of ACOS patients. PMID:26789845

  7. Pleiotropic Effect of AccD5 and AccE5 Depletion in Acyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase Activity and in Lipid Biosynthesis in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bazet Lyonnet, Bernardo; Diacovich, Lautaro; Cabruja, Matías; Bardou, Fabienne; Quémard, Annaïk; Gago, Gabriela; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria contain a large variety of fatty acids which are used for the biosynthesis of several complex cell wall lipids that have been implicated in the ability of the organism to resist host defenses. The building blocks for the biosynthesis of all these lipids are provided by a fairly complex set of acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCases) whose subunit composition and roles within these organisms have not yet been clearly established. Previous biochemical and structural studies provided strong evidences that ACCase 5 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is formed by the AccA3, AccD5 and AccE5 subunits and that this enzyme complex carboxylates acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA with a clear substrate preference for the latest. In this work we used a genetic approach to unambiguously demonstrate that the products of both accD5 and accE5 genes are essential for the viability of Mycobacterium smegmatis. By obtaining a conditional mutant on the accD5-accE5 operon, we also demonstrated that the main physiological role of this enzyme complex was to provide the substrates for fatty acid and mycolic acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, enzymatic and biochemical analysis of the conditional mutant provided strong evidences supporting the notion that AccD5 and/or AccE5 have an additional role in the carboxylation of long chain acyl-CoA prior to mycolic acid condensation. These studies represent a significant step towards a better understanding of the roles of ACCases in mycobacteria and confirm ACCase 5 as an interesting target for the development of new antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:24950047

  8. Identification and molecular characterization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetase gene (acoE) of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Priefert, H; Steinbüchel, A

    1992-01-01

    The gene locus acoE, which is involved in the utilization of acetoin in Alcaligenes eutrophus, was identified as the structural gene of an acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (acetate:coenzyme A ligase [AMP forming]; EC 6.2.1.1). This gene was localized on a 3.8-kbp SmaI-EcoRI subfragment of an 8.1-kbp EcoRI restriction fragment (fragment E) that was cloned recently (C. Fründ, H. Priefert, A. Steinbüchel, and H. G. Schlegel, J. Bacteriol. 171:6539-6548, 1989). The 1,983 bp acoE gene encoded a protein with a relative molecular weight of 72,519, and it was preceded by a putative Shine-Dalgarno sequence. A comparison analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from acoE revealed a high degree of homology to primary structures of acetyl coenzyme A synthetases from other sources (amounting to up to 50.5% identical amino acids). Tn5 insertions in two transposon-induced mutants of A. eutrophus, that were impaired in the catabolism of acetoin were mapped 481 and 1,159 bp downstream from the translational start codon of acoE. The expression of acoE in Escherichia coli led to the formation of an acyl coenzyme A synthetase that accepted acetate as the preferred substrate (100% relative activity) but also reacted with propionate (46%) and hydroxypropionate (87%); fatty acids consisting of four or more carbon atoms were not accepted. In addition, evidence for the presence of a second acyl coenzyme A synthetase was obtained; this enzyme exhibited a different substrate specificity. The latter enzyme is obviously required for the activation of propionate, e.g., during the formation of the storage compound poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) when propionate is provided as the sole carbon source. An analysis of mutants provided evidence that the expression of the uptake protein for propionate depends on the presence of alternate sigma factor sigma 54. Images PMID:1356967

  9. Characterizing the population of Asteroids in Cometary Orbits (ACOs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; Licandro, Javier; Alí-Lagoa, Victor; Martino, Silvia; Vieira Monteiro, Filipe; Silva, Jose Sergio; Lazzaro, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    The classification criterion between asteroids and comets has evolved in recent decades, but the main phenomenological distinction remains unchanged: comets are active objects as they present gas and dust ejection from the surface at some point of their orbits, while asteroids are inert objects as they do not show any kind of large scale gas and dust ejection.To identify the transitional objects several classification schemes based on the orbital elements have been used. They are usually based on the Tisserand’s parameter (TJ). Tancredi (2014) presents a much more restrictive criterion to identify ACOs that ensured that the objects have a dynamical evolution similar to the population of periodic comets. After applying the criteriaa to the sample of over half a million asteroids already discovered, we obtain 316 ACOs that are further classified in subclasses similar to the cometary classification: 203 objects belong to the Jupiter Family group; 72 objects are classified as Centaurs; and 56 objects have Halley Type Orbits (also known as Damocloids). These are the best-known extinct/dormant comets candidates from a dynamical point of view.We study the physical properties of this sample of ACOs. Two results will be presented:- We look for the ACOs detected by the NASA’s WISE and by fitting a thermal model to their observations, we derive: the effective diameter, beaming parameter and the visible geometric albedo, using the method described in Al-Lagoa et al (2013). We obtain these parameters for 37 of 203 ACOs in JFC orbits and 13 of 56 Damocloids. We also compute the Cumulative Size Distribution (CSDs) of these populations and compare them with the CSDs of JF Comets and Centaurs.- We have been monitoring the observable ACOs since 12/2014 up to 06/2015. Every other month we select all the ACOs with elongations >90deg and estimated magnitudes V<21. We try to observe them with the 1m IMPACTON telescope of the Observatório Astronômico do Sertão de Itaparica (OASI

  10. Southern blight disease of tomato control by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase producing Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ritu; Agrawal, Lalit; Gupta, Swati; Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Sumit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Tomato cultivation is highly susceptible for soil born diseases and among them southern blight disease caused by Scelerotium rolfsii is very common. For its management use of chemical fungicides is not very successful as their spores are able to survive for many years in the soil. As an alternative eco-friendly approach to control the disease antagonistic microbes are being characterized.Among them plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488 (B-30488) with antagonistic properties, multiple PGP attributes stress tolerance and ACC deaminase enzyme activity is characterized to decipher its mode of action against S. rolfsii under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro results obtained from this study clearly demonstrate that B-30488 has ability to show antagonistic properties under different abiotic stresses against S. rolfsii. Similar results were also obtained from in vivo experiments where B-30488 inoculation has efficiently controlled the disease caused by S. rolfsii and improve the plant growth. Deleterious enhanced ethylene level in S. rolfsii infected plants was also ameliorated by inoculation of ACC deaminase producing B-30488. The ACC accumulation, ACO and ACS activities were also modulated in S. rolfsii infected plants. Results from defense enzymes and other biochemical attributes were also support the role of B-30488 inoculation in ameliorating the biotic stress caused by S. rolfsii in tomato plants. These results were further validated by pathogen related gene expression analysis by real time PCR. Overall results from the present study may be concluded that ACC deaminase producing B-30488 has ability to control the southern blight disease caused by S. rolfsii and commercial bioinoculant package may be developed. PMID:26825539

  11. Southern blight disease of tomato control by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase producing Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ritu; Agrawal, Lalit; Gupta, Swati; Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Sumit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    abstract Tomato cultivation is highly susceptible for soil born diseases and among them southern blight disease caused by Scelerotium rolfsii is very common. For its management use of chemical fungicides is not very successful as their spores are able to survive for many years in the soil. As an alternative eco-friendly approach to control the disease antagonistic microbes are being characterized.Among them plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488 (B-30488) with antagonistic properties, multiple PGP attributes stress tolerance and ACC deaminase enzyme activity is characterized to decipher its mode of action against S. rolfsii under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro results obtained from this study clearly demonstrate that B-30488 has ability to show antagonistic properties under different abiotic stresses against S. rolfsii. Similar results were also obtained from in vivo experiments where B-30488 inoculation has efficiently controlled the disease caused by S. rolfsii and improve the plant growth. Deleterious enhanced ethylene level in S. rolfsii infected plants was also ameliorated by inoculation of ACC deaminase producing B-30488. The ACC accumulation, ACO and ACS activities were also modulated in S. rolfsii infected plants. Results from defense enzymes and other biochemical attributes were also support the role of B-30488 inoculation in ameliorating the biotic stress caused by S. rolfsii in tomato plants. These results were further validated by pathogen related gene expression analysis by real time PCR. Overall results from the present study may be concluded that ACC deaminase producing B-30488 has ability to control the southern blight disease caused by S. rolfsii and commercial bioinoculant package may be developed. PMID:26825539

  12. 5th International ACC Symposium: Hereditary Predisposition to Childhood ACC and the Associated Molecular Phenotype: 5th International ACC Symposium Session: Not Just for Kids!

    PubMed

    Else, Tobias; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) affects children and adults. Roughly 50% of very early onset ACCs occur in children with germline TP53 mutations. Several recent studies have extended our understanding in basic, clinical, and translational genetics with regard to TP53 germline predisposition in ACC patients. The recent description of the molecular landscape of pediatric ACCs provided insight into differences of tumors arising in patients with and without TP53 germline mutation. Another recent important finding is that not all TP53 mutations are equal in their tumor suppressing potential. It has now been shown that family histories as well as molecular characteristics of preserved TP53 functions vary greatly between mutations. It also has become clear that adult patients with ACC often harbor germline mutations causing hereditary syndromes, including Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), Lynch syndrome, and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). PMID:26660147

  13. Exogenously induced expression of ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene perception, phospholipase D, and Rboh-oxidase genes in broccoli seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowicz, Małgorzata; Gałgańska, Hanna; Nowak, Witold; Sadowski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In higher plants, copper ions, hydrogen peroxide, and cycloheximide have been recognized as very effective inducers of the transcriptional activity of genes encoding the enzymes of the ethylene biosynthesis pathway. In this report, the transcriptional patterns of genes encoding the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases (ACSs), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidases (ACOs), ETR1, ETR2, and ERS1 ethylene receptors, phospholipase D (PLD)-α1, -α2, -γ1, and -δ, and respiratory burst oxidase homologue (Rboh)-NADPH oxidase-D and -F in response to these inducers in Brassica oleracea etiolated seedlings are shown. ACS1, ACO1, ETR2, PLD-γ1, and RbohD represent genes whose expression was considerably affected by all of the inducers used. The investigations were performed on the seedlings with (i) ethylene insensitivity and (ii) a reduced level of the PLD-derived phosphatidic acid (PA). The general conclusion is that the expression of ACS1, -3, -4, -5, -7, and -11, ACO1, ETR1, ERS1, and ETR2, PLD-γ 1, and RbohD and F genes is undoubtedly under the reciprocal cross-talk of the ethylene and PAPLD signalling routes; both signals affect it in concerted or opposite ways depending on the gene or the type of stimuli. The results of these studies on broccoli seedlings are in agreement with the hypothesis that PA may directly affect the ethylene signal transduction pathway via an inhibitory effect on CTR1 (constitutive triple response 1) activity. PMID:20581125

  14. 24 CFR 982.154 - ACC reserve account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false ACC reserve account. 982.154... and PHA Administration of Program § 982.154 ACC reserve account. (a) HUD may establish and maintain an unfunded reserve account for the PHA program from available budget authority under the consolidated...

  15. Acc homoeoloci and the evolution of wheat genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chalupska, D.; Lee, H. Y.; Faris, J. D.; Evrard, A.; Chalhoub, B.; Haselkorn, R.; Gornicki, P.

    2008-01-01

    The DNA sequences of wheat Acc-1 and Acc-2 loci, encoding the plastid and cytosolic forms of the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase, were analyzed with a view to understanding the evolution of these genes and the origin of the three genomes in modern hexaploid wheat. Acc-1 and Acc-2 loci from each of the wheats Triticum urartu (A genome), Aegilops tauschii (D genome), Triticum turgidum (AB genome), and Triticum aestivum (ABD genome), as well as two Acc-2-related pseudogenes from T. urartu were sequenced. The 2.3–2.4 Mya divergence time calculated here for the three homoeologous chromosomes, on the basis of coding and intron sequences of the Acc-1 genes, is at the low end of other estimates. Our clock was calibrated by using 60 Mya for the divergence between wheat and maize. On the same time scale, wheat and barley diverged 11.6 Mya, based on sequences of Acc and other genes. The regions flanking the Acc genes are not conserved among the A, B, and D genomes. They are conserved when comparing homoeologous genomes of diploid, tetraploid, and hexaploid wheats. Substitution rates in intergenic regions consisting primarily of repetitive sequences vary substantially along the loci and on average are 3.5-fold higher than the Acc intron substitution rates. The composition of the Acc homoeoloci suggests haplotype divergence exceeding in some cases 0.5 Mya. Such variation might result in a significant overestimate of the time since tetraploid wheat formation, which occurred no more than 0.5 Mya. PMID:18599450

  16. Acc homoeoloci and the evolution of wheat genomes.

    PubMed

    Chalupska, D; Lee, H Y; Faris, J D; Evrard, A; Chalhoub, B; Haselkorn, R; Gornicki, P

    2008-07-15

    The DNA sequences of wheat Acc-1 and Acc-2 loci, encoding the plastid and cytosolic forms of the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase, were analyzed with a view to understanding the evolution of these genes and the origin of the three genomes in modern hexaploid wheat. Acc-1 and Acc-2 loci from each of the wheats Triticum urartu (A genome), Aegilops tauschii (D genome), Triticum turgidum (AB genome), and Triticum aestivum (ABD genome), as well as two Acc-2-related pseudogenes from T. urartu were sequenced. The 2.3-2.4 Mya divergence time calculated here for the three homoeologous chromosomes, on the basis of coding and intron sequences of the Acc-1 genes, is at the low end of other estimates. Our clock was calibrated by using 60 Mya for the divergence between wheat and maize. On the same time scale, wheat and barley diverged 11.6 Mya, based on sequences of Acc and other genes. The regions flanking the Acc genes are not conserved among the A, B, and D genomes. They are conserved when comparing homoeologous genomes of diploid, tetraploid, and hexaploid wheats. Substitution rates in intergenic regions consisting primarily of repetitive sequences vary substantially along the loci and on average are 3.5-fold higher than the Acc intron substitution rates. The composition of the Acc homoeoloci suggests haplotype divergence exceeding in some cases 0.5 Mya. Such variation might result in a significant overestimate of the time since tetraploid wheat formation, which occurred no more than 0.5 Mya. PMID:18599450

  17. Single phosphorylation sites in Acc1 and Acc2 regulate lipid homeostasis and the insulin–sensitizing effects of metformin

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Morgan D.; Galic, Sandra; Marcinko, Katarina; Sikkema, Sarah; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; Chen, Zhi–Ping; O’Neill, Hayley M.; Ford, Rebecca J.; Palanivel, Rengasamy; O’Brien, Matthew; Hardie, D. Grahame; Macaulay, S. Lance; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Dyck, Jason R. B.; van Denderen, Bryce J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic has led to an increased incidence of non–alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes. AMP–activated protein kinase (Ampk) regulates energy homeostasis and is activated by cellular stress, hormones and the widely prescribed anti–type 2 diabetic drug metformin1,2. Ampk phosphorylates murine acetyl–CoA carboxylase3,4 (Acc) 1 at Ser79 and Acc2 at Ser212, inhibiting the conversion of acetyl–CoA to malonyl–CoA, a precursor in fatty acid synthesis5 as well as an allosteric inhibitor of fatty acid transport into mitochondria for oxidation6. To test the physiological impact of these phosphorylation events we generated mice with alanine knock–in mutations in both Acc1 (Ser79) and Acc2 (Ser212) (Acc double knock–in, AccDKI). These mice have elevated lipogenesis and lower fatty acid oxidation compared to wild–type (WT) mice, which contribute to the progression of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and NAFLD, but not obesity. Remarkably, AccDKI mice made obese by high–fat feeding, are refractory to the lipid–lowering and insulin–sensitizing effects of metformin. These findings establish that inhibitory phosphorylation of Acc by Ampk is essential for the control of lipid metabolism, and in the setting of obesity, for metformin–induced improvements in insulin action. PMID:24185692

  18. Hospitals Participating In ACOs Tend To Be Large And Urban, Allowing Access To Capital And Data

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Valerie A.; Tierney, Emily; Muhlestein, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between physicians and hospitals have changed considerably over the past decade as hospitals and physician groups integrate and new public and private payment policies create financial interdependence. The extent to which accountable care organizations (ACOs) involve hospitals in their operations may prove to be vitally important because managing hospital care is a key part of improving quality and lowering cost growth. Using primary data on ACO composition and capabilities paired with hospital characteristics, we found that 20 percent of US hospitals were part of an ACO in 2015, and hospitals that were in urban areas, non-profit, or had a smaller share of Medicare patients were more likely to participate in ACOs compared to other ACOs. Qualitative data identified several advantages of including a hospital in an ACO: the availability of start-up capital, advanced data sharing, and engagement of providers across the care continuum. Although ACOs that include hospitals (63 percent of ACOs) offered more comprehensive services compared to ACOs without hospitals, we found no differences among ACOs in their ability to manage hospital-related aspects of patient care. PMID:26953297

  19. Adrenocortical cancer (ACC) - literature overview and own experience.

    PubMed

    Dworakowska, Dorota; Drabarek, Agata; Wenzel, Ingrid; Babińska, Anna; Świątkowska-Stodulska, Renata; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a malignant endocrine tumour. The rarity of the disease has stymied therapeutic development. Age distribution shows two peaks: the first and fifth decades of life, with children and women more frequently affected. Although 60-70% of ACCs are biochemically found to overproduce hormones, it is not clinically apparent in many cases. If present, endocrine symptoms include signs of hypercortisolaemia, virilisation or gynaecomastia. ACC carries a poor prognosis, and a cure can be achieved only by complete surgical resection. Mitotane is used both as an adjuvant treatment and also in non-operative patients. The role of radio- and chemotherapy is still controversial. The post-operative disease free survival is low and oscillates around 30% due to high tumour recurrence rate. The diagnosis is based on tumour histological assessment with the use of the Weiss score, however urinary steroid profiling (if available) can serve to differentiate between ACC and other adrenal tumours. Conventional prognostic markers in ACC include stage and grade of disease, and, as currently reported, the presence of hypercortisolaemia. Molecular analysis has had a significant impact on the understanding of the pathogenetic mechanism of ACC development and the evaluation of prognostic and predictive markers, among which alterations of the IGF system, the Wnt pathway, p53 and molecules involved in cancer cell invasion properties and angiogenesis seem to be very promising. We here summarise our own experience related to the management of ACC and present a literature overview. We have not aimed to include a detailed summary of the molecular alterations biology described in ACC, as this has already been addressed in other papers. PMID:25554619

  20. Effects of bacterial ACC deaminase on Brassica napus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Jennifer C; Woody, Owen Z; McConkey, Brendan J; Glick, Bernard R

    2012-05-01

    Plants in association with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria can benefit from lower plant ethylene levels through the action of the bacterial enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase. This enzyme cleaves the immediate biosynthetic precursor of ethylene, ACC. Ethylene is responsible for many aspects of plant growth and development but, under stressful conditions, it exacerbates stress symptoms. The ACC deaminase-containing bacterium Pseudomonas putida UW4 is a potent plant growth-promoting strain and, as such, was used to elaborate the detailed role of bacterial ACC deaminase in Brassica napus (canola) plant growth promotion. Transcriptional changes in bacterially treated canola plants were investigated with the use of an Arabidopsis thaliana oligonucleotide microarray. A heterologous approach was necessary because there are few tools available at present to measure global expression changes in nonmodel organisms, specifically with the sensitivity of microarrays. The results indicate that the transcription of genes involved in plant hormone regulation, secondary metabolism, and stress response was altered in plants by the presence of the bacterium, whereas the upregulation of genes for auxin response factors and the downregulation of stress response genes was observed only in the presence of bacterial ACC deaminase. These results support the suggestion that there is a direct link between ethylene and the auxin response, which has been suggested from physiological studies, and provide more evidence for the stress-reducing benefits of ACC deaminase-expressing plant growth-promoting bacteria. PMID:22352713

  1. First national survey of ACOs finds that physicians are playing strong leadership and ownership roles.

    PubMed

    Colla, Carrie H; Lewis, Valerie A; Shortell, Stephen M; Fisher, Elliott S

    2014-06-01

    The extent to which physicians lead, own, and govern accountable care organizations (ACOs) is unknown. However, physicians' involvement in ACOs will influence how clinicians and patients perceive the ACO model, how effective these organizations are at improving quality and costs, and how future ACOs will be organized. From October 2012 to May 2013 we fielded the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations, the first such survey of public and private ACOs. We found that 51 percent of ACOs were physician-led, with another 33 percent jointly led by physicians and hospitals. In 78 percent of ACOs, physicians constituted a majority of the governing board, and physicians owned 40 percent of ACOs. The broad reach of physician leadership has important implications for the future evolution of ACOs. It seems likely that the challenge of fundamentally changing care delivery as the country moves away from fee-for-service payment will not be accomplished without strong, effective leadership from physicians. PMID:24889945

  2. SamACO: variable sampling ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous optimization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Jun; Chung, Henry Shu-Hung; Li, Yun; Liu, Ou

    2010-12-01

    An ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm offers algorithmic techniques for optimization by simulating the foraging behavior of a group of ants to perform incremental solution constructions and to realize a pheromone laying-and-following mechanism. Although ACO is first designed for solving discrete (combinatorial) optimization problems, the ACO procedure is also applicable to continuous optimization. This paper presents a new way of extending ACO to solving continuous optimization problems by focusing on continuous variable sampling as a key to transforming ACO from discrete optimization to continuous optimization. The proposed SamACO algorithm consists of three major steps, i.e., the generation of candidate variable values for selection, the ants' solution construction, and the pheromone update process. The distinct characteristics of SamACO are the cooperation of a novel sampling method for discretizing the continuous search space and an efficient incremental solution construction method based on the sampled values. The performance of SamACO is tested using continuous numerical functions with unimodal and multimodal features. Compared with some state-of-the-art algorithms, including traditional ant-based algorithms and representative computational intelligence algorithms for continuous optimization, the performance of SamACO is seen competitive and promising. PMID:20371409

  3. On the molecular relationships between high-zinc tolerance and aconitase (Aco1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guirola, Maria; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Atrian, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    Zinc is an essential metal for all organisms, as it participates in the structure and/or function of many proteins. However, zinc excess is as deleterious to cells as zinc deficiency. A genome-wide study of the transcriptomic response to high zinc in S. cerevisiae performed in our laboratory allowed the identification of a zinc hyper-tolerant deletion mutant (pif1Δ), which lacks the Pif1 DNA helicase. Further molecular characterization of this strain phenotype revealed that the lack of Pif1 leads to increased iron accumulation, redistribution of the aconitase protein to mitochondria, and also a loss of aconitase activity, despite normal Aco1 protein levels being present, probably due to the epistasis in protecting mtDNA between PIF1 and ACO1. The results presented in this work focus now on the characterization of different features related to the Aco1 protein and activity in yeast and the tolerance to high zinc. Hence, multiple phenotypic traits related to metal metabolism, namely Aco1 protein content and activity levels, succinate dehydrogenase activity, citrate levels, metal content, BPS influence in cultures, and the range of transcription of some iron metabolism related genes, have been analyzed for several strains, some of them constructed to this end, including BY4741, the deletants pif1Δ and aco1Δ, and the aco1 mutants aco1Δ-d4, aco1-C448S, aco1-R476S and aco1-R668S. Overall, lack of Aco1 enzymatic activity in mitochondria, citrate accumulation and lack of activity of [Fe-S] enzymes, e.g. succinate dehydrogenase, appear to be direct molecular indicators of increased zinc tolerance in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24503898

  4. Energy spread measurements on the ACO storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Elleaume, P.; Billardon, M.; Deacon, D.; Girard, B.; Lapierre, Y.

    1985-06-01

    Absolute and relative energy spread measurements have been made on the ACO storage ring using two different methods. The first one consists of a spectral analysis of the electron bunch length based on the proportionality of the longitudinal bunch length versus energy spread. The second one constitutes a direct measurement using the on axis synchrotron radiation emitted by an optical klystron. The two measurement techniques present a very high signal/noise ratio allowing time resolved records. Examples are presented of the energy spread time evolution in the FEL oscillator and of harmonic generation experiments.

  5. Characterization and expression analysis of a banana gene encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Huang, P L; Do, Y Y; Huang, F C; Thay, T S; Chang, T W

    1997-04-01

    A cDNA encoding the banana 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase has previously been isolated from a cDNA library that was constructed by extracting poly(A)+ RNA from peels of ripening banana. This cDNA, designated as pMAO2, has 1,199 bp and contains an open reading frame of 318 amino acids. In order to identify ripening-related promoters of the banana ACC oxidase gene, pMAO2 was used as a probe to screen a banana genomic library constructed in the lambda EMBL3 vector. The banana ACC oxidase MAO2 gene has four exons and three introns, with all of the boundaries between these introns and exons sharing a consensus dinucleotide sequence of GT-AG. The expression of MAO2 gene in banana begins after the onset of ripening (stage 2) and continuous into later stages of the ripening process. The accumulation of MAO2 mRNA can be induced by 1 microliter/l exogenous ethylene, and it reached steady state level when 100 microliters/l exogenous ethylene was present. PMID:9137825

  6. 42 CFR 425.214 - Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement. 425.214 Section 425.214 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Application Procedures and Participation Agreement § 425.214 Managing changes to the ACO during the...

  7. 42 CFR 425.214 - Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement. 425.214 Section 425.214 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Application Procedures and Participation Agreement § 425.214 Managing changes to the ACO during the...

  8. 42 CFR 425.214 - Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement. 425.214 Section 425.214 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Application Procedures and Participation Agreement § 425.214 Managing changes to the ACO during the...

  9. 42 CFR 425.220 - Termination of an agreement by the ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Termination of an agreement by the ACO. 425.220 Section 425.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) Payment consequences of early termination. The ACO will not share in any savings for the performance...

  10. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  11. ACOs: time for ED managers to get involved, shape how their departments will add value.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    Even with a proposed rule outlining how accountable care organizations (ACO) will be structured under fee-for-service Medicare, emergency medicine experts are concerned about how ACOs will impact patient access to the ED. Further, some see a clear need to beef-up case management staff, while others say ED managers need to get involved with ACO-development now so their interests and concerns are represented. Under a proposed rule unveiled by the Department of Health and Human Services, a handful of quality indicators will require the tracking of ED visits related to certain ambulatory care-sensitive conditions; experts say it could be a challenge for ED staff to differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate use of the ED. EDs that figure out how to contribute value under the ACO mission will be better positioned to prosper under the new model. The ACO model is likely to add considerable complexity to billing and reimbursement. PMID:21675150

  12. Discovery and optimization of antibacterial AccC inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Cliff C.; Shipps, Jr., Gerald W.; Yang, Zhiwei; Sun, Binyuan; Kawahata, Noriyuki; Soucy, Kyle A.; Soriano, Aileen; Orth, Peter; Xiao, Li; Mann, Paul; Black, Todd

    2010-09-17

    The biotin carboxylase (AccC) is part of the multi-component bacterial acetyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (ACCase) and is essential for pathogen survival. We describe herein the affinity optimization of an initial hit to give 2-(2-chlorobenzylamino)-1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-5-carboxamide (1), which was identified using our proprietary Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS). The X-ray co-crystal structure of 1 was solved and revealed several key interactions and opportunities for further optimization in the ATP site of AccC. Structure Based Drug Design (SBDD) and parallel synthetic approaches resulted in a novel series of AccC inhibitors, exemplified by (R)-2-(2-chlorobenzylamino)-1-(2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-5-carboxamide (40). This compound is a potent and selective inhibitor of bacterial AccC with an IC{sub 50} of 20 nM and a MIC of 0.8 {micro}g/mL against a sensitized strain of Escherichia coli (HS294 E. coli).

  13. The ACCE 2012 Study Tour: Reflections on Reoccurring Themes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Di; Grover, David; Grover, Pam; Hearne, Dominic; Knipe, Steven; Martin, Kim; Pazzi, Georgina; Pollard, Edward; Prestridge, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Transformational leadership is essential in education as it empowers educators to make positive changes to the way they think, feel and act in improving learning for all. Reflection is a vital element of leading the change process. In relation to participating in the ACCE study tour experience, reflection allows one to sit and think about the…

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF POLYPHENOL OXIDASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.1) catalyzes the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones. Highly reactive o-quinones couple with phenolics and specific amino acids on proteins to form the characteristic browning products in many wounded fruits, vegetables, and leaf tissues of plant...

  15. Physicians' Participation In ACOs Is Lower In Places With Vulnerable Populations Than In More Affluent Communities.

    PubMed

    Yasaitis, Laura C; Pajerowski, William; Polsky, Daniel; Werner, Rachel M

    2016-08-01

    Early evidence suggested that accountable care organizations (ACOs) could improve health care quality while constraining costs, and ACOs are expanding throughout the United States. However, if disadvantaged patients have unequal access to physicians who participate in ACOs, that expansion may exacerbate health care disparities. We examined the relationship between physicians' participation in both Medicare and commercial ACOs across the country and the sociodemographic characteristics of their likely patient populations. Physicians' participation in ACOs varied widely across hospital referral regions, from nearly 0 percent to over 85 percent. After we adjusted for individual physician and practice characteristics, we found that physicians who practiced in ZIP Code Tabulation Areas where a higher percentage of the population was black, living in poverty, uninsured, or disabled or had less than a high school education-compared to other areas-had significantly lower rates of ACO participation than other physicians. Our findings suggest that vulnerable populations' access to physicians participating in ACOs may not be as great as access for other groups, which could exacerbate existing disparities in health care quality. PMID:27503961

  16. Hospitals Participating In ACOs Tend To Be Large And Urban, Allowing Access To Capital And Data.

    PubMed

    Colla, Carrie H; Lewis, Valerie A; Tierney, Emily; Muhlestein, David B

    2016-03-01

    Relationships between physicians and hospitals have changed considerably over the past decade, as hospitals and physician groups have integrated and new public and private payment policies have created financial interdependence. The extent to which accountable care organizations (ACOs) involve hospitals in their operations may prove to be vitally important, because managing hospital care is a key part of improving health care quality and lowering cost growth. Using primary data on ACO composition and capabilities paired with hospital characteristics, we found that 20 percent of US hospitals were part of an ACO in 2014. Hospitals that were in urban areas, were nonprofit, or had a smaller share of Medicare patients were more likely to participate in ACOs, compared to hospitals that were in more rural areas, were for-profit or government owned, or had a larger share of Medicare patients, respectively. Qualitative data identified the following advantages of including a hospital in an ACO: the availability of start-up capital, advanced data sharing, and engagement of providers across the care continuum. Although the 63 percent of ACOs that included hospitals offered more comprehensive services compared to ACOs without hospitals, we found no differences between the two groups in their ability to manage hospital-related aspects of patient care. PMID:26953297

  17. Layered ACO-OFDM for intensity-modulated direct-detection optical wireless transmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Chen; Guo, Xuhan; Wang, Zhaocheng; Cunningham, David G; White, Ian H

    2015-05-01

    Layered asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) with high spectral efficiency is proposed in this paper for optical wireless transmission employing intensity modulation with direct detection. In contrast to the conventional ACO-OFDM, which only utilizes odd subcarriers for modulation, leading to an obvious spectral efficiency loss, in layered ACO-OFDM, the subcarriers are divided into different layers and modulated by different kinds of ACO-OFDM, which are combined for simultaneous transmission. In this way, more subcarriers are used for data transmission and the spectral efficiency is improved. An iterative receiver is also proposed for layered ACO-OFDM, where the negative clipping distortion of each layer is subtracted once it is detected so that the signals from different layers can be recovered. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed scheme can improve the spectral efficiency by up to 2 times compared with conventional ACO-OFDM approaches with the same modulation order. Meanwhile, simulation results confirm a considerable signal-to-noise ratio gain over ACO-OFDM at the same spectral efficiency. PMID:25969323

  18. MOEA/D-ACO: a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm using decomposition and AntColony.

    PubMed

    Ke, Liangjun; Zhang, Qingfu; Battiti, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Combining ant colony optimization (ACO) and the multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (EA) based on decomposition (MOEA/D), this paper proposes a multiobjective EA, i.e., MOEA/D-ACO. Following other MOEA/D-like algorithms, MOEA/D-ACO decomposes a multiobjective optimization problem into a number of single-objective optimization problems. Each ant (i.e., agent) is responsible for solving one subproblem. All the ants are divided into a few groups, and each ant has several neighboring ants. An ant group maintains a pheromone matrix, and an individual ant has a heuristic information matrix. During the search, each ant also records the best solution found so far for its subproblem. To construct a new solution, an ant combines information from its group's pheromone matrix, its own heuristic information matrix, and its current solution. An ant checks the new solutions constructed by itself and its neighbors, and updates its current solution if it has found a better one in terms of its own objective. Extensive experiments have been conducted in this paper to study and compare MOEA/D-ACO with other algorithms on two sets of test problems. On the multiobjective 0-1 knapsack problem,MOEA/D-ACO outperforms the MOEA/D with conventional genetic operators and local search on all the nine test instances. We also demonstrate that the heuristic information matrices in MOEA/D-ACO are crucial to the good performance of MOEA/D-ACO for the knapsack problem. On the biobjective traveling salesman problem, MOEA/D-ACO performs much better than the BicriterionAnt on all the 12 test instances. We also evaluate the effects of grouping, neighborhood, and the location information of current solutions on the performance of MOEA/D-ACO. The work in this paper shows that reactive search optimization scheme, i.e., the "learning while optimizing" principle, is effective in improving multiobjective optimization algorithms. PMID:23757576

  19. ACOs in real life: a reflection on the Medicare Shared Savings Program.

    PubMed

    Behm, Craig R

    2015-01-01

    The Medicare Shared Savings Program introduced Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) as one potential method for meeting the often-cited triple aim of better individual care, improved population health, and lower cost. Built on concepts originating from HMOs and then Medicare Advantage plans, ACOs provide incentives based on total cost of care rather than any individual provider's cost. Early quality and cost results are mixed, and, more importantly, so is physician response. The ACO program still has potential to be a bright spot for the future of healthcare, but until there is widespread physician engagement, achieving the triple aim is likely to remain elusive. PMID:26062323

  20. An Open Letter to the Professional Communities of Australian Council for Computers in Education (ACCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to the Professional Communities of Australian Council for Computers in Education (ACCE). In preparing for this article, the author looked back over the contributions of other fellows in publications and ACCE Minutes, and recognized that each had led the ACCE family in this endeavor. Creating direction was the…

  1. In vitro synthesis and stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles within liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, Chantel C.; Brock, Ryan E.; Wu, Ching-Hsuan; Krejci, Minna R.; Weigand, Steven; Joester, Derk

    2012-02-07

    We show that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) can be synthesized in phospholipid bilayer vesicles (liposomes). Liposome-encapsulated ACC nanoparticles are stable against aggregation, do not crystallize for at least 20 h, and are ideally suited to investigate the influence of lipid chemistry, particle size, and soluble additives on ACC in situ.

  2. The formation of ACC and competition between polyamines and ethylene for SAM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene biosynthesis involves the conversion of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) by ACC synthase (ACS). ACC is then converted to ethylene. The genes that encode enzymes in this pathway all belong to a family of genes. Differential transcriptional regulation ...

  3. Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome (ACOS): Single disease entity or not? Could exhaled nitric oxide be a useful biomarker for the differentiation of ACOS, asthma and COPD?

    PubMed

    Karampitsakos, Theodoros; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I

    2016-06-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represent two major public health problems. However, there is a significant proportion of patients with a mixed asthma-COPD phenotype. This condition is defined as asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Since there are no internationally accepted criteria for the diagnosis of that syndrome, its management remains difficult. Given the fact that patients with ACOS have an increased risk of exacerbation and hospitalization, there is a pressing need for a more targeted approach and better management. We propose that fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), a marker of eosinophilic inflammation, could help clinicians differentiate ACOS from asthma and COPD. We evaluate this hypothesis, using data derived from the existing literature. PMID:27142135

  4. The Impact Of Medicare ACOs On Improving Integration And Coordination Of Physical And Behavioral Health Care.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Catherine A; Henke, Rachel M; Crable, Erica; Hohlbauch, Andriana; Cummings, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) model holds the promise of reducing costs and improving the quality of care by realigning payment incentives to focus on health outcomes instead of service volume. One key to managing the total cost of care is improving care coordination for and treatment of people with behavioral health disorders. We examined qualitative data from ninety organizations participating in Medicare ACO demonstration programs from 2012 through 2015 to determine whether and how they focused on behavioral health care. These ACOs had mixed degrees of engagement in improving behavioral health care for their populations. The biggest challenges included a lack of behavioral health care providers, data availability, and sustainable financing models. Nonetheless, we found substantial interest in integrating behavioral health care into primary care across a majority of the ACOs. PMID:27385242

  5. A Preliminary Validation of the ACOS/GOSAT Xco2 Product Using TCCON Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunch, D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Connor, B. J.; Fisher, B.; Osterman, G. B.; Thompson, D. R.; Oyafuso, F. A.; Toon, G. C.; Roehl, C. M.; Miller, C. E.; O'Dell, C.; Salawitch, R. J.; Crisp, D.; Castano, R.; Mandrake, L.; Sherlock, V.; Deutscher, N. M.; Griffith, D. W.; Macatangay, R.; Rettinger, M.; Sussmann, R.; Messerschmidt, J.; Notholt, J.; Warneke, T.

    2010-12-01

    The JAXA/NIES/MOE Greenhouse gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT) was launched in 2009, carrying its main instrument, the TANSO-FTS (Fourier transform spectrometer), to measure total columns of CO2 (Xco2). The Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space (ACOS) group, which was formed out of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) science team, has worked with the GOSAT Research Announcement (RA) office to retrieve Xco2 values from the GOSAT spectra. We describe a validation technique for the ACOS/GOSAT Xco2 data product with the spatially sparse but precise and accurate Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). To account for non-coincidence of the GOSAT and TCCON observations, we exploit the strong correlation between free-tropospheric temperature and Xco2. Systematic errors and biases in the ACOS/GOSAT product are described. After correcting for these biases, a more precise and accurate global picture of Xco2 is derived from the ACOS/GOSAT data.

  6. Presenting Provenance Based on User Roles - Experiences from the ACOS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, P.; Michaelis, J.; Fox, P. A.; Zednik, S.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    One goal of provenance is to provide users an understanding of the steps a system took to generate data products. Here, the level of detail captured by provenance becomes an important consideration. As detail is added, more questions can be hypothetically addressed. However, presenting significant provenance detail may also overwhelm end users, for one of two reasons: (i) the detail presented is irrelevant to the objectives, or (ii) the detail requires background knowledge a user lacks. Both of these challenges are present for data generated by the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory’s (MLSO) Advanced Coronal Observing System (ACOS). In ACOS, photometer-based readings are taken of solar activity and subsequently processed into data products consumable by end users. To fully understand these sequences of steps, background knowledge corresponding to various areas (e.g., astronomy, digital imaging, and ACOS specific techniques) is required by end users. This makes reviewing provenance difficult for users outside the ACOS development team, where varying degrees of background may be expected (ranging from outside domain experts in Solar Physics to citizen scientists). Likewise, even when steps taken by ACOS are understandable, they may provide undesired detail to an end user if presented. The work with ACOS involved the development of a Semantic Web based framework to selectively present provenance detail for data products in ACOS. Here, provenance is captured according to two sets of ontologies, the Proof Markup Language, which is an ontology based domain-independent provenance model, and a step ontology, designed to capture hierarchies of provenance steps. Used in combination, these ontology sets enable the creation of multiple levels of provenance, ranging from coarse to fine grained detail. In this setting, users may choose to expand/collapse provenance steps to view desired details. However, the specific provenance details a user initially sees is defined through

  7. Direct observations of the ACC transport across the Kerguelen Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Hyang; Vivier, Frédéric; Roquet, Fabien; Kestenare, Elodie

    2009-09-01

    Major pathways and transport of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) crossing the Kerguelen Plateau were directly observed during the 2009 Track cruise. The net eastward transport to the south of the Heard/McDonald Islands is estimated as 56 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), 43 Sv of which is tightly channelled into the Fawn Trough that appears as a predominant cross-plateau gateway of circumpolar flow associated with the Southern ACC Front (SACCF). There are also two secondary passages, with one (6 Sv) being attached to the nearshore slope just south of the Heard/McDonald Islands and the other (7 Sv) passing through the northern Princess Elizabeth Trough. With an additional 2 Sv inferred just south of the Kerguelen Islands, the transport across the entire plateau amounts to 58 Sv, accounting for ˜40% of the total ACC transport transiting through the region, 147-152 Sv, quantities consistent with other independent estimates in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean.

  8. A pheromone-rate-based analysis on the convergence time of ACO algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han; Wu, Chun-Guo; Hao, Zhi-Feng

    2009-08-01

    Ant colony optimization (ACO) has widely been applied to solve combinatorial optimization problems in recent years. There are few studies, however, on its convergence time, which reflects how many iteration times ACO algorithms spend in converging to the optimal solution. Based on the absorbing Markov chain model, we analyze the ACO convergence time in this paper. First, we present a general result for the estimation of convergence time to reveal the relationship between convergence time and pheromone rate. This general result is then extended to a two-step analysis of the convergence time, which includes the following: 1) the iteration time that the pheromone rate spends on reaching the objective value and 2) the convergence time that is calculated with the objective pheromone rate in expectation. Furthermore, four brief ACO algorithms are investigated by using the proposed theoretical results as case studies. Finally, the conclusions of the case studies that the pheromone rate and its deviation determine the expected convergence time are numerically verified with the experiment results of four one-ant ACO algorithms and four ten-ant ACO algorithms. PMID:19380276

  9. Reward salience and risk aversion underlie differential ACC activity in substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, William H.; Fukunaga, Rena; Finn, Peter; Brown, Joshua W.

    2015-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex, especially the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), has long been implicated in cognitive control and error processing. Although the association between ACC and behavior has been established, it is less clear how ACC contributes to dysfunctional behavior such as substance dependence. Evidence from neuroimaging studies investigating ACC function in substance users is mixed, with some studies showing disengagement of ACC in substance dependent individuals (SDs), while others show increased ACC activity related to substance use. In this study, we investigate ACC function in SDs and healthy individuals performing a change signal task for monetary rewards. Using a priori predictions derived from a recent computational model of ACC, we find that ACC activity differs between SDs and controls in factors related to reward salience and risk aversion between SDs and healthy individuals. Quantitative fits of a computational model to fMRI data reveal significant differences in best fit parameters for reward salience and risk preferences. Specifically, the ACC in SDs shows greater risk aversion, defined as concavity in the utility function, and greater attention to rewards relative to reward omission. Furthermore, across participants risk aversion and reward salience are positively correlated. The results clarify the role that ACC plays in both the reduced sensitivity to omitted rewards and greater reward valuation in SDs. Clinical implications of applying computational modeling in psychiatry are also discussed. PMID:26106528

  10. CACONET: Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) Based Clustering Algorithm for VANET

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Khalid Bashir; Khan, Salabat; Chaudary, Nadeem Majeed; Akram, Adeel

    2016-01-01

    A vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) is a wirelessly connected network of vehicular nodes. A number of techniques, such as message ferrying, data aggregation, and vehicular node clustering aim to improve communication efficiency in VANETs. Cluster heads (CHs), selected in the process of clustering, manage inter-cluster and intra-cluster communication. The lifetime of clusters and number of CHs determines the efficiency of network. In this paper a Clustering algorithm based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) for VANETs (CACONET) is proposed. CACONET forms optimized clusters for robust communication. CACONET is compared empirically with state-of-the-art baseline techniques like Multi-Objective Particle Swarm Optimization (MOPSO) and Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization (CLPSO). Experiments varying the grid size of the network, the transmission range of nodes, and number of nodes in the network were performed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of these algorithms. For optimized clustering, the parameters considered are the transmission range, direction and speed of the nodes. The results indicate that CACONET significantly outperforms MOPSO and CLPSO. PMID:27149517

  11. CACONET: Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) Based Clustering Algorithm for VANET.

    PubMed

    Aadil, Farhan; Bajwa, Khalid Bashir; Khan, Salabat; Chaudary, Nadeem Majeed; Akram, Adeel

    2016-01-01

    A vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) is a wirelessly connected network of vehicular nodes. A number of techniques, such as message ferrying, data aggregation, and vehicular node clustering aim to improve communication efficiency in VANETs. Cluster heads (CHs), selected in the process of clustering, manage inter-cluster and intra-cluster communication. The lifetime of clusters and number of CHs determines the efficiency of network. In this paper a Clustering algorithm based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) for VANETs (CACONET) is proposed. CACONET forms optimized clusters for robust communication. CACONET is compared empirically with state-of-the-art baseline techniques like Multi-Objective Particle Swarm Optimization (MOPSO) and Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization (CLPSO). Experiments varying the grid size of the network, the transmission range of nodes, and number of nodes in the network were performed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of these algorithms. For optimized clustering, the parameters considered are the transmission range, direction and speed of the nodes. The results indicate that CACONET significantly outperforms MOPSO and CLPSO. PMID:27149517

  12. ACC2 Is Expressed at High Levels Human White Adipose and Has an Isoform with a Novel N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Christopher K.; Garrett-Engele, Philip; Ohwaki, Kenji; Kan, Zhengyan; Kusunoki, Jun; Johnson, Jason M.

    2009-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases ACC1 and ACC2 catalyze the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, regulating fatty-acid synthesis and oxidation, and are potential targets for treatment of metabolic syndrome. Expression of ACC1 in rodent lipogenic tissues and ACC2 in rodent oxidative tissues, coupled with the predicted localization of ACC2 to the mitochondrial membrane, have suggested separate functional roles for ACC1 in lipogenesis and ACC2 in fatty acid oxidation. We find, however, that human adipose tissue, unlike rodent adipose, expresses more ACC2 mRNA relative to the oxidative tissues muscle and heart. Human adipose, along with human liver, expresses more ACC2 than ACC1. Using RT-PCR, real-time PCR, and immunoprecipitation we report a novel isoform of ACC2 (ACC2.v2) that is expressed at significant levels in human adipose. The protein generated by this isoform has enzymatic activity, is endogenously expressed in adipose, and lacks the N-terminal sequence. Both ACC2 isoforms are capable of de novo lipogenesis, suggesting that ACC2, in addition to ACC1, may play a role in lipogenesis. The results demonstrate a significant difference in ACC expression between human and rodents, which may introduce difficulties for the use of rodent models for development of ACC inhibitors. PMID:19190759

  13. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Wakabayashi, Takashi

    1982-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.9.3.1) was purified from beef heart mitochondria. By washing the oxidase with detergent on a hydrophobic interaction column, phospholipids were depleted to the level of 1 mol of cardiolipin per mol of heme a. Hydrophobic impurities and partially denatured oxidase were separated from the intact oxidase on an affinity column with cytochrome c as the specific ligand. The final preparation of the oxidase contained seven distinct polypeptides. The molecular weight of the oxidase was estimated to be 130,000 from its specific heme a and copper content and from the subunit composition. Crystals of the oxidase were obtained by slow removal of the detergent from the buffer in which the oxidase was dissolved. The needle-shaped crystals were 100 μ m in average length and 5 μ m in width, and they strongly polarized visible light. Electron diffraction patterns were obtained with an unstained glutaraldehyde-fixed single crystal by electron microscopy using 1,000-kV electrons. From electron micrographs and the diffraction patterns of the crystal, it was concluded that the crystal is monoclinic in the space group P21, with unit cell dimensions a = 92 angstrom, b = 84 angstrom, and c = 103 angstrom, and α =β 90 degrees, γ = 126 degrees.

  14. Complementary DNA cloning of the pear 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase gene and agrobacterium-mediated anti-sense genetic transformation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Yu-Xing

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to genetically modify plantlets of the Chinese yali pear to reduce their expression of ripening-associated 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) and therefore increase the shelf-life of the fruit. Primers were designed with selectivity for the conserved regions of published ACO gene sequences, and yali complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning was performed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The obtained cDNA fragment contained 831 base pairs, encoding 276 amino acid residues, and shared no less than 94% nucleotide sequence identity with other published ACO genes. The cDNA fragment was inversely inserted into a pBI121 expression vector, between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase terminator, in order to construct the anti‑sense expression vector of the ACO gene; it was transfected into cultured yali plants using Agrobacterium LBA4404. Four independent transgenic lines of pear plantlets were obtained and validated by PCR analysis. A Southern blot assay revealed that there were three transgenic lines containing a single copy of exogenous gene and one line with double copies. The present study provided germplasm resources for the cultivation of novel storage varieties of pears, therefore providing a reference for further applications of anti‑sense RNA technology in the genetic improvement of pears and other fruit. PMID:26460204

  15. MGA trajectory planning with an ACO-inspired algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Matteo; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2010-11-01

    Given a set of celestial bodies, the problem of finding an optimal sequence of swing-bys, deep space manoeuvres (DSM) and transfer arcs connecting the elements of the set is combinatorial in nature. The number of possible paths grows exponentially with the number of celestial bodies. Therefore, the design of an optimal multiple gravity assist (MGA) trajectory is a NP-hard mixed combinatorial-continuous problem. Its automated solution would greatly improve the design of future space missions, allowing the assessment of a large number of alternative mission options in a short time. This work proposes to formulate the complete automated design of a multiple gravity assist trajectory as an autonomous planning and scheduling problem. The resulting scheduled plan will provide the optimal planetary sequence and a good estimation of the set of associated optimal trajectories. The trajectory model consists of a sequence of celestial bodies connected by two-dimensional transfer arcs containing one DSM. For each transfer arc, the position of the planet and the spacecraft, at the time of arrival, are matched by varying the pericentre of the preceding swing-by, or the magnitude of the launch excess velocity, for the first arc. For each departure date, this model generates a full tree of possible transfers from the departure to the destination planet. Each leaf of the tree represents a planetary encounter and a possible way to reach that planet. An algorithm inspired by ant colony optimization (ACO) is devised to explore the space of possible plans. The ants explore the tree from departure to destination adding one node at the time: every time an ant is at a node, a probability function is used to select a feasible direction. This approach to automatic trajectory planning is applied to the design of optimal transfers to Saturn and among the Galilean moons of Jupiter. Solutions are compared to those found through more traditional genetic-algorithm techniques.

  16. Effectiveness analysis of ACOS-Xco2 bias correction method with GEOS-Chem model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Lei, Liping; Liu, Min; Guo, Lijie; Wang, Qian; Bie, Nian

    2015-08-01

    Satellite observations and model simulations are of two important data sources to study atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. For analyzing and evaluating the bias correction method of ACOS dry-air column averaged CO2 (Xco2) product, the GEOS-Chem Xco2 simulations are selected according to observing time and locations of the ACOS product. The GEOS-Chem simulations of CO2 profiles are transformed to Xco2 data by convolving with satellite averaging kernels and pressure weighting functions. The GEOS-Chem Xco2 data are then compared with both bias uncorrected and bias corrected satellite retrievals of ACOS. The comparisons show that the bias uncorrected ACOS retrievals are on average 1.12ppm higher than the model Xco2 data, while the corrected ACOS retrievals are only on average 0.06ppm lower than the model Xco2 data. By assuming consistency between model Xco2 simulations and true atmospheric Xco2, this study indicates that the bias can be obvious decreased through the bias correction method, and the correction is effective and necessary for satellite Xco2 retrievals.

  17. NADPH Oxidase and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz R G

    2012-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (Nox) is a unique, multi-protein, electron transport system that produces large amounts of superoxide via the reduction of molecular oxygen. Nox-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in a variety of physiological processes, including host defense and signal transduction. However, over the past decade, the involvement of (Nox)-dependent oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases has been increasingly recognized. ROS produced by Nox proteins contribute to neurodegenerative diseases through distinct mechanisms, such as oxidation of DNA, proteins, lipids, amino acids and metals, in addition to activation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on Nox involvement in neurodegeneration, focusing on Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. PMID:23730256

  18. Production of VUV coherent light by harmonic generation with the optical klystron of super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prazeres, R.; Guyot-Sionnest, P.; Ortega, J. M.; Billardon, M.; Jaroszynski, D.

    1991-04-01

    The aim of the experiment presented was to develop a usable source of coherent light in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) range (200-50 nm) using the Super-ACO storage ring. A presentation is made of the most recent results where coherent photons have been produced at the 3rd (177 nm) and 5th (106 nm) harmonics of the incident laser. The better performance of the new machine and the laser, compared to the older ACO, is largely offset by experimental difficulties. The number of photons is, however. larger than that obtained with the ACO, but it is approximately one order of magnitude below the expected rate. This seems to be due to positron beam instabilities. The authors believe that the extremely critical alignment of the whole experiment, from the injection laser to the monochromator, does not appear to be compatible with a user facility.

  19. Further studies of auxin and ACC induced feminization in the cucumber plant using ethylene inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, H.; Jaffe, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The present study was designed to establish the role of an essential hormone controlling sex expression in cucumber. A potent anti-ethylene agent, AgNO3, completely inhibited pistillate flower formation caused by IAA, ACC or ethephon. Inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis, AVG and CoCl2 also suppressed feminization due to exogenous IAA or ACC. Though AVG also suppressed ethephon-induced feminization, this may be due to the second effect of AVG rather than the effect on ACC biosynthesis. These results confirm that ethylene is a major factor regulating feminization and that exogenous auxin induces pistillate flower formation through its stimulation of ethylene production, rather than ACC production.

  20. Asthma and COPD Overlap Syndrome (ACOS): A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alshabanat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The combination of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or ACOS is a recently defined syndrome. The epidemiology of the condition is poorly described and previous research has suggested ACOS is associated with worse outcomes than either condition alone. We therefore decided to complete a systematic review of the published literature. Methods This review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta- Analyses guidelines. A structured search was performed in the PubMed, Embase, and Medline databases up to Feb 2015 to identify studies reporting incidence, prevalence, health care utilization, morbidity, or mortality in COPD and asthma. Results A total of 19 studies were included in the present study. The pooled prevalence of overlap among COPD was 27% (95% CI: 0.16–0.38, p<0.0001) and 28% (95% CI: 0.09–0.47, p = 0.0032) in the population and hospital-based studies, respectively. We found no significant difference between ACOS and COPD in terms of gender, smoking status, lung function and 6mWD. However, in comparison to subject with only COPD, ACOS subjects were significantly younger, had higher BMI, healthcare utilization, and lower HRQoL. Conclusion ACOS is a common condition that exists in a substantial proportion of subjects with COPD. ACOS represents a distinct clinical phenotype with more frequent exacerbations, hospitalization, worse health-related quality of life, and higher healthcare costs than either disease alone. There is a critical need to better define the management and treatment of this syndrome. PMID:26336076

  1. Few ACOs pursue innovative models that integrate care for mental illness and substance abuse with primary care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Valerie A; Colla, Carrie H; Tierney, Katherine; Van Citters, Arica D; Fisher, Elliott S; Meara, Ellen

    2014-10-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) may be well positioned to increase the focus on managing behavioral health conditions (mental health and substance abuse) through the integration of behavioral health treatment and primary care. We used a mixed-methods research design to examine the extent to which ACOs are clinically, organizationally, and financially integrating behavioral health care and primary care. We used data from 257 respondents to the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations, a nationally representative survey of ACOs. The data were supplemented with semistructured, in-depth interviews with clinical leaders at sixteen ACOs purposively sampled to represent the spectrum of behavioral health integration. We found that most ACOs hold responsibility for some behavioral health care costs, and 42 percent include behavioral health specialists among their providers. However, integration of behavioral health care and primary care remains low, with most ACOs pursuing traditional fragmented approaches to physical and behavioral health care and only a minority implementing innovative models. Contract design and contextual factors appear to influence the extent to which ACOs integrate behavioral health care. Nevertheless, the ACO model has the potential to create opportunities for improving behavioral health care and integrating it with primary care. PMID:25288427

  2. An improved adaptive ACO meta heuristic for scheduling multimedia traffic across the 802.11e EDCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditze, Michael; Becker, Markus

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive near-optimal scheduler for multimedia traffic for the 802.11e Enhanced Distributed Channel Access (EDCA) medium access control scheme. The scheduler exploits the ant colony optimization (ACO) meta heuristic to tackle the challenge of packet scheduling. ACO is a biologically inspired algorithm that is known to find near-optimal solutions for combinatorial optimization problems. Thus, we expect that ACO scheduling produces more efficient schedules than comparable deterministic scheduling approaches at the expenses of a computational overhead it introduces. We compare ACO scheduling relevant deterministic scheduling approaches, and in particular the MLLF scheduler that is specifically designed for the needs of compressed multimedia applications. The purpose of the evaluation is twofold. It allows to draw conclusions on the feasibility of ACO scheduling for multimedia traffic while it serves as a benchmark to determine to what extent deterministic schedulers fall short of a near-optimal solution.

  3. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress.

    PubMed

    Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Sultana, Asma; Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress. PMID:26463088

  4. 24 CFR 985.109 - Default under the Annual Contributions Contract (ACC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 985.109 Default under the Annual Contributions Contract (ACC). HUD may determine that an PHA's failure... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Default under the Annual Contributions Contract (ACC). 985.109 Section 985.109 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating...

  5. 24 CFR 985.109 - Default under the Annual Contributions Contract (ACC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 985.109 Default under the Annual Contributions Contract (ACC). HUD may determine that an PHA's failure... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Default under the Annual Contributions Contract (ACC). 985.109 Section 985.109 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING...

  6. ACCE/ACS National Educator and Leader of the Year Winners: AEC Congratulates These Outstanding Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Educational Computing, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the ACCE/ACS National Educator and Leader of the Year winners. Anne Mirtschin is the recipient of the ACCE/ACS 2012 Educator of the Year Award. Mirtschin is an innovative teacher at Hawkesdale P-12 College a small rural school that is isolated culturally and geographically. She uses online tools and technology to create…

  7. Analysis of Carotenoid Isomerase Activity in a Prototypical Carotenoid Cleavage Enzyme, Apocarotenoid Oxygenase (ACO)*

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Xuewu; Kiser, Philip D.; Che, Tao; Carey, Paul R.; Golczak, Marcin; Shi, Wuxian; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage enzymes (CCEs) constitute a group of evolutionarily related proteins that metabolize a variety of carotenoid and non-carotenoid substrates. Typically, these enzymes utilize a non-heme iron center to oxidatively cleave a carbon-carbon double bond of a carotenoid substrate. Some members also isomerize specific double bonds in their substrates to yield cis-apocarotenoid products. The apocarotenoid oxygenase from Synechocystis has been hypothesized to represent one such member of this latter category of CCEs. Here, we developed a novel expression and purification protocol that enabled production of soluble, native ACO in quantities sufficient for high resolution structural and spectroscopic investigation of its catalytic mechanism. High performance liquid chromatography and Raman spectroscopy revealed that ACO exclusively formed all-trans products. We also found that linear polyoxyethylene detergents previously used for ACO crystallization strongly inhibited the apocarotenoid oxygenase activity of the enzyme. We crystallized the native enzyme in the absence of apocarotenoid substrate and found electron density in the active site that was similar in appearance to the density previously attributed to a di-cis-apocarotenoid intermediate. Our results clearly demonstrated that ACO is in fact a non-isomerizing member of the CCE family. These results indicate that careful selection of detergent is critical for the success of structural studies aimed at elucidating structures of CCE-carotenoid/retinoid complexes. PMID:24648526

  8. Results of the first phase of the ACO storage ring laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, C.; Velghe, M.; Billardon, M.; Ortega, J. M.; Deacon, D. A. G.; Madey, J. M. J.; Robinson, K. E.; Elleaume, P.; Farge, Y.; Petroff, Y.

    A Superconducting undulator has been installed on the ACO storage ring and operated as a synchrotron radiation source, and as a free electron amplifier. Measurements of spontaneous emission spectrum, the gain as a function of the electron energy, and the laser induced lengthening of the electron bunch are reported.

  9. 42 CFR 425.500 - Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO. 425.500 Section 425.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting...

  10. 42 CFR 425.500 - Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO. 425.500 Section 425.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting...

  11. 42 CFR 425.502 - Calculating the ACO quality performance score.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... four domains: (i) Patient/care giver experience. (ii) Care coordination/Patient safety. (iii) Preventative health. (iv) At-risk population. (2) To satisfy quality performance requirements for a domain: (i... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculating the ACO quality performance score....

  12. 42 CFR 425.502 - Calculating the ACO quality performance score.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Patient/care giver experience. (ii) Care coordination/Patient safety. (iii) Preventative health. (iv) At... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculating the ACO quality performance score. 425... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM...

  13. 42 CFR 425.500 - Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO. 425.500 Section 425.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting...

  14. New Insights into 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Phylogeny, Evolution and Ecological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Francisco X.; Rossi, Márcio J.; Soares, Cláudio R. F. S.; McConkey, Brendan J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the study of the phylogeny, evolution and ecological importance of the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, the activity of which represents one of the most important and studied mechanisms used by plant growth–promoting microorganisms. The ACC deaminase gene and its regulatory elements presence in completely sequenced organisms was verified by multiple searches in diverse databases, and based on the data obtained a comprehensive analysis was conducted. Strain habitat, origin and ACC deaminase activity were taken into account when analyzing the results. In order to unveil ACC deaminase origin, evolution and relationships with other closely related pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes a phylogenetic analysis was also performed. The data obtained show that ACC deaminase is mostly prevalent in some Bacteria, Fungi and members of Stramenopiles. Contrary to previous reports, we show that ACC deaminase genes are predominantly vertically inherited in various bacterial and fungal classes. Still, results suggest a considerable degree of horizontal gene transfer events, including interkingdom transfer events. A model for ACC deaminase origin and evolution is also proposed. This study also confirms the previous reports suggesting that the Lrp-like regulatory protein AcdR is a common mechanism regulating ACC deaminase expression in Proteobacteria, however, we also show that other regulatory mechanisms may be present in some Proteobacteria and other bacterial phyla. In this study we provide a more complete view of the role for ACC deaminase than was previously available. The results show that ACC deaminase may not only be related to plant growth promotion abilities, but may also play multiple roles in microorganism's developmental processes. Hence, exploring the origin and functioning of this enzyme may be the key in a variety of important agricultural and biotechnological applications. PMID:24905353

  15. Minimal impact of age and housing temperature on the metabolic phenotype of Acc2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Amanda E; Stuart, Ella; Leslie, Simon J; Hoehn, Kyle L; James, David E; Kraegen, Edward W; Turner, Nigel; Cooney, Gregory J

    2016-03-01

    An important regulator of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is the allosteric inhibition of CPT-1 by malonyl-CoA produced by the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2). Initial studies suggested that deletion of Acc2 (Acacb) increased fat oxidation and reduced adipose tissue mass but in an independently generated strain of Acc2 knockout mice we observed increased whole-body and skeletal muscle FAO and a compensatory increase in muscle glycogen stores without changes in glucose tolerance, energy expenditure or fat mass in young mice (12-16 weeks). The aim of the present study was to determine whether there was any effect of age or housing at thermoneutrality (29 °C; which reduces total energy expenditure) on the phenotype of Acc2 knockout mice. At 42-54 weeks of age, male WT and Acc2(-/-) mice had similar body weight, fat mass, muscle triglyceride content and glucose tolerance. Consistent with younger Acc2(-/-) mice, aged Acc2(-/-) mice showed increased whole-body FAO (24 h average respiratory exchange ratio=0.95±0.02 and 0.92±0.02 for WT and Acc2(-/-) mice respectively, P<0.05) and skeletal muscle glycogen content (+60%, P<0.05) without any detectable change in whole-body energy expenditure. Hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp studies revealed no difference in insulin action between groups with similar glucose infusion rates and tissue glucose uptake. Housing Acc2(-/-) mice at 29 °C did not alter body composition, glucose tolerance or the effects of fat feeding compared with WT mice. These results confirm that manipulation of Acc2 may alter FAO in mice, but this has little impact on body composition or insulin action. PMID:26668208

  16. Coupling in cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, R. J.; Blondin, G. A.; Zande, H. Vande; Haworth, R. A.; Green, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c: oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.9.3.1) can be resolved into an electron transfer complex (ETC) and an ionophore transfer complex (ITC). Coupling requires an interaction between the moving electron in the ETC and a moving, positively charged ionophore-cation adduct in the ITC. The duplex character of cytochrome oxidase facilitates this interaction. The ITC mediates cyclical cation transport. It can be replaced as the coupling partner by the combination of valinomycin and nigericin in the presence of K+ when cytochrome oxidase is incorporated into liposomes containing acidic phospholipids or by the combination of lipid cytochrome c and bile acids in an ITC-resolved preparation of the ETC. Respiratory control can be induced by incorporating cytochrome oxidase into vesicles of unfractionated whole mitochondrial lipid. The activity of the ITC is suppressed by such incorporation and this suppression leads to the emergence of respiratory control. The ionophoroproteins of the ITC can be extracted into organic solvents; some 50% of the total protein of cytochrome oxidase is extractable. The release of free ionophore is achieved by tryptic digestion of the ionophoroprotein. Preliminary to this release the ionophoroprotein is degraded to an ionophoropeptide. Electrogenic ionophores, as well as uncoupler, are liberated by such proteolysis. The ITC contains a set of ionophoroproteins imbedded in a matrix of phospholipid. Images PMID:198794

  17. New synthetic AICAR derivatives with enhanced AMPK and ACC activation.

    PubMed

    Scudiero, Olga; Nigro, Ersilia; Monaco, Maria Ludovica; Oliviero, Giorgia; Polito, Rita; Borbone, Nicola; D'Errico, Stefano; Mayol, Luciano; Daniele, Aurora; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2016-10-01

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) has an important role in the regulation of the cellular metabolism showing a broad spectrum of therapeutic activities against different metabolic processes. Due to these proven AICAR properties, we have designed, synthesized and tested the biological activity of two ribose-modified AICAR derivatives, named A3 and A4, in comparison to native AICAR and its 5'-phosphorylated counterpart ZMP. Our findings have shown that A3 and A4 derivatives induce the phosphorylation of 5'-AMP activated protein kinase α (AMPKα), which leads to the inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and down-regulate the activity of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). Cytotoxicity tests demonstrated that A3 and A4 do not significantly reduce cell viability up to 24 h. Taken together our results indicate that A3 and A4 have a comparable activity to AICAR and ZMP at 0.5 and 1 mM suggesting their potential use in future pharmacological strategies relating to metabolic diseases. PMID:26446934

  18. Astronomical Image Compression Techniques Based on ACC and KLT Coder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, J.; Páta, P.; Klíma, M.; Fliegel, K.

    This paper deals with a compression of image data in applications in astronomy. Astronomical images have typical specific properties -- high grayscale bit depth, size, noise occurrence and special processing algorithms. They belong to the class of scientific images. Their processing and compression is quite different from the classical approach of multimedia image processing. The database of images from BOOTES (Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System) has been chosen as a source of the testing signal. BOOTES is a Czech-Spanish robotic telescope for observing AGN (active galactic nuclei) and the optical transient of GRB (gamma ray bursts) searching. This paper discusses an approach based on an analysis of statistical properties of image data. A comparison of two irrelevancy reduction methods is presented from a scientific (astrometric and photometric) point of view. The first method is based on a statistical approach, using the Karhunen-Loève transform (KLT) with uniform quantization in the spectral domain. The second technique is derived from wavelet decomposition with adaptive selection of used prediction coefficients. Finally, the comparison of three redundancy reduction methods is discussed. Multimedia format JPEG2000 and HCOMPRESS, designed especially for astronomical images, are compared with the new Astronomical Context Coder (ACC) coder based on adaptive median regression.

  19. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) in plants: more than just the precursor of ethylene!

    PubMed Central

    Van de Poel, Bram; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Ethylene is a simple two carbon atom molecule with profound effects on plants. There are quite a few review papers covering all aspects of ethylene biology in plants, including its biosynthesis, signaling and physiology. This is merely a logical consequence of the fascinating and pleiotropic nature of this gaseous plant hormone. Its biochemical precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) is also a fairly simple molecule, but perhaps its role in plant biology is seriously underestimated. This triangularly shaped amino acid has many more features than just being the precursor of the lead-role player ethylene. For example, ACC can be conjugated to three different derivatives, but their biological role remains vague. ACC can also be metabolized by bacteria using ACC-deaminase, favoring plant growth and lowering stress susceptibility. ACC is also subjected to a sophisticated transport mechanism to ensure local and long-distance ethylene responses. Last but not least, there are now a few exciting studies where ACC has been reported to function as a signal itself, independently from ethylene. This review puts ACC in the spotlight, not to give it the lead-role, but to create a picture of the stunning co-production of the hormone and its precursor. PMID:25426135

  20. OpenARC: Extensible OpenACC Compiler Framework for Directive-Based Accelerator Programming Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Directive-based, accelerator programming models such as OpenACC have arisen as an alternative solution to program emerging Scalable Heterogeneous Computing (SHC) platforms. However, the increased complexity in the SHC systems incurs several challenges in terms of portability and productivity. This paper presents an open-sourced OpenACC compiler, called OpenARC, which serves as an extensible research framework to address those issues in the directive-based accelerator programming. This paper explains important design strategies and key compiler transformation techniques needed to implement the reference OpenACC compiler. Moreover, this paper demonstrates the efficacy of OpenARC as a research framework for directive-based programming study, by proposing and implementing OpenACC extensions in the OpenARC framework to 1) support hybrid programming of the unified memory and separate memory and 2) exploit architecture-specific features in an abstract manner. Porting thirteen standard OpenACC programs and three extended OpenACC programs to CUDA GPUs shows that OpenARC performs similarly to a commercial OpenACC compiler, while it serves as a high-level research framework.

  1. Expression of alternative oxidase in tomato

    SciTech Connect

    Kakefuda, M.; McIntosh, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is characterized by an increase in ethylene biosynthesis, a burst in respiration (i.e. the climacteric), fruit softening and pigmentation. As whole tomatoes ripened from mature green to red, there was an increase in the alternative oxidase capacity. Aging pink tomato slices for 24 and 48 hrs also showed an increase of alternative oxidase and cytochrome oxidase capacities. Monoclonal antibodies prepared to the Sauromatum guttatum alternative oxidase were used to follow the appearance of alternative oxidase in tomato fruits. There is a corresponding increase in a 36kDa protein with an increase in alternative oxidase capacity. Effects of ethylene and norbornadiene on alternative oxidase capacity were also studied. We are using an alternative oxidase cDNA clone from potato to study the expression of mRNA in ripening and wounded tomatoes to determine if the gene is transcriptionally regulated.

  2. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2016, Chicago.

    PubMed

    Mano, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-25

    The 65(th)Annual Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at McCormick Place, Chicago, from April 2-4, 2016. The ACC Scientific Sessions are one of the 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the USA and one of the major scientific meetings of cardiology in the world. It had an attendance of 18,769 and over 2,000 oral and poster abstracts, including 8 late-breaking clinical trials. This report presents the key presentations and the highlights from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2016 in Chicago. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1308-1313). PMID:27151567

  3. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2015, San Diego.

    PubMed

    Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    The 64th Annual Scientific Sessions and Exposition of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at the San Diego Convention Center from March 14-16, 2015. The ACC Scientific Sessions are 1 of 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the United States, with nearly 20,000 attendees, including 15,000 cardiovascular professionals. There were over 2,100 oral and poster abstracts, and more than 15 late-breaking clinical trials (LBCTs) abstructs. This report presents the highlights and several key presentations, especially the LBCTs, from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2015. I hope this review will help cardiologists update to the latest information. PMID:25959559

  4. Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicides (also referred to as Protox- or PPO-inhibiting herbicides) were commercialized in the 1960s and their market share reached approximately 10% (total herbicide active ingredient output) in the late 1990’s. The wide-spread adoption of glyphosate-resista...

  5. Betting on change: Tenet deal with Vanguard shows it's primed to try ACO effort, new payment model.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-07-01

    Tenet Healthcare Corp.'s acquisition of Vanguard Health Systems is a sign the investor-owned chain is willing to take a chance on alternative payment models such as accountable care organizations. There's no certainty that ACOs will deliver the improvements on quality or cost savings, but Vanguard Vice Chairman Keith Pitts, left, says his system's Pioneer ACO in Detroit has already achieved some cost savings. PMID:23882720

  6. Super-ACO: Results on a positron low emittance ring (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, J. C.; Certain, P.; Dael, A.; Damany, A.; Juan, P.; Labeque, A.; Level, M. P.; Marin, P. C.; Michaut, J.; Monet-Descombey, C.; Nghiem, P.; Sommer, M.; Souchet, R.; Zyngier, H.

    1989-07-01

    The dedicated VUV radiation source Super-ACO is part of the Orsay synchrotron radiation complex. The construction of this 800-MeV positron storage ring was started in 1982, and the first beam was stored on March 18, 1987. Super-ACO is expected to accommodate up to six undulators. The first, a 3.2-m-long optical klystron has already been operated between 500 and 800 MeV. A 1.3-m-long undulator has been recently installed. The experience gained during the three periods of operation is presented. From March to October 1987 measurements were taken of the machine properties in the low emittance regime, as well as performances in single and multibunch operation. In March 1988 the optical klystron was tested together with the commissioning of two beamlines out of a bending magnet. Starting from May 1988 two undulators and six beamlines progressively operated.

  7. Spontaneous emission of the Super-ACO fel optical klystron domino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bazin, C.; Billardon, M.; Velghe, M.

    1989-12-01

    New free electron laser experiments are planned on the Orsay storage ring Super-ACO, which has been commisioned in 1987 at LURE (Laboratoire d'Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnétique). For this purpose, a new insertion device, DOMINO, was set up on Super-ACO in January 1988; it consists of a permanent magnet optical klystron composed of two undulators separated by a dispersive section; the magnetic gaps can be changed independently. Here, the parameters of the optical klystron are specified, and the main steps of the optimization are described. Then, the effect of the insertion device on the stored beam is discussed. The spontaneous emission of the optical klystron has been observed and analysed. Consequently, with the ring parameters measurements, the free electron laser gain versus the current can be evaluated.

  8. Applications of UV-storage ring free electron lasers: the case of super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahon, L.; Renault, E.; Couprie, M. E.; Mérola, F.; Dumas, P.; Marsi, M.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Nutarelli, D.; Roux, R.; Billardon, M.

    1999-06-01

    The potential of UV-storage ring free electron lasers (SRFELs) for the performance of original application experiments is shown with a special emphasis concerning their combination with the naturally synchronized synchrotron radiation (SR). The first two-color FEL+SR experiment, performed in surface science at Super-ACO is reported. The experimental parameters found to be the most important as gathered from the acquired experience, are underlined and discussed. Finally, future prospects for the scientific program of the Super-ACO FEL are presented with two-color experiments combining the FEL with SR undulator-based XUV and VUV beamlines as well as with a SR white light bending magnet beamline emiting in the IR-UV ( 20 μm- 0.25 μm) .

  9. Chromate reduction by rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, R.B.; Cooke, R.T. Jr.

    1986-05-29

    Chromate was reduced during the oxidation of 1-methylnicotinamide chlorine by partially purified rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase. In addition to l-methylnicotinamide, several other electron donor substrates for aldehyde oxidase were able to support the enzymatic chromate reduction. The reduction required the presence of both enzyme and the electron donor substrate. The rate of the chromate reduction was retarded by inhibitors or aldehyde oxidase but was not affected by substrates or inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. These results are consistent with the involvement of aldehyde oxidase in the reduction of chromate by rabbit liver cytosolic enzyme preparations.

  10. Technology Awareness Workshop on Active Combustion Control (ACC) in Propulsion Systems: JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Technology Awareness Seminar on Active Combustion Control (ACC) in Propulsion Systems' was held 12 November 1997 at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), Cleveland, Ohio. The objectives of the seminar were: 1) Define the need and potential of ACC to meet future requirements for gas turbines and ramjets; 2) Explain general principles of ACC and discuss recent successes to suppress combustion instabilities, increase combustion efficiency, reduce emission, and extend flammability limits; 3) Identify R&D barriers/needs for practical implementation of ACC; 4) Explore potential for improving coordination of future R&D activities funded by various government agencies. Over 40 individuals representing senior management from over 20 industry and government organizations participated. This document summarizes the presentations and findings of this seminar.

  11. IMPACC: A Tightly Integrated MPI+OpenACC Framework Exploiting Shared Memory Parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    We propose IMPACC, an MPI+OpenACC framework for heterogeneous accelerator clusters. IMPACC tightly integrates MPI and OpenACC, while exploiting the shared memory parallelism in the target system. IMPACC dynamically adapts the input MPI+OpenACC applications on the target heterogeneous accelerator clusters to fully exploit target system-specific features. IMPACC provides the programmers with the unified virtual address space, automatic NUMA-friendly task-device mapping, efficient integrated communication routines, seamless streamlining of asynchronous executions, and transparent memory sharing. We have implemented IMPACC and evaluated its performance using three heterogeneous accelerator systems, including Titan supercomputer. Results show that IMPACC can achieve easier programming, higher performance, and better scalability than the current MPI+OpenACC model.

  12. OpenACC programs of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, Yukihiro

    2015-12-01

    We present sample OpenACC programs of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm. OpenACC is a directive-based programming model for accelerators without requiring modification to the underlying CPU code itself. In this paper, we deal with the classical spin models as with the sample CUDA programs (Komura and Okabe, 2014), that is, two-dimensional (2D) Ising model, three-dimensional (3D) Ising model, 2D Potts model, 3D Potts model, 2D XY model and 3D XY model. We explain the details of sample OpenACC programs and compare the performance of the present OpenACC implementations with that of the CUDA implementations for the 2D and 3D Ising models and the 2D and 3D XY models.

  13. Acetate utilization is inhibited by benzoate in Alcaligenes eutrophus: evidence for transcriptional control of the expression of acoE coding for acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Ampe, F; Lindley, N D

    1995-01-01

    During batch growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus on benzoate-acetate mixtures, benzoate was the preferred substrate, with acetate consumption being delayed until the rate of benzoate consumption had diminished. This effect was attributed to a transcriptional control of the synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthetase, an enzyme necessary for the entry of acetate into the central metabolic pathways, rather than to a biochemical modulation of the activity of this enzyme. Analysis of a 2.4-kb mRNA transcript hybridizing with the A. eutrophus acoE gene confirmed this repression effect. In a benzoate-limited chemostat culture, derepression was observed, with no increase in the level of expression following an acetate pulse. Benzoate itself was not the signal triggering the repression of acetyl-CoA synthetase. This role was played by catechol, which transiently accumulated in the medium when high specific rates of benzoate consumption were reached. The lack of rapid inactivation of the functional acetyl-CoA synthetase after synthesis has been stopped enables A. eutrophus to retain the capacity to metabolize acetate for prolonged periods while conserving minimal protein expenditure. PMID:7592330

  14. Dynamic filling factor in the Super-ACO free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Couprie, M.-E.; Billardon, M.

    1997-02-01

    Here, the Free Electron Laser evolution before the start-up from the spontaneous radiation of an undulator, is considered. This analysis is carried on through the dynamical behaviour of the Filling-factor, representing the transverse overlap between the light pulse and the electron bunch. In such a framework, the gain optimization before the laser start-up is presented and more generally applied to low-gain storage-ring free electron lasers, such as on Super-ACO.

  15. Tailoring Systems Engineering Processes in a Conceptual Design Environment: A Case Study at NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center's ACO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, John; Maples, C. Dauphne; Fabisinski, Leo, III

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Systems Engineering as it is applied in a conceptual design space systems department at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office (ACO). Engineering work performed in the NASA MFSC's ACO is targeted toward the Exploratory Research and Concepts Development life cycle stages, as defined in the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) System Engineering Handbook. This paper addresses three ACO Systems Engineering tools that correspond to three INCOSE Technical Processes: Stakeholder Requirements Definition, Requirements Analysis, and Integration, as well as one Project Process Risk Management. These processes are used to facilitate, streamline, and manage systems engineering processes tailored for the earliest two life cycle stages, which is the environment in which ACO engineers work. The role of systems engineers and systems engineering as performed in ACO is explored in this paper. The need for tailoring Systems Engineering processes, tools, and products in the ever-changing engineering services ACO provides to its customers is addressed.

  16. Effect of dexamethasone and ACC on bacteria-induced mucin expression in human airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria can stimulate mucin production, but excessive mucus supports bacterial infection and consequently leads to airway obstruction. Therefore, the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and the antioxidant acetyl-cysteine (ACC) on bacteria-induced mucus expression was investigated. Explanted human airway mucosa and mucoepidermoid cells (Calu-3) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PAM3 (a synthetic lipoprotein). DEX or ACC were added to either LPS- or PAM3-stimulated airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells. Mucin mRNA expression (MUC5AC) and total mucus glycoconjugates (mucin protein) were quantified using real-time PCR and periodic acid Schiff staining. LPS and PAM3 significantly increased mucin expression in airway mucosa and Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). DEX alone had no significant effect on mucin expression in airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells (P > 0.05). In contrast, DEX significantly reduced LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression in explanted mucosal tissue and mucin expression in Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). In explanted human airway mucosa ACC alone significantly increased mucin expression (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACC significantly decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression (P < 0.05). In Calu-3 cells ACC alone had no significant effect on mucin expression (P > 0.05). ACC decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression, but this effect was not significant (P > 0.05). These data suggest that DEX can effectively reduce bacteria-induced mucin expression in the airways. ACC alone may increase mucin expression in noninfected mucosa, but it decreased bacteria-induced mucin expression. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether the effect of DEX or ACC is clinically relevant. PMID:17600317

  17. Effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase for growth promotion of peas (Pisum sativum) under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahir, Z A; Munir, A; Asghar, H N; Shaharoona, B; Arshad, M

    2008-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to assess the effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane- 1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase for growth promotion of peas under drought conditions. Ten rhizobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of different crops (peas, wheat, and maize) were screened for their growth promoting ability in peas under axenic condition. Three rhizobacterial isolates, Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5), P. fluorescens (ACC-14), and P. putida biotype A (Q-7), were selected for pot trial on the basis of their source, ACC deaminase activity, root colonization, and growth promoting activity under axenic conditions. Inoculated and uninoculated (control) seeds of pea cultivar 2000 were sown in pots (4 seeds/pot) at different soil moisture levels (25, 50, 75, and 100% of field capacity). Results revealed that decreasing the soil moisture levels from 100 to 25% of field capacity significantly decreased the growth of peas. However, inoculation of peas with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase significantly decreased the "drought stress imposed effects" on growth of peas, although with variable efficacy at different moisture levels. At the lowest soil moisture level (25% field capacity), rhizobacterial isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5) was found to be more promising compared with the other isolates, as it caused maximum increases in fresh weight, dry weight, root length, shoot length, number of leaves per plant, and water use efficiency on fresh and dry weight basis (45, 150, 92, 45, 140, 46, and 147%, respectively) compared with respective uninoculated controls. It is highly likely that rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase might have decreased the drought-stress induced ethylene in inoculated plants, which resulted in better growth of plants even at low moisture levels. Therefore, inoculation with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase could be helpful in eliminating the inhibitory effects of drought stress on the

  18. Ozone stress induces the expression of ACC synthase in potato plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagnhaufer, C.D.; Arteca, R.N.; Pell, E.J. )

    1993-05-01

    When potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Norland) are subjected to oxone stress ethylene is emitted. Increases in ethylene production are often the result of increased expression of the enzyme ACC synthase. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to clone a cDNA encoding an ozone-induced ACC synthase. After treating potato plants with 300 ppb ozone for 4 h, RNA was extracted using a guanidinium isothiocyanate method. Using degenerate oligonucleotides corresponding to several conserved regions of ACC synthase sequences reported from different plant tissues as primers, we were able to reverse transcribe the RNA and amplify a cDNA for ACC synthase. The clone is 1098 bp in length encoding for 386 amino acids comprising [approximately]80% of the protein. Computer analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed that our clone is 50-70% homologous with ACC synthase genes cloned from other plant tissues. Using the cDNA as a probe in northern analysis we found that there is little or no expression in control tissue: however there is a large increase in the expression of the ACC synthase message in response to ozone treatment.

  19. Mechanisms of placebo analgesia: rACC recruitment of a subcortical antinociceptive network.

    PubMed

    Bingel, U; Lorenz, J; Schoell, E; Weiller, C; Büchel, C

    2006-01-01

    Placebo analgesia is one of the most striking examples of the cognitive modulation of pain perception and the underlying mechanisms are finally beginning to be understood. According to pharmacological studies, the endogenous opioid system is essential for placebo analgesia. Recent functional imaging data provides evidence that the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) represents a crucial cortical area for this type of endogenous pain control. We therefore hypothesized that placebo analgesia recruits other brain areas outside the rACC and that interactions of the rACC with these brain areas mediate opioid-dependent endogenous antinociception as part of a top-down mechanism. Nineteen healthy subjects received and rated painful laser stimuli to the dorsum of both hands, one of them treated with a fake analgesic cream (placebo). Painful stimulation was preceded by an auditory cue, indicating the side of the next laser stimulation. BOLD-responses to the painful laser-stimulation during the placebo and no-placebo condition were assessed using event-related fMRI. After having confirmed placebo related activity in the rACC, a connectivity analysis identified placebo dependent contributions of rACC activity with bilateral amygdalae and the periaqueductal gray (PAG). This finding supports the view that placebo analgesia depends on the enhanced functional connectivity of the rACC with subcortical brain structures that are crucial for conditioned learning and descending inhibition of nociception. PMID:16364549

  20. Urate oxidase: primary structure and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X W; Lee, C C; Muzny, D M; Caskey, C T

    1989-01-01

    Urate oxidase, or uricase (EC 1.7.3.3), is a peroxisomal enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of uric acid to allantoin in most mammals. In humans and certain other primates, however, the enzyme has been lost by some unknown mechanism. To identify the molecular basis for this loss, urate oxidase cDNA clones were isolated from pig, mouse, and baboon, and their DNA sequences were determined. The mouse urate oxidase open reading frame encodes a 303-amino acid polypeptide, while the pig and baboon urate oxidase cDNAs encode a 304-amino acid polypeptide due to a single codon deletion/insertion event. The authenticity of this single additional codon was confirmed by sequencing the mouse and pig genomic copies of the gene. The urate oxidase sequence contains a domain similar to the type 2 copper binding motif found in other copper binding proteins, suggesting that the copper ion in urate oxidase is coordinated as a type 2 structure. Based upon a comparison of the NH2-terminal peptide and deduced sequences, we propose that the maturation of pig urate oxidase involves the posttranslational cleavage of a six-amino acid peptide. Two nonsense mutations were found in the human urate oxidase gene, which confirms, at the molecular level, that the urate oxidase gene in humans is nonfunctional. The sequence comparisons favor the hypothesis that the loss of urate oxidase in humans is due to a sudden mutational event rather than a progressive mutational process. Images PMID:2594778

  1. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Hazra, Saptarshi; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress. PMID:26463088

  2. Elevated Monoamine Oxidase-A Distribution Volume in Borderline Personality Disorder Is Associated With Severity Across Mood Symptoms, Suicidality, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Kolla, Nathan J.; Chiuccariello, Lina; Wilson, Alan A.; Houle, Sylvain; Links, Paul; Bagby, R. Michael; McMain, Shelley; Kellow, Charis; Patel, Jalpa; Rekkas, Paraskevi V.; Pasricha, Suvercha; Meyer, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) is a treatment target in neurodegenerative illness and mood disorders that increases oxidative stress and predisposition toward apoptosis. Increased MAO-A levels in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) occur in rodent models of depressive behavior and human studies of depressed moods. Extreme dysphoria is common in borderline personality disorder (BPD), especially when severe, and the molecular underpinnings of severe BPD are largely unknown. We hypothesized that MAO-A levels in PFC and ACC would be highest in severe BPD and would correlate with symptom magnitude. METHODS [11C] Harmine positron emission tomography measured MAO-A total distribution volume (MAO-A VT), an index of MAO-A density, in severe BPD subjects (n = 14), moderate BPD subjects (n = 14), subjects with a major depressive episode (MDE) only (n = 14), and healthy control subjects (n = 14). All subjects were female. RESULTS Severe BPD was associated with greater PFC and ACC MAO-A VT compared with moderate BPD, MDE, and healthy control subjects (multivariate analysis of variance group effect: F6,102 = 5.6, p < .001). In BPD, PFC and ACC MAO-A VT were positively correlated with mood symptoms (PFC: r = .52, p = .005; ACC: r = .53, p = .004) and suicidality (PFC: r = .40, p = .037; ACC: r = .38, p = .046), while hippocampus MAO-A VT was negatively correlated with verbal memory (r = −.44, p = .023). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that elevated MAO-A VT is associated with multiple indicators of BPD severity, including BPD symptomatology, mood symptoms, suicidality, and neurocognitive impairment. PMID:25698585

  3. Incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kosonen, T; Uriu-Hare, J Y; Clegg, M S; Keen, C L; Rucker, R B

    1997-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase is a copper-dependent enzyme involved in extracellular processing of collagens and elastin. Although it is known that copper is essential for the functional activity of the enzyme, there is little information on the incorporation of copper. In the present study we examined the insertion of copper into lysyl oxidase using 67Cu in cell-free transcription/translation assays and in normal skin fibroblast culture systems. When a full-length lysyl oxidase cDNA was used as a template for transcription/translation reactions in vitro, unprocessed prolysyl oxidase appeared to bind copper. To examine further the post-translational incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase, confluent skin fibroblasts were incubated with inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide, 10 microg/ml), glycosylation (tunicamycin, 10 microg/ml), protein secretion (brefeldin A, 10 microg/ml) and prolysyl oxidase processing (procollagen C-peptidase inhibitor, 2.5 microg/ml) together with 300 microCi of carrier-free 67Cu. It was observed that protein synthesis was a prerequisite for copper incorporation, but inhibition of glycosylation by tunicamycin did not affect the secretion of 67Cu as lysyl oxidase. Brefeldin A inhibited the secretion of 67Ci-labelled lysyl oxidase by 46%, but the intracellular incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase was not affected. In addition, the inhibition of the extracellular proteolytic processing of prolysyl oxidase to lysyl oxidase had minimal effects on the secretion of protein-bound 67Cu. Our results indicate that, similar to caeruloplasmin processing [Sato and Gitlin (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 5128-5134], copper is inserted into prolysyl oxidase independently of glycosylation. PMID:9355764

  4. Arsenite Oxidase Also Functions as an Antimonite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Warelow, Thomas P.; Kang, Yoon-Suk; Romano, Christine; Osborne, Thomas H.; Lehr, Corinne R.; Bothner, Brian; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony are toxic metalloids and are considered priority environmental pollutants by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Significant advances have been made in understanding microbe-arsenic interactions and how they influence arsenic redox speciation in the environment. However, even the most basic features of how and why a microorganism detects and reacts to antimony remain poorly understood. Previous work with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain 5A concluded that oxidation of antimonite [Sb(III)] and arsenite [As(III)] required different biochemical pathways. Here, we show with in vivo experiments that a mutation in aioA [encoding the large subunit of As(III) oxidase] reduces the ability to oxidize Sb(III) by approximately one-third relative to the ability of the wild type. Further, in vitro studies with the purified As(III) oxidase from Rhizobium sp. strain NT-26 (AioA shares 94% amino acid sequence identity with AioA of A. tumefaciens) provide direct evidence of Sb(III) oxidation but also show a significantly decreased Vmax compared to that of As(III) oxidation. The aioBA genes encoding As(III) oxidase are induced by As(III) but not by Sb(III), whereas arsR gene expression is induced by both As(III) and Sb(III), suggesting that detection and transcriptional responses for As(III) and Sb(III) differ. While Sb(III) and As(III) are similar with respect to cellular extrusion (ArsB or Acr3) and interaction with ArsR, they differ in the regulatory mechanisms that control the expression of genes encoding the different Ars or Aio activities. In summary, this study documents an enzymatic basis for microbial Sb(III) oxidation, although additional Sb(III) oxidation activity also is apparent in this bacterium. PMID:25576601

  5. OpenACC to FPGA: A Framework for Directive-based High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a directive-based, high-level programming framework for high-performance reconfigurable computing. It takes a standard, portable OpenACC C program as input and generates a hardware configuration file for execution on FPGAs. We implemented this prototype system using our open-source OpenARC compiler; it performs source-to-source translation and optimization of the input OpenACC program into an OpenCL code, which is further compiled into a FPGA program by the backend Altera Offline OpenCL compiler. Internally, the design of OpenARC uses a high- level intermediate representation that separates concerns of program representation from underlying architectures, which facilitates portability of OpenARC. In fact, this design allowed us to create the OpenACC-to-FPGA translation framework with minimal extensions to our existing system. In addition, we show that our proposed FPGA-specific compiler optimizations and novel OpenACC pragma extensions assist the compiler in generating more efficient FPGA hardware configuration files. Our empirical evaluation on an Altera Stratix V FPGA with eight OpenACC benchmarks demonstrate the benefits of our strategy. To demonstrate the portability of OpenARC, we show results for the same benchmarks executing on other heterogeneous platforms, including NVIDIA GPUs, AMD GPUs, and Intel Xeon Phis. This initial evidence helps support the goal of using a directive-based, high-level programming strategy for performance portability across heterogeneous HPC architectures.

  6. Positive coping styles and perigenual ACC volume: two related mechanisms for conferring resilience?

    PubMed

    Holz, Nathalie E; Boecker, Regina; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Buchmann, Arlette F; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Baumeister, Sarah; Plichta, Michael M; Esser, Günter; Schmidt, Martin; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel; Laucht, Manfred

    2016-05-01

    Stress exposure has been linked to increased rates of depression and anxiety in adults, particularly in females, and has been associated with maladaptive changes in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is an important brain structure involved in internalizing disorders. Coping styles are important mediators of the stress reaction by establishing homeostasis, and may thus confer resilience to stress-related psychopathology. Anatomical scans were acquired in 181 healthy participants at age 25 years. Positive coping styles were determined using a self-report questionnaire (German Stress Coping Questionnaire, SVF78) at age 22 years. Adult anxiety and depression symptoms were assessed at ages 22, 23 and 25 years with the Young Adult Self-Report. Information on previous internalizing diagnoses was obtained by diagnostic interview (2-19 years). Positive coping styles were associated with increased ACC volume. ACC volume and positive coping styles predicted anxiety and depression in a sex-dependent manner with increased positive coping and ACC volume being related to lower levels of psychopathology in females, but not in males. These results remained significant when controlled for previous internalizing diagnoses. These findings indicate that positive coping styles and ACC volume are two linked mechanisms, which may serve as protective factors against internalizing disorders. PMID:26743466

  7. Characterization of free-electron laser bunch lengthening on the ACO storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, K. E.; Deacon, D. A. G.; Madey, J. M. J.; Velghe, M. F.; Bazin, C.; Bergher, M.; Petroff, Y.; Billardon, M.; Ortega, J. M.; Elleaume, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the basic low-current, laser-induced bunch-lengthening measurements that have been made on the ACO Storage-Ring Free-Electron Laser (SRFEL). The measurements provide verification of both the functional dependence and absolute magnitude of SRFEL theoretical models. The method of measurement, which is explained, exploits frequency-domain techiques and is capable of accuracies comparable to those of a streak camera. The measurements are in good agreement with existing SRFEL theory and provide an important base for future work.

  8. Applications in biology with the super-ACO FEL and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, Marie-Emmanuelle; Renault, Eric; Garzella, David; Nutarelli, Daniele; de Ninno, G.; Merola, F.; Nahon, Laurent

    2002-04-01

    The first applications of a storage ring Free Electron Laser started in 1993 on the Super-ACO FEL with the study of the anisotropy decay of a coenzyme, NADH, allowing to understand the thermodynamical equilibrium of the different conformational states of the molecule and their hydrodynamical volume in solution. After this first one- color experiment using the time-resolved fluorescence technique, a transient absorption experiment was developed in which the system is excited with the UV FEL and is probed by Visible-UV absorption using synchrotron radiation. First results on the dynamical behavior were obtained for the acrinide molecule.

  9. Storage ring free electrons laser on super-ACO, ELETTRA and SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Brunie, C.; Garzella, D.; Nahon, L.; de Ninno, G.; Nutarelli, D.; Marsi, M.

    2002-06-01

    We present here the state of the art of Storage Ring Free Electron Lasers under operation in Europe. Free electrons Lasers (FELs) are coherent, high power and tuneable radiation sources, obtained by the interaction of an optical wave with a bunch of ultrarelavistic electrons wiggling in a periodical permanent magnetic structure. The developments and the results obtained recently in the UV domain by the FELs operating in Europe on Synchrotron Facilities, Super ACO and ELETTRA, offer new opportunities for using these sources in several scientific domains, and foresee uniques performances for the proposed FEL on the third generation french Synchrotron SOLEIL.

  10. A Comparison of Aerosol Parameterizations in the ACOS XCO2 Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. R.; O'Dell, C.; Crisp, D.; Eldering, A.; Frankenberg, C.; Gunson, M. R.; Natraj, V.; Fu, D.

    2014-12-01

    An effective parameterization of clouds and aerosols in retrieval algorithms is essential for reducing measurement errors and biases in estimates of the column-averaged dry-air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2) from space-based measurements of near-infrared reflected sunlight. The NASA Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space (ACOS) XCO2 retrieval algorithm has evolved significantly over the past several years in an effort to more accurately represent the impact of clouds and aerosols on XCO2. Recent ACOS algorithm versions up to build 3.4 used a water cloud type, ice cloud type, and two generic aerosol types for each sounding. ACOS build 3.5 uses the same cloud parameterization, but was modified to replace the "one-size-fits-all" aerosol scheme. Build 3.5 uses a monthly aerosol climatology based on the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis to choose the two most likely aerosol types for a given measurement location, along with typical optical depths. The five MERRA types available for selection are sulfate, dust, sea salt, organic carbon, and black carbon. The algorithm then uses a pre-assigned Gaussian width and height and fits for the aerosol amount and peak height based on information from the 760 nm O2 A-band and the CO2 bands centered near 1610 and 2060 nm. Here we compare ACOS builds 3.4 and build 3.5 to quantify the impact of the aerosol scheme update. Two types of tests were performed. Simulated Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) retrievals and their associated aerosol and cloud profiles were compared to the "true" aerosol and cloud profiles used to create the simulated environment for a given measurement. The retrieval algorithms were also run on Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) observations and compared to AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) aerosol optical depth measurements in order to quantify the ability of the algorithms to retrieve information about aerosol optical depths. XCO2 errors

  11. Studies on the Mechanism of Aldehyde Oxidase and Xanthine Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Joshua F.

    2009-01-01

    DFT calculations support a concerted mechanism for xanthine oxidase and aldehyde oxidase hydride displacement from the sp2 carbon of 6-substituted 4-quinazolinones. The variations in transition state structure show that C-O bond formation is nearly complete in the transition state and the transition state changes are anti-Hammond with the C-H and C-O bond lengths being more product-like for the faster reactions. The C-O bond length in the transition state is around 90% formed. However, the C-H bond is only about 80% broken. This leads to a very tetrahedral transition state with an O-C-N angle of 109 degrees. Thus, while the mechanism is concerted, the anti-bonding orbital of the C-H bond that is broken is not directly attacked by the nucleophile and instead hydride displacement occurs after almost complete tetrahedral transition state formation. In support of this the C=N bond is lengthened in the transition state indicating that attack on the electrophilic carbon occurs by addition to the C=N bond with negative charge increasing on the nitrogen. Differences in experimental reaction rates are accurately reproduced by these calculations, and tend to support this mechanism. PMID:18998731

  12. Studies on the mechanism of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Joshua F; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2008-12-01

    DFT calculations support a concerted mechanism for xanthine oxidase and aldehyde oxidase hydride displacement from the sp(2) carbon of 6-substituted 4-quinazolinones. The variations in transition state structure show that C-O bond formation is nearly complete in the transition state and the transition state changes are anti-Hammond with the C-H and C-O bond lengths being more product-like for the faster reactions. The C-O bond length in the transition state is around 90% formed. However, the C-H bond is only about 80% broken. This leads to a very tetrahedral transition state with an O-C-N angle of 109 degrees. Thus, while the mechanism is concerted, the antibonding orbital of the C-H bond that is broken is not directly attacked by the nucleophile and instead hydride displacement occurs after almost complete tetrahedral transition state formation. In support of this the C=N bond is lengthened in the transition state indicating that attack on the electrophilic carbon occurs by addition to the C=N bond with negative charge increasing on the nitrogen. Differences in experimental reaction rates are accurately reproduced by these calculations and tend to support this mechanism. PMID:18998731

  13. Precipitation of ACC in liposomes-a model for biomineralization in confined volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, Chantel C; Wu, Ching-Hsuan; Weigand, Steven; Joester, Derk

    2013-01-10

    Biomineralizing organisms frequently precipitate minerals in small phospholipid bilayer-delineated compartments. We have established an in vitro model system to investigate the effect of confinement in attoliter to femtoliter volumes on the precipitation of calcium carbonate. In particular, we analyze the growth and stabilization of liposome-encapsulated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles using a combination of in situ techniques, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM), and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Herein, we discuss ACC nanoparticle growth rate as a function of liposome size, carbon dioxide flux across the liposome membrane, pH, and osmotic pressure. Based on these experiments, we argue that the stabilization of ACC nanoparticles in liposomes is a consequence of a low nucleation rate (high activation barrier) of crystalline polymorphs of calcium carbonate.

  14. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  15. A feasibility study on porting the community land model onto accelerators using OpenACC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Dali; Wu, Wei; Winkler, Frank; Ding, Wei; Hernandez, Oscar R.

    2014-01-01

    As environmental models (such as Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME), Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Model (PFLOTRAN), Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), etc.) became more and more complicated, we are facing enormous challenges regarding to porting those applications onto hybrid computing architecture. OpenACC appears as a very promising technology, therefore, we have conducted a feasibility analysis on porting the Community Land Model (CLM), a terrestrial ecosystem model within the Community Earth System Models (CESM)). Specifically, we used automatic function testing platform to extract a small computing kernel out of CLM, then we apply this kernel into the actually CLM dataflowmore » procedure, and investigate the strategy of data parallelization and the benefit of data movement provided by current implementation of OpenACC. Even it is a non-intensive kernel, on a single 16-core computing node, the performance (based on the actual computation time using one GPU) of OpenACC implementation is 2.3 time faster than that of OpenMP implementation using single OpenMP thread, but it is 2.8 times slower than the performance of OpenMP implementation using 16 threads. On multiple nodes, MPI_OpenACC implementation demonstrated very good scalability on up to 128 GPUs on 128 computing nodes. This study also provides useful information for us to look into the potential benefits of “deep copy” capability and “routine” feature of OpenACC standards. In conclusion, we believe that our experience on the environmental model, CLM, can be beneficial to many other scientific research programs who are interested to porting their large scale scientific code using OpenACC onto high-end computers, empowered by hybrid computing architecture.« less

  16. A feasibility study on porting the community land model onto accelerators using OpenACC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dali; Wu, Wei; Winkler, Frank; Ding, Wei; Hernandez, Oscar R.

    2014-01-01

    As environmental models (such as Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME), Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Model (PFLOTRAN), Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), etc.) became more and more complicated, we are facing enormous challenges regarding to porting those applications onto hybrid computing architecture. OpenACC appears as a very promising technology, therefore, we have conducted a feasibility analysis on porting the Community Land Model (CLM), a terrestrial ecosystem model within the Community Earth System Models (CESM)). Specifically, we used automatic function testing platform to extract a small computing kernel out of CLM, then we apply this kernel into the actually CLM dataflow procedure, and investigate the strategy of data parallelization and the benefit of data movement provided by current implementation of OpenACC. Even it is a non-intensive kernel, on a single 16-core computing node, the performance (based on the actual computation time using one GPU) of OpenACC implementation is 2.3 time faster than that of OpenMP implementation using single OpenMP thread, but it is 2.8 times slower than the performance of OpenMP implementation using 16 threads. On multiple nodes, MPI_OpenACC implementation demonstrated very good scalability on up to 128 GPUs on 128 computing nodes. This study also provides useful information for us to look into the potential benefits of “deep copy” capability and “routine” feature of OpenACC standards. In conclusion, we believe that our experience on the environmental model, CLM, can be beneficial to many other scientific research programs who are interested to porting their large scale scientific code using OpenACC onto high-end computers, empowered by hybrid computing architecture.

  17. Frontal and rostral anterior cingulate (rACC) theta EEG in depression: implications for treatment outcome?

    PubMed

    Arns, Martijn; Etkin, Amit; Hegerl, Ulrich; Williams, Leanne M; DeBattista, Charles; Palmer, Donna M; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Harris, Anthony; deBeuss, Roger; Gordon, Evian

    2015-08-01

    In major depressive disorder (MDD), elevated theta current density in the rostral anterior cingulate (rACC), as estimated by source localization of scalp-recorded electroencenphalogram (EEG), has been associated with response to antidepressant treatments, whereas elevated frontal theta has been linked to non-response. This study used source localization to attempt to integrate these apparently opposite results and test, whether antidepressant response is associated with elevated rACC theta and non-response with elevated frontal theta and whether theta activity is a differential predictor of response to different types of commonly used antidepressants. In the international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D), a multi-center, international, randomized, prospective practical trial, 1008 MDD participants were randomized to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine-XR. The study also recruited 336 healthy controls. Treatment response and remission were established after eight weeks using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17). The resting-state EEG was assessed at baseline with eyes closed and source localization (eLORETA) was employed to extract theta from the rACC and frontal cortex. Patients with MDD had elevated theta in both frontal cortex and rACC, with small effect sizes. High frontal and rACC theta were associated with treatment non-response, but not with non-remission, and this effect was most pronounced in a subgroup with previous treatment failures. Low theta in frontal cortex and rACC are found in responders to antidepressant treatments with a small effect size. Future studies should investigate in more detail the role of previous treatment (failure) in the association between theta and treatment outcome. PMID:25936227

  18. An OpenACC-Based Unified Programming Model for Multi-accelerator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungwon; Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel SPMD programming model of OpenACC. Our model integrates the different granularities of parallelism from vector-level parallelism to node-level parallelism into a single, unified model based on OpenACC. It allows programmers to write programs for multiple accelerators using a uniform programming model whether they are in shared or distributed memory systems. We implement a prototype of our model and evaluate its performance with a GPU-based supercomputer using three benchmark applications.

  19. ACC interleukin-10 gene promoter haplotype as a breast cancer risk factor predictor among Jordanian females

    PubMed Central

    Atoum, Manar Fayiz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a multifactorial cytokine with a complex biological role in breast cancer. The aims of this study were to investigate any association between IL-10 gene promoter polymorphisms, 1082A>/G, −819T>C, and −592A>C, or haplotypes and breast cancer risk among Jordanian women and to evaluate any association between the most common haplotype with clinicopathological features of breast cancer. Patients and methods A total of 202 breast cancer patients and 210 age-matched healthy control subjects were genotyped for −1082A/G, −819T/C, and −592A/C single nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Study patients and control subjects were recruited from Prince Hamzah Hospital, Amman, Jordan (2012–2013). Ethical approval and signed consent forms were signed by all participants. DNA was extracted, and polymerase chain reaction fragments were amplified and restriction digested by MnII, MaeIII, and RsaI. Results This study showed no statistically significant difference between −1082A/G, −819T/C, and −592A/C IL-10 genotypes or alleles among breast cancer patients or controls. Four different haplotypes ATA, ACC, GTA, and ACA within the IL-10 promoter gene were determined among both breast cancer and control groups. The most frequent haplotype was ACC among breast cancer patients and controls (41.6% and 40.7%, respectively). No statistical differences in these haplotypes among breast cancer patients or controls were determined. Analysis of the most common ACC haplotype showed statistical difference in positive estrogen receptor (P=0.022), positive progesterone receptor (P=0.004), cancer grade (P=0.0001), and cancer stage (P=0.009) among the ACC haplotype compared to non-ACC haplotype. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report studying the association of IL-10 haplotype with breast cancer risk events among Jordanian females. The

  20. Optimatization of transient transformation methods to study gene expression in Musa acuminata (AAA group) cultivar Ambon Lumut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayuni, Kinasih; Dwivany, Fenny M.

    2015-09-01

    Banana is classified as a climateric fruit, whose ripening is regulated by ethylene. Ethylene is synthesized from ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) by ACC oxidase enzyme which is encoded by ACO gene. Controling an important gene expression in ethylene biosynthesis pathway has became a target to delay the ripening process. Therefore in the previous study we have designed a MaACO-RNAi construct to control MaACO gene expression. In this research, we study the effectiveness of different transient transformation methods to deliver the construct. Direct injection, with or no vaccum infiltration methods were used to deliver MaACO-RNAi construct. All of the methods succesfully deliver the construct into banana fruits based on RT-PCR result.

  1. Immunological comparison of sulfite oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, V.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Polyclonal antibodies (rabbit), elicited against FPLC-purified chicken and rat liver sulfite oxidase (SO), have been examined for inhibition and binding to purified chicken (C), rat (R), bovine (B), alligator (A) and shark (S) liver enzymes. Anti-CSO IgG cross-reacted with all five enzymes, with varying affinities, in the order CSO=ASO{gt}RSO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-ROS IgG also cross-reacted with all five enzymes in the order RSO{gt}CSO=ASO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited sulfite:cyt. c reductase (S:CR), sulfite:ferricyanide reductase (S:FR) and sulfite:dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (S:DR) activities of CSO to different extents (S:CR{gt}S:FR=S:DR). Similar differential inhibition was found for anti-ROS IgG and RSO S:CR, S:FR and S:DR activities. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited S:CR activities in the order CSO=ASO{much gt}SSO{gt}BSO. RSO was uninhibited. For anti-RSO IgG the inhibition order was RSO{gt}SSO{gt}BSO{gt}ASO. CSO was uninhibited. Anti-CSO and RSO IgGs partially inhibited Chlorella nitrate reductase (NR). Minor cross-reactivity was found for xanthine oxidase. Common antigenic determinants for all five SO's and NR are indicated.

  2. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance to study different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. PMID:26846578

  3. Implementing storage rings free electron lasers for users on synchrotron radiation facilities: from Super-ACO to SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Nutarelli, D.; Billardon, M.

    1998-09-01

    Storage Ring Free Electron Laser (SRFEL) sources can be implemented on synchrotron radiation facilities. Although in the beginning an additional experiment on the accelerator requires specific operating conditions as on Super-ACO at Orsay (France), they can now be conceived as an integral part of the project, providing coherent picosecond tunable light in the UV-VUV range, synchronized with synchrotron radiation for the scientific community, as on the SOLEIL project. Third generation storage ring beam characteristics are discussed in terms of synchrotron radiation and FEL optimization. FEL performances are presented, showing the improvement between the Super-ACO and the SOLEIL cases, including stability issues.

  4. Transient absorption spectroscopy using the super-ACO storage ring FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Eric; Nahon, Laurent; Nutarelli, Daniele; Garzella, David; Merola, F.; Couprie, Marie-Emmanuelle

    2000-04-01

    The Super-ACO storage ring FEL is operating with a high average power in the UV range (300 mW at 350 nm), and recently at wavelengths down to 300 nm. In addition this source exhibits high stability and long lifetime which makes it a unique tool for user applications. The coupling of the FEL with other synchrotron based sources (bending magnet and undulator) opens many unexplored possibilities for various types of two-color time-resolved spectroscopies. Presently, we are developing a two-color experiment where we study the sub-nanosecond time-resolved absorption of different chromophoric compounds. In this type of pump-probe experiments, the intense UV pulse of the Super-ACO FEL is used to prepare a high initial concentration of chromophores in their first singlet electronic excited state. The nearby bending magnet synchrotron radiation provides on the other hand a pulsed, white light continuum ranging from UV to IR, which is naturally synchronized with the FEL pulses and can be used to probe the photochemical subsequent events and the transient species. With a dye molecule (POPOP), we have obtained a two-color effect which demonstrates the feasibility of the experiment in terms of flux. Applications on various chromophores of biological interest are planned.

  5. The super-ACO free electron laser source in the UV and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ninno, G.; Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Nahon, L.; Hirsch, M.; Renault, E.; Couprie, M. E.

    2001-06-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are new sources of tuneable coherent radiation, based on the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a permanent magnetic field. The Super-ACO FEL operates in the UV (down to 300 nm) at 800 MeV, the nominal energy of the electron beam, with a high repetition rate (8 MHz) . It presents a high average extracted power (up to 300 mW), short pulses (15-50 ps FWHM) and small bandwidth (3×10 -2 nm) . Taking advantage of these characteristics, we demonstrated for the first time the possibility of using a storage ring FEL as a coherent source of radiation for scientific applications. In particular, the tuneable Super-ACO FEL source, combined with synchrotron radiation covering the X-ray to infra-red range, is a unique tool for the time-dependent studies of excited states. Such analysis benefits from the natural synchronisation of both sources at a high repetition rate, their mutual tunability, high intensity and coherence. Several experimental set-ups are now under operation.

  6. Characterization of ethylene biosynthesis associated with ripening in banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Shiomi, S; Nakatsuka, A; Kubo, Y; Nakamura, R; Inaba, A

    1999-12-01

    We investigated the characteristics of ethylene biosynthesis associated with ripening in banana (Musa sp. [AAA group, Cavendish subgroup] cv Grand Nain) fruit. MA-ACS1 encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase in banana fruit was the gene related to the ripening process and was inducible by exogenous ethylene. At the onset of the climacteric period in naturally ripened fruit, ethylene production increased greatly, with a sharp peak concomitant with an increase in the accumulation of MA-ACS1 mRNA, and then decreased rapidly. At the onset of ripening, the in vivo ACC oxidase activity was enhanced greatly, followed by an immediate and rapid decrease. Expression of the MA-ACO1 gene encoding banana ACC oxidase was detectable at the preclimacteric stage, increased when ripening commenced, and then remained high throughout the later ripening stage despite of a rapid reduction in the ACC oxidase activity. This discrepancy between enzyme activity and gene expression of ACC oxidase could be, at least in part, due to reduced contents of ascorbate and iron, cofactors for the enzyme, during ripening. Addition of these cofactors to the incubation medium greatly stimulated the in vivo ACC oxidase activity during late ripening stages. The results suggest that ethylene production in banana fruit is regulated by transcription of MA-ACS1 until climacteric rise and by reduction of ACC oxidase activity possibly through limited in situ availability of its cofactors once ripening has commenced, which in turn characterizes the sharp peak of ethylene production. PMID:10594112

  7. Characterization of Ethylene Biosynthesis Associated with Ripening in Banana Fruit1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuejun; Shiomi, Shinjiro; Nakatsuka, Akira; Kubo, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Reinosuke; Inaba, Akitsugu

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the characteristics of ethylene biosynthesis associated with ripening in banana (Musa sp. [AAA group, Cavendish subgroup] cv Grand Nain) fruit. MA-ACS1 encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase in banana fruit was the gene related to the ripening process and was inducible by exogenous ethylene. At the onset of the climacteric period in naturally ripened fruit, ethylene production increased greatly, with a sharp peak concomitant with an increase in the accumulation of MA-ACS1 mRNA, and then decreased rapidly. At the onset of ripening, the in vivo ACC oxidase activity was enhanced greatly, followed by an immediate and rapid decrease. Expression of the MA-ACO1 gene encoding banana ACC oxidase was detectable at the preclimacteric stage, increased when ripening commenced, and then remained high throughout the later ripening stage despite of a rapid reduction in the ACC oxidase activity. This discrepancy between enzyme activity and gene expression of ACC oxidase could be, at least in part, due to reduced contents of ascorbate and iron, cofactors for the enzyme, during ripening. Addition of these cofactors to the incubation medium greatly stimulated the in vivo ACC oxidase activity during late ripening stages. The results suggest that ethylene production in banana fruit is regulated by transcription of MA-ACS1 until climacteric rise and by reduction of ACC oxidase activity possibly through limited in situ availability of its cofactors once ripening has commenced, which in turn characterizes the sharp peak of ethylene production. PMID:10594112

  8. 24 CFR 969.105 - Extension of ACC upon payment of operating subsidy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... are subject to the Consolidated ACC (see 24 CFR part 990). Accordingly, if a PHA, before submitting a..., under 24 CFR part 990, for determination of the total amount of Operating Subsidy payable under the... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PHA-OWNED PROJ- ECTS-CONTINUED OPERATION AS LOW-INCOME HOUSING...

  9. Mentoring in 2 + 2 Programs: LISD/ACC 2 + 2 Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    The role of mentoring in the 2 + 2 Instrumentation and Control (I&C) articulation project between the Leander Independent School District (LISD) and Austin Community College (ACC) is discussed in this document. Following a brief history of the origin and function of the mentor, the paper explains the need for the mentoring system in the I&C…

  10. ACCE Study Tour to ISTE2011 (San Francisco, New York, Washington, Philadelphia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronn, Donna; Romeo, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    In June/July this year a group of 28 educators from across Australia travelled to the US on the 2011 ACCE ISTE Study Tour. The group comprised a very broad section of educators--primary, secondary and tertiary classroom teachers, ICT coordinators, managers, private consultants and regional office managers. The government, catholic and independent…

  11. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC. PMID:26131713

  12. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Casaburi, Ivan; Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC. PMID:26131713

  13. Waste management facility accident analysis (WASTE ACC) system: software for analysis of waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kohout, E.F.; Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Waste Management Facility Accident Analysis (WASTE{underscore}ACC) software, which was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to support the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). WASTE{underscore}ACC is a decision support and database system that is compatible with Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark}. It assesses potential atmospheric releases from accidents at waste management facilities. The software provides the user with an easy-to-use tool to determine the risk-dominant accident sequences for the many possible combinations of process technologies, waste and facility types, and alternative cases described in the WM PEIS. In addition, its structure will allow additional alternative cases and assumptions to be tested as part of the future DOE programmatic decision-making process. The WASTE{underscore}ACC system demonstrates one approach to performing a generic, systemwide evaluation of accident risks at waste management facilities. The advantages of WASTE{underscore}ACC are threefold. First, the software gets waste volume and radiological profile data that were used to perform other WM PEIS-related analyses directly from the WASTE{underscore}MGMT system. Second, the system allows for a consistent analysis across all sites and waste streams, which enables decision makers to understand more fully the trade-offs among various policy options and scenarios. Third, the system is easy to operate; even complex scenario runs are completed within minutes.

  14. A Comparative Analysis of the Integration of Faith and Learning between ACSI and ACCS Accredited Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Daniel Carl

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive quantitative study was to analyze and compare the integration of faith and learning occurring in Christian schools accredited by the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) and classical Christian schools accredited by the Association of Classical and Christian Schools (ACCS). ACSI represents the…

  15. National Computing Studies Summit: Open Learning Approaches to Computing Studies--An ACCE Discussion Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In 2005 the Australian Council for Computers in Education (ACCE) was successful in obtaining a grant from National Centre of Science, Information and Communication Technology and Mathematics Education for Rural and Regional Australia (SiMERR) to undertake the Computing Studies Teachers Network Rural and Regional Focus Project. The project had five…

  16. Usability of AcceSS for Web Site Accessibility. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackett, Stephanie; Parmanto, Bambang

    2006-01-01

    The standard display of web pages is inadequate for users who are visually impaired. Most visually impaired people obtain information from a web page in a linear fashion via a screen reader, whereas sighted users can immediately obtain a bird's-eye view of a web page's organization and content by quickly scanning the page. AcceSS (which stands for…

  17. 24 CFR 969.107 - HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration. 969.107 Section 969.107 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  18. 24 CFR 969.107 - HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... expiration. This part is not intended to preclude or restrict the demolition or disposition of a project pursuant to HUD approval in accordance with 24 CFR part 970. Subject to the requirements of 24 CFR part 970... disposition before ACC expiration. 969.107 Section 969.107 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS...

  19. 24 CFR 969.107 - HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... expiration. This part is not intended to preclude or restrict the demolition or disposition of a project pursuant to HUD approval in accordance with 24 CFR part 970. Subject to the requirements of 24 CFR part 970... disposition before ACC expiration. 969.107 Section 969.107 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS...

  20. 24 CFR 969.107 - HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... expiration. This part is not intended to preclude or restrict the demolition or disposition of a project pursuant to HUD approval in accordance with 24 CFR part 970. Subject to the requirements of 24 CFR part 970... disposition before ACC expiration. 969.107 Section 969.107 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS...

  1. RRM analysis of protoporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sauren, M; Pirogova, E; Cosic, I

    2004-12-01

    Enzymes are crucial in accelerating metabolic reactions in living organisms. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PpOI) is an enzyme that catalyses the production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a protein used in a cancer treatment known as photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study, a structure-function analysis of PpOI was carried out using the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM), a physico-mathematical approach for analysis of proteins interactions. This method is based on the finding that the distribution of delocalised electron energies along the protein plays a crucial role in determining the protein's biological activity. Two digital signal processing (DSP) methods were used: Fourier Transform (FT) and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). Here we have determined the characteristic frequencies and the "hot spot" amino acids, and predicted the location of proteins' active site(s). Several proteins that potentially belong to the PpOI functional group were also analysed to distinguish their viability in this role. PMID:15712584

  2. Crosstalk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Dikalov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in physiological and pathological processes. In recent years, a feed-forward regulation of the ROS sources has been reported. The interaction between main cellular sources of ROS, such as mitochondria and NADPH oxidases, however, remain obscure. This work summarizes the latest findings on the role of crosstalk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases in pathophysiological processes. Mitochondria have the highest levels of antioxidants in the cell and play an important role in the maintenance of cellular redox status, thereby acting as an ROS and redox sink and limiting NADPH oxidase activity. Mitochondria, however, are not only a target for ROS produced by NADPH oxidase but also a significant source of ROS, which under certain condition may stimulate NADPH oxidases. This crosstalk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases, therefore, may represent a feed-forward vicious cycle of ROS production which can be pharmacologically targeted under conditions of oxidative stress. It has been demonstrated that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants break this vicious cycle, inhibiting ROS production by mitochondria and reducing NADPH oxidase activity. This may provide a novel strategy for treatment of many pathological conditions including aging, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension and degenerative neurological disorders in which mitochondrial oxidative stress seems to play a role. It is conceivable that the use of mitochondria-targeted treatments would be effective in these conditions. PMID:21777669

  3. Structural Insights into Sulfite Oxidase Deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Wilson, H.; Graf, T.; Xiang, S.; Jaramillo-Busquets, S.; Rajagopalan, K.; Kisker, C.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is a lethal genetic disease that results from defects either in the genes encoding proteins involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis or in the sulfite oxidase gene itself. Several point mutations in the sulfite oxidase gene have been identified from patients suffering from this disease worldwide. Although detailed biochemical analyses have been carried out on these mutations, no structural data could be obtained because of problems in crystallizing recombinant human and rat sulfite oxidases and the failure to clone the chicken sulfite oxidase gene. We synthesized the gene for chicken sulfite oxidase de novo, working backward from the amino acid sequence of the native chicken liver enzyme by PCR amplification of a series of 72 overlapping primers. The recombinant protein displayed the characteristic absorption spectrum of sulfite oxidase and exhibited steady state and rapid kinetic parameters comparable with those of the tissue-derived enzyme. We solved the crystal structures of the wild type and the sulfite oxidase deficiency-causing R138Q (R160Q in humans) variant of recombinant chicken sulfite oxidase in the resting and sulfate-bound forms. Significant alterations in the substrate-binding pocket were detected in the structure of the mutant, and a comparison between the wild type and mutant protein revealed that the active site residue Arg-450 adopts different conformations in the presence and absence of bound sulfate. The size of the binding pocket is thereby considerably reduced, and its position relative to the cofactor is shifted, causing an increase in the distance of the sulfur atom of the bound sulfate to the molybdenum.

  4. Effect of Cheonggukjang supplementation upon hepatic acyl-CoA synthase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, acyl-CoA oxidase and uncoupling protein 2 mRNA levels in C57BL/6J mice fed with high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Ju-Ryoun; Shin, Dong-Hwa; Kwon, Dae Young

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of Cheonggukjang on mRNA levels of hepatic acyl-CoA synthase (ACS), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I), acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and on serum lipid profiles in C57BL/6J mice. Thirty male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups; normal diet (ND), high fat diet (HD) and high fat diet with 40% Cheonggukjang (HDC). Energy intake was significantly higher in the HDC group than in the ND and HD groups. The HDC group normalized in weight gain, epididymal and back fat (g/100 g) accumulation which are increased by high fat diet. Serum concentrations of triglyceride and total cholesterol in the HDC were significantly lower than those in the HD group. These results were confirmed by hepatic mRNA expression of enzymes and protein (ACS, CPT-1, ACO, UCP2) which is related with lipid metabolism by RT-PCR. Hepatic CPT-I, ACO and UCP2 mRNA expression was increased by Cheonggukjang supplementation. We demonstrated that Cheonggukjang supplement leads to increased mRNA expressions of enzymes and protein involved in fatty acid oxidation in liver, reduced accumulation of body fat and improvement of serum lipids in high fat diet fed mice. PMID:18850232

  5. Optimization of the permanent magnet optical klystron for the SUPER-ACO storage ring free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bazin, C.; Billardon, M.

    1989-06-01

    A permanent magnet optical klystron has been optimized for free electron laser experiments and optical harmonic generation on the new storage ring SUPER-ACO at Orsay. The conditions of the optimization and the different steps of the field characterization measurements of this insertion device are discussed. Its effects on the stored beam and the undulator radiation measurements are described.

  6. 42 CFR 425.608 - Determining first year performance for ACOs beginning April 1 or July 1, 2012.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determining first year performance for ACOs beginning April 1 or July 1, 2012. 425.608 Section 425.608 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... April 1 or July 1, 2012. (a) For April 1 and July 1, 2012 starters, first year (defined as 21 and...

  7. Human lysyl oxidase-like 2.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Finney, Joel; Ronnebaum, Trey; Mure, Minae

    2014-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase like-2 (LOXL2) belongs to the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family, which comprises Cu(2+)- and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ)-dependent amine oxidases. LOXL2 is proposed to function similarly to LOX in the extracellular matrix (ECM) by promoting crosslinking of collagen and elastin. LOXL2 has also been proposed to regulate extracellular and intracellular cell signaling pathways. Dysregulation of LOXL2 has been linked to many diseases, including cancer, pro-oncogenic angiogenesis, fibrosis and heart diseases. In this review, we will give an overview of the current understandings and hypotheses regarding the molecular functions of LOXL2. PMID:25146937

  8. NADPH Oxidases and Angiotensin II Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Abel Martin; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade many studies have demonstrated the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by NADPH oxidases in angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling, as well as a role for ROS in the development of different diseases in which Ang II is a central component. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of activation of NADPH oxidases by Ang II and describe the molecular targets of ROS in Ang II signaling in the vasculature, kidney and brain. We also discuss the effects of genetic manipulation of NADPH oxidase function on the physiology and pathophysiology of the renin angiotensin system. PMID:19059306

  9. Contributions to GOSAT Data Analysis by the NASA Atmospheric Carbon Observations from Space (ACOS) Team (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, D.; Atmospheric Carbon Observations From Space (Acos) Team

    2010-12-01

    Ground-based greenhouse gas measurements provide the accuracy and coverage needed to quantify the abundance and rate of change of CO2 on global scales, but still lack the resolution and spatial extent needed to identify and quantify CO2 fluxes on regional scales. One way to address this need is to collect precise, spatially-resolved, global measurements of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, from space. High precision is essential because CO2 sources and sinks must be inferred from spatial and temporal variations in XCO2, and this quantity typically varies by no more than 1% on regional scales. The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) were the first two satellites designed specifically to measure of XCO2. The OCO and GOSAT science teams formed a close collaboration prior to the launch of these two missions to cross calibrate their instruments and cross validate their CO2 retrievals against common standards. Immediately after the loss of the OCO spacecraft, the GOSAT team invited the OCO science team to join their efforts to analyze GOSAT data. NASA responded by reformulating the OCO science team as the Atmospheric Carbon Observations from Space (ACOS) team to (i) meet the NASA’s obligations to its GOSAT partners, (ii) recover some of the science knowledge expected from OCO, and (iii) validate the OCO retrieval algorithms in a realistic environment. The third goal has taken on greater significance since the U.S. Congress authorized a restart of the OCO project, and the President’s 2010 budget proposal included funding to produce a “carbon copy” of OCO that could be ready for launch by February 2013. To address these objectives, the ACOS team has hosted a series of GOSAT vicarious calibration campaigns over Railroad Valley, NV, retrieved global estimates of XCO2 from GOSAT soundings, and validated these XCO2 retrievals against ground-based remote sensing observations by Fourier

  10. Changes in Health Care Spending and Quality for Medicare Beneficiaries Associated with a Commercial ACO Contract

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, J. Michael; Landon, Bruce E.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Importance In a multi-payer system, new payment incentives implemented by one insurer for an accountable care organization (ACO) may affect spending and quality of care for another insurer’s enrollees served by the ACO. Such “spillover” effects reflect the extent of organizational efforts to reform care delivery and can contribute to the total impact of ACOs. Objective We examined whether the Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) of Massachusetts’ Alternative Quality Contract (AQC), an early commercial ACO initiative associated with reduced spending and improved quality for BCBS enrollees, was also associated with changes in spending and quality for Medicare beneficiaries, who were not covered by the AQC. Design and Exposure Quasi-experimental comparisons from 2007–2010 of Medicare beneficiaries served by 11 provider organizations entering the AQC in 2009 or 2010 (intervention group) vs. beneficiaries served by other providers (control group). Using a difference-in-differences approach, we estimated changes in spending and quality for the intervention group in the first and second years of exposure to the AQC relative to concurrent changes for the control group. Regression and propensity-score methods were used to adjust for differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Participants and Setting Elderly fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries in Massachusetts (1,761,325 person-years). Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was total quarterly medical spending per beneficiary. Secondary outcomes included spending by setting and type of service, 5 process measures of quality, potentially avoidable hospitalizations, and 30-day readmissions. Results Before entering the AQC, total quarterly spending for the intervention group was $150 (95% CI, $25–$274) higher than for the control group and rose at a similar rate. In year 2 of the intervention group’s exposure to the AQC, this difference was reduced to $51 (95% CI, −$109–$210; P=0

  11. Regulation of NADPH oxidases in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo F; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    The only known function of NAD(P)H oxidases is to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Skeletal muscles express three isoforms of NAD(P)H oxidases (Nox1, Nox2, and Nox4) that have been identified as critical modulators of redox homeostasis. Nox2 acts as the main source of skeletal muscle ROS during contractions, participates in insulin signaling and glucose transport, and mediates the myocyte response to osmotic stress. Nox2 and Nox4 contribute to skeletal muscle abnormalities elicited by angiotensin II, muscular dystrophy, heart failure, and high fat diet. Our review addresses the expression and regulation of NAD(P)H oxidases with emphasis on aspects that are relevant to skeletal muscle. We also summarize: i) the most widely used NAD(P)H oxidases activity assays and inhibitors, and ii) studies that have defined Nox enzymes as protagonists of skeletal muscle redox homeostasis in a variety of health and disease conditions. PMID:27184955

  12. Activation of Polyphenol Oxidase of Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase of leaves is located mainly in chloroplasts isolated by differential or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This activity is part of the lamellar structure that is not lost on repeated washing of the plastids. The oxidase activity was stable during prolonged storage of the particles at 4 C or —18 C. The Km (dihydroxyphenylalanine) for spinach leaf polyphenol oxidase was 7 mm by a spectrophotometric assay and 2 mm by the manometric assay. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaf peroxisomal fraction, after isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient, did not coincide with the peroxisomal enzymes but was attributed to proplastids at nearly the same specific density. Plants were grouped by the latency properties for polyphenol oxidase in their isolated chloroplasts. In a group including spinach, Swiss chard, and beet leaves the plastids immediately after preparation from fresh leaves required a small amount of light for maximal rates of oxidation of dihydroxyphenylalanine. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the dark or light increased many fold during aging of these chloroplasts for 1 to 5 days. Soluble polyphenol oxidase of the cytoplasm was not so stimulated. Chloroplasts prepared from stored leaves were also much more active than from fresh leaves. Maximum rates of dihydroxyphenylalanine oxidation were 2 to 6 mmoles × mg−1 chlorophyll × hr−1. Equal stimulation of latent polyphenol oxidase in fresh or aged chloroplasts in this group was obtained by either light, an aged trypsin digest, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, or antimycin A. A variety of other treatments did not activate or had little effect on the oxidase, including various peptides, salts, detergents, and other proteolytic enzymes. Activation of latent polyphenol oxidase in spinach chloroplasts by trypsin amounted to as much as 30-fold. The trypsin activation occurred even after the trypsin had been treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid, 1.0 n HCl or boiled for 30

  13. Towards a multi-node OpenACC Implementation of the ICON Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Will; Zaengl, Guenther; Linardakis, Leonidas

    2014-05-01

    We have ported the Icosahedral Non-hydrostatic (ICON) model's dynamics solver to Graphical Processing Units (GPUs), which is a task within the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE) Second Implementation Phase (2IP) Work Package 8 (WP8). Initial single-node OpenCL and CUDA-Fortran implementations of ICON's non-hydrostatic dynamical core (NHDC) resulted in a maximum factor of two speedup over the latest CPU nodes, e.g., a dual-socket Intel Sandybridge. While this performance was promising, ICON developers viewed neither OpenCL nor CUDA-Fortran as viable programming paradigms for the actual production code, and suggested instead the OpenACC standard as the proper paradigm for the multi-node GPU implementation, which was then undertaken in WP8. We will present the results of the multi-node OpenACC implementation of the ICON NHDC for hybrid multicore platforms. The code baseline is the ICON "DSL" (Domain Specific Language) testbed code, which is essentially a stripped-down version of the ICON model for dynamics simulations only. We will discuss on the OpenACC directives used for the port of the computational as well as the communication code to GPUs, and report the resulting GPU performance on NVIDIA K20x as compared to contemporary CPU architectures. In addition, the future roadmap for an accelerated ICON version will be presented. As a first step, we are now incorporating the OpenACC directives into the ICON development trunk, based on the feedback given to us from the ICON developers at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M) and the German Weather Service (DWD). Moreover, we plan to port the ICON Climate physical parameterizations stemming from the ECHAM model to OpenACC. This step should enable the full ICON on many core platforms which support OpenACC. The resulting model should benefit climate researchers world-wide who plan to transition from ECHAM to ICON in the coming years.

  14. Heme/copper terminal oxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson-Miller, S.; Babcock, G.T.

    1996-11-01

    Spatially well-organized electron-transfer reactions in a series of membrane-bound redox proteins form the basis for energy conservation in both photosynthesis and respiration. The membrane-bound nature of the electron-transfer processes is critical, as the free energy made available in exergonic redox chemistry is used to generate transmembrane proton concentration and electrostatic potential gradients. These gradients are subsequently used to drive ATP formation, which provides the immediate energy source for constructive cellular processes. The terminal heme/copper oxidases in respiratory electron-transfer chains illustrate a number of the thermodynamic and structural principles that have driven the development of respiration. This class of enzyme reduces dioxygen to water, thus clearing the respiratory system of low-energy electrons so that sustained electron transfer and free-energy transduction can occur. By using dioxygen as the oxidizing substrate, free-energy production per electron through the chain is substantial, owing to the high reduction potential of O{sub 2} (0.815 V at pH 7). 122 refs.

  15. C-terminal phosphorylation is essential for regulation of ethylene synthesizing ACC synthase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2013-02-01

    The genetic and molecular biological studies mainly in Arabidopsis and in some other plants have begun to uncover the various components of ripening signaling pathway in plants. Although transcriptional regulation of major ripening genes have been studied in detail, information on role of phosphorylation in regulating the activity and stability of core ripening pathway associated proteins in relation to ethylene biosynthesis during fruit ripening is still limited. Recently we have demonstrated the evidence for post-translational regulation of MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata ACC synthase 1), the rate limiting step enzyme regulating ripening ethylene production in banana, through phosphorylation at the C-terminal Ser 476 and 479 residues by a 41-kDa Ser/Thr protein kinase. (1) Here we have further discussed role of protein phosphorylation in regulation of stability and activity of ACS enzymes and the mechanistic and evolutionary perspective of phosphorylation pattern of Type I ACC synthase enzymes. PMID:23221778

  16. 5th International ACC Symposium: Future and Current Therapeutic Trials in Adrenocortical Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Ana O; Berruti, Alfredo

    2016-02-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and complex disease associated with a high mortality rate. Despite intensive translational and clinical research, prognosis remains poor. Over the past decade, a significant effort has been made to develop multinational, collaborative studies to better understand the pathogenesis and clinical features of this rare disease in attempt to improve the therapeutic strategies and patient outcome. The results of both standard and newer treatments are discussed in this review as well as the recent discovery of pathways involved in ACC pathogenesis that provide the rationale to introduce new molecular target therapies. Finally, remaining issues regarding how to improve available therapies in adjuvant setting are raised and addressed. PMID:26728470

  17. Biochemistry and genetics of ACC deaminase: a weapon to “stress ethylene” produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajnish P.; Shelke, Ganesh M.; Kumar, Anil; Jha, Prabhat N.

    2015-01-01

    1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD), a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme, is widespread in diverse bacterial and fungal species. Owing to ACCD activity, certain plant associated bacteria help plant to grow under biotic and abiotic stresses by decreasing the level of “stress ethylene” which is inhibitory to plant growth. ACCD breaks down ACC, an immediate precursor of ethylene, to ammonia and α-ketobutyrate, which can be further metabolized by bacteria for their growth. ACC deaminase is an inducible enzyme whose synthesis is induced in the presence of its substrate ACC. This enzyme encoded by gene AcdS is under tight regulation and regulated differentially under different environmental conditions. Regulatory elements of gene AcdS are comprised of the regulatory gene encoding LRP protein and other regulatory elements which are activated differentially under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The role of some additional regulatory genes such as AcdB or LysR may also be required for expression of AcdS. Phylogenetic analysis of AcdS has revealed that distribution of this gene among different bacteria might have resulted from vertical gene transfer with occasional horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Application of bacterial AcdS gene has been extended by developing transgenic plants with ACCD gene which showed increased tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Moreover, distribution of ACCD gene or its homolog's in a wide range of species belonging to all three domains indicate an alternative role of ACCD in the physiology of an organism. Therefore, this review is an attempt to explore current knowledge of bacterial ACC deaminase mediated physiological effects in plants, mode of enzyme action, genetics, distribution among different species, ecological role of ACCD and, future research avenues to develop transgenic plants expressing foreign AcdS gene to cope with biotic and abiotic stressors. Systemic identification of regulatory circuits

  18. Adolescent neighborhood quality predicts adult dACC response to social exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Beckes, Lane; Chango, Joanna; Allen, Joseph P.; Coan, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies using the social-exclusion paradigm Cyberball indicate increased dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and right insula activity as a function of exclusion. However, comparatively less work has been done on how social status factors may moderate this finding. This study used the Cyberball paradigm with 85 (45 females) socio-economically diverse participants from a larger longitudinal sample. We tested whether neighborhood quality during adolescence would predict subsequent neural responding to social exclusion in young adulthood. Given previous behavioral studies indicating greater social vigilance and negative evaluation as a function of lower status, we expected that lower adolescent neighborhood quality would predict greater dACC activity during exclusion at young adulthood. Our findings indicate that young adults who lived in low-quality neighborhoods in adolescence showed greater dACC activity to social exclusion than those who lived in higher quality neighborhoods. Lower neighborhood quality also predicted greater prefrontal activation in the superior frontal gyrus, dorsal medial prefrontal cortex and the middle frontal gyrus, possibly indicating greater regulatory effort. Finally, this effect was not driven by subsequent ratings of distress during exclusion. In sum, adolescent neighborhood quality appears to potentiate neural responses to social exclusion in young adulthood, effects that are independent of felt distress. PMID:25349459

  19. Estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) a promising target for the therapy of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC).

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Ivan; Avena, Paola; De Luca, Arianna; Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Malivindi, Rocco; Rago, Vittoria; Fiorillo, Marco; Domanico, Francesco; Campana, Carmela; Cappello, Anna Rita; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-09-22

    The pathogenesis of the adrenocortical cancer (ACC) involves integration of molecular signals and the interplay of different downstream pathways (i.e. IGFII/IGF1R, β-catenin, Wnt, ESR1). This tumor is characterized by limited therapeutic options and unsuccessful treatments. A useful strategy to develop an effective therapy for ACC is to identify a common downstream target of these multiple pathways. A good candidate could be the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) because of its ability to regulate energy metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and signalings related to cancer progression. In this study we tested the effect of ERRα inverse agonist, XCT790, on the proliferation of H295R adrenocortical cancer cell line. Results from in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that XCT790 reduced H295R cell growth. The inhibitory effect was associated with impaired cell cycle progression which was not followed by any apoptotic event. Instead, incomplete autophagy and cell death by a necrotic processes, as a consequence of the cell energy failure, induced by pharmacological reduction of ERRα was evidenced. Our results indicate that therapeutic strategies targeting key factors such as ERRα that control the activity and signaling of bioenergetics processes in high-energy demanding tumors could represent an innovative/alternative therapy for the treatment of ACC. PMID:26312764

  20. Estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) a promising target for the therapy of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC)

    PubMed Central

    Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Malivindi, Rocco; Rago, Vittoria; Fiorillo, Marco; Domanico, Francesco; Campana, Carmela; Cappello, Anna Rita; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the adrenocortical cancer (ACC) involves integration of molecular signals and the interplay of different downstream pathways (i.e. IGFII/IGF1R, β-catenin, Wnt, ESR1). This tumor is characterized by limited therapeutic options and unsuccessful treatments. A useful strategy to develop an effective therapy for ACC is to identify a common downstream target of these multiple pathways. A good candidate could be the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) because of its ability to regulate energy metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and signalings related to cancer progression. In this study we tested the effect of ERRα inverse agonist, XCT790, on the proliferation of H295R adrenocortical cancer cell line. Results from in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that XCT790 reduced H295R cell growth. The inhibitory effect was associated with impaired cell cycle progression which was not followed by any apoptotic event. Instead, incomplete autophagy and cell death by a necrotic processes, as a consequence of the cell energy failure, induced by pharmacological reduction of ERRα was evidenced. Our results indicate that therapeutic strategies targeting key factors such as ERRα that control the activity and signaling of bioenergetics processes in high-energy demanding tumors could represent an innovative/alternative therapy for the treatment of ACC. PMID:26312764

  1. WASTE-ACC: A computer model for analysis of waste management accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Nabelssi, B.K.; Folga, S.; Kohout, E.J.; Mueller, C.J.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1996-12-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory has developed WASTE-ACC, a computational framework and integrated PC-based database system, to assess atmospheric releases from facility accidents. WASTE-ACC facilitates the many calculations for the accident analyses necessitated by the numerous combinations of waste types, waste management process technologies, facility locations, and site consolidation strategies in the waste management alternatives across the DOE complex. WASTE-ACC is a comprehensive tool that can effectively test future DOE waste management alternatives and assumptions. The computational framework can access several relational databases to calculate atmospheric releases. The databases contain throughput volumes, waste profiles, treatment process parameters, and accident data such as frequencies of initiators, conditional probabilities of subsequent events, and source term release parameters of the various waste forms under accident stresses. This report describes the computational framework and supporting databases used to conduct accident analyses and to develop source terms to assess potential health impacts that may affect on-site workers and off-site members of the public under various DOE waste management alternatives.

  2. The ACC strategy in biomineralization: the case of earthworm's amorphous spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones, Maria J. I.; Alvarez-Otero, Rosa; Méndez, Jesús; Gago Duport, Luis

    2010-05-01

    The occurrence of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), an hydrated and highly soluble form of solid CaCO3, seems to be a common feature in all carbonate forming organisms such as mollusks, corals, echinoderms and crustaceans. The ubiquity of ACC in these Ca-carbonate biomineralizing systems, as a precursor of further crystalline phases, has recently open the interesting question about if the formation of an amorphous phase is a necessary step in the calcification process of all organisms and consequently, whether it would be possible to define the "amorphous precursor estategy" as a general mechanism in biomineralization. Neverthelees, although ACC appears to be widespread in these organisms very little is known about its particular role in the biomineralization scheme of the different phyla. The formation of CaCO3 spherulites in the calciferous glands of earthworms is a particular case of calcareous biomineralization involving the presence of ACC as a transient precursor phase [2]. Interestingly, the formation of crystalline carbonates via ACC in these organisms is not connected with skeleton building so it must play another functional role. In addition, the transient transformation stages can be followed by in situ spectrometric techniques and therefore, earthworms provide and adequate model to analyse the mutual interactions between ACC-solvent-and crystalline phases. In this study, we have analysed the morphological and structural transformations from the initial ACC spherulites until the formation of the crystalline phases: vaterite (and/or aragonite) and finally calcite, is accomplished. The characterization of ACC was done by performing in situ FT-IR, together with and HREM and Debye scherrer -XRD. The structural results were interpreted in the light of the histological study of the gland. The geometry of the secretory epithelium of the calciferous gland, as evidenced by TEM [2], shows the presence of irregulary shaped cells with their apical surface

  3. Trait impulsivity is related to ventral ACC and amygdala activity during primary reward anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Kara L.; Avery, Jason A.; Barcalow, Joel C.; Moseman, Scott E.; Bodurka, Jerzy; Bellgowan, Patrick S. F.

    2015-01-01

    Trait impulsivity is characterized by behavioral disinhibition and rash decision-making that contribute to many maladaptive behaviors. Previous research demonstrates that trait impulsivity is related to the activity of brain regions underlying reward sensitivity and emotion regulation, but little is known about this relationship in the context of immediately available primary reward. This is unfortunate, as impulsivity in these contexts can lead to unhealthy behaviors, including poor food choices, dangerous drug use and risky sexual practices. In addition, little is known about the relationship between integration of reward and affective neurocircuitry, as measured by resting-state functional connectivity, and trait impulsivity in everyday life, as measured with a commonly used personality inventory. We therefore asked healthy adults to undergo a functional magnetic resonance imaging task in which they saw cues indicating the imminent oral administration of rewarding taste, as well as a resting-state scan. Trait impulsivity was associated with increased activation during anticipation of primary reward in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and amygdala. Additionally, resting-state functional connectivity between the ACC and the right amygdala was negatively correlated with trait impulsivity. These findings demonstrate that trait impulsivity is related not only to ACC-amygdala activation but also to how tightly coupled these regions are to one another. PMID:24526181

  4. Trait impulsivity is related to ventral ACC and amygdala activity during primary reward anticipation.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Kara L; Avery, Jason A; Barcalow, Joel C; Moseman, Scott E; Bodurka, Jerzy; Bellgowan, Patrick S F; Simmons, W Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Trait impulsivity is characterized by behavioral disinhibition and rash decision-making that contribute to many maladaptive behaviors. Previous research demonstrates that trait impulsivity is related to the activity of brain regions underlying reward sensitivity and emotion regulation, but little is known about this relationship in the context of immediately available primary reward. This is unfortunate, as impulsivity in these contexts can lead to unhealthy behaviors, including poor food choices, dangerous drug use and risky sexual practices. In addition, little is known about the relationship between integration of reward and affective neurocircuitry, as measured by resting-state functional connectivity, and trait impulsivity in everyday life, as measured with a commonly used personality inventory. We therefore asked healthy adults to undergo a functional magnetic resonance imaging task in which they saw cues indicating the imminent oral administration of rewarding taste, as well as a resting-state scan. Trait impulsivity was associated with increased activation during anticipation of primary reward in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and amygdala. Additionally, resting-state functional connectivity between the ACC and the right amygdala was negatively correlated with trait impulsivity. These findings demonstrate that trait impulsivity is related not only to ACC-amygdala activation but also to how tightly coupled these regions are to one another. PMID:24526181

  5. A type III ACC synthase, ACS7, is involved in root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ing-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene is an important plant hormone that regulates developmental processes in plants. The ethylene biosynthesis pathway is a highly regulated process at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. The transcriptional regulation of these ethylene biosynthesis genes is well known. However, post-translational modifications of the key ethylene biosynthesis enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase (ACS) are little understood. In vitro kinase assays were conducted on the type III ACS, AtACS7, fusion protein and peptides to determine whether the AtACS7 protein can be phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). AtACS7 was phosphorylated at Ser216, Thr296, and Ser299 by AtCDPK16 in vitro. To investigate further the function of the ACS7 gene in Arabidopsis, an acs7-1 loss-of-function mutant was isolated. The acs7-1 mutant exhibited less sensitivity to the inhibition of root gravitropism by treatment with the calcium chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA). Seedlings were treated with gradient concentrations of ACC. The results showed that a certain concentration of ethylene enhanced the gravity response. Moreover, the acs7-1 mutant was less sensitive to inhibition of the gravity response by treatment with the auxin polar transport inhibitor 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, but exogenous ACC application recovered root gravitropism. Altogether, the results indicate that AtACS7 is involved in root gravitropism in a calcium-dependent manner in Arabidopsis. PMID:23943848

  6. Effect of nitric oxide on ethylene synthesis and softening of banana fruit slice during ripening.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guiping; Yang, En; Lu, Wangjin; Jia, Yongxia; Jiang, Yueming; Duan, Xuewu

    2009-07-01

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on ethylene synthesis and softening of ripening-initiated banana slice were investigated. Fruit firmness, color, and contents of starch and acid-soluble pectin (ASP) were measured. In addition, ethylene production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) content, expression and activities of ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase (ACO), and activities of cell-wall-modifying enzymes, polygalacturonase (PG), pectin methylesterase (PME), and endo-beta-1,4-glucanase, were analyzed. Application of NO reduced ethylene production, inhibited degreening of the peel and delayed softening of the pulp. The decrease of ethylene production was associated with the reduction in the activity of ACO and the expression of the MA-ACO1 gene. Moreover, the NO-treated fruit showed a lower expression of the MA-ACS1 gene but higher ACS activity and ACC content. In addition, NO treatment decreased the activities of PG, PME, and endo-beta-1,4-glucanase and maintained higher contents of ASP and starch, which may account for the delay of softening. We proposed that the inhibition of ACO activity and transcription of gene MA-ACO1 by NO resulted in decreased ethylene synthesis and the delay of ripening of banana slice. PMID:19534461

  7. Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Phang, James M

    2012-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase, PRODH/POX), the first enzyme in the proline degradative pathway, plays a special role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Proline metabolism catalyzed by PRODH/POX is closely linked with the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and urea cycle. The proline cycle formed by the interconversion of proline and Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) between mitochondria and cytosol interlocks with pentose phosphate pathway. Importantly, by catalyzing proline to P5C, PRODH/POX donates electrons into the electron transport chain to generate ROS or ATP. In earlier studies, we found that PRODH/POX functions as a tumor suppressor to initiate apoptosis, inhibit tumor growth, and block the cell cycle, all by ROS signaling. It also suppresses hypoxia inducible factor signaling by increasing α-ketoglutarate. During tumor progression, PRODH/POX is under the control of various tumor-associated factors, such as tumor suppressor p53, inflammatory factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), onco-miRNA miR-23b*, and oncogenic transcription factor c-MYC. Recent studies revealed the two-sided features of PRODH/POX-mediated regulation. Under metabolic stress such as oxygen and glucose deprivation, PRODH/POX can be induced to serve as a tumor survival factor through ATP production or ROS-induced autophagy. The paradoxical roles of PRODH/POX can be understood considering the temporal and spatial context of the tumor. Further studies will provide additional insights into this protein and on its metabolic effects in tumors, which may lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22886911

  8. On the representation of the ACC circulation around the Kerguelen Plateau in an OGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquet, F.; Park, Y. H.; Madek, G.

    2009-04-01

    Due to its great meridional extent and relatively shallow depths, the Kerguelen Plateau constitutes a major barrier to the eastward flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. While most of the ACC transport is deflected north of the Kerguelen Islands, the remainder (~50 x 106 m3 s-1) must pass south of the islands, most probably through the Fawn Trough (56°S, 77°E, 2650m) and Princess Elizabeth Trough (64°S, 82°E, 3650 m). Yet, lack of observations in this area still hampers our knowledge on the exact partitioning and its temporal variability of the circumpolar flow through the abovementioned three passages. We have developed a regional configuration of the Southern Indian Ocean using the eddy-permitting (1/4°) global ocean/sea-ice model NEMO. A 20-year long simulation has been performed, using the open boundary conditions derived from the KAB001 interannual experiment. The KAB001 experiment is characterized by a slight 3D TS restoring in polar areas, which allows the continuous maintaining of adequate bottom properties around Antarctica, and thus yielding a realistic and stable ACC transport (~150 x 106 m3 s-1 at Drake Passage). The main ACC veins detected from satellite and in situ observations are consistently well represented in our regional model. In particular, the presence of a strong topographically controlled northeastward current through the Fawn Trough channelling most of the Enderby Basin water has been confirmed. The lagrangian diagnostic tool ARIANE has been used on the model velocity field to show the ACC circulation splitting into several branches. It also allows a precise diagnostic of the temporal variability of these branches as well as the transformation of water masses along their trajectories. We verified that the area just downstream of the Fawn Trough in the Australian-Antarctic Basin is an outstanding region of enhanced water mass transformation where waters of different origins collide and

  9. The composition of milk xanthine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Hart, L. I.; McGartoll, Mary A.; Chapman, Helen R.; Bray, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    The composition of milk xanthine oxidase has been reinvestigated. When the enzyme is prepared by methods that include a selective denaturation step in the presence of sodium salicylate the product is obtained very conveniently and in high yield, and is homogeneous in the ultracentrifuge and in recycling gel filtration. It has specific activity higher than previously reported preparations of the enzyme and its composition approximates closely to 2mol of FAD, 2g-atoms of Mo and 8g-atoms of Fe/mol of protein (molecular weight about 275000). In contrast, when purely conventional preparative methods are used the product is also homogeneous by the above criteria but has a lower specific activity and is generally comparable to the crystallized enzyme described previously. Such samples also contain 2mol of FAD/mol of protein but they have lower contents of Mo (e.g. 1.2g-atom/mol). Amino acid compositions for the two types of preparation are indistinguishable. These results confirm the previous conclusion that conventional methods give mixtures of xanthine oxidase with an inactive modification of the enzyme now termed `de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase', and show that salicylate can selectively denature the latter. The origin of de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase was investigated. FAD/Mo ratios show that it is present not only in enzyme purified by conventional methods but also in `milk microsomes' (Bailie & Morton, 1958) and in enzyme samples prepared without proteolytic digestion. We conclude that it is secreted by cows together with the active enzyme and we discuss its occurrence in the preparations of other workers. Studies on the milks of individual cows show that nutritional rather than genetic factors determine the relative amounts of xanthine oxidase and de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase. A second inactive modification of the enzyme, now termed `inactivated xanthine oxidase', causes variability in activity relative to E450 or to Mo content and formation of it decreases these ratios

  10. NADPH oxidases: new actors in thyroid cancer?

    PubMed

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a crucial substrate for thyroid peroxidase, a key enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. However, as a potent oxidant, H2O2 might also be responsible for the high level of oxidative DNA damage observed in thyroid tissues, such as DNA base lesions and strand breakages, which promote chromosomal instability and contribute to the development of tumours. Although the role of H2O2 in thyroid hormone synthesis is well established, its precise mechanisms of action in pathological processes are still under investigation. The NADPH oxidase/dual oxidase family are the only oxidoreductases whose primary function is to produce reactive oxygen species. As such, the function and expression of these enzymes are tightly regulated. Thyrocytes express dual oxidase 2, which produces most of the H2O2 for thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyrocytes also express dual oxidase 1 and NADPH oxidase 4, but the roles of these enzymes are still unknown. Here, we review the structure, expression, localization and function of these enzymes. We focus on their potential role in thyroid cancer, which is characterized by increased expression of these enzymes. PMID:27174022

  11. Assessing the effects of heavy metals in ACC deaminase and IAA production on plant growth-promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Mendoza-Hernández José; Stefani, Perea-Vélez Yazmin; Janette, Arriola-Morales; Melani, Martínez-Simón Sara; Gabriela, Pérez-Osorio

    2016-01-01

    This study poses a methodology in order to simultaneously quantify ACC deaminase and IAA levels in the same culture medium. Ten bacterial strains isolated from plant rhizosphere naturally settled in mining residues were chosen. These bacterial strains were characterized as PGPB, and all of them showed at least three characteristics (indole-3 acetic acid and siderophore production, ACC deaminase enzyme activity, and inorganic phosphate solubilization). Taxonomic identification showed that the strains belong to Enterobacter, Serratia, Klebsiella, and Escherichia genera. Similarly, both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis in the presence of Cu, As, Pb, Ni, Cd, and Mn were measured. The results showed that both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis were higher with the Pb, As, and Cu treatments than with the Escherichia N16, Enterobacter K131, Enterobacter N9, and Serratia K120 control treatments. On the other hand, Ni, Cd, and Mn negatively affected both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA production on every bacterium except on the Klebsiella Mc173 strain. Serratia K120 bacterium got a positive correlation between ACC deaminase and IAA in the presence of every heavy metal, and it also promoted Helianthus annuus plant growth, showing a potential use in phytoremediation systems. PMID:27296962

  12. Molecular cloning, expression, and stress response of the estrogen-related receptor gene (AccERR) from Apis cerana cerana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weixing; Zhu, Ming; Zhang, Ge; Liu, Feng; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-04-01

    Estrogen-related receptor (ERR), which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been implicated in diverse physiological processes involving the estrogen signaling pathway. However, little information is available on ERR in Apis cerana cerana. In this report, we isolated the ERR gene and investigated its involvement in antioxidant defense. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed that the highest mRNA expression occurred in eggs during different developmental stages. The expression levels of AccERR were highest in the muscle, followed by the rectum. The predicted transcription factor binding sites in the promoter of AccERR suggested that AccERR potentially functions in early development and in environmental stress responses. The expression of AccERR was induced by cold (4 °C), heat (42 °C), ultraviolet light (UV), HgCl2, and various types of pesticides (phoxim, deltamethrin, triadimefon, and cyhalothrin). Western blot was used to measure the expression levels of AccERR protein. These data suggested that AccERR might play a vital role in abiotic stress responses.

  13. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    SciTech Connect

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B.; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.

    2009-05-01

    The use of biophysical assays permitted the identification of a specific human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain mutant that binds inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This mutant led to determination of the human ACC2 CT domain–CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed differences in the inhibitor conformation from the yeast protein complex that are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain–CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined α-helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

  14. Molecular cloning, expression and antioxidant characterisation of a typical thioredoxin gene (AccTrx2) in Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pengbo; Hao, Lili; Wang, Fang; Chen, Xiaobo; Yan, Yan; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2013-09-15

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are a family of small, highly conserved and ubiquitous proteins that are involved in protecting organisms against toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, a typical thioredoxin 2 gene was isolated from Apis cerana cerana, AccTrx2. The full-length cDNA sequence of AccTrx2 was composed of 407 bp containing a 318 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a predicted protein of 105 amino acids, 11.974 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.45. Expression profile of AccTrx2 as determined by a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis was higher in brain than in other tissues, with its highest transcript occurring on the 15day post-emergence adult and upregulated by such abiotic stresses as 4 °C, 16 °C, 25 °C, H2O2, cyhalothrin, acaricide, paraquat, phoxime and mercury (HgCl2) treatments. However, AccTrx2 was slightly repressed when exposed to 42 °C treatment. Characterisation of the recombinant protein showed that the purified AccTrx2 had insulin disulfide reductase activity and could protect DNA from ROS damage. These results indicate that AccTrx2 functions as an antioxidant that plays an important role in response to oxidative stress. PMID:23747404

  15. Molecular cloning, expression, and stress response of the estrogen-related receptor gene (AccERR) from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weixing; Zhu, Ming; Zhang, Ge; Liu, Feng; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-04-01

    Estrogen-related receptor (ERR), which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been implicated in diverse physiological processes involving the estrogen signaling pathway. However, little information is available on ERR in Apis cerana cerana. In this report, we isolated the ERR gene and investigated its involvement in antioxidant defense. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed that the highest mRNA expression occurred in eggs during different developmental stages. The expression levels of AccERR were highest in the muscle, followed by the rectum. The predicted transcription factor binding sites in the promoter of AccERR suggested that AccERR potentially functions in early development and in environmental stress responses. The expression of AccERR was induced by cold (4 °C), heat (42 °C), ultraviolet light (UV), HgCl2, and various types of pesticides (phoxim, deltamethrin, triadimefon, and cyhalothrin). Western blot was used to measure the expression levels of AccERR protein. These data suggested that AccERR might play a vital role in abiotic stress responses. PMID:26922780

  16. No ROI in ACO. Risk, expense of Medicare program has most for-profit groups shying away.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2012-04-23

    For-profit healthcare companies aren't beating down the door to get in on Medicare ACOs. Several of the big chains say there is too much uncertainty about the experiment, and they're waiting to see how the program evolves. One company on the sideline is Capella Healthcare. Chairman and CEO Daniel Slipkovich, left, says there is a potential for high patient dropout rates and risks in population management. PMID:22571000

  17. Eight reasons payer interoperability and data sharing are essential in ACOs. Interoperability standards could be a prerequisite to measuring care.

    PubMed

    Mookencherry, Shefali

    2012-01-01

    It makes strategic and business sense for payers and providers to collaborate on how to take substantial cost out of the healthcare delivery system. Acting independently, neither medical groups, hospitals nor health plans have the optimal mix of resources and incentives to significantly reduce costs. Payers have core assets such as marketing, claims data, claims processing, reimbursement systems and capital. It would be cost prohibitive for all but the largest providers to develop these capabilities in order to compete directly with insurers. Likewise, medical groups and hospitals are positioned to foster financial interdependence among providers and coordinate the continuum of patient illnesses and care settings. Payers and providers should commit to reasonable clinical and cost goals, and share resources to minimize expenses and financial risks. It is in the interest of payers to work closely with providers on risk-management strategies because insurers need synergy with ACOs to remain cost competitive. It is in the interest of ACOs to work collaboratively with payers early on to develop reasonable and effective performance benchmarks. Hence, it is essential to have payer interoperability and data sharing integrated in an ACO model. PMID:22352172

  18. CYTOCHROME OXIDASE IN NORMAL AND REGENERATING NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Howard A.; Mellors, Robert C.

    1945-01-01

    Manometric determinations of cytochrome oxidase activity were carried out on grey matter from the thalamus and anterior horn of cats and monkeys under various experimental conditions. The thalamus of the cat was studied following the degeneration of virtually all the thalamic neurons secondary to decortication. In comparing the deneuronated thalamus with the normal one, it was found that approximately 34 per cent of the cytochrome oxidase activity was contributed by the neurons and the balance by neuroglia and mesodermal tissues which on the operated side remained comparable to that of the normal side. Total activity of the normal thalamus averaged 5.52 units per mg. of dry weight where I unit is defined as the amount of cytochrome oxidase required to produce a net oxygen consumption of 10 c.mm. per hour under the specified conditions of the experiment. The grey matter of the anterior horns of the spinal cord was isolated by a special technique and its cytochrome oxidase activity was compared with anterior horns in which motoneurons had been stimulated to regenerative activity by section of peripheral nerves. Each animal was studied in relation to an anterior horn which was normal and one in which only the functional state of the motoneurons had been changed. Average normal levels of 2.23 units were found for cat anterior horn and 0.69 units for the monkey. Reductions of cytochrome oxidase activity in the range of 22 to 23 per cent were observed for both cat and monkey following nerve section. In the latter the time sequence was carefully studied in relation to the cytological cycle known as chromatolysis and a virus refractory state previously described by us. It was found that maximal reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity coincided with maximal refractoriness of the cells to poliomyelitis virus (30 to 70 days following nerve section). Neither of these states could be correlated in time with maximal chromatolysis (10 to 15 days). PMID:19871471

  19. NASA GES DISC support of CO2 Data from OCO-2, ACOS, and AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jennifer C; Vollmer, Bruce E.; Savtchenko, Andrey K.; Hearty, Thomas J; Albayrak, Rustem Arif; Deshong, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Centers (GES DISC) is the data center assigned to archive and distribute current AIRS, ACOS data and data from the upcoming OCO-2 mission. The GES DISC archives and supports data containing information on CO2 as well as other atmospheric composition, atmospheric dynamics, modeling and precipitation. Along with the data stewardship, an important mission of GES DISC is to facilitate access to and enhance the usability of data as well as to broaden the user base. GES DISC strives to promote the awareness of science content and novelty of the data by working with Science Team members and releasing news articles as appropriate. Analysis of events that are of interest to the general public, and that help in understanding the goals of NASA Earth Observing missions, have been among most popular practices.Users have unrestricted access to a user-friendly search interface, Mirador, that allows temporal, spatial, keyword and event searches, as well as an ontology-driven drill down. Variable subsetting, format conversion, quality screening, and quick browse, are among the services available in Mirador. The majority of the GES DISC data are also accessible through OPeNDAP (Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol) and WMS (Web Map Service). These services add more options for specialized subsetting, format conversion, image viewing and contributing to data interoperability.

  20. ACC2 gene polymorphisms, metabolic syndrome, and gene-nutrient interactions with dietary fat

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Catherine M.; Goumidi, Louisa; Bertrais, Sandrine; Field, Martyn R.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Ordovas, Jose M.; McMonagle, Jolene; Defoort, Catherine; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Drevon, Christian A.; Blaak, Ellen E.; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Riserus, Ulf; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; McManus, Ross; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Planells, Richard; Roche, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase β (ACC2) plays a key role in fatty acid synthesis and oxidation pathways. Disturbance of these pathways is associated with impaired insulin responsiveness and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene-nutrient interactions may affect MetS risk. This study determined the relationship between ACC2 polymorphisms (rs2075263, rs2268387, rs2284685, rs2284689, rs2300453, rs3742023, rs3742026, rs4766587, and rs6606697) and MetS risk, and whether dietary fatty acids modulate this in the LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX study of MetS cases and matched controls (n = 1754). Minor A allele carriers of rs4766587 had increased MetS risk (OR 1.29 [CI 1.08, 1.58], P = 0.0064) compared with the GG homozygotes, which may in part be explained by their increased body mass index (BMI), abdominal obesity, and impaired insulin sensitivity (P < 0.05). MetS risk was modulated by dietary fat intake (P = 0.04 for gene-nutrient interaction), where risk conferred by the A allele was exacerbated among individuals with a high-fat intake (>35% energy) (OR 1.62 [CI 1.05, 2.50], P = 0.027), particularly a high intake (>5.5% energy) of n-6 polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) (OR 1.82 [CI 1.14, 2.94], P = 0.01; P = 0.05 for gene-nutrient interaction). Saturated and monounsaturated fat intake did not modulate MetS risk. Importantly, we replicated some of these findings in an independent cohort. In conclusion, the ACC2 rs4766587 polymorphism influences MetS risk, which was modulated by dietary fat, suggesting novel gene-nutrient interactions. PMID:20855566

  1. Capteurs monopodes pour mesures accélérométriques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaite, R.; Valentin, J.-P.

    1993-08-01

    A new design for accelerometric measurements sensors is described. It uses a plate vibrating in thickness shear mode, maintained by the means of a single holder located at the crystal edge. This mounting does cancel the mechanical and thermal stresses which generally modify the sensor output signal. So the ratio signal/noise of a thickness shear accelerometer is improved and the intrinsic sensitivity is multiplied by a factor 40, by comparison with the sensitivity of a thickness shear plate bonded by the means of two opposite holders. Un nouveau dispositif destiné aux mesures d'accélération est présenté. Il met en œuvre une lame vibrant en cisaillement d'épaisseur, fixée à sa structure de maintien par l'intermédiaire d'une unique liaison. Ce montage permet d'éliminer les contraintes mécaniques et thermiques qui perturbent habituellement le signal de mesure, et qui sont liées soit au montage des éléments du capteur, soit aux variations rapides de température qui interviennent lors de la mise en fonctionnement du capteur. Le rapport signal/bruit d'un accéléromètre à lame vibrant en cisaillement d'épaisseur s'en trouve amélioré et la sensibilité à l'accélération est multipliée par un facteur 40, comparée à celle d'un capteur qui serait constitué d'une lame vibrant en cisaillement d'épaisseur, fixée par deux liaisons diamétralement opposées.

  2. Higher Order Modes HOM___s in Coupled Cavities of the Flash Module ACC39

    SciTech Connect

    Shinton, I.R.R.; Jones, R.M.; Li, Z.; Zhang, P.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /DESY

    2012-09-14

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM's) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  3. BACCHUS: Brussels Automatic Code for Characterizing High accUracy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masseron, Thomas; Merle, Thibault; Hawkins, Keith

    2016-05-01

    BACCHUS (Brussels Automatic Code for Characterizing High accUracy Spectra) derives stellar parameters (Teff, log g, metallicity, microturbulence velocity and rotational velocity), equivalent widths, and abundances. The code includes on the fly spectrum synthesis, local continuum normalization, estimation of local S/N, automatic line masking, four methods for abundance determinations, and a flagging system aiding line selection. BACCHUS relies on the grid of MARCS model atmospheres, Masseron's model atmosphere thermodynamic structure interpolator, and the radiative transfer code Turbospectrum (ascl:1205.004).

  4. The First Mammalian Aldehyde Oxidase Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Catarina; Mahro, Martin; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Ramos, Maria João; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Leimkühler, Silke; Romão, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) are homodimeric proteins belonging to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum-containing enzymes. Each 150-kDa monomer contains a FAD redox cofactor, two spectroscopically distinct [2Fe-2S] clusters, and a molybdenum cofactor located within the protein active site. AOXs are characterized by broad range substrate specificity, oxidizing different aldehydes and aromatic N-heterocycles. Despite increasing recognition of its role in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, the physiological function of the protein is still largely unknown. We have crystallized and solved the crystal structure of mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 to 2.9 Å. This is the first mammalian AOX whose structure has been solved. The structure provides important insights into the protein active center and further evidence on the catalytic differences characterizing AOX and xanthine oxidoreductase. The mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 three-dimensional structure combined with kinetic, mutagenesis data, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics studies make a decisive contribution to understand the molecular basis of its rather broad substrate specificity. PMID:23019336

  5. Oxidative stress, NADPH oxidases, and arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Runge, Marschall S; Madamanchi, Nageswara R

    2016-05-10

    Atherosclerosis and its major complications - myocardial infarction and stroke - remain major causes of death and disability in the United States and world-wide. Indeed, with dramatic increases in obesity and diabetes mellitus, the prevalence and public health impact of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) will likely remain high. Major advances have been made in development of new therapies to reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis and CVD, in particular for treatment of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Oxidative stress is the common mechanistic link for many CVD risk factors. However, only recently have the tools existed to study the interface between oxidative stress and CVD in animal models. The most important source of reactive oxygen species (and hence oxidative stress) in vascular cells are the multiple forms of enzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). Recently published and emerging studies now clearly establish that: 1) NADPH oxidases are of critical importance in atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal models; 2) given the tissue-specific expression of key components of NADPH oxidase, it may be possible to target vascular oxidative stress for prevention of CVD. PMID:25649240

  6. The substrate tolerance of alcohol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Pickl, Mathias; Fuchs, Michael; Glueck, Silvia M; Faber, Kurt

    2015-08-01

    Alcohols are a rich source of compounds from renewable sources, but they have to be activated in order to allow the modification of their carbon backbone. The latter can be achieved via oxidation to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. As an alternative to (thermodynamically disfavoured) nicotinamide-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases, alcohol oxidases make use of molecular oxygen but their application is under-represented in synthetic biotransformations. In this review, the mechanism of copper-containing and flavoprotein alcohol oxidases is discussed in view of their ability to accept electronically activated or non-activated alcohols and their propensity towards over-oxidation of aldehydes yielding carboxylic acids. In order to facilitate the selection of the optimal enzyme for a given biocatalytic application, the substrate tolerance of alcohol oxidases is compiled and discussed: Substrates are classified into groups (non-activated prim- and sec-alcohols; activated allylic, cinnamic and benzylic alcohols; hydroxy acids; sugar alcohols; nucleotide alcohols; sterols) together with suitable alcohol oxidases, their microbial source, relative activities and (stereo)selectivities. PMID:26153139

  7. Structure-function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure-function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  8. Structure–function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family

    PubMed Central

    Yin, DeLu (Tyler); Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M.; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure–function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  9. ACC deaminase and IAA producing growth promoting bacteria from the rhizosphere soil of tropical rice plants.

    PubMed

    Bal, Himadri Bhusan; Das, Subhasis; Dangar, Tushar K; Adhya, Tapan K

    2013-12-01

    Beneficial plant-associated bacteria play a key role in supporting and/or promoting plant growth and health. Plant growth promoting bacteria present in the rhizosphere of crop plants can directly affect plant metabolism or modulate phytohormone production or degradation. We isolated 355 bacteria from the rhizosphere of rice plants grown in the farmers' fields in the coastal rice field soil from five different locations of the Ganjam district of Odisha, India. Six bacteria producing both ACC deaminase (ranging from 603.94 to 1350.02 nmol α-ketobutyrate mg(-1)  h(-1) ) and indole acetic acid (IAA; ranging from 10.54 to 37.65 μM ml(-1) ) in pure cultures were further identified using polyphasic taxonomy including BIOLOG((R)) , FAME analysis and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses of the isolates resulted into five major clusters to include members of the genera Bacillus, Microbacterium, Methylophaga, Agromyces, and Paenibacillus. Seed inoculation of rice (cv. Naveen) by the six individual PGPR isolates had a considerable impact on different growth parameters including root elongation that was positively correlated with ACC deaminase activity and IAA production. The cultures also had other plant growth attributes including ammonia production and at least two isolates produced siderophores. Study indicates that presence of diverse rhizobacteria with effective growth-promoting traits, in the rice rhizosphere, may be exploited for a sustainable crop management under field conditions. PMID:23681643

  10. The 2013 ACC/AHA Cholesterol Treatment Guidelines: Applicability to Patients with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ziaeian, Boback; Dinkler, John; Guo, Yuanlin; Watson, Karol

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and the management of blood cholesterol is a cornerstone of medical therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes represent an important high-risk group in whom clinicians should advocate the use of statins and lifestyle modification for the reduction of ASCVD. The recent 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines on managing blood cholesterol provide an important framework for the effective implementation of this important risk reduction strategy. The guidelines identify four groups of individuals who have been shown to benefit from statin therapy and update the dosing and monitoring recommendations based on evidence from published, large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with clinical hard endpoints. Primary care physicians and specialists play key roles in identifying populations at elevated ASCVD risk and providing effective care for patients, especially those with diabetes. This article will summarize the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines on managing blood cholesterol and provide a practical management overview in order to facilitate implementation of these guidelines for patients with diabetes. PMID:26803649

  11. Various effects of fluorescent bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas containing ACC deaminase on wheat seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Magnucka, Elżbieta G; Pietr, Stanisław J

    2015-12-01

    The study evaluates the effect of rhizobacteria having 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCd) on the development of wheat seedlings. This enzyme has been proposed to play a key role in microbe-plant association. Three fluorescent pseudomonads containing this deaminase were selected from 70 strains of pseudomonads isolated from rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rape (Brassica napus L.). These bacteria, varied significantly in the ability to both biosynthesize auxins and hydrolyze ACC. Among them, Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. brassicacearum strain RZ310 presented the highest activities of ACC deaminase during 96h of growth in liquid Dworkin and Foster (DF) salt medium. Additionally, this rape rhizosphere strain did not produce indoles. Two other isolates, Pseudomonas sp. PO283 and Pseudomonas sp. PO366, secreted auxins only in the presence of their precursor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and four other protein-encoding genes indicated that these wheat rhizosphere isolates belonged to the fluorescent Pseudomonas group. Moreover, the effects of these strains on wheat seedling growth under in vitro conditions were markedly dependent on both their cell suspensions used to grain inoculation and nutrient conditions. Strains tested had beneficial influence on wheat seedlings mainly at low cell densities. In addition, access to nutrients markedly changed bacteria action on cereal growth. Their presence generally favored the positive effects of pseudomonads on length and the estimated biomasses of wheat coleoptiles. Despite these general rules, impacts of each isolate on the growth parameters of cereal seedlings were unique. PMID:25983132

  12. 5th International ACC Symposium: Classification of Adrenocortical Cancers from Pathology to Integrated Genomics: Real Advances or Lost in Translation?

    PubMed

    de Krijger, Ronald E; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2016-02-01

    For the clinician, despite its rarity, adrenocortical cancer is a heterogeneous tumor both in term of steroid excess and tumor evolution. For patient management, it is crucial to have an accurate vision of this heterogeneity, in order to use a correct tumor classification. Pathology is the best way to classify operated adrenocortical tumors: to recognize their adrenocortical nature and to differentiate benign from malignant tumors. Among malignant tumors pathology also aims at prognosis assessment. Although progress has being made for prognosis assessment, there is still a need for improvement. Recent studies have established the value of Ki67 for adrenocortical cancer (ACC) prognostication, aiming also at standardization to reduce variability. The use of genomics to study adrenocortical tumors gives a very new insight in their pathogenesis and molecular classification. Genomics studies of ACC give now a clear description of the mRNA (transcriptome) and miRNA expression profile, as well as chromosomal and methylation alterations. Exome sequencing also established firmly the list of the main ACC driver genes. Interestingly, genomics study of ACC also revealed subtypes of malignant tumors with different pattern of molecular alterations, associated with different outcome. This leads to a new vision of adrenocortical tumors classification based on molecular analysis. Interestingly, these molecular classifications meet also the results of pathological analysis. This opens new perspectives on the development and use of various molecular tools to classify, along with pathological analysis, ACC, and guides patient management at the area of precision medicine. PMID:26676358

  13. Monitoring apoptosis of TK-GFP-expressing ACC-M cells induced by ACV using FRET technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Tao; Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Juqiang; Yang, Jie; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-05-01

    Apoptosis is an evolutionary conserved cellular process that plays an important role during development, but it is also involved in tissue homeostasis and in many diseases. To study the characteristics of suicide gene system of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene in tumor cells and explore the apoptosis phenomena in this system and its effect on the human adenoid cystic carcinoma line ACC-M cell, we detected apoptosis of CD3- (ECFP-CRS-DsRed) and TK-GFP-expressing ACC-M (ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3) cells induced by acyclovir (ACV) using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. CD3 is a FRET-based indicator for activity of caspase-3, which is composed of an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, a caspase-3 sensitive linker, and a red fluorescent protein from Discosoma with efficient maturation property. FRET from ECFP to DsRed could be detected in normal ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3 cells, and the FRET efficient was remarkably decreased and then disappeared during the cells apoptosis induced by ACV. It was due to the activated caspase-3 cleaved the CD3 fusion protein. In this study, the results suggested that the ACV-induced apoptosis of ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3 cells was through caspase-3 pathway.

  14. Monitoring apoptosis of TK-GFP-expressing ACC-M cells induced by ACV using FRET technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Tao; Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Juqiang; Yang, Jie; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-09-01

    Apoptosis is an evolutionary conserved cellular process that plays an important role during development, but it is also involved in tissue homeostasis and in many diseases. To study the characteristics of suicide gene system of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene in tumor cells and explore the apoptosis phenomena in this system and its effect on the human adenoid cystic carcinoma line ACC-M cell, we detected apoptosis of CD3- (ECFP-CRS-DsRed) and TK-GFP-expressing ACC-M (ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3) cells induced by acyclovir (ACV) using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. CD3 is a FRET-based indicator for activity of caspase-3, which is composed of an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, a caspase-3 sensitive linker, and a red fluorescent protein from Discosoma with efficient maturation property. FRET from ECFP to DsRed could be detected in normal ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3 cells, and the FRET efficient was remarkably decreased and then disappeared during the cells apoptosis induced by ACV. It was due to the activated caspase-3 cleaved the CD3 fusion protein. In this study, the results suggested that the AVC-induced apoptosis of ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3 cells was through caspase-3 pathway.

  15. Changes in oxidative stress in transgenic RNAi ACO1 tomato fruit during ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglous, Najat Mohamed; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Hassan, Maizom; Zainal, Zamri

    2013-11-01

    Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum L.) is the second most cultivated vegetable in the world and widely used as a system for studying the role of ethylene during fruit ripening. Our objective was to study the oxidative stress and antioxidative metabolism during ripening of non transgenic tomato and transgenic line-21 tomato which reduced ethylene. The line-21 of transgenic tomato plants (RNAi ACO1) had lower ethylene production and longer shelf-life more than 32 days as compared to the wild-type fruits which have very short shelf-life. In this study, tomato fruit were divided into five different stages (MG: mature green 5%, B: breaker 25%, T: turning 50%, O: orange75%, RR: red ripe100%). The activity of lipoxygenase (LOX) and lipid peroxidation (MDA) were measured to assess changes in oxidative stress. The LOX activity and MDA content decreased significantly obtaining 2.6-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively, as compared to the wild type fruit. However, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were increased to 1.9 and 1.2 folds from the mature green to the fully ripe stage in transgenic tomatoes. Furthermore, the wild type tomato increases 1.3 in SOD and 1.6 in CAT activities. The overall results indicate that the wild type tomato fruit showed a faster rate of ripening, parallel to decline in the rate of enzymatic antioxidative systems as compared to the transgenic line-21 tomato fruit. In addition, the results show that the antioxidant capacity is improved during the ripening process and is accompanied by an increase in the oxidative stress.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to the alternative oxidase of higher plant mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Elthon, T.E.; Nickels, R.L.; McIntosh, L. )

    1989-04-01

    The higher plant mitochondrial electron transport chain contains, in addition to the cytochrome chain which terminates with cytochrome oxidase, an alternative pathway that terminates with an alternative oxidase. The alternative oxidase of Sauromatum guttatum Schott has recently been identified as a cluster of proteins with apparent M{sub r} of 37, 36, and 35 kilodaltons (kD). Monoclonal antibodies have now been prepared to these proteins and designated as AOA (binding all three proteins of the alternative oxidase cluster), AOU (binding the upper or 37 kD protein), and AOL (binding the lower or 36 and 35 kD proteins). All three antibodies bind to their respective alternative oxidase proteins whether the proteins are in their native or denatured states. AOA and AOU inhibit alternative oxidase activity around 49%, whereas AOL inhibits activity only 14%. When coupled individually to Sepharose 4B, all three monoclonal resins were capable of retaining the entire cluster of alternative oxidase proteins, suggesting that these proteins are physically associated in some manner. The monoclonals were capable of binding similar mitochondrial proteins in a number of thermogenic and nonthermogenic species, indicating that they will be useful in characterizing and purifying the alternative oxidase of different systems. The ability of the monoclonal-Sepharose 4B resins to retain the cluster of previously identified alternative oxidase proteins, along with the inhibition of alternative oxidase activity by these monoclonals, supports the role of these proteins in constituting the alternative oxidase.

  17. Identification and characterization of an Apis cerana cerana Delta class glutathione S-transferase gene (AccGSTD) in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huiru; Jia, Haihong; Wang, Xiuling; Gao, Hongru; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2013-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multifunctional enzyme super family that plays a pivotal role in both insecticide resistance and protection against oxidative stress. In this study, we identified a single-copy gene, AccGSTD, as being a Delta class GST in the Chinese honey bee (Apis cerana cerana). A predicted antioxidant response element, CREB, was found in the 1,492-bp 5'-flanking region, suggesting that AccGSTD may be involved in oxidative stress response pathways. Real-time PCR and immunolocalization studies demonstrated that AccGSTD exhibited both developmental- and tissue-specific expression patterns. During development, AccGSTD transcript was increased in adults. The AccGSTD expression level was the highest in the honey bee brain. Thermal stress experiments demonstrated that AccGSTD could be significantly upregulated by temperature changes in a time-dependent manner. It is hypothesized that high expression levels might be due to the increased levels of oxidative stress caused by the temperature challenges. Additionally, functional assays of the recombinant AccGSTD protein revealed that AccGSTD has the capability to protect DNA from oxidative damage. Taken together, these data suggest that AccGSTD may be responsible for antioxidant defense in adult honey bees. PMID:23275971

  18. Identification and characterization of an Apis cerana cerana Delta class glutathione S-transferase gene ( AccGSTD) in response to thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huiru; Jia, Haihong; Wang, Xiuling; Gao, Hongru; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2013-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multifunctional enzyme super family that plays a pivotal role in both insecticide resistance and protection against oxidative stress. In this study, we identified a single-copy gene, AccGSTD, as being a Delta class GST in the Chinese honey bee ( Apis cerana cerana). A predicted antioxidant response element, CREB, was found in the 1,492-bp 5'-flanking region, suggesting that AccGSTD may be involved in oxidative stress response pathways. Real-time PCR and immunolocalization studies demonstrated that AccGSTD exhibited both developmental- and tissue-specific expression patterns. During development, AccGSTD transcript was increased in adults. The AccGSTD expression level was the highest in the honey bee brain. Thermal stress experiments demonstrated that AccGSTD could be significantly upregulated by temperature changes in a time-dependent manner. It is hypothesized that high expression levels might be due to the increased levels of oxidative stress caused by the temperature challenges. Additionally, functional assays of the recombinant AccGSTD protein revealed that AccGSTD has the capability to protect DNA from oxidative damage. Taken together, these data suggest that AccGSTD may be responsible for antioxidant defense in adult honey bees.

  19. Coexistence of Two Forms of LTP in ACC Provides a Synaptic Mechanism for the Interactions between Anxiety and Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Kohei; Descalzi, Giannina; Chen, Tao; Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Lu, Jinshan; Li, Shermaine; Son, Junehee; Kim, TaeHyun; Kwak, Chuljung; Huganir, Richard L.; Zhao, Ming-gao; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Collingridge, Graham L.; Zhuo, Min

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic pain can lead to anxiety and anxiety can enhance the sensation of pain. Unfortunately, little is known about the synaptic mechanisms that mediate these re-enforcing interactions. Here we characterized two forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC); a presynaptic form (pre-LTP) that requires kainate receptors and a postsynaptic form (post-LTP) that requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Pre-LTP also involves adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A and is expressed via a mechanism involving hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Interestingly, chronic pain and anxiety both result in selective occlusion of pre-LTP. Significantly, microinjection of the HCN blocker ZD7288 into the ACC in vivo produces both anxiolytic and analgesic effects. Our results provide a mechanism by which two forms of LTP in the ACC may converge to mediate the interaction between anxiety and chronic pain. PMID:25556835

  20. Increased ability of transgenic plants expressing the bacterial enzyme ACC deaminase to accumulate Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn.

    PubMed

    Grichko, V P; Filby, B; Glick, B R

    2000-07-28

    Transgenic tomato plants Lycopersicon esculentum (Solanaceae) cv. Heinz 902 expressing the bacterial gene 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, under the transcriptional control of either two tandem 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoters (constitutive expression), the rolD promoter from Agrobacterium rhizogenes (root specific expression) or the pathogenesis related PRB-1b promoter from tobacco, were compared to non-transgenic tomato plants in their ability to grow in the presence of Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Ni, Pb, or Zn and to accumulate these metals. Parameters that were examined include metal concentration and ACC deaminase activity in both plant shoots and roots; root and shoot development; and leaf chlorophyll content. In general, transgenic tomato plants expressing ACC deaminase, especially those controlled by the PRB-1b promoter, acquired a greater amount of metal within the plant tissues, and were less subject to the deleterious effects of the metals on plant growth than were non-transgenic plants. PMID:10936659

  1. Transport of sup 14 C-IAA and sup 14 C-ACC within floral organs of Ipomoea nil

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, H.G. ); Maurice, H.R. ); Koning, R.E. ); Daie, J. )

    1989-04-01

    The transport of {sup 14}C-IAA {sup 14}C-ACC from agarose donor blocks applied to I. nil filaments their recovery as {sup 14}C-accumulation into floral organs was examined. The accumulation of the isotopes in the corolla tissue was greater when {sup 14}C-ACC was applied than {sup 14}C-IAA in intact isolated flower buds. Greater levels of the isotopes accumulated in the pistil, with minimal levels in receptacle and calyx tissues from isolated buds. With intact buds, greater levels of the isotopes were recovered in pistil, calyx receptacle tissues. This study provides further evidence for the role of the filaments as transport vectors for IAA ACC for the production of ethylene.

  2. The effect of native and ACC deaminase-containing Azospirillum brasilense Cd1843 on the rooting of carnation cuttings.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaosi; Saleh-Lakha, Saleema; Glick, Bernard R

    2005-06-01

    Carnation cuttings treated with non-transformed and 1-aminocyclopropane (ACC) deaminase-containing Azospirillum brasilense Cd1843 produced significantly more roots than untreated controls and fewer roots than cuttings treated with 0.1% indolebutyric acid (IBA). The roots produced by cuttings treated with ACC deaminase-containing Azospirillum brasilense Cd1843 were the longest roots resulting from any of the treatments, followed by non-transformed Azospirillum brasilense Cd1843, 0.1% IBA, and treatment with water. The results are interpreted in terms of a previously proposed model of bacterial promotion of plant growth by ACC deaminase and indoleacetic acid, and may have implications for the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria in the flower industry. PMID:16121231

  3. ACLY and ACC1 Regulate Hypoxia-Induced Apoptosis by Modulating ETV4 via α-ketoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Melissa M.; Liu, Beiyu; Tang, Xiaohu; Wu, Jianli; Cyr, Derek; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Huang, Zhiqing; Tollini, Laura A.; Murphy, Susan K.; Lucas, Joseph; Muoio, Deborah M.; Kim, So Young; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    In order to propagate a solid tumor, cancer cells must adapt to and survive under various tumor microenvironment (TME) stresses, such as hypoxia or lactic acidosis. To systematically identify genes that modulate cancer cell survival under stresses, we performed genome-wide shRNA screens under hypoxia or lactic acidosis. We discovered that genetic depletion of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA or ACC1) or ATP citrate lyase (ACLY) protected cancer cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Additionally, the loss of ACLY or ACC1 reduced levels and activities of the oncogenic transcription factor ETV4. Silencing ETV4 also protected cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis and led to remarkably similar transcriptional responses as with silenced ACLY or ACC1, including an anti-apoptotic program. Metabolomic analysis found that while α-ketoglutarate levels decrease under hypoxia in control cells, α-ketoglutarate is paradoxically increased under hypoxia when ACC1 or ACLY are depleted. Supplementation with α-ketoglutarate rescued the hypoxia-induced apoptosis and recapitulated the decreased expression and activity of ETV4, likely via an epigenetic mechanism. Therefore, ACC1 and ACLY regulate the levels of ETV4 under hypoxia via increased α-ketoglutarate. These results reveal that the ACC1/ACLY-α-ketoglutarate-ETV4 axis is a novel means by which metabolic states regulate transcriptional output for life vs. death decisions under hypoxia. Since many lipogenic inhibitors are under investigation as cancer therapeutics, our findings suggest that the use of these inhibitors will need to be carefully considered with respect to oncogenic drivers, tumor hypoxia, progression and dormancy. More broadly, our screen provides a framework for studying additional tumor cell stress-adaption mechanisms in the future. PMID:26452058

  4. Source challenges resulting from the first applications of a UV storage ring FEL on Super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bakker, R.; Garzella, D.; Nahn, L.; Marsi, M.; Mérola, F.; Hara, T.; Billardon, M.

    1996-02-01

    On the Super-ACO free electron laser were developed the first applications of a storage ring based FEL and of a UV FEL. The feasibility of use was demonstrated in 1993 with a time resolved polarised fluorescence experiment in biology. After these experiments, the stability of the laser source was significantly improved, with the installation of a longitudinal feedback. A particular advantage of a storage ring FEL source is to provide as well naturally synchronized synchrotron radiation. A first pump-probe time-resolved experiment coupling such two tunable, synchronized light sources was then performed in surface physics.

  5. Zonal Variations of Eddy Diffusivities in an ACC-like Channel: Discrete Transport Corridors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, A.; Thompson, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The meridional overturning circulation in a wind-driven re-entrant channel arises from a balance between an Eulerian mean overturning and an eddy overturning. These cancel to leading order in the Southern Ocean's Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). An ACC-like flow, with realistic stratification, zonal transport and distributions of eddy kinetic energy, develops even when these two overturning components cancel completely. Many studies have noted that an enhancement of the Eulerian overturning circulation, which tends to steepen isopycnals, is balanced in part by an enhancement of the eddy circulation that relaxes isopycnal tilt. Thus the domain-averaged isopycnal slope and zonal transport are relatively insensitive to changes in wind forcing. However, the response of the system's mesoscale variability and eddy fluxes is not uniform throughout the domain. We present a process study of an idealized eddy-resolving ACC-like channel with negligible residual overturning to explore how the along-stream distribution of eddy characteristics establishes a balance between wind and eddy overturning circulations. For each simulation, we decompose the overturning circulation into mean, standing and transient components. As the surface wind stress increases, the standing component balances a larger portion of the mean overturning. This in turn leads to an increasing departure from zonally-symmetric eddy characteristics. A zonal-mean, or net, eddy diffusivity Κnet is defined as the eddy diffusivity required to exactly balance the mean overturning based on the zonal-mean isopycnal slope, s. This gives Κnet=τ/ρ0fs, where τ is the wind stress, ρ0 is a reference density and f is the Coriolis parameter. Κnet is compared to local eddy diffusivities, Κlocal, diagnosed directly from the divergent component of the eddy buoyancy flux divided by the local isopycnal slope. We find that with a simple topographic ridge and moderate wind forcing, along-stream averages of

  6. Acceleration of a Particle-in-Cell Code for Space Plasma Simulations with OpenACC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Vaivads, Andris; Vencels, Juris; Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Hart, Alistair; Laure, Erwin

    2015-04-01

    We simulate space plasmas with the Particle-in-cell (PIC) method that uses computational particles to mimic electrons and protons in solar wind and in Earth magnetosphere. The magnetic and electric fields are computed by solving the Maxwell's equations on a computational grid. In each PIC simulation step, there are four major phases: interpolation of fields to particles, updating the location and velocity of each particle, interpolation of particles to grids and solving the Maxwell's equations on the grid. We use the iPIC3D code, which was implemented in C++, using both MPI and OpenMP, for our case study. By November 2014, heterogeneous systems using hardware accelerators such as Graphics Processing Unit (GPUs) and the Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessors for high performance computing continue growth in the top 500 most powerful supercomputers world wide. Scientific applications for numerical simulations need to adapt to using accelerators to achieve portability and scalability in the coming exascale systems. In our work, we conduct a case study of using OpenACC to offload the computation intensive parts: particle mover and interpolation of particles to grids, in a massively parallel Particle-in-Cell simulation code, iPIC3D, to multi-GPU systems. We use MPI for inter-node communication for halo exchange and communicating particles. We identify the most promising parts suitable for GPUs accelerator by profiling using CrayPAT. We implemented manual deep copy to address the challenges of porting C++ classes to GPU. We document the necessary changes in the exiting algorithms to adapt for GPU computation. We present the challenges and findings as well as our methodology for porting a Particle-in-Cell code to multi-GPU systems using OpenACC. In this work, we will present the challenges, findings and our methodology of porting a Particle-in-Cell code for space applications as follows: We profile the iPIC3D code by Cray Performance Analysis Tool (CrayPAT) and identify

  7. NADPH oxidases in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Belmondo, Simone; Calcagno, Cristina; Genre, Andrea; Puppo, Alain; Pauly, Nicolas; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases are the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that plays key roles as both signal and stressor in several plant processes, including defense responses against pathogens. ROS accumulation in root cells during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) development has raised the interest in understanding how ROS-mediated defense programs are modulated during the establishment of this mutualistic interaction. We have recently analyzed the expression pattern of 5 NADPH oxidase (also called RBOH) encoding genes in Medicago truncatula, showing that only one of them (MtRbohE) is specifically upregulated in arbuscule-containing cells. In line with this result, RNAi silencing of MtRbohE generated a strong alteration in root colonization, with a significant reduction in the number of arbusculated cells. On this basis, we propose that MtRBOHE-mediated ROS production plays a crucial role in the intracellular accommodation of arbuscules. PMID:27018627

  8. Human copper-dependent amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Finney, Joel; Moon, Hee-Jung; Ronnebaum, Trey; Lantz, Mason; Mure, Minae

    2014-03-15

    Copper amine oxidases (CAOs) are a class of enzymes that contain Cu(2+) and a tyrosine-derived quinone cofactor, catalyze the conversion of a primary amine functional group to an aldehyde, and generate hydrogen peroxide and ammonia as byproducts. These enzymes can be classified into two non-homologous families: 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone (TPQ)-dependent CAOs and the lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ)-dependent lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of proteins. In this review, we will focus on recent developments in the field of research concerning human CAOs and the LOX family of proteins. The aberrant expression of these enzymes is linked to inflammation, fibrosis, tumor metastasis/invasion and other diseases. Consequently, there is a critical need to understand the functions of these proteins at the molecular level, so that strategies targeting these enzymes can be developed to combat human diseases. PMID:24407025

  9. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  10. INCREASED XANTHINE OXIDASE IN THE SKIN OF PREECLAMPTIC WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Bainbridge, Shannon A.; Deng, Jau-Shyong; Roberts, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Xanthine oxioreductase is the holoenzyme responsible for terminal purine catabolism. Under conditions of metabolic stress or heightened pro-inflammatory cytokine production this enzyme is preferentially in it’s oxidized form, xanthine oxidase, with catalytic action that generates uric acid and the free radical superoxide. As preeclampsia is characterized by heightened inflammation, oxidative stress and hyperuricemia it has been proposed that xanthine oxidase plays a pivotal role in this hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. We sought to determine whether xanthine oxidase protein content was higher in maternal tissue of preeclamptic mothers, compared to healthy pregnant controls, using immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsies. We further compared xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity in skin biopsies from preeclamptic women and patients with several inflammatory conditions. In preeclamptic women, intense xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity was present within the epidermis. By contrast, only very faint xanthine oxidase staining was observed in skin biopsies from healthy pregnant controls. Further, a role for inflammation in the increase of xanthine oxidase was suggested by similar findings of heightened xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity in the skin biopsies from non-pregnant individuals diagnosed with conditions of systemic inflammation. The finding of increased xanthine oxidase in maternal tissue, most likely as the result of heightened maternal inflammation, suggest maternal xanthine oxidase as a source of free radical and uric acid generation in preeclampsia. PMID:19196876

  11. [2013 Guidelines ACC/AHA cardiovascular risk. Incomplete evidence and failed attempt at simplification].

    PubMed

    Corral, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    After almost a decade, finally Guidelines for the management of hypercholesterolemia in adults by the AHA/ACC were published. The substantial change in the paradigm of this new recommendation is the treatment decision basically statin, based on a recalculation of cardiovascular risk. Four groups were identified and based on them different statins indication, according to the power applied. As is apparent, have been used only randomized clinical trials (RCT) as the sole basis for the drafting of these new guidelines. Two basic issues are reviewed and revised in the following article: leaving aside other types of evidence to generate the recommendation and on the other hand the attempt to simplify the interpretation and management of this condition. We stress the need for any recommendation to clinical reasoning to interpret different scenarios involved in each patient. PMID:25496959

  12. Reward sensitivity modulates brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, ACC and striatum during task switching.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan C; Costumero, Víctor; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Current perspectives on cognitive control acknowledge that individual differences in motivational dispositions may modulate cognitive processes in the absence of reward contingencies. This work aimed to study the relationship between individual differences in Behavioral Activation System (BAS) sensitivity and the neural underpinnings involved in processing a switching cue in a task-switching paradigm. BAS sensitivity was hypothesized to modulate brain activity in frontal regions, ACC and the striatum. Twenty-eight healthy participants underwent fMRI while performing a switching task, which elicited activity in fronto-striatal regions during the processing of the switch cue. BAS sensitivity was negatively associated with activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the ventral striatum. Combined with previous results, our data indicate that BAS sensitivity modulates the neurocognitive processes involved in task switching in a complex manner depending on task demands. Therefore, individual differences in motivational dispositions may influence cognitive processing in the absence of reward contingencies. PMID:25875640

  13. Reward Sensitivity Modulates Brain Activity in the Prefrontal Cortex, ACC and Striatum during Task Switching

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan C.; Costumero, Víctor; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Current perspectives on cognitive control acknowledge that individual differences in motivational dispositions may modulate cognitive processes in the absence of reward contingencies. This work aimed to study the relationship between individual differences in Behavioral Activation System (BAS) sensitivity and the neural underpinnings involved in processing a switching cue in a task-switching paradigm. BAS sensitivity was hypothesized to modulate brain activity in frontal regions, ACC and the striatum. Twenty-eight healthy participants underwent fMRI while performing a switching task, which elicited activity in fronto-striatal regions during the processing of the switch cue. BAS sensitivity was negatively associated with activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the ventral striatum. Combined with previous results, our data indicate that BAS sensitivity modulates the neurocognitive processes involved in task switching in a complex manner depending on task demands. Therefore, individual differences in motivational dispositions may influence cognitive processing in the absence of reward contingencies. PMID:25875640

  14. Sequencing of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. acc. TM-1) provides a resource for fiber improvement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianzhen; Hu, Yan; Jiang, Wenkai; Fang, Lei; Guan, Xueying; Chen, Jiedan; Zhang, Jinbo; Saski, Christopher A; Scheffler, Brian E; Stelly, David M; Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Wan, Qun; Liu, Bingliang; Liu, Chunxiao; Wang, Sen; Pan, Mengqiao; Wang, Yangkun; Wang, Dawei; Ye, Wenxue; Chang, Lijing; Zhang, Wenpan; Song, Qingxin; Kirkbride, Ryan C; Chen, Xiaoya; Dennis, Elizabeth; Llewellyn, Danny J; Peterson, Daniel G; Thaxton, Peggy; Jones, Don C; Wang, Qiong; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Huaitong; Zhou, Lei; Mei, Gaofu; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Yue; Xiang, Dan; Li, Xinghe; Ding, Jian; Zuo, Qiyang; Tao, Linna; Liu, Yunchao; Li, Ji; Lin, Yu; Hui, Yuanyuan; Cao, Zhisheng; Cai, Caiping; Zhu, Xiefei; Jiang, Zhi; Zhou, Baoliang; Guo, Wangzhen; Li, Ruiqiang; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    Upland cotton is a model for polyploid crop domestication and transgenic improvement. Here we sequenced the allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L. acc. TM-1 genome by integrating whole-genome shotgun reads, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences and genotype-by-sequencing genetic maps. We assembled and annotated 32,032 A-subgenome genes and 34,402 D-subgenome genes. Structural rearrangements, gene loss, disrupted genes and sequence divergence were more common in the A subgenome than in the D subgenome, suggesting asymmetric evolution. However, no genome-wide expression dominance was found between the subgenomes. Genomic signatures of selection and domestication are associated with positively selected genes (PSGs) for fiber improvement in the A subgenome and for stress tolerance in the D subgenome. This draft genome sequence provides a resource for engineering superior cotton lines. PMID:25893781

  15. Cadmium-induced ethylene production and responses in Arabidopsis thaliana rely on ACS2 and ACS6 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic activities cause metal pollution worldwide. Plants can absorb and accumulate these metals through their root system, inducing stress as a result of excess metal concentrations inside the plant. Ethylene is a regulator of multiple plant processes, and is affected by many biotic and abiotic stresses. Increased ethylene levels have been observed after exposure to excess metals but it remains unclear how the increased ethylene levels are achieved at the molecular level. In this study, the effects of cadmium (Cd) exposure on the production of ethylene and its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), and on the expression of the ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) multigene families were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Increased ethylene release after Cd exposure was directly measurable in a system using rockwool-cultivated plants; enhanced levels of the ethylene precursor ACC together with higher mRNA levels of ethylene responsive genes: ACO2, ETR2 and ERF1 also indicated increased ethylene production in hydroponic culture. Regarding underlying mechanisms, it was found that the transcript levels of ACO2 and ACO4, the most abundantly expressed members of the ACO multigene family, were increased upon Cd exposure. ACC synthesis is the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and transcript levels of both ACS2 and ACS6 showed the highest increase and became the most abundant isoforms after Cd exposure, suggesting their importance in the Cd-induced increase of ethylene production. Conclusions Cadmium induced the biosynthesis of ACC and ethylene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants mainly via the increased expression of ACS2 and ACS6. This was confirmed in the acs2-1acs6-1 double knockout mutants, which showed a decreased ethylene production, positively affecting leaf biomass and resulting in a delayed induction of ethylene responsive gene expressions without significant differences in Cd contents between wild-type and

  16. Comparison of kinetic properties of amine oxidases from sainfoin and lentil and immunochemical characterization of copper/quinoprotein amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Zajoncová, L; Frébort, I; Luhová, L; Sebela, M; Galuszka, P; Pec, P

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic properties of novel amine oxidase isolated from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) were compared to those of typical plant amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6) from lentil (Lens culinaris). The amine oxidase from sainfoin was active toward substrates, such as 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) with K(m) of 0.09 mM and 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine) with K(m) of 0.24 mM. The maximum rate of oxidation for cadaverine at saturating concentration was 2.7 fold higher than that of putrescine. The amine oxidase from lentil had the maximum rate for putrescine comparable to the rate of sainfoin amine oxidase with the same substrate. Both amine oxidases, like other plant Cu-amine oxidases, were inhibited by substrate analogs (1,5-diamino-3-pentanone, 1,4-diamino-2-butanone and aminoguanidine), Cu2+ chelating agents (diethyltriamine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2,2'-bipyridyl, imidazole, sodium cyanide and sodium azide), some alkaloids (L-lobeline and cinchonine), some lathyrogens (beta-aminopropionitrile and aminoacetonitrile) and other inhibitors (benzamide oxime, acetone oxime, hydroxylamine and pargyline). Tested by Ouchterlony's double diffusion in agarose gel, polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from sainfoin, pea and grass pea cross-reacted with amine oxidases from several other Fabaceae and from barley (Hordeum vulgare) of Poaceae, while amine oxidase from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger did not cross-react at all. However, using Western blotting after SDS-PAGE with rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from Aspergillus niger, some degree of similarity of plant amine oxidases from sainfoin, pea, field pea, grass pea, fenugreek, common melilot, white sweetclover and Vicia panonica with the A. niger amine oxidase was confirmed. PMID:10092944

  17. Transient absorption spectroscopy in biology using the Super-ACO storage ring FEL and the synchrotron radiation combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Eric; Nahon, Laurent; Garzella, David; Nutarelli, Daniele; De Ninno, Giovanni; Hirsch, Matthias; Couprie, Marie Emmanuelle

    2001-12-01

    The Super-ACO storage ring FEL, covering the UV range down to 300 nm with a high average power (300 mW at 350 nm) together with a high stability and long lifetime, is a unique tool for the performance of users applications. We present here the first pump-probe two color experiments on biological species using a storage ring FEL coupled to the synchrotron radiation. The intense UV pulse of the Super-ACO FEL is used to prepare a high initial concentration of chromophores in their first singlet electronic excited state. The nearby bending magnet synchrotron radiation provides, on the other hand a pulsed, white light continuum (UV-IR), naturally synchronized with the FEL pulses and used to probe the photochemical subsequent events and the associated transient species. We have demonstrated the feasibility with a dye molecule (POPOP) observing a two-color effect, signature of excited state absorption and a temporal signature with Acridine. Applications on various chromophores of biological interest are carried out, such as the time-resolved absorption study of the first excited state of Acridine.

  18. Spatial Analyses of a Complete Sample of Rich Abell/ACO Clusters to z=0.14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    1999-12-01

    Galaxy clusters act as excellent mass tracers in our local Universe. They are bright, contain hundreds of galaxies, and are easy to observe. The most recognized galaxy cluster catalogs are those of Abell (1958) and Abell, Corwin and Olowin (1989-ACO). I will present the results of a new survey of Abell/ACO cluster redshifts that extends our knowledge of the large-scale mass distribution to a redshift of z = 0.14. The volume of the Universe traced by this survey is four times larger than any of its predecessors. The large number of clusters within the survey boundaries ( 560) as well as the large volume traced, allow for statistical analyses on scales never before probed. I will present the cluster power spectrum to scales approaching 1000h-1Mpc. I will also demonstrate the high-level of completeness for this survey, which allows one to study the effects of large-scale structure on internal cluster properties. I will then summarize some recent collaborative efforts which show that (1) Wide-Angle Tail radio jets are ``blown'' in the direction of the local large-scale axis; (2) High dM/dt cooling flow clusters reside in crowded environments; (3) Clusters with close near-neighbors are also close to the fundamental plane created from Lo, Lx and Ro. CM was funded in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Maine Science and Technology Foundation.

  19. Pathological changes in platelet histamine oxidases in atopic eczema

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Gruia

    1993-01-01

    Increased plasma histamine levels were associated with significantly lowered diamine and type B monoamine oxidase activities in platelet-rich plasma of atopic eczema (AE) patients. The diamine oxidase has almost normal cofactor levels (pyridoxal phosphate and Cu2+) but the cofactor levels for type B monoamine oxidase (flavin adenine dinucleotide and Fe2+) are lowered. The biogenic amines putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and serotonin in the sera, as well as dopamine and epinephrine in EDTA-plasma were found to be normal. It is unlikely, therefore, that these amines are responsible for the decreased activities of monoamine and diamine oxidase in these patients. The most likely causative factors for the inhibition of the diamine oxidase are nicotine, alcohol, food additives and other environmental chemicals, or perhaps a genetic defect of the diamine oxidase. PMID:18475554

  20. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    SciTech Connect

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.

    2009-06-15

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain-CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined -helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

  1. Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2010-12-31

    This project added a new airflow enhancement technology to an existing ACC cooling process at a selected coal power plant. Airflow parameters and efficiency improvement for the main plant cooling process using the applied technology were determined and compared with the capabilities of existing systems. The project required significant planning and pre-test execution in order to reach the required Air Cooled Condenser system configuration for evaluation. A host Power Plant ACC system had to be identified, agreement finalized, and addition of the SPX ACC Wind Guide Technology completed on that site. Design of the modification, along with procurement, fabrication, instrumentation, and installation of the new airflow enhancement technology were executed. Baseline and post-modification cooling system data was collected and evaluated. The improvement of ACC thermal performance after SPX wind guide installation was clear. Testing of the improvement indicates there is a 5% improvement in heat transfer coefficient in high wind conditions and 1% improvement at low wind speed. The benefit increased with increasing wind speed. This project was completed on schedule and within budget.

  2. 24 CFR 982.102 - Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments. 982.102 Section 982.102 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT...

  3. 24 CFR 982.102 - Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments. 982.102 Section 982.102 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT...

  4. 24 CFR 982.102 - Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments. 982.102 Section 982.102 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT...

  5. 24 CFR 982.102 - Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments. 982.102 Section 982.102 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT...

  6. 24 CFR 982.102 - Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allocation of budget authority for renewal of expiring consolidated ACC funding increments. 982.102 Section 982.102 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT...

  7. Characterization of ACC deaminase gene in Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae; Park, Seung-Moon; Chae, Jong-Chan; Yun, Bong-Sik; Lee, Yong Hoon; Park, Yool-Jin; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2010-04-01

    The enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into alpha-ketobutyrate and ammonia. The decreased level of ethylene allows the plant to be more resistant to a wide environmental stress including plant pathogens. In the present study, we characterized the ACC deaminase activity of a Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the red pepper rhizosphere region of red pepper grown at Jinan, Korea. The isolate produced 23.8 +/- 0.4 micromol of alpha-ketobutyrate/mg of protein/h during ACC deamination under in vitro conditions. Polymerase chain reaction for acdS gene showed that the isolated P. entomophila strain PS-PJH carry sequences similar to the known acdS genes. Results of the multiple sequence alignment revealed >99% identity (nucleotide and amino acid) with acdS gene of Pseudomonas putida strains AM15 and UW4. The isolated bacteria promoted 43.3 and 34.1% of growth in Raphanus sativus and Lactuca sativa plants, respectively. Based on the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region sequences, the isolate was identified as P. entomophila. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to report the acdS gene in P. entomophila. PMID:20082369

  8. Basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (perlecan) synthesized by ACC3, adenoid cystic carcinoma cells of human salivary gland origin.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Cheng, J; Toyoshima, K; Oda, K; Saku, T

    1999-02-01

    The biosynthesis of basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), known as perlecan, in ACC3 cells established from a adenoid cystic carcinoma of the human salivary gland was studied using metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation with discriminative antibodies specific for HSPG core protein. Treatment of immunoprecipitated HSPG with HNO2, heparitinase, and chondroitinase ABC revealed that ACC3 cells synthesized HSPG molecules composed of 470-kDa core protein and heparan sulfate but not of chondroitin sulfate. The core protein was shown to contain complex type N-linked oligosaccharides by digestion with N-glycanase and endoglycosidase H. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the mature form of HSPG was formed in the cells in 30 min and released into the medium thereafter. Degradation of HSPG was also found in the chase period of 3 h. In time course experiments, HSPG was found to be synthesized maximally at day 4 after plating, deposited in the cell layer maximally at day 6, and secreted maximally at day 8. This was also confirmed by immunofluorescence, Northern blotting, and in-situ hybridization. The results indicate that ACC3 cells synthesize, secrete and degrade basement membrane type HSPG, which is analogous to those produced by other cell types, and that the biosynthesis and secretion of HSPG in ACC3 cells are strictly regulated by the cell growth, that may be reflected in the characteristic histology of adenoid cystic carcinomas. PMID:9990141

  9. Implementation and efficiency analysis of parallel computation using OpenACC: a case study using flow field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shanghong; Yuan, Rui; Wu, Yu; Yi, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    The Open Accelerator (OpenACC) application programming interface is a relatively new parallel computing standard. In this paper, particle-based flow field simulations are examined as a case study of OpenACC parallel computation. The parallel conversion process of the OpenACC standard is explained, and further, the performance of the flow field parallel model is analysed using different directive configurations and grid schemes. With careful implementation and optimisation of the data transportation in the parallel algorithm, a speedup factor of 18.26× is possible. In contrast, a speedup factor of just 11.77× was achieved with the conventional Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP) parallel mode on a 20-kernel computer. These results demonstrate that optimised feature settings greatly influence the degree of speedup, and models involving larger numbers of calculations exhibit greater efficiency and higher speedup factors. In addition, the OpenACC parallel mode is found to have good portability, making it easy to implement parallel computation from the original serial model.

  10. Sound the Alarm: The Effect of Narcissism on Retaliatory Aggression Is Moderated by dACC Reactivity to Rejection.

    PubMed

    Chester, David S; DeWall, C Nathan

    2016-06-01

    Narcissists behave aggressively when their egos are threatened by interpersonal insults. This effect has been explained in terms of narcissists' motivation to reduce the discrepancy between their grandiose self and its threatened version, though no research has directly tested this hypothesis. If this notion is true, the link between narcissism and retaliatory aggression should be moderated by neural structures that subserve discrepancy detection, such as the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). This study tested the hypothesis that narcissism would only predict greater retaliatory aggression in response to social rejection when the dACC was recruited by the threat. Thirty participants (15 females; Mage  = 18.86, SD = 1.25; 77% White) completed a trait narcissism inventory, were socially accepted and then rejected while undergoing fMRI, and then could behave aggressively toward one of the rejecters by blasting him or her with unpleasant noise. When narcissists displayed greater dACC activation during rejection, they behaved aggressively. But there was only a weak or nonsignificant relation between narcissism and aggression among participants with a blunted dACC response. Narcissism's role in aggressive retaliation to interpersonal threats is likely determined by the extent to which the brain's discrepancy detector registers the newly created gap between the grandiose and threatened selves. PMID:25564936

  11. Expression of recombinant AccMRJP1 protein from royal jelly of Chinese honeybee in Pichia pastoris and its proliferation activity in an insect cell line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Main royal jelly protein 1 (MRJP1) is the most abundant member of the main royal jelly protein (MRJP) family among honeybees. Mature MRJP1 cDNA of the Chinese honeybee (Apis cerana cerana MRJP1, or AccMRJP1) was expressed in Pichia pastoris. SDS-PAGE showed that recombinant AccMRJP1 was identical in...

  12. Gravity Responsive NADH Oxidase of the Plasma Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing gravity using an NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane which has been found to respond to unit gravity and low centrifugal g forces. The oxidation rate of NADH supplied to the NADH oxidase is measured and translated to represent the relative gravitational force exerted on the protein. The NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane may be obtained from plant or animal sources or may be produced recombinantly.

  13. An overview on alcohol oxidases and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Pranab; Chinnadayyala, Soma Sekhar R; Chakraborty, Mitun; Kumar, Adepu Kiran; Kakoti, Ankana

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol oxidases (Alcohol: O₂ Oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.3.x) are flavoenzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl compounds with a concomitant release of hydrogen peroxide. Based on substrate specificity, alcohol oxidases may be categorized broadly into four different groups namely, (a) short chain alcohol oxidase (SCAO), (b) long chain alcohol oxidase (LCAO), (c) aromatic alcohol oxidase (AAO), and (d) secondary alcohol oxidase (SAO). The sources reported for these enzymes are mostly limited to bacteria, yeast, fungi, plant, insect, and mollusks. However, the quantum of reports for each category of enzymes considerably varies across these sources. The enzymes belonging to SCAO and LCAO are intracellular in nature, whereas AAO and SAO are mostly secreted to the medium. SCAO and LCAO are invariably reported as multimeric proteins with very high holoenzyme molecular masses, but the molecular characteristics of these enzymes are yet to be clearly elucidated. One of the striking features of the alcohol oxidases that make them distinct from the widely known alcohol dehydrogenase is the avidly bound cofactor to the redox center of these enzymes that obviate the need to supplement cofactor during the catalytic reaction. These flavin-based redox enzymes have gained enormous importance in the development of various industrial processes and products primarily for developing biosensors and production of various industrially useful carbonyl compounds. The present review provides an overview on alcohol oxidases from different categories focusing research on these oxidases during the last decade along with their potential industrial applications. PMID:23525937

  14. Xanthine oxidase status in ethanol-intoxicated rat liver.

    PubMed

    Abbondanza, A; Battelli, M G; Soffritti, M; Cessi, C

    1989-12-01

    The status of xanthine oxidase in ethanol-induced liver injury has been investigated in the rat, by acute and chronic ethanol treatments. A 38% increase of the enzyme O-form was observed after repeated ethanol administration. Chronic intoxication caused a significant decrease of total xanthine oxidase activity after both prolonged ethanol feeding and life span ethanol ingestion. The intermediate D/O-form of xanthine oxidase (that can act either as an oxidase or as a dehydrogenase, being able to react with O2 as well as with NAD+ as electron acceptor) increased 5.5-fold after prolonged ethanol feeding. PMID:2690670

  15. Doctors’ knowledge, attitudes, and compliance with 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines for prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Sajita; Fung, Selwyn Sze-Wang; Waters, David D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is an unmet need for strategies to prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Singapore. The main objective of this study was to investigate Singapore physicians’ response to the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines for treatment of cholesterol and their impact on clinical practice. Methods This survey was conducted in two stages, qualitative and quantitative. Physicians were initially screened on the basis of an initial screener questionnaire, and eligible physicians were then included in the study. Results Qualitative (n=19) and quantitative (n=66) surveys were completed by eligible physicians from Singapore. Physicians were less familiar with the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines (35%) as compared with the Singapore Ministry of Health (MoH) lipid guidelines 2006 (49%). Of the physicians whose opinion was sought on the ACC/AHA guidelines, more than 50% disagreed with the definition of high-, moderate-, and low-intensity statin therapy; recommendation of atorvastatin 40–80 mg and rosuvastatin 20–40 mg as medications for high-intensity statin therapy; and classification of individuals who would benefit from moderate- to high-intensity statin therapy. Most physicians assumed that Asians may be intolerant to high-intensity statin therapy. Conclusion Although embracing the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines in clinical practice is expected to provide better clinical care to patients, our study revealed high reluctance by physicians, especially in the use of high-dose statins. However, ACC/AHA guidelines can be easily adopted in Asia as there is a wealth of data available for atorvastatin in primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with similar efficacy and safety profiles in the white and Asian populations. PMID:26082642

  16. Effects of wintertime fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK and ACC in hypothalamus, adipose tissue and liver of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Sanni; Mänttäri, Satu; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Saarela, Seppo

    2016-02-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a canid with autumnal fattening and passive wintering strategy. We examined the effects of wintertime fasting and seasonality on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of metabolism, and its target, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) on the species. Twelve farmed raccoon dogs (eleven females/one male) were divided into two groups: half were fasted for ten weeks in December-March (winter fasted) and the others were fed ad libitum (winter fed). A third group (autumn fed, eight females) was fed ad libitum and sampled in December. Total AMPK, ACC and their phosphorylated forms (pAMPK, pACC) were measured from hypothalamus, liver, intra-abdominal (iWAT) and subcutaneous white adipose tissues (sWAT). The fasted animals lost 32% and the fed 20% of their body mass. Hypothalamic AMPK expression was lower and pACC levels higher in the winter groups compared to the autumn fed group. Liver pAMPK was lower in the winter fasted group, with consistently decreased ACC and pACC. AMPK and pAMPK were down-regulated in sWAT and iWAT of both winter groups, with a parallel decline in pACC in sWAT. The responses of AMPK and ACC to fasting were dissimilar to the effects observed previously in non-seasonal mammals and hibernators. Differences between the winter fed and autumn fed groups indicate that the functions of AMPK and ACC could be regulated in a season-dependent manner. Furthermore, the distinctive effects of prolonged fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK-ACC pathway could contribute to the wintering strategy of the raccoon dog. PMID:26603554

  17. Successful treatment of c-kit-positive metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC) with a combination of curcumin plus imatinib: A case report.

    PubMed

    Demiray, M; Sahinbas, H; Atahan, S; Demiray, H; Selcuk, D; Yildirim, I; Atayoglu, A T

    2016-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive malignant neoplasm of the secretory glands. Conventional chemotherapy has poor effectiveness against metastatic ACC. Thus, a novel effective therapy is needed against metastatic ACC. A majority of ACCs (up to 94%) express c-kit. Imatinib is monoclonal antibody with specific activity against c-kit but has not been found to be effective in treating patients with ACC in which c-kit is overexpressed and activated. The NF-κB and mTOR pathways have been shown that ubiquitously and concurrently activated, indicating that the inhibition of these pathways may represent a novel treatment approach for patients with ACC. Curcumin has been shown to inhibit NF-κB and NF-κB-related pathways. 43-year-old patient was diagnosed ACC from submandibular salivary gland. After complete resection of tumor adjuvant radiotherapy was initiated. Seven years later multiple lung metastases were detected and ACC was confirmed by re-biopsy. First-line chemotherapy failed. NF-κB and c-kit were overexpressed in the metastatic specimens. Therefore, we treated the patient with metastatic chemoresistant ACC with imatinib 400mg/day and intravenous curcumin 225mg/m(2) twice a week plus oral bioavailable curcumin Arantal(®) 2×84mg/day. At 24 months, we observed near complete anatomic and complete metabolic response. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with a c-kit-positive ACC that is successfully treated with the combination of imatinib and curcumin in an integrative approach. PMID:27515884

  18. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between

  19. NADPH oxidase promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Röhm, Marc; Grimm, Melissa J; D'Auria, Anthony C; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Segal, Brahm H; Urban, Constantin F

    2014-05-01

    NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in antimicrobial host defense and in regulating inflammation. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generation of reactive oxidant intermediates. Aspergillus species are ubiquitous, filamentous fungi, which can cause invasive aspergillosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CGD, reflecting the critical role for NADPH oxidase in antifungal host defense. Activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils can be coupled to the release of proteins and chromatin that comingle in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can augment extracellular antimicrobial host defense. NETosis can be driven by NADPH oxidase-dependent and -independent pathways. We therefore undertook an analysis of whether NADPH oxidase was required for NETosis in Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Oropharyngeal instillation of live Aspergillus hyphae induced neutrophilic pneumonitis in both wild-type and NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47(phox-/-)) mice which had resolved in wild-type mice by day 5 but progressed in p47(phox-/-) mice. NETs, identified by immunostaining, were observed in lungs of wild-type mice but were absent in p47(phox-/-) mice. Using bona fide NETs and nuclear chromatin decondensation as an early NETosis marker, we found that NETosis required a functional NADPH oxidase in vivo and ex vivo. In addition, NADPH oxidase increased the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils. Together, our results show that NADPH oxidase is required for pulmonary clearance of Aspergillus hyphae and generation of NETs in vivo. We speculate that dual modulation of NETosis and apoptosis by NADPH oxidase enhances antifungal host defense and promotes resolution of inflammation upon infection clearance. PMID:24549323

  20. Source challenges resulting of the first applications of a UV storage ring FEL on Super-ACO

    SciTech Connect

    Couprie, M.E.; Bakker, R.; Nahon, L. |

    1995-12-31

    Since 1992, significant progresses were achieved on the Super-ACO (S-ACO) storage ring Free Electron Laser (FEL) in the UV. The operation at the nominal energy 800 MeV has several consequences: higher average power in the UV (25 mW at 60 mA and more recently 100 mW at 100 mA available for the users), 10 hours of lasing for the same injection of positrons, providing enough time for performing an user experiment, compatibility with the users of synchrotron radiation (SR) in the temporal structure mode for 120 mA with the possibility of closing the four insertion devices of S-ACO. The main difficulties to extend the FEL optical performances come from the small gain (2%), limiting a rapid extention of the spectral range (either in the laser mode or by coherent harmonic generation from the FEL itself in the undulator) or linewidth narrowing. The installation of a 500 MHz harmonic cavity for bunch length reduction and gain increase is under consideration{hor_ellipsis} The stability of the FEL temporal and spectral was systematically followed versus time, for various scales (from ns to half an hour) with different detectors. The stability of the laser source has been significantly improved with a longitudinal feedback system allowing the jitter of the 25 ps RMS laser micropulse to be reduced from 150-200 ps down to 10-20 ps. the intensity fluctuations to be damped down 1% and the spectral drift to be smaller than the resolution of the scanning Fabry-Perot (0.01{angstrom}) at perfect synchronism. The laser can work during more than 3 consecutive hours without readjustments. In addition, according to the ring current, the positron beam is submitted to coherent modes of synchrotron oscillations. Right now, a Pedersen type longitudinal feedback damps the dipolar modes of such oscillation. The quadrupolar modes in the 120-60 mA range leading to a rather unstable FEL are on the way to be damped with an additional feedback.

  1. Multicopper oxidase-1 orthologs from diverse insect species have ascorbate oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zeyu; Dittmer, Neal T.; Lang, Minglin; Brummett, Lisa M.; Braun, Caroline L.; Davis, Lawrence C.; Kanost, Michael R.; Gorman, Maureen J.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes can be classified by their substrate specificity; for example, ferroxidases oxidize ferrous iron, ascorbate oxidases oxidize ascorbate, and laccases oxidize aromatic substrates such as diphenols. Our previous work on an insect multicopper oxidase, MCO1, suggested that it may function as a ferroxidase. This hypothesis was based on three lines of evidence: RNAi-mediated knock down of Drosophila melanogaster MCO1 (DmMCO1) affects iron homeostasis, DmMCO1 has ferroxidase activity, and DmMCO1 has predicted iron binding residues. In our current study, we expanded our focus to include MCO1 from Anopheles gambiae, Tribolium castaneum, and Manduca sexta. We verified that MCO1 orthologs have similar expression profiles, and that the MCO1 protein is located on the basal surface of cells where it is positioned to oxidize substrates in the hemolymph. In addition, we determined that RNAi-mediated knock down of MCO1 in A. gambiae affects iron homeostasis. To further characterize the enzymatic activity of MCO1 orthologs, we purified recombinant MCO1 from all four insect species and performed kinetic analyses using ferrous iron, ascorbate and two diphenols as substrates. We found that all of the MCO1 orthologs are much better at oxidizing ascorbate than they are at oxidizing ferrous iron or diphenols. This result is surpring because ascorbate oxidases are thought to be specific to plants and fungi. An analysis of three predicted iron binding residues in DmMCO1 revealed that they are not required for ferroxidase or laccase activity, but two of the residues (His374 and Asp380) influence oxidation of ascorbate. These two residues are conserved in MCO1 orthologs from insects and crustaceans; therefore, they are likely to be important for MCO1 function. The results of this study suggest that MCO1 orthologs function as ascorbate oxidases and influence iron homeostasis through an unknown mechanism. PMID:25701385

  2. Hybridisations Of Simulated Annealing And Modified Simplex Algorithms On A Path Of Steepest Ascent With Multi-Response For Optimal Parameter Settings Of ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luangpaiboon, P.

    2009-10-01

    Many entrepreneurs face to extreme conditions for instances; costs, quality, sales and services. Moreover, technology has always been intertwined with our demands. Then almost manufacturers or assembling lines adopt it and come out with more complicated process inevitably. At this stage, products and service improvement need to be shifted from competitors with sustainability. So, a simulated process optimisation is an alternative way for solving huge and complex problems. Metaheuristics are sequential processes that perform exploration and exploitation in the solution space aiming to efficiently find near optimal solutions with natural intelligence as a source of inspiration. One of the most well-known metaheuristics is called Ant Colony Optimisation, ACO. This paper is conducted to give an aid in complicatedness of using ACO in terms of its parameters: number of iterations, ants and moves. Proper levels of these parameters are analysed on eight noisy continuous non-linear continuous response surfaces. Considering the solution space in a specified region, some surfaces contain global optimum and multiple local optimums and some are with a curved ridge. ACO parameters are determined through hybridisations of Modified Simplex and Simulated Annealing methods on the path of Steepest Ascent, SAM. SAM was introduced to recommend preferable levels of ACO parameters via statistically significant regression analysis and Taguchi's signal to noise ratio. Other performance achievements include minimax and mean squared error measures. A series of computational experiments using each algorithm were conducted. Experimental results were analysed in terms of mean, design points and best so far solutions. It was found that results obtained from a hybridisation with stochastic procedures of Simulated Annealing method were better than that using Modified Simplex algorithm. However, the average execution time of experimental runs and number of design points using hybridisations were

  3. Improving production of malonyl coenzyme A-derived metabolites by abolishing Snf1-dependent regulation of Acc1.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACCase) plays a central role in carbon metabolism and has been the site of action for the development of therapeutics or herbicides, as its product, malonyl-CoA, is a precursor for production of fatty acids and other compounds. Control of Acc1 activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs mainly at two levels, i.e., regulation of transcription and repression by Snf1 protein kinase at the protein level. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for improving the activity of ACCase in S. cerevisiae by abolishing posttranslational regulation of Acc1 via site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that introduction of two site mutations in Acc1, Ser659 and Ser1157, resulted in an enhanced activity of Acc1 and increased total fatty acid content. As Snf1 regulation of Acc1 is particularly active under glucose-limited conditions, we evaluated the effect of the two site mutations in chemostat cultures. Finally, we showed that our modifications of Acc1 could enhance the supply of malonyl-CoA and therefore successfully increase the production of two industrially important products derived from malonyl-CoA, fatty acid ethyl esters and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. IMPORTANCE ACCase is responsible for carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA, which is a crucial step in the control of fatty acid metabolism. ACCase opened the door for pharmaceutical treatments of obesity and diabetes as well as the development of new herbicides. ACCase is also recognized as a promising target for developing cell factories, as its malonyl-CoA product serves as a universal precursor for a variety of high-value compounds in white biotechnology. Yeast ACCase is a good model in understanding the enzyme's catalysis, regulation, and inhibition. The present study describes the importance of protein phosphorylation in regulation of yeast ACCase and identifies potential regulation sites. This study led to the generation of a more efficient ACCase, which

  4. Effect of contraceptive steroids on monoamine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, Jennifer; Collins, G. G. S.; Pryse-Davies, J.; Sandler, M.

    1969-01-01

    Cyclical variations in monoamine oxidase activity during the human menstrual cycle, specific to the endometrium and modified in women undergoing contraceptive steroid treatment, may reflect changes in hormonal environment. Treatment of rats with individual constituents of the contraceptive pill causes analogous changes: oestrogens inhibit and progestogens potentiate uterine monoamine oxidase activity. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3

  5. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Garcinia esculenta twigs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lun-Lun; Fu, Wen-Wei; Watanabe, Shimpei; Shao, Yi-Nuo; Tan, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Tan, Chang-Heng; Xiu, Yan-Feng; Norimoto, Hisayoshi; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2014-12-01

    The EtOAc-soluble portion of the 80 % (v/v) EtOH extract from the twigs of Garcinia esculenta exhibited strong xanthine oxidase inhibition in vitro. Bioassay-guided purification led to the isolation of 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (3) and griffipavixanthone (8) as the main xanthine oxidase inhibitors, along with six additional compounds (1, 2, 4-7), including two new compounds (1 and 2). This enzyme inhibition was dose dependent with an IC50 value of approximately 1.2 µM for 3 and 6.3 µM for 8. The inhibitory activity of 3 was stronger than the control allopurinol (IC50 value: 5.3 µM). To our knowledge, compound 8 is the first bixanthone that demonstrated potent XO inhibitory activity in vitro. The structures of the new compounds were established by spectroscopic analysis, and the optical properties and absolute stereochemistry of racemic (±) esculentin A (2) were further determined by the calculation of the DP4 probability and analysis of its MTPA ester derivatives. PMID:25340468

  6. Activation of antibacterial autophagy by NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ju; Canadien, Veronica; Lam, Grace Y.; Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Dinauer, Mary C.; Magalhaes, Marco A. O.; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in immunity to microbial pathogens. The autophagy system can target bacteria in phagosomes, promoting phagosome maturation and preventing pathogen escape into the cytosol. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling from phagosomes was found to initiate their targeting by the autophagy system, but the mechanism by which TLR signaling activates autophagy is unclear. Here we show that autophagy targeting of phagosomes is not exclusive to those containing TLR ligands. Engagement of either TLRs or the Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) during phagocytosis induced recruitment of the autophagy protein LC3 to phagosomes with similar kinetics. Both receptors are known to activate the NOX2 NADPH oxidase, which plays a central role in microbial killing by phagocytes through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that NOX2-generated ROS are necessary for LC3 recruitment to phagosomes. Antibacterial autophagy in human epithelial cells, which do not express NOX2, was also dependent on ROS generation. These data reveal a coupling of oxidative and nonoxidative killing activities of the NOX2 NADPH oxidase in phagocytes through autophagy. Furthermore, our results suggest a general role for members of the NOX family in regulating autophagy. PMID:19339495

  7. Anatomically shaped cranial collimation (ACC) for lateral cephalometric radiography: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Hoogeveen, R C; van der Stelt, P F; Berkhout, W E R

    2014-01-01

    Lateral cephalograms in orthodontic practice display an area cranial of the base of the skull that is not required for diagnostic evaluation. Attempts have been made to reduce the radiation dose to the patient using collimators combining the shielding of the areas above the base of the skull and below the mandible. These so-called "wedge-shaped" collimators have not become standard equipment in orthodontic offices, possibly because these collimators were not designed for today's combination panoramic-cephalometric imaging systems. It also may be that the anatomical variability of the area below the mandible makes this area unsuitable for standardized collimation. In addition, a wedge-shaped collimator shields the cervical vertebrae; therefore, assessment of skeletal maturation, which is based on the stage of development of the cervical vertebrae, cannot be performed. In this report, we describe our investigations into constructing a collimator to be attached to the cephalostat and shield the cranial area of the skull, while allowing the visualization of diagnostically relevant structures and markedly reducing the size of the irradiated area. The shape of the area shielded by this "anatomically shaped cranial collimator" (ACC) was based on mean measurements of cephalometric landmarks of 100 orthodontic patients. It appeared that this collimator reduced the area of irradiation by almost one-third without interfering with the imaging system or affecting the quality of the image. Further research is needed to validate the clinical efficacy of the collimator. PMID:24170799

  8. CO2 Measurements from Space: Lessons Learned from the Collaboration between the ACOS/OCO-2 and GOSAT Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, D.; Eldering, A.; Gunson, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and the Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) were the first two missions designed to collect space-based observations of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, with the sensitivity, coverage, and resolution needed to quantify CO2 fluxes on regional scales over the globe. The OCO and GOSAT teams formed a close collaboration during the development phases of these missions. After the loss of OCO, the GOSAT project team invited the OCO team to contribute to the analysis of measurements collected by the GOSAT Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observations-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS). NASA responded by reformulating the OCO science team under the Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space (ACOS) task to exploit this opportunity. This collaboration is providing an independent GOSAT XCO2 product, and valuable insights into the retrieval algorithms, calibration methods, and validation techniques that are being developed to analyze data anticipated the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2). The ACOS/OCO-2 and GOSAT teams have conducted four, joint, vicarious calibration campaigns at Railroad Valley, Nevada to track the long-term radiometric performance of the TANSO-FTS instrument. The methods used in these campaigns evolved from those used to characterize the radiometric performance of high spatial resolution, imaging spectroradiometers. For TANSO-FTS, the conventional, surface based radiometric measurements have been augmented with surface and aircraft measurements of atmospheric temperature and trace gas profiles, as well as surface observations from MODIS and ASTER to characterize spatial variations of the surface reflectance within the (relatively large) sounding footprints. Similar methods will be needed for OCO-2. The ACOS/OCO-2 retrieval algorithm and associated data screening methods have been modified to estimate XCO2 from TANSO-FTS observations. Comparisons of TANSO

  9. Emission "Off-On" effect from europium complexes triggered by AcO anion: synthesis, characterization and sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jing

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a series of Eu(III) complexes based on four diamine ligands and two diketone ligands were synthesized. Their single crystal structures were studied, where intermolecular π-π stacking was found. The photophysical parameters of these Eu(III) complexes were measured, along with their ligand triplet levels. The energy transfer mechanism between ligand and metal center was discussed in detail. Energy transfer roll-back was found in Eu(III) complexes owing large-conjugated diamine ligands, compromising emissive performance. This energy transfer roll-back, however, could be stopped by the presence of AcO anion, leading to Eu(III) complex emission enhancement. The sensing performance of such Eu(III) complexes was thus investigated in detail. High sensitivity and selectivity were observed. PMID:24632149

  10. Overexpression of ACC gene from oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi enhanced the lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with increased levels of glycerol 3-phosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiancai; Xu, Ronghua; Wang, Ruling; Haque, Mohammad Enamul; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-06-01

    The conversion of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is the rate-limiting step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, a gene coding for ACC was isolated and characterized from an oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of L. starkeyi acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (LsACC1) showed that the expression levels were upregulated with the fast accumulation of lipids. The LsACC1 was co-overexpressed with the glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1), which regulates lipids biosynthesis by supplying another substrates glycerol 3-phosphate for storage lipid assembly, in the non-oleaginous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Further, the S. cerevisiae acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ScACC1) was transferred with GPD1 and its function was analyzed in comparison with LsACC1. The results showed that overexpressed LsACC1 and GPD1 resulted in a 63% increase in S. cerevisiae. This study gives new data in understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of fatty acids and lipid biosynthesis in yeasts. PMID:26865376

  11. The complex roles of NADPH oxidases in fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Deborah; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NADPH oxidases play key roles in immunity and inflammation that go beyond the production of microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS). The past decade has brought a new appreciation for the diversity of roles played by ROS in signaling associated with inflammation and immunity. NADPH oxidase activity affects disease outcome during infections by human pathogenic fungi, an important group of emerging and opportunistic pathogens that includes Candida, Aspergillus and Cryptococcus species. Here we review how alternative roles of NADPH oxidase activity impact fungal infection and how ROS signaling affects fungal physiology. Particular attention is paid to roles for NADPH oxidase in immune migration, immunoregulation in pulmonary infection, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, autophagy and inflammasome activity. These recent advances highlight the power and versatility of spatiotemporally controlled redox regulation in the context of infection, and point to a need to understand the molecular consequences of NADPH oxidase activity in the cell. PMID:24905433

  12. Ascorbic acid and L-gulonolactone oxidase in lagomorphs.

    PubMed

    Jenness, R; Birney, E C; Ayaz, K L

    1978-01-01

    1. The activity of L-gulonolactone oxidase (EC 1.1.3.8) in the liver of eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) is about 10-fold greater in winter than in summer. 2. L-gulonolactone oxidase activity is low and tissue ascorbate high during all seasons in snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus). 3. Liver contents of ascorbate fall to low levels in L. americanus fed on rabbit chow in the laboratory. 4. The activity of L-gulonolactone oxidase in liver of Sylvilagus and Oryctolagus is depressed by feeding high levels of L-ascorbic acid. 5. The New Zealand White breed of domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) has considerably higher levels of L-gulonolactone oxidase and liver ascorbate than does the Dutch breed. 6. In a wild population of Oryctolagus sampled in Australia L-gulonolactone oxidase levels were intermediate between those of the two domestic breeds and more variable than either. PMID:318384

  13. Characterization of a Decapentapletic Gene (AccDpp) from Apis cerana cerana and Its Possible Involvement in Development and Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xulei; Guo, Xingqi; Sun, Qinghua; Xu, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    To tolerate many acute and chronic oxidative stress-producing agents that exist in the environment, organisms have evolved many classes of signal transduction pathways, including the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signal pathway. Decapentapletic gene (Dpp) belongs to the TGFβ superfamily, and studies on Dpp have mainly focused on its role in the regulation of development. No study has investigated the response of Dpp to oxidative pressure in any organism, including Apis cerana cerana (A. cerana cerana). In this study, we identified a Dpp gene from A. cerana cerana named AccDpp. The 5΄ flanking region of AccDpp had many transcription factor binding sites that relevant to development and stress response. AccDpp was expressed at all stages of A. cerana cerana, with its highest expression in 15-day worker bees. The mRNA level of AccDpp was higher in the poison gland and midgut than other tissues. Furthermore, the transcription of AccDpp could be repressed by 4°C and UV, but induced by other treatments, according to our qRT-PCR analysis. It is worth noting that the expression level of AccDpp protein was increased after a certain time when A. cerana cerana was subjected to all simulative oxidative stresses, a finding that was not completely consistent with the result from qRT-PCR. It is interesting that recombinant AccDpp restrained the growth of Escherichia coli, a function that might account for the role of the antimicrobial peptides of AccDpp. In conclusion, these results provide evidence that AccDpp might be implicated in the regulation of development and the response of oxidative pressure. The findings may lay a theoretical foundation for further genetic studies of Dpp. PMID:26881804

  14. Gene structure and quinol oxidase activity of a cytochrome bd-type oxidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, J; Koga, E; Mizuta, T; Sato, C; Noguchi, S; Sone, N

    1999-04-21

    Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus species contain cytochrome caa3-type cytochrome c oxidase as their main terminal oxidase in the respiratory chain. We previously identified and purified an alternative oxidase, cytochrome bd-type quinol oxidase, from a mutant of Bacillus stearothermophilus defective in the caa3-type oxidase activity (J. Sakamoto et al., FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 143 (1996) 151-158). Compared with proteobacterial counterparts, B. stearothermophilus cytochrome bd showed lower molecular weights of the two subunits, shorter wavelength of alpha-band absorption maximum due to heme D, and lower quinol oxidase activity. Preincubation with menaquinone-2 enhanced the enzyme activity up to 40 times, suggesting that, besides the catalytic site, there is another quinone-binding site which largely affects the enzyme activity. In order to clarify the molecular basis of the differences of cytochromes bd between B. stearothermophilus and proteobacteria, the genes encoding for the B. stearothermophilus bd was cloned based on its partial peptide sequences. The gene for subunit I (cbdA) encodes 448 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 50195 Da, which is 14 and 17% shorter than those of Escherichia coli and Azotobacter vinelandii, respectively, and CbdA lacks the C-terminal half of the long hydrophilic loop between the putative transmembrane segments V and VI (Q loop), which has been suggested to include the substrate quinone-binding site for the E. coli enzyme. The gene for subunit II (cbdB) encodes 342 residues with a molecular weight of 38992 Da. Homology search indicated that the B. stearothermophilus cbdAB has the highest sequence similarity to ythAB in B. subtilis genome rather than to cydAB, the first set of cytochrome bd genes identified in the genome. Sequence comparison of cytochromes bd and their homologs from various organisms demonstrates that the proteins can be classified into two subfamilies, a proteobacterial type including E. coli bd and a

  15. 2016 ESC and ACC/AHA/HFSA heart failure guideline update - what is new and why is it important?

    PubMed

    Jessup, Mariell; Marwick, Thomas H; Ponikowski, Piotr; Voors, Adriaan A; Yancy, Clyde W

    2016-09-14

    Heart failure (HF) is a global epidemic affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Although important progress has been made in the management of HF, this condition remains a common cause of morbidity and death. Since the publication of the previous sets of guidelines for the management of HF, new diagnostic and therapeutic options for HF have emerged. Now, both the ESC and the ACC/AHA/HFSA have simultaneously published an update of their guidelines incorporating, among others, recommendations for the use of new pharmacological therapies for the treatment of HF. For this Viewpoint article, we have asked the chairs of the ESC Task Force, the chairs of the ACC/AHA/HFSA Writing Committee, and an independent opinion leader in the field to offer their expert insight into the new guidelines, highlighting what is new, what the main differences are between the two sets of guidelines, and what steps should be taken to improve the guidelines in future updates. PMID:27625120

  16. A comparison of native GPU computing versus OpenACC for implementing flow-routing algorithms in hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Antonio J.; Noguera, José M.; Luque, Adrián

    2016-02-01

    In recent years GPU computing has gained wide acceptance as a simple low-cost solution for speeding up computationally expensive processing in many scientific and engineering applications. However, in most cases accelerating a traditional CPU implementation for a GPU is a non-trivial task that requires a thorough refactorization of the code and specific optimizations that depend on the architecture of the device. OpenACC is a promising technology that aims at reducing the effort required to accelerate C/C++/Fortran code on an attached multicore device. Virtually with this technology the CPU code only has to be augmented with a few compiler directives to identify the areas to be accelerated and the way in which data has to be moved between the CPU and GPU. Its potential benefits are multiple: better code readability, less development time, lower risk of errors and less dependency on the underlying architecture and future evolution of the GPU technology. Our aim with this work is to evaluate the pros and cons of using OpenACC against native GPU implementations in computationally expensive hydrological applications, using the classic D8 algorithm of O'Callaghan and Mark for river network extraction as case-study. We implemented the flow accumulation step of this algorithm in CPU, using OpenACC and two different CUDA versions, comparing the length and complexity of the code and its performance with different datasets. We advance that although OpenACC can not match the performance of a CUDA optimized implementation (×3.5 slower in average), it provides a significant performance improvement against a CPU implementation (×2-6) with by far a simpler code and less implementation effort.

  17. Expression of the alternative oxidase complements cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Dassa, Emmanuel P; Dufour, Eric; Gonçalves, Sérgio; Paupe, Vincent; Hakkaart, Gertjan A J; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from early onset devastating encephalomyopathy and cardiomyopathy, to neurological diseases in adulthood and in the elderly. No method of compensating successfully for COX deficiency has been reported so far. In vitro, COX-deficient human cells require additional glucose, pyruvate and uridine for normal growth and are specifically sensitive to oxidative stress. Here, we have tested whether the expression of a mitochondrially targeted, cyanide-resistant, alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis could alleviate the metabolic abnormalities of COX-deficient human cells either from a patient harbouring a COX15 pathological mutation or rendered deficient by silencing the COX10 gene using shRNA. We demonstrate that the expression of the AOX, well-tolerated by the cells, compensates for both the growth defect and the pronounced oxidant-sensitivity of COX-deficient human cells. PMID:20049701

  18. Reduced AMPK-ACC and mTOR signaling in muscle from older men, and effect of resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengyao; Verdijk, Lex B; Sakamoto, Kei; Ely, Brian; van Loon, Luc J C; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key energy-sensitive enzyme that controls numerous metabolic and cellular processes. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is another energy/nutrient-sensitive kinase that controls protein synthesis and cell growth. In this study we determined whether older versus younger men have alterations in the AMPK and mTOR pathways in skeletal muscle, and examined the effect of a long term resistance type exercise training program on these signaling intermediaries. Older men had decreased AMPKα2 activity and lower phosphorylation of AMPK and its downstream signaling substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). mTOR phosphylation also was reduced in muscle from older men. Exercise training increased AMPKα1 activity in older men, however, AMPKα2 activity, and the phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and mTOR, were not affected. In conclusion, older men have alterations in the AMPK-ACC and mTOR pathways in muscle. In addition, prolonged resistance type exercise training induces an isoform-selective up regulation of AMPK activity. PMID:23000302

  19. In Situ Enzymatically Generated Photoswitchable Oxidase Mimetics and Their Application for Colorimetric Detection of Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gen-Xia; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Dong, Yu-Ming; Li, Zai-Jun; Wang, Guang-Li

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a simple and amplified colorimetric assay is developed for the detection of the enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase (GOx) based on in situ formation of a photoswitchable oxidase mimetic of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS quantum dots (QDs). GOx catalyzes the oxidation of 1-thio-β-d-glucose to give 1-thio-β-d-gluconic acid which spontaneously hydrolyzes to β-d-gluconic acid and H₂S; the generated H₂S instantly reacts with Cd(2+) in the presence of Na₃PO₄ to give PO₄(3-)-stabilized CdS QDs in situ. Under visible-light (λ ≥ 400 nm) stimulation, the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs are a new style of oxidase mimic derived by producing some active species, such as h⁺, (•)OH, O₂(•-) and a little H₂O₂, which can oxidize the typical substrate (3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzydine (TMB)) with a color change. Based on the GOx-triggered growth of the oxidase mimetics of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs in situ, we developed a simple and amplified colorimetric assay to probe the enzymatic activity of GOx. The proposed method allowed the detection of the enzymatic activity of GOx over the range from 25 μg/L to 50 mg/L with a low detection limit of 6.6 μg/L. We believe the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs generated in situ with photo-stimulated enzyme-mimicking activity may find wide potential applications in biosensors. PMID:27409598

  20. NADPH Oxidases in Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Joy X.; Török, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common feature observed in a wide spectrum of chronic liver diseases including viral hepatitis, alcoholic, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) are emerging as major sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several major isoforms are expressed in the liver, including NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4. While the phagocytic NOX2 has been known to play an important role in Kupffer cell and neutrophil phagocytic activity and inflammation, the nonphagocytic NOX homologues are increasingly recognized as key enzymes in oxidative injury and wound healing. In this review, we will summarize the current advances in knowledge on the regulatory pathways of NOX activation, their cellular distribution, and their role in the modulation of redox signaling in liver diseases. PMID:26436133

  1. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mei-Fang; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Wei-De; Liao, Lin; Wan, Hong-Fu

    2011-11-01

    In this study, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was extracted from commercial potatoes. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO was investigated. The experimental results show that potato PPO is more active in weak acid than in basic condition and that the optimum pH for the reaction is 5.0. The degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO reaches a maximum at 298 K. After reaction for 1 h, the removal of both pentachlorophenol and total organic carbon is >70% with 6.0 units/mL potato PPO at pH 5.0 and 298 K. Pentachlorophenol can be degraded through dechlorination and ring-opening by potato PPO. The work demonstrates that pentachlorophenol can be effectively eliminated by crude potato PPO. PMID:21967325

  2. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  3. Drugs related to monoamine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Zdeněk

    2016-08-01

    Progress in understanding the role of monoamine neurotransmission in pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders was made after the discovery of the mechanisms of action of psychoactive drugs, including monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. The increase in monoamine neurotransmitter availability, decrease in hydrogen peroxide production, and neuroprotective effects evoked by MAO inhibitors represent an important approach in the development of new drugs for the treatment of mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. New drugs are synthesized by acting as multitarget-directed ligands, with MAO, acetylcholinesterase, and iron chelation as targets. Basic information is summarized in this paper about the drug-induced regulation of monoaminergic systems in the brain, with a focus on MAO inhibition. Desirable effects of MAO inhibition include increased availability of monoamine neurotransmitters, decreased oxidative stress, decreased formation of neurotoxins, induction of pro-survival genes and antiapoptotic factors, and improved mitochondrial functions. PMID:26944656

  4. NADPH Oxidases in Lung Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Karen; Hecker, Louise; Luckhardt, Tracy R.; Cheng, Guangjie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The evolution of the lungs and circulatory systems in vertebrates ensured the availability of molecular oxygen (O2; dioxygen) for aerobic cellular metabolism of internal organs in large animals. O2 serves as the physiologic terminal acceptor of mitochondrial electron transfer and of the NADPH oxidase (Nox) family of oxidoreductases to generate primarily water and reactive oxygen species (ROS), respectively. Recent advances: The purposeful generation of ROS by Nox family enzymes suggests important roles in normal physiology and adaptation, most notably in host defense against invading pathogens and in cellular signaling. Critical issues: However, there is emerging evidence that, in the context of chronic stress and/or aging, Nox enzymes contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of lung diseases. Future Directions: Here, we review evolving functions of Nox enzymes in normal lung physiology and emerging pathophysiologic roles in lung disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2838–2853. PMID:24093231

  5. Modeling dioxygen reduction at multicopper oxidase cathodes.

    PubMed

    Agbo, Peter; Heath, James R; Gray, Harry B

    2014-10-01

    We report a general kinetics model for catalytic dioxygen reduction on multicopper oxidase (MCO) cathodes. Our rate equation combines Butler-Volmer (BV) electrode kinetics and the Michaelis-Menten (MM) formalism for enzymatic catalysis, with the BV model accounting for interfacial electron transfer (ET) between the electrode surface and the MCO type 1 copper site. Extending the principles of MM kinetics to this system produced an analytical expression incorporating the effects of subsequent intramolecular ET and dioxygen binding to the trinuclear copper cluster into the cumulative model. We employed experimental electrochemical data on Thermus thermophilus laccase as benchmarks to validate our model, which we suggest will aid in the design of more efficient MCO cathodes. In addition, we demonstrate the model's utility in determining estimates for both the electronic coupling and average distance between the laccase type-1 active site and the cathode substrate. PMID:25188422

  6. POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 from rice (Oryza sativa) is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taibo; Wook Kim, Dong; Niitsu, Masaru; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-01-01

    POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 (OsPAO1), from rice (Oryza sativa), and POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5 (AtPAO5), from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are enzymes sharing high identity at the amino acid level and with similar characteristics, such as polyamine specificity and pH preference; furthermore, both proteins localize to the cytosol. A loss-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, Atpao5–2, was hypersensitive to low doses of exogenous thermospermine but this phenotype could be rescued by introduction of the wild-type AtPAO5 gene. Introduction of OsPAO1, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into Atpao5–2 mutants also restored normal thermospermine sensitivity, allowing growth in the presence of low levels of thermospermine, along with a concomitant decrease in thermospermine content in plants. By contrast, introduction of OsPAO3, which encodes a peroxisome-localized polyamine oxidase, into Atpao5–2 plants could not rescue any of the mutant phenotypes in the presence of thermospermine. These results suggest that OsPAO1 is the functional ortholog of AtPAO5. PMID:25763711

  7. POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 from rice (Oryza sativa) is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taibo; Wook Kim, Dong; Niitsu, Masaru; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-07-25

    POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 (OsPAO1), from rice (Oryza sativa), and POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5 (AtPAO5), from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are enzymes sharing high identity at the amino acid level and with similar characteristics, such as polyamine specificity and pH preference; furthermore, both proteins localize to the cytosol. A loss-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, Atpao5-2, was hypersensitive to low doses of exogenous thermospermine but this phenotype could be rescued by introduction of the wild-type AtPAO5 gene. Introduction of OsPAO1, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into Atpao5-2 mutants also restored normal thermospermine sensitivity, allowing growth in the presence of low levels of thermospermine, along with a concomitant decrease in thermospermine content in plants. By contrast, introduction of OsPAO3, which encodes a peroxisome-localized polyamine oxidase, into Atpao5-2 plants could not rescue any of the mutant phenotypes in the presence of thermospermine. These results suggest that OsPAO1 is the functional ortholog of AtPAO5. PMID:25061821

  8. Lysyl oxidase binds transforming growth factor-beta and regulates its signaling via amine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Atsawasuwan, Phimon; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Kaku, Masaru; Fong, Keith S K; Csiszar, Katalin; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2008-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX), an amine oxidase critical for the initiation of collagen and elastin cross-linking, has recently been shown to regulate cellular activities possibly by modulating the functions of growth factors. In this study, we investigated the interaction between LOX and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), a potent growth factor abundant in bone, the effect of LOX on TGF-beta1 signaling, and its potential mechanism. The specific binding between mature LOX and mature TGF-beta1 was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pulldown assay in vitro. Both proteins were colocalized in the extracellular matrix in an osteoblastic cell culture system, and the binding complex was identified in the mineral-associated fraction of bone matrix. Furthermore, LOX suppressed TGF-beta1-induced Smad3 phosphorylation likely through its amine oxidase activity. The data indicate that LOX binds to mature TGF-beta1 and enzymatically regulates its signaling in bone and thus may play an important role in bone maintenance and remodeling. PMID:18835815

  9. Circumpolar Estimates of Isopycnal Mixing in the ACC from Argo Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, C. J.; Balwada, D.; Speer, K. G.

    2015-12-01

    There are few direct observations of cross-stream isopycnal mixing in the interior of the Southern Ocean, yet such measurements are needed to determine the role of eddies transporting properties across the ACC, and key to progress toward testing theories of meridional overturning. In light of this we examine if it is possible to obtain estimates of mixing from Argo float trajectories. We divided the Southern Ocean into overlapping 15ο longitude bins before estimating mixing. Resulting diffusivities ranged from 300 to 3000 m2s-1, with peaks corresponding to the Scotia Sea; Kerguelen and Campbell Plateaus. Comparison of our diffusivities with previous regional studies demonstrated good agreement. Tests of the methodology in the DIMES region found that mixing from Argo floats agreed closely with mixing from RAFOS floats. To further test the method we used the Southern Ocean State Estimate velocity fields to advect particles with Argo and RAFOS float like behaviours. Stirring estimates from the particles agreed well with each other in the Kerguelen Island region, South Pacific and Scotia Sea, despite the differences in the imposed behaviour. Finally, these estimates were compared to mixing length suppression theory presented in Ferrari and Nikurashin 2010. This mixing length suppression theory quantifies horizontal diffusivity similar to Prandtl (1925), but the mixing length is suppressed in the presence of mean flows and eddy phase speeds. Our results suggest that the theory can explain both the structure and magnitude of mixing using mean flow data. An exception is near the Kerguelen and Campbell Plateaus where theory under-estimates mixing relative to our results.

  10. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase and specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Cachat, Julien; Deffert, Christine; Hugues, Stephanie; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2 produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a well-known player in host defence. However, there is also increasing evidence for a regulatory role of NOX2 in adaptive immunity. Deficiency in phagocyte NADPH oxidase causes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) in humans, a condition that can also be studied in CGD mice. Clinical observations in CGD patients suggest a higher susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, in particular lupus, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and rheumatoid arthritis. In mice, a strong correlation exists between a polymorphism in a NOX2 subunit and the development of autoimmune arthritis. NOX2 deficiency in mice also favours lupus development. Both CGD patients and CGD mice exhibit increased levels of immunoglobulins, including autoantibodies. Despite these phenotypes suggesting a role for NOX2 in specific immunity, mechanistic explanations for the typical increase of CGD in autoimmune disease and antibody levels are still preliminary. NOX2-dependent ROS generation is well documented for dendritic cells and B-lymphocytes. It is unclear whether T-lymphocytes produce ROS themselves or whether they are exposed to ROS derived from dendritic cells during the process of antigen presentation. ROS are signalling molecules in virtually any cell type, including T- and B-lymphocytes. However, knowledge about the impact of ROS-dependent signalling on T- and B-lymphocyte phenotype and response is still limited. ROS might contribute to Th1/Th2/Th17 cell fate decisions during T-lymphocyte activation and might enhance immunoglobulin production by B-lymphocytes. In dendritic cells, NOX2-derived ROS might be important for antigen processing and cell activation. PMID:25760962

  11. Polyphenol Oxidase Activity Expression in Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Solano, Francisco; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the genome of Ralstonia solanacearum revealed several genes that putatively code for polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). To study the actual expression of these genes, we looked for and detected all kinds of PPO activities, including laccase, cresolase, and catechol oxidase activities, in cellular extracts of this microorganism. The conditions for the PPO assays were optimized for the phenolic substrate, pH, and sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration used. It was demonstrated that three different PPOs are expressed. The genes coding for the enzymes were unambiguously correlated with the enzymatic activities detected by generation of null mutations in the genes by using insertional mutagenesis with a suicide plasmid and estimating the changes in the levels of enzymatic activities compared to the levels in the wild-type strain. The protein encoded by the RSp1530 locus is a multicopper protein with laccase activity. Two other genes, RSc0337 and RSc1501, code for nonblue copper proteins exhibiting homology to tyrosinases. The product of RSc0337 has strong tyrosine hydroxylase activity, and it has been shown that this enzyme is involved in melanin synthesis by R. solanacearum. The product of the RSc1501 gene is an enzyme that shows a clear preference for oxidation of o-diphenols. Preliminary characterization of the mutants obtained indicated that PPOs expressed by R. solanacearum may participate in resistance to phenolic compounds since the mutants exhibited higher sensitivity to l-tyrosine than the wild-type strain. These results suggest a possible role in the pathogenic process to avoid plant resistance mechanisms involving the participation of phenolic compounds. PMID:16269713

  12. Evaluation of oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Cassland, Pierre; Sjöde, Anders; Winestrand, Sandra; Jönsson, Leif J; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof

    2010-05-01

    Increased recirculation of process water has given rise to problems with formation of calcium oxalate incrusts (scaling) in the pulp and paper industry and in forest biorefineries. The potential in using oxalate decarboxylase from Aspergillus niger for oxalic acid removal in industrial bleaching plant filtrates containing oxalic acid was examined and compared with barley oxalate oxidase. Ten different filtrates from chemical pulping were selected for the evaluation. Oxalate decarboxylase degraded oxalic acid faster than oxalate oxidase in eight of the filtrates, while oxalate oxidase performed better in one filtrate. One of the filtrates inhibited both enzymes. The potential inhibitory effect of selected compounds on the enzymatic activity was tested. Oxalate decarboxylase was more sensitive than oxalate oxidase to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate decarboxylase was not as sensitive to chlorate and chlorite as oxalate oxidase. Up to 4 mM chlorate ions, the highest concentration tested, had no inhibitory effect on oxalate decarboxylase. Analysis of the filtrates suggests that high concentrations of chlorate present in some of the filtrates were responsible for the higher sensitivity of oxalate oxidase in these filtrates. Oxalate decarboxylase was thus a better choice than oxalate oxidase for treatment of filtrates from chlorine dioxide bleaching. PMID:19763895

  13. Dephenolization of industrial wastewaters catalyzed by polyphenol oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Atlow, S.C.; Bonadonna-Aparo, L.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    A new enzymatic method for the removal of phenols from industrial aqueous effluents has been developed. The method uses the enzyme polyphenol oxidase which oxidizes phenols to the corresponding o-quinones; the latter then undergo a nonenzymatic polymerization to form water-insoluble aggregates. Therefore, the enzyme in effect precipitates phenols from water. Polyphenol oxidase has been found to nearly completely dephenolize solutions of phenol in the concentration range from 0.01 to 1.0 g/L. The enzymatic treatment is effective over a wide range of pH and temperature; a crude preparation of polyphenol oxidase (mushroom extract) is as effective as a purified, commercially obtained version. In addition to phenol itself, polyphenol oxidase is capable of precipitating from water a number of substituted phenols (cresols, chlorophenols, naphthol, etc.). Also, even pollutants which are unreactive towards polyphenol oxidase can be enzymatically coprecipitated with phenol. The polyphenol oxidase treatment has been successfully used to dephenolize two different real industrial wastewater samples, from a plant producing triarylphosphates and from a coke plant. The advantage of the polyphenol oxidase dephenolization over the peroxidase-catalyzed one previously elaborated by the authors is that the former enzyme uses molecular oxygen instead of costly hydrogen peroxide (used by peroxidase) as an oxidant.

  14. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  15. Direct observations of the ACC transport across the Kerguelen Plateau from the 2009-2010 TRACK cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyang Park, Young; Vivier, Frédéric; Roquet, Fabien; Kestenare, Elodie; Sekma, Hela; Durand, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    The Kerguelen Plateau is considered as a major barrier to the eastward flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), diverting about 2/3 of its transport to the north of the plateau and the remaining transport across the vast plateau developed between the Kerguelen Islands and Antarctica. However, due to the lack of systematic high-quality observations especially across the Fawn Trough, our knowledge of ACC branches and associated transports across the Kerguelen Plateau has been largely indirect and debated, with previous transport estimates ranging from 30 to 100 Sv. In order to fill this knowledge gap, we undertook full-depth CTD and LADCP measurements in the Fawn Trough area and moored three lines of a total of 9 current-meters across the Fawn Trough in February-March 2009 during the TRACK-1 cruise. The TRACK-1 data have permitted us to document for the first time a detailed vertical current structure especially across the Fawn Trough as well as the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) on the eastern flank of the Kerguelen Plateau at 58°S. The Fawn Trough Current appears as a principal across-plateau jet associated with the Southern ACC Front, concentrating the majority (43 Sv) of the eastward transport passing to the south of the Kerguelen Islands (58 Sv), compared to ~92 Sv at the Subantarctic Front as estimated previously to the north of the islands. This yields a total transport of ~150 Sv for the ACC transiting through the Kerguelen longitude, consistent with other independent estimates in the other sectors of the Southern Ocean, but with an up-to-date partition of ~60% of the transport passing to the north of the Kerguelen Plateau and ~40% across the plateau. The DWBC transport at 58°S is estimated as 43 Sv, of which 36 Sv come from the northward turning of the westward flowing Antarctic Slope Current and the rest (7 Sv) originates from the southernmost branch of the ACC passing through the northern Princess Elizabeth Trough. Two other transport branches

  16. CotA, a Multicopper Oxidase from Bacillus pumilus WH4, Exhibits Manganese-Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmei; Bao, Peng; Bai, Tenglong; Deng, Lin; Wu, Hui; Liu, Fan; He, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) are a family of enzymes that use copper ions as cofactors to oxidize various substrates. Previous research has demonstrated that several MCOs such as MnxG, MofA and MoxA can act as putative Mn(II) oxidases. Meanwhile, the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus species has been confirmed as a typical MCO. To study the relationship between CotA and the Mn(II) oxidation, the cotA gene from a highly active Mn(II)-oxidizing strain Bacillus pumilus WH4 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain M15. The purified CotA contained approximately four copper atoms per molecule and showed spectroscopic properties typical of blue copper oxidases. Importantly, apart from the laccase activities, the CotA also displayed substantial Mn(II)-oxidase activities both in liquid culture system and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum Mn(II) oxidase activity was obtained at 53°C in HEPES buffer (pH 8.0) supplemented with 0.8 mM CuCl2. Besides, the addition of o-phenanthroline and EDTA both led to a complete suppression of Mn(II)-oxidizing activity. The specific activity of purified CotA towards Mn(II) was 0.27 U/mg. The Km, Vmax and kcat values towards Mn(II) were 14.85±1.17 mM, 3.01×10−6±0.21 M·min−1 and 0.32±0.02 s−1, respectively. Moreover, the Mn(II)-oxidizing activity of the recombinant E. coli strain M15-pQE-cotA was significantly increased when cultured both in Mn-containing K liquid medium and on agar plates. After 7-day liquid cultivation, M15-pQE-cotA resulted in 18.2% removal of Mn(II) from the medium. Furthermore, the biogenic Mn oxides were clearly observed on the cell surfaces of M15-pQE-cotA by scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides the direct observation of Mn(II) oxidation with the heterologously expressed protein CotA, Therefore, this novel finding not only establishes the foundation for in-depth study of Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms, but also offers a

  17. The terminal oxidase in the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H; Denis, M; Malatesta, F

    1997-06-01

    The molecular properties of a novel membrane quinol oxidase from the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617 are presented. The protein contains 2b hemes/mole which may be distinguished by EPR spectroscopy but not by optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Respiration, though being cyanide insensitive, is not inhibited by carbon monoxide and oxygen reduction is carried out only half-way with production of hydrogen peroxide. The terminal oxidase represents, therefore, a unique example in the large family of terminal oxidases known up to date. PMID:9337488

  18. Identification of yeasts from clinical specimens by oxidase test.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Arora, B S; Mathur, M D

    2000-10-01

    A total of 100 yeasts and yeast like fungi isolates from clinical specimens were negative for oxidase production on Sabouraud dextrose agar. When grown on Columbia agar, chocolate agar, tryptose agar, Mueller-Hinton agar, brain heart infusion and a medium resembling Sabouraud's dextrose agar but with starch instead of dextrose, all the isolate of Candida albicans (55), C. guilliermondii (6), C. parapsilosis (14), C. tropicalis (6), C. pseudotropicalis (6) and Crytococcus neoformans (2) were positive for oxidase producation. Torulopsis glabrata (2), Saccharomyces cervisiae (2) and two out of seven isolates of C. krusei were negative for oxidase test. PMID:11344606

  19. Aiding and abetting roles of NOX oxidases in cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves

    2013-01-01

    NADPH oxidases of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) family are dedicated reactive oxygen species-generating enzymes that broadly and specifically regulate redox-sensitive signalling pathways that are involved in cancer development and progression. They act at specific cellular membranes and microdomains through the activation of oncogenes and the inactivation of tumour suppressor proteins. In this Review, we discuss primary targets and redox-linked signalling systems that are influenced by NOX-derived ROS, and the biological role of NOX oxidases in the aetiology of cancer. PMID:22918415

  20. Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules: Interaction with the Enzyme Cytochrome C Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Laura; Dellacasa, Elena; Noor, Mohamed R.; Soulimane, Tewfik; Bianchini, Paolo; D'Autilia, Francesca; Antipov, Alexei; Diaspro, Alberto; Tofail, Syed A. M.; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2014-01-01

    Cell-sized polyelectrolyte capsules functionalized with a redox-driven proton pump protein were assembled for the first time. The interaction of polyelectrolyte microcapsules, fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly, with cytochrome c oxidase molecules was investigated. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase retained its functionality, that the functionalized microcapsules interacting with cytochrome c oxidase were permeable and that the permeability characteristics of the microcapsule shell depend on the shell components. This work provides a significant input towards the fabrication of an integrated device made of biological components and based on specific biomolecular functions and properties. PMID:25372607

  1. Cardiac-specific deletion of acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) prevents metabolic remodeling during pressure-overload hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Olson, David P.; Marney, Luke C.; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Synovec, Robert E.; Tian, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO) with increased reliance on glucose are hallmarks of metabolic remodeling that occurs in pathological cardiac hypertrophy and is associated with decreased myocardial energetics and impaired cardiac function. To date, it has not been tested whether prevention of the metabolic switch that occurs during the development of cardiac hypertrophy has unequivocal benefits on cardiac function and energetics. Objectives Since malonyl CoA production via acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid transport, we hypothesized that mice with a cardiac-specific deletion of ACC2 (ACC2H−/−) would maintain cardiac fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and improve function and energetics during the development of pressure-overload hypertrophy. Methods and Results ACC2 deletion led to a significant reduction in cardiac malonyl CoA levels. In isolated perfused heart experiments, left ventricular (LV) function and oxygen consumption were similiar in ACC2H−/− mice despite an ~60% increase in FAO compared to controls (CON). After 8 weeks of pressure-overload via transverse aortic constriction (TAC), ACC2H−/− mice exhibited a substrate utilization profile similar to sham animals while CON-TAC hearts had decreased FAO with increased glycolysis and anaplerosis. Myocardial energetics, assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and cardiac function were maintained in ACC2H−/− after 8 weeks of TAC. Furthermore, ACC2H−/−-TAC demonstrated an attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy with a significant reduction in fibrosis relative to CON-TAC. Conclusions These data suggest that reversion to the fetal metabolic profile in chronic pathological hypertrophy is associated with impaired myocardial function and energetics and maintenance of the inherent cardiac metabolic profile and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is a viable therapeutic strategy. PMID:22730442

  2. Structural Evidence for Direct Interactions Between the BRCT Domains of Human BRCA1 and a Phospho-Peptide from Human ACC1

    SciTech Connect

    Shen,Y.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    The tandem BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domains are phospho-serine/threonine recognition modules essential for the function of BRCA1. Recent studies suggest that acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), an enzyme with crucial roles in de novo fatty acid biosynthesis and lipogenesis and essential for cancer cell survival, may be a novel binding partner for BRCA1, through interactions with its BRCT domains. We report here the crystal structure at 3.2 Angstroms resolution of human BRCA1 BRCT domains in complex with a phospho-peptide from human ACC1 (p-ACC1 peptide, with the sequence 1258-DSPPQ-pS-PTFPEAGH-1271), which provides molecular evidence for direct interactions between BRCA1 and ACC1. The p-ACC1 peptide is bound in an extended conformation, located in a groove between the tandem BRCT domains. There are recognizable and significant structural differences to the binding modes of two other phospho-peptides to these domains, from BACH1 and CtIP, even though they share a conserved pSer-Pro-(Thr/Val)-Phe motif. Our studies establish a framework for understanding the regulation of lipid biosynthesis by BRCA1 through its inhibition of ACC1 activity, which could be a novel tumor suppressor function of BRCA1.

  3. Cloning, expression patterns, and preliminary characterization of AccCPR24, a novel RR-1 type cuticle protein gene from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiaoqian; Lu, Wenjing; Zhang, Yuanying; Guo, Xingqi; Sun, Rujiang; Xu, Baohua

    2013-11-01

    Cuticular proteins (CPs) are key components of insect cuticle, a structure that plays a pivotal role in insect development and defense. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of a CP gene from Apis cerana cerana (AccCPR24). An amino acid sequence alignment indicated that AccCPR24 contains the conserved Rebers and Riddiford consensus sequence and shares high similarity with the genes from other hymenopteran insects. We then isolated the genomic DNA and found that the first intron, which is present in other CP genes, is absent in AccCPR24. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis revealed that AccCPR24 is highly expressed in the late pupal stage and midgut. Expression was inhibited by an exogenous ecdysteroid in vitro but was enhanced by this hormone in vivo; environmental stressors, such as heavy metals and pesticides, also influenced gene expression. In addition, a disc diffusion assay showed that AccCPR24 enhanced the ability of bacterial cells to resist multiple stresses. We infer from our results that AccCPR24 acts in honeybee development and in protecting these insects from abiotic stresses. PMID:24115354

  4. A novel 1-Cys thioredoxin peroxidase gene in Apis cerana cerana: characterization of AccTpx4 and its role in oxidative stresses.

    PubMed

    Huaxia, Yifeng; Wang, Fang; Yan, Yan; Liu, Feng; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2015-07-01

    Thioredoxin peroxidase (Tpx), also named peroxiredoxin (Prx), is an important peroxidase that can protect organisms against stressful environments. AccTpx4, a 1-Cys thioredoxin peroxidase gene from the Chinese honey bee Apis cerana cerana, was cloned and characterized. The AccTpx4 gene encodes a protein that is predicted to contain the conserved PVCTTE motif from 1-Cys peroxiredoxin. Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) and Western blotting revealed that AccTpx4 was induced by various oxidative stresses, such as cold, heat, insecticides, H(2)O(2), and HgCl(2). The in vivo peroxidase activity assay showed that recombinant AccTpx4 protein could efficiently degrade H(2)O(2) in the presence of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT). In addition, disc fusion assays revealed that AccTpx4 could function to protect cells against oxidative stresses. These results indicate that AccTpx4 plays an important role in oxidative stress responses and may contribute to the conservation of honeybees. PMID:25971604

  5. Beyond brown: polyphenol oxidases as enzymes of plant specialized metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Most cloned and/or characterized plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have catechol oxidase activity (i.e., they oxidize o-diphenols to o-quinones) and are localized or predicted to be localized to plastids. As a class, they have broad substrate specificity and are associated with browning of produce and other plant materials. Because PPOs are often induced by wounding or pathogen attack, they are most generally believed to play important roles in plant defense responses. However, a few well-characterized PPOs appear to have very specific roles in the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites via both tyrosinase (monophenol oxidase) and catechol oxidase activities. Here we detail a few examples of these and explore the possibility that there may be many more “biosynthetic” PPOs. PMID:25642234

  6. Inhibition of plant and mammalian diamine oxidase by substrate analogues.

    PubMed

    Biegański, T; Osińska, Z; Masliński, C

    1982-04-01

    Imidazoles, aliphatic substrate analogues and the natural dipeptides, carnosine and anserine, were investigated as inhibitors of diamine oxidase from the pig kidney, human pregnancy plasma and pea seedlings. Imidazole, methylimidazoles, N-acetylimidazole, histamine and N tau-methylhistamine are relatively potent inhibitors of mammalian diamine oxidase showing no influence on plant enzymes. Anserine and carnosine are inhibitors of pig kidney and pea seedling enzymes. Ki values are 2 microM and 10 microM respectively. Investigated natural derivatives of putrescine and cadaverine have no influence on diamine oxidase of different origin. In conclusion, we present some evidence to suggest that mammalian diamine oxidase, despite a high reaction rate with putrescine, is better adapted to histamine oxidation, whereas for plant enzymes the diamines are preferred substrates. PMID:6805264

  7. [Heterogeneity of molecular forms of phenol oxidase from grape leaves].

    PubMed

    Pruidze, G N; Zaprometov, M N; Durmishidze, S V; Kintsurashvili, D F

    1983-07-01

    The substrate specificity and some kinetic properties of the monomeric (Mr = 26 000--35 000) and dimeric (Mr = 55 000--70 000) forms of phenol oxidase from vine leaves were studied. These forms possess different hydroxylating and o-diphenol oxidase activities. A kinetic analysis demonstrated that the monomeric form of the enzyme possesses a higher affinity for monophenols and can more effectively accomplish the hydroxylation reaction as compared to the dimeric one. During vine vegetation the ratio of molecular forms of phenol oxidase is altered manifesting itself in quantitative and qualitative changes of enzymatic activity. During plant maturation the dimeric fraction is predominant. The maturation process is associated with a sharp rise of the o-phenol oxidase activity, a disappearance of the hydroxylating activity and a substantial deceleration of phenol compounds production. PMID:6412775

  8. Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedy, Katrin; Freudenschuss, Alexandra; Zethner, Gehard; Spiegel, Heide; Franko, Uwe; Gründling, Ralf; Xaver Hölzl, Franz; Preinstorfer, Claudia; Haslmayr, Hans Peter; Formayer, Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils. The project funded by the Klima- und Energiefonds, Austrian Climate Research Programme, 4th call Authors: Katrin Sedy, Alexandra Freudenschuss, Gerhard Zethner (Environment Agency Austria), Heide Spiegel (Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety), Uwe Franko, Ralf Gründling (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research) Climate change will affect plant productivity due to weather extremes. However, adverse effects could be diminished and satisfying production levels may be maintained with proper soil conditions. To sustain and optimize the potential of agricultural land for plant productivity it will be necessary to focus on preserving and increasing soil organic carbon (SOC). Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils is strongly influenced by management practice. The present management is affected by management practices that tend to speed up carbon loss. Crop rotation, soil cultivation and the management of crop residues are very important measures to influence carbon dynamics and soil fertility. For the future it will be crucial to focus on practical measures to optimize SOC and to improve soil structure. To predict SOC turnover the existing humus balance model the application of the "Carbon Candy Balance" was verified by results from Austrian long term field experiments and field data of selected farms. Thus the main aim of the project is to generate a carbon balancing tool box that can be applied in different agricultural production regions to assess humus dynamics due to agricultural management practices. The toolbox will allow the selection of specific regional input parameters for calculating the C-balance at field level. However farmers or other interested user can also apply their own field data to receive the result of C-dynamics under certain management practises within the next 100 years. At regional level the impact of predefined changes in agricultural management

  9. Design and performance of a beam line with a 1 m focal length toroidal grating monochromator at the ACO storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudat, W.; Kisker, E.; Rothberg, G. M.; Depautex, C.

    We describe a new beam line at the ACO storage ring for solid state photoelectron spectorscopy incorporating a 1 m focal length toroidal grating monochromator for the photon energy range 6 eV to 120 eV custom-built by Jobin-Yvon Instruments S.A. Test results for the TGM with laboratory line light sources are reported as well as performance data with synchrotron radiation.

  10. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with ({sup 14}C)iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 ({plus minus} 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked.

  11. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calvé, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability. PMID:24113189

  12. Temporal and spectral evolution of a storage ring FEL source: Experimental results on Super-ACO and new theoretical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Couprie, M.E. ||

    1995-12-31

    The Super-ACO FEL source in UV is now used for applications like a time-resolved fluorescence in biology and two colors experiments coupling FEL and Synchrotron Radiation, which are naturally synchronized. The stability of the FEL is then a critical issue for the users. Detailed experimental studies conducted on the temporal characteristics of the laser micropulse showed various phenomena, such as a longitudinal micropulse jitter and a deformation of a longitudinal micropulse distribution. A similar analysis has been performed on the laser spectral evolution with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer, showing a spectrum narrowing, and a wavelength drift. A longitudinal feedback system developed after the first user experiment, allowed to reduce significantly the longitudinal jitter, the intensity fluctuation and the spectral drift. Nevertheless, the stability of the FEL is very dependent on any perturbation, and the observed phenomena can not be described by former models like super-mode assuming a stationary regime. A new theoretical model has then been developed, in order to simulate dynamic behaviors. A simple iterative method is employed to obtain the laser spectrum. The access to the temporal distribution requires additional complexity, because the Fourier transformation has to be performed for each pass. The comparison between the experimental data and the simulation results will be given.

  13. Molecular aspects of monoamine oxidase B.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Rona R

    2016-08-01

    Monoamine oxidases (MAO) influence the monoamine levels in brain by virtue of their role in neurotransmitter breakdown. MAO B is the predominant form in glial cells and in platelets. MAO B structure, function and kinetics are described as a background for the effect of alterations in its activity on behavior. The need to inhibit MAO B to combat decreased brain amines continues to drive the search for new drugs. Reversible and irreversible inhibitors are now designed using data-mining, computational screening, docking and molecular dynamics. Multi-target ligands designed to combat the elevated activity of MAO B in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases incorporate MAO inhibition (usually irreversible) as well as iron chelation, antioxidant or neuroprotective properties. The main focus of drug design is the catalytic activity of MAO, but the imidazoline I2 site in the entrance cavity of MAO B is also a pharmacological target. Endogenous regulation of MAO B expression is discussed briefly in light of new studies measuring mRNA, protein, or activity in healthy and degenerative samples, including the effect of DNA methylation on the expression. Overall, this review focuses on examples of recent research on the molecular aspects of the expression, activity, and inhibition of MAO B. PMID:26891670

  14. Polyphenol oxidase from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius).

    PubMed

    Neves, Valdir Augusto; da Silva, Maraiza Aparecida

    2007-03-21

    Polyphenol oxidase (E.C. 1.14.18.1) (PPO) extracted from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius) was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and separation on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 45 490+/-3500 Da and Km values of 0.23, 1.14, 1.34, and 5.0 mM for the substrates caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4-methylcatechol, and catechol, respectively. When assayed with resorcinol, DL-DOPA, pyrogallol, protocatechuic, p-coumaric, ferulic, and cinnamic acids, catechin, and quercetin, the PPO showed no activity. The optimum pH varied from 5.0 to 6.6, depending on substrate. PPO activity was inhibited by various phenolic and nonphenolic compounds. p-Coumaric and cinnamic acids showed competitive inhibition, with Ki values of 0.017 and 0.011 mM, respectively, using chlorogenic acid as substrate. Heat inactivation from 60 to 90 degrees C showed the enzyme to be relatively stable at 60-70 degrees C, with progressive inactivation when incubated at 80 and 90 degrees C. The Ea (apparent activation energy) for inactivation was 93.69 kJ mol-1. Sucrose, maltose, glucose, fructose, and trehalose at high concentrations appeared to protect yacon PPO against thermal inactivation at 75 and 80 degrees C. PMID:17316020

  15. Origin and evolution of lysyl oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize primary amine substrates to reactive aldehydes. The best-studied role of LOX enzymes is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in animals by cross-linking collagens and elastin, although intracellular functions have been reported as well. Five different LOX enzymes have been identified in mammals, LOX and LOX-like (LOXL) 1 to 4, showing a highly conserved catalytic carboxy terminal domain and more divergence in the rest of the sequence. Here we have surveyed a wide selection of genomes in order to infer the evolutionary history of LOX. We identified LOX proteins not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, as well as in bacteria and archaea – which reveals a pre-metazoan origin for this gene family. LOX genes expanded during metazoan evolution resulting in two superfamilies, LOXL2/L3/L4 and LOX/L1/L5. Considering the current knowledge on the function of mammalian LOX isoforms in ECM remodeling, we propose that LOXL2/L3/L4 members might have preferentially been involved in making cross-linked collagen IV-based basement membrane, whereas the diversification of LOX/L1/L5 forms contributed to chordate/vertebrate-specific ECM innovations, such as elastin and fibronectin. Our work provides a novel view on the evolution of this family of enzymes. PMID:26024311

  16. Origin and evolution of lysyl oxidases.

    PubMed

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize primary amine substrates to reactive aldehydes. The best-studied role of LOX enzymes is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in animals by cross-linking collagens and elastin, although intracellular functions have been reported as well. Five different LOX enzymes have been identified in mammals, LOX and LOX-like (LOXL) 1 to 4, showing a highly conserved catalytic carboxy terminal domain and more divergence in the rest of the sequence. Here we have surveyed a wide selection of genomes in order to infer the evolutionary history of LOX. We identified LOX proteins not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, as well as in bacteria and archaea - which reveals a pre-metazoan origin for this gene family. LOX genes expanded during metazoan evolution resulting in two superfamilies, LOXL2/L3/L4 and LOX/L1/L5. Considering the current knowledge on the function of mammalian LOX isoforms in ECM remodeling, we propose that LOXL2/L3/L4 members might have preferentially been involved in making cross-linked collagen IV-based basement membrane, whereas the diversification of LOX/L1/L5 forms contributed to chordate/vertebrate-specific ECM innovations, such as elastin and fibronectin. Our work provides a novel view on the evolution of this family of enzymes. PMID:26024311

  17. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  18. Photodynamic therapy using a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fingar, V H; Wieman, T J; McMahon, K S; Haydon, P S; Halling, B P; Yuhas, D A; Winkelman, J W

    1997-10-15

    The use of endogenously created porphyrins as an alternative to photosensitizer injection for photodynamic therapy is a rapidly evolving area of study. One common method to induce porphyrin synthesis and accumulation in cells is the topical, oral, or parenteral administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid, a precursor for heme biosynthesis. Porphyrin accumulation may also be elicited by the use of enzyme inhibitors of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Groups of DBA/2 mice bearing SMT-F mammary tumors were placed on a diet containing 0-4000 ppm of a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor, FP-846. This agent blocks a critical step in porphyrin metabolism and results in elevated intracellular levels of protoporphyrin IX. Light treatment of tumors produced both initial and long-term regression that was dependent on the amount of inhibitor, the duration of inhibitor exposure to animals, and the amount of light used in PDT. Tumor regression occurred without significant destruction of normal tissues in the treatment field and without initial vascular constriction or blood flow stasis. Tumor cure in animals given 4000 ppm FP-846 in feed for 3 days and 300 J/cm2 602-670 nm light (23% cure) was similar to the response in animals given 10 mg/kg Photofrin and the same light dose (20%). PMID:9377568

  19. Analyzing the electrogenicity of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-07-12

    Measurements of voltage changes in response to charge separation within membrane proteins can offer fundamental information on spectroscopically "invisible" steps. For example, results from studies of voltage changes associated with electron and proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase could, in principle, be used to discriminate between different theoretical models describing the molecular mechanism of proton pumping. Earlier analyses of data from these measurements have been based on macroscopic considerations that may not allow for exploring the actual molecular mechanisms. Here, we have used a coarse-grained model describing the relation between observed voltage changes and specific charge-transfer reactions, which includes an explicit description of the membrane, the electrolytes, and the electrodes. The results from these calculations offer mechanistic insights at the molecular level. Our main conclusion is that previously assumed mechanistic evidence that was based on electrogenic measurements is not unique. However, the ability of our calculations to obtain reliable voltage changes means that we have a tool that can be used to describe a wide range of electrogenic charge transfers in channels and transporters, by combining voltage measurements with other experiments and simulations to analyze new mechanistic proposals. PMID:27357681

  20. Molecularly "wired" cholesterol oxidase for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Leonida, Mihaela D; Aurian-Blajeni, Benedict

    2015-02-01

    The influence of several factors on the activity of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) transiently exposed to a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was studied. Presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, prosthetic group of ChOx) during exposure to RTIL makes the procedure enzyme-friendly, while the use of RTIL (green reagent) makes it environmentally-friendly. Following exposure to RTIL and its subsequent removal, FAD becomes part of the molecular structure of the refolded protein (a molecular "wire"). This makes the procedure used here a molecular one. The factors studied were: FAD presence in RTIL during modification, water presence during exposure to RTIL, and ratio FAD:RTIL during "wiring". Performance parameters monitored were: enzyme activity before and after "wiring" (expressed as (dA/dt)/mg enzyme, and measured spectrophotometrically), peak current in an amperometric biosensor for cholesterol detection, and linearity of the biosensor response depending on cholesterol concentration. After RTIL removal, the modified enzyme (ME) retained a high percentage of the added FAD, which supplemented that of the native enzyme (functioning as a "wire" and enhancing electron transfer kinetics), and a fraction of the initial activity. Used in an amperometric biosensor, ME showed catalytic activity, linear behavior as a function of cholesterol concentration, and stability. PMID:25579496

  1. Crystallization of carbohydrate oxidase from Microdochium nivale.

    PubMed

    Dusková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Østergaard, Lars Henrik; Fuglsang, Claus Crone; Kolenko, Petr; Stepánková, Andrea; Hasek, Jindrich

    2009-06-01

    Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase was produced by heterologous recombinant expression in Aspergillus oryzae, purified and crystallized. The enzyme crystallizes with varying crystal morphologies depending on the crystallization conditions. Several different crystal forms were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, two of which were used for diffraction measurements. Hexagon-shaped crystals (form I) diffracted to 2.66 A resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.7, c = 610.4 A and apparent space group P6(2)22. Analysis of the data quality showed almost perfect twinning of the crystals. Attempts to solve the structure by molecular replacement did not give satisfactory results. Recently, clusters of rod-shaped crystals (form II) were grown in a solution containing PEG MME 550. These crystals belonged to the monoclinic system C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 132.9, b = 56.6, c = 86.5 A, beta = 95.7 degrees . Data sets were collected to a resolution of 2.4 A. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method. Model refinement is currently in progress. PMID:19478452

  2. Crystallization of carbohydrate oxidase from Microdochium nivale

    PubMed Central

    Dušková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Østergaard, Lars Henrik; Fuglsang, Claus Crone; Kolenko, Petr; Štěpánková, Andrea; Hašek, Jindřich

    2009-01-01

    Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase was produced by heterologous recombinant expression in Aspergillus oryzae, purified and crystallized. The enzyme crystallizes with varying crystal morphologies depending on the crystallization conditions. Several different crystal forms were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, two of which were used for diffraction measurements. Hexagon-shaped crystals (form I) diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.7, c = 610.4 Å and apparent space group P6222. Analysis of the data quality showed almost perfect twinning of the crystals. Attempts to solve the structure by molecular replacement did not give satisfactory results. Recently, clusters of rod-shaped crystals (form II) were grown in a solution containing PEG MME 550. These crystals belonged to the monoclinic system C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 132.9, b = 56.6, c = 86.5 Å, β = 95.7°. Data sets were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method. Model refinement is currently in progress. PMID:19478452

  3. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variablesmore » which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.« less

  4. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  5. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shackleton, D R; Hulmes, D J

    1990-03-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a [4,5-3H]-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware. PMID:1971160

  6. The role of ABA in triggering ethylene biosynthesis and ripening of tomato fruit

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Bing; Leng, Ping

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand more details about the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in fruit ripening and senescence of tomato, two cDNAs (LeNCED1 and LeNCED2) which encode 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) as a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis, two cDNAs (LeACS2 and LeACS4) which encode 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase, and one cDNA (LeACO1) which encodes ACC oxidase involved in ethylene biosynthesis were cloned from tomato fruit using a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) approach. The relationship between ABA and ethylene during ripening was also investigated. Among six sampling times in tomato fruits, the LeNCED1 gene was highly expressed only at the breaker stage when the ABA content becomes high. After this, the LeACS2, LeACS4, and LeACO1 genes were expressed with some delay. The change in pattern of ACO activity was in accordance with ethylene production reaching its peak at the pink stage. The maximum ABA content preceded ethylene production in both the seeds and the flesh. The peak value of ABA, ACC, and ACC oxidase activity, and ethylene production all started to increase earlier in seeds than in flesh tissues, although they occurred at different ripening stages. Exogenous ABA treatment increased the ABA content in both flesh and seed, inducing the expression of both ACS and ACO genes, and promoting ethylene synthesis and fruit ripening, while treatment with fluridone or nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited them, delaying fruit ripening and softening. Based on the results obtained in this study, it was concluded that LeNCED1 initiates ABA biosynthesis at the onset of fruit ripening, and might act as an original inducer, and ABA accumulation might play a key role in the regulation of ripeness and senescence of tomato fruit. PMID:19246595

  7. Better Rooting Procedure to Enhance Survival Rate of Field Grown Malaysian Eksotika Papaya Transformed with 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylic Acid Oxidase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sekeli, Rogayah; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Muda, Pauziah; Abu Bakar, Umi Kalsom

    2013-01-01

    A high survival rate for transformed papaya plants when transferred to the field is useful in the quest for improving the commercial quality traits. We report in this paper an improved rooting method for the production of transformed Malaysian Eksotika papaya with high survival rate when transferred to the field. Shoots were regenerated from embryogenic calli transformed with antisense and RNAi constructs of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) genes using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Regenerated transformed shoots, each measuring approximately 3-4 cm in height, were cultured in liquid half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium or sterile distilled water, and with either perlite or vermiculite supplementation. All the culturing processes were conducted either under sterile or nonsterile condition. The results showed that rooting under sterile condition was better. Shoots cultured in half-strength MS medium supplemented with vermiculite exhibited a 92.5% rooting efficiency while perlite showed 77.5%. The survival rate of the vermiculite-grown transformed papaya plantlets after transfer into soil, contained in polybags, was 94%, and the rate after transfer into the ground was 92%. Morpho-histological analyses revealed that the tap roots were more compact, which might have contributed to the high survival rates of the plantlets. PMID:25969786

  8. Better rooting procedure to enhance survival rate of field grown malaysian eksotika papaya transformed with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid oxidase gene.

    PubMed

    Sekeli, Rogayah; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Muda, Pauziah; Abu Bakar, Umi Kalsom

    2013-01-01

    A high survival rate for transformed papaya plants when transferred to the field is useful in the quest for improving the commercial quality traits. We report in this paper an improved rooting method for the production of transformed Malaysian Eksotika papaya with high survival rate when transferred to the field. Shoots were regenerated from embryogenic calli transformed with antisense and RNAi constructs of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) genes using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Regenerated transformed shoots, each measuring approximately 3-4 cm in height, were cultured in liquid half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium or sterile distilled water, and with either perlite or vermiculite supplementation. All the culturing processes were conducted either under sterile or nonsterile condition. The results showed that rooting under sterile condition was better. Shoots cultured in half-strength MS medium supplemented with vermiculite exhibited a 92.5% rooting efficiency while perlite showed 77.5%. The survival rate of the vermiculite-grown transformed papaya plantlets after transfer into soil, contained in polybags, was 94%, and the rate after transfer into the ground was 92%. Morpho-histological analyses revealed that the tap roots were more compact, which might have contributed to the high survival rates of the plantlets. PMID:25969786

  9. Characterization of an Apis cerana cerana cytochrome P450 gene (AccCYP336A1) and its roles in oxidative stresses responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ming; Zhang, Weixing; Liu, Feng; Chen, Xiaobo; Li, Han; Xu, Baohua

    2016-06-15

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450), widely distributed multifunctional enzymes, that play an important role in the oxidative metabolism of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. Studies have found that these enzymes show peroxidase-like activity and may thus be involved in protecting organisms against reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this work, Apis cerana cerana was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms of P450 family genes in resisting ROS damage. A cytochrome P450 gene was isolated, AccCYP336A1. The open reading frame (ORF) of AccCYP336A1 is 1491bp in length and encodes a predicted protein of 496 amino acids. The obtained amino acid sequence of AccCYP336A1 shared a high sequence identity with homologous proteins and contained the highly conserved features of this protein family. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that AccCYP336A1 was present in some fast developmental stages and had a higher expression in the epidermis than in other tissues. Additionally, the expression levels of AccCYP336A1 were up-regulated by cold (4°C), heat (42°C), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, H2O2 and pesticide (thiamethoxam, deltamethrin, methomyl and phoxim) treatments. These results were confirmed by the western blot assays. Furthermore, the recombinant AccCYP336A1 protein acted as an antioxidant that resisted paraquat-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, these results suggest that AccCYP336A1 may play a very significant role in antioxidant defense against ROS damage. PMID:26877110

  10. An alcohol oxidase of Phanerochaete chrysosporium with a distinct glycerol oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Linke, Diana; Lehnert, Nicole; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf G

    2014-01-01

    An intracellular alcohol oxidase (AOX) was isolated from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Pch), grown on l-lactate induction medium, and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The dimeric protein consisted of two identical 75kDa subunits. The open reading frame of 1,956bp resulted in a monomer consisting of 651 amino acids. The enzyme showed a pI at 5.4, a pH optimum of 9, a temperature optimum at 50°C, possessed putative conserved domains of the GMC superfamily, a FAD binding domain, and showed up to 86% homology to alcohol oxidase sequences of Gloeophyllum trabeum and Coprinopsis cinerea. As was shown for the first time for an AOX from a basidiomycete, not only methanol, but also lower primary alcohols and glycerol were accepted as substrates. An assay based on aldehyde dehydrogenase confirmed d-glyceraldehyde as the product of the reaction. A bioprocess based on this enzyme could alleviate the problems associated with the huge side-stream of glycerol occurring during the manufacture of biodiesel, yielding the green oxidant hydrogen peroxide. PMID:24910330

  11. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. PMID:26851573

  12. Structure and function of mammalian aldehyde oxidases.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mineko; Romão, Maria João; Leimkühler, Silke; Bolis, Marco; Fratelli, Maddalena; Coelho, Catarina; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Garattini, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian aldehyde oxidases (AOXs; EC1.2.3.1) are a group of conserved proteins belonging to the family of molybdo-flavoenzymes along with the structurally related xanthine dehydrogenase enzyme. AOXs are characterized by broad substrate specificity, oxidizing not only aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes into the corresponding carboxylic acids, but also hydroxylating a series of heteroaromatic rings. The number of AOX isoenzymes expressed in different vertebrate species is variable. The two extremes are represented by humans, which express a single enzyme (AOX1) in many organs and mice or rats which are characterized by tissue-specific expression of four isoforms (AOX1, AOX2, AOX3, and AOX4). In vertebrates each AOX isoenzyme is the product of a distinct gene consisting of 35 highly conserved exons. The extant species-specific complement of AOX isoenzymes is the result of a complex evolutionary process consisting of a first phase characterized by a series of asynchronous gene duplications and a second phase where the pseudogenization and gene deletion events prevail. In the last few years remarkable advances in the elucidation of the structural characteristics and the catalytic mechanisms of mammalian AOXs have been made thanks to the successful crystallization of human AOX1 and mouse AOX3. Much less is known about the physiological function and physiological substrates of human AOX1 and other mammalian AOX isoenzymes, although the importance of these proteins in xenobiotic metabolism is fairly well established and their relevance in drug development is increasing. This review article provides an overview and a discussion of the current knowledge on mammalian AOX. PMID:26920149

  13. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory activities of heterocyclic chalcones.

    PubMed

    Minders, Corné; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-15

    Studies have shown that natural and synthetic chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones) possess monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activities. Of particular importance to the present study is a report that a series of furanochalcones acts as MAO-B selective inhibitors. Since the effect of heterocyclic substitution, other than furan (and more recently thiophene, piperidine and quinoline) on the MAO inhibitory properties of the chalcone scaffold remains unexplored, the aim of this study was to synthesise and evaluate further heterocyclic chalcone analogues as inhibitors of the human MAOs. For this purpose, heterocyclic chalcone analogues that incorporate pyrrole, 5-methylthiophene, 5-chlorothiophene and 6-methoxypyridine substitution were examined. Seven of the nine synthesised compounds exhibited IC50 values <1 μM for the inhibition of MAO-B, with all compounds exhibiting higher affinities for MAO-B compared to the MAO-A isoform. The most potent MAO-B inhibitor (4h) displays an IC50 value of 0.067 μM while the most potent MAO-A inhibitor (4e) exhibits an IC50 value of 3.81 μM. It was further established that selected heterocyclic chalcones are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors. 4h, however, may exhibit tight-binding to MAO-B, a property linked to its thiophene moiety. We conclude that high potency chalcones such as 4h represent suitable leads for the development of MAO-B inhibitors for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26432037

  14. Role of NADPH Oxidases in Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Yong-Han; Kim, Jonghwa; Aoyama, Tomonori; De Minicis, Samuele; Bataller, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hepatic fibrosis is the common pathophysiologic process resulting from chronic liver injury, characterized by the accumulation of an excessive extracellular matrix. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) is a multicomponent enzyme complex that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to a wide range of stimuli. In addition to phagocytic NOX2, there are six nonphagocytic NOX proteins. Recent Advances: In the liver, NOX is functionally expressed both in the phagocytic form and in the nonphagocytic form. NOX-derived ROS contributes to various kinds of liver disease caused by alcohol, hepatitis C virus, and toxic bile acids. Recent evidence indicates that both phagocytic NOX2 and nonphagocytic NOX isoforms, including NOX1 and NOX4, mediate distinct profibrogenic actions in hepatic stellate cells, the main fibrogenic cell type in the liver. The critical role of NOX in hepatic fibrogenesis provides a rationale to assess pharmacological NOX inhibitors that treat hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. Critical Issues: Although there is compelling evidence indicating a crucial role for NOX-mediated ROS generation in hepatic fibrogenesis, little is known about the expression, subcellular localization, regulation, and redox signaling of NOX isoforms in specific cell types in the liver. Moreover, the exact mechanism of NOX-mediated fibrogenic signaling is still largely unknown. Future Directions: A better understanding through further research about NOX-mediated fibrogenic signaling may enable the development of novel anti-fibrotic therapy using NOX inhibition strategy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2854–2872. PMID:24040957

  15. Dose reduction in orthodontic lateral cephalography: dosimetric evaluation of a novel cephalographic thyroid protector (CTP) and anatomical cranial collimation (ACC)

    PubMed Central

    Rottke, D; van der Stelt, P F; Berkhout, W E R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To test the dose-reducing capabilities of a novel thyroid protection device and a recently introduced cranial collimator to be used in orthodontic lateral cephalography. Methods: Cephalographic thyroid protector (CTP) was designed to shield the thyroid while leaving the cervical vertebrae depicted. Using a RANDO® head phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) equipped with dosemeters and a Proline XC (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) cephalograph, lateral cephalograms were taken, and the effective dose (ED) was calculated for four protocols: (1) without shielding; (2) with CTP; (3) with CTP and anatomical cranial collimator (ACC); and (4) with a thyroid collar (TC). Results: The ED for the respective protocols was (1) 8.51; (2) 5.39; (3) 3.50; and (4) 4.97 µSv. The organ dose for the thyroid was reduced from 30.17 to 4.50 µSv in Protocols 2 and 3 and to 3.33 µSv in Protocol 4. Conclusions: The use of just the CTP (Protocol 2) resulted in a 36.8% reduction of the ED of a lateral cephalogram. This was comparable to the classical TC (Protocol 4). A 58.8% reduction of the ED was obtained when combining CTP and ACC (Protocol 3). The dose to the radiosensitive thyroid gland was reduced by 85% in Protocols 2 and 3 and by 89% in Protocol 4. PMID:25564885

  16. Reward Sensitivity of ACC as an Intermediate Phenotype between DRD4-521T and Substance Misuse.

    PubMed

    Baker, Travis E; Stockwell, Tim; Barnes, Gordon; Haesevoets, Roderick; Holroyd, Clay B

    2016-03-01

    The development and expression of the midbrain dopamine system is determined in part by genetic factors that vary across individuals such that dopamine-related genes are partly responsible for addiction vulnerability. However, a complete account of how dopamine-related genes predispose individuals to drug addiction remains to be developed. Adopting an intermediate phenotype approach, we investigated whether reward-related electrophysiological activity of ACC-a cortical region said to utilize dopamine reward signals to learn the value of extended, context-specific sequences of goal-directed behaviors-mediates the influence of multiple dopamine-related functional polymorphisms over substance use. We used structural equation modeling to examine whether two related electrophysiological phenomena associated with the control and reinforcement learning functions of ACC-theta power and the reward positivity-mediated the relationship between the degree of substance misuse and genetic polymorphisms that regulate dopamine processing in frontal cortex. Substance use data were collected from 812 undergraduate students. One hundred ninety-six returned on a subsequent day to participate in an electrophysiological experiment and to provide saliva samples for DNA analysis. We found that these electrophysiological signals mediated a relationship between the DRD4-521T dopamine receptor genotype and substance misuse. Our results provide a theoretical framework that bridges the gap between genes and behavior in drug addiction and illustrate how future interventions might be individually tailored for specific genetic and neurocognitive profiles. PMID:26601911

  17. OpenACC acceleration of an unstructured CFD solver based on a reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method for compressible flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xia, Yidong; Lou, Jialin; Luo, Hong; Edwards, Jack; Mueller, Frank

    2015-02-09

    Here, an OpenACC directive-based graphics processing unit (GPU) parallel scheme is presented for solving the compressible Navier–Stokes equations on 3D hybrid unstructured grids with a third-order reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method. The developed scheme requires the minimum code intrusion and algorithm alteration for upgrading a legacy solver with the GPU computing capability at very little extra effort in programming, which leads to a unified and portable code development strategy. A face coloring algorithm is adopted to eliminate the memory contention because of the threading of internal and boundary face integrals. A number of flow problems are presented to verify the implementationmore » of the developed scheme. Timing measurements were obtained by running the resulting GPU code on one Nvidia Tesla K20c GPU card (Nvidia Corporation, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and compared with those obtained by running the equivalent Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallel CPU code on a compute node (consisting of two AMD Opteron 6128 eight-core CPUs (Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA)). Speedup factors of up to 24× and 1.6× for the GPU code were achieved with respect to one and 16 CPU cores, respectively. The numerical results indicate that this OpenACC-based parallel scheme is an effective and extensible approach to port unstructured high-order CFD solvers to GPU computing.« less

  18. OpenACC acceleration of an unstructured CFD solver based on a reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method for compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yidong; Lou, Jialin; Luo, Hong; Edwards, Jack; Mueller, Frank

    2015-02-09

    Here, an OpenACC directive-based graphics processing unit (GPU) parallel scheme is presented for solving the compressible Navier–Stokes equations on 3D hybrid unstructured grids with a third-order reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method. The developed scheme requires the minimum code intrusion and algorithm alteration for upgrading a legacy solver with the GPU computing capability at very little extra effort in programming, which leads to a unified and portable code development strategy. A face coloring algorithm is adopted to eliminate the memory contention because of the threading of internal and boundary face integrals. A number of flow problems are presented to verify the implementation of the developed scheme. Timing measurements were obtained by running the resulting GPU code on one Nvidia Tesla K20c GPU card (Nvidia Corporation, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and compared with those obtained by running the equivalent Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallel CPU code on a compute node (consisting of two AMD Opteron 6128 eight-core CPUs (Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA)). Speedup factors of up to 24× and 1.6× for the GPU code were achieved with respect to one and 16 CPU cores, respectively. The numerical results indicate that this OpenACC-based parallel scheme is an effective and extensible approach to port unstructured high-order CFD solvers to GPU computing.

  19. 2013 ACC/AHA guideline recommends fixed-dose strategies instead of targeted goals to lower blood cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sidney C; Grundy, Scott M

    2014-08-12

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Task Force on Practice Guidelines recently issued the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults. This new guideline endorses a paradigm shift in strategies for reducing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events by lowering blood cholesterol. Whereas previous guidelines focused on therapy to decrease low-density lipoprotein and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to specific target levels, the new guideline instead proposes implementation of cholesterol-lowering treatment using evidenced-based intensity of statin therapy without such targets. The guideline also provides a new risk estimator for primary prevention decisions, including stroke outcomes and data on African Americans, which will significantly increase the number of patients recommended for outcome-related benefits of cholesterol-lowering therapy. The first section of this paper reviews the process by which the task force developed the new evidence-based guideline, the major findings and recommendations, and their implications. The second section primarily focuses on the question of how much low-density lipoprotein cholesterol should be lowered and on additional considerations in risk assessment. PMID:25104531

  20. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing rhizobacteria protect Ocimum sanctum plants during waterlogging stress via reduced ethylene generation.

    PubMed

    Barnawal, Deepti; Bharti, Nidhi; Maji, Deepamala; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Kalra, Alok

    2012-09-01

    Ocimum sanctum grown as rain-fed crop, is known to be poorly adapted to waterlogged conditions. Many a times the crop suffers extreme damages because of anoxia and excessive ethylene generation due to waterlogging conditions present under heavy rain. The usefulness of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria was investigated under waterlogging stress. The comparison of herb yield and stress induced biochemical changes of waterlogged and non-waterlogged plants with and without ACC deaminase-containing microbiological treatments were monitored in this study. Ten plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains containing ACC-deaminase were isolated and characterized. Four selected isolates Fd2 (Achromobacter xylosoxidans), Bac5 (Serratia ureilytica), Oci9 (Herbaspirillum seropedicae) and Oci13 (Ochrobactrum rhizosphaerae) had the potential to protect Ocimum plants from flood induced damage under waterlogged glass house conditions. Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of these ACC deaminase-containing selected strains for reducing the yield losses caused by waterlogging conditions. Bacterial treatments protected plants from waterlogging induced detrimental changes like stress ethylene production, reduced chlorophyll concentration, higher lipid peroxidation, proline concentration and reduced foliar nutrient uptake. Fd2 (A. xylosoxidans) induced maximum waterlogging tolerance as treated waterlogged plants recorded maximum growth and herb yield (46.5% higher than uninoculated waterlogged plants) with minimum stress ethylene levels (53% lower ACC concentration as compared to waterlogged plants without bacterial inoculation) whereas under normal non-waterlogged conditions O. rhizosphaerae was most effective in plant growth promotion. PMID:22846334

  1. Terminal Oxidases of Bacillus subtilis Strain 168: One Quinol Oxidase, Cytochrome aa3 or Cytochrome bd, Is Required for Aerobic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Winstedt, Lena; von Wachenfeldt, Claes

    2000-01-01

    The gram-positive endospore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis has, under aerobic conditions, a branched respiratory system comprising one quinol oxidase branch and one cytochrome oxidase branch. The system terminates in one of four alternative terminal oxidases. Cytochrome caa3 is a cytochrome c oxidase, whereas cytochrome bd and cytochrome aa3 are quinol oxidases. A fourth terminal oxidase, YthAB, is a putative quinol oxidase predicted from DNA sequence analysis. None of the terminal oxidases are, by themselves, essential for growth. However, one quinol oxidase (cytochrome aa3 or cytochrome bd) is required for aerobic growth of B. subtilis strain 168. Data indicating that cytochrome aa3 is the major oxidase used by exponentially growing cells in minimal and rich medium are presented. We show that one of the two heme-copper oxidases, cytochrome caa3 or cytochrome aa3, is required for efficient sporulation of B. subtilis strain 168 and that deletion of YthAB in a strain lacking cytochrome aa3 makes the strain sporulation deficient. PMID:11073895

  2. Crystal Structure of Alcohol Oxidase from Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Valerius, Oliver; Feussner, Ivo; Ficner, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    FAD-dependent alcohol oxidases (AOX) are key enzymes of methylotrophic organisms that can utilize lower primary alcohols as sole source of carbon and energy. Here we report the crystal structure analysis of the methanol oxidase AOX1 from Pichia pastoris. The crystallographic phase problem was solved by means of Molecular Replacement in combination with initial structure rebuilding using Rosetta model completion and relaxation against an averaged electron density map. The subunit arrangement of the homo-octameric AOX1 differs from that of octameric vanillyl alcohol oxidase and other dimeric or tetrameric alcohol oxidases, due to the insertion of two large protruding loop regions and an additional C-terminal extension in AOX1. In comparison to other alcohol oxidases, the active site cavity of AOX1 is significantly reduced in size, which could explain the observed preference for methanol as substrate. All AOX1 subunits of the structure reported here harbor a modified flavin adenine dinucleotide, which contains an arabityl chain instead of a ribityl chain attached to the isoalloxazine ring. PMID:26905908

  3. NADPH OXIDASE: STRUCTURE AND ACTIVATION MECHANISMS (REVIEW). NOTE I.

    PubMed

    Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina; Manciuc, Carmen; Stoleriu, Gabriela; Foia, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), with its generically termed NOX isoforms, is the major source of ROS (reactive oxigen species) in biological systems. ROS are small oxygen-derived molecules with an important role in various biological processes (physiological or pathological). If under physiological conditions some processes are beneficial and necessary for life, under pathophysiological conditions they are noxious, harmful. NADPH oxidases are present in phagocytes and in a wide variety of nonphagocytic cells. The enzyme generates superoxide by transferring electrons from NADPH inside the cell across the membrane and coupling them to molecular oxygen to produce superoxide anion, a reactive free-radical. Structurally, NADPH oxidase is a multicomponent enzyme which includes two integral membrane proteins, glycoprotein gp9 1 Phox and adaptor protein p22(phox), which together form the heterodimeric flavocytochrome b558 that constitutes the core of the enzyme. During the resting state, the multidomain regulatory subunits p40P(phox), p47(phox), p67(Phox) are located in the cytosol organized as a complex. The activation of phagocytic NADPH oxidase occurs through a complex series of protein interactions. PMID:27125069

  4. Sulfide inhibition of and metabolism by cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Peter; Marshall, Doug C; Cooper, Chris E; Wilson, Mike T

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a classic cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, is also an in vitro oxidase substrate and an in vivo candidate hormonal ('gasotransmitter') species affecting sleep and hibernation. H2S, nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) share some common features. All are low-molecular-mass physiological effectors and also oxidase inhibitors, capable of binding more than one enzyme site, and each is an oxidizable 'substrate'. The oxidase oxidizes CO to CO2, NO to nitrite and sulfide to probable persulfide species. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase in an aerobic steady state with ascorbate and cytochrome c is rapidly inhibited by sulfide in a biphasic manner. At least two successive inhibited species are involved, probably partially reduced. The oxidized enzyme, in the absence of turnover, occurs in at least two forms: the 'pulsed' and 'resting' states. The pulsed form reacts aerobically with sulfide to form two intermediates, 'P' and 'F', otherwise involved in the reaction of oxygen with reduced enzyme. Sulfide can directly reduce the oxygen-reactive a3CuB binuclear centre in the pulsed state. The resting enzyme does not undergo such a step, but only a very slow one-electron reduction of the electron-transferring haem a. In final reactivation phases, both the steady-state inhibition of catalysis and the accumulation of P and F states are reversed by slow sulfide oxidation. A model for this complex reaction pattern is presented. PMID:24059525

  5. Crystal Structure of Alcohol Oxidase from Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian; Neumann, Piotr; Valerius, Oliver; Feussner, Ivo; Ficner, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    FAD-dependent alcohol oxidases (AOX) are key enzymes of methylotrophic organisms that can utilize lower primary alcohols as sole source of carbon and energy. Here we report the crystal structure analysis of the methanol oxidase AOX1 from Pichia pastoris. The crystallographic phase problem was solved by means of Molecular Replacement in combination with initial structure rebuilding using Rosetta model completion and relaxation against an averaged electron density map. The subunit arrangement of the homo-octameric AOX1 differs from that of octameric vanillyl alcohol oxidase and other dimeric or tetrameric alcohol oxidases, due to the insertion of two large protruding loop regions and an additional C-terminal extension in AOX1. In comparison to other alcohol oxidases, the active site cavity of AOX1 is significantly reduced in size, which could explain the observed preference for methanol as substrate. All AOX1 subunits of the structure reported here harbor a modified flavin adenine dinucleotide, which contains an arabityl chain instead of a ribityl chain attached to the isoalloxazine ring. PMID:26905908

  6. Bone marrow purging by a xanthine oxidase-antibody conjugate.

    PubMed

    Dinota, A; Tazzari, P L; Abbondanza, A; Battelli, M G; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1990-07-01

    The selective cytotoxicity of the xanthine oxidase conjugated to an 8A monoclonal antibody recognizing a human plasma cell-associated antigen has been described. The selectivity and the toxicity of the hypoxanthine/conjugated xanthine oxidase system was increased by removing the excess of conjugate and by adding chelated iron. Under these experimental conditions the cytotoxicity of the conjugate exceeded that of free xanthine oxidase by one order of magnitude. The conjugate effectively purged bone marrow from infiltrating neoplastic plasma cells and added target Raji cells, provided blood was removed and bone marrow peroxidases were exhausted. In conditions of purging effectiveness the conjugate had no toxicity to CFU-GM. No toxicity to mice was observed after i.v. injection of xanthine oxidase-antibody conjugate up to 2.9 U/kg body weight. Thus the hypoxanthine/conjugated xanthine oxidase system could be an effective and nontoxic tool for the ex vivo bone marrow purging in multiple myeloma patients for autologous transplantation. PMID:2390631

  7. Regulation of Ascorbate Oxidase Expression in Pumpkin by Auxin and Copper 1

    PubMed Central

    Esaka, Muneharu; Fujisawa, Kouichi; Goto, Miwa; Kisu, Yasutomo

    1992-01-01

    Ascorbate oxidase expression in pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.) tissues was studied. Specific ascorbate oxidase activities in pumpkin leaf and stem tissues were about 2 and 1.5 times that in the fruit tissues, respectively. In seeds, little ascorbate oxidase activity was detected. Northern blot analyses showed an abundant ascorbate oxidase mRNA in leaf and stem tissues. Fruit tissues had lower levels of ascorbate oxidase mRNA than leaf and stem tissues. Ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not detected in seeds. Specific ascorbate oxidase activity gradually increased during early seedling growth of pumpkin seeds. The increase was accompanied by an increase in ascorbate oxidase mRNA. When ascorbate oxidase activity in developing pumpkin fruits was investigated, the activities in immature fruits that are rapidly growing at 0, 2, 4, and 7 d after anthesis were much higher than those in mature fruits at 14 and 30 d after anthesis. The specific activity and mRNA of ascorbate oxidase markedly increased after inoculation of pumpkin fruit tissues into Murashige and Skoog's culture medium in the presence of an auxin such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) but not in the absence of 2,4-D. In the presence of 10 mg/L of 2,4-D, ascorbate oxidase mRNA was the most abundant. Thus, ascorbate oxidase is induced by 2,4-D. These results indicate that ascorbate oxidase is involved in cell growth. In pumpkin callus, ascorbate oxidase activity could be markedly increased by adding copper. Furthermore, immunological blotting showed that the amount of ascorbate oxidase protein was also increased by adding copper. However, northern blot analyses showed that ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not increased by adding copper. We suggest that copper may control ascorbate oxidase expression at translation or at a site after translation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:16652952

  8. Regulation of ascorbate oxidase expression in pumpkin by auxin and copper.

    PubMed

    Esaka, M; Fujisawa, K; Goto, M; Kisu, Y

    1992-09-01

    Ascorbate oxidase expression in pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.) tissues was studied. Specific ascorbate oxidase activities in pumpkin leaf and stem tissues were about 2 and 1.5 times that in the fruit tissues, respectively. In seeds, little ascorbate oxidase activity was detected. Northern blot analyses showed an abundant ascorbate oxidase mRNA in leaf and stem tissues. Fruit tissues had lower levels of ascorbate oxidase mRNA than leaf and stem tissues. Ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not detected in seeds. Specific ascorbate oxidase activity gradually increased during early seedling growth of pumpkin seeds. The increase was accompanied by an increase in ascorbate oxidase mRNA. When ascorbate oxidase activity in developing pumpkin fruits was investigated, the activities in immature fruits that are rapidly growing at 0, 2, 4, and 7 d after anthesis were much higher than those in mature fruits at 14 and 30 d after anthesis. The specific activity and mRNA of ascorbate oxidase markedly increased after inoculation of pumpkin fruit tissues into Murashige and Skoog's culture medium in the presence of an auxin such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) but not in the absence of 2,4-D. In the presence of 10 mg/L of 2,4-D, ascorbate oxidase mRNA was the most abundant. Thus, ascorbate oxidase is induced by 2,4-D. These results indicate that ascorbate oxidase is involved in cell growth. In pumpkin callus, ascorbate oxidase activity could be markedly increased by adding copper. Furthermore, immunological blotting showed that the amount of ascorbate oxidase protein was also increased by adding copper. However, northern blot analyses showed that ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not increased by adding copper. We suggest that copper may control ascorbate oxidase expression at translation or at a site after translation. PMID:16652952

  9. pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles induces apoptosis via reduced fatty acid synthesis in MDA-MB-231 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliaperumal, Jagatheesh; Hari, Natarajan; Pavankumar, Padarthi; Elangovan, Namasivayam

    2015-06-01

    The development of formulations with therapeutic peptides has been restricted to poor cell penetration and in this attempt; we developed pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized with FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TEM. In addition, the suitable formulation was evaluated for hemocompatibility, plasma stability and embryo toxicity using Danio rerio embryo model. The results showed that pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles were compatible with plasma. They possess sustained release pattern and also found to be safe up to 300 mg/L in embryo toxicity tests. Cytotoxicity assays with MDA-MB-231 cell lines suggested that, pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles were capable of enhanced cellular penetration and reduced palmitic acid content, which was confirmed by H1 NMR. Hence, these nanoparticles could be employed as excellent adjuvant therapeutics while treating solid tumors with multi-drug resistance.

  10. pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles induces apoptosis via reduced fatty acid synthesis in MDA-MB-231 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliaperumal, Jagatheesh; Hari, Natarajan; Pavankumar, Padarthi; Elangovan, Namasivayam

    2016-06-01

    The development of formulations with therapeutic peptides has been restricted to poor cell penetration and in this attempt; we developed pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized with FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TEM. In addition, the suitable formulation was evaluated for hemocompatibility, plasma stability and embryo toxicity using Danio rerio embryo model. The results showed that pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles were compatible with plasma. They possess sustained release pattern and also found to be safe up to 300 mg/L in embryo toxicity tests. Cytotoxicity assays with MDA-MB-231 cell lines suggested that, pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles were capable of enhanced cellular penetration and reduced palmitic acid content, which was confirmed by H1 NMR. Hence, these nanoparticles could be employed as excellent adjuvant therapeutics while treating solid tumors with multi-drug resistance.

  11. Expression of alternative oxidase in Drosophila ameliorates diverse phenotypes due to cytochrome oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Kia K.; Rinne, Juho; Sriram, Ashwin; Lakanmaa, Matti; Zeb, Akbar; Tuomela, Tea; Popplestone, Anna; Singh, Satpal; Sanz, Alberto; Rustin, Pierre; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a significant factor in human disease, ranging from systemic disorders of childhood to cardiomyopathy, ischaemia and neurodegeneration. Cytochrome oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is a frequent target. Lower eukaryotes possess alternative respiratory-chain enzymes that provide non-proton-translocating bypasses for respiratory complexes I (single-subunit reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenases, e.g. Ndi1 from yeast) or III + IV [alternative oxidase (AOX)], under conditions of respiratory stress or overload. In previous studies, it was shown that transfer of yeast Ndi1 or Ciona intestinalis AOX to Drosophila was able to overcome the lethality produced by toxins or partial knockdown of complex I or IV. Here, we show that AOX can provide a complete or substantial rescue of a range of phenotypes induced by global or tissue-specific knockdown of different cIV subunits, including integral subunits required for catalysis, as well as peripheral subunits required for multimerization and assembly. AOX was also able to overcome the pupal lethality produced by muscle-specific knockdown of subunit CoVb, although the rescued flies were short lived and had a motility defect. cIV knockdown in neurons was not lethal during development but produced a rapidly progressing locomotor and seizure-sensitivity phenotype, which was substantially alleviated by AOX. Expression of Ndi1 exacerbated the neuronal phenotype produced by cIV knockdown. Ndi1 expressed in place of essential cI subunits produced a distinct residual phenotype of delayed development, bang sensitivity and male sterility. These findings confirm the potential utility of alternative respiratory chain enzymes as tools to combat mitochondrial disease, while indicating important limitations thereof. PMID:24293544

  12. Polyamine Oxidase5 Regulates Arabidopsis Growth through Thermospermine Oxidase Activity1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Wook; Watanabe, Kanako; Murayama, Chihiro; Izawa, Sho; Niitsu, Masaru; Michael, Anthony J.; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-01-01

    The major plant polyamines (PAs) are the tetraamines spermine (Spm) and thermospermine (T-Spm), the triamine spermidine, and the diamine putrescine. PA homeostasis is governed by the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism; the latter is catalyzed by polyamine oxidase (PAO). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has five PAO genes, AtPAO1 to AtPAO5, and all encoded proteins have been biochemically characterized. All AtPAO enzymes function in the back-conversion of tetraamine to triamine and/or triamine to diamine, albeit with different PA specificities. Here, we demonstrate that AtPAO5 loss-of-function mutants (pao5) contain 2-fold higher T-Spm levels and exhibit delayed transition from vegetative to reproductive growth compared with that of wild-type plants. Although the wild type and pao5 are indistinguishable at the early seedling stage, externally supplied low-dose T-Spm, but not other PAs, inhibits aerial growth of pao5 mutants in a dose-dependent manner. Introduction of wild-type AtPAO5 into pao5 mutants rescues growth and reduces the T-Spm content, demonstrating that AtPAO5 is a T-Spm oxidase. Recombinant AtPAO5 catalyzes the conversion of T-Spm and Spm to triamine spermidine in vitro. AtPAO5 specificity for T-Spm in planta may be explained by coexpression with T-Spm synthase but not with Spm synthase. The pao5 mutant lacking T-Spm oxidation and the acl5 mutant lacking T-Spm synthesis both exhibit growth defects. This study indicates a crucial role for T-Spm in plant growth and development. PMID:24906355

  13. Characterization of wheat germin (oxalate oxidase) expressed by Pichia pastoris

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Heng-Yen; Whittaker, Mei M.; Bouveret, Romaric; Berna, Anne; Bernier, Francois; Whittaker, James W. . E-mail: jim@ebs.ogi.edu

    2007-05-18

    High-level secretory expression of wheat (Triticum aestivum) germin/oxalate oxidase was achieved in Pichia pastoris fermentation cultures as an {alpha}-mating factor signal peptide fusion, based on the native wheat cDNA coding sequence. The oxalate oxidase activity of the recombinant enzyme is substantially increased (7-fold) by treatment with sodium periodate, followed by ascorbate reduction. Using these methods, approximately 1 g (4 x 10{sup 4} U) of purified, activated enzyme was obtained following eight days of induction of a high density Pichia fermentation culture, demonstrating suitability for large-scale production of oxalate oxidase for biotechnological applications. Characterization of the recombinant protein shows that it is glycosylated, with N-linked glycan attached at Asn47. For potential biomedical applications, a nonglycosylated (S49A) variant was also prepared which retains essentially full enzyme activity, but exhibits altered protein-protein interactions.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  15. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase as a molecular target for diphenyl ether herbicides.

    PubMed Central

    Matringe, M; Camadro, J M; Labbe, P; Scalla, R

    1989-01-01

    Diphenyl ether herbicides induce an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX in plant tissues. By analogy to human porphyria, the accumulation could be attributed to decreased (Mg or Fe)-chelatase or protoporphyrinogen oxidase activities. Possible effects of acifluorfen-methyl on these enzymes were investigated in isolated corn (maize, Zea mays) etioplasts, potato (Solanum tuberosum) and mouse mitochondria, and yeast mitochondrial membranes. Acifluorfen-methyl was strongly inhibitory to protoporphyrinogen oxidase activities whatever their origins [concn. causing 50% inhibition (IC50) = 4 nM for the corn etioplast enzyme]. By contrast, it was roughly 100,000 times less active on (Mg or Fe)-chelatase activities (IC50 = 80-100 microM). Our results lead us to propose protoporphyrinogen oxidase as a cellular target for diphenyl ether herbicides. PMID:2775186

  16. [Amperometric enzyme biosensor with a glucose oxidase-polyaniline membrane].

    PubMed

    Dziadevich, S V; Doldatkin, A P; Rossokhatyĭ, V K; Shram, N F; Shul'ga, A A; Strikha, V I

    1994-01-01

    An amperometric glucose biosensor was made by electrochemical polymerization of aniline onto the gold electrodes in presence of the enzyme glucose oxidase in the phosphate buffer solution with pH 7.0. Aniline is easily polymerized forming a thin film, which adheres tightly on the electrodes surface. During the electropolymerization process glucose oxidase was entrapped into polyaniline film which then became the catalyst of the enzyme reaction of glucose hydrolysis. Experiments were performed to determine optimal conditions of polyaniline-glucose oxidase film preparation. Glucose was amperometrically determined with the electrochemically fabricated biosensor in the concentration range 10(-4) M to 2 x 10(-2) M. The linearity of the enzyme electrode response ranged from 2 x 10(-4) M to 6 x 10(-3) M. The electrochemical synthesis of a polyaniline-enzyme thin film a high-technologic one and this permits fabricating various microbiosensors and multisensors in the continuous technological cycle. PMID:7754558

  17. The alternative oxidases: simple oxidoreductase proteins with complex functions.

    PubMed

    Young, Luke; Shiba, Tomoo; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; Albury, Mary S; Moore, Anthony L

    2013-10-01

    The alternative oxidases are membrane-bound monotopic terminal electron transport proteins found in all plants and in some agrochemically important fungi and parasites including Trypansoma brucei, which is the causative agent of trypanosomiasis. They are integral membrane proteins and reduce oxygen to water in a four electron process. The recent elucidation of the crystal structure of the trypanosomal alternative oxidase at 2.85 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) has revealed salient structural features necessary for its function. In the present review we compare the primary and secondary ligation spheres of the alternative oxidases with other di-iron carboxylate proteins and propose a mechanism for the reduction of oxygen to water. PMID:24059524

  18. Forage polyphenol oxidase and ruminant livestock nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is predominately associated with the detrimental effect of browning fruit and vegetables, however, interest within PPO containing forage crops (crops to be fed to animals) has grown since the browning reaction was associated with reduced nitrogen (N) losses in silo and the rumen. The reduction in protein breakdown in silo of red clover (high PPO forage) increased the quality of protein, improving N-use efficiency [feed N into product N (e.g., Milk): NUE] when fed to ruminants. A further benefit of red clover silage feeding is a significant reduction in lipolysis (cleaving of glycerol-based lipid) in silo and an increase in the deposition of beneficial C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in animal products, which has also been linked to PPO activity. PPOs protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in silo is related to the deactivation of plant proteases and lipases. This deactivation occurs through PPO catalyzing the conversion of diphenols to quinones which bind with cellular nucleophiles such as protein reforming a protein-bound phenol (PBP). If the protein is an enzyme (e.g., protease or lipase) the complexing denatures the enzyme. However, PPO is inactive in the anaerobic rumen and therefore any subsequent protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen must be as a result of events that occurred to the forage pre-ingestion. Reduced activity of plant proteases and lipases would have little effect on NUE and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen due to the greater concentration of rumen microbial proteases and lipases. The mechanism for PPOs protection of plant protein in the rumen is a consequence of complexing plant protein, rather than protease deactivation per se. These complexed proteins reduce protein digestibility in the rumen and subsequently increase undegraded dietary protein flow to the small intestine. The mechanism for protecting glycerol-based PUFA has yet to be fully elucidated but may be associated

  19. Studies on Plant Growth Promoting Properties of Fruit-Associated Bacteria from Elettaria cardamomum and Molecular Analysis of ACC Deaminase Gene.

    PubMed

    Jasim, B; Anish, Mathew Chacko; Shimil, Vellakudiyan; Jyothis, Mathew; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2015-09-01

    Endophytic microorganisms have been reported to have diverse plant growth promoting mechanisms including phosphate solubilization, N2 fixation, production of phyto-hormones and ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase and antiphyto-pathogenic properties. Among these, ACC deaminase production is very important because of its regulatory effect on ethylene which is a stress hormone with precise role in the control of fruit development and ripening. However, distribution of these properties among various endophytic bacteria associated with fruit tissue and its genetic basis is least investigated. In the current study, 11 endophytic bacteria were isolated and identified from the fruit tissue of Elettaria cardamomum and were studied in detail for various plant growth promoting properties especially ACC deaminase activity using both culture-based and PCR-based methods. PCR-based screening identified the isolates EcB 2 (Pantoea sp.), EcB 7 (Polaromonas sp.), EcB 9 (Pseudomonas sp.), EcB 10 (Pseudomonas sp.) and EcB 11 (Ralstonia sp.) as positive for ACC deaminase. The PCR products were further subjected to sequence analysis which proved the similarity of the sequences identified in the study with ACC deaminase sequences reported from other sources. The detailed bioinformatic analysis of the sequence including homology-based modelling and molecular docking confirmed the sequences to have ACC deaminase activity. The docking of the modelled proteins was done using patch dock, and the detailed scrutiny of the protein ligand interaction revealed conservation of key amino acids like Lys51, Ser78, Tyr268 and Tyr294 which play important role in the enzyme activity. These suggest the possible regulatory effect of these isolates on fruit physiology. PMID:26164855

  20. Alternative Oxidase Gene Family in Hypericum perforatum L.: Characterization and Expression at the Post-germinative Phase

    PubMed Central

    Velada, Isabel; Cardoso, Hélia G.; Ragonezi, Carla; Nogales, Amaia; Ferreira, Alexandre; Valadas, Vera; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) protein is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane and is encoded in the nuclear genome being involved in plant response upon a diversity of environmental stresses and also in normal plant growth and development. Here we report the characterization of the AOX gene family of Hypericum perforatum L. Two AOX genes were identified, both with a structure of four exons (HpAOX1, acc. KU674355 and HpAOX2, acc. KU674356). High variability was found at the N-terminal region of the protein coincident with the high variability identified at the mitochondrial transit peptide. In silico analysis of regulatory elements located at intronic regions identified putative sequences coding for miRNA precursors and trace elements of a transposon. Simple sequence repeats were also identified. Additionally, the mRNA levels for the HpAOX1 and HpAOX2, along with the ones for the HpGAPA (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A subunit) and the HpCAT1 (catalase 1), were evaluated during the post-germinative development. Gene expression analysis was performed by RT-qPCR with accurate data normalization, pointing out HpHYP1 (chamba phenolic oxidative coupling protein 1) and HpH2A (histone 2A) as the most suitable reference genes (RGs) according to GeNorm algorithm. The HpAOX2 transcript demonstrated larger stability during the process with a slight down-regulation in its expression. Contrarily, HpAOX1 and HpGAPA (the corresponding protein is homolog to the chloroplast isoform involved in the photosynthetic carbon assimilation in other plant species) transcripts showed a marked increase, with a similar expression pattern between them, during the post-germinative development. On the other hand, the HpCAT1 (the corresponding protein is homolog to the major H2O2-scavenging enzyme in other plant species) transcripts showed an opposite behavior with a down-regulation during the process. In summary, our findings, although preliminary, highlight the importance to

  1. Alternative Oxidase Gene Family in Hypericum perforatum L.: Characterization and Expression at the Post-germinative Phase.

    PubMed

    Velada, Isabel; Cardoso, Hélia G; Ragonezi, Carla; Nogales, Amaia; Ferreira, Alexandre; Valadas, Vera; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) protein is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane and is encoded in the nuclear genome being involved in plant response upon a diversity of environmental stresses and also in normal plant growth and development. Here we report the characterization of the AOX gene family of Hypericum perforatum L. Two AOX genes were identified, both with a structure of four exons (HpAOX1, acc. KU674355 and HpAOX2, acc. KU674356). High variability was found at the N-terminal region of the protein coincident with the high variability identified at the mitochondrial transit peptide. In silico analysis of regulatory elements located at intronic regions identified putative sequences coding for miRNA precursors and trace elements of a transposon. Simple sequence repeats were also identified. Additionally, the mRNA levels for the HpAOX1 and HpAOX2, along with the ones for the HpGAPA (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A subunit) and the HpCAT1 (catalase 1), were evaluated during the post-germinative development. Gene expression analysis was performed by RT-qPCR with accurate data normalization, pointing out HpHYP1 (chamba phenolic oxidative coupling protein 1) and HpH2A (histone 2A) as the most suitable reference genes (RGs) according to GeNorm algorithm. The HpAOX2 transcript demonstrated larger stability during the process with a slight down-regulation in its expression. Contrarily, HpAOX1 and HpGAPA (the corresponding protein is homolog to the chloroplast isoform involved in the photosynthetic carbon assimilation in other plant species) transcripts showed a marked increase, with a similar expression pattern between them, during the post-germinative development. On the other hand, the HpCAT1 (the corresponding protein is homolog to the major H2O2-scavenging enzyme in other plant species) transcripts showed an opposite behavior with a down-regulation during the process. In summary, our findings, although preliminary, highlight the importance to

  2. A Conserved Steroid Binding Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Ling; Mills, Denise A.; Buhrow, Leann; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2010-09-02

    Micromolar concentrations of the bile salt deoxycholate are shown to rescue the activity of an inactive mutant, E101A, in the K proton pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. A crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme reveals, as predicted, deoxycholate bound with its carboxyl group at the entrance of the K path. Since cholate is a known potent inhibitor of bovine oxidase and is seen in a similar position in the bovine structure, the crystallographically defined, conserved steroid binding site could reveal a regulatory site for steroids or structurally related molecules that act on the essential K proton path.

  3. Expression of terminal oxidases under nutrient-starved conditions in Shewanella oneidensis: detection of the A-type cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella species are facultative anaerobic bacteria that colonize redox-stratified habitats where O2 and nutrient concentrations fluctuate. The model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses genes coding for three terminal oxidases that can perform O2 respiration: a bd-type quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidases of the cbb3-type and the A-type. Whereas the bd- and cbb3-type oxidases are routinely detected, evidence for the expression of the A-type enzyme has so far been lacking. Here, we investigated the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of these terminal oxidases under different O2 tensions. Our results reveal that the bd-type oxidase plays a significant role under nutrient starvation in aerobic conditions. The expression of the cbb3-type oxidase is also modulated by the nutrient composition of the medium and increases especially under iron-deficiency in exponentially growing cells. Most importantly, under conditions of carbon depletion, high O2 and stationary-growth, we report for the first time the expression of the A-type oxidase in S. oneidensis, indicating that this terminal oxidase is not functionally lost. The physiological role of the A-type oxidase in energy conservation and in the adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is discussed. PMID:26815910

  4. Expression of terminal oxidases under nutrient-starved conditions in Shewanella oneidensis: detection of the A-type cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Le Laz, Sébastien; kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella species are facultative anaerobic bacteria that colonize redox-stratified habitats where O2 and nutrient concentrations fluctuate. The model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses genes coding for three terminal oxidases that can perform O2 respiration: a bd-type quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidases of the cbb3-type and the A-type. Whereas the bd- and cbb3-type oxidases are routinely detected, evidence for the expression of the A-type enzyme has so far been lacking. Here, we investigated the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of these terminal oxidases under different O2 tensions. Our results reveal that the bd-type oxidase plays a significant role under nutrient starvation in aerobic conditions. The expression of the cbb3-type oxidase is also modulated by the nutrient composition of the medium and increases especially under iron-deficiency in exponentially growing cells. Most importantly, under conditions of carbon depletion, high O2 and stationary-growth, we report for the first time the expression of the A-type oxidase in S. oneidensis, indicating that this terminal oxidase is not functionally lost. The physiological role of the A-type oxidase in energy conservation and in the adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is discussed. PMID:26815910

  5. SCAI/AATS/ACC/STS operator and institutional requirements for transcatheter valve repair and replacement, Part III: Pulmonic valve.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Ziyad M; Ruiz, Carlos E; Zahn, Evan; Ringel, Richard; Aldea, Gabriel S; Bacha, Emile A; Bavaria, Joseph; Bolman, R Morton; Cameron, Duke E; Dean, Larry S; Feldman, Ted; Fullerton, David; Horlick, Eric; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Moon, Marc R; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Trento, Alfredo; Tommaso, Carl L

    2015-07-01

    With the evolution of transcatheter valve replacement, an important opportunity has arisen for cardiologists and surgeons to collaborate in identifying the criteria for performing these procedures. Therefore, The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS), American College of Cardiology (ACC), and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) have partnered to provide recommendations for institutions to assess their potential for instituting and/or maintaining a transcatheter valve program. This article concerns transcatheter pulmonic valve replacement (tPVR). tPVR procedures are in their infancy with few reports available on which to base an expert consensus statement. Therefore, many of these recommendations are based on expert consensus and the few reports available. As the procedures evolve, technology advances, experience grows, and more data accumulate, there will certainly be a need to update this consensus statement. The writing committee and participating societies believe that the recommendations in this report serve as appropriate requisites. In some ways, these recommendations apply to institutions more than to individuals. There is a strong consensus that these new valve therapies are best performed using a Heart Team approach; thus, these credentialing criteria should be applied at the institutional level. Partnering societies used the ACC's policy on relationships with industry (RWI) and other entities to author this document (http://www.acc.org/guidelines/about-guidelines-and-clinical-documents). To avoid actual, potential, or perceived conflicts of interest due to industry relationships or personal interests, all members of the writing committee, as well as peer reviewers of the document, were asked to disclose all current healthcare-related relationships including those existing 12 months before the initiation of the writing effort. A committee of interventional cardiologists and

  6. Removal of Asbestos-Containing Coatings (ACC) from gas transmission pipelines. Final report, January 1991-October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, L.E.; Blackburn, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion control coatings on transmission pipelines may contain asbestos as a secondary component of the coating. Current environmental and health regulations require a wet removal process for asbestos materials that provides close control of airborne emissions and asbestos fibers in effluent water. Modification of current line-traveling, water jet equipment was successfully completed in developing an economic removal process for asbestos-containing coatings (ACC). Materials handling components were added in yard experiments that permitted water jet removal, slurry filtration, and residue containerization meeting emission control levels, while providing pipe cleanliness suitable for recoating. Field evaluations under in-the-ditch and over-the-ditch conditions on 16-, 26- and 30-inch pipelines verified the achievement of design coating removal rates and asbestos emission control that meets current regulations.

  7. 2015 ACC Health Policy Statement on Cardiovascular Team-Based Care and the Role of Advanced Practice Providers.

    PubMed

    Brush, John E; Handberg, Eileen M; Biga, Cathleen; Birtcher, Kim K; Bove, Alfred A; Casale, Paul N; Clark, Michael G; Garson, Arthur; Hines, Jerome L; Linderbaum, Jane A; Rodgers, George P; Shor, Robert A; Thourani, Vinod H; Wyman, Janet F

    2015-05-19

    The mission of the American College of Cardiology is "to transform cardiovascular care and improve heart health." Cardiovascular team-based care is a paradigm for practice that can transform care, improve heart health, and help meet the demands of the future. One strategic goal of the College is to help members successfully transition their clinical practices to the future, with all its complexity, challenges, and opportunities. The ACC's strategic plan is aligned with the triple aim of improved care, improved population health, and lower costs per capita. The traditional understanding of quality, access, and cost is that you cannot improve one component without diminishing the others. With cardiovascular team-based care, it is possible to achieve the triple aim of improving quality, access, and cost simultaneously to also improve cardiovascular health. Striving to serve the best interests of patients is the true north of our guiding principles. Cardiovascular team-based care is a model that can improve care coordination and communication and allow each team member to focus more on the quality of care. In addition, the cardiovascular team-based care model increases access to cardiovascular care and allows expansion of services to populations and geographic areas that are currently underserved. This document will increase awareness of the important components of cardiovascular team-based care and create an opportunity for more discussion about the most creative and effective means of implementing it. We hope that this document will stimulate further discussions and activities within the ACC and beyond about team-based care. We have identified areas that need improvement, specifically in APP education and state regulation. The document encourages the exploration of collaborative care models that should enable team members to optimize their education, training, experience, and talent. Improved team leadership, coordination, collaboration, engagement, and efficiency

  8. Computer-controlled system for the study of oxidase reactions: application to the peroxidase-oxidase oscillator.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrew G; Tipton, Keith F

    2010-12-16

    An apparatus for the study of bisubstrate oxidase reactions at maintained steady-state substrate concentrations is described, and its specific application to the peroxidase-oxidase biochemical oscillator is reported. Instrument control and data acquisition are provided by custom software written in LabVIEW. The software allows measurement, recording, and control of dissolved oxygen through a Clark-type oxygen electrode, reaction monitoring by a UV/vis spectrophotometer, and controlled substrate delivery by a syringe infusion pump. For peroxidase from horseradish, the optimal pH for oscillatory behavior was found to be in the range 4.5-5.5. PMID:21049952

  9. Diiron centre mutations in Ciona intestinalis alternative oxidase abolish enzymatic activity and prevent rescue of cytochrome oxidase deficiency in flies

    PubMed Central

    Andjelković, Ana; Oliveira, Marcos T.; Cannino, Giuseppe; Yalgin, Cagri; Dhandapani, Praveen K.; Dufour, Eric; Rustin, Pierre; Szibor, Marten; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase, AOX, carries out the non proton-motive re-oxidation of ubiquinol by oxygen in lower eukaryotes, plants and some animals. Here we created a modified version of AOX from Ciona instestinalis, carrying mutations at conserved residues predicted to be required for chelation of the diiron prosthetic group. The modified protein was stably expressed in mammalian cells or flies, but lacked enzymatic activity and was unable to rescue the phenotypes of flies knocked down for a subunit of cytochrome oxidase. The mutated AOX transgene is thus a potentially useful tool in studies of the physiological effects of AOX expression. PMID:26672986

  10. IRON REGULATES XANTHINE OXIDASE ACTIVITY IN THE LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The iron chelator deferoxamine has been reported to inhibit both xanthine oxidase (XO) and xanthine dehydrogenase activity, but the relationship of this effect to the availability of iron in the cellular and tissue environment remains unexplored. XO and total xanthine oxidoreduct...

  11. Beyond brown: polyphenol oxidases as enzymes of plant specialized metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most cloned and/or characterized plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have catecholase activity (i.e., they oxidize o-diphenols to o-quinones) and are localized or predicted to be localized to plastids. As a class, they have broad substrate specificity and are associated with browning of produce and oth...

  12. Reducing peanut allergens by high pressure combined with polyphenol oxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce major peanut allergens (Ara h 1 and Ara h 2). Because high pressure (HP) can increase enzyme activity, we postulated that further reduction of peanut allergens can be achieved through HP combined with PPO. Peanut extracts were treated with each of th...

  13. HypC, the anthrone oxidase involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on gene disruption and enzyme activity, hypC, an open reading frame in the pksA (aflC)/nor-1 (aflD) intergenic region in the aflatoxin biosynthesis cluster, encodes a 17 kDa oxidase that catalyzes the conversion of norsolorinic acid anthrone to norsolorinic acid....

  14. Platinum Nanoparticles: Efficient and Stable Catechol Oxidase Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Chong, Yu; Wamer, Wayne G; Xia, Qingsu; Cai, Lining; Nie, Zhihong; Fu, Peter P; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-09-01

    Although enzyme-like nanomaterials have been extensively investigated over the past decade, most research has focused on the peroxidase-like, catalase-like, or SOD-like activity of these nanomaterials. Identifying nanomaterials having oxidase-like activities has received less attention. In this study, we demonstrate that platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) exhibit catechol oxidase-like activity, oxidizing polyphenols into the corresponding o-quinones. Four unique approaches are employed to demonstrate the catechol oxidase-like activity exerted by Pt NPs. First, UV-vis spectroscopy is used to monitor the oxidation of polyphenols catalyzed by Pt NPs. Second, the oxidized products of polyphenols are identified by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) identification. Third, electron spin resonance (ESR) oximetry techniques are used to confirm the O2 consumption during the oxidation reaction. Fourth, the intermediate products of semiquinone radicals formed during the oxidation of polyphenols are determined by ESR using spin stabilization. These results indicate Pt NPs possess catechol oxidase-like activity. Because polyphenols and related bioactive substances have been explored as potent antioxidants that could be useful for the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and Pt NPs have been widely used in the chemical industry and medical science, it is essential to understand the potential effects of Pt NPs for altering or influencing the antioxidant activity of polyphenols. PMID:26305170

  15. Structural Changes and Proton Transfer in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Vilhjálmsdóttir, Jóhanna; Johansson, Ann-Louise; Brzezinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In cytochrome c oxidase electron transfer from cytochrome c to O2 is linked to transmembrane proton pumping, which contributes to maintaining a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane. The mechanism by which cytochrome c oxidase couples the exergonic electron transfer to the endergonic proton translocation is not known, but it presumably involves local structural changes that control the alternating proton access to the two sides of the membrane. Such redox-induced structural changes have been observed in X-ray crystallographic studies at residues 423–425 (in the R. sphaeroides oxidase), located near heme a. The aim of the present study is to investigate the functional effects of these structural changes on reaction steps associated with proton pumping. Residue Ser425 was modified using site-directed mutagenesis and time-resolved spectroscopy was used to investigate coupled electron-proton transfer upon reaction of the oxidase with O2. The data indicate that the structural change at position 425 propagates to the D proton pathway, which suggests a link between redox changes at heme a and modulation of intramolecular proton-transfer rates. PMID:26310633

  16. Glucose oxidase-magnetite nanoparticle bioconjugate for glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Liane M; Quach, Ashley D; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2004-10-01

    Immobilization of bioactive molecules on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles is of great interest, because the magnetic properties of these bioconjugates promise to greatly improve the delivery and recovery of biomolecules in biomedical applications. Here we present the preparation and functionalization of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles 20 nm in diameter and the successful covalent conjugation of the enzyme glucose oxidase to the amino-modified nanoparticle surface. Functionalization of the magnetic nanoparticle surface with amino groups greatly increased the amount and activity of the immobilized enzyme compared with immobilization procedures involving physical adsorption. The enzymatic activity of the glucose oxidase-coated magnetic nanoparticles was investigated by monitoring oxygen consumption during the enzymatic oxidation of glucose using a ruthenium phenanthroline fluorescent complex for oxygen sensing. The glucose oxidase-coated magnetite nanoparticles could function as nanometric glucose sensors in glucose solutions of concentrations up to 20 mmol L(-1). Immobilization of glucose oxidase on the nanoparticles also increased the stability of the enzyme. When stored at 4 degrees C the nanoparticle suspensions maintained their bioactivity for up to 3 months. PMID:15448967

  17. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bossis, Fabrizio; Palese, Luigi L.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  18. Polyphenol oxidase activity in co-ensiled temperate grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and its o-diphenol substrates have been shown to effectively decrease proteolytic activity during the ensiling of forages such as red clover. Orchardgrass and smooth bromegrass both contain high levels of PPO activity, but lack appropriate levels of o-diphenols to adequately...

  19. Phosphoproteins and the activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, N.; Curnutte, J.T.; Babior, B.M.

    1987-05-01

    The respiratory burst oxidase is a neutrophil enzyme that converts oxygen to O/sub 2//sup -/. It is dormant in resting cells but is activated when the cells are exposed to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA also induces the incorporation of /sup 32/P into certain neutrophil proteins. To determine whether phosphorylation of these proteins is related to oxidase activation, protein phosphorylation was studied in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (GCD), a group of inherited conditions in which oxidase activity is missing. In normals, neutrophil activation by PMA is associated with the phosphorylation inter alia of 48K proteins at pI 7.3 and 7.8. There is also inconstant phosphorylation of a 48K protein at pI 6.8. In 4 patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), phosphorylation of pp48/6.8 and pp48/7.3 was absent, while in autosomal recessive CGD, phosphorylation of all 3 of these proteins was absent in 3 patients and significantly diminished in a fourth. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of these proteins is related to the activation of the respiratory burst oxidase. By peptide mapping, these 3 proteins appear to consist of a single peptide species whose pI variability may be due to post-translational modification. The only phosphoamino acid found in pp48/7.3 was phosphoserine.

  20. Purification of gibberellin sub 53 -oxidase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.M.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Spinach is a long-day rosette plants, in which stem growth is mediated by gibberellins. It has been shown that two enzymatic steps, GA{sub 53}-oxidase and GA{sub 19}-oxidase, are controlled by light. To develop an understanding into this light regulation, purification of GA{sub 53}-oxidase has been undertaken. The original assay relied on the HPLC separation of the product and substrate, but was considered too slow for the development of a purification scheme. A TLC system was developed which in conjunction with improvements to the assay conditions was sensitive and gave rapid results. The partial purification of the GA{sub 53}-oxidase is achieved by a high speed centrifugation, 40-55% ammonium sulfate precipitation, an hydroxyapatite column, Sephadex G-100 column and an anion exchange FPLC column, Mono Q HR10/10, yielding 1000-fold purification and 15% recovery. Monoclonal antibodies to the protein will be raised and used to further characterize the enzyme.

  1. Activity of glucose oxidase functionalized onto magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kouassi, Gilles K; Irudayaraj, Joseph; McCarty, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Background Magnetic nanoparticles have been significantly used for coupling with biomolecules, due to their unique properties. Methods Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal co-precipitation of ferric and ferrous chloride using two different base solutions. Glucose oxidase was bound to the particles by direct attachment via carbodiimide activation or by thiophene acetylation of magnetic nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the size and structure of the particles while the binding of glucose oxidase to the particles was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The direct binding of glucose oxidase via carbodiimide activity was found to be more effective, resulting in bound enzyme efficiencies between 94–100% while thiophene acetylation was 66–72% efficient. Kinetic and stability studies showed that the enzyme activity was more preserved upon binding onto the nanoparticles when subjected to thermal and various pH conditions. The overall activity of glucose oxidase was improved when bound to magnetic nanoparticles Conclusion Binding of enzyme onto magnetic nanoparticles via carbodiimide activation is a very efficient method for developing bioconjugates for biological applications PMID:15762994

  2. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  3. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  4. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  5. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  6. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  7. CHARACTERISTICS OF POLYPHENOL OXIDASES FROM RED CLOVER (TRIFOLIUM PRATENSE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.1) catalyzes the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones which cause browning reactions in many wounded fruits, vegetables, and plants including the forage crop red clover (Trifolium pratense). Production of o-quinones in red clover inhibits post-har...

  8. The glossyhead1 Allele of ACC1 Reveals a Principal Role for Multidomain Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in the Biosynthesis of Cuticular Waxes by Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Xu, C.; Zhao, H.; Parsons, E. P.; Kosma, D. K.; Xu, X.; Chao, D.; Lohrey, G.; Bangarusamy, D. K.; Wang, G.; Bressan, R. A.; Jenks, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), having highly glossy inflorescence stems, postgenital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene was identified as a new allele of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase1 (ACC1), a gene encoding the main enzyme in cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A synthesis. This, to our knowledge, is the first mutant allele of ACC1 that does not cause lethality at the seed or early germination stage, allowing for the first time a detailed analysis of ACC1 function in mature tissues. Broad lipid profiling of mature gsd1 organs revealed a primary role for ACC1 in the biosynthesis of the very-long-chain fatty acids (C{sub 20:0} or longer) associated with cuticular waxes and triacylglycerols. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analysis revealed that gsd1 has limited impact on any lipid metabolic networks but instead has a large effect on environmental stress-responsive pathways, especially senescence and ethylene synthesis determinants, indicating a possible role for the cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A-derived lipids in stress response signaling.

  9. Structure of the trypanosome cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Tomoo; Kido, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Tsuge, Chiaki; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Takahashi, Gen; Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Honma, Teruki; Tanaka, Akiko; Inoue, Masayuki; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Moore, Anthony L.; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    In addition to haem copper oxidases, all higher plants, some algae, yeasts, molds, metazoans, and pathogenic microorganisms such as Trypanosoma brucei contain an additional terminal oxidase, the cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase (AOX). AOX is a diiron carboxylate protein that catalyzes the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water by ubiquinol. In T. brucei, a parasite that causes human African sleeping sickness, AOX plays a critical role in the survival of the parasite in its bloodstream form. Because AOX is absent from mammals, this protein represents a unique and promising therapeutic target. Despite its bioenergetic and medical importance, however, structural features of any AOX are yet to be elucidated. Here we report crystal structures of the trypanosomal alternative oxidase in the absence and presence of ascofuranone derivatives. All structures reveal that the oxidase is a homodimer with the nonhaem diiron carboxylate active site buried within a four-helix bundle. Unusually, the active site is ligated solely by four glutamate residues in its oxidized inhibitor-free state; however, inhibitor binding induces the ligation of a histidine residue. A highly conserved Tyr220 is within 4 Å of the active site and is critical for catalytic activity. All structures also reveal that there are two hydrophobic cavities per monomer. Both inhibitors bind to one cavity within 4 Å and 5 Å of the active site and Tyr220, respectively. A second cavity interacts with the inhibitor-binding cavity at the diiron center. We suggest that both cavities bind ubiquinol and along with Tyr220 are required for the catalytic cycle for O2 reduction. PMID:23487766

  10. Structure of the trypanosome cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Tomoo; Kido, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Tsuge, Chiaki; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Takahashi, Gen; Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Honma, Teruki; Tanaka, Akiko; Inoue, Masayuki; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Moore, Anthony L; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-03-19

    In addition to haem copper oxidases, all higher plants, some algae, yeasts, molds, metazoans, and pathogenic microorganisms such as Trypanosoma brucei contain an additional terminal oxidase, the cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase (AOX). AOX is a diiron carboxylate protein that catalyzes the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water by ubiquinol. In T. brucei, a parasite that causes human African sleeping sickness, AOX plays a critical role in the survival of the parasite in its bloodstream form. Because AOX is absent from mammals, this protein represents a unique and promising therapeutic target. Despite its bioenergetic and medical importance, however, structural features of any AOX are yet to be elucidated. Here we report crystal structures of the trypanosomal alternative oxidase in the absence and presence of ascofuranone derivatives. All structures reveal that the oxidase is a homodimer with the nonhaem diiron carboxylate active site buried within a four-helix bundle. Unusually, the active site is ligated solely by four glutamate residues in its oxidized inhibitor-free state; however, inhibitor binding induces the ligation of a histidine residue. A highly conserved Tyr220 is within 4 Å of the active site and is critical for catalytic activity. All structures also reveal that there are two hydrophobic cavities per monomer. Both inhibitors bind to one cavity within 4 Å and 5 Å of the active site and Tyr220, respectively. A second cavity interacts with the inhibitor-binding cavity at the diiron center. We suggest that both cavities bind ubiquinol and along with Tyr220 are required for the catalytic cycle for O2 reduction. PMID:23487766

  11. Localization of the Dual Oxidase BLI-3 and Characterization of Its NADPH Oxidase Domain during Infection of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    van der Hoeven, Ransome; Cruz, Melissa R; Chávez, Violeta; Garsin, Danielle A

    2015-01-01

    Dual oxidases (DUOX) are enzymes that contain an NADPH oxidase domain that produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and a peroxidase domain that can utilize H2O2 to carry out a variety of reactions. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans produces the DUOX, BLI-3, which has roles in both cuticle development and in protection against infection. In previous work, we demonstrated that while certain peroxidases were protective against the human bacterial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis, the peroxidase domain of BLI-3 was not, leading to the postulate that the NADPH oxidase domain is the basis for BLI-3's protective effects. In this work, we show that a strain carrying a mutation in the NADPH oxidase domain of BLI-3, bli-3(im10), is more susceptible to E. faecalis and the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Additionally, less H2O2 is produced in response to pathogen using both an established Amplex Red assay and a strain of C. albicans, WT-OXYellow, which acts as a biosensor of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Finally, a C. elegans line containing a BLI-3::mCherry transgene was generated. Previous work suggested that BLI-3 is produced in the hypodermis and the intestine. Expression of the transgene was observed in both these tissues, and additionally in the pharynx. The amount and pattern of localization of BLI-3 did not change in response to pathogen exposure. PMID:25909649

  12. Replacement of a terminal cytochrome c oxidase by ubiquinol oxidase during the evolution of acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Minenosuke; Fukushima, Kota; Kayama, Chiho; Arimitsu, Misato; Hirakawa, Hideki; Toyama, Hirohide; Adachi, Osao; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial aerobic respiratory chain has a terminal oxidase of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily, comprised of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and ubiquinol oxidase (UOX); UOX evolved from COX. Acetobacter pasteurianus, an α-Proteobacterial acetic acid bacterium (AAB), produces UOX but not COX, although it has a partial COX gene cluster, ctaBD and ctaA, in addition to the UOX operon cyaBACD. We expressed ctaB and ctaA genes of A. pasteurianus in Escherichia coli and demonstrated their function as heme O and heme A synthases. We also found that the absence of ctaD function is likely due to accumulated mutations. These COX genes are closely related to other α-Proteobacterial COX proteins. However, the UOX operons of AAB are closely related to those of the β/γ-Proteobacteria (γ-type UOX), distinct from the α/β-Proteobacterial proteins (α-type UOX), but different from the other γ-type UOX proteins by the absence of the cyoE heme O synthase. Thus, we suggest that A. pasteurianus has a functional γ-type UOX but has lost the COX genes, with the exception of ctaB and ctaA, which supply the heme O and A moieties for UOX. Our results suggest that, in AAB, COX was replaced by β/γ-Proteobacterial UOX via horizontal gene transfer, while the COX genes, except for the heme O/A synthase genes, were lost. PMID:24862920

  13. Inheritance of polyphenol oxidase activity in wheat breeding lines derived from matings of low polyphenol oxidase parents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in grain plays a major role in time-dependent discoloration of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) products, especially fresh noodles. Breeding wheat cultivars with low or nil PPO activity can reduce the undesirable product darkening. The low PPO line PI 117635 was crossed to two...

  14. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3−) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3− than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3− into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3− formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3−. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  15. Role of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase in gibberellin biosynthesis during barley seed germination.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kyohei; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Watabe, Gaku; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2016-05-01

    NADPH oxidase catalyzes the production of the superoxide anion (O2(-)), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), and regulates the germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, delayed barley germination, and exogenous H2O2 (an ROS) partially rescued it. Six enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) and GA3-oxidase (GA3ox), catalyze the transformation of trans-geranylgeranyl diphosphate to active gibberellin, which promotes germination. Exogenous H2O2 promoted the expressions of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1 in barley embryos. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidase are involved in gibberellin biosynthesis through the regulation of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1. PMID:27110861

  16. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Rompel, Annette

    2016-03-29

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze theo-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme's interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate-enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO's acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their--so far unknown--natural substrates in vivo. PMID:26976571

  17. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze the o-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme’s interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate–enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO’s acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their—so far unknown—natural substrates in vivo. PMID:26976571

  18. Phenol oxidase activity in secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styła, K.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of peat depends on the geobotanical conditions of its formation and on the depth of sampling. The evolution of hydrogenic peat soils is closely related to the genesis of peat and to the changes in water conditions. Due to a number of factors including oscillation of ground water level, different redox potential, changes of aerobic conditions, different plant communities, and root exudes, and products of the degradation of plant remains, peat-moorsh soils may undergo a process of secondary transformation conditions (Sokolowska et al. 2005; Szajdak et al. 2007). Phenol oxidase is one of the few enzymes able to degrade recalcitrant phenolic materials as lignin (Freeman et al. 2004). Phenol oxidase enzymes catalyze polyphenol oxidation in the presence of oxygen (O2) by removing phenolic hydrogen or hydrogenes to from radicals or quinines. These products undergo nucleophilic addition reactions in the presence or absence of free - NH2 group with the eventual production of humic acid-like polymers. The presence of phenol oxidase in soil environments is important in the formation of humic substances a desirable process because the carbon is stored in a stable form (Matocha et al. 2004). The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites of investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: cartel (0-50cm) and cattle (50-100cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the phenol oxidize activity in two layers of the four different peat-moors soils used as meadow. The phenol oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring quinone formation at λmax=525 nm with catechol as substrate by method of Perucci

  19. Consistent evaluation of ACOS-GOSAT, BESD-SCIAMACHY, CarbonTracker, and MACC through comparisons to TCCON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulawik, Susan; Wunch, Debra; O'Dell, Christopher; Frankenberg, Christian; Reuter, Maximilian; Oda, Tomohiro; Chevallier, Frederic; Sherlock, Vanessa; Buchwitz, Michael; Osterman, Greg; Miller, Charles E.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Griffith, David; Morino, Isamu; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Notholt, Justus; Hase, Frank; Warneke, Thorsten; Sussmann, Ralf; Robinson, John; Strong, Kimberly; Schneider, Matthias; De Mazière, Martine; Shiomi, Kei; Feist, Dietrich G.; Iraci, Laura T.; Wolf, Joyce

    2016-02-01

    Consistent validation of satellite CO2 estimates is a prerequisite for using multiple satellite CO2 measurements for joint flux inversion, and for establishing an accurate long-term atmospheric CO2 data record. Harmonizing satellite CO2 measurements is particularly important since the differences in instruments, observing geometries, sampling strategies, etc. imbue different measurement characteristics in the various satellite CO2 data products. We focus on validating model and satellite observation attributes that impact flux estimates and CO2 assimilation, including accurate error estimates, correlated and random errors, overall biases, biases by season and latitude, the impact of coincidence criteria, validation of seasonal cycle phase and amplitude, yearly growth, and daily variability. We evaluate dry-air mole fraction (XCO2) for Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) (Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space, ACOS b3.5) and SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) (Bremen Optimal Estimation DOAS, BESD v2.00.08) as well as the CarbonTracker (CT2013b) simulated CO2 mole fraction fields and the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) CO2 inversion system (v13.1) and compare these to Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) observations (GGG2012/2014). We find standard deviations of 0.9, 0.9, 1.7, and 2.1 ppm vs. TCCON for CT2013b, MACC, GOSAT, and SCIAMACHY, respectively, with the single observation errors 1.9 and 0.9 times the predicted errors for GOSAT and SCIAMACHY, respectively. We quantify how satellite error drops with data averaging by interpreting according to error2 = a2 + b2/n (with n being the number of observations averaged, a the systematic (correlated) errors, and b the random (uncorrelated) errors). a and b are estimated by satellites, coincidence criteria, and hemisphere. Biases at individual stations have year-to-year variability of ˜ 0.3 ppm, with biases larger than the TCCON

  20. Consistent Evaluation of ACOS-GOSAT, BESD-SCIAMACHY, CarbonTracker, and MACC Through Comparisons to TCCON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulawik, Susan; Wunch, Debra; O’Dell, Christopher; Frankenberg, Christian; Reuter, Maximilian; Chevallier, Frederic; Oda, Tomohiro; Sherlock, Vanessa; Buchwitz, Michael; Osterman, Greg; Miller, Charles E.; Iraci, Laura T.; Wolf, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Consistent validation of satellite CO2 estimates is a prerequisite for using multiple satellite CO2 measurements for joint flux inversion, and for establishing an accurate long-term atmospheric CO2 data record. Harmonizing satellite CO2 measurements is particularly important since the differences in instruments, observing geometries, sampling strategies, etc. imbue different measurement characteristics in the various satellite CO2 data products. We focus on validating model and satellite observation attributes that impact flux estimates and CO2 assimilation, including accurate error estimates, correlated and random errors, overall biases, biases by season and latitude, the impact of coincidence criteria, validation of seasonal cycle phase and amplitude, yearly growth, and daily variability. We evaluate dry-air mole fraction (X(sub CO2)) for Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) (Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space, ACOS b3.5) and SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) (Bremen Optimal Estimation DOAS, BESD v2.00.08) as well as the CarbonTracker (CT2013b) simulated CO2 mole fraction fields and the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) CO2 inversion system (v13.1) and compare these to Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) observations (GGG2012/2014). We find standard deviations of 0.9, 0.9, 1.7, and 2.1 parts per million vs. TCCON for CT2013b, MACC, GOSAT, and SCIAMACHY, respectively, with the single observation errors 1.9 and 0.9 times the predicted errors for GOSAT and SCIAMACHY, respectively. We quantify how satellite error drops with data averaging by interpreting according to (error(sup 2) equals a(sup 2) plus b(sup 2) divided by n (with n being the number of observations averaged, a the systematic (correlated) errors, and b the random (uncorrelated) errors). a and b are estimated by satellites, coincidence criteria, and hemisphere. Biases at individual stations have year

  1. Oxygen reactivity of mammalian sulfite oxidase provides a concept for the treatment of sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Belaidi, Abdel A; Röper, Juliane; Arjune, Sita; Krizowski, Sabina; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Schwarz, Guenter

    2015-07-15

    Mammalian sulfite oxidase (SO) is a dimeric enzyme consisting of a molybdenum cofactor- (Moco) and haem-containing domain and catalyses the oxidation of toxic sulfite to sulfate. Following sulfite oxidation, electrons are passed from Moco via the haem cofactor to cytochrome c, the terminal electron acceptor. In contrast, plant SO (PSO) lacks the haem domain and electrons shuttle from Moco to molecular oxygen. Given the high similarity between plant and mammalian SO Moco domains, factors that determine the reactivity of PSO towards oxygen, remained unknown. In the present study, we generated mammalian haem-deficient and truncated SO variants and demonstrated their oxygen reactivity by hydrogen peroxide formation and oxygen-consumption studies. We found that intramolecular electron transfer between Moco and haem showed an inverse correlation to SO oxygen reactivity. Haem-deficient SO variants exhibited oxygen-dependent sulfite oxidation similar to PSO, which was confirmed further using haem-deficient human SO in a cell-based assay. This finding suggests the possibility to use oxygen-reactive SO variants in sulfite detoxification, as the loss of SO activity is causing severe neurodegeneration. Therefore we evaluated the potential use of PEG attachment (PEGylation) as a modification method for future enzyme substitution therapies using oxygen-reactive SO variants, which might use blood-dissolved oxygen as the electron acceptor. PEGylation has been shown to increase the half-life of other therapeutic proteins. PEGylation resulted in the modification of up to eight surface-exposed lysine residues of SO, an increased conformational stability and similar kinetic properties compared with wild-type SO. PMID:26171830

  2. Neolignans as xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Hyptis rhomboides.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Fa; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2014-05-01

    The active fraction from the EtOH extract of Hyptis rhomboides against xanthine oxidase was identified by use of an HPLC microfractionation-centrifugal vacuum evaporation-bioassay hyphenated technique. Scale-up separation of the active subfractions using semi-preparative RP-HPLC provided 13 phenylpropanoid compounds, including O-styrenylneolignans, hyprhombins A-C, epihyprhombin B, and hyprhombin B methyl ester, and O-caffeoylnorneolignans, hyprhombins D and E. All of these compounds shared a common 1,4-benzodioxane skeleton, as established by spectroscopic analyses. Hyprhombin C and epihyprhombin B exhibited better anti-xanthine oxidase activity than allopurinol, with IC50 values of 0.6 and 2.0 μM, respectively. PMID:24559911

  3. Bilirubin oxidases in bioelectrochemistry: features and recent findings.

    PubMed

    Mano, Nicolas; Edembe, Lise

    2013-12-15

    Bilirubin oxidases, a sub class of the Multicopper oxidases family, were discovered in 1981 by Tanaka and Murao (Murao and Tanaka, 1981) and first used for the detection of bilirubin. Since 2001 and the pioneering work of Tsujimura, these BODs have attracted a lot of attention for the reduction of O2. Unlike laccases, these BODs are stable in physiological conditions (20mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, 0.14 M NaCl, 37 °C) and more than 120 papers have been published in the last 7 years. Here, we will first briefly describe some general features of BODs and then review the use of BODs for bilirubin biosensors and the recent achievements and progress toward the elaboration of efficient O2 reducing cathodes. PMID:23911663

  4. Cloning and expression of the potato alternative oxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hiser, C.; McIntosh, L. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1990-05-01

    Mitochondria from 24-hour-aged potato slices possess an alternative path capacity and a 36kD protein not present in fresh potato mitochondria. This 36kD protein was identified by a monoclonal antibody against the Sauromatum guttatum alternative oxidase. These results suggest de novo synthesis of the 36kD protein during the aging process. To investigate this phenomenon, a clone containing a potato alternative oxidase gene was isolated from a cDNA library using the S. guttatum gene as a probe. This clone shows areas of high homology to the S. guttatum gene. Norther blots of RNA from fresh and 24-hour-aged potato slices are being probed with the potato gene to examine its expression in relation to the appearance of the 36kD protein.

  5. Alternative oxidase expression in aged potato tuber slices

    SciTech Connect

    Hiser, C.; Herdies, L.; McIntosh, L. )

    1989-04-01

    Higher plant mitochondria posses a cyanide-resistant, hydroxamate-sensitive alternative pathway of electron transport that does not conserve energy. Aging of potato tuber slices for 24 hours leads to the development of an alternative pathway capacity. We have shown that a monoclonal antibody raised against the alternative pathway terminal oxidase of Sauromatum guttatum crossreacts with a protein of similar size in aged potato slice mitochondria. This protein was partially purified and characterized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and its relative levels parallel the rise in cyanide-resistant respiration. We are using a putative clone of the S. guttatum alternative oxidase gene to isolate the equivalent gene from potato and to examine its expression.

  6. Tyrosinase versus Catechol Oxidase: One Asparagine Makes the Difference.

    PubMed

    Solem, Even; Tuczek, Felix; Decker, Heinz

    2016-02-18

    Tyrosinases mediate the ortho-hydroxylation and two-electron oxidation of monophenols to ortho-quinones. Catechol oxidases only catalyze the oxidation of diphenols. Although it is of significant interest, the origin of the functional discrimination between tyrosinases and catechol oxidases has been unclear. Recently, it has been postulated that a glutamate and an asparagine bind and activate a conserved water molecule towards deprotonation of monophenols. Here we demonstrate for the first time that a polyphenoloxidase, which exhibits only diphenolase activity, can be transformed to a tyrosinase by mutation to introduce an asparagine. The asparagine and a conserved glutamate are necessary to properly orient the conserved water in order to abstract a proton from the monophenol. These results provide direct evidence for the crucial importance of a proton shuttle for tyrosinase activity of type 3 copper proteins, allowing a consistent understanding of their different chemical reactivities. PMID:26773413

  7. Glycosides and xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Conyza bonariensis.

    PubMed

    Kong, L D; Abliz, Z; Zhou, C X; Li, L J; Cheng, C H; Tan, R X

    2001-10-01

    Fractionation of the xanthine oxidase inhibitory methanol extract of Conyza bonariensis afforded three glycosides, in addition to nine known compounds including amyrin, beta-sitostero1 daucosterol, syringic acid 3-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzoic acid, eugenol 4-O-glucopyranoside, and luteolin, apigenin and takakin 8-O-glucuronide. The structures of the glycosides were established by a combination of spectroscopic methods (IR, MS, 1H and 13C NMR, DEPT, COSY, HMQC and HMBC) as 4-hydroxypyridin-3-carboxylic acid 4-O-glucopyranoside, 8-hydroxy-6,7-dihydrolinalool 8-O-glucopyranoside and bonaroside [viz. 1,3,4,12-tetrahydroxy-2-(9-hexadecenoylamino)octadecane 1-O-glucopyranoside]. The in vitro enzyme assay showed that syringic acid and takakin 8-O-glucuronide displayed weak inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase with IC50 values of 500+/-41 microM and 170+/-12 microM, respectively. PMID:11576616

  8. A new crystal form of human diamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Aaron P; Hilmer, Kimberly M; Collyer, Charles A; Dooley, David M; Guss, J Mitchell

    2010-02-01

    Copper amine oxidases (CAOs) are ubiquitous in nature and catalyse the oxidative deamination of primary amines to the corresponding aldehydes. Humans have three viable CAO genes (AOC1-3). AOC1 encodes human diamine oxidase (hDAO), which is the frontline enzyme for histamine metabolism. hDAO is unique among CAOs in that it has a distinct substrate preference for diamines. The structure of hDAO in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with two molecules in the asymmetric unit has recently been reported. Here, the structure of hDAO refined to 2.1 A resolution in space group C222(1) with one molecule in the asymmetric unit is reported. PMID:20124708

  9. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species in cardiac pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Alison; Grieve, David; Johar, Sofian; Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2005-01-01

    Chronic heart failure, secondary to left ventricular hypertrophy or myocardial infarction, is a condition with increasing morbidity and mortality. Although the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this condition remain a subject of intense interest, there is now growing evidence that redox-sensitive pathways play an important role. This article focuses on the involvement of reactive oxygen species derived from a family of superoxide-generating enzymes, termed NADPH oxidases (NOXs), in the pathophysiology of ventricular hypertrophy, the accompanying interstitial fibrosis and subsequent heart failure. In particular, the apparent ability of the different NADPH oxidase isoforms to define the response of a cell to a range of physiological and pathophysiological stimuli is reviewed. If confirmed, these data would suggest that independently targeting different members of the NOX family may hold the potential for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of cardiac disease. PMID:16321803

  10. T lymphocyte killing by a xanthine-oxidase-containing immunotoxin.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Tazzari, P L; Bolognesi, A; Lemoli, R M; Stirpe, F

    1992-01-01

    We report on the preparation of an immunotoxin consisting of xanthine oxidase, a free-radical-producing enzyme, covalently linked to an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. The immunotoxin retained both enzymic and immunological properties and its toxicity to target cells (a) was greater than that of the free enzyme, (b) was proportional to the enzyme concentration, and (c) was reduced either in the absence of hypoxanthine or by an excess of free anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. The cytotoxicity and selectivity of the hypoxanthine/conjugated xanthine oxidase system were potentiated by the addition of chelated iron and by washing away the unbound immunotoxin prior to the addition of substrate. The same system was not toxic to bone marrow progenitor cells. A possible use of this immunotoxin for the ex vivo purging of organs to be transplanted from T lymphocytes, to avoid the graft-versus-host reaction, is suggested. PMID:1394345

  11. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiuchun; Shi, Xiaoli; Shi, Limei; Liu, Jinlin; Stone, Victoria; Kong, Fanxiang; Kitten, Todd; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation. PMID:26950587

  12. Characterisation of ethylene pathway components in non-climacteric capsicum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Climacteric fruit exhibit high ethylene and respiration levels during ripening but these levels are limited in non-climacteric fruit. Even though capsicum is in the same family as the well-characterised climacteric tomato (Solanaceae), it is non-climacteric and does not ripen normally in response to ethylene or if harvested when mature green. However, ripening progresses normally in capsicum fruit when they are harvested during or after what is called the ‘Breaker stage’. Whether ethylene, and components of the ethylene pathway such as 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase (ACO), ACC synthase (ACS) and the ethylene receptor (ETR), contribute to non-climacteric ripening in capsicum has not been studied in detail. To elucidate the behaviour of ethylene pathway components in capsicum during ripening, further analysis is therefore needed. The effects of ethylene or inhibitors of ethylene perception, such as 1-methylcyclopropene, on capsicum fruit ripening and the ethylene pathway components may also shed some light on the role of ethylene in non-climacteric ripening. Results The expression of several isoforms of ACO, ACS and ETR were limited during capsicum ripening except one ACO isoform (CaACO4). ACS activity and ACC content were also low in capsicum despite the increase in ACO activity during the onset of ripening. Ethylene did not stimulate capsicum ripening but 1-methylcyclopropene treatment delayed the ripening of Breaker-harvested fruit. Some of the ACO, ACS and ETR isoforms were also differentially expressed upon treatment with ethylene or 1-methylcyclopropene. Conclusions ACS activity may be the rate limiting step in the ethylene pathway of capsicum which restricts ACC content. The differential expression of several ethylene pathway components during ripening and upon ethylene or 1-methylclopropene treatment suggests that the ethylene pathway may be regulated differently in non-climacteric capsicum compared to the climacteric tomato

  13. Multiple controls affect arsenite oxidase gene expression in Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Both the speciation and toxicity of arsenic are affected by bacterial transformations, i.e. oxidation, reduction or methylation. These transformations have a major impact on environmental contamination and more particularly on arsenic contamination of drinking water. Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans has been isolated from an arsenic- contaminated environment and has developed various mechanisms for coping with arsenic, including the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) as a detoxification mechanism. Results In the present study, a differential transcriptome analysis was used to identify genes, including arsenite oxidase encoding genes, involved in the response of H. arsenicoxydans to As(III). To get insight into the molecular mechanisms of this enzyme activity, a Tn5 transposon mutagenesis was performed. Transposon insertions resulting in a lack of arsenite oxidase activity disrupted aoxR and aoxS genes, showing that the aox operon transcription is regulated by the AoxRS two-component system. Remarkably, transposon insertions were also identified in rpoN coding for the alternative N sigma factor (σ54) of RNA polymerase and in dnaJ coding for the Hsp70 co-chaperone. Western blotting with anti-AoxB antibodies and quantitative RT-PCR experiments allowed us to demonstrate that the rpoN and dnaJ gene products are involved in the control of arsenite oxidase gene expression. Finally, the transcriptional start site of the aoxAB operon was determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and a putative -12/-24 σ54-dependent promoter motif was identified upstream of aoxAB coding sequences. Conclusion These results reveal the existence of novel molecular regulatory processes governing arsenite oxidase expression in H. arsenicoxydans. These data are summarized in a model that functionally integrates arsenite oxidation in the adaptive response to As(III) in this microorganism. PMID:20167112

  14. Crystal structures of intermediates in the nitroalkane oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Annie; Bozinovski, Dragana M; Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Orville, Allen M

    2009-04-21

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 A resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes [Valley, M. P., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2003) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 8738-8739]. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped [Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066]. The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle. PMID:19265437

  15. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Nitroalkane Oxidase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, A.; Bozinovski, D; Valley, M; Fitzpatrick, P; Orville, A

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped (Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066). The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle.

  16. Characterization of two brassinosteroid C-6 oxidase genes in pea.

    PubMed

    Jager, Corinne E; Symons, Gregory M; Nomura, Takahito; Yamada, Yumiko; Smith, Jennifer J; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Weller, James L; Yokota, Takao; Reid, James B

    2007-04-01

    C-6 oxidation genes play a key role in the regulation of biologically active brassinosteroid (BR) levels in the plant. They control BR activation, which involves the C-6 oxidation of 6-deoxocastasterone (6-DeoxoCS) to castasterone (CS) and in some cases the further conversion of CS to brassinolide (BL). C-6 oxidation is controlled by the CYP85A family of cytochrome P450s, and to date, two CYP85As have been isolated in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), two in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), one in rice (Oryza sativa), and one in grape (Vitis vinifera). We have now isolated two CYP85As (CYP85A1 and CYP85A6) from pea (Pisum sativum). However, unlike Arabidopsis and tomato, which both contain one BR C-6 oxidase that converts 6-DeoxoCS to CS and one BR C-6 Baeyer-Villiger oxidase that converts 6-DeoxoCS right through to BL, the two BR C-6 oxidases in pea both act principally to convert 6-DeoxoCS to CS. The isolation of these two BR C-6 oxidation genes in pea highlights the species-specific differences associated with C-6 oxidation. In addition, we have isolated a novel BR-deficient mutant, lke, which blocks the function of one of these two BR C-6 oxidases (CYP85A6). The lke mutant exhibits a phenotype intermediate between wild-type plants and previously characterized pea BR mutants (lk, lka, and lkb) and contains reduced levels of CS and increased levels of 6-DeoxoCS. To date, lke is the only mutant identified in pea that blocks the latter steps of BR biosynthesis and it will therefore provide an excellent tool to further examine the regulation of BR biosynthesis and the relative biological activities of CS and BL in pea. PMID:17322341

  17. Use of a xanthine oxidase inhibitor in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Al-Shamma, Safa; Eross, Balint; Mclaughlin, Simon

    2013-03-01

    A 62-year-old woman with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) failed to sustain remission when steroids were withdrawn from a regimen of steroids and azathioprine (AZA). Thiopurine metabolites revealed elevated 6-MMP (6-methyl mercaptopurine) and low 6-TGN (6-thioguanine nucleotide) consistent with AZA-induced hepatotoxicity. Introducing the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol led to rapid normalization of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and discontinuation of steroids. PMID:23238820

  18. Structures and Mechanism of the Monoamine Oxidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Gaweska, Helena; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the monoamine oxidase family of flavoproteins catalyze the oxidation of primary and secondary amines, polyamines, amino acids, and methylated lysine side chains in proteins. The enzymes have similar overall structures, with conserved FAD-binding domains and varied substrate-binding sites. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed for the catalytic reactions of these enzymes. The present review compares the structures of different members of the family and the various mechanistic proposals. PMID:22022344

  19. Studies of GA sub 53 oxidase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    GA{sub 53} oxidase was purified 1,750-fold with 1% recovery of activity from spinach after exposure to 8 long days. This preparation was injected into balb/c mice and hybridomas from spleen cells were produced. Upon preliminary screening by immunoprecipitation of enzyme activity, three positive cell lines were selected. These are being cloned to select a true monoclonal antibody cell line. This antibody will be used to study the light/dark regulation of this enzyme.

  20. Functional characterization of alcohol oxidases from Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Kiran; Goswami, Pranab

    2006-10-01

    Short chain alcohol oxidase (SCAO), long chain alcohol oxidase (LCAO), secondary alcohol oxidase (SAO), and aryl alcohol oxidase (AAO) activities were localized in the microsome of Aspergillus terreus during growth of the fungi on n-hexadecane. Zymogram analysis of the microsomes of n-hexadecane-grown cells in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed distinct bands, H4, H3, H2, and H1, in a sequence of their molecular weight (Mr) from high to low. The Mr of the isozymes corresponding to the bands H4, H3, and H2 were close to each other and were higher than 272 kDa. While, the Mr of the isozyme H1 was found to be approximately 48 kDa. H1 gave activity only as SCAO. Although the substrates for other bands were varied, strong (S), medium (M), and weak (W) activity for the bands were as follows: H2: SAO (S), AAO (S), LCAO (M), SCAO (S); H3: LCAO (S), SCAO (S); H4: SCAO (S), LCAO (W), SAO (W). The pH and temperature optima of these isozymes were found to be 8.5+/-0.5 and 30+/-1 degrees C, respectively. The stability of the isozymes was drastically decreased beyond 30 degrees C. The SAO showed 33% enantiomeric excess for the R(-)2-octanol over S(+)2-octanol, which may be correlated with the lower Michaelis-Menten constant (K (M)) values of the enzyme for the R(-)2-octanol than the S(+)2-octanol. The fluorescence emission spectra of the chromatographically purified SCAO at 443 nm excitation were similar to that obtained with authentic flavin adenine dinucleotide. PMID:16547701

  1. Four novel mutations of the coproporphyrinogen III oxidase gene.

    PubMed

    Aurizi, C; Lupia Palmieri, G; Barbieri, L; Macrì, A; Sorge, F; Usai, G; Biolcati, G

    2009-01-01

    Here we report the characterization of four novel mutations and a previously described one of the coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPO) gene in five Italian patients affected by Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP). Three of the novel genetic variants are missense mutations (p.Gly242Cys; p.Leu398Pro; p.Ser245Phe) and one is a frameshift mutation (p.Gly188TrpfsX45). PMID:19267996

  2. Alkylamino derivatives of 4-aminomethylpyridine as inhibitors of copper-containing amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Vincenzo; Buffoni, Franca; Ignesti, Giovanni; Picci, Nevio; Trombino, Sonia; Iemma, Francesca; Alfei, Silvana; Pocci, Marco; Lucchesini, Francesco; De Munno, Angela

    2005-02-10

    The first substratelike, reversible inhibitors of different copper amine oxidases (CAOs) with IC50 (M) as low as 2.0 x 10(-8) corresponding to derivatives of 4-aminomethylpyridine with alkoxy (1a-d), alkylthio (2a,b), and alkylamino (3a-e, 4a-j) groups in the positions 3 and 5 have been prepared and studied. The inhibitors 1a-d are active on benzylamine oxidase and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and are very selective with respect to diamine oxidase, lysyl oxidase, and monoamine oxidases. The inhibitors 2a,b are selective for benzylamine oxidase whereas 2a is also a new type of good substrate of diamine oxidase. The inhibitors 3a-e and 4a-j are substratelike, reversible, nonselective inhibitors of various CAOs including pea seedling amine oxidase and Hansenula polymorpha amine oxidase, whose enzymatic sites are known from X-ray structure determinations. The inhibitors 3b,c and 4b,c are excellent substratelike tools for studies correlating CAOs that afford crystals suitable for X-ray structure determinations with CAOs from mammals. PMID:15689151

  3. [Respiratory oxidases: the enzymes which use most of the oxygen which living things breathe].

    PubMed

    Toledo-Cuevas, E M

    1997-01-01

    The respiratory oxidases are the last enzymes of the aerobic respiratory chain. They catalize the reduction of molecular oxygen to water, with generation of an electrochemical gradient useful for the energy demanding cellular processes. Most of the oxidases belong to the heme-copper superfamily. They possess a heme-copper center, constituted of a high spin heme and a CuB center, where the reduction of oxygen takes place and probably where the link to proton pumping is located. The superfamily is divided in two classes: the quinol- and the cytochrome c-oxidases. The latter are divided in the aa3 and the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. The main difference between quinol- and the aa3-type cytochrome c-oxidases is the CuA center, which is absent in the quinol oxidases. The cbb3-type cytochrome oxidases have the binuclear center, but lack the CuA center. They also does not have the classical subunits II and III. These differences seem not to affect the oxygen reduction or the proton pumping. Probably the oxidases have evolved from some denitrification enzymes and prior the photosynthetic process. Also is possible that the cbb3-type cytochrome oxidases or others very similar have been the first oxidases to appear. PMID:10932727

  4. Characterization of Euphorbia characias Latex Amine Oxidase1

    PubMed Central

    Padiglia, Alessandra; Medda, Rosaria; Lorrai, Anita; Murgia, Barbara; Pedersen, Jens Z.; Finazzi Agró, Alessandro; Floris, Giovanni

    1998-01-01

    A copper-containing amine oxidase from the latex of Euphorbia characias was purified to homogeneity and the copper-free enzyme obtained by a ligand-exchange procedure. The interactions of highly purified apo- and holoenzyme with several substrates, carbonyl reagents, and copper ligands were investigated by optical spectroscopy under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The extinction coefficients at 278 and 490 nm were determined as 3.78 × 105 m−1 cm−1 and 6000 m−1 cm−1, respectively. Active-site titration of highly purified enzyme with substrates and carbonyl reagents showed the presence of one cofactor at each enzyme subunit. In anaerobiosis the native enzyme oxidized one equivalent substrate and released one equivalent aldehyde per enzyme subunit. The apoenzyme gave exactly the same 1:1:1 stoichiometry in anaerobiosis and in aerobiosis. These findings demonstrate unequivocally that copper-free amine oxidase can oxidize substrates with a single half-catalytic cycle. The DNA-derived protein sequence shows a characteristic hexapeptide present in most 6-hydroxydopa quinone-containing amine oxidases. This hexapeptide contains the tyrosinyl residue that can be modified into the cofactor 6-hydroxydopa quinone. PMID:9701592

  5. Potential xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Neha; Saxena, Sanjai

    2014-07-01

    Xanthine oxidase is considered as a potential target for treatment of hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia is predisposing factor for gout, chronic heart failure, atherosclerosis, tissue injury, and ischemia. To date, only two inhibitors of xanthine oxidase viz. allopurinol and febuxostat have been clinically approved for used as drugs. In the process of searching for new xanthine oxidase inhibitors, we screened culture filtrates of 42 endophytic fungi using in vitro qualitative and quantitative XO inhibitory assays. The qualitative assay exhibited potential XO inhibition by culture filtrates of four isolates viz. #1048 AMSTITYEL, #2CCSTITD, #6AMLWLS, and #96 CMSTITNEY. The XO inhibitory activity was present only in the chloroform extract of the culture filtrates. Chloroform extract of culture filtrate #1048 AMSTITYEL exhibited the highest inhibition of XO with an IC50 value of 0.61 μg ml(-1) which was better than allopurinol exhibiting an IC50 of 0.937 μg ml(-1) while febuxostat exhibited a much lower IC50 of 0.076 μg ml(-1). Further, molecular phylogenetic tools and morphological studies were used to identify #1048 AMSTITYEL as Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae. This is the first report of an endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae from Aegle marmelos exhibiting potential XO Inhibitory activity. PMID:24801403

  6. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase: a multicomponent enzyme essential for host defenses.

    PubMed

    El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Elbim, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Phagocytes such as neutrophils and monocytes play an essential role in host defenses against microbial pathogens. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical, and hypochlorous acid, together with microbicidal peptides and proteases, constitute their antimicrobial arsenal. The enzyme responsible for superoxide anion production and, consequently, ROS generation, is called NADPH oxidase or respiratory burst oxidase. This multicomponent enzyme system is composed of cytosolic proteins (p47phox, p67phox, p40phox, and rac1/2) and membrane proteins (p22phox and gp91phox, which form cytochrome b558) which assemble at membrane sites upon cell activation. The importance of this enzyme in host defenses is illustrated by a life-threatening genetic disorder called chronic granulomatous disease in which the phagocyte enzyme is dysfunctional, leading to life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Also, because ROS can damage surrounding tissues, their production, and thus NADPH oxidase activation, must be tightly regulated. This review describes the structure and activation of the neutrophil NADPH enzyme complex. PMID:15995580

  7. Androgen receptor and monoamine oxidase polymorphism in wild bonobos.

    PubMed

    Garai, Cintia; Furuichi, Takeshi; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Ryu, Heungjin; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2014-12-01

    Androgen receptor gene (AR), monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) and monoamine oxidase B gene (MAOB) have been found to have associations with behavioral traits, such as aggressiveness, and disorders in humans. However, the extent to which similar genetic effects might influence the behavior of wild apes is unclear. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ), AR glycine repeat (ARG), MAOA intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MAin2) and MAOB intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MBin2) in 32 wild bonobos, Pan paniscus, and compared them with those of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, and humans. We found that bonobos were polymorphic on the four loci examined. Both loci MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos showed a higher diversity than in chimpanzees. Because monoamine oxidase influences aggressiveness, the differences between the polymorphisms of MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos and chimpanzees may be associated with the differences in aggression between the two species. In order to understand the evolution of these loci and AR, MAOA and MAOB in humans and non-human primates, it would be useful to conduct future studies focusing on the potential association between aggressiveness, and other personality traits, and polymorphisms documented in bonobos. PMID:25606465

  8. Reaction mechanism of mammalian mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Shinya; Muramoto, Kazumasa; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal oxidase of the mitochondrial respiratory system. This enzyme reduces molecular oxygen (O(2)) to water in a reaction coupled with the pumping of protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Progress in investigating the reaction mechanism of this enzyme has been limited by the resolution of its X-ray structure. Bovine heart COX has provided the highest resolution (1.8 Å) X-ray structure presently available among the terminal oxidases. The reaction mechanism of the bovine heart enzyme has been the most extensively studied, particularly with respect to (1) the reduction of O(2) to water without release of reactive oxygen species, (2) the mechanism of coupling between the O(2) reduction process and proton pumping, (3) the structural basis for unidirectional proton transfer (proton pumping), and (4) the effective prevention of proton leakage from the proton-pumping pathway to the proton pathway used for generation of water molecules. In this chapter, we will review recent structural studies of bovine heart COX and discuss the mechanisms described earlier in context of the structural data. PMID:22729860

  9. Effects of a 500 Mc s -1 additional cavity on spontaneous coherent synchrotron oscillations in the Super-ACO storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergher, M.

    An additional 500 Mc s -1 cavity, fifth harmonics of the main cavity, was installed on the Super-ACO storage ring in order to shorten the bunch length. This cavity was introduced to obtain shorter wavelengths in the UV for the FEL and shorter flashes of light for the experiments using the two-bunches-mode functioning for the time-resolved measurements. Spontaneous coherent synchrotron oscillations (SCSO) were profoundly modified by the presence of this cavity. These instabilities are probably the consequence of the formation of micro-bunches. The vanishing of these micro-bunches is associated to the emission of coherent synchrotron radiation, which gives the SCSO a cyclic character. The identification of the resonant elements responsible for these cyclic instabilities can help us to suppress or substantial ameliorate the SCSO by acting selectively on these resonant elements. This method can be applied to other storage or damping rings that show the same type of instabilities.

  10. Absolute calibration of soft x-ray detectors (photocathodes, XUV photodiodes, thinned CCD, ...) with the synchrotron radiation of SUPER ACO at the LURE, Orsay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdin, C.; Troussel, P.; Bourgade, J. L.; Le Guern, F.; Mens, A.; Schirmann, D.; Dalmasso, J. M.; Gontier, D.; Mazataud, D.

    1994-10-01

    To interpret the experimental results in laser matter interaction experiments, the absolute spectral response of soft x-ray detectors is often needed. For this purpose CEL-V uses calibration lines of synchrotron radiation of SUPER-ACO at the LURE. The energy of output photons can be selected from 50 eV to 1000 eV. The output photon flux is absolutely calibrated with a bolometer or a soft x-ray photodiode. Then we measure the response of the studied detector installed at the same location. Measurements of quantum efficiencies of photocathodes (Al and CsI on Al) and of the response of a thinned CCD are presented versus photon energy.

  11. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by the aldehyde oxidase inhibitor raloxifene: implications for identifying molybdopterin nitrite reductases.

    PubMed

    Weidert, E R; Schoenborn, S O; Cantu-Medellin, N; Choughule, K V; Jones, J P; Kelley, E E

    2014-02-15

    Sources of nitric oxide alternative to nitric oxide synthases are gaining significant traction as crucial mediators of vessel function under hypoxic inflammatory conditions. For example, capacity to catalyze the one electron reduction of nitrite (NO2-) to ·NO has been reported for hemoglobin, myoglobin and molybdopterin-containing enzymes including xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and aldehyde oxidase (AO). For XOR and AO, use of selective inhibition strategies is therefore crucial when attempting to assign relative contributions to nitrite-mediated ·NO formation in cells and tissue. To this end, XOR inhibition has been accomplished with application of classic pyrazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors allo/oxypurinol or the newly FDA-approved XOR-specific inhibitor, Uloric® (febuxostat). Likewise, raloxifene, an estrogen receptor antagonist, has been identified as a potent (Ki=1.0 nM) inhibitor of AO. Herein, we characterize the inhibition kinetics of raloxifene for XOR and describe the resultant effects on inhibiting XO-catalyzed ·NO formation. Exposure of purified XO to raloxifene (PBS, pH 7.4) resulted in a dose-dependent (12.5-100 μM) inhibition of xanthine oxidation to uric acid. Dixon plot analysis revealed a competitive inhibition process with a Ki=13 μM. This inhibitory process was more effective under acidic pH; similar to values encountered under hypoxic/inflammatory conditions. In addition, raloxifene also inhibited anoxic XO-catalyzed reduction of NO2- to NO (EC50=64 μM). In contrast to having no effect on XO-catalyzed uric acid production, the AO inhibitor menadione demonstrated potent inhibition of XO-catalyzed NO2- reduction (EC50=60 nM); somewhat similar to the XO-specific inhibitor, febuxostat (EC50=4 nM). Importantly, febuxostat was found to be a very poor inhibitor of human AO (EC50=613 μM) suggesting its usefulness for validating XO-dependent contributions to NO2- reduction in biological systems. Combined, these data indicate care should be taken

  12. Asymmetric Total Synthesis of (+)- and (−)-Clusianone and (+)- and (−)Clusianone Methyl Enol Ether via ACC Alkylation and Evaluation of their Anti-HIV Activity

    PubMed Central

    Garnsey, Michelle R.; Matous, James A.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Coltart, Don M.

    2011-01-01

    The total asymmetric synthesis of (+)- and (−)-clusianone and (+)- and (−)-clusianone methyl enol ether is reported. Asymmetric induction is achieved through the use of ACC alkylation, providing the key intermediates with an er of 99:1. The four synthetic compounds were evaluated for their anti-HIV activity. Both (+)- and (−)-clusianone displayed significant anti-HIV activity. PMID:21414776

  13. Support for a history-dependent predictive model of dACC activity in producing the bivalency effect: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Grundy, John G; Shedden, Judith M

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, we examine electrophysiological correlates of factors influencing an adjustment in cognitive control known as the bivalency effect. During task-switching, the occasional presence of bivalent stimuli in a block of univalent trials is enough to elicit a response slowing on all subsequent univalent trials. Bivalent stimuli can be congruent or incongruent with respect to the response afforded by the irrelevant stimulus feature. Here we show that the incongruent bivalency effect, the congruent bivalency effect, and an effect of a simple violation of expectancy are captured at a frontal ERP component (between 300 and 550ms) associated with ACC activity, and that the unexpectedness effect is distinguished from both congruent and incongruent bivalency effects at an earlier component (100-120ms) associated with the temporal parietal junction. We suggest that the frontal component reflects the dACC's role in predicting future cognitive load based on recent history. In contrast, the posterior component may index early visual feature extraction in response to bivalent stimuli that cue currently ongoing tasks; dACC activity may trigger the temporal parietal activity only when specific task cueing is involved and not for simple violations of expectancy. PMID:24686093

  14. Differential regulation of genes encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase in etiolated pea seedlings: effects of indole-3-acetic acid, wounding, and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Peck, S C; Kende, H

    1998-12-01

    Treatment of 5- to 6-day-old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings with indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced within 15 min an increase in the transcript levels of two genes encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase, Ps-ACS1 and Ps-ACS2. Simultaneous treatment with ethylene inhibited this increase and also caused a decrease in ACC synthase enzyme activity as compared to that of seedlings treated with IAA alone. These results indicate that ethylene inhibits its own biosynthesis by decreasing ACC synthase transcript levels via a negative feedback loop. Wounding of pea stems had no effect on the expression of Ps-ACS1, but led within 10 min to an increase in the mRNA levels of Ps-ACS2. This increase was also inhibited by ethylene. The wound signal was transmitted over a distance of at least 4 cm through the stem with no delay in induction or response intensity. The rapid transmission of the wound response is consistent with the possibility that a hydraulic or electric signal is responsible for the spread of the wound response. PMID:9869404

  15. Quantitation of rat liver xanthine oxidase by radioimmunoassay. A mechanism for sex-specific differences

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.E.; Levinson, D.J.

    1982-03-01

    To further delineate the mechanism responsible for the differences in xanthine oxidase activity in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for the measurement of hepatic xanthine oxidase. The RIA could detect as little as 5 mg of liver enzyme. Specificity of the RIA was confirmed by 1) Ouchterlony double immuno-diffusion in which a single precipitin band exhibited xanthine oxidase activity, when crude liver homogenate and an enzyme-specific stain were used; 2) parallelism between purified 125I-labeled xanthine oxidase and serial dilutions of crude liver homogenate; 3) a linear correlation between xanthine oxidase activity and the level of enzyme protein; and 4) a single protein band coincident with purified xanthine oxidase, when an immunoprecipitate prepared from antisera and crude liver homogenate was analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels. Whether xanthine oxidase activity was assayed in the absence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) (oxidase form) or in the presence of NAD+ (dehydrogenase), male values were consistently higher, and both forms of the enzyme correlated significantly with each other. When purified to homogeneity, neither form of the enzyme was appreciably affected by 17 beta-estradiol or testosterone propionate. When the RIA was employed, levels of hepatic xanthine oxidase were significantly greater in male than in female rats. We concluded from these data that increased xanthine oxidase activity in the male corresponds to a greater quantitative complement of xanthine oxidase protein. Furthermore, lower xanthine oxidase activity in the female cannot be explained by immunologically cross-reactive material without enzyme activity nor by a direct sex-steroid enzyme interaction.

  16. Changes in lysyl oxidase (LOX) distribution and its decreased activity in keratoconus corneas.

    PubMed

    Dudakova, Lubica; Liskova, Petra; Trojek, Tomas; Palos, Michalis; Kalasova, Sarka; Jirsova, Katerina

    2012-11-01

    Inadequate cross-linking between collagen lamellae is a characteristic feature of keratoconus corneas. The formation of covalent bonds between collagen and elastin fibrils, which maintain the biomechanical properties of the cornea, is mediated by the cuproenzyme lysyl oxidase and four lysyl oxidase-like enzymes. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of lysyl oxidase and the total lysyl oxidase activity (lysyl oxidase and the four lysyl oxidase-like enzymes) in control and keratoconic corneas. Seven control and eight keratoconic corneas were used for the imunohistochemical detection of lysyl oxidase in corneal cryosections using two different antibodies. The total lysyl oxidase activity in the culture medium of corneal fibroblasts from six explanted keratoconic and four control corneas was measured using a fluorometric assay in the presence and absence of the lysyl oxidase inhibitor beta-aminopropionitrile and determined as the production of H(2)O(2) in nM per μg of total protein. In the control tissue, the most intense signal for lysyl oxidase was present in the corneal epithelium, in which perinuclear dots brightly projecting from more or less homogenous cytoplasmic staining may represent the lysyl oxidase propeptide. Less intense staining was present in keratocytes, the extracellular matrix and in the corneal endothelium. The epithelium of the limbus and the perilimbal conjunctiva showed intense to very intense staining. The distribution of lysyl oxidase was clearly decreased in at least five of the eight keratoconic specimens. The most marked signal reduction was observed in the stromal matrix and in keratocytes. Moreover, the signal in pathological specimens revealed a more irregular pattern, including the presence of intra- and extracellular clumps in the epithelium. Interestingly, endothelial cells showed no or very weak staining in areas just beneath negative stromal tissue. The mean activity of total lysyl oxidase in the keratoconic

  17. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K.; Vicente, João B.; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  18. Deep sea water modulates blood pressure and exhibits hypolipidemic effects via the AMPK-ACC pathway: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Chou, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Chien, Yi-Chung; Chung, Yun-Lung; Liu, Fon-Chang; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2013-06-01

    Deep sea water (DSW), originally pumped from the Pacific Rim off the coast of Hualien County (Taiwan), and its mineral constituents, were concentrated by a low-temperature vacuum evaporation system to produce a hardness of approximately 400,000 mg/L of seawater mineral concentrate. The primary composition of this seawater mineral concentrate was ionic magnesium (Mg²⁺), which was approximately 96,000 mg/L. Referring to the human recommended daily allowance (RDA) of magnesium, we diluted the mineral concentrate to three different dosages: 0.1 × DSW (equivalent to 3.75 mg Mg²⁺/kg DSW); 1 × DSW (equivalent to 37.5 mg Mg²⁺/kg DSW); and 2 × DSW (equivalent to 75 mg Mg²⁺/kg DSW). Additionally, a magnesium chloride treatment was conducted for comparison with the DSW supplement. The study indicated that 0.1 × DSW, 1 × DSW and 2 × DSW decreased the systolic and diastolic pressures in spontaneous hypertensive rats in an eight-week experiment. DSW has been shown to reduce serum lipids and prevent atherogenesis in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit model. Our results demonstrated that 1 × DSW and 2 × DSW significantly suppressed the serum cholesterol levels, reduced the lipid accumulation in liver tissues, and limited aortic fatty streaks. These findings indicated that the antiatherogenic effects of DSW are associated with 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) stimulation and the consequent inhibition of phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in atherosclerotic rabbits. We hypothesize that DSW could potentially be used as drinking water because it modulates blood pressure, reduces lipids, and prevents atherogenesis. PMID:23774889

  19. Photochemical reactions of cytochrome oxidase at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Orii, Y

    1978-01-01

    The unique of CO-cytochrome oxidase as first noted by Yonetani et al. (22) is that after its photodissociation at low temperatures recombination occurs as the sample temperature is raised, but at temperatures considerably higher than those for other CO-heme and CO-hemoprotein complexes; that is, the half recombination temperature is 180 K contrary to 25-30 K for other CO complexes. The photodissociability, however, disappeared when monomeric cytochrome oxidase was treated with pCMB to remove an intrinsic copper, the significance of which in CO complex formation was thus demonstrated. It is proposed that the copper is situated close to heme a and traps the photodissociated CO. The access of the trapped CO to the heme a to resume the original binding is effected only when sufficient energy for thermal agitation is provided by elevating the sample temperature. During the course of this study, new photo- and thermochromic properties were observed with the reduced enzyme by cooling it in liquid nitrogen after preincubation at pH 8.6 to 10.5. The characteristic bands appeared at 575 and 428 nm and diminished when this ample was illuminated at 26 K. As the sample temperature was raised these bands were restored with a half transition temperature of 80 K. When the reduced oxidase had been complexed with CO, cyanide or azide, or treated with pCMB, such a unique species did not appear. The enthalpy change of 1.16 kcal/mol for the formation of this species as well as the above-described properties suggests that the hydrogen bond between the formyl side group of heme a and one of seven sulfhydryl groups in cytochrome oxidase is responsible for the appearance and disappearance of this new species. Based on these results a schematic model has been proposed for the photo- and thermochromism of cytochrome oxidase at cryogenic temperatures and for the microenvironment of the prosthetic heme a and copper in this enzyme. On the other hand, contrary to the central dogma of Warburg

  20. Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) exhibit NADH oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Wiseman, Ben; Deemagarn, Taweewat; Donald, Lynda J; Duckworth, Harry W; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2004-10-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyze the oxidation of NADH to form NAD+ and either H2O2 or superoxide radical depending on pH. The NADH oxidase reaction requires molecular oxygen, does not require hydrogen peroxide, is not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase, and has a pH optimum of 8.75, clearly differentiating it from the peroxidase and catalase reactions with pH optima of 5.5 and 6.5, respectively, and from the NADH peroxidase-oxidase reaction of horseradish peroxidase. B. pseudomallei KatG has a relatively high affinity for NADH (Km=12 microm), but the oxidase reaction is slow (kcat=0.54 min(-1)) compared with the peroxidase and catalase reactions. The catalase-peroxidases also catalyze the hydrazinolysis of isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) in an oxygen- and H2O2-independent reaction, and KatG-dependent radical generation from a mixture of NADH and INH is two to three times faster than the combined rates of separate reactions with NADH and INH alone. The major products from the coupled reaction, identified by high pressure liquid chromatography fractionation and mass spectrometry, are NAD+ and isonicotinoyl-NAD, the activated form of isoniazid that inhibits mycolic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis. Isonicotinoyl-NAD synthesis from a mixture of NAD+ and INH is KatG-dependent and is activated by manganese ion. M. tuberculosis KatG catalyzes isonicotinoyl-NAD formation from NAD+ and INH more efficiently than B. pseudomallei KatG. PMID:15280362

  1. A Simple Litmus Test for Aldehyde Oxidase Metabolism of Heteroarenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bioavailability of aromatic azaheterocyclic drugs can be affected by the activity of aldehyde oxidase (AO). Susceptibility to AO metabolism is difficult to predict computationally and can be complicated in vivo by differences between species. Here we report the use of bis(((difluoromethyl)sulfinyl)oxy)zinc (DFMS) as a source of CF2H radical for a rapid and inexpensive chemical “litmus test” for the early identification of heteroaromatic drug candidates that have a high probability of metabolism by AO. PMID:24472070

  2. Cell-free NADPH oxidase activation assays: "in vitro veritas".

    PubMed

    Pick, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The superoxide (O2 (∙-))-generating NADPH oxidase complex of phagocytes comprises a membrane-imbedded heterodimeric flavocytochrome, known as cytochrome b 558 (consisting of Nox2 and p22 (phox) ) and four cytosolic regulatory proteins, p47 (phox) , p67 (phox) , p40 (phox) , and the small GTPase Rac. Under physiological conditions, in the resting phagocyte, O2 (∙-) generation is initiated by engagement of membrane receptors by a variety of stimuli, followed by specific signal transduction sequences leading to the translocation of the cytosolic components to the membrane and their association with the cytochrome. A consequent conformational change in Nox2 initiates the electron "flow" along a redox gradient, from NADPH to oxygen, leading to the one-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to O2 (∙-). Methodological difficulties in the dissection of this complex mechanism led to the design "cell-free" systems (also known as "broken cells" or in vitro systems). In these, membrane receptor stimulation and all or part of the signal transduction sequence are missing, the accent being placed on the actual process of "NADPH oxidase assembly," thus on the formation of the complex between cytochrome b 558 and the cytosolic components and the resulting O2 (∙-) generation. Cell-free assays consist of a mixture of the individual components of the NADPH oxidase complex, derived from resting phagocytes or in the form of purified recombinant proteins, exposed in vitro to an activating agent (distinct from and unrelated to whole cell stimulants), in the presence of NADPH and oxygen. Activation is commonly quantified by measuring the primary product of the reaction, O2 (∙-), trapped immediately after its generation by an appropriate acceptor in a kinetic assay, permitting the calculation of the linear rate of O2 (∙-) production, but numerous variations exist, based on the assessment of reaction products or the consumption of substrates. Cell-free assays played a paramount

  3. Functions of the hydrophilic channels in protonmotive cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Peter R.; Maréchal, Amandine

    2013-01-01

    The structures and functions of hydrophilic channels in electron-transferring membrane proteins are discussed. A distinction is made between proton channels that can conduct protons and dielectric channels that are non-conducting but can dielectrically polarize in response to the introduction of charge changes in buried functional centres. Functions of the K, D and H channels found in A1-type cytochrome c oxidases are reviewed in relation to these ideas. Possible control of function by dielectric channels and their evolutionary relation to proton channels is explored. PMID:23864498

  4. "Ping-pong gaze" secondary to monoamine oxidase inhibitor overdose.

    PubMed

    Attaway, Amy; Sroujieh, Laila; Mersfelder, Tracey L; Butler, Christopher; Ouellette, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An infrequent manifestation of monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) toxicity is "ping-pong gaze" (PPG). We describe the case of a 26-year-old female who was found unresponsive after taking 40 tablets of phenelzine. On presentation to the hospital, her eyes were moving in characteristic "ping pong" fashion. After 6 hours her gaze terminated. The following day her neurologic exam was benign and she had no long-term sequelae. While the etiology of PPG is unknown, it is most often seen with irreversible structural brain damage. However, a detailed literature review revealed that previous cases of MAOI toxicity where the patient survived have all had complete neurologic recovery. PMID:27127395

  5. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Vietnamese Blumea balsamifera L.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai Thanh Thi; Nguyen, Nhan Trung

    2012-08-01

    From the MeOH extract of the aerial part of Blumea balsamifera L., a new dihydroflavonol, (2R,3S)-(-)-4'-O-methyldihydroquercetin (1), together with seven known compounds has been isolated. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-4 and 6-8 displayed significant xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity in a concentration-dependent manner, and compounds 1, 6 and 8 showed more potent inhibitory activity, with IC₅₀ values ranging from 0.23 to 1.91 µM, than that of a positive control allopurinol (IC₅₀ 2.50 µM). PMID:22821854

  6. The Role of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors in Current Psychiatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Swartz, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    The use of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) by psychiatrists has declined over the past several decades with the expansion of psychiatrists’ pharmacologic armamentarium. This trend has also been driven by concern about food and drug interactions and side effects, as well as waning physician experience with these medications. Many psychiatrists, in fact, never prescribe MAOIs. Recent research has liberalized the MAOI diet and identified symptom presentations more likely to respond to these medications. Thus, clinicians must continue to familiarize themselves with the properties of and indications for prescribing MAOIs. PMID:15552546

  7. Purification and properties of human amniotic fluid diamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tufvesson, G

    1978-09-01

    Diamine oxidase (DAO) was purified from amniotic fluid. The activity was separated in two DAO fractions with pI values of 5.8 and 4.0. Molecular weight were found to be 245,000 and 485,000, respectively, with subunit molecular weight of 110,000. This indicated that they probably are dimer and tetramer of the same DAO subunit. The enzyme was active against putrescine and histamine and was strongly inhibited by carbonyl group reagents. A Ping Pong Bi Ter enzyme reaction mechanism is probable. The diamine, with one amino group protonized, is suggested to be responsible for interaction with the enzyme. PMID:30164

  8. Electronic Structure Contributions to Reactivity in Xanthine Oxidase Family Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Benjamin W.; Kirk, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    We review the xanthine oxidase (XO) family of pyranopterin molybdenum enzymes with a specific emphasis on electronic structure contributions to reactivity. In addition to xanthine and aldehyde oxidoreductases, which catalyze the 2-electron oxidation of aromatic heterocycles and aldehyde substrates, this mini-review highlights recent work on the closely related carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) that catalyzes the oxidation of CO using a unique Mo-Cu heterobimetallic active site. A primary focus of this mini-review relates to how spectroscopy and computational methods have been used to develop an understanding of critical relationships between geometric structure, electronic structure, and catalytic function. PMID:25425163

  9. Reductive trapping of substrate to bovine plasma amine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, C.; Klinman, J.P.

    1987-01-25

    Plasma amine oxidases catalyze the oxidative deamination of amines to aldehydes, followed by a 2e- reduction of O/sub 2/ to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), previously believed to be restricted to prokaryotes, has recently been proposed to be the cofactor undergoing reduction in the first half-reaction of bovine plasma amine oxidase (Ameyama, M., Hayashi, U., Matsushita, K., Shinagawa, E., and Adachi, O. (1984) Agric. Biol. Chem. 48, 561-565; Lobenstein-Verbeek, C. L., Jongejan, J. A., Frank, J., and Duine, J. A. (1984) FEBS Lett. 170, 305-309). This result is unexpected, since model studies with PQQ implicate Schiff's base formation between a reactive carbonyl and substrates, whereas experiments with bovine plasma amine oxidase have failed to provide evidence for a carbonyl cofactor. We have, therefore, re-examined putative adducts between substrate and enzyme-bound cofactor, employing a combination of (/sup 14/C)benzylamine and (/sup 3/H)NaCNBH/sub 3/. The use of the relatively weak reductant, NaCNBH/sub 3/, affords Schiff's base specificity and permits the study of enzyme below pH 7.0. As we show, enzyme can only be inactivated by NaCNBH/sub 3/ in the presence of substrate, leading to the incorporation of 1 mol of (/sup 14/C)benzylamine/mol of enzyme subunit at complete inactivation. By contrast, we are unable to detect any labeling with (/sup 3/H)NaCNBH/sub 3/, analogous to an earlier study with (/sup 3/H)NaCNBH/sub 4/ (Suva, R. H., and Abeles, R. H. (1978) Biochemistry 17, 3538-3545). We conclude, first, that our inability to obtain adducts containing both carbon 14 and tritium rules out the reductive trapping either of amine substrate with pyridoxal phosphate or of aldehyde product with a lysyl side chain and, second, that the observed pattern of labeling is fully consistent with the presence of PQQ at the active site of bovine plasma amine oxidase.

  10. Photosensitivity in sponge due to cytochrome c oxidase?

    PubMed

    Björn, Lars Olof; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2009-06-01

    An action spectrum for photosensitivity in sponge larvae published by Leys et al. [J. Comp. Physiol., A, 2002, 188, 199-202] was interpreted by the authors as being due to a combination of light absorption by flavin or carotenoid in the blue region, and another pigment such as pterin in the long-wavelength region. Here we show here that their action spectrum closely matches the absorption spectrum of reduced cytochrome c oxidase that is present in sponges, and compare with other photoreactions which are thought to be due to this chromoprotein. PMID:19492101

  11. Partial conversion of Hansenula polymorpha amine oxidase into a "plant" amine oxidase: implications for copper chemistry and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Welford, Richard W D; Lam, Angel; Mirica, Liviu M; Klinman, Judith P

    2007-09-25

    The mechanism of the first electron transfer from reduced cofactor to O2 in the catalytic cycle of copper amine oxidases (CAOs) remains controversial. Two possibilities have been proposed. In the first mechanism, the reduced aminoquinol form of the TPQ cofactor transfers an electron to the copper, giving radical semiquinone and Cu(I), the latter of which reduces O2 (pathway 1). The second mechanism invokes direct transfer of the first electron from the reduced aminoquinol form of the TPQ cofactor to O2 (pathway 2). The debate over these mechanisms has arisen, in part, due to variable experimental observations with copper amine oxidases from plant versus other eukaryotic sources. One important difference is the position of the aminoquinol/Cu(II) to semiquinone/Cu(I) equilibrium on anaerobic reduction with amine substrate, which varies from almost 0% to 40% semiquinone/Cu(I). In this study we have shown how protein structure controls this equilibrium by making a single-point mutation at a second-sphere ligand to the copper, D630N in Hansenula polymorpha amine oxidase, which greatly increases the concentration of the cofactor semiquinone/Cu(I) following anaerobic reduction by substrate. The catalytic properties of this mutant, including 18O kinetic isotope effects, point to a conservation of pathway 2, despite the elevated production of the cofactor semiqunone/Cu(I). Changes in kcat/Km[O2] are attributed to an impact of D630N on an increased affinity of O2 for its hydrophobic pocket. The data in this study indicate that changes in cofactor semiquinone/Cu(I) levels are not sufficient to alter the mechanism of O2 reduction and illuminate how subtle features are able to control the reduction potential of active site metals in proteins. PMID:17760423

  12. Identification and biochemical characterization of polyamine oxidases in amphioxus: Implications for emergence of vertebrate-specific spermine and acetylpolyamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huihui; Liu, Baobao; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-01-10

    Polyamine oxidases (PAOs) have been identified in a wide variety of animals, as well as in fungi and plant. Generally, plant PAOs oxidize spermine (Spm), spermidine (Spd) and their acetylated derivatives, N(1)-acetylspermine (N(1)-Aspm) and N(1)-acetylspermidine (N(1)-Aspd), while yeast PAOs oxidize Spm, N(1)-Aspm and N(1)-Aspd, but not Spd. By contrast, two different enzymes, namely spermine oxidase (SMO) and acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO), specifically catalyze the oxidation of Spm and N(1)-Aspm/N(1)-Aspd, respectively. However, our knowledge on the biochemical and structural characterization of PAOs remains rather limited, and their evolutionary history is still enigmatic. In this study, two amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum) PAO genes, named Bjpao1 and Bjpao2, were cloned and characterized. Both Bjpao1 and Bjpao2 displayed distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. Notably, rBjPAO1 oxidized both spermine and spermidine, but not N(1)-acetylspermine, whereas rBjPAO2 oxidizes both spermidine and N(1)-acetylspermine, but not spermine. To understand structure-function relationship, the enzymatic activities of mutant BjPAOs that were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in E. coli were examined, The results indicate that the residues H64, K301 and T460 in rBjPAO1, and H69, K315 and T467 in rBjPAO2 were all involved in substrate binding and enzyme catalytic activity to some extent. Based on our results and those of others, a model depicting the divergent evolution and functional specialization of vertebrate SMO and APAO genes is proposed. PMID:26367330

  13. High rate GPS positioning , JASON altimetry and marine gravimetry : monitoring the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) through the DRAKE campaigns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melachroinos, S. A.; Biancale, R.; Menard, Y.; Sarrailh, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Drake campaign which took place from Jan 14, 2006 - 08 Feb, 2006 has been a very successful mission in collecting a wide range of GPS and marine gravity data all along JASON altimetry ground track n° 104. The same campaign will be repeated in 2009 along 028 and 104 JASON-2 ground track. The Drake Passage (DP) chokepoint is not only well suited geographically, as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) is constricted to its narrowest extent of 700 km, but observations and models suggest that dynamical balances are particular effective in this area. Furthermore the space geodesy observations and their products provided from several altimetry missions (currently operating ENVISAT, JASON 1 and 2, GFO, ERS and other plannified for the future such as Altika, SWOT) require the cross comparison with independent geodetic techniques at the DP. The current experiment comprises a kinematic GPS and marine gravimetry Cal/Val geodetic approach and it aims to : validate with respect to altimetry data and surface models such a kinematic high frequency GPS technique for measuring sea state and sea surface height (SSH), compare the GPS SSH profiles with altimetry mean dynamic topography (MDT) and mean sea surface (MSS) models, give recommendations for future "offshore" Cal/Val activities on the ground tracks of altimeter satellites such as JASON-2, GFO, Altika using the GNSS technology etc. The GPS observations are collected from GPS antennas installed on a wave-rider buoy , aboard the R/V "Polarstern" and from continuous geodetic reference stations in the proximity. We also analyse problems related to the ship's attitude variations in roll, pitch and yaw and a way to correct them. We also give emphasis on the impact of the ship's acceleration profiles on the so called "squat effect" and ways to deal with it. The project will in particular benefit the GOCE mission by proposing to integrate GOCE in the ocean circulation study and validate GOCE products with our independent

  14. Purification, characterization and decolorization of bilirubin oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria 3.2190

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myrothecium verrucaria 3.2190 is a nonligninolytic fungus that produces bilirubin oxidase. Both Myrothecium verrucaria and the extracellular bilirubin oxidase were tested for their ability to decolorize indigo carmine. The biosorption and biodegradation of the dye were detected during the process of...

  15. The hemibiotrophic cacao pathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa depends on a mitochondrial alternative oxidase for biotrophic development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) is a non-energy conserving ubiquinol oxidase found in most fungal genomes studied to date. With the development of fungicides containing cytochrome-dependent respiratory chain (CRC) inhibitors, a strong interest in studying AOX functions in phytopathogenic...

  16. Generation of protonic potential by the bd-type quinol oxidase of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Bertsova, Y V; Bogachev, A V; Skulachev, V P

    1997-09-01

    Inside-out subcellular vesicles of Azotobacter vinelandii are found to produce delta pH and delta psi (interior acidic and positive) when oxidising malate or menadiol. These effects are inherent in both Cyd+ Cyo- (lacking the o-type oxidase) and Cyd- Cyo+ (lacking the bd-type oxidase) strains. They appear to be myxothiazol-sensitive in the Cyd- Cyo+ strain but not in the Cyd+ Cyo- strain. The H+/e- ratio for the terminal part of respiratory chain of a bd-type oxidase overproducing strain is established as being close to 1. It is also shown that NADH oxidation by the vesicles from the Cyd- Cyo+ strain is sensitive to low concentrations of myxothiazol and antimycin A whereas that of the Cyd+ Cyo- strain is resistant to these Q-cycle inhibitors. It is concluded that (i) the bd-type oxidase of A. vinelandii is competent in generating a protonic potential but its efficiency is lower than that of the o-type oxidase and (ii) Q-cycle does operate in the o-type cytochrome oxidase terminated branch of the A. vinelandii respiratory chain and does not in the bd-type quinol oxidase terminated branch. These relationships are discussed in the context of the respiratory protection function of the bd-type oxidase in A. vinelandii. PMID:9315721

  17. Cold-adapted arsenite oxidase from a psychrotolerant Polaromonas species.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Thomas H; Heath, Matthew D; Martin, Andrew C R; Pankowski, Jaroslaw A; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A; Santini, Joanne M

    2013-04-01

    Polaromonas sp. str. GM1 is an aerobic, psychrotolerant, heterotrophic member of the Betaproteobacteria and is the only isolate capable of oxidising arsenite at temperatures below 10 °C. Sequencing of the aio gene cluster in GM1 revealed the presence of the aioB and aioA genes, which encode the arsenite oxidase but the regulatory genes typically found upstream of aioB in other members of the Proteobacteria were absent. The GM1 Aio was purified to homogeneity and was found to be a heterodimer. The enzyme contained Mo and Fe as cofactors and had, using the artificial electron acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, a Km for arsenite of 111.70 ± 0.88 μM and a Vmax of 12.16 ± 0.30 U mg(-1), which is the highest reported specific activity for any known Aio. The temperature-activity profiles of the arsenite oxidases from GM1 and the mesophilic betaproteobacterium Alcaligenes faecalis were compared and showed that the GM1 Aio was more active at low temperatures than that of A. faecalis. A homology model of the GM1 Aio was made using the X-ray crystal structure of the Aio from A. faecalis as the template. Structural changes that account for cold adaptation were identified and it was found that these resulted in increased enzyme flexibility and a reduction in the hydrophobicity of the core. PMID:23150098

  18. Alternative oxidase in animals: unique characteristics and taxonomic distribution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Allison E; Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Staples, James F

    2009-08-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX), a ubiquinol oxidase, introduces a branch point into the respiratory electron transport chain, bypassing complexes III and IV and resulting in cyanide-resistant respiration. Previously, AOX was thought to be limited to plants and some fungi and protists but recent work has demonstrated the presence of AOX in most kingdoms of life, including animals. In the present study we identified AOX in 28 animal species representing nine phyla. This expands the known taxonomic distribution of AOX in animals by 10 species and two phyla. Using bioinformatics we found AOX gene sequences in members of the animal phyla Porifera, Placozoa, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Annelida, Nematoda, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Chordata. Using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with degenerate primers designed to recognize conserved regions of animal AOX, we demonstrated that AOX genes are transcribed in several animals from different phyla. An analysis of full-length AOX sequences revealed an amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of the protein that is unique to animal AOXs. Animal AOX also lacks an N-terminal cysteine residue that is known to be important for AOX enzyme regulation in plants. We conclude that the presence of AOX is the ancestral state in animals and hypothesize that its absence in some lineages, including vertebrates, is due to gene loss events. PMID:19648408

  19. Crystal Structure of the Deglycating Enzyme Fructosamine Oxidase (Amadoriase II)

    SciTech Connect

    Collard, François; Zhang, Jianye; Nemet, Ina; Qanungo, Kaustubha R.; Monnier, Vincent M.; Yee, Vivien C.

    2009-01-12

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6{angstrom} resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12{angstrom} deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Deglycating Enzyme Fructosamine Oxidase (Amadoriase ll)

    SciTech Connect

    Collard, F.; Zhang, J; Nemet, I; Qanungo, K; Monnier, V; Yee, V

    2008-01-01

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6{angstrom} resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12{angstrom} deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates.

  1. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits smooth muscle cell signaling and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Guo Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-{alpha}-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology.

  2. Oxidative Half-reaction of Arabidopsis thaliana Sulfite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Robert S.; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R.; Hille, Russ

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate forms of the molybdenum-containing enzyme sulfite oxidase possess a b-type cytochrome prosthetic group that accepts reducing equivalents from the molybdenum center and passes them on to cytochrome c. The plant form of the enzyme, on the other hand, lacks a prosthetic group other than its molybdenum center and utilizes molecular oxygen as the physiological oxidant. Hydrogen peroxide is the ultimate product of the reaction. Here, we present data demonstrating that superoxide is produced essentially quantitatively both in the course of the reaction of reduced enzyme with O2 and during steady-state turnover and only subsequently decays (presumably noncatalytically) to form hydrogen peroxide. Rapid-reaction kinetic studies directly following the reoxidation of reduced enzyme demonstrate a linear dependence of the rate constant for the reaction on [O2] with a second-order rate constant of kox = 8.7 × 104 ± 0.5 × 104 m−1s−1. When the reaction is carried out in the presence of cytochrome c to follow superoxide generation, biphasic time courses are observed, indicating that a first equivalent of superoxide is generated in the oxidation of the fully reduced Mo(IV) state of the enzyme to Mo(V), followed by a slower oxidation of the Mo(V) state to Mo(VI). The physiological implications of plant sulfite oxidase as a copious generator of superoxide are discussed. PMID:19875441

  3. Evolution of the primate cytochrome c oxidase subunit II gene.

    PubMed

    Adkins, R M; Honeycutt, R L

    1994-03-01

    We examined the nucleotide and amino acid sequence variation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene from 25 primates (4 hominoids, 8 Old World monkeys, 2 New World monkeys, 2 tarsiers, 7 lemuriforms, 2 lorisiforms). Marginal support was found for three phylogenetic conclusions: (1) sister-group relationship between tarsiers and a monkey/ape clade, (2) placement of the aye-aye (Daubentonia) sister to all other strepsirhine primates, and (3) rejection of a sister-group relationship of dwarf lemurs (i.e., Cheirogaleus) with lorisiform primates. Stronger support was found for a sister-group relationship between the ring-tail lemur (Lemur catta) and the gentle lemurs (Hapalemur). In congruence with previous studies on COII, we found that the monkeys and apes have undergone a nearly two-fold increase in the rate of amino acid replacement relative to other primates. Although functionally important amino acids are generally conserved among all primates, the acceleration in amino acid replacements in higher primates is associated with increased variation in the amino terminal end of the protein. Additionally, the replacement of two carboxyl-bearing residues (glutamate and aspartate) at positions 114 and 115 may provide a partial explanation for the poor enzyme kinetics in cross-reactions between the cytochromes c and cytochrome c oxidases of higher primates and other mammals. PMID:8006990

  4. Crystal Structure of the Deglycating Enzyme Fructosamine Oxidase (Amadoriase II)*

    PubMed Central

    Collard, François; Zhang, Jianye; Nemet, Ina; Qanungo, Kaustubha R.; Monnier, Vincent M.; Yee, Vivien C.

    2008-01-01

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6Å resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12Å deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates. PMID:18667417

  5. Substrate specificity of copper-containing plant amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Pietrangeli, P; Federico, R; Mondovì, B; Morpurgo, L

    2007-07-01

    The steady-state kinetic parameters of the amine oxidases purified from Lathyrus cicera (LCAO) and Pisum sativum (PSAO) seedling were measured on a series of common substrates, previously tested on bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO). LCAO, as PSAO, was substantially more reactive than BSAO with aliphatic diamines and histamine. The k(cat) and k(cat)/Km for putrescine were four and six order of magnitude higher, respectively. Differences were smaller with some aromatic monoamines. The plot of k(cat) versus hydrogen ions concentration produced bell-shaped curves, the maximum of which was substrate dependent, shifting from neutral pH with putrescine to alkaline pH with phenylethylamine and benzylamine. The latter substrates made the site more hydrophobic and increased the pK(a) of both enzyme-substrate and enzyme-product adducts. The plot of k(cat)/Km versus hydrogen ion concentration produced approximately parallel bell-shaped curves. Similar pK(a) couples were obtained from the latter curves, in agreement with the assignment as free enzyme and free substrate pK(a). The limited pH dependence of kinetic parameters suggests a predominance of hydrophobic interactions. PMID:17521737

  6. Renalase Prevents AKI Independent of Amine Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Velazquez, Heino; Moeckel, Gilbert; Chang, John; Ham, Ahrom; Lee, H. Thomas; Safirstein, Robert

    2014-01-01

    AKI is characterized by increased catecholamine levels and hypertension. Renalase, a secretory flavoprotein that oxidizes catecholamines, attenuates ischemic injury and the associated increase in catecholamine levels in mice. However, whether the amine oxidase activity of renalase is involved in preventing ischemic injury is debated. In this study, recombinant renalase protected human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells against cisplatin- and hydrogen peroxide–induced necrosis. Similarly, genetic depletion of renalase in mice (renalase knockout) exacerbated kidney injury in animals subjected to cisplatin-induced AKI. Interestingly, compared with the intact renalase protein, a 20–amino acid peptide (RP-220), which is conserved in all known renalase isoforms, but lacks detectable oxidase activity, was equally effective at protecting HK-2 cells against toxic injury and preventing ischemic injury in wild-type mice. Furthermore, in vitro treatment with RP-220 or recombinant renalase rapidly activated Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and downregulated c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In summary, renalase promotes cell survival and protects against renal injury in mice through the activation of intracellular signaling cascades, independent of its ability to metabolize catecholamines, and we have identified the region of renalase required for these effects. Renalase and related peptides show potential as therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of AKI. PMID:24511138

  7. Function and structure of rat hepatic coproporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sorianello, E M; Mazzetti, M B

    2000-10-01

    Rat hepatic coproporphyrinogen oxidase, the sixth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, was purified 1340-fold with a yield of 39.7%. To obtain the soluble enzyme, different methods were applied to disrupt mitochondria, with sonication giving the highest yield (85%). The minimum catalytic form of enzyme was a dimer with a molecular mass of 77 +/- 4 kDa. The existence of aggregated forms was possible since in fractions of gel filtration elution activity was observed with higher molecular mass. We determined a Stokes radius of 36.3 A, a sedimentation coefficient (S20,w) of 5.06 S, and frictional ratio of 1.29, suggesting a nearly globular shape of the protein. Regardless of the type of salt, high ionic strength inhibits the enzyme, probably modifying its native structure. Experiments with amino acid modifiers showed that histidine, arginine, and tryptophan are involved in the catalytic process. Non-ionic detergents and phospholipids activated the enzyme, probably because they reproduce its natural hydrophobic environment. The present study describes a simple method for the purification of rat liver coproporphyrinogen oxidase, introducing for the first time data on the structure and function of the protein in a tissue often used as a laboratory model in biological studies, and contributing to the study of human hereditary coproporphyria. PMID:11079369

  8. Red light regulation of ethylene biosynthesis and gravitropism in etiolated pea stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steed, C. L.; Taylor, L. K.; Harrison, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    During gravitropism, the accumulation of auxin in the lower side of the stem causes increased growth and the subsequent curvature, while the gaseous hormone ethylene plays a modulating role in regulating the kinetics of growth asymmetries. Light also contributes to the control of gravitropic curvature, potentially through its interaction with ethylene biosynthesis. In this study, red-light pulse treatment of etiolated pea epicotyls was evaluated for its effect on ethylene biosynthesis during gravitropic curvature. Ethylene biosynthesis analysis included measurements of ethylene; the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC); malonyl-conjugated ACC (MACC); and expression levels of pea ACC oxidase (Ps-ACO1) and ACC synthase (Ps-ACS1, Ps-ACS2) genes by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Red-pulsed seedlings were given a 6 min pulse of 11 micromoles m-2 s-1 red-light 15 h prior to horizontal reorientation for consistency with the timeline of red-light inhibition of ethylene production. Red-pulse treatment significantly reduced ethylene production and MACC levels in epicotyl tissue. However, there was no effect of red-pulse treatment on ACC level, or expression of ACS or ACO genes. During gravitropic curvature, ethylene production increased from 60 to 120 min after horizontal placement in both control and red-pulsed epicotyls. In red-pulsed tissues, ACC levels increased by 120 min after horizontal reorientation, accompanied by decreased MACC levels in the lower portion of the epicotyl. Overall, our results demonstrate that ethylene production in etiolated epicotyls increases after the initiation of curvature. This ethylene increase may inhibit cell growth in the lower portion of the epicotyl and contribute to tip straightening and reduced overall curvature observed after the initial 60 min of curvature in etiolated pea epicotyls.

  9. Expression of ACO1, ERS1 and ERF1 genes in harvested bananas in relation to heat-induced defense against Colletotrichum musae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangfei; Wang, Aiping; Zhu, Shijiang; Zhang, Lubin

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the connection between heat-induced ethylene signal changes and enhanced disease resistance. Heat enhanced ripening and elevated MaACO1 expression in naturally ripened bananas (NRB), while it delayed ripening and reduced MaACO1expression in the ethephon-treated bananas (ETB). However, in both cases, heat reduced lesion sizes infected by Colletotrichum musae. This indicates that heat-induced disease resistance in bananas was independent of ripening rate. The expression of MaERS1 gene was inhibited by heat treatment in both NRB and ETB, implying that heat as a physical signal could be sensed by banana fruits through the inhibition of ethylene receptor gene expression. The intensity of MaERF1 transcript signals was elevated in heated bananas, suggesting that the enhanced accumulation of MaERF1 transcript following heat treatment could play an important role in activation of the defense system. In ETB, inhibition of JA biosynthesis by application of IBU down-regulated the expression of MaERF and significantly weakened disease resistance, suggesting involvement of endogenous JA in induction of the gene expression, which was reconfirmed by the fact that exposure to exogenous MeJA following the combination of heat plus IBU treatment restored part of the gene expression. On the other hand, in NRB, application of IBU elevated level of MaERF1 expression at 24h and enhanced disease resistance, suggesting that, when banana was not exposed to ethephon, the expression of MaERF1 gene was not JA dependent, which was verified by the fact that MeJA application did not enhance MaERF1 gene expression. In conclusion, heat-induced disease resistance in harvested bananas could involve down-regulation of MaERS1 expression and up-regulation of MaERF1 expression and JA pathway could be involved in heat activation of the defense system in bananas exposed to ethephon. PMID:21511361

  10. Expression and Chloroplast Targeting of Cholesterol Oxidase in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, David R.; Grebenok, Robert J.; Ohnmeiss, Thomas E.; Greenplate, John T.; Purcell, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase represents a novel type of insecticidal protein with potent activity against the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman). We transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with the cholesterol oxidase choM gene and expressed cytosolic and chloroplast-targeted versions of the ChoM protein. Transgenic leaf tissues expressing cholesterol oxidase exerted insecticidal activity against boll weevil larvae. Our results indicate that cholesterol oxidase can metabolize phytosterols in vivo when produced cytosolically or when targeted to chloroplasts. The transgenic plants exhibiting cytosolic expression accumulated low levels of saturated sterols known as stanols, and displayed severe developmental aberrations. In contrast, the transgenic plants expressing chloroplast-targeted cholesterol oxidase maintained a greater accumulation of stanols, and appeared phenotypically and developmentally normal. These results are discussed within the context of plant sterol distribution and metabolism. PMID:11457962

  11. [Molecular docking analysis of xanthine oxidase inhibition by constituents of cichory].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jie; Lin, Zhi-jian; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Chun-sheng; Niu, Hong-juan; Zhou, Yue; Nie, An-zheng; Wang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Human xanthine oxidase is considered to be a target for therapy of hyperuricemia. Cichorium intybus is a Chinese plant medicine which widely used in Xinjiang against various diseases. In order to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from C. intybus and to explore main pharmacological actions of cichory a compound collection of C. intybus was built via consulting related references about chemical research on cichory. The three-dimensional crystal structure of xanthine oxidase (PDB code: 1N5X) from Protein Data Bank was downloaded.. Autodock 4.2 was employed to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from cichory 70 compounds were found to possess quite low binding free energy comparing with TEI (febuxostat). C. intybus contains constituents possessing potential inhibitive activity against xanthine oxidase. It can explain the main pharmacological actions of cichory which can significantly lower the level of serum uric acid. PMID:26975108

  12. Cox26 is a novel stoichiometric subunit of the yeast cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Maria; Wuttke, Jan-Moritz; Römpler, Katharina; Schmidt, Bernhard; Neifer, Klaus; Juris, Lisa; Wissel, Mirjam; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. The complex accepts electrons from cytochrome c and passes them onto molecular oxygen. This process contributes to energy capture in the form of a membrane potential across the inner membrane. The enzyme complex assembles in a stepwise process from the three mitochondria-encoded core subunits Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, which associate with nuclear-encoded subunits and cofactors. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cytochrome c oxidase associates with the bc1-complex into supercomplexes, allowing efficient energy transduction. Here we report on Cox26 as a protein found in respiratory chain supercomplexes containing cytochrome c oxidase. Our analyses reveal Cox26 as a novel stoichiometric structural subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase. A loss of Cox26 affects cytochrome c oxidase activity and respirasome organization. PMID:27083394

  13. NADPH Oxidase 1 and Its Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Tissue Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiu-Jun; Peng, Ying-Bo; Hu, Yi-Ping; Shi, You-Zhen; Yao, Min; Zhang, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are mostly viewed to cause oxidative damage to various cells and induce organ dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, they are also considered as crucial molecules for cellular signal transduction in biology. NADPH oxidase, whose only function is reactive oxygen species production, has been extensively investigated in many cell types especially phagocytes. The deficiency of NADPH oxidase extends the process of inflammation and delays tissue repair, which causes chronic granulomatous disease in patients. NADPH oxidase 1, one member of the NADPH oxidase family, is not only constitutively expressed in a variety of tissues, but also induced to increase expression in both mRNA and protein levels under many circumstances. NADPH oxidase 1 and its derived reactive oxygen species are suggested to be able to regulate inflammation reaction, cell proliferation and migration, and extracellular matrix synthesis, which contribute to the processes of tissue injury and repair. PMID:24669283

  14. Infantile isolated sulphite oxidase deficiency: report of a case with negative sulphite test and normal sulphate excretion.

    PubMed

    van der Klei-van Moorsel, J M; Smit, L M; Brockstedt, M; Jakobs, C; Dorche, C; Duran, M

    1991-01-01

    We present the clinical and biochemical data of a patient with infantile isolated sulphite oxidase deficiency with late onset of symptoms. A comparison of the biochemical parameters is made with the neonatal type of this disease and with the data of described patients with the combined defect of sulphite oxidase and xanthine oxidase, due to molybdenum cofactor deficiency. False-negative sulphite dip stick test as a pitfall in the diagnosis of sulphite oxidase deficiency is discussed. PMID:2044591

  15. High concentrations of antibodies to xanthine oxidase in human and animal sera. Molecular characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, G; Jarasch, E D; Heid, H W

    1984-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of antibodies (IgG) specific to xanthine oxidase in both normal (nonimmune) human and animal sera, and in antisera raised against a diversity of unrelated antigens is described. A study of sera from 81 humans revealed that xanthine oxidase-specific IgG represents a high proportion (1-8%) of total IgG. No obvious correlation to pathological events or symptoms of disease could be found. These xanthine oxidase-specific antibodies could be isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography on purified human or bovine xanthine oxidase and showed specific binding to the enzyme polypeptide of Mr 155,000 in immunoblotting experiments. By immunofluorescence microscopy they displayed the same cell type-specific reaction as experimentally induced antibodies, i.e., the staining of lactating mammary gland epithelium and capillary endothelium. The naturally occurring xanthine oxidase-specific antibodies consisted of polyclonal IgG of various subclasses. F(ab')2 preparations gave immune-reactions identical to those of IgG. The human xanthine oxidase-specific IgG cross-reacted with the bovine enzyme and both human and animal antibodies partially inhibited its activity. The xanthine oxidase activity of human milk lipid globules and supernatant fractions from various human tissues was extremely low when compared with that of the bovine antigen. The enzyme protein, however, was effectively precipitated from these sources by both the human and bovine antibodies. We suggest that the exceptionally high concentrations of antibodies against one protein, xanthine oxidase, are due to self-immunization to the xanthine oxidase antigen present in endothelial cells of capillaries. We do not exclude, however, nutritional contributions of bovine milk antigen to the appearance of xanthine oxidase antibodies in human sera. The possible biological functions of this immunological reaction are discussed. Images PMID:6381540

  16. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise: a role in inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Hellsten, Y; Frandsen, U; Orthenblad, N; Sjødin, B; Richter, E A

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised and the control leg, together with venous blood samples, were obtained prior to exercise and at 45 min, 24, 48 and 96 h after exercise. The time courses of xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity and indicators of muscle damage and inflammation were examined. 2. The number of xanthine oxidase structures observed by immunohistological methods in the exercised muscle was up to eightfold higher than control from day 1 to day 4 after exercise (P < 0.05). The increase was attributed to an enhanced expression of xanthine oxidase in microvascular endothelial cells and an invasion of leucocytes containing xanthine oxidase. 3. The concentration of plasma interleukin-6 was significantly higher 90 min after exercise than before exercise (P < 0.05) and remained higher than pre-exercise levels throughout the 4 days. On day 4 the plasma creatine kinase activity was approximately 150-fold higher (P < 0.05) than resting levels. 4. Despite the increase in xanthine oxidase in the muscle there were no detectable changes in the levels of muscle malondialdehyde or in plasma antioxidant capacity up to 4 days post-exercise. 5. It is concluded that eccentric exercise leads to an increased level of xanthine oxidase in human muscle and that the increase is associated with secondary inflammatory processes. The increase in xanthine oxidase in the muscle occurs mainly in microvascular endothelial cells, but occurs also via infiltrating leucocytes containing xanthine oxidase. A role for leucocytes in xanthine oxidase induction in endothelium is proposed. Images Figure 2 PMID:9023782

  17. Spatiotemporal Localization of d-Amino Acid Oxidase and d-Aspartate Oxidases during Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Yasuaki; Katane, Masumi; Kawata, Tomonori; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Kobuna, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Taro; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasuhito

    2012-01-01

    Recent investigations have shown that a variety of d-amino acids are present in living organisms and that they possibly play important roles in physiological functions in the body. d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) and d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) are degradative enzymes stereospecific for d-amino acids. They have been identified in various organisms, including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, although the significance of these enzymes and the relevant functions of d-amino acids remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal localization of C. elegans DAO and DDOs (DDO-1, DDO-2, and DDO-3) and measured the levels of several d- and l-amino acids in wild-type C. elegans and four mutants in which each gene for DAO and the DDOs was partially deleted and thereby inactivated. Furthermore, several phenotypes of these mutant strains were characterized. The results reported in this study indicate that C. elegans DAO and DDOs are involved in egg-laying events and the early development of C. elegans. In particular, DDOs appear to play important roles in the development and maturation of germ cells. This work provides novel and useful insights into the physiological functions of these enzymes and d-amino acids in multicellular organisms. PMID:22393259

  18. Spatiotemporal localization of D-amino acid oxidase and D-aspartate oxidases during development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Yasuaki; Katane, Masumi; Kawata, Tomonori; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Kobuna, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Taro; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasuhito; Homma, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Recent investigations have shown that a variety of D-amino acids are present in living organisms and that they possibly play important roles in physiological functions in the body. D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) and D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) are degradative enzymes stereospecific for D-amino acids. They have been identified in various organisms, including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, although the significance of these enzymes and the relevant functions of D-amino acids remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal localization of C. elegans DAO and DDOs (DDO-1, DDO-2, and DDO-3) and measured the levels of several D- and L-amino acids in wild-type C. elegans and four mutants in which each gene for DAO and the DDOs was partially deleted and thereby inactivated. Furthermore, several phenotypes of these mutant strains were characterized. The results reported in this study indicate that C. elegans DAO and DDOs are involved in egg-laying events and the early development of C. elegans. In particular, DDOs appear to play important roles in the development and maturation of germ cells. This work provides novel and useful insights into the physiological functions of these enzymes and D-amino acids in multicellular organisms. PMID:22393259

  19. Cyanobacterial lactate oxidases serve as essential partners in N2 fixation and evolved into photorespiratory glycolate oxidases in plants.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Claudia; Kern, Ramona; Hüge, Jan; Stal, Lucas J; Tsuji, Yoshinori; Kopka, Joachim; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Bauwe, Hermann; Hagemann, Martin

    2011-08-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GOX) is an essential enzyme involved in photorespiratory metabolism in plants. In cyanobacteria and green algae, the corresponding reaction is catalyzed by glycolate dehydrogenases (GlcD). The genomes of N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria, such as Nostoc PCC 7120 and green algae, appear to harbor genes for both GlcD and GOX proteins. The GOX-like proteins from Nostoc (No-LOX) and from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii showed high L-lactate oxidase (LOX) and low GOX activities, whereas glycolate was the preferred substrate of the phylogenetically related At-GOX2 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Changing the active site of No-LOX to that of At-GOX2 by site-specific mutagenesis reversed the LOX/GOX activity ratio of No-LOX. Despite its low GOX activity, No-LOX overexpression decreased the accumulation of toxic glycolate in a cyanobacterial photorespiratory mutant and restored its ability to grow in air. A LOX-deficient Nostoc mutant grew normally in nitrate-containing medium but died under N(2)-fixing conditions. Cultivation under low oxygen rescued this lethal phenotype, indicating that N(2) fixation was more sensitive to O(2) in the Δlox Nostoc mutant than in the wild type. We propose that LOX primarily serves as an O(2)-scavenging enzyme to protect nitrogenase in extant N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria, whereas in plants it has evolved into GOX, responsible for glycolate oxidation during photorespiration. PMID:21828292

  20. Digenic inheritance of mutations in the coproporphyrinogen oxidase and protoporphyrinogen oxidase genes in a unique type of porphyria.

    PubMed

    van Tuyll van Serooskerken, Anne Moniek; de Rooij, Felix W; Edixhoven, Annie; Bladergroen, Reno S; Baron, Jens M; Joussen, Sylvia; Merk, Hans F; Steijlen, Peter M; Poblete-Gutiérrez, Pamela; te Velde, Kornelis; Wilson, J H Paul; Koole, Rita H; van Geel, Michel; Frank, Jorge

    2011-11-01

    The simultaneous dysfunction of two enzymes within the heme biosynthetic pathway in a single patient is rare. Not more than 15 cases have been reported. A woman with a transient episode of severe photosensitivity showed a biochemical porphyrin profile suggestive of hereditary coproporphyria (HCP), whereas some of her relatives had a profile that was suggestive of variegate porphyria (VP). HCP and VP result from a partial enzymatic deficiency of coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX), respectively. DNA analysis in the index patient revealed mutations in both the CPOX and PPOX genes, designated as c.557-15C>G and c.1289dupT, respectively. The CPOX mutation leads to a cryptic splice site resulting in retention of 14 nucleotides from intron 1 in the mRNA transcript. Both mutations encode null alleles and were associated with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Given the digenic inheritance of these null mutations, coupled with the fact that both HCP and VP can manifest with life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks, the unusual aspect of this case is a relatively mild clinical phenotype restricted to dermal photosensitivity. PMID:21734717

  1. Banana Transcription Factor MaERF11 Recruits Histone Deacetylase MaHDA1 and Represses the Expression of MaACO1 and Expansins during Fruit Ripening1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan-Chao; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Fu, Chang-Chun; Wang, Jun-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormone ethylene controls diverse developmental and physiological processes such as fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Our previous study identified that ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR11 (MaERF11), a transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway, negatively regulates the ripening of banana, but the mechanism for the MaERF11-mediated transcriptional regulation remains largely unknown. Here we showed that MaERF11 has intrinsic transcriptional repression activity in planta. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that MaERF11 binds to promoters of three ripening-related Expansin genes, MaEXP2, MaEXP7 and MaEXP8, as well as an ethylene biosynthetic gene MaACO1, via the GCC-box motif. Furthermore, expression patterns of MaACO1, MaEXP2, MaEXP7, and MaEXP8 genes are correlated with the changes of histone H3 and H4 acetylation level during fruit ripening. Moreover, we found that MaERF11 physically interacts with a histone deacetylase, MaHDA1, which has histone deacetylase activity, and the interaction significantly strengthens the MaERF11-mediated transcriptional repression of MaACO1 and Expansins. Taken together, these findings suggest that MaERF11 may recruit MaHDA1 to its target genes and repress their expression via histone deacetylation. PMID:27208241

  2. Measurement of annexin V uptake and lactadherin labeling for the quantification of apoptosis in adherent Tca8113 and ACC-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, T; Shi, J; Jiao, X; Zhou, J; Yin, X

    2008-09-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure occurs during the cell death program and fluorescein-labeled lactadherin permits the detection of PS exposure earlier than annexin V in suspended cell lines. Adherent cell lines were studied for this apoptosis-associated phenomenon to determine if PS probing methods are reliable because specific membrane damage may occur during harvesting. Apoptosis was induced in the human tongue squamous carcinoma cell line (Tca8113) and the adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-2) by arsenic trioxide. Cells were harvested with a modified procedure and labeled with lactadherin and/or annexin V. PS exposure was localized by confocal microscopy and apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. The detachment procedure without trypsinization did not induce cell damage. In competition binding experiments, phospholipid vesicles competed for more than 95 and 90% of lactadherin but only about 75 and 70% of annexin V binding to Tca8113 and ACC-2 cells. These data indicate that PS exposure occurs in three stages during the cell death program and that fluorescein-labeled lactadherin permitted the detection of early PS exposure. A similar pattern of PS exposure has been observed in two malignant cell lines with different adherence, suggesting that this pattern of PS exposure is common in adherent cells. Both lactadherin and annexin V could be used in adherent Tca8113 and ACC-2 cell lines when an appropriate harvesting procedure was used. Lactadherin is more sensitive than annexin V for the detection of PS exposure as the physical structure of PS in these blebs and condensed apoptotic cell surface may be more conducive to binding lactadherin than annexin V. PMID:18820763

  3. Complete plastid genome sequence of Primula sinensis (Primulaceae): structure comparison, sequence variation and evidence for accD transfer to nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong-Jian; Zhang, Cai-Yun; Yan, Hai-Fei; Zhang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Species-rich genus Primula L. is a typical plant group with which to understand genetic variance between species in different levels of relationships. Chloroplast genome sequences are used to be the information resource for quantifying this difference and reconstructing evolutionary history. In this study, we reported the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Primula sinensis and compared it with other related species. This genome of chloroplast showed a typical circular quadripartite structure with 150,859 bp in sequence length consisting of 37.2% GC base. Two inverted repeated regions (25,535 bp) were separated by a large single-copy region (82,064 bp) and a small single-copy region (17,725 bp). The genome consists of 112 genes, including 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and four rRNA genes. Among them, seven coding genes, seven tRNA genes and four rRNA genes have two copies due to their locations in the IR regions. The accD and infA genes lacking intact open reading frames (ORF) were identified as pseudogenes. SSR and sequence variation analyses were also performed on the plastome of Primula sinensis, comparing with another available plastome of P. poissonii. The four most variable regions, rpl36–rps8, rps16–trnQ, trnH–psbA and ndhC–trnV, were identified. Phylogenetic relationship estimates using three sub-datasets extracted from a matrix of 57 protein-coding gene sequences showed the identical result that was consistent with previous studies. A transcript found from P. sinensis transcriptome showed a high similarity to plastid accD functional region and was identified as a putative plastid transit peptide at the N-terminal region. The result strongly suggested that plastid accD has been functionally transferred to the nucleus in P. sinensis. PMID:27375965

  4. Determination of ACC-induced cell-programmed death in roots of Vicia faba ssp. minor seedlings by acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining.

    PubMed

    Byczkowska, Anna; Kunikowska, Anita; Kaźmierczak, Andrzej

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence staining with acridine orange (AO) and ethidium bromide (EB) showed that nuclei of cortex root cells of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC)-treated Vicia faba ssp. minor seedlings differed in color. Measurement of resultant fluorescence intensity (RFI) showed that it increased when the color of nuclear chromatin was changed from green to red, indicating that EB moved to the nuclei via the cell membrane which lost its integrity and stained nuclei red. AO/EB staining showed that changes in color of the nuclear chromatin were accompanied by DNA condensation, nuclei fragmentation, and chromatin degradation which were also shown after 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindol staining. These results indicate that ACC induced programmed cell death. The increasing values of RFI together with the corresponding morphological changes of nuclear chromatin were the basis to prepare the standard curve; cells with green unchanged nuclear chromatin were alive while those with dark orange and bright red nuclei were dead. The cells with nuclei with green-yellow, yellow-orange, and bright orange chromatin with or without their condensation and fragmentation chromatin were dying. The prepared curve has became the basis to draw up the digital method for detection and determination of the number of living, dying, and dead cells in an in planta system and revealed that ACC induced death in about 20% of root cortex cells. This process was accompanied by increase in ion leakage, shortening of cells and whole roots, as well as by increase in weight and width of the apical part of roots and appearance of few aerenchymatic spaces while not by internucleosomal DNA degradation. PMID:22350735

  5. Enhancement of heavy metal accumulation by tissue specific co-expression of iaaM and ACC deaminase genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Lihong; Wang, Yao; Yang, Baoyu; Chen, Shiyun

    2008-06-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane deaminase (ACC) and tryptophan monooxygenase are two enzymes involved in plant senescence-inhibiting and growth-promoting regulation, respectively. In this study, two binary vectors were constructed in which the Agrobacterium iaaM gene was under the transcriptional control of a xylem-specific glycine-rich protein promoter alone, or co-expressed with the bacterial ACC deaminase gene, which was driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. Transgenic petunia shoots co-expressing both genes were able to root on medium supplemented with 7.5 mg l(-1) CoCl2. When T1 transgenic tobacco plants were grown in sand supplemented with Cu2+ and Co2+, tissue specific co-expression of both iaaM and ACC deaminase genes showed faster growth with larger biomass with a more extensive root system, and accumulated a greater amount of heavy metals than the empty vector control plants. When T1 transgenic tobacco plants were grown in soil watered with different concentrations of CuSO4, xylem specific expression of the iaaM gene caused the accumulation of more Cu2+ than the empty vector control at lower CuSO4 concentrations, but showed severe toxic symptoms at concentration of 100 mg l(-1) CuSO4. T1 transgenic plants co-expressing both genes accumulated more heavy metals into the plant shoots and can tolerate CuSO4 at 150 mg l(-1). In addition, plants co-expressing these two genes can grow well in a complex contaminated soil containing both inorganic and organic pollutants, while the growth of the control plants was greatly inhibited. PMID:18471863

  6. Two-color experiments combining the UV storage ring free-electron laser and the SA5 IR beamline at Super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahon, Laurent; Renault, Eric; Couprie, Marie-Emmanuelle; Nutarelli, Daniele; Garzella, David; Billardon, Michel; Carr, G. Lawrence; Williams, Gwyn P.; Dumas, Paul

    1999-10-01

    The UV-storage ring Free Electron Laser (FEL) operating at Super-ACO is a tunable, coherent and intense (up to 300 mW) photon source in the near-UV range (300 - 350 nm). Besides, it has the unique feature to be synchronized in a one-to-one shot ratio with the Synchrotron Radiation (SR) at the high repetition rate of 8.32 MHz. This FEL + SR combination appears to be very powerful for the performance of pump- probe time-resolved and/or frequency-resolved experiments on the sub-ns and ns time-scales. In particular, there is a strong scientific case for the combination of the recently- commissioned SA5 Infra-Red Synchrotron Radiation beamline with the UV-FEL, for the performance of transient IR- absorption spectroscopy on FEL-excited samples with a Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a microscope allowing high spectral and spatial resolution. The principle and interest of the two-color combination altogether with the description of both the FEL and the SA5 IR beamline are presented. The first synchronization signal between the IR and the UV beams is shown. The correct spatial overlap between the UV (FEL) and the IR (SR) photon beams is demonstrated by monitoring via IR-spectro-microscopy the time evolution of a single mineral particulate (kaolinite) under UV-FEL irradiation.

  7. Cytoplasmic CopZ-Like Protein and Periplasmic Rusticyanin and AcoP Proteins as Possible Copper Resistance Determinants in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Claudio A.; von Bernath, Diego; Martínez-Bussenius, Cristóbal; Castillo, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    Acidophilic organisms, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, possess high-level resistance to copper and other metals. A. ferrooxidans contains canonical copper resistance determinants present in other bacteria, such as CopA ATPases and RND efflux pumps, but these components do not entirely explain its high metal tolerance. The aim of this study was to find other possible copper resistance determinants in this bacterium. Transcriptional expression of A. ferrooxidans genes coding for a cytoplasmic CopZ-like copper-binding chaperone and the periplasmic copper-binding proteins rusticyanin and AcoP, which form part of an iron-oxidizing supercomplex, was found to increase when the microorganism was grown in the presence of copper. All of these proteins conferred more resistance to copper when expressed heterologously in a copper-sensitive Escherichia coli strain. This effect was absent when site-directed-mutation mutants of these proteins with altered copper-binding sites were used in this metal sensitivity assay. These results strongly suggest that the three copper-binding proteins analyzed here are copper resistance determinants in this extremophile and contribute to the high-level metal resistance of this industrially important biomining bacterium. PMID:26637599

  8. A Transition from Localized to Strongly Correlated Electron Behavior and Mixed Valence Driven by Physical or Chemical Pressure in ACo2As2 (A = Eu and Ca).

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Fabbris, Gilberto; Haskel, Daniel; Yaroslavtsev, Alexander A; Cao, Huibo; Thompson, Corey M; Kovnir, Kirill; Menushenkov, Alexey P; Chernikov, Roman V; Garlea, V Ovidiu; Shatruk, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that the action of physical pressure, chemical compression, or aliovalent substitution in ACo2As2 (A = Eu and Ca) has a general consequence of causing these antiferromagnetic materials to become ferromagnets. In all cases, the mixed valence triggered at the electropositive A site results in the increase of the Co 3d density of states at the Fermi level. Remarkably, the dramatic alteration of magnetic behavior results from the very minor (<0.15 electron) change in the population of the 3d orbitals. The mixed valence state of Eu observed in the high-pressure (HP) form of EuCo2As2 exhibits a remarkable stability, achieving the average oxidation state of +2.25 at 12.6 GPa. In the case of CaCo2As2, substituting even 10% of Eu or La into the Ca site causes ferromagnetic ordering of Co moments. Similar to HP-EuCo2As2, the itinerant 3d ferromagnetism emerges from electronic doping into the Co layer because of chemical compression of Eu sites in Ca0.9Eu0.1Co1.91As2 or direct electron doping in Ca0.85La0.15Co1.89As2. The results reported herein demonstrate the general possibility of amplifying minor localized electronic effects to achieve major changes in material's properties via involvement of strongly correlated electrons. PMID:26840063

  9. Cytoplasmic CopZ-Like Protein and Periplasmic Rusticyanin and AcoP Proteins as Possible Copper Resistance Determinants in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Claudio A; von Bernath, Diego; Martínez-Bussenius, Cristóbal; Castillo, Rodrigo A; Jerez, Carlos A

    2016-02-01

    Acidophilic organisms, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, possess high-level resistance to copper and other metals. A. ferrooxidans contains canonical copper resistance determinants present in other bacteria, such as CopA ATPases and RND efflux pumps, but these components do not entirely explain its high metal tolerance. The aim of this study was to find other possible copper resistance determinants in this bacterium. Transcriptional expression of A. ferrooxidans genes coding for a cytoplasmic CopZ-like copper-binding chaperone and the periplasmic copper-binding proteins rusticyanin and AcoP, which form part of an iron-oxidizing supercomplex, was found to increase when the microorganism was grown in the presence of copper. All of these proteins conferred more resistance to copper when expressed heterologously in a copper-sensitive Escherichia coli strain. This effect was absent when site-directed-mutation mutants of these proteins with altered copper-binding sites were used in this metal sensitivity assay. These results strongly suggest that the three copper-binding proteins analyzed here are copper resistance determinants in this extremophile and contribute to the high-level metal resistance of this industrially important biomining bacterium. PMID:26637599

  10. Environment effect on fruit ripening related gene to develop a new post harvest technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivany, Fenny; Esyanti, Rizkita Rahmi; Robertlee, Jekson; Paramaputra, Indra Chandra; Permatadewi, Rinda Kania; Tambun, Dina Hermawaty; Handayani, Resnanti Utami; Pratiwi, Aksarani'Sa; Zaskia, Herafi

    2014-03-01

    Ripening process of fruits is a very complex process, which involves ethylene production, causing alteration on molecular and physiology level. Environmental stress caused by biotic and abiotic stress conditions (such as pathogen, mechanical stress, physical and physiology stress) can stimulate ethylene production. High levels of ethylene in turn can also inhibit growth, cause premature ripening and induce the onset of senescence, which then potentially reduce plant productivity. The ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) genes are genes that have role in the ethylene production. By regulating those genes, especially ethylene biosynthesis genes, we might improve the quality of fruit at post harvest condition. Therefore, in this research we studied fruit ripening related genes expression on banana such as MaACS family at different environment condition. The result of study can give contributions in developing of new plants with desired traits or new post harvest technologies.

  11. Potential role of NADPH oxidase in pathogenesis of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wei-Li; Xiang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Kai; Xu, Wei; Xia, Shi-Hai

    2014-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to inflammatory disorders. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX), originally found in phagocytes, is the main source of ROS in nonphagocytic cells. Besides directly producing the detrimental highly reactive ROS to act on biomolecules (lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids), NOX can also activate multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis by producing ROS. Recently, research on pancreatic NOX is no longer limited to inflammatory cells, but extends to the aspect of pancreatic acinar cells and pancreatic stellate cells, which are considered to be potentially associated with pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize the literature on NOX protein structure, activation, function and its role in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. PMID:25133019

  12. Xanthine oxidase inhibition by febuxostat attenuates experimental atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Johji; Busso, Nathalie; Ives, Annette; Matsui, Chieko; Tsujimoto, Syunsuke; Shirakura, Takashi; Tamura, Mizuho; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi; So, Alexander; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease due to lipid deposition in the arterial wall. Multiple mechanisms participate in the inflammatory process, including oxidative stress. Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show enhanced XO expression in macrophages in the atherosclerotic plaque and in aortic endothelial cells in ApoE(-/-) mice, and that febuxostat, a highly potent XO inhibitor, suppressed plaque formation, reduced arterial ROS levels and improved endothelial dysfunction in ApoE(-/-) mice without affecting plasma cholesterol levels. In vitro, febuxostat inhibited cholesterol crystal-induced ROS formation and inflammatory cytokine release in murine macrophages. These results demonstrate that in the atherosclerotic plaque, XO-mediated ROS formation is pro-inflammatory and XO-inhibition by febuxostat is a potential therapy for atherosclerosis. PMID:24686534

  13. Isolation and characterization of sulfite oxidase from Alligator mississipiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, A.; Neame, P.J.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Sulfite oxidase has been isolated from fresh alligator liver using ammonium sulfate and acetone fractionation, DEAE chromatography and FPLC on Mono Q. The enzyme is dimeric and exhibits a subunit M. Wt. of approximately 58 kDa, larger than that of chicken SO. EPR spectroscopy of the partially-reduced enzyme revealed a single Mo(V) species while visible spectroscopy revealed the presence of cytochrome b{sub 557}. Maximal activities were obtained at pH 8 and 9, respectively. K{sub m}'s for SO{sub 3}{sup 2 {minus}}, cyt. c and Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3 {minus}} were 23.5 uM, 2.9 uM and 8.0 uM, respectively. Sequencing of peptides obtained by endoprotease K digestion indicated regions of extensive sequence similarity to chicken and rat enzymes in both heme and Mo-pterin domains. Regions of sequence dissimilarity were also found.

  14. Biogenesis and Assembly of Eukaryotic Cytochrome c Oxidase Catalytic Core

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. COX is a multimeric enzyme formed by subunits of dual genetic origin which assembly is intricate and highly regulated. The COX catalytic core is formed by three mitochondrial DNA encoded subunits, Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, conserved in the bacterial enzyme. Their biogenesis requires the action of messenger-specific and subunit-specific factors which facilitate the synthesis, membrane insertion, maturation or assembly of the core subunits. The study of yeast strains and human cell lines from patients carrying mutations in structural subunits and COX assembly factors has been invaluable to identify these ancillary factors. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the biogenesis and assembly of the eukaryotic COX catalytic core and discuss the degree of conservation of the players and mechanisms operating from yeast to human. PMID:21958598

  15. Quantitative structure-activity studies on monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C L

    1976-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity studies were carried out on a series of N-isopropylaryl hydrazides which inhibits monoamine oxidase (MAO). The inhibitory potencies of these compounds of MAO were found to correlate with the electron-withdrawing capacity of the aryl ring substituents as estimated by both empirical Hammet sigma constants and electronic indices from molecular orbital calculations. Based on these correlations and previously published data on other classes of MAO inhibitors, a general model for the inhibitor pharmacophore is proposed: potent MAO of an aromatic ring; electron-withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring or replacing the phenyl ring with certain types of heterocyclic rings will tend to increase the potency. PMID:1271400

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury and NADPH Oxidase: A Deep Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Prata, Cecilia; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Piperno, Roberto; Hrelia, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents one of the major causes of mortality and disability in the world. TBI is characterized by primary damage resulting from the mechanical forces applied to the head as a direct result of the trauma and by the subsequent secondary injury due to a complex cascade of biochemical events that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the genesis of the delayed harmful effects contributing to permanent damage. NADPH oxidases (Nox), ubiquitary membrane multisubunit enzymes whose unique function is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), have been shown to be a major source of ROS in the brain and to be involved in several neurological diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Nox is upregulated after TBI, suggesting Nox critical role in the onset and development of this pathology. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the role of Nox enzymes in the pathophysiology of TBI. PMID:25918580

  17. Optical characterization of porous silicon microcavities for glucose oxidase biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palestino, G.; Agarwal, V.; Garcia, D. B.; Legros, R.; Pérez, E.; Gergely, C.

    2008-04-01

    PSi microcavity (PSiMc) is characterized by a narrow resonance peak in the optical spectrum that is very sensitive to small changes in the refractive index. We report that the resonant optical cavities of PSi structures can be used to enhance the detection of labeled fluorescent biomolecules. Various PSi configurations were tested in order to compare the optical response of the PSi devices to the capture of organic molecules. Morphological and topographical analyses were performed on PSiMc using Atomic Force (AFM) and Scanning Electron (SEM) microscopies. The heterogeneity in pores lengths resulting from etching process assures a better penetration of larger molecules into the pores and sensor sensitivity depends on the pore size. Molecular detection is monitored by the successive red shifts in the reflectance spectra after the stabilization of PSiMc with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The glucose oxidase was cross linked into the PSiMc structures following a silane-glutaraldehyde (GTA) chemistry.

  18. Molecular basis of infantile reversible cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, John P.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.; Hudson, Gavin; Oldfors, Anders; Marie, Suely K. N.; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Servidei, Serenella; Holme, Elisabeth; Shanske, Sara; Kollberg, Gittan; Jayakar, Parul; Pyle, Angela; Marks, Harold M.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Maggie C.; Çoku, Jorida; Günther-Scholz, Andrea; Smith, Paul M.; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M. A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Hirano, Michio; Lochmüller, Hanns; Taylor, Robert W.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Tulinius, Mar; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Childhood-onset mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are usually severe, relentlessly progressive conditions that have a fatal outcome. However, a puzzling infantile disorder, long known as ‘benign cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy’ is an exception because it shows spontaneous recovery if infants survive the first months of life. Current investigations cannot distinguish those with a good prognosis from those with terminal disease, making it very difficult to decide when to continue intensive supportive care. Here we define the principal molecular basis of the disorder by identifying a maternally inherited, homoplasmic m.14674T>C mt-tRNAGlu mutation in 17 patients from 12 families. Our results provide functional evidence for the pathogenicity of the mutation and show that tissue-specific mechanisms downstream of tRNAGlu may explain the spontaneous recovery. This study provides the rationale for a simple genetic test to identify infants with mitochondrial myopathy and good prognosis. PMID:19720722

  19. NADPH Oxidase: A Potential Target for Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Jie; Duan, Xiaochun; Tian, Xiaodi; Shen, Haitao; Sun, Qing; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in industrialized nations. Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of stroke, and excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria is thought to be the main cause of oxidative stress. NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes have recently been identified and studied as important producers of ROS in brain tissues after stroke. Several reports have shown that knockout or deletion of NOX exerts a neuroprotective effect in three major experimental stroke models. Recent studies also confirmed that NOX inhibitors ameliorate brain injury and improve neurological outcome after stroke. However, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of NOX enzymes in the central nervous system (CNS) are not known well. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of our current understanding about expression and physiological function of NOX enzymes in the CNS and its pathophysiological roles in the three major types of stroke: ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26941888

  20. Resolution of thylakoid polyphenol oxidase and a protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Race, H.L.; Davenport, J.W.; Hind, G.

    1995-12-31

    The predominant protein kinase activity in octylglucoside (OG) extracts of spinach thylakoids has been attributed to a 64-kDa protein, tp64. Recent work calls into question the relation between tp64 and protein kinase activity, which were fractionated apart using fluid phase IEF and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Hind et al. sequenced tp64 from the cDNA and showed it to be a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) homolog. Its transit peptide indicates a location for the mature protein within the thylakoid lumen, where there is presumably no ATP and where it is remote from the presumed kinase substrates: the stromally exposed regions of integral PS-II membrane proteins. Here the authors suggest that the kinase is a 64-kDa protein distinct from tp64.