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Sample records for accase inhibiting herbicides

  1. Synonymous mutation gene design to overexpress ACCase in creeping bentgrass to obtain resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Heckart, Douglas L; Schwartz, Brian M; Raymer, Paul L; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-08-01

    Overexpression of a native gene can cause expression of both introduced and native genes to be silenced by posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mechanisms. PTGS mechanisms rely on sequence identity between the transgene and native genes; therefore, designing genes with mutations that do not cause amino acid changes, known as synonymous mutations, may avoid PTGS. For proof of concept, the sequence of acetyl-coA carboxylase (ACCase) from creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) was altered with synonymous mutations. A native bentgrass ACCase was cloned and used as a template for the modified gene. Wild-type (WT) and modified genes were further modified with a non-synonymous mutation, coding for an isoleucine to leucine substitution at position 1781, known to confer resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. Five-hundred calli of creeping bentgrass 'Penn A-4' were inoculated with Agrobacterium containing either the WT or modified genes, with or without the herbicide-resistance mutation. Six herbicide-resistant-transgenic events containing the modified gene with the 1781 mutation were obtained. Transcription of the modified ACCase was confirmed in transgenic plants, showing that gene-silencing mechanisms were avoided. Transgenic plants were confirmed to be resistant to the ACCase-inhibiting herbicide, sethoxydim, providing evidence that the modified gene was functional. The result is a novel herbicide-resistance trait and shows that overexpression of a native enzyme with a gene designed with synonymous mutations is possible. PMID:27116460

  2. Resistance of American sloughgrass (Bechmannia syzigachne) populations to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides involves three different target site mutations from China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Zhou, Fengyan; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Jie

    2015-10-01

    American sloughgrass [Beckmannia syzigachne (Steud.) Fernald] is a problematic annual grass weed in winter wheat fields of China, which causes great loss of wheat yield. Repeated use of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicides during the last two decades to control this weed has been selected for resistance in American sloughgrass in Jiangsu province. In this study, whole-plant dose-response assays were conducted to investigate the level of resistance in four resistant American sloughgrass populations (LY, JH, BYJ and BYP) to four ACCase-inhibiting herbicides belonging to aryloxyphenoxypropionates, cyclohexanediones, and phenylpyrazolines groups under greenhouse conditions. Based on resistance factor (RF), three populations, LY, BYJ and BYP, were highly resistant to fenoxaprop-P-ethyl, clodinafop propargyl, sethoxydim and pinoxaden. JH plants exhibited resistance to fenoxaprop-P-ethyl and clodinafop propargyl, but showed much lower RF values for sethoxydim and pinoxaden. Molecular analysis of resistance revealed that resistance in all the four populations was target site-based. Results confirmed that substitutions of Ile-1781-Leu, Ile-2041-Asn and Asp-2078-Gly, respectively, in LY, JH and BYJ/BYP, are responsible for diverse sensitivity to different ACCase-inhibiting herbicides in these populations. The substitution at position 1781 had been reported, while it is the first report of Ile-2041-Asn and Asp-2078-Gly mutations that corresponded to resistance in American sloughgrass.

  3. Molecular genotyping of herbicide resistance in P. minor: ACCase resistance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajender; Sharma, Davinder; Raghav, Nishu; Chhokar, Rajender Singh; Sharma, Indu

    2015-02-01

    Little seed canary grass (Phalaris minor Retz.) populations resistant to herbicides that inhibit acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) represent an increasingly important weed control problem in northern India. The objective of this study was to develop DNA-based markers to differentiate herbicide-resistant and herbicide-susceptible population of P. minor. Primers were designed to amplify the conserved region carrying two reported mutations Trp2027 to Cys and Ile2041 to Asn conferring ACCase inhibitor resistance in several grass weeds and subjected to single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) to detect the mutations. Five distinctive electrophoretic patterns on non-denaturing PAGE were observed, and four patterns were found to be associated with ACCase herbicide resistance in P. minor. The PCR-SSCP test developed in this study confirmed 17 resistant populations to contain mutations in CT domain of ACCase gene. This is the first report of rapid and easy molecular diagnosis of ACCase herbicide-resistant and herbicide-sensitive population of P. minor through PCR-SSCP analysis.

  4. Molecular survey of turfgrass species for mutations conferring resistance to ACCase inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The control of grassy weeds in turfgrass is often problematic due to lack of herbicide selectivity. Seven different naturally occurring mutation sites have been reported to confer resistance to Acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase inhibiting herbicides. One or more of these mutation sites may hold potentia...

  5. Herbicide resistance-endowing ACCase gene mutations in hexaploid wild oat (Avena fatua): insights into resistance evolution in a hexaploid species.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q; Ahmad-Hamdani, M S; Han, H; Christoffers, M J; Powles, S B

    2013-03-01

    Many herbicide-resistant weed species are polyploids, but far too little about the evolution of resistance mutations in polyploids is understood. Hexaploid wild oat (Avena fatua) is a global crop weed and many populations have evolved herbicide resistance. We studied plastidic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicide resistance in hexaploid wild oat and revealed that resistant individuals can express one, two or three different plastidic ACCase gene resistance mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Asp-2078-Gly and Cys-2088-Arg). Using ACCase resistance mutations as molecular markers, combined with genetic, molecular and biochemical approaches, we found in individual resistant wild-oat plants that (1) up to three unlinked ACCase gene loci assort independently following Mendelian laws for disomic inheritance, (2) all three of these homoeologous ACCase genes were transcribed, with each able to carry its own mutation and (3) in a hexaploid background, each individual ACCase resistance mutation confers relatively low-level herbicide resistance, in contrast to high-level resistance conferred by the same mutations in unrelated diploid weed species of the Poaceae (grass) family. Low resistance conferred by individual ACCase resistance mutations is likely due to a dilution effect by susceptible ACCase expressed by homoeologs in hexaploid wild oat and/or differential expression of homoeologous ACCase gene copies. Thus, polyploidy in hexaploid wild oat may slow resistance evolution. Evidence of coexisting non-target-site resistance mechanisms among wild-oat populations was also revealed. In all, these results demonstrate that herbicide resistance and its evolution can be more complex in hexaploid wild oat than in unrelated diploid grass weeds. Our data provide a starting point for the daunting task of understanding resistance evolution in polyploids.

  6. Effect of herbicide resistance endowing Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly ACCase gene mutations on ACCase kinetics and growth traits in Lolium rigidum

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Aiub, Martin M.; Yu, Qin; Han, Heping; Powles, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of herbicide resistance evolution in plants depends on fitness traits endowed by alleles in both the presence and absence (resistance cost) of herbicide selection. The effect of two Lolium rigidum spontaneous homozygous target-site resistance-endowing mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Asp-2078-Gly) on both ACCase activity and various plant growth traits have been investigated here. Relative growth rate (RGR) and components (net assimilation rate, leaf area ratio), resource allocation to different organs, and growth responses in competition with a wheat crop were assessed. Unlike plants carrying the Ile-1781-Leu resistance mutation, plants homozygous for the Asp-2078-Gly mutation exhibited a significantly lower RGR (30%), which translated into lower allocation of biomass to roots, shoots, and leaves, and poor responses to plant competition. Both the negligible and significant growth reductions associated, respectively, with the Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly resistance mutations correlated with their impact on ACCase activity. Whereas the Ile-1781-Leu mutation showed no pleiotropic effects on ACCase kinetics, the Asp-2078-Gly mutation led to a significant reduction in ACCase activity. The impaired growth traits are discussed in the context of resistance costs and the effects of each resistance allele on ACCase activity. Similar effects of these two particular ACCase mutations on the ACCase activity of Alopecurus myosuroides were also confirmed. PMID:26019257

  7. Effect of herbicide resistance endowing Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly ACCase gene mutations on ACCase kinetics and growth traits in Lolium rigidum.

    PubMed

    Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Yu, Qin; Han, Heping; Powles, Stephen B

    2015-08-01

    The rate of herbicide resistance evolution in plants depends on fitness traits endowed by alleles in both the presence and absence (resistance cost) of herbicide selection. The effect of two Lolium rigidum spontaneous homozygous target-site resistance-endowing mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Asp-2078-Gly) on both ACCase activity and various plant growth traits have been investigated here. Relative growth rate (RGR) and components (net assimilation rate, leaf area ratio), resource allocation to different organs, and growth responses in competition with a wheat crop were assessed. Unlike plants carrying the Ile-1781-Leu resistance mutation, plants homozygous for the Asp-2078-Gly mutation exhibited a significantly lower RGR (30%), which translated into lower allocation of biomass to roots, shoots, and leaves, and poor responses to plant competition. Both the negligible and significant growth reductions associated, respectively, with the Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly resistance mutations correlated with their impact on ACCase activity. Whereas the Ile-1781-Leu mutation showed no pleiotropic effects on ACCase kinetics, the Asp-2078-Gly mutation led to a significant reduction in ACCase activity. The impaired growth traits are discussed in the context of resistance costs and the effects of each resistance allele on ACCase activity. Similar effects of these two particular ACCase mutations on the ACCase activity of Alopecurus myosuroides were also confirmed.

  8. Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly Mutations in ACCase Gene, Endow Cross-resistance to APP, CHD, and PPZ in Phalaris minor from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo; Fernandez, Pablo; Alcantara, Ricardo; Gherekhloo, Javid; Osuna, Maria Dolores; De Prado, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides that inhibit acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) are commonly used in Mexico to control weedy grasses such as little seed canarygrass (Phalaris minor). These herbicides are classified into three major families (ariloxyphenoxypropionates (APP), cyclohexanodiones (CHD), and, recently, phenylpyrazolines (PPZ)). In this work, the resistance to ACCase (APP, CHD, and PPZ) inhibiting herbicides was studied in a biotype of Phalaris minor (P. minor) from Mexico, by carrying out bioassays at the whole-plant level and investigating the mechanism behind this resistance. Dose-response and ACCase in vitro activity assays showed cross-resistance to all ACCase herbicides used. There was no difference in the absorption, translocation, and metabolism of the 14C-diclofop-methyl between the R and S biotypes. The PCR generated CT domain fragments of ACCase from the R biotype and an S reference were sequenced and compared. The Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly point mutations were identified. These mutations could explain the loss of affinity for ACCase by the ACCase-inhibing herbicides. This is the first report showing that this substitution confers resistance to APP, CHD, and PPZ herbicides in P. minor from Mexico. The mutations have been described previously only in a few cases; however, this is the first study reporting on a pattern of cross-resistance with these mutations in P. minor. The findings could be useful for better management of resistant biotypes carrying similar mutations. PMID:26370967

  9. Resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kaundun, Shiv S

    2014-09-01

    Resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase herbicides is documented in at least 43 grass weeds and is particularly problematic in Lolium, Alopecurus and Avena species. Genetic studies have shown that resistance generally evolves independently and can be conferred by target-site mutations at ACCase codon positions 1781, 1999, 2027, 2041, 2078, 2088 and 2096. The level of resistance depends on the herbicides, recommended field rates, weed species, plant growth stages, specific amino acid changes and the number of gene copies and mutant ACCase alleles. Non-target-site resistance, or in essence metabolic resistance, is prevalent, multigenic and favoured under low-dose selection. Metabolic resistance can be specific but also broad, affecting other modes of action. Some target-site and metabolic-resistant biotypes are characterised by a fitness penalty. However, the significance for resistance regression in the absence of ACCase herbicides is yet to be determined over a practical timeframe. More recently, a fitness benefit has been reported in some populations containing the I1781L mutation in terms of vegetative and reproductive outputs and delayed germination. Several DNA-based methods have been developed to detect known ACCase resistance mutations, unlike metabolic resistance, as the genes remain elusive to date. Therefore, confirmation of resistance is still carried out via whole-plant herbicide bioassays. A growing number of monocotyledonous crops have been engineered to resist ACCase herbicides, thus increasing the options for grass weed control. While the science of ACCase herbicide resistance has progressed significantly over the past 10 years, several avenues provided in the present review remain to be explored for a better understanding of resistance to this important mode of action.

  10. ACCase mutations in Avena sterilis populations and their impact on plant fitness.

    PubMed

    Papapanagiotou, Aristeidis P; Paresidou, Maria I; Kaloumenos, Nikolaos S; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G

    2015-09-01

    Avena sterilis (sterile oat) populations originating from wheat-growing regions of Greece, developed resistance to fenoxaprop, clodinafop and other herbicides. The partial ACCase gene sequence revealed six point mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Trp-1999-Cys, Trp-2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Cys-2088-Arg) in 24 out of the 26 resistant (R) populations, confirming the molecular mechanism of resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. However, DNA sequence of two R populations did not reveal any known ACCase mutations, suggesting possible presence of unknown mutation or metabolism-based mechanism of resistance. The Cys-2088-Arg mutation is the first record for ACCase mutant conferring target-site resistance in A. sterilis worldwide. The evaluation of 12 R and 6 susceptible (S) populations under non-competitive field conditions did not indicate consistent mean growth rate differences, whereas the pot evaluation of the same (12 R and 6 S) populations grown in competition with wheat or in pure stands showed significant growth (fresh weight and panicle number) differences between six S populations and between six R populations containing the same ACCase mutation (Ile-2041-Asn). Finally, one S and five R (Trp-1999-Cys, Trp-2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Cys-2088-Arg) populations grown under field competitive conditions indicated fresh weight and panicle number differences in competition with other populations as compared with pure stands. These findings suggest clearly that the inconsistent fitness differences between R and S A. sterilis populations are not related with the ACCase resistance trait but they may result from other non-resistance fitness traits selected in their different geographical locations. PMID:26267051

  11. ACCase mutations in Avena sterilis populations and their impact on plant fitness.

    PubMed

    Papapanagiotou, Aristeidis P; Paresidou, Maria I; Kaloumenos, Nikolaos S; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G

    2015-09-01

    Avena sterilis (sterile oat) populations originating from wheat-growing regions of Greece, developed resistance to fenoxaprop, clodinafop and other herbicides. The partial ACCase gene sequence revealed six point mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Trp-1999-Cys, Trp-2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Cys-2088-Arg) in 24 out of the 26 resistant (R) populations, confirming the molecular mechanism of resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. However, DNA sequence of two R populations did not reveal any known ACCase mutations, suggesting possible presence of unknown mutation or metabolism-based mechanism of resistance. The Cys-2088-Arg mutation is the first record for ACCase mutant conferring target-site resistance in A. sterilis worldwide. The evaluation of 12 R and 6 susceptible (S) populations under non-competitive field conditions did not indicate consistent mean growth rate differences, whereas the pot evaluation of the same (12 R and 6 S) populations grown in competition with wheat or in pure stands showed significant growth (fresh weight and panicle number) differences between six S populations and between six R populations containing the same ACCase mutation (Ile-2041-Asn). Finally, one S and five R (Trp-1999-Cys, Trp-2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Cys-2088-Arg) populations grown under field competitive conditions indicated fresh weight and panicle number differences in competition with other populations as compared with pure stands. These findings suggest clearly that the inconsistent fitness differences between R and S A. sterilis populations are not related with the ACCase resistance trait but they may result from other non-resistance fitness traits selected in their different geographical locations.

  12. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha(-1)) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha(-1)) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar (14)C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of (14)C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  13. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D.; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha-1) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha-1) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar 14C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of 14C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  14. Nucleotide variability at the acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase gene and the signature of herbicide selection in the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides (Huds.).

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Straub, Cécile; Michel, Séverine; Le Corre, Valérie

    2004-05-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) is the target of highly effective herbicides. We investigated the nucleotide variability of the ACCase gene in a sample of 18 black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides [Huds.]) populations to search for the signature of herbicide selection. Sequencing 3,396 bp encompassing ACCase herbicide-binding domain in 86 individuals revealed 92 polymorphisms, which formed 72 haplotypes. The ratio of nonsynonymous versus synonymous substitutions was very low, in agreement with ACCase being a vital metabolic enzyme. Within black grass, most nonsynonymous substitutions were related to resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. Differentiation between populations was strong, in contrast to expectations for an allogamous, annual plant. Significant H tests revealed recent hitchhiking events within populations. These results were consistent with recent and local positive selection. We propose that, although they have only been used since at most 15 black-grass generations, ACCase-inhibiting herbicides have exerted a positive selection targeting resistant haplotypes that has been strong enough to have a marked effect upon ACCase nucleotide diversity. A minimum-spanning network of nonrecombinant haplotypes revealed multiple, independent apparitions of resistance-associated mutations. This study provides the first evidence for the signature of ongoing, recent, pesticide selection upon variation at the gene encoding the targeted enzyme in natural plant populations.

  15. DNA analysis of herbarium Specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides reveals herbicide resistance pre-dated herbicides.

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Deulvot, Chrystel; Chauvel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) alleles carrying one point mutation that confers resistance to herbicides have been identified in arable grass weed populations where resistance has evolved under the selective pressure of herbicides. In an effort to determine whether herbicide resistance evolves from newly arisen mutations or from standing genetic variation in weed populations, we used herbarium specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides to seek mutant ACCase alleles carrying an isoleucine-to-leucine substitution at codon 1781 that endows herbicide resistance. These specimens had been collected between 1788 and 1975, i.e., prior to the commercial release of herbicides inhibiting ACCase. Among the 734 specimens investigated, 685 yielded DNA suitable for PCR. Genotyping the ACCase locus using the derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (dCAPS) technique identified one heterozygous mutant specimen that had been collected in 1888. Occurrence of a mutant codon encoding a leucine residue at codon 1781 at the heterozygous state was confirmed in this specimen by sequencing, clearly demonstrating that resistance to herbicides can pre-date herbicides in weeds. We conclude that point mutations endowing resistance to herbicides without having associated deleterious pleiotropic effects can be present in weed populations as part of their standing genetic variation, in frequencies higher than the mutation frequency, thereby facilitating their subsequent selection by herbicide applications.

  16. DNA Analysis of Herbarium Specimens of the Grass Weed Alopecurus myosuroides Reveals Herbicide Resistance Pre-Dated Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Délye, Christophe; Deulvot, Chrystel; Chauvel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) alleles carrying one point mutation that confers resistance to herbicides have been identified in arable grass weed populations where resistance has evolved under the selective pressure of herbicides. In an effort to determine whether herbicide resistance evolves from newly arisen mutations or from standing genetic variation in weed populations, we used herbarium specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides to seek mutant ACCase alleles carrying an isoleucine-to-leucine substitution at codon 1781 that endows herbicide resistance. These specimens had been collected between 1788 and 1975, i.e., prior to the commercial release of herbicides inhibiting ACCase. Among the 734 specimens investigated, 685 yielded DNA suitable for PCR. Genotyping the ACCase locus using the derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (dCAPS) technique identified one heterozygous mutant specimen that had been collected in 1888. Occurrence of a mutant codon encoding a leucine residue at codon 1781 at the heterozygous state was confirmed in this specimen by sequencing, clearly demonstrating that resistance to herbicides can pre-date herbicides in weeds. We conclude that point mutations endowing resistance to herbicides without having associated deleterious pleiotropic effects can be present in weed populations as part of their standing genetic variation, in frequencies higher than the mutation frequency, thereby facilitating their subsequent selection by herbicide applications. PMID:24146749

  17. Pollen Expression of Herbicide Target Site Resistance Genes in Annual Ryegrass (Lolium rigidum).

    PubMed Central

    Richter, J.; Powles, S. B.

    1993-01-01

    Herbicide resistance can occur either through target-site insensitivity or by nontarget site-based mechanisms. Two herbicide-resistant biotypes of Lolium rigidum Gaud., one resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides (biotype WLR1) and the other resistant to acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicides (biotype WLR96) through target-site insensitivity at the whole plant and enzymic levels, were found to express this resistance in the pollen. Pollen produced by resistant biotypes grew uninhibited when challenged with herbicide, whereas that from a susceptible biotype was inhibited. A third biotype, SLR31, resistant to ACCase-inhibiting and certain ALS-inhibiting herbicides at the whole plant level through nontarget site-based mechanisms, did not exhibit this expression in the pollen. The technique described may form the basis for a rapid screen for certain nuclear-encoded, target site-based herbicide-resistance mechanisms. PMID:12231886

  18. Mechanism of metamifop inhibition of the carboxyltransferase domain of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase in Echinochloa crus-galli

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiangdong; Tang, Wenjie; He, Shun; Kang, Jing; Ma, Hongju; Li, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) plays crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for herbicide discovery. Metamifop is a novel ACCase-inhibiting herbicide that can be applied to control sensitive weeds in paddy fields. In this study, the effects of metamifop on the chloroplasts, ACCase activity and carboxyltransferase (CT) domain gene expression in Echinochloa crus-galli were investigated. The results showed that metamifop interacted with the CT domain of ACCase in E. crus-galli. The three-dimensional structure of the CT domain of E. crus-galli ACCase in complex with metamifop was examined by homology modelling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Metamifop has a different mechanism of inhibiting the CT domain compared with other ACCase inhibitors as it interacted with a different region in the active site of the CT domain. The protonation of nitrogen in the oxazole ring of metamifop plays a crucial role in the interaction between metamifop and the CT domain. The binding mode of metamifop provides a foundation for elucidating the molecular mechanism of target resistance and cross-resistance among ACCase herbicides, and for designing and optimizing ACCase inhibitors. PMID:27666674

  19. Mechanism of metamifop inhibition of the carboxyltransferase domain of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase in Echinochloa crus-galli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiangdong; Tang, Wenjie; He, Shun; Kang, Jing; Ma, Hongju; Li, Jianhong

    2016-09-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) plays crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for herbicide discovery. Metamifop is a novel ACCase-inhibiting herbicide that can be applied to control sensitive weeds in paddy fields. In this study, the effects of metamifop on the chloroplasts, ACCase activity and carboxyltransferase (CT) domain gene expression in Echinochloa crus-galli were investigated. The results showed that metamifop interacted with the CT domain of ACCase in E. crus-galli. The three-dimensional structure of the CT domain of E. crus-galli ACCase in complex with metamifop was examined by homology modelling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Metamifop has a different mechanism of inhibiting the CT domain compared with other ACCase inhibitors as it interacted with a different region in the active site of the CT domain. The protonation of nitrogen in the oxazole ring of metamifop plays a crucial role in the interaction between metamifop and the CT domain. The binding mode of metamifop provides a foundation for elucidating the molecular mechanism of target resistance and cross-resistance among ACCase herbicides, and for designing and optimizing ACCase inhibitors.

  20. Cross-Resistance to Herbicides in Annual Ryegrass (Lolium rigidum)

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, John M.; Holtum, Joseph A. M.; Liljegren, David R.; Furness, Barbara; Powles, Stephen B.

    1990-01-01

    Lolium rigidum biotype SR4/84 is resistant to the herbicides diclofop-methyl and chlorsulfuron when grown in the field, in pots, and in hydroponics. Similar extractable activities and affinities for acetyl-coenzyme A of carboxylase (ACCase), an enzyme inhibited by diclofop-methyl, were found for susceptible and resistant L. rigidum. ACCase activity from both biotypes was inhibited by diclofop-methyl, diclofop acid, haloxyfop acid, fluazifop acid, sethoxydim, and tralkoxydim but not by chlorsulfuron or trifluralin. Exposure of plants to diclofop-methyl did not induce any changes in either the extractable activities or the herbicide inhibition kinetics of ACCase. It is concluded that, in contrast to diclofop resistance in L. multiflorum and diclofop tolerance in many dicots, the basis of resistance to diclofop-methyl and to other aryloxyphenoxypropionate and cyclohexanedione herbicides in L. rigidum is not due to the altered inhibition characteristics or expression of the enzyme ACCase. The extractable activities and substrate affinity of acetolactate synthase (ALS), an enzyme inhibited by chlorsulfuron, from susceptible and resistant biotypes of L. rigidum were similar. ALS from susceptible and resistant plants was equally inhibited by chlorsulfuron. Prior exposure of plants to 100 millimolar chlorsulfuron did not affect the inhibition kinetics. It is concluded that resistance to chlorsulfuron is not caused by alterations in either the expression or inhibition characteristics of ALS. PMID:16667814

  1. Dominant mutations causing alterations in acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase confer tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W B; Marshall, L C; Burton, J D; Somers, D A; Wyse, D L; Gronwald, J W; Gengenbach, B G

    1990-01-01

    A partially dominant mutation exhibiting increased tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides was isolated by exposing susceptible maize (Zea mays) tissue cultures to increasingly inhibitory concentrations of sethoxydim (a cyclohexanedione). The selected tissue culture (S2) was greater than 40-fold more tolerant to sethoxydim and 20-fold more tolerant to haloxyfop (an aryloxyphenoxypropionate) than the nonselected wild-type tissue culture. Regenerated S2 plants were heterozygous for the mutant allele and exhibited a high-level, but not complete, tolerance to both herbicides. Homozygous mutant families derived by self-pollinating the regenerated S2 plants exhibited no injury after treatment with 0.8 kg of sethoxydim per ha, which was greater than 16-fold the rate lethal to wild-type plants. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) is the target enzyme of cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides. ACCase activities of the nonselected wild-type and homozygous mutant seedlings were similar in the absence of herbicide. ACCase activity from homozygous tolerant plants required greater than 100-fold more sethoxydim and 16-fold more haloxyfop for 50% inhibition than ACCase from wild-type plants. These results indicate that tolerance to sethoxydim and haloxyfop is controlled by a partially dominant nuclear mutation encoding a herbicide-insensitive alteration in maize ACCase. Images PMID:1976254

  2. Resistance to herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Herbicides that act by inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) have been used to control grass weeds in major crops throughout the world for the past 60 years. VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides are generally highly selective in crops, induce similar symptoms in susceptible grasses and can be found within the herbicide groups classified by the HRAC as K3 and N. Even after many years of continuous use, only 12 grass weed species have evolved resistance to VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides. Here, the cases of resistance that have evolved in major grass weed species belonging to the Avena, Echinochloa and Lolium genera in three different agricultural systems are reviewed. In particular we explore the possible reasons why VLCFA herbicides have been slow to select resistant weeds, outline the herbicide mode of action and discuss the resistance mechanisms that are most likely to have been selected.

  3. Triazine herbicides inhibit relaxin signaling and disrupt nitric oxide homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Eun; Lim, Sa Rang; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Bae, Jeehyeon

    2016-09-15

    Triazines are herbicides that are widely used worldwide, and we previously observed that the maternal exposure of mice to simazine (50 or 500μg/kg) resulted in smaller ovaries and uteri of their female offspring. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism that may account for the reproductive dysfunction induced by simazine. We found that following maternal exposure, simazine is transmitted to the offspring, as evidenced by its presence in the offspring ovaries. Analyses of the simazine-exposed offspring revealed that the expression of the relaxin hormone receptor, relaxin-family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), prominently decreased in their ovaries and uteri. In addition, downstream target genes of the relaxin pathway including nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2 (Nos2), Nos3, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Mmp9), and vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) were downregulated in their ovaries. Moreover, AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) levels and their phosphorylated active forms decreased in simazine-exposed ovaries. In vitro exposure of the human ovarian granulosa cells (KGN) and uterine endometrium cells (Hec-1A) to very low concentrations (0.001 to 1nM) of triazines including atrazine, terbuthylazine, and propazine repressed NO production with a concurrent reduction in RXFP1, NOS2, and NOS3. The inhibitory action of triazines on NO release was dependent on RXFP1, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, and ERK. Radioligand-binding assay also confirmed that triazines competitively inhibited the binding of relaxin to its receptor. Therefore, the present study suggests that triazine herbicides act as endocrine disrupters by interfering with relaxin hormone signaling. Thus, further evaluation of their impact on human health is imperative. PMID:27431321

  4. Acetolactate Synthase-Inhibiting Herbicide-Resistant Rice Flatsedge (Cyperus iria): Cross Resistance and Molecular Mechanism of Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overuse of acetolactate synthase (ALS) –inhibiting herbicides in rice has led to evolution of halosulfuron-resistant rice flatsedge (Cyperus iria L.) in Arkansas (AR) and Mississippi (MS), USA. Resistant accessions were cross-resistant to labeled field rates of ALS-inhibiting herbicides from four d...

  5. Inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase by two classes of grass-selective herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Rendina, A.R.; Craig-Kennard, A.C.; Beaudoin, J.D.; Breen, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The selective grass herbicides diclofop, haloxyfop, and trifop (((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acids) and alloxydim, sethoxydim, and clethodim (cyclohexanediones) are potent, reversible inhibitors of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) partially purified from barley, corn, and wheat. Although inhibition of the wheat enzyme by clethodim and diclofop is noncompetitive versus each of the substrates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), diclofop and clethodim are nearly competitive versus acetyl-CoA since the level of inhibition is most sensitive to the concentration of acetyl-CoA (K{sub is} < K{sub ii}). To conclusively show whether the herbicides interact at the biotin carboxylation site or the carboxyl transfer site, the inhibition of isotope exchange and partial reactions catalyzed at each site was studied with the wheat enzyme. Only the ({sup 14}C)acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA exchange and decarboxylation of ({sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA reactions are strongly inhibited by clethodim and diclofop, suggesting that the herbicides interfere with the carboxyl transfer site rather than the biotin carboxylation site of the enzyme. Double-inhibition studies with diclofop and clethodim suggest that the ((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acid and cyclohexanedione herbicides may bind to the same region of the enzyme.

  6. Similarities and differences in global gene expression profiles between herbicide- and pathogen-induced PSII inhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogens, and photosynthesis inhibiting herbicides, can both damage photosystem II (PSII), causing it to be highly sensitive to damage by light energy, and to release high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This photoinhibition of PSII could possibly be the source of the strong oxidativ...

  7. Sensitivity of locally naturalized Panicum species to HPPD- and ALS-inhibiting herbicides in maize.

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, B; Geeroms, T; Claerhout, S; Reheul, D; Bulcke, R

    2012-01-01

    Until recently the Panicum species Panicum schinzii Hack. (Transvaal millet), Panicum dichotomiflorum Michx. (Fall panicum) and Panicum capillare L. (Witchgrass) were completely overlooked in Belgium. Since 1970, these species have gradually spread and are now locally naturalized and abundant in and along maize fields. One of the possible raisons for their expansion in maize fields might be a lower sensitivity to postemergence herbicides acting against panicoid grasses, in particular those inhibiting 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) and acetolactate synthase (ALS). A dose-response pot experiment was conducted in the greenhouse to evaluate the effectiveness of five HPPD-inhibiting herbicides (sulcotrione, mesotrione, isoxaflutole, topramezone, tembotrione) and two ALS-inhibiting herbicides (nicosulfuron, foramsulfuron) for controlling Belgian populations of P. schinzii, P. dichotomiflorum and P. capillare. Shortly after sowing, half of all pots were covered with a film of activated charcoal to evaluate foliar activity of the applied herbicides. In another dose-response pot experiment, sensitivity of five local P. dichotomiflorum populations to HPPD-inhibitors and nicosulfuron was investigated. Finally, the influence of leaf stage at time of herbicide application on efficacy of topramezone and nicosulfuron for Panicum control was evaluated. Large interspecific differences in sensitivity to HPPD-inhibiting herbicides were observed. Panicum schinzii was sensitive (i.e., required a dose lower than the maximum authorized field dose to achieve 90% reduction in biomass) to tembotrione but moderately sensitive (i.e. required maximum field dose) to topramezone and poorly sensitive (i.e. required three-fold higher dose than maximum field dose) to mesotrione and sulcotrione. However, P. dichotomiflorum, a species that morphologically closely resembles P. schinzii, was sensitive to mesotrione and topramezone but moderately sensitive to tembotrione. All Panicum

  8. Resistance to PPO‐inhibiting herbicide in Palmer amaranth from Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Reiofeli A; Tranel, Patrick J; Singh, Shilpa; Glasgow, Les; Scott, Robert C; Nichols, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND The widespread occurrence of ALS inhibitor‐ and glyphosate‐resistant Amaranthus palmeri has led to increasing use of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO)‐inhibiting herbicides in cotton and soybean. Studies were conducted to confirm resistance to fomesafen (a PPO inhibitor), determine the resistance frequency, examine the resistance profile to other foliar‐applied herbicides and investigate the resistance mechanism of resistant plants in a population collected in 2011 (AR11‐LAW B) and its progenies from two cycles of fomesafen selection (C1 and C2). RESULTS The frequency of fomesafen‐resistant plants increased from 5% in the original AR11‐LAW‐B to 17% in the C2 population. The amounts of fomesafen that caused 50% growth reduction were 6‐, 13‐ and 21‐fold greater in AR11‐LAW‐B, C1 and C2 populations, respectively, than in the sensitive ecotype. The AR11‐LAW‐B population was sensitive to atrazine, dicamba, glufosinate, glyphosate and mesotrione but resistant to ALS‐inhibiting herbicides pyrithiobac and trifloxysulfuron. Fomesafen survivors from C1 and C2 populations tested positive for the PPO glycine 210 deletion previously reported in waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus). CONCLUSION These studies confirmed that Palmer amaranth in Arkansas has evolved resistance to foliar‐applied PPO‐inhibiting herbicide. © 2016 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26817647

  9. RESISTANCE TO ALS-INHIBITING HERBICIDES IN WEED POPULATIONS FROM BELGIAN WHEAT FIELDS.

    PubMed

    S, Claerhout; B, De Cauwer

    2015-01-01

    In modern agriculture, most farmers rely on herbicides for weed control. The intensive use of herbicides in crops has led to the development of herbicide resistance in numerous weeds worldwide. In Belgium, farmers have encountered problems with controlling populations of Alopecurus myosuroides, Matricaria recutita, Stellaria media and Popover rhoeas in some wheat fields with the conventionally used acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides. Dose response assays were conducted in the greenhouse to test the sensitivity of these populations to the key ALS-inhibiting herbicides mesosulfuron-methyl + iodosulfuron-methyl for A. myosuroides and metsulfuron-methyl and florasulam for M. recutita, S. media and P. rhoeas. The ED₉₀- and ED₅₀-values (effective dose for resp. 90% and 50% biomass reduction) were compared with those of sensitive reference populations and the resistance index (RI) was calculated. High levels of resistance were detected forA. myosuroides (RI: 24.3) after treatment with mesosulfuron-methyl and for M. recutita (RI: 36.4 to 49.5), S. media (RI > 20) and P. rhoeas (RI: 23.6) after treatment with metsulfuron-methyl. However, the metsulfuron-methyl resistant populations of M. recutita and S. media were sufficiently controlled with florasulam at the maximum authorised field dose. This was not the case for P. rhoeas. The metsulfuron-methyl resistant P. rhoeas population were also high-level resistant against florasulam (RI: 29.5). Integrated weed management practices (crop rotation, herbicide mixing, ...) should be applied to reduce the selection pressure for resistant weeds. PMID:27145589

  10. RESISTANCE TO ALS-INHIBITING HERBICIDES IN WEED POPULATIONS FROM BELGIAN WHEAT FIELDS.

    PubMed

    S, Claerhout; B, De Cauwer

    2015-01-01

    In modern agriculture, most farmers rely on herbicides for weed control. The intensive use of herbicides in crops has led to the development of herbicide resistance in numerous weeds worldwide. In Belgium, farmers have encountered problems with controlling populations of Alopecurus myosuroides, Matricaria recutita, Stellaria media and Popover rhoeas in some wheat fields with the conventionally used acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides. Dose response assays were conducted in the greenhouse to test the sensitivity of these populations to the key ALS-inhibiting herbicides mesosulfuron-methyl + iodosulfuron-methyl for A. myosuroides and metsulfuron-methyl and florasulam for M. recutita, S. media and P. rhoeas. The ED₉₀- and ED₅₀-values (effective dose for resp. 90% and 50% biomass reduction) were compared with those of sensitive reference populations and the resistance index (RI) was calculated. High levels of resistance were detected forA. myosuroides (RI: 24.3) after treatment with mesosulfuron-methyl and for M. recutita (RI: 36.4 to 49.5), S. media (RI > 20) and P. rhoeas (RI: 23.6) after treatment with metsulfuron-methyl. However, the metsulfuron-methyl resistant populations of M. recutita and S. media were sufficiently controlled with florasulam at the maximum authorised field dose. This was not the case for P. rhoeas. The metsulfuron-methyl resistant P. rhoeas population were also high-level resistant against florasulam (RI: 29.5). Integrated weed management practices (crop rotation, herbicide mixing, ...) should be applied to reduce the selection pressure for resistant weeds.

  11. Comparison of toxicity to terrestrial plants with algal growth inhibition by herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Frank, M.L.

    1984-10-01

    The toxicities of 21 different herbicides to algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris) and to terrestrial plants (radishes, barley, and bush beans or soybeans) were compared to order to determine the feasibility of using a short-term (96-h) algal growth inhibition test for identifying chemicals having potential toxicity in a 4-week terrestrial plant bioassay. The toxicity of each test chemical, usually in combination with a commercial formulation, was evaluated at six nominal concentrations, between 0 and 100 mg/L growth medium in the algal bioassay or between 0 and 100 mg/kg substate in the terrestrial plant bioassay, in terms of both (1) the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC), i.e., the highest concentration tested at which no significant (P < 0.05, one-sided test) reduction in algal growth rate or in terrestrial plant yield, relative to controls, was observed; and (2) the concentration at which algal growth rate or terrestrial plant yield was reduced by 50% or more relative to controls. There was generally poor agreement between results from the two types of bioassays; results from algal growth inhibition tests were not significantly correlated with results from the terrestrial plant bioassays. Overall, there was an approximately 50% chance of an algal bioassay, using Selenastrum capricornutum, successfully screening (detecting) herbicide levels that reduced terrestrial plant yield. The results indicated that algal growth inhibition tests cannot be used generically to predict phytotoxicity of herbicides to terrestrial plant species. 7 references, 14 tables.

  12. Two roles of thylakoid lipids in modifying the activity of herbicides which inhibit photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Kupatt, C.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Thylakoid lipids may modify the activity of herbicides which inhibit electron transport at the Q/sub B/ protein of photosystem II in two ways: (1) lipids can act as a hydrophobic barrier to a binding site localized close to the loculus of the membrane, and (2) changes in lipid composition can reduce the ability of inhibitors to block electron transport, possibly due to a change in the conformation of the Q/sub B/ protein. The herbicide binding site was localized close to the locular side of the thylakoid membrane by determining the activity of a number of substituted phenylurea and s-triazine herbicides in inverted and non-inverted thylakoids. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis showed that inversion of thylakoids reduced the requirement of molecular lipophilicity deemed necessary for phenylurea activity in non-inverted membranes, whereas s-triazines exhibited no differences in the lipophilicity requirement in thylakoid membranes of either orientation. The binding affinity of /sup 14/C-diuron was reduced in bicarbonate-depleted thylakoids relative to reconstituted or control membranes, as is the case with atrazine binding. These observations support a model of the herbicide binding site containing both common and herbicide family specific binding domains. Thylakoids isolated either from detached lambs quarters (Chenopodium album L.) leaves, treated with SAN 6706, or from soybean (Glycine max L.), with norflurazon or pyrazon applied preemergence, exhibited decreased susceptibility to atrazine. The ability of lipid-modifying treatments to decrease the atrazine susceptibility of field-grown soybeans was also investigated.

  13. Organochlorine insecticide, herbicide and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) inhibition of NaK-ATPase in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Paul W.; Friedhoff, Jacqueline M.; Wedemeyer, Gary A.

    1972-01-01

    The current widespread presence of chlorinated insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) and herbicides in world waterways has elicited much interest in the mechanisms of their toxicity in fishes. Inhibition of Na+,K+-activated adenosinetriphosphatase (NaK-ATPase) and Mg++-dependent ATPase (Mg-ATPase) by DDT, endosulfan and dicofol has been demonstrated in gill, brain and kidney microsomes of rainbow trout (1,2). Intestinal and gill ATPases in marine teleosts were recently reported to be sensitive to organochlorines (3). CutkonTp et al (4) noted inhibition of NaK-ATPase and Mg-ATPase in bluegill brain, liver, muscle and kidney by DDT and related chlorinated hydrocarbons. Inhibition of ATPases by PCB's has been recently shown in bluegill kidney, brain and liver (5). In the present study, we have further examined the NaK-ATPase enzyme system in trout gill as a site for the possible toxicity of selected organopolychlors, i.e., chlorinated insecticides, herbicides and PCB's.

  14. Inhibition of cytokine production by the herbicide atrazine. Search for nuclear receptor targets.

    PubMed

    Devos, Sabrina; De Bosscher, Karolien; Staels, Bart; Bauer, Ellinor; Roels, Frank; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Haegeman, Guy; Hooghe, Robert; Hooghe-Peters, Elisabeth L

    2003-01-15

    The hematological toxicity of the commonly used triazine herbicides is a cause for concern. In a search for molecular targets of these compounds, as their effects paralleled those seen with dexamethasone (DEX), we first looked for interaction with the glucocorticoid receptor. In contrast to the effects on proliferation and cytokine production of DEX, those induced by atrazine were not prevented by the glucocorticoid antagonist RU486. Also, whereas DEX was able to inhibit the promoter activity of genes regulated by NF-kappaB, atrazine failed to do so. We next looked for interaction with members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family. No peroxisome proliferation was observed in the liver or kidneys of mice treated with atrazine. Moreover, no PPAR-mediated induction of promoter activity was seen on targets of PPARalpha, PPARgamma, or PPARdelta. Similarly, neither atrazine nor simazine were able to stimulate RORalpha-mediated promoter activity. Finally, no binding of atrazine to the AR was observed. In conclusion, the effects of atrazine-type herbicides most probably do not result from interaction with the above-mentioned nuclear receptors.

  15. Photosystem II-inhibitors play a limited role in sweet corn response to 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase-inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postemergence (POST) application of 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) inhibitors in combination with a photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor, such as atrazine, is common practice in sweet corn production. Given the sensitivity of sweet corn to HPPD-inhibiting herbicides, the objective of this wo...

  16. Bleaching herbicide norflurazon inhibits phytoene desaturase by competition with the cofactors.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, J; Zhu, C; Sandmann, G

    2001-11-01

    Cofactor requirement was determined for the heterologous expressed phytoene desaturases from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus and the higher plant Gentiana lutea. The cyanobacterial enzyme is dependent on either NAD(P) or plastoquinone, whereas only quinones such as plastoquinone can function as a cofactor for the phytoene desaturase from G. lutea. Enzyme kinetic studies were carried out to determine a possible competition between the cofactors and the bleaching herbicide norflurazon. For the Synechococcus enzyme, competition between norflurazon and NADP, as well as plastoquinone, could be demonstrated. The K(m) values for these cofactors were 6.6 mM and 0.23 microM, respectively. Inhibition of the phytoene desaturase from G. lutea by norflurazon was also competitive with respect to plastoquinone. The K(m) values of both enzymes for plastoquinone were very close.

  17. Chemical inhibition of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase as a strategy to increase polyhydroxybutyrate yields in transgenic sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Petrasovits, Lars A; McQualter, Richard B; Gebbie, Leigh K; Blackman, Deborah M; Nielsen, Lars K; Brumbley, Stevens M

    2013-12-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a naturally occurring bacterial polymer that can be used as a biodegradable replacement for some petrochemical-derived plastics. Polyhydroxybutyrate is produced commercially by fermentation, but to reduce production costs, efforts are underway to produce it in engineered plants, including sugarcane. However, PHB levels in this high-biomass crop are not yet commercially viable. Chemical ripening with herbicides is a strategy used to enhance sucrose production in sugarcane and was investigated here as a tool to increase PHB production. Class A herbicides inhibit ACCase activity and thus reduce fatty acid biosynthesis, with which PHB production competes directly for substrate. Treatment of PHB-producing transgenic sugarcane plants with 100 μM of the class A herbicide fluazifop resulted in a fourfold increase in PHB content in the leaves, which peaked ten days post-treatment. The minimum effective concentration of herbicide required to maximize PHB production was 30 μM for fluazifop and 70 μM for butroxydim when applied to saturation. Application of a range of class A herbicides from the DIM and FOP groups consistently resulted in increased PHB yields, particularly in immature leaf tissue. Butroxydim or fluazifop treatment of mature transgenic sugarcane grown under glasshouse conditions increased the total leaf biomass yield of PHB by 50%-60%. Application of an ACCase inhibitor in the form of a class A herbicide to mature sugarcane plants prior to harvest is a promising strategy for improving overall PHB yield. Further testing is required on field-grown transgenic sugarcane to more precisely determine the effectiveness of this strategy.

  18. Evolution of herbicide resistance mechanisms in grass weeds.

    PubMed

    Matzrafi, Maor; Gadri, Yaron; Frenkel, Eyal; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2014-12-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are becoming increasingly common, threatening global food security. Here, we present BrIFAR: a new model system for the functional study of mechanisms of herbicide resistance in grass weeds. We have developed a large collection of Brachypodium accessions, the BrI collection, representing a wide range of habitats. Wide screening of the responses of the accessions to four major herbicide groups (PSII, ACCase, ALS/AHAS and EPSPS inhibitors) identified 28 herbicide-resistance candidate accessions. Target-site resistance to PSII inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a known history of herbicide applications. An amino acid substitution in the psbA gene (serine264 to glycine) conferred resistance and also significantly affected the flowering and shoot dry weight of the resistant accession, as compared to the sensitive accession. Non-target site resistance to ACCase inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a history of herbicide application and from a nature reserve. In-vitro enzyme activity tests and responses following pre-treatment with malathion (a cytochrome-P450 inhibitor) indicated sensitivity at the enzyme level, and give strong support to diclofop-methyl and pinoxaden enhanced detoxification as NTS resistance mechanism. BrIFAR can promote better understanding of the evolution of mechanisms of herbicide resistance and aid the implementation of integrative management approaches for sustainable agriculture.

  19. Evolution of herbicide resistance mechanisms in grass weeds.

    PubMed

    Matzrafi, Maor; Gadri, Yaron; Frenkel, Eyal; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2014-12-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are becoming increasingly common, threatening global food security. Here, we present BrIFAR: a new model system for the functional study of mechanisms of herbicide resistance in grass weeds. We have developed a large collection of Brachypodium accessions, the BrI collection, representing a wide range of habitats. Wide screening of the responses of the accessions to four major herbicide groups (PSII, ACCase, ALS/AHAS and EPSPS inhibitors) identified 28 herbicide-resistance candidate accessions. Target-site resistance to PSII inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a known history of herbicide applications. An amino acid substitution in the psbA gene (serine264 to glycine) conferred resistance and also significantly affected the flowering and shoot dry weight of the resistant accession, as compared to the sensitive accession. Non-target site resistance to ACCase inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a history of herbicide application and from a nature reserve. In-vitro enzyme activity tests and responses following pre-treatment with malathion (a cytochrome-P450 inhibitor) indicated sensitivity at the enzyme level, and give strong support to diclofop-methyl and pinoxaden enhanced detoxification as NTS resistance mechanism. BrIFAR can promote better understanding of the evolution of mechanisms of herbicide resistance and aid the implementation of integrative management approaches for sustainable agriculture. PMID:25443832

  20. Multiple-herbicide resistance in Echinochloa crus-galli var. formosensis, an allohexaploid weed species, in dry-seeded rice.

    PubMed

    Iwakami, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Masato; Matsushima, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Hamamura, Kenshiro; Uchino, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Biotypes of Echinochloa crus-galli var. formosensis with resistance to cyhalofop-butyl, an acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitor, have been found in dry-seeded rice fields in Okayama, Japan. We collected two lines with suspected resistance (Ecf27 and Ecf108) from dry-seeded rice fields and investigated their sensitivity to cyhalofop-butyl and other herbicides. Both lines exhibited approximately 7-fold higher resistance to cyhalofop-butyl than a susceptible line. Ecf108 was susceptible to penoxsulam, an acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor. On the other hand, Ecf27 showed resistance to penoxsulam and two other ALS inhibitors: propyrisulfuron and pyriminobac-methyl. The alternative herbicides butachlor, thiobencarb, and bispyribac-sodium effectively controlled both lines. To examine the molecular mechanisms of resistance, we amplified and sequenced the target-site encoding genes in Ecf27, Ecf108, and susceptible lines. Partial sequences of six ACCase genes and full-length sequences of three ALS genes were examined. One of the ACCase gene sequences encodes a truncated aberrant protein due to a frameshift mutation in both lines. Comparisons of the genes among Ecf27, Ecf108, and the susceptible lines revealed that none of the ACCases and ALSs in Ecf27 and Ecf108 have amino acid substitutions that are known to confer herbicide resistance, although a single amino acid substitution was found in each of three ACCases in Ecf108. Our study reveals the existence of a multiple-herbicide resistant biotype of E. crus-galli var. formosensis at Okayama, Japan that shows resistance to cyhalofop-butyl and several ALS inhibitors. We also found a biotype that is resistant only to cyhalofop-butyl among the tested herbicides. The resistance mechanisms are likely to be non-target-site based, at least in the multiple-herbicide resistant biotype.

  1. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  2. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  3. Discovery of (2-benzoylethen-1-ol)-containing 1,2-benzothiazine derivatives as novel 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) inhibiting-based herbicide lead compounds.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kang; Hua, Xue-Wen; Tao, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Yang; Liu, Na; Ma, Yi; Li, Yong-Hong; Xu, Xiao-Hua; Kong, Chui-Hua

    2016-01-15

    A series of (2-benzoylethen-1-ol)-containing benzothiazine derivatives was synthesized, and their herbicidal activities were first evaluated. The bioassay results indicated that some of 3-benzoyl-4-hydroxy-2-methyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-1,1-dioxide derivatives displayed good herbicidal activity in greenhouse testing, especially, compound 4w had good pre-emergent herbicidal activities against Brassica campestris, Amaranthus retroflexus and Echinochloa crusgalli even at a dosage of 187.5 g ha(-1). More importantly, compound 4w displayed significant inhibitory activity against Arabidopsis thaliana HPPD and was identified as the most potent candidate with IC50 value of 0.48 μM, which is better than the commercial herbicide sulctrione (IC50=0.53 μM) and comparable with the commercial herbicide mesotrione (IC50=0.25 μM). The structure-activity relationships was studied and provided some useful information for improving herbicidal activity. The present work indicated that (2-benzoylethen-1-ol)-containing 1,2-benzothiazine motif could be a potential lead structure for further development of novel HPPD inhibiting-based herbicides. PMID:26682702

  4. Structural basis of cyanobacterial photosystem II Inhibition by the herbicide terbutryn.

    PubMed

    Broser, Matthias; Glöckner, Carina; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Buchta, Joachim; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Dau, Holger; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2011-05-01

    Herbicides that target photosystem II (PSII) compete with the native electron acceptor plastoquinone for binding at the Q(B) site in the D1 subunit and thus block the electron transfer from Q(A) to Q(B). Here, we present the first crystal structure of PSII with a bound herbicide at a resolution of 3.2 Å. The crystallized PSII core complexes were isolated from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The used herbicide terbutryn is found to bind via at least two hydrogen bonds to the Q(B) site similar to photosynthetic reaction centers in anoxygenic purple bacteria. Herbicide binding to PSII is also discussed regarding the influence on the redox potential of Q(A), which is known to affect photoinhibition. We further identified a second and novel chloride position close to the water-oxidizing complex and in the vicinity of the chloride ion reported earlier (Guskov, A., Kern, J., Gabdulkhakov, A., Broser, M., Zouni, A., and Saenger, W. (2009) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 334-342). This discovery is discussed in the context of proton transfer to the lumen.

  5. Structural Basis of Cyanobacterial Photosystem II Inhibition by the Herbicide Terbutryn*

    PubMed Central

    Broser, Matthias; Glöckner, Carina; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Buchta, Joachim; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Dau, Holger; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2011-01-01

    Herbicides that target photosystem II (PSII) compete with the native electron acceptor plastoquinone for binding at the QB site in the D1 subunit and thus block the electron transfer from QA to QB. Here, we present the first crystal structure of PSII with a bound herbicide at a resolution of 3.2 Å. The crystallized PSII core complexes were isolated from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The used herbicide terbutryn is found to bind via at least two hydrogen bonds to the QB site similar to photosynthetic reaction centers in anoxygenic purple bacteria. Herbicide binding to PSII is also discussed regarding the influence on the redox potential of QA, which is known to affect photoinhibition. We further identified a second and novel chloride position close to the water-oxidizing complex and in the vicinity of the chloride ion reported earlier (Guskov, A., Kern, J., Gabdulkhakov, A., Broser, M., Zouni, A., and Saenger, W. (2009) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 334–342). This discovery is discussed in the context of proton transfer to the lumen. PMID:21367867

  6. Competitive Inhibition of High-Affinity Oryzalin Binding to Plant Tubulin by the Phosphoric Amide Herbicide Amiprophos-Methyl.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, J. V.; Kim, H. H.; Hanesworth, V. R.; Hugdahl, J. D.; Morejohn, L. C.

    1994-01-01

    Amiprophos-methyl (APM), a phosphoric amide herbicide, was previously reported to inhibit the in vitro polymerization of isolated plant tubulin (L.C. Morejohn, D.E. Fosket [1984] Science 224: 874-876), yet little other biochemical information exists concerning this compound. To characterize further the mechanism of action of APM, its interactions with tubulin and microtubules purified from cultured cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright Yellow-2) were investigated. Low micromolar concentrations of APM depolymerized preformed, taxol-stabilized tobacco microtubules. Remarkably, at the lowest APM concentration examined, many short microtubules were redistributed into fewer but 2.7-fold longer microtubules without a substantial decrease in total polymer mass, a result consistent with an end-to-end annealing of microtubules with enhanced kinetic properties. Quasi-equilibrium binding measurements showed that tobacco tubulin binds [14C]oryzalin with high affinity to produce a tubulin-oryzalin complex having a dissociation constant (Kd) = 117 nM (pH 6.9; 23[deg]C). Also, an estimated maximum molar binding stoichiometry of 0.32 indicates pharamacological heterogeneity of tobacco dimers and may be related to structural heterogeneity of tobacco tubulin subunits. APM inhibits competitively the binding of [14C]oryzalin to tubulin with an inhibition constant (Ki) = 5 [mu]M, indicating the formation of a moderate affinity tubulin-APM complex that may interact with the ends of microtubules. APM concentrations inhibiting tobacco cell growth were within the threshold range of APM concentrations that depolymerized cellular microtubules, indicating that growth inhibition is caused by microtubules depolymerization. APM had no apparent effect on microtubules in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. Because cellular microtubules were depolymerized at APM and oryzalin concentrations below their respective Ki and Kd values, both herbicides are proposed to depolymerize microtubules by a

  7. 2,4-D resistance in wild radish: reduced herbicide translocation via inhibition of cellular transport

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Cawthray, Gregory R.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to auxinic herbicides is increasing in a range of dicotyledonous weed species, but in most cases the biochemical mechanism of resistance is unknown. Using 14C-labelled herbicide, the mechanism of resistance to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in two wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) populations was identified as an inability to translocate 2,4-D out of the treated leaf. Although 2,4-D was metabolized in wild radish, and in a different manner to the well-characterized crop species wheat and bean, there was no difference in metabolism between the susceptible and resistant populations. Reduced translocation of 2,4-D in the latter was also not due to sequestration of the herbicide, or to reduced uptake by the leaf epidermis or mesophyll cells. Application of auxin efflux or ABCB transporter inhibitors to 2,4-D-susceptible plants caused a mimicking of the reduced-translocation resistance phenotype, suggesting that 2,4-D resistance in the populations under investigation could be due to an alteration in the activity of a plasma membrane ABCB-type auxin transporter responsible for facilitating long-distance transport of 2,4-D. PMID:26994475

  8. A novel amperometric biosensor for ß-triketone herbicides based on hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibition: A case study for sulcotrione.

    PubMed

    Rocaboy-Faquet, Emilie; Barthelmebs, Lise; Calas-Blanchard, Carole; Noguer, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    An amperometric biosensor was designed for the determination of sulcotrione, a β-triketone herbicide, based on inhibition of hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), an enzyme allowing the oxidation of hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) in homogentisic acid (HGA). HPPD was produced by cloning the hppd gene from Arabidopsis thaliana in E. coli, followed by overexpression and purification by nickel-histidine affinity. The electrochemical detection of HPPD activity was based on the electrochemical oxidation of HGA at +0.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl, using a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate-modified screen-printed electrode. Assays were performed at 25°C in 0.1 M phosphate buffer pH 8 containing 0.1M KCl. The purified HPPD was shown to display a maximum velocity of 0.51 µM(HGA) min(-1), and an apparent K(M) of 22.6 µM for HPP. HPPD inhibition assays in presence of sulcotrione confirmed a competitive inhibition of HPPD, the calculated inhibition constant K(I) was 1.11.10(-8) M. The dynamic range for sulcotrione extended from 5.10(-10) M to 5.10(-6) M and the limit of detection (LOD), estimated as the concentration inducing 20% of inhibition, was 1.4.10(-10) M.

  9. The novel herbicide oxaziclomefone inhibits cell expansion in maize cell cultures without affecting turgor pressure or wall acidification.

    PubMed

    O'Looney, Nichola; Fry, Stephen C

    2005-11-01

    Oxaziclomefone [OAC; IUPAC name 3-(1-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-1-methylethyl)-3,4-dihydro-6-methyl-5-phenyl-2H-1,3-oxazin-4-one] is a new herbicide that inhibits cell expansion in grass roots. Its effects on cell cultures and mode of action were unknown. In principle, cell expansion could be inhibited by a decrease in either turgor pressure or wall extensibility. Cell expansion was estimated as settled cell volume; cell division was estimated by cell counting. Membrane permeability to water was measured by a novel method involving simultaneous assay of the efflux of (3)H(2)O and [(14)C]mannitol from a 'bed' of cultured cells. Osmotic potential was measured by depression of freezing point. OAC inhibited cell expansion in cultures of maize (Zea mays), spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and rose (Rosa sp.), with an ID(50) of 5, 30 and 250 nm, respectively. In maize cultures, OAC did not affect cell division for the first 40 h. It did not affect the osmotic potential of cell sap or culture medium, nor did it impede water transport across cell membranes. It did not affect cells' ability to acidify the apoplast (medium), which may be necessary for 'acid growth'. As OAC did not diminish turgor pressure, its ability to inhibit cell expansion must depend on changes in wall extensibility. It could be a valuable tool for studies on cell expansion.

  10. Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds.

    PubMed

    Heap, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species × site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avena spp., Lolium spp., Phalaris spp., Setaria spp. and Alopecurus myosuroides, infesting more than 25 million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyza canadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus tuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30 years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide.

  11. Various effects of the photosystem II--inhibiting herbicides on 5-n-alkylresorcinol accumulation in rye seedlings.

    PubMed

    Magnucka, Elżbieta G; Pietr, Stanisław J; Kozubek, Arkadiusz; Zarnowski, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The effect of three PSII-inhibiting herbicides, lenacil, linuron, and pyrazon, on the accumulation of 5-n-alkylresorcinols in rye seedlings (Secale cereale L.) grown under various light and thermal conditions was studied. All used chemicals increased resorcinolic lipid content in both green and etiolated plants grown at 29 °C. At 22 °C pyrazon and lenacil decreased the content of alkylresorcinols in plants kept in the darkness and increased their amount in the light-grown seedlings. In turn, level of resorcinolic lipids was decreased by linuron in both etiolated and green plants. At the lowest tested temperature lenacil enhanced production of alkylresorcinols only in etiolated rye seedlings, whereas the light-independent stimulatory action of pyrazon on alkylresorcinol accumulation in rye grown at 15 °C was observed. Additionally, only the latter did not exert a negative effect on rye seedling growth under any of tested conditions. Compared with respective controls, the herbicides used also markedly modified the qualitative pattern of resorcinolic homologs. Interestingly, the observed changes generally favored the enhanced antifungal activity of these compounds. Our study provides novel information on the influence of PSII inhibitors on alkylresorcinol metabolism in rye seedlings. The unquestionable achievement of this work is the observation that low dose of pyrazon mainly stimulated both growth and alkylresorcinol synthesis in rye seedlings, a non-target plant. Moreover, our experimental work showed unambiguously that the observed pyrazon-driven accumulation and homolog pattern modification of alkylresorcinols dramatically improved the resistance of winter rye to infections caused by Rhizoctonia cerealis.

  12. RNA-Seq analysis of rye-grass transcriptomic response to an herbicide inhibiting acetolactate-synthase identifies transcripts linked to non-target-site-based resistance.

    PubMed

    Duhoux, Arnaud; Carrère, Sébastien; Gouzy, Jérôme; Bonin, Ludovic; Délye, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides that disrupts agricultural weed control is a worldwide concern for food security. NTSR is considered a polygenic adaptive trait driven by differential gene regulation in resistant plants. Little is known about its genetic determinism, which precludes NTSR diagnosis and evolutionary studies. We used Illumina RNA-sequencing to investigate transcriptomic differences between plants from the global major weed rye-grass sensitive or resistant to the acetolactate-synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicide pyroxsulam. Plants were collected before and along a time-course after herbicide application. De novo transcriptome assembly yielded a resource (LOLbase) including 92,381 contigs representing potentially active transcripts that were assigned putative annotations. Early effects of ALS inhibition consistent with the literature were observed in resistant and sensitive plants, proving LOLbase data were relevant to study herbicide response. Comparison of resistant and sensitive plants identified 30 candidate NTSR contigs. Further validation using 212 plants resistant or sensitive to pyroxsulam and/or to the ALS inhibitors iodosulfuron + mesosulfuron confirmed four contigs (two cytochromes P450, one glycosyl-transferase and one glutathione-S-transferase) were NTSR markers which combined expression levels could reliably identify resistant plants. This work confirmed that NTSR is driven by differential gene expression and involves different mechanisms. It provided tools and foundation for subsequent NTSR investigations. PMID:25636204

  13. RNA-Seq analysis of rye-grass transcriptomic response to an herbicide inhibiting acetolactate-synthase identifies transcripts linked to non-target-site-based resistance.

    PubMed

    Duhoux, Arnaud; Carrère, Sébastien; Gouzy, Jérôme; Bonin, Ludovic; Délye, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides that disrupts agricultural weed control is a worldwide concern for food security. NTSR is considered a polygenic adaptive trait driven by differential gene regulation in resistant plants. Little is known about its genetic determinism, which precludes NTSR diagnosis and evolutionary studies. We used Illumina RNA-sequencing to investigate transcriptomic differences between plants from the global major weed rye-grass sensitive or resistant to the acetolactate-synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicide pyroxsulam. Plants were collected before and along a time-course after herbicide application. De novo transcriptome assembly yielded a resource (LOLbase) including 92,381 contigs representing potentially active transcripts that were assigned putative annotations. Early effects of ALS inhibition consistent with the literature were observed in resistant and sensitive plants, proving LOLbase data were relevant to study herbicide response. Comparison of resistant and sensitive plants identified 30 candidate NTSR contigs. Further validation using 212 plants resistant or sensitive to pyroxsulam and/or to the ALS inhibitors iodosulfuron + mesosulfuron confirmed four contigs (two cytochromes P450, one glycosyl-transferase and one glutathione-S-transferase) were NTSR markers which combined expression levels could reliably identify resistant plants. This work confirmed that NTSR is driven by differential gene expression and involves different mechanisms. It provided tools and foundation for subsequent NTSR investigations.

  14. Specific and differential inhibition of very-long-chain fatty acid elongases from Arabidopsis thaliana by different herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Trenkamp, Sandra; Martin, William; Tietjen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In higher plants, very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are the main constituents of hydrophobic polymers that prevent dessication at the leaf surface and provide stability to pollen grains. Of the 21 genes encoding VLCFA elongases (VLCFAEs) from Arabidopsis thaliana, 17 were expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Six VLCFAEs, including three known elongases (FAE1, KCS1, and KCS2) and three previously uncharacterized gene products (encoded by At5g43760, At1g04220, and At1g25450) were found to be enzymatically active with endogenous yeast fatty acid substrates and to some extent with externally supplied unsaturated substrates. The spectrum of VLCFAs accumulated in expressing yeast strains was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Marked specificity was found among elongases tested with respect to their elongation products, which encompassed saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids 20–30 carbon atoms in length. The active VLCFAEs revealed highly distinct patterns of differential sensitivity to oxyacetamides, chloroacetanilides, and other compounds tested, whereas yeast endogenous VLCFA production, which involves its unrelated elongase (ELO) in sphingolipid synthesis, was unaffected. Several compounds inhibited more than one VLCFAE, and some inhibited all six active enzymes. These findings pinpoint VLCFAEs as the target of the widely used K3 class herbicides, which have been in commercial use for 50 years, provide important clues as to why spontaneous resistance to this class is rare, and point to complex patterns of substrate specificity and product spectrum among members of the Arabidopsis VLCFAE family. PMID:15277688

  15. Growth inhibition and recovery of Lemna gibba after pulse exposure to sulfonylurea herbicides.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke T; Baun, Anders; Kusk, K Ole

    2013-03-01

    The exposure of non-target aquatic organisms to pesticides often happens as short-term, high exposure events (pulses) and effects of these must be addressed in the current regulation in the EU. It is, however, questionable whether the effects of pulse exposures are adequately covered by the standardized ecotoxicological tests used in environmental effect assessments, since these aim at maintaining constant exposure concentrations during the incubation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of four sulfonylurea herbicides (flupyrsulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, rimsulfuron, and thifensulfuron-methyl) on the growth of Lemna gibba over a 6-day period after 24h of pulse exposure, and compared with effects observed in standard OECD tests with continuous exposure. It was observed that concentrations around the E(y)C50-values found in OECD tests did not affect the growth in the 6 days post-exposure period. Slightly higher concentrations initially resulted in lower growth in pulse exposure tests, but the growth rate of the plants reached the level of untreated plants during the 6 days post-exposure period. The 24h pulse exposure tests gave 2-6 times higher E(y)C50-values than the OECD 7-d continuous exposure tests. The approach of this study enables experimentally based comparisons between observations of effects between the two exposure regimes. We propose that results obtained in this way be applied in effect assessments for intermittent releases. PMID:23276408

  16. Both foliar and residual applications of herbicides that inhibit amino acid biosynthesis induce alternative respiration and aerobic fermentation in pea roots.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz, O; Gil-Monreal, M; Zulet, A; Zabalza, A; Royuela, M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this work was to ascertain whether there is a general pattern of carbon allocation and utilisation in plants following herbicide supply, independent of the site of application: sprayed on leaves or supplied to nutrient solution. The herbicides studied were the amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides (ABIH): glyphosate, an inhibitor of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, and imazamox, an inhibitor of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. All treated plants showed impaired carbon metabolism; carbohydrate accumulation was detected in both leaves and roots of the treated plants. The accumulation in roots was due to lack of use of available sugars as growth was arrested, which elicited soluble carbohydrate accumulation in the leaves due to a decrease in sink strength. Under aerobic conditions, ethanol fermentative metabolism was enhanced in roots of the treated plants. This fermentative response was not related to a change in total respiration rates or cytochrome respiratory capacity, but an increase in alternative oxidase capacity was detected. Pyruvate accumulation was detected after most of the herbicide treatments. These results demonstrate that both ABIH induce the less-efficient, ATP-producing pathways, namely fermentation and alternative respiration, by increasing the key metabolite, pyruvate. The plant response was similar not only for the two ABIH but also after foliar or residual application.

  17. Herbicide clomazone does not inhibit in vitro geranylgeranyl synthesis from mevalonate.

    PubMed

    Weimer, M R; Balke, N E; Buhler, D D

    1992-02-01

    Clomazone reduced the chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik.), and soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) seedlings. The order of species sensitivity was velvetleaf > spinach > barley > soybean. Clomazone (100 micromolar) did not affect the in vitro activities of spinach isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase or prenyl transferase. Clomazone also did not affect the synthesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate from mevalonic acid. Thus, clomazone had no direct in vitro effect on the synthesis of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate from mevalonic acid. Greening seedlings of both soybean and velvetleaf metabolized clomazone. No qualitative differences in the metabolites were detected between soybean and velvetleaf. Thus, differential metabolism of clomazone to a toxic chemical that inhibits terpenoid synthesis is unlikely. Clomazone has either a mode of action not yet identified or a metabolite that is selective in that it is much more active in sensitive than tolerant species.

  18. Herbicide Clomazone Does Not Inhibit In Vitro Geranylgeranyl Synthesis from Mevalonate 1

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Monte R.; Balke, Nelson E.; Buhler, Douglas D.

    1992-01-01

    Clomazone reduced the chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik.), and soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) seedlings. The order of species sensitivity was velvetleaf > spinach > barley > soybean. Clomazone (100 micromolar) did not affect the in vitro activities of spinach isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase or prenyl transferase. Clomazone also did not affect the synthesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate from mevalonic acid. Thus, clomazone had no direct in vitro effect on the synthesis of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate from mevalonic acid. Greening seedlings of both soybean and velvetleaf metabolized clomazone. No qualitative differences in the metabolites were detected between soybean and velvetleaf. Thus, differential metabolism of clomazone to a toxic chemical that inhibits terpenoid synthesis is unlikely. Clomazone has either a mode of action not yet identified or a metabolite that is selective in that it is much more active in sensitive than tolerant species. PMID:16668657

  19. Overview of herbicide mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Duke, S O

    1990-01-01

    Commercial herbicides exhibit many different mechanisms of action. Several enzymes involved in biosynthesis of amino acids are sites of action for herbicides. A large number of different herbicide classes inhibit photosynthesis by binding to the quinone-binding protein, D-1, to prevent photosynthetic electron transfer. Several different types of herbicides apparently cause accumulation of photodynamic porphyrins by inhibiting protoporphyrinogen oxidase. Bipyridyliums and heteropentalenes cause the production of superoxide radicals by energy diversion from photosystem I of photosynthesis. Lipid synthesis is the site of action of a broad array of herbicides used in controlling monocot weeds. Herbicides of several classes apparently act by inhibiting mitosis through direct interaction with tubulin. Several other molecular sites of herbicide action are known. Despite a growing body of knowledge, the exact molecular sites of action of many herbicides are unknown. Some herbicides are known to have more than one site of action. Virtually all knowledge of herbicide structure-activity relationships is semiempirical. In addition to site of action structure-activity relationships, herbicide structure and chemical properties also strongly influence absorption, translocation, bioactivation, and environmental stability. Considering how little is known about all the potential sites of herbicide action, it is unlikely that during the next decade more than a relatively small number of site-specific herbicide structure-activity relationships will be developed. PMID:1980104

  20. Evolution and diversity of the mechanisms endowing resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate-synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.).

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Pernin, Fanny; Scarabel, Laura

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the diversity of mechanisms conferring resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.) and the processes underlying the selection for resistance. Six mutant ALS alleles, Arg₁₉₇, His₁₉₇, Leu₁₉₇, Ser₁₉₇, Thr₁₉₇ and Leu₅₇₄ were identified in five Italian populations. Different alleles were found in a same population or a same plant. Comparison of individual plant phenotype (herbicide sensitivity) and genotype (amino-acid substitution(s) at codon 197) showed that all mutant ALS alleles conferred dominant resistance to the field rate of the sulfonylurea tribenuron and moderate or no resistance to the field rate of the triazolopyrimidine florasulam. Depending on the allele, dominant or partially dominant resistance to the field rate of the imidazolinone imazamox was observed. Putative non-target-site resistance mechanisms were also likely present in the populations investigated. The derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence assays targeting ALS codons crucial for herbicide sensitivity developed in this work will facilitate the detection of resistance due to mutant ALS alleles. Nucleotide variation around codon 197 indicated that mutant ALS alleles evolved by multiple, independent appearances. Resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas clearly evolved by redundant evolution of a set of mutant ALS alleles and likely of non-target-site mechanisms.

  1. Evolution and diversity of the mechanisms endowing resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate-synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.).

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Pernin, Fanny; Scarabel, Laura

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the diversity of mechanisms conferring resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.) and the processes underlying the selection for resistance. Six mutant ALS alleles, Arg₁₉₇, His₁₉₇, Leu₁₉₇, Ser₁₉₇, Thr₁₉₇ and Leu₅₇₄ were identified in five Italian populations. Different alleles were found in a same population or a same plant. Comparison of individual plant phenotype (herbicide sensitivity) and genotype (amino-acid substitution(s) at codon 197) showed that all mutant ALS alleles conferred dominant resistance to the field rate of the sulfonylurea tribenuron and moderate or no resistance to the field rate of the triazolopyrimidine florasulam. Depending on the allele, dominant or partially dominant resistance to the field rate of the imidazolinone imazamox was observed. Putative non-target-site resistance mechanisms were also likely present in the populations investigated. The derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence assays targeting ALS codons crucial for herbicide sensitivity developed in this work will facilitate the detection of resistance due to mutant ALS alleles. Nucleotide variation around codon 197 indicated that mutant ALS alleles evolved by multiple, independent appearances. Resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas clearly evolved by redundant evolution of a set of mutant ALS alleles and likely of non-target-site mechanisms. PMID:21421378

  2. In vitro exposure to the herbicide atrazine inhibits T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production and significantly increases the frequency of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Thueson, Lindsay E; Emmons, Tiffany R; Browning, Dianna L; Kreitinger, Joanna M; Shepherd, David M; Wetzel, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    The herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-[ethylamino]-6-[isopropylamino]-s-triazine) is the most common water contaminant in the United States. Atrazine is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and is classified as an estrogen disrupting compound because it elevates estrogen levels via induction of the enzyme aromatase. Previous studies have shown that atrazine exposure alters the function of innate immune cells such as NK cells, DC, mast cells, and macrophages. In this study we have examined the impact of in vitro atrazine exposure on the activation, proliferation, and effector cytokine production by primary murine CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We found that atrazine exposure significantly inhibited CD4(+) T cell proliferation and accumulation as well as the expression of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the effects were more pronounced in cells from male animals. These effects were partially mimicked by pharmacological reagents that elevate intracellular cAMP levels and addition of exogenous rmIL-2 further inhibited proliferation and CD25 expression. Consistent with these findings, atrazine exposure during T cell activation resulted in a 2- to 5-fold increase in the frequency of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells.

  3. Selective inhibition of Erwinia amylovora by the herbicidally-active Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) produced by Pseudomonas bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6, and identified as 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, specifically inhibits the germination of a wide range of grassy weeds. The present study was undertaken to determine if GAF has antimicrobial activity in addition to it...

  4. Some arguments in favor of a Myriophyllum aquaticum growth inhibition test in a water-sediment system as an additional test in risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Tunić, Tanja; Knežević, Varja; Kerkez, Đurđa; Tubić, Aleksandra; Šunjka, Dragana; Lazić, Sanja; Brkić, Dragica; Teodorović, Ivana

    2015-09-01

    The present study compares the practicability, reproducibility, power, and sensitivity of a Myriophyllum aquaticum growth inhibition test in a water-sediment system with the recently accepted Myriophyllum spicatum test in an equivalent testing system and the standard Lemna sp. test. Special consideration was given to endpoints based on M. aquaticum control plant growth and variability of relative growth rate and yield: shoot length, fresh weight, dry weight, and root weight. Sensitivity analysis was based on tests performed with 3,5-dichlorophenol, atrazine, isoproturon, trifluralin, 2,4-dichlorophenoloxyacetic acid, and dicamba. Growth rates for average M. aquaticum control plants were 0.119 d(-1) and 0.112 d(-1), with average estimated doubling time 6.33 d and 6.74 d for relative growth rate fresh weight and shoot length, respectively. Intrinsic variability of M. aquaticum endpoints was low: 12.9%, 12.5%, and 17.8% for relative growth rate shoot length, relative growth rate fresh weight and yield fresh weight, respectively. The power of the test was fairly high. When the most sensitive endpoints were used for comparison, the 2 Myriophyllum species were similarly sensitive, more sensitive (in the case of auxin simulators), or at least equally sensitive as Lemna minor to other tested herbicides. The M. aquaticum 10-d test with a 7-d exposure period in a water-sediment system has acceptable sensitivity and can provide repeatable, reliable, and reproducible results; therefore, it should not be disregarded as a good and representative additional test in environmental risk assessment. PMID:25943248

  5. Some arguments in favor of a Myriophyllum aquaticum growth inhibition test in a water-sediment system as an additional test in risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Tunić, Tanja; Knežević, Varja; Kerkez, Đurđa; Tubić, Aleksandra; Šunjka, Dragana; Lazić, Sanja; Brkić, Dragica; Teodorović, Ivana

    2015-09-01

    The present study compares the practicability, reproducibility, power, and sensitivity of a Myriophyllum aquaticum growth inhibition test in a water-sediment system with the recently accepted Myriophyllum spicatum test in an equivalent testing system and the standard Lemna sp. test. Special consideration was given to endpoints based on M. aquaticum control plant growth and variability of relative growth rate and yield: shoot length, fresh weight, dry weight, and root weight. Sensitivity analysis was based on tests performed with 3,5-dichlorophenol, atrazine, isoproturon, trifluralin, 2,4-dichlorophenoloxyacetic acid, and dicamba. Growth rates for average M. aquaticum control plants were 0.119 d(-1) and 0.112 d(-1), with average estimated doubling time 6.33 d and 6.74 d for relative growth rate fresh weight and shoot length, respectively. Intrinsic variability of M. aquaticum endpoints was low: 12.9%, 12.5%, and 17.8% for relative growth rate shoot length, relative growth rate fresh weight and yield fresh weight, respectively. The power of the test was fairly high. When the most sensitive endpoints were used for comparison, the 2 Myriophyllum species were similarly sensitive, more sensitive (in the case of auxin simulators), or at least equally sensitive as Lemna minor to other tested herbicides. The M. aquaticum 10-d test with a 7-d exposure period in a water-sediment system has acceptable sensitivity and can provide repeatable, reliable, and reproducible results; therefore, it should not be disregarded as a good and representative additional test in environmental risk assessment.

  6. Treatment influence on herbicide resistance level of Belgian Alopecurus myosuroides populations (black-grass).

    PubMed

    Marechal, P Y; Henriet, F; Bodson, B

    2009-01-01

    Black-grass is a common grass weed, widely spread in Northern Europe and also in Belgium. For ages, it has been an increasing problem in industrial crops, especially winter cereals. Therefore, farmers started to spray herbicide intensively and soon cases of failure occurred for different molecules and different modes of action. Black-grass populations have been tested in greenhouses to assess the influence of an herbicide treatment as to the resistance level regarding three different herbicides: chlortoluron, fenoxaprop-P and mesosulfuron+iodosulfuron. Black-grass seeds were collected in field trials in six locations in Belgium, on individuals which have survived the herbicide treatment. Each population comes from trial plots, measuring 2 meters wide by 5 meters long and characterized by a single or a combination of products. Herbicides sprayed were isoproturon, flufenacet+diflufenican, ACCase inhibitors and ALS inhibitors. Seeds were also collected in the untreated plots. The population present in these last ones corresponds to the former population, before the herbicide selection pressure was applied. In the glasshouse assay, this population was used as the standard population to compare with other populations issued from the same field. The 'R' rating system was set up with this population to assess the evolution of resistance level, year in, year out. Rothamsted and Peldon populations were also included as cross-reference. Each field population presented different behaviours towards herbicide applied in greenhouses and some cases of resistance can be highlighted. Generally, a reduction of treatment efficiency between field and greenhouse results was clearly visible for the whole of studied active ingredients. Indeed, a distribution shift of the populations towards higher resistance classes could be observed. This is particularly remarkable for active ingredients sharing the same mode of action. For example, it has been found that populations already sprayed

  7. Treatment influence on herbicide resistance level of Belgian Alopecurus myosuroides populations (black-grass).

    PubMed

    Marechal, P Y; Henriet, F; Bodson, B

    2009-01-01

    Black-grass is a common grass weed, widely spread in Northern Europe and also in Belgium. For ages, it has been an increasing problem in industrial crops, especially winter cereals. Therefore, farmers started to spray herbicide intensively and soon cases of failure occurred for different molecules and different modes of action. Black-grass populations have been tested in greenhouses to assess the influence of an herbicide treatment as to the resistance level regarding three different herbicides: chlortoluron, fenoxaprop-P and mesosulfuron+iodosulfuron. Black-grass seeds were collected in field trials in six locations in Belgium, on individuals which have survived the herbicide treatment. Each population comes from trial plots, measuring 2 meters wide by 5 meters long and characterized by a single or a combination of products. Herbicides sprayed were isoproturon, flufenacet+diflufenican, ACCase inhibitors and ALS inhibitors. Seeds were also collected in the untreated plots. The population present in these last ones corresponds to the former population, before the herbicide selection pressure was applied. In the glasshouse assay, this population was used as the standard population to compare with other populations issued from the same field. The 'R' rating system was set up with this population to assess the evolution of resistance level, year in, year out. Rothamsted and Peldon populations were also included as cross-reference. Each field population presented different behaviours towards herbicide applied in greenhouses and some cases of resistance can be highlighted. Generally, a reduction of treatment efficiency between field and greenhouse results was clearly visible for the whole of studied active ingredients. Indeed, a distribution shift of the populations towards higher resistance classes could be observed. This is particularly remarkable for active ingredients sharing the same mode of action. For example, it has been found that populations already sprayed

  8. Quantitative Distribution and Metabolism of Auxin Herbicides in Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Peter C.; Morris, Roy O.

    1970-01-01

    The internal concentrations of four auxin herbicides— 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dicamba, picloram, and naphthaleneacetic acid—were measured in the roots of treated pea seedlings. Intact seedlings were immersed in solutions of labeled herbicides at concentrations sufficient to produce toxic symptoms (inhibition of elongation, radial enlargement, and lateral root proliferation). Measurements of volume and herbicide content of segments taken sequentially along the root showed that an acropetal concentration gradient of each herbicide was established within the root immediately following treatment. Although there was a net loss of herbicide in the following 24 hours, the gradient was maintained. Initially, the concentration of herbicide in the root tips exceeded that in the external medium. In support of the contention that toxic symptoms due to herbicide treatment are caused by the presence of unmetabolized chemical at the site of action, it was found that metabolism was negligible for all herbicides except naphthaleneacetic acid. PMID:16657529

  9. Herbicide Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lanzilotta, R. P.; Pramer, David

    1970-01-01

    Replacement cultures liberated 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) from 3,4-dichloropropionanilide (propanil). The kinetics of the conversion suggest a requirement for de novo enzyme synthesis, but the system was not influenced by chloramphenicol or puromycin. Enzyme activity was detected when acetanilide (Km = 0.195 mm) was used to replace propanil as substrate. Fungal acylamidase (E.C. 3.5.1., an aryl acylamine amidohydrolase) was concentrated by salt precipitation and characterized. The Fusarium solani acylamidase exhibited an optimum at pH 7.5 to 9.0 and was inactivated in 10 min at 50 C. The enzyme was not sensitive to methyl-carbamate or organophosphate insecticides, but the herbicide, Ramrod (N-isopropyl-2-chloroacetanilide), acted as a competitive inhibitor of acetanilide hydrolysis (Ki = 0.167 mm). Hydrolysis rates were decreased by various para substitutions of acetanilide. Chloro substitution in the acyl moiety of acetanilide also reduced the rate of hydrolysis. 3,4-Dichloroacetanilide was less susceptible to enzyme action than acetanilide, but 3,4-dichloropropionanilide was hydrolyzed much more rapidly than propionanilide. The fungal acylamidase was highly specific for N-acetylarylamines. It did not catalyze hydrolysis of formanilide, butyranilide, dicryl, Karsil, fenuron, monuron, or isopropyl-N-phenylcarbamate. It appears to differ from acylamidases that have been isolated from rice, rat liver, chick kidney, and Neurospora. PMID:5437306

  10. Assessing the additive risks of PSII herbicide exposure to the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephen E; Schaffelke, Britta; Shaw, Melanie; Bainbridge, Zoë T; Rohde, Ken W; Kennedy, Karen; Davis, Aaron M; Masters, Bronwyn L; Devlin, Michelle J; Mueller, Jochen F; Brodie, Jon E

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide residues have been measured in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon at concentrations which have the potential to harm marine plant communities. Monitoring on the Great Barrier Reef lagoon following wet season discharge show that 80% of the time when herbicides are detected, more than one are present. These herbicides have been shown to act in an additive manner with regards to photosystem-II inhibition. In this study, the area of the Great Barrier Reef considered to be at risk from herbicides is compared when exposures are considered for each herbicide individually and also for herbicide mixtures. Two normalisation indices for herbicide mixtures were calculated based on current guidelines and PSII inhibition thresholds. The results show that the area of risk for most regions is greatly increased under the proposed additive PSII inhibition threshold and that the resilience of this important ecosystem could be reduced by exposure to these herbicides.

  11. Occurrence, genetic control and evolution of non-target-site based resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in the dicot weed Papaver rhoeas.

    PubMed

    Scarabel, Laura; Pernin, Fanny; Délye, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is a major issue for the chemical control of weeds. Whilst predominant in grass weeds, NTSR remains largely uninvestigated in dicot weeds. We investigated the occurrence, inheritance and genetic control of NTSR to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Papaver rhoeas (corn poppy) using progenies from plants with potential NTSR to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox. NTSR to imazamox was inherited from parents over two successive generations. NTSR to tritosulfuron (a sulfonylurea) was observed in F1 generations and inherited in F2 generations. NTSR to florasulam (a triazolopyrimidine) emerged in F2 generations. Our findings suggest NTSR was polygenic and gradually built-up by accumulation over generations of loci with moderate individual effects in single plants. We also demonstrated that ALS alleles conferring herbicide resistance can co-exist with NTSR loci in P. rhoeas plants. Previous research focussed on TSR in P. rhoeas, which most likely caused underestimation of NTSR significance in this species. This may also apply to other dicot species. From our data, resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas appears complex, and involves well-known mutant ALS alleles and a set of unknown NTSR loci that confer resistance to ALS inhibitors from different chemical families. PMID:26259184

  12. Occurrence, genetic control and evolution of non-target-site based resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in the dicot weed Papaver rhoeas.

    PubMed

    Scarabel, Laura; Pernin, Fanny; Délye, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is a major issue for the chemical control of weeds. Whilst predominant in grass weeds, NTSR remains largely uninvestigated in dicot weeds. We investigated the occurrence, inheritance and genetic control of NTSR to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Papaver rhoeas (corn poppy) using progenies from plants with potential NTSR to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox. NTSR to imazamox was inherited from parents over two successive generations. NTSR to tritosulfuron (a sulfonylurea) was observed in F1 generations and inherited in F2 generations. NTSR to florasulam (a triazolopyrimidine) emerged in F2 generations. Our findings suggest NTSR was polygenic and gradually built-up by accumulation over generations of loci with moderate individual effects in single plants. We also demonstrated that ALS alleles conferring herbicide resistance can co-exist with NTSR loci in P. rhoeas plants. Previous research focussed on TSR in P. rhoeas, which most likely caused underestimation of NTSR significance in this species. This may also apply to other dicot species. From our data, resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas appears complex, and involves well-known mutant ALS alleles and a set of unknown NTSR loci that confer resistance to ALS inhibitors from different chemical families.

  13. Blood, sweat, tears and success of technology transfer long-term controlled-release of herbicides: Root-growth-inhibiting biobarrier technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van Voris, P.; Cataldo, D.A.; Burton, F.G.; Skeins, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Through the unique combination of polymers with a herbicidally active dinitroaniline, a cylinderical pellet (9mm long and 9mm in diameter) was developed that continuously releases a herbicide for a period of up to 100 years. Equilibrium concentration of the herbicide in soil adjacent to the pellet and the bioactive lifetime of the device cam be adjusted by changing the size of the pellet; the type of polymer; the type, quality, and quantity of carrier; and/or the concentration and type of dinitroaniline used. Commercial products that have been developed under a Federal Technology Transfer Program that utilize this technology include: (1) ROOT-SHIELD, a root repelling sewer gasket for concrete, clay, and PVC sewer lines, (2) BIOBARRIER, a spun-bonded polypropylene geotextile fabric developed to prevent root growth from invading septic tanks; penetrating under roadways, and along the edge of sidewalks, airport runways, and tennis courts, and for landscaped areas; and (3) ROOT-GUARD, a plastic drip irrigation emitter designed to protect buried drip irrigation systems from being plugged by roots. 17 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m '), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm ) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows of

  15. [Herbicides in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Funari, E; Sampaolo, A

    1989-01-01

    Toxicological implications due to the use of herbicide-contaminated drinking water, as well as other organic chemicals, are related to their nature and levels. These implications can be defined for each substance on the basis of an adequate evaluation of epidemiological information and experimental data on animals. In this paper, World Health Organization's procedures for establishing guidelines for 11 herbicides widely used in Italy are described. Furthermore, data and information about the use of these herbicides and their levels in Italian drinking-water supplies are also reported and discussed. Finally, factors and conditions responsible for the groundwater contamination by some herbicides in determined areas are presented and discussed.

  16. Herbicides and plant hormesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide hormesis is commonly observed at sub-toxic doses of herbicides and other phytotoxins. The occurrence and magnitude of this phenomenon is influenced by plant growth stage and physiological status, environmental factors, the endpoint measured, and the timing between treatment and endpoint me...

  17. The aquatic ecotoxicology of triazine herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    Triazine herbicides control plant growth by inhibiting photophosphorylation, but typically do not cause permanent cell damage or death. Effects on aquatic plants are reversible; photosynthesis resumes when the herbicide disappears from the water, and sometimes even while it is still present. Effects on aquatic plant communities are further ameliorated by species replacements, so the communities as a whole are less sensitive than their most sensitive species. Atrazine, a representative triazine herbicide, is toxic to aquatic plants (algae and macrophytes) at concentrations in the range of 20 to 200 {mu}g/L or less. Aquatic invertebrates and fish are much less sensitive than plants, with acute toxicity occurring at 1000 {mu}g/L or higher. Ecologically significant effects in aquatic ecosystems are likely only if plant communities are severely damaged by prolonged exposure to high atrazine concentrations.

  18. Inhibition of para-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase by Analogues of the Herbicide Nitisinone As a Strategy to Decrease Homogentisic Acid Levels, the Causative Agent of Alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Laschi, Marcella; Bernardini, Giulia; Dreassi, Elena; Millucci, Lia; Geminiani, Michela; Braconi, Daniela; Marzocchi, Barbara; Botta, Maurizio; Manetti, Fabrizio; Santucci, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare multisystem metabolic disease caused by deficient activity of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), which leads to the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Currently, there is no treatment for AKU. The sole drug with some beneficial effects is the herbicide nitisinone (1), an inhibitor of p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4-HPPD). 1 has been used as a life-saving drug in infants with type I tyrosinemia despite severe side effects due to the buildup of tyrosine. Four clinical trials of nitisinone to treat AKU have shown that 1 consistently decreases HGA levels, but also caused the accumulation of tyrosine in blood serum. Moreover, the human preclinical toxicological data for 1 are incomplete. In this work, we performed pharmacodynamics and toxicological evaluations of 1, providing the first report of LD50 values in human cells. Intracellular tyrosinemia was also evaluated. Three additional 4-HPPD inhibitors with a more favorable profile than that of 1 in terms of IC50, LD50, and tyrosine accumulation were also identified among commercially available compounds. These may be promising starting points for the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AKU.

  19. Inhibition of para-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase by Analogues of the Herbicide Nitisinone As a Strategy to Decrease Homogentisic Acid Levels, the Causative Agent of Alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Laschi, Marcella; Bernardini, Giulia; Dreassi, Elena; Millucci, Lia; Geminiani, Michela; Braconi, Daniela; Marzocchi, Barbara; Botta, Maurizio; Manetti, Fabrizio; Santucci, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare multisystem metabolic disease caused by deficient activity of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), which leads to the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Currently, there is no treatment for AKU. The sole drug with some beneficial effects is the herbicide nitisinone (1), an inhibitor of p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4-HPPD). 1 has been used as a life-saving drug in infants with type I tyrosinemia despite severe side effects due to the buildup of tyrosine. Four clinical trials of nitisinone to treat AKU have shown that 1 consistently decreases HGA levels, but also caused the accumulation of tyrosine in blood serum. Moreover, the human preclinical toxicological data for 1 are incomplete. In this work, we performed pharmacodynamics and toxicological evaluations of 1, providing the first report of LD50 values in human cells. Intracellular tyrosinemia was also evaluated. Three additional 4-HPPD inhibitors with a more favorable profile than that of 1 in terms of IC50, LD50, and tyrosine accumulation were also identified among commercially available compounds. These may be promising starting points for the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AKU. PMID:26947423

  20. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  1. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  2. Herbicide-resistant crops, resistant weeds, and herbicide drift

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New herbicide-resistance traits in corn and soybean may bring new management challenges for fruit and vegetable growers in the Mid-Atlantic region. Herbicide-resistant crops are an important weed management technology in row crop agriculture that allow growers to apply an herbicide to control weed...

  3. ANALYTICAL MASS SPECTROMETRY OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicides are chemical substances that are applied to agricultural soils, gardens, lawns, or plants to destroy or to prevent the growth of undesirable vegetation. The herbicides included in this review are generally syntehtic organic compuonds that are ingredients in commercial...

  4. Enantioselectivity in the phytotoxicity of herbicide imazethapyr.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingyan; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Yongsong; Liu, Weiping

    2009-02-25

    Chiral compounds usually behave enantioselectively in phyto-biochemical processes. With the increasing application of chiral herbicides, their enantioselective phytotoxicity to plants merits further study, and little information is available in this area. The purpose of this study was to examine the enantioselective phytotoxicity of the herbicide imazethapyr (IM) on the roots of maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings. Enantiomers of IM were separated by HPLC, and their absolute configurations were confirmed as S-(+)-IM and R-(-)-IM by the octant rule. Plant growth measurements and morphological, microscopic, and ultrastructural observations were conducted after treatment with individual IM enantiomers and the racemate. Observations of root morphology showed that the root diameter significantly increased, whereas the root volume, surface area, and number of root tips decreased significantly. IM enantiomers selectively damaged root hair growth and significantly reduced the sloughing of border cells from the tips. IM also had adverse effects on cell organelles, such as statocytes, mitochondria, dictyosomes, and endoplasmic reticulum in maize roots. Moreover, cell membranes and cell walls were thicker than usual after IM treatment. All of the results showed the same trend that the R-(-)-IM affected the root growth of maize seedlings more severely than the S-(+)-IM. The inhibition abilities of (+/-)-IM was between S-(+)- and R-(-)-IM. The behavior of the active enantiomer, instead of just the racemate, may have more relevance to the herbicidal effects and ecological safety of IM. Therefore, enantiomeric differences should be considered when evaluating the bioavailability of the herbicide IM.

  5. Herbicide Resistance in Datura innoxia1

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Praveen K.; King, John

    1988-01-01

    Cells resistant to the sulfonylurea herbicides chlorsulfuron and sulfometuron methyl were isolated from a predominantly haploid cell suspension culture of Datura innoxia P. Mill. Exponentially growing cell colonies (aggregates of about 40 cells) were mutagenized with ethyl methane sulfonate, subcultured for 10 days to allow growth recovery and plated on a medium containing either chlorsulfuron or sulfometuron methyl at a concentration (10−8 molar) which killed wild type cells. Surviving clones were picked up after 3 to 4 weeks, further proliferated as callus or cell suspension cultures, and tested for their resistance to both the sulfonylureas and imidazolinones, a chemically different class of herbicides. The variants were stable and showed high (100- to 1000-fold) resistance to the sulfonylureas. While some also exhibited cross resistance to imidazolinones, others showed no cross-resistance at all or, as in one case, greater sensitivity than wild type cells to the imidazolinones. Both classes of herbicides tested inhibited acetolactate synthase activity isolated from wild type cells. The acetolactate synthase of the resistant variants, however, was found to be resistant to the sulfonylureas and also to the imidazolinone(s) in those cells showing cross-resistance to the latter. The lack of cross-resistance observed in some cases provides evidence that the two groups of herbicides have slightly different sites on the acetolactate synthase molecule. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16666001

  6. Impairment of carbon metabolism induced by the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Orcaray, Luis; Zulet, Amaia; Zabalza, Ana; Royuela, Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate reduces plant growth and causes plant death by inhibiting the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. The objective of this work was to determine whether glyphosate-treated plants show a carbon metabolism pattern comparable to that of plants treated with herbicides that inhibit branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. Glyphosate-treated plants showed impaired carbon metabolism with an accumulation of carbohydrates in the leaves and roots. The growth inhibition detected after glyphosate treatment suggested impaired metabolism that impedes the utilization of available carbohydrates or energy at the expected rate. These effects were common to both types of amino acid biosynthesis inhibitors. Under aerobic conditions, ethanolic fermentative metabolism was enhanced in the roots of glyphosate-treated plants. This fermentative response was not related to changes in the respiratory rate or to a limitation of the energy charge. This response, which was similar for both types of herbicides, might be considered a general response to stress conditions.

  7. Thymoquinone effectively alleviates lung fibrosis induced by paraquat herbicide through down-regulation of pro-fibrotic genes and inhibition of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pourgholamhossein, Fatemeh; Sharififar, Fariba; Rasooli, Rokhsana; Pourgholi, Leyla; Nakhaeipour, Fatemeh; Samareh-Fekri, Hojjat; Iranpour, Maryam; Mandegary, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The potential preventive and therapeutic effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and its molecular mechanism were evaluated in paraquat (PQ)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. TQ was administered orally at the doses of 20 and 40mg/kg during the course and after development of fibrosis. Pathological changes, expressions of genes involved in fibrogenesis, hydroxyproline (HP) and oxidative stress parameters were determined in the lung tissues. TQ dose-dependently recovered the pathological changes induced by PQ. TQ decreased hydroxyproline content, lipid peroxidation and restored the antioxidant enzymes to the normal values. In molecular level, expressions of TGF-β1, α-SMA, collagen 1a1 and collagen 4a1 genes were also returned to the control level by TQ. This study indicated that TQ has the preventive and therapeutic potentials for the treatment of lung fibrosis by inhibition of oxidative stress and down-regulation of profibrotic genes. PMID:27375216

  8. Brassica greens herbicide screening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to screen herbicides for potential use in brassica greens. Plots were in a RBD with 4 replications. The study was direct seeded on May 19, 2009 with a seeding rate of 272,000 seeds/acre (‘Savanna’ mustard). Treatments included trifluralin PPI + DCPA pre-emergence ap...

  9. Postemergence herbicides for calendula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calendula is an alternative oilseed crop whose seed oil is valued as a substitute for tung oil and a replacement for petroleum-based volatile organic compounds in paints and other coatings. Calendula is not yet grown extensively as an agronomic crop, and its tolerances to most herbicides are unknown...

  10. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-11-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/Fm‧) by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l-1 (ametryn) to 132 μg l-1 (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/Fm‧.

  11. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Adam D; Collier, Catherine J; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-11-30

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/F(m)') by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l(-1) (ametryn) to 132 μg l(-1) (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/F(m)'.

  12. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/Fm′) by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l−1 (ametryn) to 132 μg l−1 (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/Fm′. PMID:26616444

  13. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Adam D; Collier, Catherine J; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/F(m)') by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l(-1) (ametryn) to 132 μg l(-1) (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/F(m)'. PMID:26616444

  14. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  15. SulE, a sulfonylurea herbicide de-esterification esterase from Hansschlegelia zhihuaiae S113.

    PubMed

    Hang, Bao-Jian; Hong, Qing; Xie, Xiang-Ting; Huang, Xing; Wang, Cheng-Hong; He, Jian; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-03-01

    De-esterification is an important degradation or detoxification mechanism of sulfonylurea herbicide in microbes and plants. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of sulfonylurea herbicide de-esterification are still unknown. In this study, a novel esterase gene, sulE, responsible for sulfonylurea herbicide de-esterification, was cloned from Hansschlegelia zhihuaiae S113. The gene contained an open reading frame of 1,194 bp, and a putative signal peptide at the N terminal was identified with a predicted cleavage site between Ala37 and Glu38, resulting in a 361-residue mature protein. SulE minus the signal peptide was synthesized in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified to homogeneity. SulE catalyzed the de-esterification of a variety of sulfonylurea herbicides that gave rise to the corresponding herbicidally inactive parent acid and exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency toward thifensulfuron-methyl. SulE was a dimer without the requirement of a cofactor. The activity of the enzyme was completely inhibited by Ag(+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), methamidophos, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. A sulE-disrupted mutant strain, ΔsulE, was constructed by insertion mutation. ΔsulE lost the de-esterification ability and was more sensitive to the herbicides than the wild type of strain S113, suggesting that sulE played a vital role in the sulfonylurea herbicide resistance of the strain. The transfer of sulE into Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 conferred on it the ability to de-esterify sulfonylurea herbicides and increased its resistance to the herbicides. This study has provided an excellent candidate for the mechanistic study of sulfonylurea herbicide metabolism and detoxification through de-esterification, construction of sulfonylurea herbicide-resistant transgenic crops, and bioremediation of sulfonylurea herbicide-contaminated environments.

  16. Current state of herbicides in herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M

    2014-09-01

    Current herbicide and herbicide trait practices are changing in response to the rapid spread of glyphosate-resistant weeds. Growers urgently needed glyphosate when glyphosate-resistant crops became available because weeds were becoming widely resistant to most commonly used selective herbicides, making weed management too complex and time consuming for large farm operations. Glyphosate made weed management easy and efficient by controlling all emerged weeds at a wide range of application timings. However, the intensive use of glyphosate over wide areas and concomitant decline in the use of other herbicides led eventually to the widespread evolution of weeds resistant to glyphosate. Today, weeds that are resistant to glyphosate and other herbicide types are threatening current crop production practices. Unfortunately, all commercial herbicide modes of action are over 20 years old and have resistant weed problems. The severity of the problem has prompted the renewal of efforts to discover new weed management technologies. One technology will be a new generation of crops with resistance to glyphosate, glufosinate and other existing herbicide modes of action. Other technologies will include new chemical, biological, cultural and mechanical methods for weed management. From the onset of commercialization, growers must now preserve the utility of new technologies by integrating their use with other weed management technologies in diverse and sustainable systems.

  17. Herbicides interfere with antigrazer defenses in Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuexia; Sun, Yunfei; Zhang, Xingxing; Heng, Hailu; Nan, Haihong; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-11-01

    The extensive application of herbicides has led to a serious threat of herbicide contamination to aquatic ecosystem. Herbicide exposure affects aquatic communities not only by exerting toxicity on single species but also by changing interspecific interactions. This study investigated the antigrazer defenses of the common green alga Scenedesmus obliquus against different herbicides [glyphosate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and atrazine] at various concentrations (0-2.0 mg L(-1)). In the presence of grazer (Daphnia)-derived cues, S. obliquus populations without herbicides formed high proportions of multicelled (e.g., four- and eight-celled) colonies. This result confirms that S. obliquus exhibits a morphological defense against grazing risk. At the low concentration range of 0.002-0.02 mg L(-1), the three herbicides exerted no influence on the growth and photosynthetic efficiency of S. obliquus, and multicelled colonies showed constant proportions. At the high concentration range of 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1), atrazine significantly inhibited the algal growth and photosynthesis whereas glyphosate or 2,4-D did not. Nonetheless, these levels of glyphosate or 2,4-D remarkably decreased the proportion of multicelled colonies, with reduced numbers of cells per particle in Daphnia filtrate-treated population. No eight-celled colony was formed after treatment with atrazine at 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1) despite the addition of Daphnia filtrate. These results suggest that herbicide exposure impairs antigrazer colonial morphs in phytoplankton although it is not sufficient to hamper algal growth. This phenomenon can increase the risk of predation by herbivores, thereby disrupting the inducible phytoplankton community. Furthermore, the predator-prey interactions between herbivores and phytoplankton can be potentially changed more seriously than previously considered.

  18. Herbicides interfere with antigrazer defenses in Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuexia; Sun, Yunfei; Zhang, Xingxing; Heng, Hailu; Nan, Haihong; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-11-01

    The extensive application of herbicides has led to a serious threat of herbicide contamination to aquatic ecosystem. Herbicide exposure affects aquatic communities not only by exerting toxicity on single species but also by changing interspecific interactions. This study investigated the antigrazer defenses of the common green alga Scenedesmus obliquus against different herbicides [glyphosate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and atrazine] at various concentrations (0-2.0 mg L(-1)). In the presence of grazer (Daphnia)-derived cues, S. obliquus populations without herbicides formed high proportions of multicelled (e.g., four- and eight-celled) colonies. This result confirms that S. obliquus exhibits a morphological defense against grazing risk. At the low concentration range of 0.002-0.02 mg L(-1), the three herbicides exerted no influence on the growth and photosynthetic efficiency of S. obliquus, and multicelled colonies showed constant proportions. At the high concentration range of 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1), atrazine significantly inhibited the algal growth and photosynthesis whereas glyphosate or 2,4-D did not. Nonetheless, these levels of glyphosate or 2,4-D remarkably decreased the proportion of multicelled colonies, with reduced numbers of cells per particle in Daphnia filtrate-treated population. No eight-celled colony was formed after treatment with atrazine at 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1) despite the addition of Daphnia filtrate. These results suggest that herbicide exposure impairs antigrazer colonial morphs in phytoplankton although it is not sufficient to hamper algal growth. This phenomenon can increase the risk of predation by herbivores, thereby disrupting the inducible phytoplankton community. Furthermore, the predator-prey interactions between herbivores and phytoplankton can be potentially changed more seriously than previously considered. PMID:27501311

  19. Mechanism of sulfonylurea herbicide resistance in the broadleaf weed, Kochia scoparia

    SciTech Connect

    Saari, L.L.; Cotterman, J.C.; Primiani, M.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Selection of kochia (Kochia scoparia) biotypes resistant to the sulfonylurea herbicide chlorsulfuron has occurred through the continued use of this herbicide in monoculture cereal-growing areas in the United States. The apparent sulfonylurea resistance observed in kochia was confirmed in greenhouse tests. Fresh and dry weight accumulation in the resistance kochia was 2- to >350-fold higher in the presence of four sulfonylurea herbicides as compared to the susceptible biotype. Acetolactate synthase (ALS) activity isolated from sulfonylurea-resistant kochia was less sensitive to inhibition by three classes of ALS-inhibiting herbicides, sulfonylureas, imidazolinones, and sulfonanilides. The decrease in ALS sensitivity to inhibition (as measured by the ratio of resistant I{sub 50} to susceptible I{sub 50}) was 5- to 28-fold, 2- to 6-fold, and 20-fold for sulfonylurea herbicides, imidazolinone herbicides, and a sulfonanilide herbicide, respectively. No differences were observed in the ALS-specific activities or the rates of ({sup 14}C)chlorsulfuron uptake, translocation, and metabolism between susceptible and resistant kochia biotypes. The K{sub m} values for pyruvate using ALS from susceptible and resistant kochia were 2.13 and 1.74 mM, respectively. Based on these results, the mechanism of sulfonylurea resistance in this kochia biotype is due solely to a less sulfonylurea-sensitive ALS enzyme.

  20. Monitoring of herbicide effect in maize based on electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseresnyés, I.; Fekete, G.; Végh, K.; Székács, A.; Mörtl, M.; Rajkai, K.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the herbicide acetochlor on root growth was studied by a non-destructive electrical impedance and capacitance method in pot experiments on maize. Acetochlor was applied both as single active ingredient and mixed with safener AD-67 in two dosages. Without safener addition, acetochlor had a permanent inhibiting effect on plant root expansion. The safener AD-67 was capable of providing protective effect against herbicide application. High correlations between root electrical impedance or capacitance and the root dry mass or surface area under our laboratory conditions were confirmed by plant harvest method. Root electrical impedance and capacitance measurements proved to be valid for monitoring the effect of the herbicide influencing root development and for distinguishing plant groups subjected to different stress conditions.

  1. Introduction of the anti-apoptotic baculovirus p35 gene in passion fruit induces herbicide tolerance, reduced bacterial lesions, but does not inhibits passion fruit woodiness disease progress induced by cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV).

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Daniele Scandiucci; Coelho, Marly C Felipe; Souza, Manoel T; Marques, Abi; Ribeiro, E Bergmann Morais

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of anti-apoptotic genes into plants leads to resistance to environmental stress and broad-spectrum disease resistance. The anti-apoptotic gene (p35) from a baculovirus was introduced into the genome of passion fruit plants by biobalistics. Eleven regenerated plants showed the presence of the p35 gene by PCR and/or dot blot hybridization. Transcriptional analysis of regenerated plants showed the presence of specific p35 transcripts in 9 of them. Regenerated plants containing the p35 gene were inoculated with the cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), the bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv passiflorae, and the herbicide, glufosinate, (Syngenta). None of the plants showed resistance to CABMV. Regenerated plants (p35+) showed less than half of local lesions showed by non-transgenic plants when inoculated with X. axonopodis and some p35+ plants showed increased tolerance to the glufosinate herbicide when compared to non-transgenic plants. PMID:17016672

  2. The potential benefits of herbicide regulation: a cautionary note for the Great Barrier Reef catchment area.

    PubMed

    Davis, A M; Lewis, S E; Brodie, J E; Benson, Ash

    2014-08-15

    Industry transitions away from traditional photosystem II inhibiting (PSII) herbicides towards an 'alternative' herbicide suite are now widely advocated as a key component of improved environmental outcomes for Australia's Great Barrier Reef and improved environmental stewardship on the part of the Queensland sugar industry. A systematic desktop risk analysis found that based on current farming practices, traditional PSII herbicides can pose significant environmental risks. Several of the 'alternatives' that can directly fill a specific pre-emergent ('soil residual') weed control function similar to regulated PSII herbicides also, however, presented a similar environmental risk profile, regardless of farming systems and bio-climatic zones being considered. Several alternatives with a pre-emergent residual function as well as alternative post-emergent (contact or 'knockdown') herbicides were, predicted to pose lower environmental risks than the regulated PSII herbicides to most trophic levels, although environmental risks could still be present. While several herbicides may well be viable alternatives in terms of weed control, they can still present equal or possibly higher risks to the environment. Imposing additional regulations (or even de-registrations) on particular herbicides could result in marginal, and possibly perverse environmental impacts in the long term, if usage shifts to alternative herbicides with similar risk profiles. Regardless of any regulatory efforts, improved environmental sustainability outcomes in pesticide practices within the Great Barrier Reef catchment area will hinge primarily on the continuing adoption of integrated, strategic pest management systems and technologies applied to both traditional and 'alternative' herbicides. One of the emerging policy challenges is ensuring the requisite technical and extension support for cane growers to ensure effective adoption of rapidly evolving farming system technologies, in a very dynamic and

  3. The potential benefits of herbicide regulation: a cautionary note for the Great Barrier Reef catchment area.

    PubMed

    Davis, A M; Lewis, S E; Brodie, J E; Benson, Ash

    2014-08-15

    Industry transitions away from traditional photosystem II inhibiting (PSII) herbicides towards an 'alternative' herbicide suite are now widely advocated as a key component of improved environmental outcomes for Australia's Great Barrier Reef and improved environmental stewardship on the part of the Queensland sugar industry. A systematic desktop risk analysis found that based on current farming practices, traditional PSII herbicides can pose significant environmental risks. Several of the 'alternatives' that can directly fill a specific pre-emergent ('soil residual') weed control function similar to regulated PSII herbicides also, however, presented a similar environmental risk profile, regardless of farming systems and bio-climatic zones being considered. Several alternatives with a pre-emergent residual function as well as alternative post-emergent (contact or 'knockdown') herbicides were, predicted to pose lower environmental risks than the regulated PSII herbicides to most trophic levels, although environmental risks could still be present. While several herbicides may well be viable alternatives in terms of weed control, they can still present equal or possibly higher risks to the environment. Imposing additional regulations (or even de-registrations) on particular herbicides could result in marginal, and possibly perverse environmental impacts in the long term, if usage shifts to alternative herbicides with similar risk profiles. Regardless of any regulatory efforts, improved environmental sustainability outcomes in pesticide practices within the Great Barrier Reef catchment area will hinge primarily on the continuing adoption of integrated, strategic pest management systems and technologies applied to both traditional and 'alternative' herbicides. One of the emerging policy challenges is ensuring the requisite technical and extension support for cane growers to ensure effective adoption of rapidly evolving farming system technologies, in a very dynamic and

  4. Detection of herbicide subclasses by an optical multibiosensor based on an array of photosystem II mutants.

    PubMed

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Guzzella, Licia; Euzet, Pierre; Rouillon, Regis; Esposito, Dania

    2005-07-15

    Massive use of herbicides in agriculture over the last few decades has become a serious environmental problem. The residual concentration of these compounds frequently exceeds the maximum admissible concentration in drinking water for human consumption and is a real environmental risk for the aquatic ecosystem. Herbicides inhibiting photosynthesis via targeting photosystem II function still represent the basic means of weed control. A multibiosensor was constructed for detecting herbicides using as biosensing elements photosynthetic preparations coupled to an optical fluorescence transduction system (Giardi et al. EU patent EP1134585, 01830148.1-2204); this paper is about its application in the detection of herbicide subclasses in river water. Photosynthetic material was immobilized on a silicio septum inside a series of flow cells, close to diodes so as to activate photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence. The principle of the detection was based on the factthat herbicides selectively modify PSII fluorescence activity. The multibiosensor has the original feature of being able to distinguish the subclasses of the photosynthetic herbicides by using specific immobilized biomediators isolated from mutated organisms. This setup resulted in a reusable, portable multibiosensor for the detection of herbicide subclasses with a half-life of 54 h for spinach thylakoids and limit of detection of 3 x 10(-9) M for herbicides present in river water.

  5. Determination of damages of photosynthetic metabolism caused by herbicides using a delayed fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingrui; Xing, Da; Zhou, Xiaoming; Li, Qiang

    2007-11-01

    The structure and function of chloroplast in plant can be affected by herbicide, resulting in the decrease in photosynthetic capacity. The photosystem II (PSII) in plants is considered to be the primary site where light-induced delayed fluorescence (DF) is produced. In this study, a simple analytical model of DF has been developed to diagnose the damages of photosynthesis caused by herbicides based on the charge recombination theory. Using a home-made portable DF detection system, we have studied the effects of two different kinds of herbicides on decay kinetics of DF in soybean (Glycine max (L.), Jinghuang No. 3). Current investigations have demonstrated that the analytic equation of DF decay dynamics we proposed here can accurately determine the extent of damage of herbicides to photosynthetic metabolism and truly reflect the mechanism and site about which herbicides inhibit photosynthetic electron transport chain. Therefore, the decay kinetics of DF with proper calibration may provide a promisingly new and practical means for pharmacological analysis of herbicides and damage-diagnosis of photosynthetic metabolism. The DF technique could be potentially useful for detecting the effects of herbicide on plant performance in vivo and screening new generation of promising herbicides with low toxicity and superhigh efficiency.

  6. Dual action of phosphonate herbicides in plants affected by herbivore--model study on black bean aphid Aphis fabae rearing on broad bean Vicia faba plants.

    PubMed

    Lipok, Jacek

    2009-09-01

    The interactions between plants, herbicides and herbivore insects were studied as an aspect of possible side effect of the using of phosphonate herbicides. The experimental system was composed of phosphonate herbicides, broad bean Vicia faba (L.) plants and black bean aphid Aphis fabae (Scopoli). Two means of herbicide application, namely standard spraying and direct introduction of the herbicide into stem via glass capillary, were examined. The results obtained for N-2-piridylaminomethylene bisphosphonic acid and its derivatives show 10 times higher inhibition of the plant growth if glass capillary mode was used. When plants were infested by aphids 24h after the use of herbicide, a significant decrease in plant growth rate was observed in relation to plants treated with herbicides alone. Moreover, the sensitivity of aphids towards glyphosate, N-2-piridylaminomethylene bisphosphonic acid and its 3-methyl derivative introduced to artificial diet indicated that these herbicidal phosphonates possessed also insecticidal activity if applied in a systemic manner. Additionally, olfactometer measurements revealed that aphids preferred intact V. faba leaves over those that had been treated with sublethal doses of herbicides. The results achieved in these experiments indicate that the use of phosphonate herbicides decreases plant resistance and influences the number of aphids accompanied with treated plants. Regarding these facts it can be concluded that the combined effect of herbicide-induced stress and insect herbivory reduced plant fitness and thus should be considered as also a factor enabling the reduction of herbicide doses.

  7. Natural Compounds as Next-Generation Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Franck E.; Duke, Stephen O.

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action (MOAs) are badly needed due to the rapidly evolving resistance to commercial herbicides, but a new MOA has not been introduced in over 20 years. The greatest pest management challenge for organic agriculture is the lack of effective natural product herbicides. The structural diversity and evolved biological activity of natural phytotoxins offer opportunities for the development of both directly used natural compounds and synthetic herbicides with new target sites based on the structures of natural phytotoxins. Natural phytotoxins are also a source for the discovery of new herbicide target sites that can serve as the focus of traditional herbicide discovery efforts. There are many examples of strong natural phytotoxins with MOAs other than those used by commercial herbicides, which indicates that there are molecular targets of herbicides that can be added to the current repertoire of commercial herbicide MOAs. PMID:24784133

  8. Natural compounds as next-generation herbicides.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Duke, Stephen O

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action (MOAs) are badly needed due to the rapidly evolving resistance to commercial herbicides, but a new MOA has not been introduced in over 20 years. The greatest pest management challenge for organic agriculture is the lack of effective natural product herbicides. The structural diversity and evolved biological activity of natural phytotoxins offer opportunities for the development of both directly used natural compounds and synthetic herbicides with new target sites based on the structures of natural phytotoxins. Natural phytotoxins are also a source for the discovery of new herbicide target sites that can serve as the focus of traditional herbicide discovery efforts. There are many examples of strong natural phytotoxins with MOAs other than those used by commercial herbicides, which indicates that there are molecular targets of herbicides that can be added to the current repertoire of commercial herbicide MOAs.

  9. Use of growth regulator of cytokinin type for enhancement and modification of herbicide activity.

    PubMed

    Karakotov, S D; Zheltova, E V; Putsykin, Y G; Balakin, K V; Shapovalov, A A

    2006-01-01

    The herbicidal action of Betanal Express (BPAM) on Chine jute (Abutilon theophrasti) weed was studied in the presence of a new plant growth regulator of urea type, N-phenyl-N-(1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)urea (PhenylTriazolylUrea, PTU). In the past years, Chine jute has become a major limiting factor in sugar beet production in the southern Russia due to its resistance to BPAM which is an essential herbicide widely used for sugar beet protection. When PTU was added to BPAM, the combination appeared to be more effective than the herbicide alone. The influence of phytohormone PTU was observed at very low application rate of 20-100 g/ha, thus herbicide dose in the ecosystem was reduced. The main visual signs of herbicidal action of the combination BPAM + PTU on Chine jute were inhibition of growth of overground plant and stem, leaves changes and sharp inhibition of root growth. No sugar beet injury was observed when this tank mixture was used. It was found that enhanced performance of the novel herbicide formulation is determined by increased herbicidal action of Ethofumesate, one of the active ingredients of BPAM.

  10. Towards the D1 protein application for the development of sensors specific for herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Piletskaya, E.; Piletsky, S.; Lavrik, N.; Masuchi, Y.; Karube, I.

    1998-12-01

    One of the most widespread groups of pesticides are the triazine herbicides. These substances inhibit photosynthesis by blocking electron transport in plant chloroplasts. The possibility of the chloroplast D1 protein application for determination of the herbicide concentration in solution was investigated. Potentiometry and cyclic voltammetry have been selected to monitor specific interaction between the D1 protein and herbicide. It was found that membranes with well-defined structure, like Langmuir-Blongett film are more suitable for sensitive sensor construction than cross-linked membranes. After addition of atrazine, the current through these multilayers appeared to increase 5 fold. The effect was found to be fast and irreversible. It has been proposed that the toxic action of herbicides on chloroplasts, traditionally interpreted by inhibition of electron flow along the chloroplast membrane, may also be the result of the thylakoid membrane depolarization.

  11. Herbicide activity of monosulfuron and its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhi-Jin; Ai, Ying-Wei; Qian, Chuan-Fan; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Monosulfuron was developed for weed control in the field of wheat (Triticum, aestivum L.) and millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) with the application rate ranging from 15 to 60 g ai/hm2. Herbicidal activity of monosulfuron was evaluated systematically by bioassay using maize (Zea mays L.) taproot as indicator and weed fresh weight of Acalypha australis L. and Echinochloa phyllopogon. Maize CAU 3138 was the most tolerant cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 (concentration of 50% inhibition) of 85 microg/kg, Yedan 13 was one of the most sensitive cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 of 6.4 microg/kg. Monosulfuron inhibited the growth of Acalypha australis L. strongly comparing with that of Echinochloa phyllopogon. Monosulfuron was a good acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor in vitro, the I50 (50% of inhibition) of monosulfuron, chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron for CAU 3138 were 32, 2, 19 and 26 nmol/L respectively, for Yedan 13 the I50 were 15, 3, 17 and 65 nmol/L respectively. In vivo ALS inhibition occurred only in higher concentration of 4 sulfonylurea herbicide tested. Comparison study of this test indicated that the mode of action of monosulfuron was the same as that of other sulfonylurea herbicides such as chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron, they were all inhibitors targeted at the ALS. PMID:16083111

  12. Herbicidal activity of cineole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Barton, Allan F M; Dell, Bernard; Knight, Allan R

    2010-09-22

    Essential oils and their constituents have potential as ecologically acceptable pesticides that may also have novel modes of action. In this work hydroxy and ester derivatives of the naturally occurring monoterpenoids 1,8-cineole 3, the main component in most eucalyptus oils, and 1,4-cineole 4 were prepared and their pre-emergence herbicidal activity against annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) and radish (Raphanus sativus var. Long Scarlet) investigated in laboratory-based bioassays. 1,8-Cineole, eucalyptus oil and all derivatives showed a dose-dependent herbicidal activity against annual ryegrass and radish with many of the derivatives showing improved herbicidal activity relative to 1,8-cineole and high-cineole eucalyptus oil. Increased activity of cineole ester derivatives compared to their associated hydroxy-cineole and carboxylic acid was not observed. No relationship between lipophilicity of the carboxylic acid portion of cineole ester derivatives and herbicidal activity was observed. The results indicate that these cineole derivatives could be environmentally acceptable herbicides.

  13. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    PubMed

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations. PMID:26479195

  14. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    PubMed

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations.

  15. Best management practices for herbicide resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of the recent focus on herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide resistant weeds are not new to agriculture; the first herbicide resistant weed was documented in 1957, with the first widespread resistance occurring in common groundsel with atrazine in the early 1970’s. Glyphosate resistant weed...

  16. Amino-substituted para-Benzoquinones as Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nain-Perez, Amalyn; Barbosa, Luiz C A; Picanço, Marcelo C; Giberti, Samuele; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Although quinones present a large array of biological activities, a few studies on the herbicidal potential of 2,5-bis(alkyl/arylamino)-1,4-benzoquinones have been reported to date. In this work, starting from benzoquinone, 13 2,5-bis(alkyl/arylamino)-1,4-benzoquinones were prepared in 46 - 93% yield. The products were fully characterized by spectroscopic analyses and their phytotoxicity against Cucumis sativus and Sorghum bicolor seedlings was investigated. At 100 ppm, compounds caused 10 - 88% growth inhibition of the dicotyledonous species, whereas the monocotyledon was less affected. Most compounds exerted little inhibitory effect on a cyanobacterial model strain. However, at 100 μm, compounds 8 - 10 caused about 50% inhibition of algal growth, and compounds 1 and 2 reduced cell viability in the 1 - 10 μm range. The ability of benzoquinone derivatives to interfere with the light-driven ferricyanide reduction by isolated spinach chloroplasts was evaluated. Some substances showed a moderate effect as uncouplers, but no relationship was found between this property and their biological activity, indicating that the herbicidal effect is not associated with the inhibition of the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Phytotoxic compounds were not toxic to insects, strengthening the possibility that they may serve as lead for the development of eco-friendly herbicides. PMID:27389616

  17. Modelling the effect of fluctuating herbicide concentrations on algae growth.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Coutu, Sylvain; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    Herbicide concentrations fluctuate widely in watercourses after crop applications and rain events. The level of concentrations in pulses can exceed the water chronic quality criteria. In the present study, we proposed modelling the effects of successive pulse exposure on algae. The deterministic model proposed is based on two parameters: (i) the typical growth rate of the algae, obtained by monitoring growth rates of several successive batch cultures in growth media, characterizing both the growth of the control and during the recovery periods; (ii) the growth rate of the algae exposed to pulses, determined from a dose-response curve obtained with a standard toxicity test. We focused on the herbicide isoproturon and on the freshwater alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus, and we validated the model prediction based on effect measured during five sequential pulse exposures in laboratory. The comparison between the laboratory and the modelled effects illustrated that the results yielded were consistent, making the model suitable for effect prediction of the herbicide photosystem II inhibitor isoproturon on the alga S. vacuolatus. More generally, modelling showed that both pulse duration and level of concentration play a crucial role. The application of the model to a real case demonstrated that both the highest peaks and the low peaks with a long duration affect principally the cell density inhibition of the alga S. vacuolatus. It is therefore essential to detect these characteristic pulses when monitoring of herbicide concentrations are conducted in rivers. PMID:25499055

  18. Nanoencapsulation Enhances the Post-Emergence Herbicidal Activity of Atrazine against Mustard Plants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia Bueno Reis; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been recently developed as a modified release system for atrazine, an herbicide that can have harmful effects in the environment. Here, the post-emergence herbicidal activity of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine was evaluated using mustard (Brassica juncea) as target plant species model. Characterization of atrazine-loaded PCL nanocapsules by nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a concentration of 7.5 x 10(12) particles mL(-1) and an average size distribution of 240.7 nm. The treatment of mustard plants with nanocapsules carrying atrazine at 1 mg mL(-1) resulted in a decrease of net photosynthesis and PSII maximum quantum yield, and an increase of leaf lipid peroxidation, leading to shoot growth inhibition and the development of severe symptoms. Time course analysis until 72 h after treatments showed that nanoencapsulation of atrazine enhanced the herbicidal activity in comparison with a commercial atrazine formulation. In contrast to the commercial formulation, ten-fold dilution of the atrazine-containing nanocapsules did not compromise the herbicidal activity. No effects were observed when plants were treated with nanocapsules without herbicide compared to control leaves sprayed with water. Overall, these results demonstrated that atrazine-containing PCL nanocapsules provide very effective post-emergence herbicidal activity. More importantly, the use of nanoencapsulated atrazine enables the application of lower dosages of the herbicide, without any loss of efficiency, which could provide environmental benefits. PMID:26186597

  19. Phytotoxicity of four herbicides on Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria natans and Elodea nuttallii.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiyun; Li, Xiaolu; Xu, Xiaohua; Gao, Shixiang

    2009-01-01

    The physiological effects of 4 herbicides (butachlor, quinclorac, bensulfuron-methyl and atrazine) on 3 submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria natans and Elodea nuttallii) were tested in laboratory. The variables of the relative growth rate and the photosynthetic pigment content showed that all of the tested herbicides affected the growth of the plants obviously, even at the lowest concentration (0.0001 mg/L). Except for the C. demersum treated with quinclorac at 0.005 and 0.01 mg/L, the relative growth rates of the plants were inhibited significantly (p < 0.01). Statistical analysis of chlorophyll a (Chl-a) contents was carried out with both the t-test and one-way ANOVA to determine the difference between the treatment and control. The results showed that Chl-a contents of the plants in all treatment groups were affected by herbicides significantly, except for the C. demersum treated with bensulfuron-methyl at 0.0005 mg/L. The decrease in Chl-a content was positively correlated to the dosage of the herbicides in most treatment groups. It was suggested that herbicides in water bodies might potentially affect the growth of aquatic macrophytes. Since the Chl-a content of submerged macrophytes responded to the stress of herbicides sensitively and directly, it could be used as a biomaker in environmental monitoring or in the ecological risk assessment of herbicide contamination. PMID:19634441

  20. Nanoencapsulation Enhances the Post-Emergence Herbicidal Activity of Atrazine against Mustard Plants

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia Bueno Reis; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been recently developed as a modified release system for atrazine, an herbicide that can have harmful effects in the environment. Here, the post-emergence herbicidal activity of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine was evaluated using mustard (Brassica juncea) as target plant species model. Characterization of atrazine-loaded PCL nanocapsules by nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a concentration of 7.5 x 1012 particles mL-1 and an average size distribution of 240.7 nm. The treatment of mustard plants with nanocapsules carrying atrazine at 1 mg mL-1 resulted in a decrease of net photosynthesis and PSII maximum quantum yield, and an increase of leaf lipid peroxidation, leading to shoot growth inhibition and the development of severe symptoms. Time course analysis until 72 h after treatments showed that nanoencapsulation of atrazine enhanced the herbicidal activity in comparison with a commercial atrazine formulation. In contrast to the commercial formulation, ten-fold dilution of the atrazine-containing nanocapsules did not compromise the herbicidal activity. No effects were observed when plants were treated with nanocapsules without herbicide compared to control leaves sprayed with water. Overall, these results demonstrated that atrazine-containing PCL nanocapsules provide very effective post-emergence herbicidal activity. More importantly, the use of nanoencapsulated atrazine enables the application of lower dosages of the herbicide, without any loss of efficiency, which could provide environmental benefits. PMID:26186597

  1. A novel system for reducing leaching from formulations of anionic herbicides: clay-liposomes.

    PubMed

    Undabeytia, Tomas; Mishael, Yael Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Rubin, Baruch; Morillo, Esmeralda; Maqueda, Celia

    2003-10-01

    A new approach was developed for reducing leaching of herbicides and contamination of groundwater. Liposome-clay formulations of the anionic herbicides sulfometuron and sulfosulfuron were designed for slow release by incorporating the herbicide in positively charged vesicles of didodecyldimethylammonium (DDAB), which were adsorbed on the negatively charged clay, montmorillonite. Freeze fracture electron microscopy demonstrated the existence of DDAB vesicles and aggregated structures on external clay surfaces. X-ray diffraction results for DDAB with montmorillonite imply the existence of DDAB bilayers with an oblique orientation to the basal plane within the clay interlayer space at adsorbed amounts beyond the cation exchange capacity of the clay. Adding DDAB with sulfometuron or sulfosulfuron to montmorillonite yielded 95% or 83% adsorption of the herbicide at optimal ratios. Liposome-clay formulations exhibited slow release of the herbicides in water. Analytical measurements in soil columns demonstrated 2-10-fold reduction in leaching of the herbicides from liposome-clay formulations in comparison with commercial formulations. Percents of root growth inhibition of a test plant in the upper soil depths were severalfold higher for the liposome-clay formulations than for the commercial ones. Consequently, liposome-clay formulations of anionic herbicides can solve environmental and economical problems by reducing their leaching.

  2. Nanoencapsulation Enhances the Post-Emergence Herbicidal Activity of Atrazine against Mustard Plants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia Bueno Reis; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been recently developed as a modified release system for atrazine, an herbicide that can have harmful effects in the environment. Here, the post-emergence herbicidal activity of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine was evaluated using mustard (Brassica juncea) as target plant species model. Characterization of atrazine-loaded PCL nanocapsules by nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a concentration of 7.5 x 10(12) particles mL(-1) and an average size distribution of 240.7 nm. The treatment of mustard plants with nanocapsules carrying atrazine at 1 mg mL(-1) resulted in a decrease of net photosynthesis and PSII maximum quantum yield, and an increase of leaf lipid peroxidation, leading to shoot growth inhibition and the development of severe symptoms. Time course analysis until 72 h after treatments showed that nanoencapsulation of atrazine enhanced the herbicidal activity in comparison with a commercial atrazine formulation. In contrast to the commercial formulation, ten-fold dilution of the atrazine-containing nanocapsules did not compromise the herbicidal activity. No effects were observed when plants were treated with nanocapsules without herbicide compared to control leaves sprayed with water. Overall, these results demonstrated that atrazine-containing PCL nanocapsules provide very effective post-emergence herbicidal activity. More importantly, the use of nanoencapsulated atrazine enables the application of lower dosages of the herbicide, without any loss of efficiency, which could provide environmental benefits.

  3. Mechanism of resistance to fenoxaprop in Japanese foxtail (Alopecurus japonicus) from China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongle; Zhu, Xudong; Wang, Hongchun; Li, Jun; Dong, Liyao

    2013-09-01

    Japanese foxtail is one of the most common and troublesome weeds infesting cereal and oilseed rape fields in China. Repeated use during the last three decades of the ACCase-inhibiting herbicide fenoxaprop-P-ethyl to control this weed has resulted in the occurrence of resistance. Dose-response tests established that a population (AHFD-1) from eastern China had evolved high-level resistance to fenoxaprop-P-ethyl. Based on the resistance index, this resistant population of A. japonicus is 60.31-fold resistant to fenoxaprop-P-ethyl. Subsequently, only a tryptophan to cysteine substitution was identified to confer resistance to fenoxaprop-P-ethyl in this resistant population. ACCase activity tests further confirmed this substitution was linked to resistance. This is the first report of the occurrence of Trp-2027-Cys substitution of ACCase in A. japonicus. From whole-plant pot dose-response tests, we confirmed that this population conferred resistance to other APP herbicides, including clodinafop-propargyl, fluazifop-P-butyl, quizalofop-P-ethyl, haloxyfop-R-methyl, cyhalofop-butyl, metamifop, DEN herbicide pinoxaden, but not to CHD herbicides clethodim, sethoxydim. There was also no resistance observed to ALS-inhibiting herbicides sulfosulfuron, mesosulfuron-methyl, flucarbazone-sodium, pyroxsulam, Triazine herbicide prometryne and glyphosate. However, this resistant population was likely to confer slightly (or no) resistant to Urea herbicides chlortoluron and isoproturon.

  4. Comparisons of herbicide treated and cultivated herbicide-resistant corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four glyphosate resistant corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids, a glufosinate-ammonium resistant hybrid, and a conventional atrazine resistant hybrid grown at Stoneville, MS in 2005, 2006, and 2007 with furrow irrigation were treated with thier respective herbicides and their growth, yeild, and mycotoxin inci...

  5. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Franck E.; Owens, Daniel K.; Watson, Susan B.; Asolkar, Ratnakar N.; Boddy, Louis G.

    2015-01-01

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in response between plants treated with sarmentine and herbicidal soaps such as pelargonic acid (nonanoic acid). However, little was known about the mechanism of action leading to the rapid desiccation of foliage treated by sarmentine. In cucumber cotyledon disc-assays, sarmentine induced rapid light-independent loss of membrane integrity at 100 μM or higher concentration, whereas 3 mM pelargonic acid was required for a similar effect. Sarmentine was between 10 and 30 times more active than pelargonic acid on wild mustard, velvetleaf, redroot pigweed and crabgrass. Additionally, the potency of 30 μM sarmentine was greatly stimulated by light, suggesting that this natural product may also interfere with photosynthetic processes. This was confirmed by observing a complete inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport at that concentration. Sarmentine also acted as an inhibitor of photosystem II (PSII) on isolated thylakoid membranes by competing for the binding site of plastoquinone. This can be attributed in part to structural similarities between herbicides like sarmentine and diuron. While this mechanism of action accounts for the light stimulation of the activity of sarmentine, it does not account for its ability to destabilize membranes in darkness. In this respect, sarmentine has some structural similarity to crotonoyl-CoA, the substrate of enoyl-ACP reductase, a key enzyme in the early steps of fatty acid synthesis. Inhibitors of this enzyme, such as triclosan, cause rapid loss of membrane integrity in the dark. Sarmentine inhibited the activity of enoyl-ACP reductase, with an I50app of 18.3 μM. Therefore, the herbicidal activity of sarmentine appears to be a

  6. Herbicide regulation: a case study of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Barber, K R; House, P

    1995-01-01

    Lawn-care herbicides are a type of pesticide regulated under federal and state pesticide legislation. The Michigan Department of Agriculture implements herbicide regulation to protect the public's health and welfare. Yet, due to gaps that exist in all levels of government in the regulation of lawn-care herbicide application, the public is placed at risk. The federal pesticide legislation (Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act) provides for a lower standard of safety in the classification of herbicides applied in the residential context as opposed to the agricultural context. Michigan legislation (The Pesticide Control Act) exempts from the law persons applying general herbicides on their own premises. The state does not require public notification of risks or safety precautions prior to commercial application of these herbicides. Furthermore, on-site inspections are not performed for residential application of herbicides and the state applicator certification program is not assessed for effectiveness.

  7. Introduction to Weeds and Herbicides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is an introduction to weed control and herbicide use. An initial discussion of the characteristics of weeds includes scientific naming, weed competition with crops, weed dispersal and dormancy, and conditions affecting weed seed germination. The main body of the…

  8. Transgenic Crops for Herbicide Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since their introduction in 1995, crops made resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate with transgenes are widely available and used in much of the world. As of 2008, over 80% of the transgenic crops grown world-wide have this transgenic trait. This technology has had m...

  9. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  10. Herbicide Phosphinothricin Causes Direct Stimulation Hormesis

    PubMed Central

    Dragićević, Milan; Platiša, Jelena; Nikolić, Radomirka; Todorović, Slađana; Bogdanović, Milica; Mitić, Nevena; Simonović, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Herbicide phosphinothricin (PPT) inhibits glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in nitrogen assimilation, thus causing ammonia accumulation, glutamine depletion and eventually plant death. However, the growth response of Lotus corniculatus L. plants immersed in solutions with a broad range of PPT concentrations is biphasic, with pronounced stimulating effect on biomass production at concentrations ≤ 50 μM and growth inhibition at higher concentrations. The growth stimulation at low PPT concentrations is a result of activation of chloroplastic isoform GS2, while the growth suppression is caused by inhibition of both cytosolic GS1 and GS2 at higher PPT concentrations. Since the results are obtained in cell-free system (e.g. protein extracts), to which the principles of homeostasis are not applicable, this PPT effect is an unambiguous example of direct stimulation hormesis. A detailed molecular mechanism of concentration-dependent interaction of both PPT and a related GS inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine, with GS holoenzymes is proposed. The mechanism is in concurrence with all experimental and literature data. PMID:23983663

  11. Binding sites associated with inhibition of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Shipman, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of experimental and theoretical evidence has been integrated into coherent molecular mechanisms for the action of photosystem II herbicides. Photosystem II herbicides act by inhibiting electron transfers between the first and second plastoquinones on the reducing side of photosystem II. Each herbicide molecule must have a flat polar component with hydrophobic substituents to be active. The hydrophobic substituents serve to partition the molecule into lipid regions of the cell and to fit the hydrophobic region of the herbicide binding site. The flat polar portion of the herbicide is used for electrostatic binding to the polar region of the herbicide binding site. Theoretical calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of herbicides to model proteinaceous binding sites.

  12. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  13. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  14. Combined thermal and herbicide stress in functionally diverse coral symbionts.

    PubMed

    van Dam, J W; Uthicke, S; Beltran, V H; Mueller, J F; Negri, A P

    2015-09-01

    Most reef building corals rely on symbiotic microalgae (genus Symbiodinium) to supply a substantial proportion of their energy requirements. Functional diversity of different Symbiodinium genotypes, endorsing the host with physiological advantages, has been widely reported. Yet, the influence of genotypic specificity on the symbiont's susceptibility to contaminants or cumulative stressors is unknown. Cultured Symbiodinium of presumed thermal-tolerant clade D tested especially vulnerable to the widespread herbicide diuron, suggesting important free-living populations may be at risk in areas subjected to terrestrial runoff. Co-exposure experiments where cultured Symbiodinium were exposed to diuron over a thermal stress gradient demonstrated how fast-growing clade C1 better maintained photosynthetic capability than clade D. The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action, considering combined thermal stress and herbicide contamination, revealed response additivity for inhibition of photosynthetic yield in both tested cultures, emphasizing the need to account for cumulative stressor impacts in ecological risk assessment and resource management. PMID:25989453

  15. Phytotoxicity of chiral herbicide bromacil: Enantioselectivity of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Jia; Li, Meichao; Wen, Yuezhong

    2016-04-01

    With the wide application of chiral herbicides and the frequent detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides, it is of great importance to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis in an enantiomeric level. In the present study, the enantioselective phytotoxicity of bromacil (BRO), typical photosynthesis inhibition herbicide, on Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. The results showed that S-BRO exhibited a greater inhibition of electron transmission in photosystem I (PSI) of A. thaliana than R-BRO by inhibiting the transcription of fnr 1. S-BRO also changed the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Y (II), Y (NO), and Y (NPQ) to a greater extent than R-Bro. Transcription of genes psbO2, Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 was down-regulated in an enantioselective rhythm and S-BRO caused more serious influence, indicating that S-BRO did worse damage to the photosystem II (PSII) of A. thaliana than R-BRO. This study suggested that S-BRO disturbed the photosynthesis of plants to a larger extent than R-BRO and provided a new sight to evaluate the phytotoxicity of chiral herbicides. PMID:26802342

  16. Phytotoxicity of chiral herbicide bromacil: Enantioselectivity of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Jia; Li, Meichao; Wen, Yuezhong

    2016-04-01

    With the wide application of chiral herbicides and the frequent detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides, it is of great importance to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis in an enantiomeric level. In the present study, the enantioselective phytotoxicity of bromacil (BRO), typical photosynthesis inhibition herbicide, on Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. The results showed that S-BRO exhibited a greater inhibition of electron transmission in photosystem I (PSI) of A. thaliana than R-BRO by inhibiting the transcription of fnr 1. S-BRO also changed the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Y (II), Y (NO), and Y (NPQ) to a greater extent than R-Bro. Transcription of genes psbO2, Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 was down-regulated in an enantioselective rhythm and S-BRO caused more serious influence, indicating that S-BRO did worse damage to the photosystem II (PSII) of A. thaliana than R-BRO. This study suggested that S-BRO disturbed the photosynthesis of plants to a larger extent than R-BRO and provided a new sight to evaluate the phytotoxicity of chiral herbicides.

  17. Herbicide tolerant regenerates of potato.

    PubMed

    Wersuhn, G; Kirsch, K; Gienapp, R

    1987-08-01

    Culture-derived plants and cell cultures of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) respond to the application of the herbicides SYS 67 ME (MCPA) and OMNIDEL (Na-2,2-dichloropropionate) in a comparable fashion. By gradually increasing the herbicide concentration, cell lines were developed which tolerated 50 mg/l of ME or 300 mg/l of OMNIDEL. Any further increase in concentration resulted in the death of all cell cultures. From cell cultures that had been able to grow on media supplemented with 30 mg/l of ME, regenerate plants were obtained that were also tolerant to this concentration. This new trait was retained even after repeated vegetative propagation of the plants.

  18. Effects of Eight Herbicides on In Vitro Hatching of Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Wong, A. T. S.; Tylka, G. L.; Hartzler, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of selected herbicides on hatching of free eggs of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The herbicides used were Atrazine (atrazine), Basagran (bentazon), Bladex (cyanazine), Blazer (acifluorfen), Command (clomazone), Lasso (alachlor), Sonalan (ethalfluralin), and Treflan (trifluralin). Treatments comprised two concentrations of commercial herbicide formulations and deionized water and 3.14 mM zinc sulfate as negative and positive controls, respectively. Eggs were extracted from females and cysts, surface disinfested, and incubated in herbicide or control solutions at 25 ± 2 C in darkness. Hatched second-stage juveniles were counted every other day for 24 days. Hatching of H. glycines eggs in 50 and 500 μg/ml Blazer was 42 to 67% less than that in deionized water and 6l to 78% less than that in zinc sulfate solution. Zinc sulfate significantly increased hatching activity in 50 μg/ml but not 500 μg/ml Blazer. The other herbicides tested at various concentrations had no significant effect on egg hatching. The specific component of Blazer inhibiting egg hatching is unknown. Suppression of hatching by Blazer indicates that this postemergence soybean herbicide may have a potential role in managing H. glycines. PMID:19279812

  19. Effects of Eight Herbicides on In Vitro Hatching of Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Wong, A T; Tylka, G L; Hartzler, R G

    1993-12-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of selected herbicides on hatching of free eggs of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The herbicides used were Atrazine (atrazine), Basagran (bentazon), Bladex (cyanazine), Blazer (acifluorfen), Command (clomazone), Lasso (alachlor), Sonalan (ethalfluralin), and Treflan (trifluralin). Treatments comprised two concentrations of commercial herbicide formulations and deionized water and 3.14 mM zinc sulfate as negative and positive controls, respectively. Eggs were extracted from females and cysts, surface disinfested, and incubated in herbicide or control solutions at 25 +/- 2 C in darkness. Hatched second-stage juveniles were counted every other day for 24 days. Hatching of H. glycines eggs in 50 and 500 mug/ml Blazer was 42 to 67% less than that in deionized water and 6l to 78% less than that in zinc sulfate solution. Zinc sulfate significantly increased hatching activity in 50 mug/ml but not 500 mug/ml Blazer. The other herbicides tested at various concentrations had no significant effect on egg hatching. The specific component of Blazer inhibiting egg hatching is unknown. Suppression of hatching by Blazer indicates that this postemergence soybean herbicide may have a potential role in managing H. glycines.

  20. Are Nutrient Stresses Associated with Enantioselectivity of the Chiral Herbicide Imazethapyr in Arabidopsis thaliana?

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Chen, Hui; Zou, Yuqin; Qiu, Jiguo; Wen, Yuezhong; Xu, Dongmei

    2015-12-01

    Plant growth can be inhibited by herbicides and is strongly limited by the availability of nutrients, which can influence human health through the food chain. Until now, however, cross talk between the enantioselectivity of herbicides and nutrient stresses has been poorly understood. We analyzed trace element and macroelement contents in shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana treated by the chiral herbicide imazethapyr (IM) and observed that multiple-nutrient stress (trace elements Mn, Cu, and Fe and macroelements P, K, Ca, and Mg) was enantioselective. The (R)-IM treatments resulted in Mn 23.37%, Cu 63.53%, P 30.61%, K 63.70%, Ca 34.32%, and Mg 36.14% decreases compared with the control. Interestingly, it was also found that herbicidally active (R)-IM induced notable aggregation of nutrient elements in leaves and roots compared with the control and (S)-IM. Through gene expression analyses, it was found that herbicidally active (R)-IM induced the up- or down-regulation of genes involved in the transport of nutrient elements. We propose that (R)-IM affected the uptake and translocation of nutrient elements in A. thaliana, which destroyed the balance of nutrient elements in the plant. This finding reminds us to reconsider the effect of nutrient stresses in risk assessment of herbicides. PMID:26566036

  1. Herbicides in streams. Midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, Donald A.; Thurman, E. Michael; Kolpin, Dana W.

    1991-01-01

    Results from a 2-year study of 149 streams geographically distributed across the corn-producing region of 10 midwestern States show that detectable concentrations of herbicides persist year round in most streams. Some herbicides exceeded proposed maximum contaminant levels for drinking water for periods of several weeks to several months following application. Atrazine was the most frequently detected and most persistent herbicide measured, followed by desethylatrazine and metolachlor. The seasonal distribution of atrazine indicates that aquifers contributing base flow to many of the streams are contaminated with herbicides.

  2. Symbiont-specific responses in foraminifera to the herbicide diuron.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Joost W; Negri, Andrew P; Mueller, Jochen F; Uthicke, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the photosystem II (PSII) herbicide diuron was assessed on thirteen tropical foraminifera hosting diatom, dinoflagellate, red or green algae endosymbionts. Inhibition of photosynthesis (reduced ΔF/F(m)(')) by diuron depended on both symbiont type and test ultrastructure, with greatest sensitivity observed for diatom- and chlorophyte-hosting species (24h IC(25) 2.5-4μg L(-1)). Inhibition kinetics was slow (24-48h until maximum inhibition) in comparison with corals, suggesting structural differences may influence herbicide uptake and transport. Although foraminifera were generally less sensitive to direct effects of diuron (inhibition ΔF/F(m)(')) than other marine phototrophs, damage to PSII (reduction F(v)/F(m)) occurred at concentrations lower than observed for other organisms (24h IC(25) 3-12μg L(-1)). Damage to PSII was highly light dependent and occurred at very low light intensities indicating limited photoprotective capacity. The high diversity, widespread occurrence and relative sensitivity make foraminifera good bioindicator organisms to evaluate phytotoxic stress on coral reefs.

  3. Perspectives on transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in the United States almost 20 years after introduction.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2015-05-01

    Herbicide-resistant crops have had a profound impact on weed management. Most of the impact has been by glyphosate-resistant maize, cotton, soybean and canola. Significant economic savings, yield increases and more efficacious and simplified weed management have resulted in widespread adoption of the technology. Initially, glyphosate-resistant crops enabled significantly reduced tillage and reduced the environmental impact of weed management. Continuous use of glyphosate with glyphosate-resistant crops over broad areas facilitated the evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds, which have resulted in increases in the use of tillage and other herbicides with glyphosate, reducing some of the initial environmental benefits of glyphosate-resistant crops. Transgenic crops with resistance to auxinic herbicides, as well as to herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, stacked with glyphosate and/or glufosinate resistance, will become available in the next few years. These technologies will provide additional weed management options for farmers, but will not have all of the positive effects (reduced cost, simplified weed management, lowered environmental impact and reduced tillage) that glyphosate-resistant crops had initially. In the more distant future, other herbicide-resistant crops (including non-transgenic ones), herbicides with new modes of action and technologies that are currently in their infancy (e.g. bioherbicides, sprayable herbicidal RNAi and/or robotic weeding) may affect the role of transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in weed management. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Perspectives on transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in the United States almost 20 years after introduction.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2015-05-01

    Herbicide-resistant crops have had a profound impact on weed management. Most of the impact has been by glyphosate-resistant maize, cotton, soybean and canola. Significant economic savings, yield increases and more efficacious and simplified weed management have resulted in widespread adoption of the technology. Initially, glyphosate-resistant crops enabled significantly reduced tillage and reduced the environmental impact of weed management. Continuous use of glyphosate with glyphosate-resistant crops over broad areas facilitated the evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds, which have resulted in increases in the use of tillage and other herbicides with glyphosate, reducing some of the initial environmental benefits of glyphosate-resistant crops. Transgenic crops with resistance to auxinic herbicides, as well as to herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, stacked with glyphosate and/or glufosinate resistance, will become available in the next few years. These technologies will provide additional weed management options for farmers, but will not have all of the positive effects (reduced cost, simplified weed management, lowered environmental impact and reduced tillage) that glyphosate-resistant crops had initially. In the more distant future, other herbicide-resistant crops (including non-transgenic ones), herbicides with new modes of action and technologies that are currently in their infancy (e.g. bioherbicides, sprayable herbicidal RNAi and/or robotic weeding) may affect the role of transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in weed management. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:25052888

  5. Toxicological effects of selective herbicides on plant growth promoting activities of phosphate solubilizing Klebsiella sp. strain PS19.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees; Saghir Khan, Md

    2011-02-01

    This study examines the effect of four herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, clodinafop, metribuzin and glyphosate, on plant growth promoting activities like phosphate solubilization, siderophores, indole acetic acid, exo-polysaccharides, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia production by herbicide tolerant Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. The strain was isolated from mustard rhizosphere. The selected herbicides were applied two to three times at the recommended rates. Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 tolerated a concentration of 1600 μg/ml each of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop, and 3200 and 2800 μg/ml of metribuzin and glyphosate, respectively. The activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 observed under in vitro environment were persistent in the presence of all herbicides at lower rates. The plant growth promoting activities even-though decreased regularly, but was not lost completely, as the concentration of each herbicide was increased from the recommended to three times of higher doses. Among all herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, generally, showed maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. As an example, 40, 80 and 120 μg/l of quizalafop-p-ethyl added to liquid culture Pikovskaya medium, decreased phosphate solubilizing activity of strain PS19 by 93, 95 and 97%, respectively over untreated control. The study revealed that the higher rates of herbicides though decreased the plant growth promoting activity but it did not completely inhibit the metabolic activities of strain PS19. The herbicide tolerance together with growth promoting activities observed under herbicide stress suggests that Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 could be used as bacterial preparation for facilitating the growth and yields of crops even in soils polluted with herbicides.

  6. Toxicological effects of selective herbicides on plant growth promoting activities of phosphate solubilizing Klebsiella sp. strain PS19.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees; Saghir Khan, Md

    2011-02-01

    This study examines the effect of four herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, clodinafop, metribuzin and glyphosate, on plant growth promoting activities like phosphate solubilization, siderophores, indole acetic acid, exo-polysaccharides, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia production by herbicide tolerant Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. The strain was isolated from mustard rhizosphere. The selected herbicides were applied two to three times at the recommended rates. Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 tolerated a concentration of 1600 μg/ml each of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop, and 3200 and 2800 μg/ml of metribuzin and glyphosate, respectively. The activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 observed under in vitro environment were persistent in the presence of all herbicides at lower rates. The plant growth promoting activities even-though decreased regularly, but was not lost completely, as the concentration of each herbicide was increased from the recommended to three times of higher doses. Among all herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, generally, showed maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. As an example, 40, 80 and 120 μg/l of quizalafop-p-ethyl added to liquid culture Pikovskaya medium, decreased phosphate solubilizing activity of strain PS19 by 93, 95 and 97%, respectively over untreated control. The study revealed that the higher rates of herbicides though decreased the plant growth promoting activity but it did not completely inhibit the metabolic activities of strain PS19. The herbicide tolerance together with growth promoting activities observed under herbicide stress suggests that Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 could be used as bacterial preparation for facilitating the growth and yields of crops even in soils polluted with herbicides. PMID:20721665

  7. Differential expression of acetohydroxyacid synthase genes in sunflower plantlets and its response to imazapyr herbicide.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Gabriela; Vega, Tatiana; Felitti, Silvina A; Picardi, Liliana; Nestares, Graciela

    2013-07-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) catalyzes the first reaction in branch chain amino acids biosynthesis. This enzyme is the target of several herbicides, including all members of the imidazolinone family. Little is known about the expression of the three acetohydroxyacid synthase genes (ahas1, ahas2 and ahas3) in sunflower. The aim of this work was to evaluate ahas gene expression and AHAS activity in different tissues of sunflower plantlets. Three genotypes differing in imidazolinone resistance were evaluated, two of which carry an herbicide resistant-endowing mutation known as Ahasl1-1 allele. In vivo and in vitro AHAS activity and transcript levels were higher in leaves than in roots. The ahas3 transcript was the less abundant in both tissues. No significant difference was observed between ahas1 and ahas2 transcript levels of the susceptible genotype but a higher ahas1 transcript level was observed in leaves of genotypes carrying Ahasl1-1 allele. Similar transcript levels were found for ahas1 and ahas2 in roots of genotypes carrying Ahasl1-1 allele whereas higher ahas2 abundance was found in the susceptible genotype. Herbicide treatment triggered tissue-specific, gene and genotype-dependent changes in ahas gene expression. AHAS activity was highly inhibited in the susceptible genotype. Differential responses were observed between in vitro and in vivo AHAS inhibition assays. These findings enhance our understanding of AHAS expression in sunflower genotypes differing for herbicide resistance and its response to herbicide treatment.

  8. The impact of altered herbicide residues in transgenic herbicide-resistant crops on standard setting for herbicide residues.

    PubMed

    Kleter, Gijs A; Unsworth, John B; Harris, Caroline A

    2011-10-01

    The global area covered with transgenic (genetically modified) crops has rapidly increased since their introduction in the mid-1990s. Most of these crops have been rendered herbicide resistant, for which it can be envisaged that the modification has an impact on the profile and level of herbicide residues within these crops. In this article, the four main categories of herbicide resistance, including resistance to acetolactate-synthase inhibitors, bromoxynil, glufosinate and glyphosate, are reviewed. The topics considered are the molecular mechanism underlying the herbicide resistance, the nature and levels of the residues formed and their impact on the residue definition and maximum residue limits (MRLs) defined by the Codex Alimentarius Commission and national authorities. No general conclusions can be drawn concerning the nature and level of residues, which has to be done on a case-by-case basis. International residue definitions and MRLs are still lacking for some herbicide-crop combinations, and harmonisation is therefore recommended.

  9. Differential Clomazone, Herbicide Tolerance among Sweetpotato Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clomazone (Command 3ME) is a broad spectrum preemergence herbicide that is registered for use in sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam.)]. It controls several important annual weeds that are not controlled by the other sweetpotato herbicides. Following clomazone application for weed control in the ...

  10. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  11. Control of Butterfly Bush with Postemergence Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) is classified as invasive in several parts of the United States. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of four herbicides and two application methods on postemergence butterfly bush control. The four herbicides included: Roundup (glyphosate)...

  12. Post-emergence herbicides useful in calendula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Easy and effective weed control is required by growers who are considering new industrial crops. Post-emergence herbicides typically are the products of choice by today’s growers. Unfortunately, post-emergence herbicides with proven safety margins are not known for calendula (Calendula officinalis),...

  13. Managing the evolution of herbicide resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds are widespread threats to the sustainability, productivity, and profitability of many cropping systems. Efforts to combat their spread through herbicide rotation schedules have been marginally effective at best. Despite the scope of the problem, we lack sound empirical...

  14. Natural compounds as next generation herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides with new modes of action (MOAs) are badly needed because of rapidly evolving resistance to commercial herbicides, for which a new MOA has not been introduced for more than 20 years. The biggest pest management challenge for organic agriculture is the lack of effective natural product her...

  15. Herbicide runoff along highways. 1. Field observations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinjiang; Pedersen, Theresa; Fischer, Michael; White, Richard; Young, Thomas M

    2004-06-15

    Herbicides are widely applied along highways to control roadside vegetation, and surface water is frequently nearby. To determine whether herbicide runoff along highways threatens water quality, a field study was conducted at two sites in northern California for three rainy seasons. The herbicides oryzalin, isoxaben, diuron, glyphosate, and clopyralid were selected for study to include compounds with significant variation in physical/chemical properties. Concentrations of herbicides in runoff were monitored for up to 11 storms following herbicide application, and 24 samples were collected per storm, providing unprecedented temporal detail. Flow-weighted event mean concentrations were calculated for each herbicide in each storm and ranged from below detection limits to 43.13 microg/L for oryzalin. The least soluble compounds, isoxaben and oryzalin, were detected in all storms monitored while the more soluble compounds, diuron and clopyralid, declined to levels below detection limits before monitoring was concluded. Very small amounts of glyphosate were mobilized, but its transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid was detected at higher concentrations, in more storm events, and at greater depth in the soil profile. A first-order model successfully described the declining herbicide concentrations in spray zone soil and in surface runoff for all sites and herbicides. Fitted first-order coefficients were always higher for runoff than for soil, indicating that the herbicide that persists in the source zone becomes less available for runoff as the time since application increases. The percentage of the applied herbicide that was detected in surface runoff over a season ranged from 0.05% to 43.5%, and the most critical variables in controlling the variation were the solubility of the herbicide and the runoff volume. For a given herbicide and site, the most critical factors in determining seasonal herbicide loss to surface water were the timing and intensity of the

  16. Precision Herbicide Application Technologies To Decrease Herbicide Losses in Furrow Irrigation Outflows in a Northeastern Australian Cropping System.

    PubMed

    Davis, Aaron M; Pradolin, Jordan

    2016-05-25

    This study compared water quality benefits of using precision herbicide application technologies in relation to traditional spraying approaches across several pre- and postemergent herbicides in furrow-irrigated canefarming systems. The use of shielded sprayers (herbicide banding) provided herbicide load reductions extending substantially beyond simple proportionate decreases in amount of active herbicide ingredient applied to paddocks. These reductions were due largely to the extra management control available to irrigating growers in relation to where both herbicides and irrigation water can be applied to paddocks, coupled with knowledge of herbicide toxicological and physicochemical properties. Despite more complex herbicide mixtures being applied in banded practices, banding provided capacity for greatly reduced environmental toxicity in off-paddock losses. Similar toxicological and loss profiles of alternative herbicides relative to recently regulated pre-emergent herbicides highlight the need for a carefully considered approach to integrating alternative herbicides into improved pest management. PMID:26795709

  17. Precision Herbicide Application Technologies To Decrease Herbicide Losses in Furrow Irrigation Outflows in a Northeastern Australian Cropping System.

    PubMed

    Davis, Aaron M; Pradolin, Jordan

    2016-05-25

    This study compared water quality benefits of using precision herbicide application technologies in relation to traditional spraying approaches across several pre- and postemergent herbicides in furrow-irrigated canefarming systems. The use of shielded sprayers (herbicide banding) provided herbicide load reductions extending substantially beyond simple proportionate decreases in amount of active herbicide ingredient applied to paddocks. These reductions were due largely to the extra management control available to irrigating growers in relation to where both herbicides and irrigation water can be applied to paddocks, coupled with knowledge of herbicide toxicological and physicochemical properties. Despite more complex herbicide mixtures being applied in banded practices, banding provided capacity for greatly reduced environmental toxicity in off-paddock losses. Similar toxicological and loss profiles of alternative herbicides relative to recently regulated pre-emergent herbicides highlight the need for a carefully considered approach to integrating alternative herbicides into improved pest management.

  18. Mitigation of plant penetration into radioactive waste utilizing herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the use of herbicides as an effective method of precluding plant root penetration into buried radioactive wastes. The discussed surface applications are selective herbicides to control broadleaf vegetation in grasses; nonselective herbicides, which control all vegetation; and slow-release forms of these herbicides to prolong effectiveness.

  19. Response of multiple seeded cocklebur and other cocklebur types to herbicide treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hamed K; Johnson, Bobbie J; Pantone, Dan J; Wax, Loyd M; Hine, Ron; Shier, W Thomas

    2005-07-01

    Multiple seeded cocklebur has been found in the last decade in Texas, and described as a biotype of Xanthium strumarium L with up to 25 seeds per bur instead of the usual two. The multiple seeded bur typically produces up to nine seedlings, causing concern that it may be harder to control than normal seeded common cocklebur. The efficacies of a series of fungal and conventional commercial herbicides have been compared in the greenhouse on seedlings of multiple seeded cocklebur from Texas (MSC-TX) and normal common cockleburs from Texas (NCC-TX), Arkansas (NCC-AR), Illinois (NCC-ILL) and two from Mississippi (NCC-MS#1, NCC-MS#2). Three measures of herbicidal activity (reductions in plant height and dry weight, and mortality) were used. The fungal herbicide Alternaria helianthi (Hansf) Tubaki & Nishihara at 1 x 10(5) conidia ml(-1) + 2 g liter(-1) Silwet L-77 with an 8-h dew period was an effective herbicide with all biotypes, as were the commercial chemical herbicides chlorimuron (14.8 g ha(-1)), imazaquin (29.6 g ha(-1)), sodium hydrogen methylarsonate (MSMA; 279.1 g ha(-1)) and imazethapyr (39.5 g ha(-1)). The membrane-disrupting organic arsenical MSMA was effective with all biotypes, whereas commercial chemical herbicides which act by inhibiting branched-chain amino acid synthesis (chlorimuron, imazaquin and imazethapyr) were less effective against normal seeded common cocklebur biotypes with short stature. These studies showed that multiple seeded cocklebur was at least as susceptible to the biological agent A helianthi and to the conventional commercial herbicides studied as were normal seeded cockleburs, suggesting that existing methods should be adequate to control this novel biotype. PMID:15712354

  20. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  1. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  2. Hybridization using cytoplasmic male sterility, cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance, and herbicide tolerance from nuclear genes

    SciTech Connect

    Beversdorf, W.D.; Erickson, L.R.; Grant, I.

    1987-04-14

    An improved process is described for producing a substantially homogeneous population of plants of a predetermined hybrid variety of crop which is capable of undergoing self-pollination and cross-pollination. The process comprises: growing in a first planting area a substantially random population of cytoplasmic male sterile plants which exhibit cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide which is attributable solely to homozygous dominant nuclear genes and male fertile plants which are homozygous recessive maintainer plants for the cytoplasmic male sterile plants and which lack the cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide attributable solely to the homozygous dominant nuclear genes.

  3. Herbicidal action of 2-hydroxy-3-alkyl-1,4-naphthoquinones.

    PubMed

    Jewess, Philip J; Higgins, James; Berry, Kate J; Moss, Stephen R; Boogaard, Adrian B; Khambay, Bhupinder P S

    2002-03-01

    The main mode of herbicidal activity of 2-hydroxy-3-alkyl-1,4-naphthoquinones is shown to be inhibition of photosystem II (PSII). The herbicidal and in vitro activities have been measured and correlated with their (Log)octanol/water partition coefficients (Log Ko/w). The length of the 3-n-alkyl substituent for optimal activity differed between herbicidal and in vitro activity. The maximum in vitro activity was given by the nonyl to dodecyl homologues (Log Ko/w between 6.54 and 8.12), whereas herbicidal activity peaked with the n-hexyl compound (Log Ko/w = 4.95). The effect of chain branching was also investigated using isomeric pentyl analogues substituted at position 3. All exhibited similar levels of in vitro activities but herbicidal activities differed, albeit moderately, with the exception of one analogue that was much less phytotoxic. Other modes of action were also investigated using two representative compounds. They did not show any activity on photosystem I or mitochondrial complex I, or generate toxic oxygen radicals by redox cycling reactions. Only moderate activity was found against mitochondrial complex III from plants, in contrast to much higher corresponding activity using an insect enzyme.

  4. Effects of four rice paddy herbicides on algal cell viability and the relationship with population recovery.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Ishihara, Satoru; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Iwafune, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    Paddy herbicides are a high-risk concern for aquatic plants, including algae, because they easily flow out from paddy fields into rivers, with toxic effects. The effect on algal population dynamics, including population recovery after timed exposure, must be assessed. Therefore, we demonstrated concentration-response relationships of four paddy herbicides for algal growth inhibition and mortality, and the relationship between the effect on algal cell viability and population recovery following exposure. We used SYTOX Green dye assay and flow cytometry to assess cell viability of the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Live cells could be clearly distinguished from dead cells during herbicide exposure. Our results showed that pretilachlor and quinoclamine had both algicidal and algistatic effects, whereas bensulfuron-methyl only had an algistatic effect, and pentoxazone only had an algicidal effect. Then, a population recovery test following a 72-h exposure was conducted. The algal population recovered in all tests, but the periods required for recovery differed among exposure concentrations and herbicides. The periods required for recovery were inconsistent with the dead cell ratio at the beginning of the recovery test; that is, population recovery could not be described only by cell viability. Consequently, the temporal effect of herbicides and subsequent recovery of the algal population could be described not only by the toxicity characteristics but also by toxicokinetics, such as rate of uptake, transport to the target site, and elimination of the substance from algal cells. PMID:21590715

  5. Synthesis and herbicidal activity evaluation of novel α-amino phosphonate derivatives containing a uracil moiety.

    PubMed

    Che, Jian-yi; Xu, Xiao-yun; Tang, Zi-long; Gu, Yu-cheng; Shi, De-qing

    2016-02-15

    A series of novel α-amino phosphonate derivatives containing a uracil moiety 3a-3l were designed and synthesized by a Lewis acid (magnesium perchlorate) catalyzed the Kabachnik-Fields reaction. The bioassays {in vitro, in vivo [Glass House 1 (GH1) and Glass House 2 (GH2)]} showed that most of compounds 3 exhibited excellent and selective herbicidal activities; for example, in GH1 test, compounds 3b, 3d, 3f, 3h and 3j showed excellent and wide spectrum herbicidal activities at the dose of 1000 g/ha, and compounds 3b and 3j exhibited 100% inhibition activities against the four plants in both post- and pre-emergence treatments. Moreover, most of compounds 3 showed higher inhibition against Amaranthus retroflexus and Digitaria sanguinalis than Glyphosate did in pre-emergence treatment. In GH2 test, the four compounds (3b, 3d, 3h and 3j) exhibited 100% inhibition against Solanum nigrum, Amaranthus retroflexus and Ipomoea hederacea in post-emergence treatment and displayed 100% inhibition against Solanum nigrum, Amaranthus retroflexus in pre-emergence treatment at the rate of 250 g/ha, and compound 3b showed the best and broad spectrum herbicidal activities against the six test plants. However, the four compounds displayed weaker herbicidal activities against Lolium perenne and Echinochloa crus-galli than the other four plants at the rate of 250 g/ha in both pre- and post-emergence treatments. So, compounds 3 can be used as a lead compound for further structure optimization for developing potential selective herbicidal agent. Their preliminary structure-activity relationships were also investigated. PMID:26786699

  6. Herbicidal and Fungicidal Activities of Lactones in Kava (Piper methysticum).

    PubMed

    Xuan, T D; Elzaawely, A A; Fukuta, M; Tawata, S

    2006-02-01

    This is the first report showing that kava lactones are plant and plant fungus growth inhibitors. Aqueous extract of kava roots showed high allelopathic potential and strongly suppressed germination and growth of lettuce, radish, barnyardgrass, and monochoria. Nine kava lactones were detected using GC-MS including desmethoxyyagonin, kavain, 7,8-dihydrokavain, hydroxykavain, yagonin, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroxyyagonin, methysticin, dihydromethysticin, and 11-hydroxy-12-methoxydihydrokavain. Quantities of desmethoxyyagonin, kavain, 7,8-dihydrokavain, yagonin, methysticin, and dihydromethysticin detected were 4.3, 6.9, 18.6, 5.7, 1.4, and 5.4 mg/g of dry weight, respectively. These six major lactones in kava roots showed great herbicidal and antifungal activities. Growth of lettuce and barnyardgrass were significantly inhibited at 1-10 ppm, and four plant fungi including Colletotrichum gloeosporides, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum, and Trichoderma viride were significantly inhibited at 10-50 ppm. The biological activities of kava lactones were characterized by different double-bond linkage patterns in positions 5,6 and 7,8. The findings of this study suggest that kava lactones may be useful for the development of bioactive herbicides and fungicides.

  7. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  8. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops. PMID:26296738

  9. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  10. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  11. Potential organic herbicides for squash production: Pelargonic acid herbicides AXXE® and Scythe®

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide season-long weed control. Although corn gluten meal has shown promise as an early-season pre-emergent organic herbicide in squash production, any uncontrolled weeds can inflict serious yield reducti...

  12. An interactive database to explore herbicide physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Gandy, Michael N; Corral, Maxime G; Mylne, Joshua S; Stubbs, Keith A

    2015-05-28

    Herbicides are an essential tool not only in weed management, but also in conservation tillage approaches to cropping. The first commercial herbicides were released in the 1940s and hundreds more since then, although genetic resistance to them is an issue. Here, we review the experimental and estimated physicochemical properties of 334 successful herbicidal compounds and make available a dynamic electronic database containing detailed analyses of the main chemical properties for herbicides and which adopts the Simplified Molecular-Input Line-Entry System (SMILES) for describing the structure of chemical molecules. This fully available resource allows for the rapid comparison of potential new herbicidal compounds to the chemical properties of known herbicides.

  13. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  14. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  15. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  16. Concentration of Selected Sulfonylurea, Sulfonamide, and Imidazolinone Herbicides, Other Pesticides, and Nutrients in 71 Streams, 5 Reservoir Outflows, and 25 Wells in the Midwestern United States, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Furlong, Edward T.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Sulfonylurea (SU), sulfonamide (SA), and imidazolinone (IMI) herbicides are recently developed herbicides that function by inhibiting the action of a key plant enzyme, stopping plant growth, and eventually killing the plant. These compounds generally have low mammalian toxicity, but crop and non-crop plants demonstrate a wide range in sensitivity to SUs, SAs, and IMIs, with over a 10,000-fold difference in observed toxicity levels for some compounds. SUs, SAs, and IMIs are applied either pre- or post-emergence to crops commonly at 1/50th or less of the rate of other herbicides. Little is known about their occurrence, fate, or transport in surface water or ground water in the United States. To obtain information on the occurrence of SU, SA, and IMI herbicides in the Midwestern United States, 214 water samples were collected from 76 surface-water and 25 ground-water sites in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 16 SU, SA, and IMI herbicides by using highperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples also were analyzed for 46 pesticides and pesticide degradation products and 13 herbicides and 10 herbicide degradates. At least 1 of the 16 SUs, SAs, or IMIs was detected at or above the method reporting limit of 0.010 microgram per liter (ug/L) in 83 percent of 133 stream samples. Imazethapyr was detected most frequently (69 percent of samples), followed by flumetsulam (65 percent of samples) and nicosulfuron (53 percent of samples). At least one SU, SA, or IMI herbicide was detected at or above the method reporting limit in 6 of 8 reservoir samples and 5 of 25 ground-water samples. SU, SA, and IMI herbicides occurred less frequently and at a fraction (often 1/50th or less) of the concentrations of other herbicides such as atrazine. Acetochlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor were all detected in 95 percent or more of 136 stream samples.

  17. Mode of Action Studies on Nitrodiphenyl Ether Herbicides 1

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, John R.; Hallahan, Beverly J.; Camilleri, Patrick; Howard, Joy

    1989-01-01

    The nitrodiphenyl ether herbicide 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitroacetophenone oxime-o-(acetic acid, methyl ester) (DPEI) induces light- and O2-dependent lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll (Chl) bleaching in the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. Under conditions of O2-limitation, these effects are diminished by prometyne and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), both inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport. Mutants in which photosynthetic electron transport is blocked are also resistant to DPEI under conditions of O2-limitation. Light- and O2-dependent lipid peroxidation and Chl bleaching are also induced by 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-3-methoxyphthalide (DPEII), a diphenyl ether whose redox properties preclude reduction by photosystem I. However, these effects of DPEII are also inhibited by DCMU. Under conditions of high aeration, DCMU does not protect Scenedesmus cells from Chl bleaching induced by DPEI, but does protect against paraquat. DPEI, but not paraquat, induces tetrapyrrole formation in treated cells in the dark. This is also observed in a mutant lacking photosystem I but is suppressed under conditions likely to lead to O2 limitation. Our results indicate that, in contrast to paraquat, the role of photosynthetic electron transport in diphenyl ether toxicity in Scenedesmus is not to reduce the herbicide to a radical species which initiates lipid peroxidation. Its role is probably to maintain a sufficiently high O2 concentration, through water-splitting, in the algal suspension. PMID:16666600

  18. Effects of selected herbicides on cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hooghe, R J; Devos, S; Hooghe-Peters, E L

    2000-05-19

    To evaluate possible deleterious effects of commonly used herbicides on leukocytes, cytokine production was selected as a sensitive indicator. After in vitro exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal donors, the production of all 3 cytokines tested--interferon-gamma (a type 1 cytokine), interleukin-5 (a type 2 cytokine) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (an inflammatory cytokine)--was impaired by up to 70, 50 and 70% respectively in a concentration-dependent manner in cultures exposed to atrazine (0.03-3 microM in 1% dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO). The effect paralleled that seen with dexamethasone, a known immunosuppressive agent. Other pesticides also dissolved in DMSO--mecoprop, simazine or MCPA (each up to 1 microM)--or dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline--diuron (up to 1 microM), isoproturon (up to 3 microM), metoxuron (up to 8 microM) or metamitron (up to 80 microM)--showed no concentration-related effects on cytokine production. There was, however, an inhibition of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha production by simazine, metoxuron and mecoprop and of all three cytokines tested by diuron. MCPA (0.01 and 0.1 microM) stimulated the production of TNF-alpha. Thus, exposure to herbicides leading to plasma levels in the micromolar range induces imbalance in cytokine production.

  19. Herbicide resistance modelling: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Renton, Michael; Busi, Roberto; Neve, Paul; Thornby, David; Vila-Aiub, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Computer simulation modelling is an essential aid in building an integrated understanding of how different factors interact to affect the evolutionary and population dynamics of herbicide resistance, and thus in helping to predict and manage how agricultural systems will be affected. In this review, we first discuss why computer simulation modelling is such an important tool and framework for dealing with herbicide resistance. We then explain what questions related to herbicide resistance have been addressed to date using simulation modelling, and discuss the modelling approaches that have been used, focusing first on the earlier, more general approaches, and then on some newer, more innovative approaches. We then consider how these approaches could be further developed in the future, by drawing on modelling techniques that are already employed in other areas, such as individual-based and spatially explicit modelling approaches, as well as the possibility of better representing genetics, competition and economics, and finally the questions and issues of importance to herbicide resistance research and management that could be addressed using these new approaches are discussed. We conclude that it is necessary to proceed with caution when increasing the complexity of models by adding new details, but, with appropriate care, more detailed models will make it possible to integrate more current knowledge in order better to understand, predict and ultimately manage the evolution of herbicide resistance.

  20. The benefits of herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M

    2012-10-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant crops, primarily glyphosate-resistant soybean, corn, cotton and canola, have helped to revolutionize weed management and have become an important tool in crop production practices. Glyphosate-resistant crops have enabled the implementation of weed management practices that have improved yield and profitability while better protecting the environment. Growers have recognized their benefits and have made glyphosate-resistant crops the most rapidly adopted technology in the history of agriculture. Weed management systems with glyphosate-resistant crops have often relied on glyphosate alone, have been easy to use and have been effective, economical and more environmentally friendly than the systems they have replaced. Glyphosate has worked extremely well in controlling weeds in glyphosate-resistant crops for more than a decade, but some key weeds have evolved resistance, and using glyphosate alone has proved unsustainable. Now, growers need to renew their weed management practices and use glyphosate with other cultural, mechanical and herbicide options in integrated systems. New multiple-herbicide-resistant crops with resistance to glyphosate and other herbicides will expand the utility of existing herbicide technologies and will be an important component of future weed management systems that help to sustain the current benefits of high-efficiency and high-production agriculture.

  1. Herbicide resistance modelling: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Renton, Michael; Busi, Roberto; Neve, Paul; Thornby, David; Vila-Aiub, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Computer simulation modelling is an essential aid in building an integrated understanding of how different factors interact to affect the evolutionary and population dynamics of herbicide resistance, and thus in helping to predict and manage how agricultural systems will be affected. In this review, we first discuss why computer simulation modelling is such an important tool and framework for dealing with herbicide resistance. We then explain what questions related to herbicide resistance have been addressed to date using simulation modelling, and discuss the modelling approaches that have been used, focusing first on the earlier, more general approaches, and then on some newer, more innovative approaches. We then consider how these approaches could be further developed in the future, by drawing on modelling techniques that are already employed in other areas, such as individual-based and spatially explicit modelling approaches, as well as the possibility of better representing genetics, competition and economics, and finally the questions and issues of importance to herbicide resistance research and management that could be addressed using these new approaches are discussed. We conclude that it is necessary to proceed with caution when increasing the complexity of models by adding new details, but, with appropriate care, more detailed models will make it possible to integrate more current knowledge in order better to understand, predict and ultimately manage the evolution of herbicide resistance. PMID:24585689

  2. Herbicide loss following application to a roadside.

    PubMed

    Ramwell, Carmel T; Heather, Andrew I J; Shepherd, Anthony J

    2002-07-01

    Risk assessments for herbicides applied to roads are limited by the lack of knowledge on the fate and behaviour of the compounds in the urban environment. This study was designed to address this deficiency by quantifying the percentage loss of six herbicides following application to a roadside. Herbicides were applied on two occasions to a 16-m length of roadside and kerb edge. An automatic water sampler was used to collect run-off, draining to a single gulley pot, until 25 mm of rain had fallen. Samples were analysed for glyphosate, atrazine, diuron, oxadiazon and oryzalin, and peak concentrations were 650, 2210, 1810, 390 and 70 micrograms litre-1 respectively. Isoxaben was also applied, but concentrations in run-off were below the limit of detection (10 micrograms litre-1). Herbicide concentrations all followed a similar pattern of rapid decline throughout the first rain event following application, with the majority of loss occurring within the first 10 mm of accumulated rainfall, but compounds of high solubility and low Koc produced the highest peak concentrations. For those compounds of relatively low solubility and moderate Koc, application rate may be an influential factor in determining herbicide loss for these compounds. The percentage loss of the active substances applied differed between compounds, ranging from < 10% to 73%. The ecotoxicological significance of the results is discussed.

  3. Herbicide-Resistant Crops: Utilities and Limitations for Herbicide-Resistant Weed Management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds. PMID:20586458

  4. Herbicide-resistant crops: utilities and limitations for herbicide-resistant weed management.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M; Owen, Micheal D K

    2011-06-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds.

  5. Herbicide-resistant crops: utilities and limitations for herbicide-resistant weed management.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M; Owen, Micheal D K

    2011-06-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds. PMID:20586458

  6. Forecasting residual herbicide concentrations in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Gavan; Scanlan, Craig; van Zwieten, Lukas; Rose, Mick; Rose, Terry

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of herbicides remaining in soil at the time of planting can adversely impact agricultural production and lead to off-site impacts in streams and groundwater. Being able to forecast the likelihood of residual concentrations at specific times in the future offers the potential to improve environmental and economic outcomes. Here we develop a solution for the full transient probability density function for herbicide concentrations in soil as a function of rainfall variability. Quasi-analytical solutions that account for rainfall seasonality are also demonstrated. In addition, new rapid and relatively cost-effective bioassays to quantify herbicide concentrations in near real-time, offers opportunities for data assimilation approaches to improve forecast risks.

  7. Metsulfuron-methyl-based herbicidal ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Pernak, Juliusz; Niemczak, Michał; Shamshina, Julia L; Gurau, Gabriela; Głowacki, Grzegorz; Praczyk, Tadeusz; Marcinkowska, Katarzyna; Rogers, Robin D

    2015-04-01

    Ten sulfonylurea-based herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs) were prepared by combining the metsulfuron-methyl anion with various cation types including quaternary ammonium ([bis(2-hydroxyethyl)methyloleylammonium](+), [2-hydroxyethyltrimethylammonium](+)), pyridinium ([1-dodecylpyridinium](+)), piperidinium ([1-methyl-1-propylpiperidinium](+)), imidazolium ([1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium](+), [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium](+)), pyrrolidinium ([1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium](+)), morpholinium ([4-decyl-4-methylmorpholinium](+)), and phosphonium ([trihexyltetradecylphosphonium](+) and [tetrabutylphosphonium](+)). Their herbicidal efficacy was studied in both greenhouse tests and field trials. Preliminary results for the greenhouse tests showed at least twice the activity for all HILs when compared to the activity of commercial Galmet 20 SG, with HILs with phosphonium cations being the most effective. The results of two-year field studies showed significantly less enhancement of activity than observed in the greenhouse; nonetheless, it was found that the herbicidal efficacy was higher than that of the commercial analog, and efficacy varied depending on the plant species. PMID:25734891

  8. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by herbicide inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Takamasa; Tsubata, Yukari; Okimoto, Tamio; Hoshino, Teppei; Hamaguchi, Shun-Ichi; Isobe, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia is caused by aspiration or inhalation of oily substances. Generally, lipoid pneumonia has non-specific clinical and radiological presentations and may be misdiagnosed as bacterial pneumonia. Our patient, a 68-year-old man who had been diagnosed with pneumonia on three previous occasions, was admitted to our hospital with a fourth similar episode. Computed tomography of the chest revealed extensive consolidations with air bronchograms in lung fields on the right side. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) increased ghost-like macrophages that stained positive for lipid. Our patient reported that he had sprayed herbicide in large quantities without wearing a mask. We analysed the BALF and herbicide by gas chromatography and diagnosed exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by inhalation of herbicide. Clinicians should be aware of lipoid pneumonia, which may present as infectious pneumonia. PMID:27516888

  9. Discovery of new herbicide modes of action with natural phytotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 20 modes of action (MOAs) are utilized by commercial herbicides, and almost 30 years have passed since the last new MOA was introduced. Rapidly increasing evolution of resistance to herbicides with these MOAs has greatly increased the need for herbicides with new MOAs. Combinatorial chemistry ...

  10. Tolerance evaluation of vegetatively established Miscanthus x giganteus to herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of the recent focus on herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide resistant weeds are not new to agriculture; the first herbicide resistant weed was documented in 1957, with the first widespread resistance occurring in common groundsel with atrazine in the early 1970’s. Glyphosate resistant weed...

  11. Cellular membranes, the sites for the antifungal activity of the herbicide sethoxydim.

    PubMed

    Pakdaman, B S; Goltapeh, E Mohammadi; Sepehrifar, R; Pouriesa, M; Fard, M Rahimi; Moradi, F; Modarres, S A M

    2007-08-01

    The fungicidal effect of sethoxydim on the canola (Brassica napus var. Olifera) white stem rot pathogen (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) encouraged us to conduct a series of studies on the mechanism of the antifungal activity of this herbicide commonly applied in Iranian fields under canola cultivation. Present preliminary studies on the changes in the level of Malondialdehyde (MDA) as the main product generated through peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids indicated the disintegration of the fungal bilayer of plasma membrane as the result of the herbicidal treatment. Also, it was demonstrated that the amount of hydrogen peroxide in the treated samples was higher than the control samples with no herbicidal treatment. Therefore, our present results confirm the disintegration of the plasma membrane as one of the mechanism for the antifungal impact of sethoxydim. As with weed plants, the phytotoxic impact of this herbicide has been attributed to the inhibition of the first enzyme in the lipid biosynthesis pathway, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, therefore, it would be very interesting to study on this subject and the relations between the sensitivity of different fungi and their DNA and protein sequences of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:19070118

  12. Toxicity of synthetic herbicides containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties towards Pseudomonas putida mt-2 and its response at the level of membrane fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Syguda, Anna; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-02-01

    One of the attempts to create more effective herbicidal compounds includes the use of ionic liquids. Herbicidal ionic liquids have more effective biological activity, they are less volatile, more thermally stable, and exhibit superior efficiency in comparison to typically employed herbicides, allowing the reduction of the herbicide dose applied per hectare. However, studies on the environmental toxicity of this group of compounds are very rarely available. Environmental toxicity is an important factor, showing the concentration of compounds that has negative effects on soil bacteria including those responsible for biodegradation processes. Therefore, potential toxicity of four herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs) precursors containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties was tested with the well investigated model organism for toxicity and adaptation, Pseudomonas putida mt-2. Results were compared to those obtained for commercial 2,4-D and MCPA herbicides. Next to growth inhibition, given as EC50, changes in the isomerisation of cis to trans unsaturated fatty acids were applied as proxy for cellular stress adaptation to toxic substances. The results revealed that all investigated precursors of HILs showed lower toxicity compared to commercialized synthetic herbicides 2,4-D and MCPA. The collected data on toxicity of HILs together with their physico-chemical properties might be useful for assessing the potential risk of the environmental pollution as well as guidelines for setting the legislation for their future use. PMID:26347932

  13. Toxicity of synthetic herbicides containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties towards Pseudomonas putida mt-2 and its response at the level of membrane fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Syguda, Anna; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-02-01

    One of the attempts to create more effective herbicidal compounds includes the use of ionic liquids. Herbicidal ionic liquids have more effective biological activity, they are less volatile, more thermally stable, and exhibit superior efficiency in comparison to typically employed herbicides, allowing the reduction of the herbicide dose applied per hectare. However, studies on the environmental toxicity of this group of compounds are very rarely available. Environmental toxicity is an important factor, showing the concentration of compounds that has negative effects on soil bacteria including those responsible for biodegradation processes. Therefore, potential toxicity of four herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs) precursors containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties was tested with the well investigated model organism for toxicity and adaptation, Pseudomonas putida mt-2. Results were compared to those obtained for commercial 2,4-D and MCPA herbicides. Next to growth inhibition, given as EC50, changes in the isomerisation of cis to trans unsaturated fatty acids were applied as proxy for cellular stress adaptation to toxic substances. The results revealed that all investigated precursors of HILs showed lower toxicity compared to commercialized synthetic herbicides 2,4-D and MCPA. The collected data on toxicity of HILs together with their physico-chemical properties might be useful for assessing the potential risk of the environmental pollution as well as guidelines for setting the legislation for their future use.

  14. Sensitivity of freshwater periphytic diatoms to agricultural herbicides.

    PubMed

    Debenest, T; Pinelli, E; Coste, M; Silvestre, J; Mazzella, N; Madigou, C; Delmas, F

    2009-06-01

    The biomonitoring of pesticide pollution in streams and rivers using algae such as diatoms remains difficult. The responses of diatom communities to toxic stress in stream water are disturbed by the variations of environmental parameters. In this study, periphytic algae collected in situ were exposed under controlled conditions to two major herbicides used in French agriculture (isoproturon and s-metolachlor). Three exposure regimes were tested: 5 and 30 microg L(-1) for 6 days and 30 microg L(-1) for 3 days followed by a recovery period of 3 days. The algal biomasses were assessed from pigment concentrations (chlorophyll a and c) and from live cell density. The highest concentration (30 microg L(-1)) of isoproturon inhibited the biomass increase statistically significantly. In periphyton exposed to 5 and 30 microg L(-1) of s-metolachlor, chlorophyll c concentration and live cell density were also statistically significantly lower than in the control. Periphyton left to recover after reduced exposure duration (3 days) showed higher growth rates after treatment with s-metolachlor than with isoproturon. Taxonomic identifications showed that species like Melosira varians, Nitzschia dissipata and Cocconeis placentula were not affected by the herbicide exposure. Other species like Eolimna minima and Navicula reichardtiana were more sensitive. Studying diatoms according to their trophic mode showed that facultative heterotroph species were statistically significantly favoured by isoproturon exposure at the highest concentration. Results obtained with s-metolachlor exposure showed a disturbance of cell multiplication rather than that of photosynthesis. These results suggest that photosynthesis inhibitors like isoproturon favour species able to survive when the autotroph mode is inhibited. PMID:19342109

  15. Realistic environmental mixtures of micropollutants in surface, drinking, and recycled water: herbicides dominate the mixture toxicity toward algae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2014-06-01

    Mixture toxicity studies with herbicides have focused on a few priority components that are most likely to cause environmental impacts, and experimental mixtures were often designed as equipotent mixtures; however, real-world mixtures are made up of chemicals with different modes of toxic action at arbitrary concentration ratios. The toxicological significance of environmentally realistic mixtures has only been scarcely studied. Few studies have simultaneously compared the mixture effect of water samples with designed reference mixtures comprised of the ratios of analytically detected concentrations in toxicity tests. In the present study, the authors address the effect of herbicides and other chemicals on inhibition of photosynthesis and algal growth rate. The authors tested water samples including secondary treated wastewater effluent, recycled water, drinking water, and storm water in the combined algae assay. The detected chemicals were mixed in the concentration ratios detected, and the biological effects of the water samples were compared with the designed mixtures of individual detected chemicals to quantify the fraction of effect caused by unknown chemicals. The results showed that herbicides dominated the algal toxicity in these environmentally realistic mixtures, and the contribution by the non-herbicides was negligible. A 2-stage model, which used concentration addition within the groups of herbicides and non-herbicides followed by the model of independent action to predict the mixture effect of the two groups, could predict the experimental mixture toxicity effectively, but the concentration addition model for herbicides was robust and sufficient for complex mixtures. Therefore, the authors used the bioanalytical equivalency concept to derive effect-based trigger values for algal toxicity for monitoring water quality in recycled and surface water. All water samples tested would be compliant with the proposed trigger values associated with the

  16. Realistic environmental mixtures of micropollutants in surface, drinking, and recycled water: herbicides dominate the mixture toxicity toward algae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2014-06-01

    Mixture toxicity studies with herbicides have focused on a few priority components that are most likely to cause environmental impacts, and experimental mixtures were often designed as equipotent mixtures; however, real-world mixtures are made up of chemicals with different modes of toxic action at arbitrary concentration ratios. The toxicological significance of environmentally realistic mixtures has only been scarcely studied. Few studies have simultaneously compared the mixture effect of water samples with designed reference mixtures comprised of the ratios of analytically detected concentrations in toxicity tests. In the present study, the authors address the effect of herbicides and other chemicals on inhibition of photosynthesis and algal growth rate. The authors tested water samples including secondary treated wastewater effluent, recycled water, drinking water, and storm water in the combined algae assay. The detected chemicals were mixed in the concentration ratios detected, and the biological effects of the water samples were compared with the designed mixtures of individual detected chemicals to quantify the fraction of effect caused by unknown chemicals. The results showed that herbicides dominated the algal toxicity in these environmentally realistic mixtures, and the contribution by the non-herbicides was negligible. A 2-stage model, which used concentration addition within the groups of herbicides and non-herbicides followed by the model of independent action to predict the mixture effect of the two groups, could predict the experimental mixture toxicity effectively, but the concentration addition model for herbicides was robust and sufficient for complex mixtures. Therefore, the authors used the bioanalytical equivalency concept to derive effect-based trigger values for algal toxicity for monitoring water quality in recycled and surface water. All water samples tested would be compliant with the proposed trigger values associated with the

  17. Herbicides as stimulators regulators and ripeners

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of low doses of herbicide as plant growth regulators to increase sugar concentrations (ripen) in sugarcane prior to harvest plays an important role in the profitable and sustainable production of sugarcane in the U.S. as well as in other sugarcane industries around the world. Several studies...

  18. SOIL ORGANIC AMENDMENT AS AFFECTING HERBICIDE FATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of organic amendments or organic wastes to soils have been shown to affect the fate of soil applied herbicides, although it is an issue very seldom considered when making the decision of fertilizing soil or disposing organic wastes. The addition of organic wastes to soils is viewed as v...

  19. The 1975 Insecticide, Herbicide, Fungicide Quick Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Bill G.; Thomson, W. T.

    This is a quick guide for choosing a chemical to use to control a certain pest on a specific crop. Information in the book was obtained from manufacturers' labels and from the USDA and FDA pesticide summary. The book is divided into four parts: (1) insecticides, (2) herbicides, (3) fungicides, and (4) conversion tables. Each of the first three…

  20. Kudzu response to foliar applied herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical control is presently the most cost-effective means to control kudzu, however, many of the herbicides labeled for kudzu control have substantial non-target toxicity, poor selectivity, high cost, long soil persistence, high soil mobility and / or high use rates. The present study evaluated ot...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicides comprise over 75% of all the agricultural pesticide use in the United States. This amounts to over 500 million pounds of active ingredients applied each year. The US EPA has the responsibility to register these products and label them for use such that unintended effec...

  2. Controlled release of water-soluble herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Riggle, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pine kraft lignin was used to control the release of metribuzin (4-amino-6-tert-butyl-3-(methylthio)-as-triazin-5(4H)-one) and alachlor (2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N-methoxy-methyl acetanalide). Soil thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis using /sup 14/C-metribuzin and /sup 14/C-alachlor demonstrated that NB-5203-58 series and PC940 series kraft lignins could retard the mobility of both herbicides after multiple soil TLC plate developments with water. Soil column chromatography analysis demonstrated that PC940C could retard the mobility of both herbicides after soil column water leaching by positioning the herbicides in the top portion of the soil column where the PC940C-herbicide mixture had been applied. There was a concentration effect where, as more PC940C was used, more /sup 14/C-labelled herbicide was retained in the top portion of the soil columns. Soil column chromatography and soil TLC plate analysis demonstrated that /sup 3/H-PC940C was immobile. Finally, PC940C significantly reduced metribuzin related phytotoxicity to field and greenhouse grown soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) which had been treated with PC940C rates of 0.77 and 1.15 L/ha and metribuzin rates of 0.42 and 0.84 kg/ha. The results for /sup 14/C-metribuzin and /sup 14/C-alachlor as well as the reduction in metribuzin related phytotoxicity to soybeans suggests that PC940C can effectively control the release of metribuzin and alachlor.

  3. [Participation of dexamethasone and E and C vitamins in the modulation of the hepatotoxic effect induced by fomesafen and 2,4-D amino herbicides, in rats ].

    PubMed

    Orfila, Luz; Mendoza, Solangela; Rodríguez, Jesús; Arvelo, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    The fomesafen and 2,4-D amine herbicide induce cytotoxic effects at hepatic level in rats, such as: hepatomegaly, hyperplasia and increase in the enzymes activity which participate in the processes of peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids. In this work, the effect of vitamin E and C was evaluated, as well as, the dexamethasone in the modulation of these hepatotoxic effects. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with the herbicides and with the agents to be evaluated. The different treatments were given during 15 days orally route. The herbicides combined with the dexamethasone and antioxidant agents were administrated only and simultaneously with the herbicides. Once concluded the different treatment, the rats were weighed and sacrificed. It was evaluated the liver size and liver fragments were obtained to determine the enzymatic activity of Fatty Acyl CoA-oxidase (FACO) and cellular number. The results showed that the hepatomegaly induced by fomesafen was inhibited by the vitamins and by the dexamethasone, while any effect was not observed in the group of rats treated with 2,4-D amine. None of the agents modulated the FACO activity induced by herbicides in treated rats. However, the dexamethasone showed a protective effect in the hyperplasia induced by two herbicides. The hepatotoxic effects induced by the herbicides responded to a different mechanism due to the differences of the effects observed at the antioxidant agents. On the other hand, the inhibition of the cellular proliferation by the dexamethasone does not keep relation with the responsible mechanisms of inducing the oxidant stress into FACO activity. Under experimental conditions of this study, the use of these agents does not guarantee protection against the hepatotoxic effects induced by the herbicides.

  4. Evaluation of a biohybrid photoelectrochemical cell employing the purple bacterial reaction centre as a biosensor for herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Swainsbury, David J.K.; Friebe, Vincent M.; Frese, Raoul N.; Jones, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre is a relatively robust and tractable membrane protein that has potential for exploitation in technological applications, including biohybrid devices for photovoltaics and biosensing. This report assessed the usefulness of the photocurrent generated by this reaction centre adhered to a small working electrode as the basis for a biosensor for classes of herbicides used extensively for the control of weeds in major agricultural crops. Photocurrent generation was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the triazides atrazine and terbutryn, but not by nitrile or phenylurea herbicides. Measurements of the effects of these herbicides on the kinetics of charge recombination in photo-oxidised reaction centres in solution showed the same selectivity of response. Titrations of reaction centre photocurrents yielded half maximal inhibitory concentrations of 208 nM and 2.1 µM for terbutryn and atrazine, respectively, with limits of detection estimated at around 8 nM and 50 nM, respectively. Photocurrent attenuation provided a direct measure of herbicide concentration, with no need for model-dependent kinetic analysis of the signal used for detection or the use of prohibitively complex instrumentation, and prospects for the use of protein engineering to develop the sensitivity and selectivity of herbicide binding by the Rba. sphaeroides reaction centre are discussed. PMID:24637165

  5. Evaluation of three herbicide resistance genes for use in genetic transformations and for potential crop protection in algae production.

    PubMed

    Brueggeman, Andrew J; Bruggeman, Andrew J; Kuehler, Daniel; Weeks, Donald P

    2014-09-01

    Genes conferring resistance to the herbicides glyphosate, oxyfluorfen and norflurazon were developed and tested for use as dominant selectable markers in genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and as potential tools for the protection of commercial-scale algal production facilities against contamination by organisms sensitive to these broad-spectrum herbicides. A synthetic glyphosate acetyltransferase (GAT) gene, when fitted with a strong Chlamydomonas promoter, conferred a 2.7×-fold increase in tolerance to the EPSPS inhibitor, glyphosate, in transgenic cells compared with progenitor WT cells. A mutant Chlamydomonas protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox, PPO) gene previously shown to produce an enzyme insensitive to PPO-inhibiting herbicides, when genetically engineered, generated transgenic cells able to tolerate up to 136× higher levels of the PPO inhibitor, oxyfluorfen, than nontransformed cells. Genetic modification of the Chlamydomonas phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene-based gene sequences found in various norflurazon-resistant organisms allowed production of transgenic cells tolerant to 40× higher levels of norflurazon than nontransgenic cells. The high efficiency of all three herbicide resistance genes in producing transgenic cells demonstrated their suitability as dominant selectable markers for genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas and, potentially, other eukaryotic algae. However, the requirement for high concentrations of glyphosate and its associated negative effects on cell growth rates preclude its consideration for use in large-scale production facilities. In contrast, only low doses of norflurazon and oxyfluorfen (~1.5 μm and ~0.1 μm, respectively) are required for inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that these two herbicides may prove effective in large-scale algal production facilities in suppressing growth of organisms sensitive to these herbicides.

  6. The herbicide Glyphosate affects nitrification in the Elbe estuary, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Tina; Lassen, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Elbe River is one of the biggest European rivers discharging into the North Sea. It also transports high amounts of nutrients and pollutants like pesticides. Important source regions of both nutrients and pollutants are located within the river catchment, which is dominated by agricultural land-use. From these agricultural soils, pesticides can be carried via the river and estuary into the North Sea. Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) is the most commonly used herbicide worldwide and mainly used to regulate unwanted plant growth and for the expedition of crop ripening. In Germany, ~ 6000 tons of glyphosate are applied yearly in agriculture and private use. Glyphosate is degradable by microorganisms and has a half-life in water of 35 to 60 days. This herbicide specifically inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of essential aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Nitrifying bacteria, which play an important role in the internal nitrogen cycling in the Elbe estuary, also possess this enzyme. The aim of our study was to quantify the concentration of glyphosate in water and sediment samples of the Elbe to get an overview about relevant environmental levels and to assess the impact of glyphosate on inhibition of nitrifying activities. To quantify the effect of glyphosate on nitrification activity, natural samples as well as pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europea (strain Nm50) were incubated with different concentrations of glyphosate over a period of some weeks. The nitrifying activity was determined according to changes of the nitrite and nitrate concentration as well as the cell number. Glyphosate was detectable in water and sediment samples in the Elbe estuary with up to 5 ppb mainly in the Port of Hamburg region. In both incubation experiments an inhibiting effect of glyphosate on nitrification could be shown. The incubated natural water sample was affected by a glyphosate

  7. Unique cellular effect of the herbicide bromoxynil revealed by electrophysiological studies using characean cells.

    PubMed

    Shimmen, Teruo

    2010-09-01

    In a previous paper, we proposed that the primary action of the herbicide bromoxynil (BX; 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzonitrile) is cytosol acidification, based on the fact that bromoxynil induced the inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming and cell death of Chara corallina in acidic external medium (Morimoto and Shimmen in J Plant Res 121:227-233, 2008). In the present study, electrophysiological analysis of the BX effect was carried out in internodal cells of C. corallina. Upon addition of BX, a large and rapid pH-dependent depolarization was induced, supporting our hypothesis. Ioxynil, which belongs to the same group as bromoxynil, also induced a large and rapid membrane depolarization in a pH-dependent manner. On the other hand, four herbicides belonging to other groups of herbicides did not induce such a membrane depolarization. Thus, BX has a unique cellular effect. The decrease in the electro-chemical potential gradient for H(+) across the plasma membrane appears to result in inhibition of cell growth and disturbance of intracellular homeostasis in the presence of BX.

  8. Aryl chain analogues of the biotin vitamers as potential herbicides. Part 3.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Tali; Pinkert, Dalia; Nudelman, Ayelet; Widberg, Ayala; Wexler, Barry; Wittenbach, Vernon; Flint, Dennis; Nudelman, Abraham

    2007-10-01

    Novel aryl chain isosters and analogues of 7-keto-8-aminopelargonic acid (KAPA) and 7,8-diaminopelargonic acid (DAPA), the vitamer intermediates involved in the biosynthetic pathway of biotin, possessing chain lengths of eight carbon atoms, were prepared and evaluated as potential herbicides. In the greenhouse test the most active compounds were the fluorinated derivative 9d and the selenophenyl/furan mixture 17m/17p, which were most active against Foxtail millet. In the more sensitive Arabidopsis test the most active substances were 9a and 17m, which displayed GR(50) (concentration of active compound causing 50% growth inhibition) values of 0.2 and 0.5 mg kg(-1) respectively (values of < 50 mg kg(-1) are considered herbicidal).

  9. Effects of flumioxazin herbicide on carbon nutrition of Vitis vinifera L.

    PubMed

    Saladin, Gaëlle; Magné, Christian; Clément, Christophe

    2003-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of the herbicide flumioxazin (fmx) on nontarget grapevines, its effects were assessed on fruiting cuttings and field-grown plants. The stress caused by the herbicide differed according to the grapevine model. In cuttings, leaf gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment levels as well as hexose contents decreased, whereas sucrose and starch accumulated, suggesting an inhibition of photosynthesis and an increase of carbohydrate reserves as a response to the fmx-induced stress. Paradoxically, in the field-grown grapevine leaves, fmx caused a stimulation of photosynthesis, an accumulation of photosynthetic pigments and monosaccharides, in parallel with a mobilization of sucrose and starch. These results suggest that fmx reaches grapevine leaves via root uptake and has prolonged effects. In cuttings, fmx generated a toxic effect related to its target, whereas in field-grown plants, fmx had rather positive physiological effects and acts as a signal further stimulating photosynthesis and related parameters.

  10. Hematological and biochemical alterations in the fish Prochilodus lineatus caused by the herbicide clomazone.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lindalva; Fernandes, Marisa N; Martinez, Cláudia B R

    2013-07-01

    The indiscriminate use of herbicides has led to the contamination of water bodies, possibly affecting the health of aquatic biota. Therefore, to evaluate the possible effects of the clomazone-based herbicide (Gamit(®) 500) on the fish Prochilodus lineatus, juveniles were exposed for 96h to three concentrations (1, 5 and 10mgL(-1)) of clomazone, and an analysis was made of their hematological parameters: hemoglobin (Hb); hematocrit (Hct); red blood cell (RBC) count; mean corpuscular volume (MCV); mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH); mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and biochemical parameters: glutathione S-transferase (GST); catalase (CAT); glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Hct presented a significant decrease at the concentration of 10mgL(-1), while the parameters Hb, HCM and MCHC presented a significant decrease at the two higher concentrations, indicating an anemic condition. The RBC increased significantly at the lowest concentration, possibly due to the release of new red blood cells into the bloodstream in response to splenic contraction, which may occur as an adaptive response to the stressor agent. P. lineatus presented activation of the biotransformation pathway, indicated by augmented hepatic activity of the enzyme GST and hepatic activation of the antioxidant enzyme CAT at the higher concentrations. Liver GPx was significantly inhibited at the higher concentrations, which may indicate the efficient action of CAT in the elimination of H2O2 or its competition with GST for the same substrate (GSH). AChE activity in brain and muscle was inhibited at the higher concentrations, indicating the neurotoxic effects of the herbicide in the fish. The hematological and biochemical alterations led to the conclusion that the herbicide clomazone has toxic effects on the species P. lineatus, and that its presence in the environment may jeopardize the health of these animals.

  11. A Miniature Bioassay for Testing the Acute Phytotoxicity of Photosystem II Herbicides on Seagrass

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Mercurio, Phil; O’Brien, Jake; Ralph, Peter J.; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/Fm’) was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/Fm’ by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes), indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m-2 s-1). High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future. PMID:25674791

  12. A miniature bioassay for testing the acute phytotoxicity of photosystem II herbicides on seagrass.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Adam D; Collier, Catherine J; Flores, Florita; Mercurio, Phil; O'Brien, Jake; Ralph, Peter J; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/F(m)') was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/F(m)' by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes), indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future. PMID:25674791

  13. Evolved polygenic herbicide resistance in Lolium rigidum by low-dose herbicide selection within standing genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    Busi, Roberto; Neve, Paul; Powles, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between environment and genetic traits under selection is the basis of evolution. In this study, we have investigated the genetic basis of herbicide resistance in a highly characterized initially herbicide-susceptible Lolium rigidum population recurrently selected with low (below recommended label) doses of the herbicide diclofop-methyl. We report the variability in herbicide resistance levels observed in F1 families and the segregation of resistance observed in F2 and back-cross (BC) families. The selected herbicide resistance phenotypic trait(s) appear to be under complex polygenic control. The estimation of the effective minimum number of genes (NE), depending on the herbicide dose used, reveals at least three resistance genes had been enriched. A joint scaling test indicates that an additive-dominance model best explains gene interactions in parental, F1, F2 and BC families. The Mendelian study of six F2 and two BC segregating families confirmed involvement of more than one resistance gene. Cross-pollinated L. rigidum under selection at low herbicide dose can rapidly evolve polygenic broad-spectrum herbicide resistance by quantitative accumulation of additive genes of small effect. This can be minimized by using herbicides at the recommended dose which causes high mortality acting outside the normal range of phenotypic variation for herbicide susceptibility. PMID:23798973

  14. Remote sensing study of the influence of herbicides on the spectral reflectance of pea plant leaves (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, D.; Alexieva, V.; Yanev, T.; Ivanov, S.

    Results from a remote sensing study of spectral reflectance of leaves of pea plants Pisum sativum L treated by the herbicides atrazine 2 4-D glyphosate fluridone and chlorsulfuron are reported According to the classification of the Herbicide Action Committee reflecting their mode of action they belong to different groups photosystem II bloker - C1 atrazine synthetic auxins - O 2 4-D inhibition of EPSP synthase - G glyphosate photobleaching - F1 fluridone and inhibition of acetoctate synthase - B chlorsulfuron The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at three low concentrations 1 mu M 0 1 mu M and 0 01 mu M with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice The spectral measurements of the leaf spectral reflectance were carried out in laboratory using a multichannel spectrometer in the visible and near infrared regions of the spectrum 480 div 810 nm Data was registered in 128 channels at a high spectral resolution of 2 6 nm halfwidth and a spatial resolution of 2 mm 2 The reflectance spectra were obtained from the leaf-reflected radiation referenced against a standard white screen To assess the changes arising in the leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action the developed by us approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods was applied The spectral reflectance characteristics SRC were investigated in three spectral intervals 520 div 580 nm region of maximal

  15. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of Als1 and Als2 mutations conferring tolerance to acetolactate synthase herbicides in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Kay L; Strachan, Stephen D; Ferry, Nancy M; Albert, Henrik H; Castle, Linda A; Sebastian, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sulfonylurea (SU) herbicides are effective because they inhibit acetolactate synthase (ALS), a key enzyme in branched-chain amino acid synthesis required for plant growth. A soybean line known as W4-4 was developed through rounds of seed mutagenesis and was demonstrated to have a high degree of ALS-based resistance to both post-emergence and pre-emergence applications of a variety of SU herbicides. This report describes the molecular and phenotypic characterization of the Als1 and Als2 mutations that confer herbicide resistance to SUs and other ALS inhibitors. RESULTS The mutations are shown to occur in two different ALS genes that reside on different chromosomes: Als1 (P178S) on chromosome 4 and Als2 (W560L) on chromosome 6 (P197S and W574L in Arabidopsis thaliana). CONCLUSION Although the Als1 and Als2 genes are unlinked, the combination of these two mutations is synergistic for improved tolerance of soybeans to ALS-inhibiting herbicides. © 2014 DuPont Pioneer. Pest Management Science published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:24425499

  16. Synthesis, Herbicidal Activity, and QSAR of Novel N-Benzothiazolyl- pyrimidine-2,4-diones as Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yang; Wu, Qiongyou; Su, Sun-Wen; Niu, Cong-Wei; Xi, Zhen; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-01-27

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO, E.C. 1.3.3.4) is known as a key action target for several structurally diverse herbicides. As a continuation of our research work on the development of new PPO-inhibiting herbicides, a series of novel 3-(2'-halo-5'-substituted-benzothiazol-1'-yl)-1-methyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diones 9 were designed and synthesized. The bioassay results indicated that a number of the newly synthesized compounds exhibited higher inhibition activity against tobacco PPO (mtPPO) than the controls, saflufenacil and sulfentrazone. Compound 9F-5 was identified as the most potent inhibitor with a Ki value of 0.0072 μM against mtPPO, showing about 4.2-fold and 1.4-fold higher potency than sulfentrazone (Ki = 0.03 μM) and saflufenacil (Ki = 0.01 μM), respectively. An additional green house assay demonstrated that compound 9F-6 (Ki = 0.012 μM) displayed the most promising postemergence herbicidal activity with a broad spectrum even at a concentration as low as 37.5 g of active ingredient (ai)/ha. Maize exhibits relative tolerance against compound 9F-6 at the dosage of 150 g ai/ha, but it is susceptible to saflufenacil even at 75 g ai/ha. Thus, compound 9F-6 exhibits the potential to be a new herbicide for weed control in maize fields. PMID:26728549

  17. Non-target-site herbicide resistance: a family business.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Joshua S; Tranel, Patrick J; Stewart, C Neal

    2007-01-01

    We have witnessed a dramatic increase in the frequency and diversity of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes over the past two decades, which poses a threat to the sustainability of agriculture at both local and global levels. In addition, non-target-site mechanisms of herbicide resistance seem to be increasingly implicated. Non-target-site herbicide resistance normally involves the biochemical modification of the herbicide and/or the compartmentation of the herbicide (and its metabolites). In contrast to herbicide target site mutations, fewer non-target mechanisms have been elucidated at the molecular level because of the inherently complicated biochemical processes and the limited genomic information available for weedy species. To further understand the mechanisms of non-target-site resistance, we propose an integrated genomics approach to dissect systematically the functional genomics of four gene families in economically important weed species. PMID:17161644

  18. Hazard and risk of herbicides for marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Sjollema, Sascha B; Martínezgarcía, Gema; van der Geest, Harm G; Kraak, Michiel H S; Booij, Petra; Vethaak, A Dick; Admiraal, Wim

    2014-04-01

    Due to their specific effect on photosynthesis, herbicides pose a potential threat to coastal and estuarine microalgae. However, comprehensive understanding of the hazard and risk of these contaminants is currently lacking. Therefore the aim of the present study was to investigate the toxic effects of four ubiquitous herbicides (atrazine, diuron, Irgarol(®)1051 and isoproturon) and herbicide mixtures on marine microalgae. Using a Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry based bioassay we demonstrated a clear species and herbicide specific toxicity and showed that the current environmental legislation does not protect algae sufficiently against diuron and isoproturon. Although a low actual risk of herbicides in the field was demonstrated, monitoring data revealed that concentrations occasionally reach potential effect levels. Hence it cannot be excluded that herbicides contribute to observed changes in phytoplankton species composition in coastal waters, but this is likely to occur only occasionally. PMID:24463473

  19. An interactive database to explore herbicide physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Gandy, Michael N; Corral, Maxime G; Mylne, Joshua S; Stubbs, Keith A

    2015-05-28

    Herbicides are an essential tool not only in weed management, but also in conservation tillage approaches to cropping. The first commercial herbicides were released in the 1940s and hundreds more since then, although genetic resistance to them is an issue. Here, we review the experimental and estimated physicochemical properties of 334 successful herbicidal compounds and make available a dynamic electronic database containing detailed analyses of the main chemical properties for herbicides and which adopts the Simplified Molecular-Input Line-Entry System (SMILES) for describing the structure of chemical molecules. This fully available resource allows for the rapid comparison of potential new herbicidal compounds to the chemical properties of known herbicides. PMID:25895669

  20. Non-target-site herbicide resistance: a family business.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Joshua S; Tranel, Patrick J; Stewart, C Neal

    2007-01-01

    We have witnessed a dramatic increase in the frequency and diversity of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes over the past two decades, which poses a threat to the sustainability of agriculture at both local and global levels. In addition, non-target-site mechanisms of herbicide resistance seem to be increasingly implicated. Non-target-site herbicide resistance normally involves the biochemical modification of the herbicide and/or the compartmentation of the herbicide (and its metabolites). In contrast to herbicide target site mutations, fewer non-target mechanisms have been elucidated at the molecular level because of the inherently complicated biochemical processes and the limited genomic information available for weedy species. To further understand the mechanisms of non-target-site resistance, we propose an integrated genomics approach to dissect systematically the functional genomics of four gene families in economically important weed species.

  1. Hazard and risk of herbicides for marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Sjollema, Sascha B; Martínezgarcía, Gema; van der Geest, Harm G; Kraak, Michiel H S; Booij, Petra; Vethaak, A Dick; Admiraal, Wim

    2014-04-01

    Due to their specific effect on photosynthesis, herbicides pose a potential threat to coastal and estuarine microalgae. However, comprehensive understanding of the hazard and risk of these contaminants is currently lacking. Therefore the aim of the present study was to investigate the toxic effects of four ubiquitous herbicides (atrazine, diuron, Irgarol(®)1051 and isoproturon) and herbicide mixtures on marine microalgae. Using a Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry based bioassay we demonstrated a clear species and herbicide specific toxicity and showed that the current environmental legislation does not protect algae sufficiently against diuron and isoproturon. Although a low actual risk of herbicides in the field was demonstrated, monitoring data revealed that concentrations occasionally reach potential effect levels. Hence it cannot be excluded that herbicides contribute to observed changes in phytoplankton species composition in coastal waters, but this is likely to occur only occasionally.

  2. Herbicide Metabolites in Surface Water and Groundwater: Introduction and Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several future research topics for herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water are outlined in this chapter. They are herbicide usage, chemical analysis of metabolites, and fate and transport of metabolites in surface and ground water. These three ideas follow the themes in this book, which are the summary of a symposium of the American Chemical Society on herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water. First, geographic information systems allow the spatial distribution of herbicide-use data to be combined with geochemical information on fate and transport of herbicides. Next these two types of information are useful in predicting the kinds of metabolites present and their probable distribution in surface and ground water. Finally, methods development efforts may be focused on these specific target analytes. This chapter discusses these three concepts and provides an introduction to this book on the analysis, chemistry, and fate and transport of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water.

  3. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the results of research in which novel activated carbons have been examined for their efficacy in water treatment and, specifically, for the adsorption of a common herbicide and wood preservative, sodium pentachlorophenolate. To place this work in context, the introduction will discuss first some of the considerations of using activated carbons for water treatment, and then certain aspects of the authors research that has led to this particular topic.

  4. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  5. Adenosine-5'-phosphate deaminase. A novel herbicide target.

    PubMed Central

    Dancer, J E; Hughes, R G; Lindell, S D

    1997-01-01

    The isolation of carbocyclic coformycin as the herbicidally active component from a fermentation of Saccharothrix species was described previously (B.D. Bush, G.V. Fitchett, D.A. Gates, D. Langley [1993] Phytochemistry 32: 737-739). Here we report that the primary mode of action of carbocyclic coformycin has been identified as inhibition of the enzyme AMP deaminase (EC 3.5.4.6) following phosphorylation at the 5' hydroxyl on the carbocyclic ring in vivo. When pea (Pisum sativum L. var Onward) seedlings are treated with carbocyclic coformycin, there is a very rapid and dramatic increase in ATP levels, indicating a perturbation in purine metabolism. Investigation of the enzymes of purine metabolism showed a decrease in the extractable activity of AMP deaminase that correlates with a strong, noncovalent association of the phosphorylated natural product with the protein. The 5'-phosphate analog of the carbocyclic coformycin was synthesized and shown to be a potent, tight binding inhibitor of AMP deaminase isolated from pea seedlings. Through the use of a synthetic radiolabeled marker, rapid conversion of carbocyclic coformycin to the 5'-phosphate analog could be demonstrated in vivo. It is proposed that inhibition of AMP deaminase leads to the death of the plant through perturbation of the intracellular ATP pool. PMID:9159944

  6. Toxicity of herbicides in highway runoff.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinjiang; Fong, Stephanie; Deanovic, Linda; Young, Thomas M

    2005-09-01

    Previous field monitoring at two highway sites found highway-applied herbicides in storm water runoff at maximum concentrations ranging from 10 microg/L for glyphosate and diuron to as high as 200 microg/L for oryzalin. To determine whether these herbicides at these concentrations can cause any toxicity to aquatic organisms, a standard toxicity study was conducted. Storm water was collected along Highway 37, Sonoma County, California, USA, and the herbicides isoxaben, oryzalin, diuron, clopyralid, and glyphosate were spiked into the storm water at the highest concentrations observed during the five previous field-monitoring campaigns. Three different toxicity studies were conducted and the results showed the following: No significant reduction in reproduction or increase in mortality relative to the control for an 8-d Ceriodaphnia (water flea) toxicity test; no significant increase in mortality or decrease in biomass compared to the control during a 7-d Pimephales (fish) toxicity test; and, in a 96-h Selenastrum (algae) toxicity test, both the 10-microg/L diuron treatment and the combined 50-microg/L isoxaben plus 200-microg/L oryzalin treatment produced significant (p < 0.05) reductions in algal growth compared to the controls, although the 30-microg/L clopyralid or 10-microg/L glyphosate treatments did not exhibit any toxic effects. PMID:16193763

  7. Toxicity of herbicides in highway runoff.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinjiang; Fong, Stephanie; Deanovic, Linda; Young, Thomas M

    2005-09-01

    Previous field monitoring at two highway sites found highway-applied herbicides in storm water runoff at maximum concentrations ranging from 10 microg/L for glyphosate and diuron to as high as 200 microg/L for oryzalin. To determine whether these herbicides at these concentrations can cause any toxicity to aquatic organisms, a standard toxicity study was conducted. Storm water was collected along Highway 37, Sonoma County, California, USA, and the herbicides isoxaben, oryzalin, diuron, clopyralid, and glyphosate were spiked into the storm water at the highest concentrations observed during the five previous field-monitoring campaigns. Three different toxicity studies were conducted and the results showed the following: No significant reduction in reproduction or increase in mortality relative to the control for an 8-d Ceriodaphnia (water flea) toxicity test; no significant increase in mortality or decrease in biomass compared to the control during a 7-d Pimephales (fish) toxicity test; and, in a 96-h Selenastrum (algae) toxicity test, both the 10-microg/L diuron treatment and the combined 50-microg/L isoxaben plus 200-microg/L oryzalin treatment produced significant (p < 0.05) reductions in algal growth compared to the controls, although the 30-microg/L clopyralid or 10-microg/L glyphosate treatments did not exhibit any toxic effects.

  8. Chromatographic methods for analysis of triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hana Hassan; Elbashir, Abdalla A; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to different detectors, and in combination with different sample extraction methods, are most widely used for analysis of triazine herbicides in different environmental samples. Nowadays, many variations and modifications of extraction and sample preparation methods such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), stir bar sportive extraction (SBSE), headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO), ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME), and others have been introduced and developed to obtain sensitive and accurate methods for the analysis of these hazardous compounds. In this review, several analytical properties such as linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, and accuracy for each developed method are discussed, and excellent results were obtained for the most of developed methods combined with GC and HPLC techniques for the analysis of triazine herbicides. This review gives an overview of recent publications of the application of GC and HPLC for analysis of triazine herbicides residues in various samples.

  9. Sorption and predicted mobility of herbicides in Baltic soils.

    PubMed

    Sakaliene, Ona; Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C; Spokas, Kurt A

    2007-08-01

    This study was undertaken to determine sorption coefficients of eight herbicides (alachlor, amitrole, atrazine, simazine, dicamba, imazamox, imazethapyr, and pendimethalin) to seven agricultural soils from sites throughout Lithuania. The measured sorption coefficients were used to predict the susceptibility of these herbicides to leach to groundwater. Soil-water partitioning coefficients were measured in batch equilibrium studies using radiolabeled herbicides. In most soils, sorption followed the general trend pendimethalin > alachlor > atrazine approximately amitrole approximately simazine > imazethapyr > imazamox > dicamba, consistent with the trends in hydrophobicity (log K(ow)) except in the case of amitrole. For several herbicides, sorption coefficients and calculated retardation factors were lowest (predicted to be most susceptible to leaching) in a soil of intermediate organic carbon content and sand content. Calculated herbicide retardation factors were high for soils with high organic carbon contents. Estimated leaching times under saturated conditions, assuming no herbicide degradation and no preferential water flow, were more strongly affected by soil textural effects on predicted water flow than by herbicide sorption effects. All herbicides were predicted to be slowest to leach in soils with high clay and low sand contents, and fastest to leach in soils with high sand content and low organic matter content. Herbicide management is important to the continued increase in agricultural production and profitability in the Baltic region, and these results will be useful in identifying critical areas requiring improved management practices to reduce water contamination by pesticides.

  10. Occurrence of sulfonylurea, sulfonamide, imidazolinone, and other herbicides in rivers, reservoirs and ground water in the Midwestern United States, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Furlong, E.T.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Peter, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfonylurea (SU), sulfonamide (SA), and imidazolinone (IMI) herbicides are relatively new classes of chemical compounds that function by inhibiting the action of a plant enzyme, stopping plant growth, and eventually killing the plant. These compounds generally have low mammalian toxicity, but plants demonstrate a wide range in sensitivity to SUs, SAs, and IMIs with over a 10000-fold difference in observed toxicity levels for some compounds. SUs, SAs, and IMIs are applied either pre- or post-emergence to crops commonly at 1/50th or less of the rate of other herbicides. Little is known about their occurrence, fate, or transport in surface water or ground water in the USA. To obtain information on the occurrence of SU, SA, and IMI herbicides in the Midwestern United States, 212 water samples were collected from 75 surface-water and 25 ground-water sites in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 16 SU, SA and IMI herbicides by USGS Methods Research and Development Program staff using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples were also analyzed for 47 pesticides or pesticide degradation products. At least one of the 16 SUs, SAs or IMIs was detected above the method reporting limit (MRL) of 0.01 ??g/l in 83% of 130 stream samples. Imazethapyr was detected most frequently (71% of samples) followed by flumetsulam (63% of samples) and nicosulfuron (52% of samples). The sum of SU, SA and IMI concentrations exceeded 0.5 ??g/l in less than 10% of stream samples. Acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine and metolachlor were all detected in 90% or more of 129 stream samples. The sum of the concentration of these five herbicides exceeded 50 ??g/l in approximately 10% of stream samples. At least one SU, SA, or IMI herbicide was detected above the MRL in 24% of 25 ground-water samples and 86% of seven reservoir samples. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. Additive toxicity of herbicide mixtures and comparative sensitivity of tropical benthic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Marie; Heimann, Kirsten; Quayle, Pamela; Negri, Andrew P

    2010-11-01

    Natural waters often contain complex mixtures of unknown contaminants potentially posing a threat to marine communities through chemical interactions. Here, acute effects of the photosystem II-inhibiting herbicides diuron, tebuthiuron, atrazine, simazine, and hexazinone, herbicide breakdown products (desethyl-atrazine (DEA) and 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA)) and binary mixtures, were investigated using three tropical benthic microalgae; Navicula sp. and Cylindrotheca closterium (Ochrophyta) and Nephroselmis pyriformis (Chlorophyta), and one standard test species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Ochrophyta), in a high-throughput Maxi-Imaging-PAM bioassay (Maxi-IPAM). The order of toxicity was; diuron > hexazinone > tebuthiuron > atrazine > simazine > DEA > 3,4-DCA for all species. The tropical green alga N. pyriformis was up to 10-fold more sensitive than the diatoms tested here and reported for coral symbionts, and is recommended as a standard tropical test species for future research. All binary mixtures exhibited additive toxicity, and the use of herbicide equivalents (HEq) is therefore recommended in order to incorporate total-maximum-load measures for environmental regulatory purposes.

  12. Impact of flumioxazin herbicide on growth and carbohydrate physiology in Vitis vinifera L.

    PubMed

    Saladin, G; Magné, C; Clément, C

    2003-04-01

    The impact of flumioxazin herbicide on in vitro-grown grapevine ( Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay) was investigated. The herbicide treatments (1, 10 or 100 micro M flumioxazin in MM medium) had a negative impact on photosynthesis, as revealed by a reduction in foliar chlorophyll and carotenoid contents, gas exchanges and alteration in plastid structure and, consequently, resulted in a strong inhibition of plantlet growth. Surprisingly, soluble sugars and starch accumulated in all organs, suggesting a stimulation of sugar uptake from the medium. Moreover, photosynthetic activity and starch content partially recovered within 3 weeks of treatment at the weakest herbicide concentration. These results provide new insights into the physiological responses of non-target crops to flumioxazin, showing that flumioxazin is active in photosynthetic tissues of the non-target grapevine via root uptake, which is contrary to what is mentioned in the literature, and that the in vitro-grown plantlet is a good model for investigating the physiological effects of pesticides on crop species.

  13. Behavioral response of juvenile rainbow trout exposed to an herbicide mixture.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Candida; Santos, Miguel Machado; Lek, Sovan; Grenouillet, Gaël

    2015-02-01

    Fish are capable of sensing water-borne chemicals at sub-lethal concentrations. Inadequate behavioral responses to physiological and environmental stimuli owing to adverse effects of aquatic toxicants can have serious implications for survival. In this study we exposed juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during 5 days to a low-concentration mixture of three co-occurring herbicides: atrazine, linuron and metolachlor, at maximum concentrations of 4.5, 4.9 and 13.4 μg L(-1), respectively. Our hypothesis was that fish behavior - swimming activity and interactions between individuals - would be modified due to exposure to the mixture. We studied these behaviors by observing fish twice-daily throughout the exposure period at 30-s intervals for 5 min, registering the vertical distribution of fish in the water column and the number of agoniztic acts between all individuals. Fish exposed to the mixture of herbicides were hypoactive and spent more time in the lower parts of the aquaria in comparison to non-exposed controls, reflecting inhibited swimming activity. Average swimming height of exposed fish decreased significantly with the number of agoniztic acts, whilst in control groups there was no significant relationship between the two behaviors. Overall, behavior of fish exposed for a short time to the herbicide mixture was altered in comparison to control-fish behavior. The behavioral endpoints chosen here were easily observed, simple to quantify, and of ecological relevance.

  14. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  15. Herbicides and herbicide degradation products in upper midwest agricultural streams during august base-flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Lee, K.E.; Porter, S.D.; Terrio, P.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Herbicide concentrations in streams of the U.S. Midwest have been shown to decrease through the growing season due to a variety of chemical and physical factors. The occurrence of herbicide degradation products at the end of the growing season is not well known. This study was conducted to document the occurrence of commonly used herbicides and their degradation products in Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota streams during base-flow conditions in August 1997. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide (94%), was present at relatively low concentrations (median 0.17 μg L−1). Metolachlor was detected in 59% and cyanazine in 37% of the samples. Seven of nine compounds detected in more than 50% of the samples were degradation products. The total concentration of the degradation products (median of 4.4 μg L−1) was significantly greater than the total concentration of parent compounds (median of 0.26 μg L−1). Atrazine compounds were present less frequently and in significantly smaller concentrations in streams draining watersheds with soils developed on less permeable tills than in watersheds with soils developed on more permeable loess. The detection and concentration of triazine compounds was negatively correlated with antecedent rainfall (April–July). In contrast, acetanalide compounds were positively correlated with antecedant rainfall in late spring and early summer that may transport the acetanalide degradates into ground water and subsequently into nearby streams. The distribution of atrazine degradation products suggests regional differences in atrazine degradation processes.

  16. Effect of herbicide adjuvants on the biodegradation rate of the methylthiotriazine herbicide prometryn.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bárcena, José Fernando; Ahuatzi-Chacón, Deifilia; Castillo-Martínez, Karla Lizzette; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Juárez-Ramírez, Cleotilde; Ramos-Monroy, Oswaldo

    2014-06-01

    A microbial community, selected by its ability to degrade triazinic herbicides was acclimatized by successive transfers in batch cultures. Initially, its ability to degrade prometryn, was evaluated using free cells or cells attached to fragments of a porous support. As carbon, nitrogen and sulfur sources, prometryn, (98.8 % purity), or Gesagard, a herbicide formulation containing 44.5 % prometryn and 65.5 % of adjuvants, were used. In batch cultures, a considerable delay in the degradation of prometryn, presumptively caused by the elevated concentration of inhibitory adjuvants, occurred. When pure prometryn was used, volumetric removal rates remarkably higher than those obtained with the herbicide formulation were estimated by fitting the raw experimental data to sigmoidal decay models, and differentiating them. When the microbial consortium was immobilized in a continuously operated biofilm reactor, the negative effect of adjuvants on the rate and removal efficiency of prometryn could not be detected. Using the herbicide formulation, the consortium showed volumetric removal rates greater than 20 g m(-3) h(-1), with prometryn removal efficiencies of 100 %. The predominant bacterial strains isolated from the microbial consortium were Microbacterium sp., Enterobacter sp., Acinetobacter sp., and Flavobacterium sp. Finally, by comparison of the prometryn removal rates with others reported in the literature, it can be concluded that the use of microbial consortia immobilized in a biofilm reactor operated in continuous regime offer better results than batch cultures of pure microbial strains.

  17. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in ...

  18. Possibilities of chemical weed control in Lupinus albus and Lupinus luteus-screening of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Dewitte, K; Latré, J; Haesaert, G

    2006-01-01

    Weed control in sweet lupins is still a problem. Especially the phytotoxicity of herbicides in sweet lupins is not enough studied. Therefore a screening with 16 selected herbicides and 4 lupin varieties has been set up. During the growing season 2005, 10 of the tested herbicides were applied in pre-emergence, 6 in post-emergence. Pre-emergence: Most of the active matters tested in pre-emergence were not phytotoxic for lupins. Pendimethalin (1000 g/ha), linuron (500 g/ha), chlorotoluron (1500 g/ha), prosulfocarb (2400 g/ha), clomazone (72 g/ha), isoxaben (100 g/ha), metamitron (1050 g/ha) and dimethenamid-P (720 g/ha) were applied without causing any significant phytotoxic symptoms. Only the lupins treated with aclonifen (1200 g/ha) showed a significant growth inhibition, 3 weeks after treatment. Significantly more chlorosis was noticed when the lupins were treated with aclonifen or with diflufenican, in preemergence. Post-emergence: In post-emergence, diflufenican (50 g/ha) did not cause any crop damage. Florasulam (5 g/ha) caused almost 100% necrosis in L. albus as well as in L. luteus. Bentazon (652 g/ha), thifensulfuron-methyl (15 g/ha) and metribuzin (175 g/ha) caused obvious necrosis and growth inhibition of the crop. The growth inhibition was significantly more severe for lupins treated with bentazon than if they were treated with thifensulfuron-methyl or metribuzin. Three weeks after treatment, clomazone (90 g/ha) and diflufenican (50 g/ha), did not cause any crop injury at all. The results indicated an interesting range of active matters which can be applied in pre-emergence, but weed control in post-emergence stays difficult.

  19. Multiple Mechanisms Increase Levels of Resistance in Rapistrum rugosum to ALS Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Hatami, Zahra M.; Gherekhloo, Javid; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia M.; Osuna, Maria D.; Alcántara, Ricardo; Fernández, Pablo; Sadeghipour, Hamid R.; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Rapistrum rugosum (turnip weed) is a common weed of wheat fields in Iran, which is most often controlled by tribenuron-methyl (TM), a sulfonylurea (SU) belonging to the acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicides group. Several cases of unexplained control failure of R. rugosum by TM have been seen, especially in Golestan province-Iran. Hence, there is lack of research in evaluation of the level of resistance of the R. rugosum populations to TM, using whole plant dose-response and enzyme assays, then investigating some potential resistance mechanisms Results revealed that the resistance factor (RF) for resistant (R) populations was 2.5–6.6 fold higher than susceptible (S) plant. Neither foliar retention, nor 14C-TM absorption and translocation were the mechanisms responsible for resistance in turnip weed. Metabolism of TM was the second resistant mechanism in two populations (Ag-R5 and G-1), in which three metabolites were found. The concentration of TM for 50% inhibition of ALS enzyme activity in vitro showed a high level of resistance to the herbicide (RFs were from 28 to 38) and cross-resistance to sulfonyl-aminocarbonyl-triazolinone (SCT), pyrimidinyl-thiobenzoate (PTB) and triazolopyrimidine (TP), with no cross-resistance to imidazolinone (IMI). Substitution Pro 197 to Ser 197 provided resistance to four of five ALS-inhibiting herbicides including SU, TP, PTB, and SCT with no resistance to IMI. These results documented the first case of R. rugosum resistant population worldwide and demonstrated that both RST and NRST mechanisms are involved to the resistance level to TM. PMID:26941749

  20. Isolation and characterization of Bradyrhizobium sp. SR1 degrading two β-triketone herbicides.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, Sana; Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Calvayrac, Christophe; Rocaboy-Faquet, Emilie; Riboul, David; Cooper, Jean-François; Barthelmebs, Lise

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a bacterial strain able to use sulcotrione, a β-triketone herbicide, as sole source of carbon and energy was isolated from soil samples previously treated with this herbicide. Phylogenetic study based on16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the isolate has 100 % of similarity with several Bradyrhizobium and was accordingly designated as Bradyrhizobium sp. SR1. Plasmid profiling revealed the presence of a large plasmid (>50 kb) in SR1 not cured under nonselective conditions. Its transfer to Escherichia coli by electroporation failed to induce β-triketone degrading capacity, suggesting that degrading genes possibly located on this plasmid cannot be expressed in E. coli or that they are not plasmid borne. The evaluation of the SR1 ability to degrade various synthetic (mesotrione and tembotrione) and natural (leptospermone) triketones showed that this strain was also able to degrade mesotrione. Although SR1 was able to entirely dissipate both herbicides, degradation rate of sulcotrione was ten times higher than that of mesotrione, showing a greater affinity of degrading-enzyme system to sulcotrione. Degradation pathway of sulcotrione involved the formation of 2-chloro-4-mesylbenzoic acid (CMBA), previously identified in sulcotrione degradation, and of a new metabolite identified as hydroxy-sulcotrione. Mesotrione degradation pathway leads to the accumulation of 4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoic acid (MNBA) and 2-amino-4 methylsulfonylbenzoic acid (AMBA), two well-known metabolites of this herbicide. Along with the dissipation of β-triketones, one could observe the decrease in 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) inhibition, indicating that toxicity was due to parent molecules, and not to the formed metabolites. This is the first report of the isolation of bacterial strain able to transform two β-triketones. PMID:25903192

  1. Development of whole cell biosensors for the detection of herbicides in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The development of novel whole cell biosensors for the on-line detection of herbicides in drinking water is described. Novel whole cell biosensors were developed using redox mediators to monitor the metabolic activity of whole cells. Photosynthetic microorganisms were chosen as the biocatalyst since many of the commercially available herbicides were known to inhibit the photosynthetic electron transport chain (PETC). The biocatalyst selected for the preliminary investigations was the cyanobacterium Synechococcus. To monitor similar PETC activity in the eukaryotic green alga Chlorella the non-ionic quinones were required. The organism Synechococcus and the mediator potassium ferricyanide were the most appropriate mediator/whole cell combination for the continued development of a whole cell biosensor (WCB). Investigations were undertaken to determine the mechanism by which potassium ferricyanide was able to monitor the photosynthetic activity of Synechococcus. Studies revealed that no PETC components were located on the cytoplasmic membrane, all such activity appeared solely on the intracytoplasmic membrane, potassium ferricyanide did not access the PETC directly, but rather interacted with membrane bound NADPH dehydrogenases, located in the CM. Therefore, any agents known to disturb photosynthetic electron transport should be readily detected as a reduction in current. The sensors were capable of detecting herbicides from the nitriles, ureas, anilides and triazine families at concentrations of 1--3 ppM. All herbicides were readily detected at a concentration of 25 ppB with the nitriles (ioxynil and bromoxynil), the anilide (propanil) and the urea (chlortoluron) readily detected at levels as low as 10 ppB. The sensors were also capable of detecting pentachlorophenol at a concentration of 100 ppB. A procedure was developed which enabled the production of a biocatalyst with a shelf-life of 1--2 months.

  2. Key role for a glutathione transferase in multiple-herbicide resistance in grass weeds.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Ian; Wortley, David J; Sabbadin, Federico; He, Zhesi; Coxon, Christopher R; Straker, Hannah E; Sellars, Jonathan D; Knight, Kathryn; Edwards, Lesley; Hughes, David; Kaundun, Shiv Shankhar; Hutchings, Sarah-Jane; Steel, Patrick G; Edwards, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Multiple-herbicide resistance (MHR) in black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides) and annual rye-grass (Lolium rigidum) is a global problem leading to a loss of chemical weed control in cereal crops. Although poorly understood, in common with multiple-drug resistance (MDR) in tumors, MHR is associated with an enhanced ability to detoxify xenobiotics. In humans, MDR is linked to the overexpression of a pi class glutathione transferase (GSTP1), which has both detoxification and signaling functions in promoting drug resistance. In both annual rye-grass and black-grass, MHR was also associated with the increased expression of an evolutionarily distinct plant phi (F) GSTF1 that had a restricted ability to detoxify herbicides. When the black-grass A. myosuroides (Am) AmGSTF1 was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana, the transgenic plants acquired resistance to multiple herbicides and showed similar changes in their secondary, xenobiotic, and antioxidant metabolism to those determined in MHR weeds. Transcriptome array experiments showed that these changes in biochemistry were not due to changes in gene expression. Rather, AmGSTF1 exerted a direct regulatory control on metabolism that led to an accumulation of protective flavonoids. Further evidence for a key role for this protein in MHR was obtained by showing that the GSTP1- and MDR-inhibiting pharmacophore 4-chloro-7-nitro-benzoxadiazole was also active toward AmGSTF1 and helped restore herbicide control in MHR black-grass. These studies demonstrate a central role for specific GSTFs in MHR in weeds that has parallels with similar roles for unrelated GSTs in MDR in humans and shows their potential as targets for chemical intervention in resistant weed management.

  3. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual Grass Seed Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Auxinic herbicides, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, that act as plant growth regulators are commonly used for broadleaf weed control in cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley), grasslands, and non-croplands. If applied at later growth stages, while cereals are developing reproductive parts, the herbicides can...

  4. Are Herbicide Resistant Crops The Answer To Controlling Cascuta?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide tolerant crop technology could provide new management strategies for the control of parasitic plants. Three herbicide-tolerant oilseed rape genotypes were used to examine the response of attached C. campestris to glyphosate, imazamox and glufosinate. C. campestris was allowed to establi...

  5. ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS BY LC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propachlor, flufen...

  6. Confirmation of resistance to herbicides and evaluation of resistance levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As cases of resistance to herbicides escalate worldwide, there is increasing demand from growers to test for weed resistance and how to manage it. Scientists have developed resistance testing protocols for numerous herbicides and weed species. Growers need immediate answers and scientists are faced ...

  7. Rainfastness and adsorption of herbicides on hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Spanoghe, Pieter; Claeys, Johan; Pinoy, Luc; Steurbaut, Walter

    2005-08-01

    Herbicides are still used to control weeds on hard surfaces, including municipal, private and industrial sites. Used under unfavourable conditions, especially when rain occurs shortly after application, herbicides may run off to surface waters. Such losses of herbicides from hard surfaces are estimated to be much higher than for herbicides used in arable fields. In this study, three kinds of hard surface were evaluated: asphalt, concrete surface and gravel (fine and coarse). Three herbicides were applied: glyphosate, diuron and diflufenican. Adsorption isotherms of diuron and diflufenican to the three surfaces were determined. At different times after treatment with the herbicides, rainfall was simulated by use of a rain-droplet spray nozzle, and the run-off was collected for analysis. After this run-off event, the materials were immersed in water to measure desorption which, together with the compound in the run-off, gave a measure of the dislodgable residues. The apolar herbicides diuron and especially diflufenican adsorbed strongly to asphalt. The polar herbicide glyphosate lost 75% in run-off from asphalt but was adsorbed strongly to soil and concrete pavement.

  8. Herbicide-resistant crop biotechnology: potential and pitfalls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide-resistant crops are an important agricultural biotechnology that can enable farmers to effectively control weeds without harming their crops. Glyphosate-resistant (i.e. Roundup Ready) crops have been the most commercially successful varieties of herbicide-resistant crops and have been plan...

  9. Expanding the eco-evolutionary context of herbicide resistance research.

    PubMed

    Neve, Paul; Busi, Roberto; Renton, Michael; Vila-Aiub, Martin M

    2014-09-01

    The potential for human-driven evolution in economically and environmentally important organisms in medicine, agriculture and conservation management is now widely recognised. The evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds is a classic example of rapid adaptation in the face of human-mediated selection. Management strategies that aim to slow or prevent the evolution of herbicide resistance must be informed by an understanding of the ecological and evolutionary factors that drive selection in weed populations. Here, we argue for a greater focus on the ultimate causes of selection for resistance in herbicide resistance studies. The emerging fields of eco-evolutionary dynamics and applied evolutionary biology offer a means to achieve this goal and to consider herbicide resistance in a broader and sometimes novel context. Four relevant research questions are presented, which examine (i) the impact of herbicide dose on selection for resistance, (ii) plant fitness in herbicide resistance studies, (iii) the efficacy of herbicide rotations and mixtures and (iv) the impacts of gene flow on resistance evolution and spread. In all cases, fundamental ecology and evolution have the potential to offer new insights into herbicide resistance evolution and management.

  10. Spatial variation in sorption and dissipation is herbicide-dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eroded landforms, soil properties that influence herbicide fate are highly variable with landscape position. Understanding the variation in herbicide sorption and dissipation is essential to characterize weed control efficacy and availability for off-site transport. We evaluated the sorption and/...

  11. Kudzu Suppression by Herbicides in Two-Year Field trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are currently the principle means of halting the spread of kudzu (Pueraria montana var lobata) and reclaiming kudzu-infested lands. The efficacy of several herbicides on this invasive weed has been well-established, but these chemicals can be prohibitively expensive, come with significan...

  12. Herbicide Leaching Column for a Weed Science Teaching Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an experiment which enables weed science students to observe first-hand the process of herbicide leaching in soils. Features of this technique which demonstrate the movement of herbicide within a column of soil are outlined. Diagrams are provided of the apparatus employed in the exercise. (ML)

  13. Manuka oil a natural herbicide with preemergence activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural herbicides approved in organic agriculture are primarily non-selective burn-down essential oils applied POST. Multiple applications are often required due to their low efficacy. To address this problem, the in vivo herbicidal activity of manuka oil, the essential oil distilled from Leptosp...

  14. Pelargonic acid as a herbicide in sweet bell peppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonic acid, although not certified as organic, is naturally occurring in many plants, animals, and foods. It is also phytotoxic to plants as a contact herbicide, injuring and killing plants by destroying the cell membrane. Vegetable producers would benefit from additional herbicide options tha...

  15. Herbicide volatilization trumps runoff losses, a multi-year investigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface runoff and volatilization are two processes critical to herbicide off-site transport. To determine the relevance of these off-site transport mechanisms, runoff and turbulent vapor fluxes were simultaneously monitored on the same site for eight years. Site location, herbicide formulations, ...

  16. Groundwater resources impact assessment for triazine herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, E.; Barrett, M.R.; Behl, E.

    1996-10-01

    The Environmental Fate and Ground Water Branch of EPA`s Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) has conducted a Water Resources Impact Assessment of the potential for triazine herbicides to be transported to ground and surface waters (only ground-water is discussed in this paper). The herbicides discussed in this document include atrazine, cyanazine, simazine, and prometon. Part of OPP`s regulatory mission is to prevent contamination of ground and surface water resources resulting from the normal use of registered pesticides. OPP has recently produced several resource documents to support such activities at the federal, state, and local levels (e.g., the Pesticides and Ground-Water Strategy and the Pesticides in Ground Water Database). This Water Resources Impact Assessment will also be useful in assisting state and regional agencies in customizing risk reduction strategies and to implement proposed pollution prevention measures. Major conclusions include: Atrazine is the most frequently detected pesticide in ground water in virtually the entire Midwestern United States, and especially in Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. The Pesticides in Ground Water Database 1992 Report indicates that atrazine has been detected in 32 out of the 40 states that have reported monitoring data, and in 1,512 wells (6%) of the wells sampled. Based on EPA`s National Pesticide Survey (NPS), 4.7% of rural domestic drinking water wells in the U.S. (490,000 wells) are estimated to contain atrazine, mostly at concentrations less than 0.12 {mu}g/L (the MCL for atrazine is 3 {mu}g/L). Triazine herbicides other than atrazine (simazine, cyanazine, and prometon) have had much less impact on ground-water quality than atrazine, primarily because they are less intensively used.

  17. Herbicide concentrations in the Mississippi River Basin - The importance of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rebich, R.A.; Coupe, R.H.; Thurman, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The proportion of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates, specifically the ethane sulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OA) acids, averaged 70% of the total herbicide concentration in samples from the Upper Mississippi River. In samples from the Missouri River and the Ohio River, the proportion of chloroacetanilide degradates in the total herbicide concentration was much less, 24% and 41%, respectively. The amount of tile drainage throughout the Mississippi River Basin appeared to be related to the occurrence and distribution of chloroacetanilide degradates in water samples. Pesticide concentrations in streams of the Mississippi River Basin have been well characterized. However, recent research demonstrates that in order to more fully understand the fate and transport of pesticides, the major pesticide degradates need to be included in the analysis. From March 1999 through May 2001, water samples from four major junctures of the Mississippi River Basin were collected and analyzed for a suite of herbicides and their degradate compounds. Each sampling site was selected to represent a major part of the Mississippi River: upper and lower Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio Rivers. Each basin has unique landscape variables, geology, hydrology, precipitation, and land use, which is reflected in the pesticide content at the most downstream sample site near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Atrazine was the most frequently detected herbicide (detected in 97% of the samples), followed by metolachlor (60%), and acetochlor (31%). The most frequently detected degradates were metolachlor ESA (69%), followed by deethylatrazine (62%), metolachlor OA (37%), and alachlor ESA (37%). Metolachlor ESA was detected more frequently than its parent compound (69 vs. 60%), as was alachlor ESA (37 vs. 9%). After an improvement was made in the analytical method, metolachlor ESA was detected in every sample, metolachlor OA in 89% of the samples, alachlor ESA in 84%, acetochlor ESA in 71%, and acetochlor

  18. Effects of herbicide applications in wheat fields

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Sugandha; Hayat, Shamshul; Alyemeni, Mohammed Nasser; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    The present review encompasses the physiological and yield constraints of herbicide applications with special reference to wheat productivity. Post-independence lagging of Indian agriculture to feed its population led to haphazard use of chemical pesticides and weedicides which deteriorated the productivity pay-off particularly of wheat and rice. Past some decades witnessed the potential use of certain phytohormones in augmenting abiotic stress to get rid of yield gap and productivity constraints. We summed up with reviewing the potential role of these natural regulators in overcoming above mentioned drawbacks to substitute or to integrate these chemicals with the use of plant hormones. PMID:22516826

  19. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  20. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  1. Degradation of the 32 kD herbicide binding protein in far red light. [Spirodella oligorrhiza

    SciTech Connect

    Gaba, V.; Marder, J.B.; Greenberg, B.M.; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M.

    1987-06-01

    White light (400-700 nanometers) supports the activity of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II while far red light (greater than or equal to700 nanometers) supports PSI almost exclusively. In intact fronds of Spirodela oligorrhiza, turnover of the 32 kilodaltons herbicide binding protein is stimulated under both these light conditions, although not in the dark or at wavelengths > 730 nanometers. As is the case in white light, the far red light induced degradation of the protein is inhibited by DCMU. The means by which far red light operates is unclear. Hypotheses considered include: PSI activated proteolysis, PSI-induced formation of semiquinone anions, and PSI-generated free radicals.

  2. Antifungal and Herbicidal Effects of Fruit Essential Oils of Four Myrtus communis Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kordali, Saban; Usanmaz, Ayse; Cakir, Ahmet; Komaki, Amanmohammad; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils isolated by hydrodistillation from the fruits of four selected Myrtus communis L. genotypes from Turkey was characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. 1,8-Cineole (29.20-31.40%), linalool (15.67-19.13%), α-terpineol (8.40-18.43%), α-pinene (6.04-20.71%), and geranyl acetate (3.98-7.54%) were found to be the major constituents of the fruit essential oils of all M. communis genotypes investigated. The oils were characterized by high amounts of oxygenated monoterpenes, representing 73.02-83.83% of the total oil compositions. The results of the fungal growth inhibition assays showed that the oils inhibited the growth of 19 phytopathogenic fungi. However, their antifungal activity was generally lower than that of the commercial pesticide benomyl. The herbicidal effects of the oils on the seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus L., Chenopodium album L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Lactuca serriola L., and Rumex crispus L. were also determined. The oils completely or partly inhibited the seed germinations and seedling growths of the plants. The findings of the present study suggest that the M. communis essential oils might have potential to be used as natural herbicides as well as fungicides.

  3. Antifungal and Herbicidal Effects of Fruit Essential Oils of Four Myrtus communis Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kordali, Saban; Usanmaz, Ayse; Cakir, Ahmet; Komaki, Amanmohammad; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils isolated by hydrodistillation from the fruits of four selected Myrtus communis L. genotypes from Turkey was characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. 1,8-Cineole (29.20-31.40%), linalool (15.67-19.13%), α-terpineol (8.40-18.43%), α-pinene (6.04-20.71%), and geranyl acetate (3.98-7.54%) were found to be the major constituents of the fruit essential oils of all M. communis genotypes investigated. The oils were characterized by high amounts of oxygenated monoterpenes, representing 73.02-83.83% of the total oil compositions. The results of the fungal growth inhibition assays showed that the oils inhibited the growth of 19 phytopathogenic fungi. However, their antifungal activity was generally lower than that of the commercial pesticide benomyl. The herbicidal effects of the oils on the seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus L., Chenopodium album L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Lactuca serriola L., and Rumex crispus L. were also determined. The oils completely or partly inhibited the seed germinations and seedling growths of the plants. The findings of the present study suggest that the M. communis essential oils might have potential to be used as natural herbicides as well as fungicides. PMID:26765354

  4. Aryl Hydroxylation of the Herbicide Diclofop by a Wheat Cytochrome P-450 Monooxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, Alfred; Durst, Francis

    1992-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Etoile de Choisy) microsomes catalyzed the cytochrome P-450-dependent oxidation of the herbicide diclofop to three hydroxy-diclofop isomers. Hydroxylation was predominant at carbon 4, with migration of chlorine to carbon 5 (67%) and carbon 3 (25%). The 2,4-dichloro-5-hydroxy isomer was identified as a minor reaction product (8%). Substrate-specificity studies showed that the activity was not inhibited or was weakly inhibited by a range of xenobiotic or physiological cytochrome P-450 substrates, with the exception of lauric acid. Wheat microsomes also catalyze the metabolism of the herbicides chlorsulfuron, chlortoluron, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and of the model substrate ethoxycoumarin, as well as the hydroxylation of the endogenous substrates cinnamic and lauric acids. Treatments of wheat seedlings with phenobarbital or the safener naphthalic acid anhydride enhanced the cytochrome P-450 content of the microsomes and all related activities except that of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase, which was reduced. The stimulation patterns of diclofop aryl hydroxylase and lauric acid hydroxylase were similar, in contrast with the other activities tested. Lauric acid inhibited competitively (Ki = 9 μm) the oxidation of diclofop and reciprocally. The similarity of diclofop aryl hydroxylase and lauric acid hydroxylase was further investigated by alternative substrate kinetics, autocatalytic inactivation, and computer-aided molecular modelisation studies, and the results suggest that both reactions are catalyzed by the same cytochrome P-450 isozyme. PMID:16653070

  5. Deciphering the evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds.

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Jasieniuk, Marie; Le Corre, Valérie

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to herbicides in arable weeds is increasing rapidly worldwide and threatening global food security. Resistance has now been reported to all major herbicide modes of action despite the development of resistance management strategies in the 1990s. We review here recent advances in understanding the genetic bases and evolutionary drivers of herbicide resistance that highlight the complex nature of selection for this adaptive trait. Whereas early studied cases of resistance were highly herbicide-specific and largely under monogenic control, cases of greatest concern today generally involve resistance to multiple modes of action, are under polygenic control, and are derived from pre-existing stress response pathways. Although 'omics' approaches should enable unraveling the genetic bases of complex resistances, the appearance, selection, and spread of herbicide resistance in weed populations can only be fully elucidated by focusing on evolutionary dynamics and implementing integrative modeling efforts.

  6. Betaine and Carnitine Derivatives as Herbicidal Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Pernak, Juliusz; Niemczak, Michał; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Fochtman, Przemysław; Marcinkowska, Katarzyna; Praczyk, Tadeusz

    2016-08-16

    This study focused on the synthesis and subsequent characterization of herbicidal ionic liquids based on betaine and carnitine, two derivatives of amino acids, which were used as cations. Four commonly used herbicides (2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP and Dicamba) were used as anions in simple (single anion) and oligomeric (two anions) salts. The obtained salts were subjected to analyzes regarding physicochemical properties (density, viscosity, refractive index, thermal decomposition profiles and solubility) as well as evaluation of their herbicidal activity under greenhouse and field conditions, toxicity towards rats and biodegradability. The obtained results suggest that the synthesized herbicidal ionic liquids displayed low toxicity (classified as category 4 compounds) and showed similar or improved efficacy against weed compared to reference herbicides. The highest increase was observed during field trials for salts containing 2,4-D as the anion, which also exhibited the highest biodegradability (>75 %). PMID:27374836

  7. Effects of the herbicides clomazone, quinclorac, and metsulfuron methyl on acetylcholinesterase activity in the silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) (Heptapteridae).

    PubMed

    dos Santos Miron, Denise; Crestani, Márcia; Rosa Shettinger, Maria; Maria Morsch, Vera; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Angel Tierno, Miguel; Moraes, Gilberto; Vieira, Vania Lucia Pimentel

    2005-07-01

    Fingerlings of the silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) were exposed to three herbicides widely used in rice culture in south Brazil: clomazone, quinclorac, and metsulfuron methyl. LC50 was determined and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was evaluated in brain and muscle tissue of fish exposed to different herbicide concentrations after 96h (short term). The LC50 value (nominal concentration) was 7.32 mg/L for clomazone and 395 mg/L for quinclorac, but was not obtained for metsulfuron-methyl since all fingerlings survived the highest concentration of 1200 mg/L. Brain and muscle AChE activity in unexposed fish were 17.9 and 9.08 micromol/min/g protein, respectively. Clomazone significantly inhibited AChE activity in both tissues, achieving maximal inhibition of about 83% in brain and 89% in muscle tissue. In contrast, quinclorac and metsulfuron methyl caused increases in enzyme activity in the brain (98 and 179%, respectively) and inhibitions in muscle tissue (88 and 56%, respectively). This study demonstrated short-term effects of exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of rice field herbicides on AChE activity in brain and muscle tissue of silver catfish.

  8. Comparison of the sensitivity of different toxicity test endpoints in a microalga exposed to the herbicide paraquat.

    PubMed

    Prado, R; García, R; Rioboo, C; Herrero, C; Abalde, J; Cid, A

    2009-02-01

    The use of herbicides constitutes the principal method of weed control but the introduction of these compounds into the aquatic environment can provoke severe consequences for non-target organisms such as microalgae. Toxic effects of these pollutants on microalgae are generally evaluated using phytotoxicity tests based on growth inhibition, a population-based parameter. However, physiological cellular endpoints could allow early detection of cell stress and elucidate underlying toxicity mechanisms. Effects of the herbicide paraquat on the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii were studied to evaluate growth rate and cellular parameters such as cellular viability and metabolic activity assayed by flow cytometry and DNA damage assayed by the comet assay. Sensitivity of growth and parameters assayed by flow cytometry were similar, showing a significant effect in cultures exposed to a paraquat concentration of 0.1 microM or higher, although in cultures exposed during 48 h to 0.05 microM, a significant stimulation of cellular fluorescein fluorescence was observed, related to cellular metabolic activity. After only 24 h of herbicide exposure significant DNA damage was observed in microalgal cells exposed to all paraquat concentrations assayed, with a 23.67% of comets in cultures exposed to 0.05 microM, revealing the genotoxicity of this herbicide. Taking into account the results obtained, comet assay provides a sensitive and rapid system for measuring primary DNA damage in Chlamydomonas moewusii, which could be an important aspect of environmental genotoxicity monitoring in surface waters. PMID:18703230

  9. Synthesis and herbicidal activity of novel 1-(Diethoxy-phosphoryl)-3-(4-one-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-propan-2-yl carboxylic esters.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Zhao, Hanqing; Lu, Huizhe; Kuemmel, Colleen M; Zhang, Jianjun; Wang, Daoquan

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel compounds, namely 1-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-3-(4-ones-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)propan-2-yl carboxylic esters, were designed on the basis of the diazafulvene intermediate of imidazole glycerol phosphate dehydratase (IGPD) and high-activity inhibitors of IGPD, and synthesized as inhibitors targeting IGPD in plants. Their structures were confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 31P-NMR and HR-MS. The herbicidal evaluation performed by a Petri dish culture method showed that most compounds possessed moderate to good herbicidal activities. Six compounds were chosen for further herbicidal evaluation on barnyard grass by pot experiments. 1-(Diethoxyphosphoryl)-3-(4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)propan-2-yl 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)acetate (5-A3) and ethyl 1-(2-acetoxy-3-(diethoxyphosphoryl)propyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylate (5-B4) showed good herbicidal activities. Compared with the compounds with the best herbicidal activity ever reported, both compounds 5-A3 and 5-B4, which can inhibit the growth of barnyard grass at the concentration of 250g/hm2, efficiently gave rise to a nearly 4-fold increase of the herbicidal potency. However, their herbicidal activities were lower than that of acetochlor (62.5 g/hm2) in the pot experiments.

  10. Synthesis and herbicidal activity of novel 1-(Diethoxy-phosphoryl)-3-(4-one-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-propan-2-yl carboxylic esters.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Zhao, Hanqing; Lu, Huizhe; Kuemmel, Colleen M; Zhang, Jianjun; Wang, Daoquan

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel compounds, namely 1-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-3-(4-ones-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)propan-2-yl carboxylic esters, were designed on the basis of the diazafulvene intermediate of imidazole glycerol phosphate dehydratase (IGPD) and high-activity inhibitors of IGPD, and synthesized as inhibitors targeting IGPD in plants. Their structures were confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 31P-NMR and HR-MS. The herbicidal evaluation performed by a Petri dish culture method showed that most compounds possessed moderate to good herbicidal activities. Six compounds were chosen for further herbicidal evaluation on barnyard grass by pot experiments. 1-(Diethoxyphosphoryl)-3-(4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)propan-2-yl 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)acetate (5-A3) and ethyl 1-(2-acetoxy-3-(diethoxyphosphoryl)propyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylate (5-B4) showed good herbicidal activities. Compared with the compounds with the best herbicidal activity ever reported, both compounds 5-A3 and 5-B4, which can inhibit the growth of barnyard grass at the concentration of 250g/hm2, efficiently gave rise to a nearly 4-fold increase of the herbicidal potency. However, their herbicidal activities were lower than that of acetochlor (62.5 g/hm2) in the pot experiments. PMID:25587785

  11. Toxicity of the herbicide glyphosate to Chordodes nobilii (Gordiida, Nematomorpha).

    PubMed

    Achiorno, Cecilia L; Villalobos, Cristina de; Ferrari, Lucrecia

    2008-05-01

    Nematomorpha (horsehair worms) is a poorly known group of worm-like animals similar to nematodes. Adults are free-living and reproduction takes place in freshwater environments, where preparasitic larvae undergo development. All species have a parasitic juvenil stage and infection may result in the host's death, insects being the most frequent host. Most of the life cycle occurs in freshwater environments, which are often contaminated by different pollutants. Based on the lack of information on the toxicity of herbicides to horsehair worms, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of glyphosate (technical grade and formulated product) on Chordodes nobilii (Gordiida, Nematomorpha). Bioassays were performed with embryos and larvae (preparasitic stages), and adults (postparasitic stage). Test organisms were exposed for a short period of time to concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 8 mga.e.l(-1) of glyphosate (technical and formulated). Although embryo development was not inhibited, there was a significant decrease in the infective capacity of larvae derived from eggs that had been exposed to >or= 0.1mg/l. Similar results were obtained for directly exposed larvae. No differences in toxicity were detected between the active ingredient and formulated product. Adult exposed for 96 h to 1.76 mgl(-1) formulated Gly shown a mortality of 50%. Results indicate that C. nobilii is affected at glyphosate concentrations lower than those expected to be found in freshwater environments and those specified in the legislation.

  12. Inhibition of Phenylamide Hydrolysis by Bacillus sphaericus with Methylcarbamate and Organophosphorus Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, G.; Wallnöfer, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    The degradation of the phenylamide herbicides monolinuron, linuron, and solan by cultures of Bacillus sphaericus ATCC 12123 was inhibited by the methylcarbamate insecticides metmercapturon, aldicarb, propoxur, and carbaryl and by the organophosphorus insecticides fenthion and parathion. The extent of inhibition was largest with metmercapturon and smallest with parathion. Inhibition of hydrolysis of the two phenylurea herbicides was greater than of the acylanilide compound. Tests with crude enzyme preparations of aryl acylamidase derived from B. sphaericus showed that the inhibition of the hydrolysis of linuron with methylcarbamates is a competitive one. The insecticides tested did not induce the enzyme, nor could they serve as its substrate. PMID:1155931

  13. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: The Challenge of Herbicides for Aquatic Weeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Dean F.; Martin, Barbara B.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses problems in selecting the correct herbicide for use in controlling aquatic weeds, considering specificity, size of the market, fear of trace contaminants, and herbicide resistance in weeds. Also summarizes some successful herbicides, providing a table listing mode of action of some herbicides used for control of aquatic plants. (JN)

  14. Research methods in weed science: herbicide absorption and translocation in plants using radioisotopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide absorption and translocation in plants is a key component in the study of herbicide physiology, mode of action, selectivity, resistance mechanisms, and in the registration process. Radioactive herbicides have been in use for over half-a-century in the research and study of herbicide absorp...

  15. Herbicidal effects of harmaline from Peganum harmala on photosynthesis of Chlorella pyrenoidosa: probed by chlorophyll fluorescence and thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Shao, Hua; Pan, Xiangliang; Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Daoyong

    2014-10-01

    The herbicidal effects of harmaline extracted from Peganum harmala seed on cell growth and photosynthesis of green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated using chlorophyll a fluorescence and thermoluminescence techniques. Exposure to harmaline inhibited cell growth, pigments contents and oxygen evolution of C. pyrenoidosa. Oxygen evolution was more sensitive to harmaline toxicity than cell growth or the whole photosystem II (PSII) activity, maybe it was the first target site of harmaline. The JIP-test parameters showed that harmaline inhibited the donor side of PSII. Harmaline decreased photochemical efficiency and electron transport flow of PSII but increased the energy dissipation. The charge recombination was also affected by harmaline. Amplitude of the fast phase decreased and the slow phase increased at the highest level of harmaline. Electron transfer from QA(-) to QB was inhibited and backward electron transport flow from QA(-) to oxygen evolution complex was enhanced at 10 μg mL(-1) harmaline. Exposure to 10 μg mL(-1) harmaline caused appearance of C band in thermoluminescence. Exposure to 5 μg mL(-1) harmaline inhibited the formation of proton gradient. The highest concentration of harmaline treatment inhibited S3QB(-) charge recombination but promoted formation of QA(-)YD(+) charge pairs. P. harmala harmaline may be a promising herbicide because of its inhibition of cell growth, pigments synthesis, oxygen evolution and PSII activities.

  16. Washoff of Residual Photosystem II Herbicides from Sugar Cane Trash under a Rainfall Simulator.

    PubMed

    Dang, Aaditi; Silburn, Mark; Craig, Ian; Shaw, Melanie; Foley, Jenny

    2016-05-25

    Herbicides are often applied to crop residues, but their fate has not been well studied. We measured herbicide washoff from sugar cane trash during simulated rainfall, at 1, 8, and 40 days after spraying (DAS), to provide insight into herbicide fate and for use in modeling. Herbicides included are commonly used in the sugar industry, either in Australia or in Brazil. Concentrations of all herbicides and applied Br tracer in washoff declined exponentially over time. The rate of washoff during rainfall declined with increasing DAS. Cumulative washoff as a function of rainfall was similar for most herbicides, although the most soluble herbicides did have more rapid washoff. Some but not all herbicides became more resistant to washoff with increasing DAS. Of the total mass washed off, 80% washed off in the first 30 mm (∼40 min) of rainfall for most herbicides. Little herbicide remained on the trash after rainfall, implying nearly complete washoff. PMID:26964670

  17. Washoff of Residual Photosystem II Herbicides from Sugar Cane Trash under a Rainfall Simulator.

    PubMed

    Dang, Aaditi; Silburn, Mark; Craig, Ian; Shaw, Melanie; Foley, Jenny

    2016-05-25

    Herbicides are often applied to crop residues, but their fate has not been well studied. We measured herbicide washoff from sugar cane trash during simulated rainfall, at 1, 8, and 40 days after spraying (DAS), to provide insight into herbicide fate and for use in modeling. Herbicides included are commonly used in the sugar industry, either in Australia or in Brazil. Concentrations of all herbicides and applied Br tracer in washoff declined exponentially over time. The rate of washoff during rainfall declined with increasing DAS. Cumulative washoff as a function of rainfall was similar for most herbicides, although the most soluble herbicides did have more rapid washoff. Some but not all herbicides became more resistant to washoff with increasing DAS. Of the total mass washed off, 80% washed off in the first 30 mm (∼40 min) of rainfall for most herbicides. Little herbicide remained on the trash after rainfall, implying nearly complete washoff.

  18. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-07-02

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs.

  19. Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.; Squillace, P.

    1994-01-01

    Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer and quantification of herbicide bank storage during high streamflow were investigated at a research site on the Cedar River flood plain, 10 km southeast of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. During high streamflow in March 1990, alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background in water from wells as distant as 20, 50, and 10 m from the river's edge, respectively. During high streamflow in May 1990, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background as distant as 20, 50, 10, and 20 m from the river's edge, respectively. Herbicide bank storage took place during high streamflow when hydraulic gradients were from the river to the alluvial aquifer and the laterally infiltrating river water contained herbicide concentrations larger than background concentrations in the aquifer. The herbicide bank storage can be quantified by multiplying herbicide concentration by the "effective area" that a well represented and an assumed porosity of 0.25. During March 1990, herbicide bank storage values were calculated to be 1.7,79, and 4.0 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor, respectively. During May 1990, values were 7.1, 54, 11, and 19 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor, respectively. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  20. Herbicidal treatments for control of Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M

    1977-01-01

    In order to test herbicides for the destruction of illicit stands of cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.) a series of commercially available herbicides were sprayed on glasshouse-grown plants having 2 to 6 leaves. The following herbicides caused complete kill or severe injury to cannabis plants: (a) herbicides with root and foliage activity--ametryn, atrazine, metribuzin, prometryn, terbutryne, diuron, fluometuron, linuron, methabenzthiazuron, phenobenzuron, ethofumesate, karbutilate, methazole and oxadiazon; and (b) foliar-acting herbicides with brief or no soil persistence--amitrole, bentazon, 2,4-D, diquat + paraquat, glyphosate and phenmedipham. In field experiments herbicides of the latter group, and ioxynil, metribuzin, and a MSMA-cacodylate mixture, caused death or severe damage to young cannabis plants. Glyphosate, ioxynil and bentazon destroyed developed cannabis plants. In glasshouse and field experiments the following herbicides applied to young cannabis plants caused marked deformations of stems, leaves and/or inflorescences: barban, butralin, dalapon, difenzoquat, dinitramine, diphenamid, IPC, napropamide, penoxalin, triffuralin, and U-27267. PMID:585583

  1. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs. PMID:26167668

  2. Influence of Environmental Factors on the Germination of Urena lobata L. and Its Response to Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Tahir Hussain; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh; Cruz, Pompe C. Sta.

    2014-01-01

    Urena lobata is becoming a noxious and invasive weed in rangelands, pastures, and undisturbed areas in the Philippines. This study determined the effects of seed scarification, light, salt and water stress, amount of rice residue, and seed burial depth on seed germination and emergence of U. lobata; and evaluated the weed's response to post-emergence herbicides. Germination was stimulated by both mechanical and chemical seed scarifications. The combination of the two scarification methods provided maximum (99%) seed germination. Germination was slightly stimulated when seeds were placed in light (65%) compared with when seeds were kept in the dark (46%). Sodium chloride concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 mM and osmotic potential ranging from 0 to −1.6 MPa affected the germination of U. lobata seeds significantly. The osmotic potential required for 50% inhibition of the maximum germination was −0.1 MPa; however, some seeds germinated at −0.8 MPa, but none germinated at −1.6 MPa. Seedling emergence and biomass increased with increase in rice residue amount up to 4 t ha−1, but declined beyond this amount. Soil surface placement of weed seeds resulted in the highest seedling emergence (84%), which declined with increase in burial depth. The burial depth required for 50% inhibition of maximum emergence was 2 cm; emergence was greatly reduced (93%) at burial depth of 4 cm or more. Weed seedling biomass also decreased with increase in burial depth. Bispyribac-sodium, a commonly used herbicide in rice, sprayed at the 4-leaf stage of the weed, provided 100% control, which did not differ much with 2,4-D (98%), glyphosate (97%), and thiobencarb + 2,4-D (98%). These herbicides reduced shoot and root biomass by 99–100%. PMID:24658143

  3. Triazolopyrimidines as a New Herbicidal Lead for Combating Weed Resistance Associated with Acetohydroxyacid Synthase Mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Chao; Qu, Ren-Yu; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Jing-Fang; Cong-Wei, Niu; Zhen, Xi; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-06-22

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS; also known as acetolactate synthase; EC 2.2.1.6, formerly EC 4.1.3.18) is the first common enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the branched-chain amino acids in plants and a wide range of microorganisms. Weed resistance to AHAS-inhibiting herbicides, increasing at an exponential rate, is becoming a global problem and leading to an urgent demand of developing novel compounds against both resistant and wild AHAS. In the present work, a series of novel 2-aroxyl-1,2,4-triazolopyrimidine derivatives (a total of 55) were designed and synthesized with the aim to discover an antiresistant lead compound. Fortunately, the screening results indicated that many of the newly synthesized compounds showed a better, even excellent, inhibition effect against both the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS and P197L mutants. Among them, compounds 5-3 to 5-17, compounds 5-19 to 5-26, compounds 5-28 to 5-45, and compound 5-48 have the lower values of resistance factor (RF) and display a potential power to overcome resistance associated with the P197L mutation in the enzyme levels. Further greenhouse in vivo assay showed that compounds 5-15 and 5-20 displayed "moderate" to "good" herbicidal activity against both the wild type-and the resistant (P197L mutation) Descurainia sophia, even at a rate as low as 0.9375 (g of ai/ha). The above results indicated that these two compounds could be used as new leads for the future development of antiresistance herbicides. PMID:27265721

  4. Herbicide contamination and dispersion pattern in lowland springs.

    PubMed

    Laini, Alex; Bartoli, Marco; Lamastra, Lucrezia; Capri, Ettore; Balderacchi, Matteo; Trevisan, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Herbicides reduce the diversity of flora and fauna in freshwater ecosystems and also contaminate groundwater due to leaching. Herbicide contamination can be a serious threat for all groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDE), altering their chemical and biological quality. Successful management to protect GDE is dependent on detailed knowledge of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical features of the surrounding environment. We consider the possible diffuse contamination by herbicides of groundwater and of GDE as lowland springs, semi-artificial ecosystems with elevated biodiversity. The main objectives of the present work were thus: (1) to map herbicide contamination in lowland springs, (2) to evaluate the potential risk for biota and (3) to quantify the extent of the area from which the herbicide use can affect the water quality of lowland springs. In June and August 2009, nearly 23 springs within the Po River Plain (Northern Italy) were sampled and analyzed for five herbicides used to control weeds in maize. Hydrogeological properties, half-lives of the herbicides and their concentrations in both groundwater and springs were used to quantify the area from which the contamination could originate. Such evaluation was performed by means of GIS techniques. Terbuthylazine were the only herbicide found, together with its metabolite desethylterbuthylazine. In 16 out of 84 measurements, their concentrations were above the threshold for drinking water; however, they were always below the ecotoxicological end-points of aquatic flora and fauna. Spatial analyses reveal that the theoretical area from which herbicides can contaminate spring water is within a distance varying between a few and 1800 m. Our findings indicate that conservation plans should focus on the fields adjacent to or surrounding the springs and should address the optimization of irrigation practices, restoration of buffer strips, crop rotation and in general more sustainable agricultural practices in the

  5. Sorption of polar herbicides and herbicide metabolites by biochar-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Dechene, Annika; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Laabs, Volker; Amelung, Wulf

    2014-08-01

    Biochar-amended soil has been proven to possess superior sorption capacities for several environmental pollutants compared with pure soil. However, the role of biochar in the immobilization of polar pesticides and their metabolites has hardly been tested. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the effect of a soil amendment with biochar on the sorption of selected polar herbicides and herbicide metabolites (log Kow 0.3-<2). To simulate worst-case sorption, a sandy soil (1.7% organic matter) was amended with 1.5% biochar (fresh or composted) to determine sorption/desorption isotherms of the test compounds. One herbicide (imazamox) and three herbicide metabolites (methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon, metazachlor oxalic acid, metazachlor sulfonic acid) were tested, i.e. three anionic and one neutral polar compound. The results showed that the presence of biochar increased the sorption capacity of the soil only in the case of the uncharged compound methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon, for which the average distribution coefficients in biochar-amended soils were higher than in pure soil by a factor of 2.1-2.5. However, this effect rather seemed to reflect the increased soil organic carbon content after the addition of biochar than a preferred sorption of methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon to biochar. In the case of the three anionic compounds imazamox, metazachlor oxalic acid and metazachlor sulfonic acid, biochar amendment did not increase the sorption capacity of the soil for these compounds, presumably as a result of its negative net charge. Similarly, desorption experiments did not show any significant effect of the biochar amendment on desorption. This suggests that the potential of using biochar to mitigate the leaching of the tested polar pesticides or metabolites is limited.

  6. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.; Gilbert, C.W.; Guy, R.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa Q/sub B/ protein of chloroplast membranes. 42 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  7. Detection of bromacil herbicide in ponderosa pine

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Spall, W.D.; LaCombe, D.M.

    1981-08-01

    Bromacil is a substituted uracil herbicide, 5-bromo-3-sec-butyl-6-methyluracil. Because it is readily absorbed through the root system of plants, bromacil usually is applied to the soil as an aqueous solution or suspension during or just before periods of active plnt growth. Until recently, bromacil was used as part of a vegetation control program along roadways at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The prescribed method of application was to spray a four-foot wide strip of bromacil solution along the edges of roadways with a spray-bar. During the late spring and early summer of 1978, bromacil was determined to be the proximate cause of damage to numerous trees at substantial distances away from roadways at Los Alamos. This paper describes the investigation that was undertaken to determine the cause of the tree mortality.

  8. Surrogates for herbicide removal in stormwater biofilters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kefeng; Deletic, Ana; Page, Declan; McCarthy, David T

    2015-09-15

    Real time monitoring of suitable surrogate parameters are critical to the validation of any water treatment processes, and is of particularly high importance for validation of natural stormwater treatment systems. In this study, potential surrogates for herbicide removal in stormwater biofilters (also known as stormwater bio-retention or rain-gardens) were assessed using field challenge tests and matched laboratory column experiments. Differential UV absorbance at 254mn (ΔUVA254), total phosphorus (ΔTP), dissolved phosphorus (ΔDP), total nitrogen (ΔTN), ammonia (ΔNH3), nitrate and nitrite (ΔNO3+NO2), dissolved organic carbon (ΔDOC) and total suspended solids (ΔTSS) were compared with glyphosate, atrazine, simazine and prometryn removal rates. The influence of different challenge conditions on the performance of each surrogate was studied. Differential TP was significantly and linearly related to glyphosate reduction (R(2) = 0.75-0.98, P < 0.01), while ΔTP and ΔUVA254 were linearly correlated (R(2) = 0.44-0.84, P < 0.05) to the reduction of triazines (atrazine, simazine and prometryn) in both field and laboratory tests. The performance of ΔTP and ΔUVA254 as surrogates for herbicides were reliable under normal and challenge dry conditions, but weaker correlations were observed under challenge wet conditions. Of those tested, ΔTP is the most promising surrogate for glyphosate removal and ΔUVA254 is a suitable surrogate for triazines removal in stormwater biofilters.

  9. Screening Marine Fungi for Inhibitors of the C4 Plant Enzyme Pyruvate Phosphate Dikinase: Unguinol as a Potential Novel Herbicide Candidate▿

    PubMed Central

    Motti, Cherie A.; Bourne, David G.; Burnell, James N.; Doyle, Jason R.; Haines, Dianne S.; Liptrot, Catherine H.; Llewellyn, Lyndon E.; Ludke, Shilo; Muirhead, Andrew; Tapiolas, Dianne M.

    2007-01-01

    A total of 2,245 extracts, derived from 449 marine fungi cultivated in five types of media, were screened against the C4 plant enzyme pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), a potential herbicide target. Extracts from several fungal isolates selectively inhibited PPDK. Bioassay-guided fractionation of one isolate led to the isolation of the known compound unguinol, which inhibited PPDK with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 42.3 ± 0.8 μM. Further kinetic analysis revealed that unguinol was a mixed noncompetitive inhibitor of PPDK with respect to the substrates pyruvate and ATP and an uncompetitive inhibitor of PPDK with respect to phosphate. Unguinol had deleterious effects on a model C4 plant but no effect on a model C3 plant. These results indicate that unguinol inhibits PPDK via a novel mechanism of action which also translates to an herbicidal effect on whole plants. PMID:17220253

  10. On the way to cyanobacterial blooms: impact of the herbicide metribuzin on the competition between a green alga (Scenedesmus) and a cyanobacterium (Microcystis).

    PubMed

    Lürling, Miquel; Roessink, Ivo

    2006-10-01

    The hypothesis that exposure to a common and widely applied photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicide, metribuzin, would alter the outcome of the competitive battle between susceptible green algae (Scenedesmus obliquus) and tolerant cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa) was tested. In a long-term (17 d) experiment, Scenedesmus and Microcystis populations as well as mixtures that started with different inoculum composition (i.e. 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 Scenedesmus:Microcystis) were grown in the absence or presence of metribuzin (100 microg l-1). In the absence of metribuzin, Scenedesmus was competitively superior and out-competed Microcystis regardless the initial composition of the mixed communities. However, this competitive outcome was reversed completely in the presence of metribuzin, where despite growth inhibition Microcystis became dominant. Hence, photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides may not only affect algal community structure, but also provide cyanobacteria founder populations a window for dominance and thus play an important role in promoting cyanobacteria blooms.

  11. On the way to cyanobacterial blooms: impact of the herbicide metribuzin on the competition between a green alga (Scenedesmus) and a cyanobacterium (Microcystis).

    PubMed

    Lürling, Miquel; Roessink, Ivo

    2006-10-01

    The hypothesis that exposure to a common and widely applied photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicide, metribuzin, would alter the outcome of the competitive battle between susceptible green algae (Scenedesmus obliquus) and tolerant cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa) was tested. In a long-term (17 d) experiment, Scenedesmus and Microcystis populations as well as mixtures that started with different inoculum composition (i.e. 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 Scenedesmus:Microcystis) were grown in the absence or presence of metribuzin (100 microg l-1). In the absence of metribuzin, Scenedesmus was competitively superior and out-competed Microcystis regardless the initial composition of the mixed communities. However, this competitive outcome was reversed completely in the presence of metribuzin, where despite growth inhibition Microcystis became dominant. Hence, photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides may not only affect algal community structure, but also provide cyanobacteria founder populations a window for dominance and thus play an important role in promoting cyanobacteria blooms. PMID:16540149

  12. Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) Control with Preemergence and Postemergence Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted during 2005 and 2006 at Stoneville, MS to determine control of ragweed parthenium with several preemergence (PRE) and postemergence (POST) herbicides registered for use in corn, cotton, peanut, rice, and soybean. Norflurazon, pendimethalin, clomazone, ...

  13. Response of avian communities to herbicide-induced vegetation changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Meslow, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between avian communities and herbicide modification of vegetation were analyzed on early-growth clear-cuts in western Oregon that had received phenoxy herbicide treatment 1 or 4 years previously. For both 1 and 4 years post-spray, vegetation development was greater in the third height interval (> 3.0 m) on untreated sites. All measures of vegetative diversity on untreated sites exceeded those on treated sites. Overall density and diversity of birds were similar between treated and untreated sites. Several bird species altered their foraging behavior on treated sites, i.e., birds using deciduous trees increased use of shrubs on treated sites. The primary effect of herbicide application was a reduction in the complexity of vegetation, a condition due primarity to the removal of deciduous trees. Small patches of deciduous trees scattered in clear-cuts treated with phenoxy herbicides can maintain an avian community similar to that on untreated sites.

  14. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  15. Herbicide contamination of surficial groundwater in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Guzzella, Licia; Pozzoni, Fiorenzo; Giuliano, Giuseppe

    2006-07-01

    Data on herbicide pollution in groundwater are rather scarce; monitoring data are based on single investigation, focussing on limited area and on few compounds of interest. The large number of approved active ingredients (approximately 600 chemicals) makes difficult to obtain an accurate and actual information on herbicide application in different countries, even if herbicides are the second most important class of pesticides used in the European Union. The results of a two-year monitoring campaign undertaken in two areas intensively cultivated at Lombardy, Northern Italy, showed a diffuse groundwater contamination due to active ingredients and their metabolites. More than 50% of samples overcame M.A.C. and the most common herbicides were Atrazine, Terbuthylazine and Metolachlor, while DEA and DET metabolites were often characterized by greater concentrations than their relative active principles.

  16. Impacts of forest herbicides on wildlife: Toxicity and habitat alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Meslow, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper begins with a review of both laboratory and field studies on tbe possible direct toxic effects of herbicides on terrestrial vertebrates, primarily birds and mammals. Alteration of the palatability of forage and changes in reproductive success are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the use of herbicides in forestry; studies dealing with agricultural systems are referenced where appropriate. The indirect effects of herbicides on wildlife-habitat are then conceptualized and quantified using data from a 3-year study on effects of phenoxy and glyphosate herbicides on bird and small mammal communities in western Oregon. Data on density and habitat use are presented and compared with data available from other geographic regions.

  17. Some biological and biochemical activities of resormycin, a novel herbicidal antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, M; Kawada, M; Hamada, M; Iinuma, H; Hayashi, H; Tsuchiya, K; Hori, M

    2001-12-01

    Biological and biochemical activities of resormycin were studied using unicellular green algae, Selenastrum capricornutum (abbreviated as Selena.), as a test organism. Resormycin inhibited the growth in vitro of Selena. more strongly in the dark than in the light. A weaker but more photo-stable derivative, (+/-)-2,3-dihydro-resormycin, showed more long-lasting activity against Selena. in the light. Resormycin started killing Selena. only after exposure for 2 days and longer, even at high concentrations. Resormycin at concentrations near IC50 rapidly inhibited incorporation of 3H-leu, but not 3H-UR or 3H-TdR, into the TCA insoluble fraction of Selena. Herbicidal activity of resormycin was confirmed using some crops and weeds.

  18. Allergic contact dermatitis due to a herbicide (barban).

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, D J; Lane, P R

    1985-01-01

    Canadian farmers are using increasing amounts of herbicides. Often they do not use adequate skin protection. Two cases of severe allergic contact dermatitis due to the herbicide barban are described. Patch testing with various substances, including barban, confirmed the diagnosis. Sensitization studies in guinea pigs and in one of the authors showed that barban is a potent sensitizer. It is recommended that if skin contact with barban occurs the skin be washed immediately with soap and water. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3971254

  19. Synthesis and herbicidal activities of benzothiazole N,O-acetals.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiqin; Zhou, Fengxing; Wei, Shaopeng

    2015-10-01

    A new series of N,O-acetals were prepared via a simple one-pot reaction by the condensation of 2-amino-methybenzothiazole with aldehydes and alcohols. The title compounds were obtained in moderate to good yields in the presence of acid catalyst. Bioassay results indicated that some synthesized compounds had good herbicidal activity against both dicotyledon and monocotyledon weeds. This investigation provided a new type of herbicidal lead compounds, as well as its facile preparation method. PMID:26318996

  20. Modelling the biodegradation kinetics of the herbicide propanil and its metabolite 3,4-dichloroaniline.

    PubMed

    Marques, Ricardo; Oehmen, Adrian; Carvalho, Gilda; Reis, Maria A M

    2015-05-01

    This study models the biodegradation kinetics of two toxic xenobiotic compounds in enriched mixed cultures: a commonly applied herbicide (3,4-dichloropropionanilide or propanil) and its metabolite (3,4-dichloroaniline or DCA). The dependence of the metabolite degradation kinetics on the presence of the parent compound was investigated, as well as the influence of the feeding operation strategy. Model equations were proposed incorporating substrate inhibition of the parent compound and the metabolite during dump feed operation of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The kinetic parameters of the biomass were compared to step feed degradation of the SBR. The relationship between propanil and DCA degradation rates with the concentration of each compound was studied. A statistical comparison was carried out between the model predictions and experimental results. Substrate inhibition by both propanil and DCA was prominent during dump feed operation but insignificant during step feed. With both feeding strategies, the metabolite degradation was found to be dependent on the concentration of both the parent compound and the metabolite, suggesting that the DCA degrading enzymatic activity was independent of the detachment of the propionate moiety from the propanil molecule. After incorporating this finding into the model equations, the model was able to describe well the propanil and DCA degradation profiles, with an r (2) correlation >0.95 for each case. A kinetic model was developed for the degradation of the herbicide propanil and its metabolite DCA. An exponential inhibition term was incorporated to describe the substrate inhibition during dump feeding. The kinetics of metabolite degradation was dependent of the sum of the concentrations of metabolite and parent compound, which could also be of relevance to future xenobiotic modelling applications from wastewater.

  1. Herbicidal treatments for control of Papaver somniferum L.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-five commercially available herbicides were evaluated for possible use to destroy illicit opium poppy crops (Papaver somniferum). In the first stage, herbicides were sprayed on poppy plants grown in containers. The following compounds killed poppy plants: (a) herbicides with typical foliar activity--amitrole, bromoxynil, 2,4-D, glyphosate, ioxynil and paraquat; and (b) herbicides with root and foliar activity--the triazines ametryn, atrazine, metribuzin, prometryn, simazine and terbutryn; the substituted ureas benzthiazuron, chloroxuron, diuron, fluometuron, linuron, methabenzthiazuron, neburon and phenobenzuron; and the miscellaneous compounds karbutilate, methazole, oxadiazon and pyrazon. Severe but sublethal injury was caused by cycloate, EPTC, molinate, pobulate, cacodylate + MSMA, ethofumesate, perfluidone and phenmedipham. Abnormal development of vegetative or reproductive parts of the plant was induced by benefin, butralin, dinitramine, pendimethalin, trifluralin, diphenamid, napropamide, dalapon and propham. Efficient herbicides with negligible persistence in soil at the doses applied were evaluated on poppy plants in the field at various stages of growth. Small plants were severely injured by 2,4-D, killed rapidly by bromoxynil, ioxynil, paraquat (in mixture + diquat), and more slowly by glyphosate and metribuzin. The resistance to herbicides increased with the age of the poppy plant. Severe damage with partial kill of developed plants was obtained with bromoxynil, ioxynil, glyphosate, and paraquat + diquat; the last treatment produced the fastest effect.

  2. Herbicidal treatments for control of Papaver somniferum L.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-five commercially available herbicides were evaluated for possible use to destroy illicit opium poppy crops (Papaver somniferum). In the first stage, herbicides were sprayed on poppy plants grown in containers. The following compounds killed poppy plants: (a) herbicides with typical foliar activity--amitrole, bromoxynil, 2,4-D, glyphosate, ioxynil and paraquat; and (b) herbicides with root and foliar activity--the triazines ametryn, atrazine, metribuzin, prometryn, simazine and terbutryn; the substituted ureas benzthiazuron, chloroxuron, diuron, fluometuron, linuron, methabenzthiazuron, neburon and phenobenzuron; and the miscellaneous compounds karbutilate, methazole, oxadiazon and pyrazon. Severe but sublethal injury was caused by cycloate, EPTC, molinate, pobulate, cacodylate + MSMA, ethofumesate, perfluidone and phenmedipham. Abnormal development of vegetative or reproductive parts of the plant was induced by benefin, butralin, dinitramine, pendimethalin, trifluralin, diphenamid, napropamide, dalapon and propham. Efficient herbicides with negligible persistence in soil at the doses applied were evaluated on poppy plants in the field at various stages of growth. Small plants were severely injured by 2,4-D, killed rapidly by bromoxynil, ioxynil, paraquat (in mixture + diquat), and more slowly by glyphosate and metribuzin. The resistance to herbicides increased with the age of the poppy plant. Severe damage with partial kill of developed plants was obtained with bromoxynil, ioxynil, glyphosate, and paraquat + diquat; the last treatment produced the fastest effect. PMID:6905769

  3. Simulating the dissipation of two herbicides using micro paddy lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Nhung, Dang Thi Tuyet; Phong, Thai Khanh; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Iwafune, Takashi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc

    2009-11-01

    A set of packed micro paddy lysimeters, placed in a greenhouse, was used to simulate the dissipation of two herbicides, simetryn and thiobencarb, in a controlled environment. Data from a field monitoring study in 2003, including the soil condition and water balances, were used in the simulation. The herbicides were applied and monitored over a period of 21 d. The water balances under two water management scenarios, intermittent irrigation management (AI) and continuous irrigation management (CI), were simulated. In the AI scenario, the pattern of herbicide dissipation in the surface water of the field were simulated, following the first-order kinetics. In the CI scenario, similarity was observed in most lysimeter and field concentrations, but there were differences in some data points. Dissipation curves of both herbicides in the surface water of the two simulated scenarios were not significantly different (P>0.05) from the field data except for intercept of the thiobencarb curve in the CI scenario. The distribution of simetryn and thiobencarb in the soil profile after simulation were also similar to the field data. The highest concentrations of both herbicides were found on the topsoil layer at 0-2.5 cm depth. Only a small amount of herbicides moved down to the deeper soil layers. Micro paddy lysimeters are thus a good alternative for the dissipation study of pesticides in the paddy environment. PMID:19811801

  4. Sampling of herbicides in streams during flood events.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jens; Grant, Ruth; Larsen, Søren E; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte

    2012-12-01

    In stream water xenobiotics usually occur as pulses in connection with floods caused by surface run-off and tile drainage following precipitation events. In streams located in small agricultural catchments we monitored herbicide concentrations during flood events by applying an intensive sampling programme of ½ h intervals for 7 h. In contrast to grab sampling under non-flood conditions, clearly elevated concentrations were recorded during the floods, and pulses varying in occurrence, duration and concentration were recorded. Pulses of recently applied herbicides were the most prominent, but also agricultural herbicides used in previous seasons caused pulses in the streams. Asynchronism of chemographs may be related to the characteristics of the compounds as well as their transport pathways and transformation in compartments between the source and the point of sampling in the stream. Thus, the occurrence of chemographs is difficult to predict, which ought to be taken into account when designing a sampling strategy. Even though the chemographs of herbicides and their transformation products (glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) as well as terbuthylazine and desethylterbuthylazine) seem to be synchronous, their occurrence may still be difficult to predict. It is evident that grab sampling under non-flood conditions yields insufficient information on the dynamics of occurrence of herbicides in stream water, both with respect to environmental effects and the calculation of the load to a recipient. In conclusion, the design of a sampling strategy regarding herbicides in stream waters should adequately consider the aim of the investigation.

  5. The increasing importance of herbicides in worldwide crop production.

    PubMed

    Gianessi, Leonard P

    2013-10-01

    Herbicide use is increasingly being adopted around the world. Many developing countries (India, China, Bangladesh) are facing shortages of workers to hand weed fields as millions of people move from rural to urban areas. In these countries, herbicides are far cheaper and more readily available than labor for hand weeding. History shows that in industrializing countries in the past, including the United States, Germany, Japan and South Korea, the same phenomenon has occurred-as workers have left agriculture, herbicides have been adopted. It is inevitable that herbicide use will increase in sub-Saharan Africa, not only because millions of people are leaving rural areas, creating shortages of hand weeders, but also because of the need to increase crop yields. Hand weeding has never been a very efficient method of weed control-often performed too late and not frequently enough. Uncontrolled weeds have been a major cause of low crop yields in sub-Saharan Africa for a long time. In many parts of the world, herbicides are being increasingly used to replace tillage in order to improve environmental conditions. In comparison with tillage, herbicide use reduces erosion, fuel use, greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient run-off and conserves water.

  6. Measuring Rates of Herbicide Metabolism in Dicot Weeds with an Excised Leaf Assay.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong; Skelton, Joshua J; Riechers, Dean E

    2015-01-01

    In order to isolate and accurately determine rates of herbicide metabolism in an obligate-outcrossing dicot weed, waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus), we developed an excised leaf assay combined with a vegetative cloning strategy to normalize herbicide uptake and remove translocation as contributing factors in herbicide-resistant (R) and -sensitive (S) waterhemp populations. Biokinetic analyses of organic pesticides in plants typically include the determination of uptake, translocation (delivery to the target site), metabolic fate, and interactions with the target site. Herbicide metabolism is an important parameter to measure in herbicide-resistant weeds and herbicide-tolerant crops, and is typically accomplished with whole-plant tests using radiolabeled herbicides. However, one difficulty with interpreting biokinetic parameters derived from whole-plant methods is that translocation is often affected by rates of herbicide metabolism, since polar metabolites are usually not mobile within the plant following herbicide detoxification reactions. Advantages of the protocol described in this manuscript include reproducible, accurate, and rapid determination of herbicide degradation rates in R and S populations, a substantial decrease in the amount of radiolabeled herbicide consumed, a large reduction in radiolabeled plant materials requiring further handling and disposal, and the ability to perform radiolabeled herbicide experiments in the lab or growth chamber instead of a greenhouse. As herbicide resistance continues to develop and spread in dicot weed populations worldwide, the excised leaf assay method developed and described herein will provide an invaluable technique for investigating non-target site-based resistance due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism and detoxification.

  7. Remote Sensing Study of the Influence of Different Herbicides on the Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Fluorescence of Pea Plants (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Yanev, Tony; Iliev, Ilko; Alexieva, Vera; Tsaneva, Mariana

    The effective use of airborne and satellite-based remote sensor systems in resource management, agriculture, mineral exploration and environmental monitoring requires an understanding of the nature and limitations of the high-resolution remote sensing data and of various strategies for processing and interpreting it. In developing the necessary knowledge base, ground-based measurements are the expedient source of information. In this study, remote sensing techniques were applied in laboratory for detection of the influence of herbicides 2.4-D, glyphosate, fluridone and acifluorfen on the leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence of pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). According to the classification of the Herbicide Resistance Action Committee with reference to their mode of action they belong to different groups: synthetic auxins - O (2.4-D), inhibition of EPSP synthase - G (glyphosate), photobleaching - F1 (fluridone), and inhibition of PPO - E (acifluorfen). During the last 40 years, these herbicides are among the ones used most widely in agriculture worldwide. The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at two low concentrations (1 µM, 0.1 µM) with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice. High-resolution spectral data for leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence were collected from freshly detached leaves using three multichannel spectrometers. Spectral reflectance characteristics were obtained from the leaf reflectance referenced against a standard (white diffuse screen) in the visible and near infrared ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum (450÷850 nm). Fluorescence spectra were taken in the spectral range 650-850 nm. To assess the changes arising in leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action we developed and applied an analytical approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods. The spectral characteristics were analyzed in

  8. Interference in Carotenogenesis as a Mechanism of Action of the Pyridazinone Herbicide Sandoz 6706

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Aziz, Abraham; Koren, Ephraim

    1974-01-01

    The herbicide Sandoz 6706 (4-chloro-5-(dimethylamino)-2-α,α,α, (trifluoro-m-tolyl)-3(2H)-pyridazinone), when applied as a preplant soil treatment at a concentration of 0.05 μg/g reduced the content of β-carotene and chlorophylls in 21-day-old wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L.) by 55% and 29%, respectively, without affecting the fresh or dry matter of the seedlings. At 0.8 μg/g, the herbicide reduced the content of β-carotene and chlorophyll by as much as 98%, while the fresh weight of the albino seedlings was reduced by only 24%. The effect of the herbicide on chlorophyll b was much stronger than on chlorophyll a. Time course studies of pigment synthesis in Sandoz 6706-treated seedlings showed that chlorophyll, β-carotene, cyclic xanthophylls, phytoene, phytofluene, and ζ-carotene were accumulating during the first 7 days after sowing. Later on, there was a sharp decline in the content of chlorophyll and β-carotene and a gradual reduction in the content of phytofluene, ζ-carotene, and cyclic xanthophylls; the content of phytoene remained essentially unchanged. Coinciding with the drop in content of β-carotene and chlorophyll, there was a remarkable increase in the content of epoxy phytoene. It is suggested that Sandoz 6706 might act as an inhibitor of the cyclization reaction in the biosynthetic pathway of carotenoids and that other effects, such as the bleaching of chlorophyll, are a consequence of this inhibition. PMID:16659000

  9. Metabolism-Based Herbicide Resistance and Cross-Resistance in Crop Weeds: A Threat to Herbicide Sustainability and Global Crop Production1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Weedy plant species that have evolved resistance to herbicides due to enhanced metabolic capacity to detoxify herbicides (metabolic resistance) are a major issue. Metabolic herbicide resistance in weedy plant species first became evident in the 1980s in Australia (in Lolium rigidum) and the United Kingdom (in Alopecurus myosuroides) and is now increasingly recognized in several crop-weed species as a looming threat to herbicide sustainability and thus world crop production. Metabolic resistance often confers resistance to herbicides of different chemical groups and sites of action and can extend to new herbicide(s). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glycosyl transferase, and glutathione S-transferase are often implicated in herbicide metabolic resistance. However, precise biochemical and molecular genetic elucidation of metabolic resistance had been stalled until recently. Complex cytochrome P450 superfamilies, high genetic diversity in metabolic resistant weedy plant species (especially cross-pollinated species), and the complexity of genetic control of metabolic resistance have all been barriers to advances in understanding metabolic herbicide resistance. However, next-generation sequencing technologies and transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling are now revealing the genes endowing metabolic herbicide resistance in plants. This Update presents an historical review to current understanding of metabolic herbicide resistance evolution in weedy plant species. PMID:25106819

  10. Balance between herbicidal activity and toxicity effect: a case study of the joint effects of triazine and phenylurea herbicides on Selenastrum capricornutum and Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongming; Lin, Zhifen; Yao, Zhifeng; Gao, Ya; Cong, Yongping; Yu, Hongxia

    2014-05-01

    The use of herbicide mixtures has become a cost-effective strategy against the evolution of herbicide resistance to protect global food production. Much research has focused on investigating either the herbicidal activities or the toxicity effects of herbicides; however, few of them have investigated both factors. This study investigates the balance between herbicidal activity for Selenastrum capricornutum and toxicity effect toward Photobacterium phosphoreum by determining the joint effects of triazine (simetryn, atrazine, prometon and prometryn) and phenylurea (fenuron, monuron, monolinuron and diuron) herbicides. The results showed that among the four triazines, only simetryn exhibited a unique effect (formation of a pi-sigma bond with the D1 microalga protein and an H-bond with the Luc photobacterial protein); and among 16 triazine-phenylurea binary mixtures, only the mixtures containing simetryn resulted in TU1 values (herbicidal activities of mixtures on S. capricornutum) >TU2 values (toxicity effects of mixtures on P. phosphoreum). However, the other 12 mixtures, which did not contain simetryn, showed the opposite result (TU1herbicide mixtures was proposed. Meanwhile, some suggestions are provided firstly for herbicide combinations based on the balance between herbicidal activity and toxicity effect, which will encourage thoughtful efforts for how to best combine herbicides in a sustainable way. PMID:24681700

  11. Metabolism-based herbicide resistance and cross-resistance in crop weeds: a threat to herbicide sustainability and global crop production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Weedy plant species that have evolved resistance to herbicides due to enhanced metabolic capacity to detoxify herbicides (metabolic resistance) are a major issue. Metabolic herbicide resistance in weedy plant species first became evident in the 1980s in Australia (in Lolium rigidum) and the United Kingdom (in Alopecurus myosuroides) and is now increasingly recognized in several crop-weed species as a looming threat to herbicide sustainability and thus world crop production. Metabolic resistance often confers resistance to herbicides of different chemical groups and sites of action and can extend to new herbicide(s). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glycosyl transferase, and glutathione S-transferase are often implicated in herbicide metabolic resistance. However, precise biochemical and molecular genetic elucidation of metabolic resistance had been stalled until recently. Complex cytochrome P450 superfamilies, high genetic diversity in metabolic resistant weedy plant species (especially cross-pollinated species), and the complexity of genetic control of metabolic resistance have all been barriers to advances in understanding metabolic herbicide resistance. However, next-generation sequencing technologies and transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling are now revealing the genes endowing metabolic herbicide resistance in plants. This Update presents an historical review to current understanding of metabolic herbicide resistance evolution in weedy plant species.

  12. Proximity to crops and residential to agricultural herbicides in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, M.H.; Lubin, J.; Giglierano, J.; Colt, J.S.; Wolter, C.; Bekiroglu, N.; Camann, D.; Hartge, P.; Nuckols, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Rural residents can be exposed to agricultural pesticides through the proximity of their homes to crop fields. Previously, we developed a method to create historical crop maps using a geographic information system. The aim of the present study was to determine whether crop maps are useful for predicting levels of crop herbicides in carpet dust samples from residences. From homes of participants in a case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Iowa (1998-2000), we collected vacuum cleaner dust and measured 14 herbicides with high use on corn and soybeans in Iowa. Of 112 homes, 58% of residences had crops within 500 m of their home, an intermediate distance for primary drift from aerial and ground applications. Detection rates for herbicides ranged from 0% for metribuzin and cyanazine to 95% for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Six herbicides used almost exclusively in agriculture were detected in 28% of homes. Detections and concentrations were highest in homes with an active farmer. Increasing acreage of corn and soybean fields within 750 m of homes was associated with significantly elevated odds of detecting agricultural herbicides compared with homes with no crops within 750 m (adjusted odds ratio per 10 acres = 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.11). Herbicide concentrations also increased significantly with increasing acreage within 750 m. We evaluated the distance of crop fields from the home at < 100, 101-250, 251-500, and 501-750 m. Including the crop buffer distance parameters in the model did not significantly improve the fit compared with a model with total acres within 750 m. Our results indicate that crop maps may be a useful method for estimating levels of herbicides in homes from nearby crop fields.

  13. Leaching of three sulfonylurea herbicides during sprinkler irrigation.

    PubMed

    Cessna, Allan J; Elliott, Jane A; Bailey, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Sulfonylurea herbicides are widely applied on the Canadian prairies to control weeds in a variety of crops. Several sulfonylurea herbicides are mobile in soil, and there is concern about their possible movement to ground water. This study was performed to assess the susceptibility of three sulfonylurea herbicides commonly used in prairie crop production to leach under a worst-case scenario. Thifensulfuron-methyl, tribenuron-methyl, and rimsulfuron were applied to a 9-ha tile-drained field, and then approximately 300 mm of irrigation water were applied over a 2-wk period using a center pivot. The commencement of tile-drain flow corresponded to the rise of the water table above tile-drain depth, and peak flow rates corresponded to the greatest depths of ground water above the tile drains. The volume of irrigation water intercepted by the tile drains in each quadrant was determined by site hydrology and represented <10% of the irrigation water applied. Concentrations of thifensulfuron-methyl, tribenuron-methyl, and rimsulfuron in the tile-drain effluent ranged (analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry) from 2.0 to 248 ng L(-1), not detected (nd) to 55 ng L(-1), and nd to 497 ng L(-1), respectively. Total herbicide transport from the root zone in each quadrant was estimated at <0.5% of the amount of each sulfonylurea herbicide applied. Thifensulfuron-methyl was the only herbicide detected in ground water, with concentrations ranging from 1.2 to 2.5 ng L(-1). With the frequency and amount of rainfall typically encountered in the prairie region of Canada, detectable concentrations (>1 ng L(-1)) of these sulfonylurea herbicides in ground water would be unlikely. PMID:20048324

  14. Partitioning of penoxsulam, a new sulfonamide herbicide.

    PubMed

    Jabusch, Thomas W; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2005-09-01

    Penoxsulam (trade name Granite) is a new acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor herbicide for postemergence control of annual grasses, sedges, and broadleaf weeds in rice culture. This study was done to understand the equilibrium phase partitioning of penoxsulam to soil and air under conditions simulating California rice field conditions. Partitioning of penoxsulam was determined between soil and water (Kd) by the batch equilibrium method and between air and water (K(H)) by the gas-purge method. In four representative soils from the Sacramento Valley, the Kd values ranged from 0.14 to 5.05 and displayed a modest increase with soil pH. In soil amended with manure compost, soil sorption increased 4-fold with increasing soil organic matter content, but was still low with a Kd of 0.4 in samples with high organic carbon contents of 15%. Penoxsulam was confirmed to be extremely nonvolatile and did not partition into air at any measurable rate at 20 or 40 degrees C. K(H) (pH 7) was estimated at 4.6 x 10(-15) Pa x L x mol(-1) on the basis of available water solubility and vapor pressure data. The results imply that soil and air partitioning of penoxsulam do not significantly affect its potential for degradation or offsite movement in water.

  15. Acute Oral Poisoning Due to Chloracetanilide Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Su-Jin; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Chloracetanilide herbicides (alachlor, butachlor, metachlor) are used widely. Although there are much data about chronic low dose exposure to chloracetanilide in humans and animals, there are few data about acute chloracetanilide poisoning in humans. This study investigated the clinical feature of patients following acute oral exposure to chloracetanilide. We retrospectively reviewed the data on the patients who were admitted to two university hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Thirty-five patients were enrolled. Among them, 28, 5, and 2 cases of acute alachlor, metachlor, butachlor poisoning were included. The mean age was 49.8 ± 15.4 yr. The poison severity score (PSS) was 17 (48.6%), 10 (28.6%), 5 (14.3%), 2 (5.7%), and 1 (2.9%) patients with a PSS of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The age was higher for the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that for the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS) (43.6 ± 15.2 vs 55.7 ± 13.5). The arterial blood HCO3 ¯ was lower in the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that in the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS). Three patients were a comatous. One patient died 24 hr after the exposure. In conclusion, although chloracetanilide poisoning is usually of low toxicity, elder patients with central nervous system symptoms should be closely monitored and cared after oral exposure. PMID:22323855

  16. Acute oral poisoning due to chloracetanilide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Seok, Su-Jin; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    Chloracetanilide herbicides (alachlor, butachlor, metachlor) are used widely. Although there are much data about chronic low dose exposure to chloracetanilide in humans and animals, there are few data about acute chloracetanilide poisoning in humans. This study investigated the clinical feature of patients following acute oral exposure to chloracetanilide. We retrospectively reviewed the data on the patients who were admitted to two university hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Thirty-five patients were enrolled. Among them, 28, 5, and 2 cases of acute alachlor, metachlor, butachlor poisoning were included. The mean age was 49.8 ± 15.4 yr. The poison severity score (PSS) was 17 (48.6%), 10 (28.6%), 5 (14.3%), 2 (5.7%), and 1 (2.9%) patients with a PSS of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The age was higher for the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that for the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS) (43.6 ± 15.2 vs 55.7 ± 13.5). The arterial blood HCO₃⁻ was lower in the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that in the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS). Three patients were a comatous. One patient died 24 hr after the exposure. In conclusion, although chloracetanilide poisoning is usually of low toxicity, elder patients with central nervous system symptoms should be closely monitored and cared after oral exposure.

  17. Microorganisms capable of metabolizing the herbicide metolachlor.

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, A; Zhang, R W; Bollag, J M

    1987-01-01

    We screened several strains of microorganisms and microbial populations for their ability to mineralize or transform the herbicide metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)-acetami de] because such cultures would potentially be useful in the cleanup of contaminated sites. Although we used various inocula and enrichment culture techniques, we were not able to isolate microorganisms that could mineralize metolachlor. However, strains of Bacillus circulans, Bacillus megaterium, Fusarium sp., Mucor racemosus, and an actinomycete were found to transform metolachlor. Several metabolites could be determined with high-performance liquid chromatography. The tolerance of the strains to high concentrations of metolachlor was also evaluated for the usefulness of the strains for decontamination. Tolerance of the actinomycete to metolachlor concentrations over 200 ppm (200 micrograms/ml) was low and could not be increased by doubling the sucrose concentration in the growth medium or by using a large biomass as inoculum. However, a Fusarium sp. could grow and transform metolachlor up to a concentration of 300 ppm. PMID:3105457

  18. Finding minimal herbicide concentrations in ground water? Try looking for their degradates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Linhart, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted regarding the occurrence of herbicides in the hydrologic system, their fate, and their effects on human health and the environment. Few studies, however, have considered herbicide transformation products (degradates). In this study of Iowa ground water, herbicide degradates were frequently detected. In fact, herbicide degradates were eight of the 10 most frequently detected compounds. Furthermore, a majority of a herbicide's measured concentration was in the form of its degradates — ranging from 55 to over 99%. The herbicide detection frequencies and concentrations varied significantly among the major aquifer types sampled. These differences, however, were much more pronounced when herbicide degradates were included. Aquifer types presumed to have the most rapid recharge rates (alluvial and bedrock/karst region aquifers) were those most likely to contain detectable concentrations of herbicide compounds. Two indirect estimates of ground-water age (depth of well completion and dissolved-oxygen concentration) were used to separate the sampled wells into general vulnerability classes (low, intermediate, and high). The results show that the herbicide detection frequencies and concentrations varied significantly among the vulnerability classes regardless of whether or not herbicide degradates were considered. Nevertheless, when herbicide degradates were included, the frequency of herbicide compound detection within the highest vulnerability class approached 90%, and the median total herbicide residue concentration increased over an order of magnitude, relative to the parent compounds alone, to 2 μg/l. The results from this study demonstrate that obtaining data on herbicide degradates is critical for understanding the fate of herbicides in the hydrologic system. Furthermore, the prevalence of herbicide degradates documented in this study suggests that to accurately determine the overall effect on human health and the environment of

  19. Influence of herbicide-resistant canola on the environmental impact of weed management.

    PubMed

    Brimner, Theresa A; Gallivan, Gordon James; Stephenson, Gerald R

    2005-01-01

    The growth of herbicide-resistant canola varieties increased from 10% of the canola area in Canada in 1996, when the technology was first introduced, to 80% in 2000. From 1995 to 2000, the amount of herbicide active ingredient applied per hectare of canola declined by 42.8% and the Environmental Impact (EI) per hectare, calculated using the Environmental Impact Quotient for individual herbicides and the amounts of active ingredients applied, declined 36.8%. The amount of herbicide active ingredient per hectare applied to conventional canola was consistently higher than that applied to herbicide-resistant canola each year between 1996 and 2000. Similarly, the EI of herbicide use per hectare in conventional canola was higher than that of herbicide-resistant canola during the same time period. Since 1996, herbicide use has shifted from broadcast applications of soil-active herbicides to post-emergence applications of herbicides with broad-spectrum foliar activity. The decline in herbicide use and EI since the introduction of herbicide-resistant varieties was due to increased use of chemicals with lower application rates, a reduced number of applications and a decreased need for herbicide combinations.

  20. Degradates provide insight to spatial and temporal trends of herbicides in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Schnoebelen, D.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    During 2001, 86 municipal wells in Iowa were sampled and analyzed for 21 herbicide parent compounds and 24 herbicide degradates. The frequency of detection increased from 17% when only herbicide parent compounds were considered to 53% when both herbicide parents and degradates were considered. Thus, the transport of herbicide compounds to ground water is substantially underestimated when herbicide degradates are not considered. A significant difference in the results among the major aquifer types was apparent only when both herbicide parent compounds and their degradates were considered. In addition, including herbicide degradates greatly improved the statistical relation to the age of the water being sampled. When herbicide parent compounds are considered, only 40% of the wells lacking a herbicide detection could be explained by the age of the water predating herbicide use. However, when herbicide degradates were also considered, 80% of the ground water samples lacking a detection could be explained by the age of the water predating herbicide use. Finally, a temporal pattern in alachlor concentrations in ground water could only be identified when alachlor degradates were considered.

  1. Herbicides and transformation products in surface waters of the Midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Porter, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    Most herbicides applied to crops are adsorbed by plants or transformed (degraded) in the soil, but small fractions are lost from fields and either move to streams in overland runoff, near surface flow, or subsurface drains, or they infiltrate slowly to ground water. Herbicide transformation products (TPs) can be more or less mobile and more or less toxic in the environment than their source herbicides. To obtain information on the concentrations of selected herbicides and TPs in surface waters of the Midwestern United States, 151 water samples were collected from 71 streams and five reservoir outflows in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 13 herbicides and 10 herbicide TPs. Herbicide TPs were found to occur as frequently or more frequently than source herbicides and at concentrations that were often larger than their source herbicides. Most samples contained a mixture of more than 10 different herbicides or TPs. The ratios of TPs to herbicide concentrations can be used to determine the source of herbicides in streams. Results of a two-component mixing model suggest that on average 90 percent or more of the herbicide mass in Midwestern streams during early summer runoff events originates from the runoff and 10 percent or less comes from increased ground water discharge.

  2. Influence of herbicide-resistant canola on the environmental impact of weed management.

    PubMed

    Brimner, Theresa A; Gallivan, Gordon James; Stephenson, Gerald R

    2005-01-01

    The growth of herbicide-resistant canola varieties increased from 10% of the canola area in Canada in 1996, when the technology was first introduced, to 80% in 2000. From 1995 to 2000, the amount of herbicide active ingredient applied per hectare of canola declined by 42.8% and the Environmental Impact (EI) per hectare, calculated using the Environmental Impact Quotient for individual herbicides and the amounts of active ingredients applied, declined 36.8%. The amount of herbicide active ingredient per hectare applied to conventional canola was consistently higher than that applied to herbicide-resistant canola each year between 1996 and 2000. Similarly, the EI of herbicide use per hectare in conventional canola was higher than that of herbicide-resistant canola during the same time period. Since 1996, herbicide use has shifted from broadcast applications of soil-active herbicides to post-emergence applications of herbicides with broad-spectrum foliar activity. The decline in herbicide use and EI since the introduction of herbicide-resistant varieties was due to increased use of chemicals with lower application rates, a reduced number of applications and a decreased need for herbicide combinations. PMID:15593073

  3. Herbicidal activity of Peumus boldus and Drimys winterii essential oils from Chile.

    PubMed

    Verdeguer, Mercedes; García-Rellán, David; Boira, Herminio; Pérez, Eduardo; Gandolfo, Sandra; Blázquez, María Amparo

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil composition of Peumus boldus and Drimys winterii was analyzed by means of capillary GC-FID and GC-MS. More than 96% of the total oil components (43 and 54 compounds, respectively) were identified, with ascaridole (51.17 ± 9.51), p-cymene (16.31 ± 2.52) and 1,8-cineole (14.45 ± 2.99) as the main compounds in P. boldus and g-eudesmol (21.65 ± 0.41), followed of elemol (12.03 ± 0.34) and terpinen-4-ol (11.56 ± 1.06) in D. winterii. The herbicidal activity was tested against Amaranthus hybridus and Portulaca oleracea. P. boldus essential oil was the most phytotoxic against both weeds, inhibiting seed germination and seedling growth at all concentrations assayed (0.125-1 µL/mL). D. winterii essential oil did not show any effect on A. hybridus germination and only affected P. oleracea germination at the highest concentration. The results suggest the possible use of the essential oil from P. boldus as a natural herbicide. PMID:21221059

  4. Toxicity of the herbicide linuron as assessed by bacterial and mitochondrial model systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sandra M A; Videira, Romeu A; Fernandes, Maria A S; Santos, Maria S; Moreno, António J M; Vicente, Joaquim A F; Jurado, Amália S

    2014-08-01

    Linuron is one of the most intensively used herbicides with predictable effects on the environment and non-target organisms. In the present study, two in vitro biological models (a Bacillus sp. and rat liver mitochondria) were used to evaluate linuron toxicity at a cell/subcellular level. Linuron inhibited bacterial growth and NADH-supported respiration, similar IC₅₀ values being estimated for both toxic responses (74 and 98 μM, respectively). At concentrations up to 120 μM, linuron perturbed the respiration and phosphorylation efficiency of rat liver mitochondria, reflected by an increase of state 4 respiration and a decrease of the transmembrane potential, state 3 and FCCP-uncoupled respiration, when malate/glutamate or succinate were used as respiratory substrates. Consequently, a decrease of the respiratory control and ADP/O ratio was observed. This study suggests that linuron membrane interactions with adverse repercussions in the activity of membrane enzymatic complexes, such as those which constitute the prokaryotic and mitochondrial respiratory systems, may underlie the toxic effects exerted by that herbicide on non-target organisms. Moreover, this work contributes to the establishment of our bacterial model system as a good tool for chemical toxicity screening. PMID:24747295

  5. Studies on the mechanisms of action of the herbicide safener CGA-92194

    SciTech Connect

    Zama, P.

    1986-01-01

    CGA-92194 is a herbicide safener that is used as a seed dressing agent to protect grain sorghum against metolachlor injury. The potential adverse phytotoxic effects and the mechanisms of the protective action of this safener were studied in laboratory experiments. Adverse phytotoxicity was assessed by comparing CGA-92194 and the herbicide safeners cyometrinil and flurazole for their effects on CO/sub 2/ fixation, protein, DNA, RNA and lipid synthesis of enzymatically isolated leaf cells of soybean. The safening action mechanisms of CGA-92194 were studied by examining the potential interactions of this safener with metolachlor at the levels of uptake and macromolecular syntheses in enzymatically isolated leaf mesophyll protoplasts of grain sorghum. When CGA-92194 and metolachlor were given simultaneously, CGA-92194 enhanced /sup 14/C-metolachlor uptake into the sorghum protoplasts in a concentration-dependent pattern. Treatments with metolachlor and CGA-92194 in combination inhibited the incorporation of /sup 14/C-uracil, /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 14/C-acetate into sorghum protoplast macromolecules less than metolachlor given alone, suggesting the potential involvement of a competitive antagonism in CGA-92194 mechanism of action. The metabolic activity and growth of sorghum seedlings grown from CGA-92194-pretreated seeds were lower than that of seedlings grown from untreated seeds at 10 or 20 days after planting. These results indicate that a safener-induced stimulation of the spontaneous or enzymatic conjugation of metolachlor with GSH is most likely involved in CGA-92194 protective action.

  6. A red and far-red light receptor mutation confers resistance to the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Sharkhuu, Altanbadralt; Narasimhan, Meena L; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Bressan, Ray A; Weller, Steve; Gehring, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Glyphosate is a widely applied broad-spectrum systemic herbicide that inhibits competitively the penultimate enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) from the shikimate pathway, thereby causing deleterious effects. A glyphosate-resistant Arabidopsis mutant (gre1) was isolated and genetic analyses indicated that a dysfunctional red (R) and far-red (FR) light receptor, phytochrome B (phyB), caused this phenotype. This finding is consistent with increased glyphosate sensitivity and glyphosate-induced shikimate accumulation in low R:FR light, and the induction of genes encoding enzymes of the shikimate pathway in high R:FR light. Expression of the shikimate pathway genes exhibited diurnal oscillation and this oscillation was altered in the phyB mutant. Furthermore, transcript analysis suggested that this diurnal oscillation was not only dependent on phyB but was also due to circadian regulatory mechanisms. Our data offer an explanation of the well documented observation that glyphosate treatment at various times throughout the day, with their specific composition of light quality and intensity, results in different efficiencies of the herbicide.

  7. Diffuse geographic distribution of herbicides in northern prairie wetlands.

    PubMed

    Donald, D B; Gurprasad, N P; Quinnett-Abbott, L; Cash, K

    2001-02-01

    The concentrations of herbicides in water from wetlands on landscapes where herbicides are not used should be less than on farms with moderate (conventional farms) and intense (minimum-till farms) herbicide use. In general, this hypothesis was not supported for wetlands situated in the Boreal Plains Ecozone of central Saskatchewan, Canada. The overall detection frequency of 10 commonly used herbicides was not significantly different among wildlife habitat with no pesticide use (44.4%), farms with no pesticide use (51.6%), conventional farms (54.9%), and minimum-till farms (56.5%, chi 2 = 5.64, p = 0.13). The herbicides (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamba, mecoprop, and diclorprop accounted for 87% of all detections. In general, detection frequencies and concentrations of individual herbicides were similar on all land-use types. For example, the mean concentration of 2,4-D in water on the four land types ranged from 0.12 +/- 0.104 to 0.26 +/- 0.465 microgram/L, and MCPA ranged from 0.08 +/- 0.078 to 0.19 +/- 0.166 microgram/L. However, in the year of application, mean concentrations of MCPA and bromoxynil, but not 2,4-D, were significantly higher by about twofold in wetlands situated in fields where these herbicides were applied compared with all other wetlands. We propose that many agricultural pesticides are rapidly lost to the atmosphere at the time of application by processes such as volatilization from soil and plant evapotranspiration. Then, the herbicides used throughout the region may be directly absorbed to the surface of wetlands from the atmosphere, or they become entrained in local convective clouds, and are redistributed by rainfall in a relatively homogenous mixture over the agricultural landscape. The low levels of individual herbicides we found in most of the wetland waters would not cause chronic effects to aquatic biota.

  8. Broad 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitor Herbicide Tolerance in Soybean with an Optimized Enzyme and Expression Cassette[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Siehl, Daniel L.; Tao, Yumin; Albert, Henrik; Dong, Yuxia; Heckert, Matthew; Madrigal, Alfredo; Lincoln-Cabatu, Brishette; Lu, Jian; Fenwick, Tamara; Bermudez, Ericka; Sandoval, Marian; Horn, Caroline; Green, Jerry M.; Hale, Theresa; Pagano, Peggy; Clark, Jenna; Udranszky, Ingrid A.; Rizzo, Nancy; Bourett, Timothy; Howard, Richard J.; Johnson, David H.; Vogt, Mark; Akinsola, Goke; Castle, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    With an optimized expression cassette consisting of the soybean (Glycine max) native promoter modified for enhanced expression driving a chimeric gene coding for the soybean native amino-terminal 86 amino acids fused to an insensitive shuffled variant of maize (Zea mays) 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), we achieved field tolerance in transgenic soybean plants to the HPPD-inhibiting herbicides mesotrione, isoxaflutole, and tembotrione. Directed evolution of maize HPPD was accomplished by progressively incorporating amino acids from naturally occurring diversity and novel substitutions identified by saturation mutagenesis, combined at random through shuffling. Localization of heterologously expressed HPPD mimicked that of the native enzyme, which was shown to be dually targeted to chloroplasts and the cytosol. Analysis of the native soybean HPPD gene revealed two transcription start sites, leading to transcripts encoding two HPPD polypeptides. The N-terminal region of the longer encoded peptide directs proteins to the chloroplast, while the short form remains in the cytosol. In contrast, maize HPPD was found almost exclusively in chloroplasts. Evolved HPPD enzymes showed insensitivity to five inhibitor herbicides. In 2013 field trials, transgenic soybean events made with optimized promoter and HPPD variant expression cassettes were tested with three herbicides and showed tolerance to four times the labeled rates of mesotrione and isoxaflutole and two times the labeled rates of tembotrione. PMID:25192697

  9. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells. PMID:25752428

  10. The structure-activity relationship in herbicidal monosubstituted sulfonylureas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng-Ming; Ma, Yi; Guddat, Luke; Cheng, Pei-Quan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Pang, Siew S; Dong, Yu-Hui; Lai, Cheng-Ming; Wang, Ling-Xiu; Jia, Guo-Feng; Li, Yong-Hong; Wang, Su-Hua; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Wei-Guang; Wang, Bao-Lei

    2012-05-24

    The herbicide sulfonylurea (SU) belongs to one of the most important class of herbicides worldwide. It is well known for its ecofriendly, extreme low toxicity towards mammals and ultralow dosage application. The original inventor, G Levitt, set out structure-activity relationship (SAR) guidelines for SU structural design to attain superhigh bioactivity. A new approach to SU molecular design has been developed. After the analysis of scores of SU products by X-ray diffraction methodology and after greenhouse herbicidal screening of 900 novel SU structures synthesized in the authors laboratory, it was found that several SU structures containing a monosubstituted pyrimidine moiety retain excellent herbicidal characteristics, which has led to partial revision of the Levitt guidelines. Among the novel SU molecules, monosulfuron and monosulfuron-ester have been developed into two new herbicides that have been officially approved for field application and applied in millet and wheat fields in China. A systematic structural study of the new substrate-target complex and the relative mode of action in comparison with conventional SU has been carried out. A new mode of action has been postulated.

  11. Cloud based, Open Source Software Application for Mitigating Herbicide Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, D.; Scott, B.

    2014-12-01

    The spread of herbicide resistant weeds has resulted in the need for clearly marked fields. In response to this need, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service launched a program named Flag the Technology in 2011. This program uses color-coded flags as a visual alert of the herbicide trait technology within a farm field. The flag based program also serves to help avoid herbicide misapplication and prevent herbicide drift damage between fields with differing crop technologies. This program has been endorsed by Southern Weed Science Society of America and is attracting interest from across the USA, Canada, and Australia. However, flags have risk of misplacement or disappearance due to mischief or severe windstorms/thunderstorms, respectively. This presentation will discuss the design and development of a cloud-based, free application utilizing open-source technologies, called Flag the Technology Cloud (FTTCloud), for allowing agricultural stakeholders to color code their farm fields for indicating herbicide resistant technologies. The developed software utilizes modern web development practices, widely used design technologies, and basic geographic information system (GIS) based interactive interfaces for representing, color-coding, searching, and visualizing fields. This program has also been made compatible for a wider usability on different size devices- smartphones, tablets, desktops and laptops.

  12. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yahnke, Amy E.; Grue, Christian E.; Hayes, Marc P.; Troiano, Alexandra T.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

  13. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs.

    PubMed

    Yahnke, Amy E; Grue, Christian E; Hayes, Marc P; Troiano, Alexandra T

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

  14. EEI pulls out of herbicide fight: utilities plan alliance

    SciTech Connect

    Utroska, D.

    1980-07-01

    The Edison Electric Institute has decided it will not go into battle against the Environmental Protection Agency over the agency's suspension and possible cancellation of the herbicide 2,4,5-T. The herbicide is used extensively by electric utilities for woody brush control along transmission and distribution rights-of-way. Edison Electric Institute determined that the cost to participate in the hearing was not in line with the total amount of information the company could offer. Although Dow Chemical Co., the principal manufacturer of the chemical, still plans to testify at the hearing on benefits, several utility companies are attempting to organize a consortium of interested utilities to testify instead of the manufacturer. The Environmental Protection Agency's recent questioning of another herbicide, 2,4-D, has prompted greater interest in 2,4,5-T support. The chemical 2,4-D constitutes the base for many of the most important alternate herbicides. With both 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T banned, many feel the herbicide industry would collapse. Interest in 2,4,5-T began in 1976 when a causal relationship between spontaneous abortions and forest spraying with dioxin was suggested by eight women living in Alsea, Oregon. (SAC)

  15. Aging effects on the availability of herbicides to runoff transfer.

    PubMed

    Louchart, Xavier; Voltz, Marc

    2007-02-15

    Realistic estimation of sorption parameters is essential to predict long-term herbicide availability in soils and their contamination of surface water and groundwater. This study examined the temporal change of an effective partition coefficient Kd(eff) for the herbicides simazine, diuron, and oryzalin from a 0.12 ha field experiment during 7 vineyard growing seasons. Kd(eff) is the ratio of solvent extractable herbicide concentrations in the top soil (0-2 cm) to the average concentrations in runoff water and is considered to assess the effective availability of herbicides to runoff transfer. Kd(eff) increased largely with aging time since application, from values similar to those of the literature (determined in 24 h batch conditions, Kd(ref)), up to 88, 164, and 30 times these initial values for simazine, diuron, and oryzalin respectively. The seasonal variation of Kd(eff) values between years and compounds could be adequately described by a unique model, taking into account the cumulative rainfall since application and Kd(ref) of each compound. This simple model was able to represent the influence of the soil moisture content and its changes in the different biological and physicochemical processes that may contribute to the (bio)available, sorbed, or entrapped state of any of the studied herbicides with aging time under Mediterranean climate.

  16. Catchment-scale herbicides transport: Theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Thomet, M.; Botter, G.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper proposes and tests a model which couples the description of hydrologic flow and transport of herbicides at catchment scales. The model accounts for streamflow components' age to characterize short and long term fluctuations of herbicide flux concentrations in stream waters, whose peaks exceeding a toxic threshold are key to exposure risk of aquatic ecosystems. The model is based on a travel time formulation of transport embedding a source zone that describes near surface herbicide dynamics. To this aim we generalize a recently proposed scheme for the analytical derivation of travel time distributions to the case of solutes that can be partially taken up by transpiration and undergo chemical degradation. The framework developed is evaluated by comparing modeled hydrographs and atrazine chemographs with those measured in the Aabach agricultural catchment (Switzerland). The model proves reliable in defining complex transport features shaped by the interplay of long term processes, related to the persistence of solute components in soils, and short term dynamics related to storm inter-arrivals. The effects of stochasticity in rainfall patterns and application dates on concentrations and loads in runoff are assessed via Monte Carlo simulations, highlighting the crucial role played by the first rainfall event occurring after herbicide application. A probabilistic framework for critical determinants of exposure risk to aquatic communities is defined. Modeling of herbicides circulation at catchment scale thus emerges as essential tools for ecological risk assessment.

  17. Phenylurea herbicide sorption to biochars and agricultural soil

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DAOYUAN; MUKOME, FUNGAI N. D.; YAN, DENGHUA; WANG, HAO; SCOW, KATE M.; PARIKH, SANJAI J.

    2016-01-01

    Biochar is increasingly been used as a soil amendment to improve water holding capacity, reduce nutrient leaching, increase soil pH and also as a means to reduce contamination through sorption of heavy metals or organic pollutants. The sorption behavior of three phenylurea herbicides (monuron, diuron, linuron) on five biochars (Enhanced Biochar, Hog Waste, Turkey Litter, Walnut Shell and Wood Feedstock) and an agricultural soil (Yolo silt loam) was investigated using a batch equilibration method. Sorption isotherms of herbicides to biochars were well described by the Freundlich model (R2 = 0.93 -- 0.97). The adsorption KF values ranged from 6.94 to 1306.95 mg kg−1 and indicated the sorption of herbicides in the biochars and Yolo soil was in the sequence of linuron > diuron > monuron and walnut shell biochar > wood feedstock biochar > turkey litter biochar > enhanced biochar > hog waste biochar > Yolo soil. These data show that sorption of herbicides to biochar can have both positive (reduced off-site transport) and negative (reduced herbicide efficacy) implications and specific biochar properties, such as H/C ratio and surface area, should be considered together with soil type, agriculture chemical and climate condition in biochar application to agricultural soil to optimize the system for both agricultural and environmental benefits. PMID:26065514

  18. Phenylurea herbicide sorption to biochars and agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daoyuan; Mukome, Fungai N D; Yan, Denghua; Wang, Hao; Scow, Kate M; Parikh, Sanjai J

    2015-01-01

    Biochar is increasingly been used as a soil amendment to improve water-holding capacity, reduce nutrient leaching, increase soil pH, and also as a means to reduce contamination through sorption of heavy metals or organic pollutants. The sorption behavior of three phenylurea herbicides (monuron, diuron and linuron) on five biochars (Enhanced Biochar, Hog Waste, Turkey Litter, Walnut Shell and Wood Feedstock) and an agricultural soil (Yolo silt loam) was investigated using a batch equilibration method. Sorption isotherms of herbicides to biochars were well described by the Freundlich model (R(2) = 0.93-0.97). The adsorption KF values ranged from 6.94 to 1306.95 mg kg(-1) and indicated the sorption of herbicides in the biochars and Yolo soil was in the sequence of linuron > diuron > monuron and walnut shell biochar > wood feedstock biochar > turkey litter biochar > enhanced biochar > hog waste biochar > Yolo soil. These data show that sorption of herbicides to biochar can have both positive (reduced off-site transport) and negative (reduced herbicide efficacy) implications and specific biochar properties, such as H/C ratio and surface area, should be considered together with soil type, agriculture chemical and climate condition in biochar application to agricultural soil to optimize the system for both agricultural and environmental benefits. PMID:26065514

  19. Reducing the risks of herbicide resistance: best management practices and recommendations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are the foundation of weed control in commercial crop production. However, herbicide-resistant weed populations are developing rapidly in response to selection pressure. Critical practices include reducing selection through diversification of weed control techniques, minimizing spread of ...

  20. ASSESSING THE RISKS OF NON-TARGET TERRESTRIAL PLANTS FROM HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of chemical herbicides to reduce weed competition is a major contributing factor to the high productivity of conventional intensive agricultural cropping systems. However, because of their inherent phytotoxicity, movement of herbicides from target crops and soils can adverse...

  1. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions. PMID:26328425

  2. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... When herbicides or defoliants volatize, the resulting vapors may be poisonous to humans, and they may damage nearby plants, crops or shrubbery; also, herbicides or defoliants containing chlorates may be...

  3. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions.

  4. Holadysenterine, a natural herbicidal constituent from Drechslera australiensis for management of Rumex dentatus.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Muhammad; Javaid, Arshad; Ahmed, Ejaz; Javed, Tariq; Clary, Jacob

    2014-01-15

    Rumex dentatus L. is a problematic weed of wheat. Bioassay-directed isolation of culture filtrates of a plant pathogenic fungus Drechslera australiensis gave holadysenterine as the main herbicidal constituent against this weed of wheat. Leaf disc bioassay showed that herbicidal activity of holadysenterine was comparable to that of synthetic herbicide 2,4-D. This is the first report of this herbicidal compound from the genus Drechslera.

  5. Mechanisms of Tolerance and High Degradation Capacity of the Herbicide Mesotrione by Escherichia coli Strain DH5-α

    PubMed Central

    Olchanheski, Luiz R.; Dourado, Manuella N.; Beltrame, Flávio L.; Zielinski, Acácio A. F.; Demiate, Ivo M.; Pileggi, Sônia A. V.; Azevedo, Ricardo A.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Pileggi, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The intensive use of agrochemicals has played an important role in increasing agricultural production. One of the impacts of agrochemical use has been changes in population structure of soil microbiota. The aim of this work was to analyze the adaptive strategies that bacteria use to overcome oxidative stress caused by mesotrione, which inhibits 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. We also examined antioxidative stress systems, saturation changes of lipid membranes, and the capacity of bacteria to degrade mesotrione. Escherichia coli DH5-á was chosen as a non-environmental strain, which is already a model bacterium for studying metabolism and adaptation. The results showed that this bacterium was able to tolerate high doses of the herbicide (10× field rate), and completely degraded mesotrione after 3 h of exposure, as determined by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Growth rates in the presence of mesotrione were lower than in the control, prior to the period of degradation, showing toxic effects of this herbicide on bacterial cells. Changes in the saturation of the membrane lipids reduced the damage caused by reactive oxygen species and possibly hindered the entry of xenobiotics in the cell, while activating glutathione-S-transferase enzyme in the antioxidant system and in the metabolizing process of the herbicide. Considering that E. coli DH5-α is a non-environmental strain and it had no previous contact with mesotrione, the defense system found in this strain could be considered non-specific. This bacterium system response may be a general adaptation mechanism by which bacterial strains resist to damage from the presence of herbicides in agricultural soils. PMID:24924203

  6. Presumption of Herbicide Exposure and Presumption of Disability During Service for Reservists Presumed Exposed to Herbicide. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-06-19

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its regulation governing individuals presumed to have been exposed to certain herbicides. Specifically, VA is expanding the regulation to include an additional group consisting of individuals who performed service in the Air Force or Air Force Reserve under circumstances in which they had regular and repeated contact with C-123 aircraft known to have been used to spray an herbicide agent ("Agent Orange'') during the Vietnam era. In addition, the regulation will establish a presumption that members of this group who later develop an Agent Orange presumptive condition were disabled during the relevant period of service, thus establishing that this service constituted "active, naval, military or air service.'' The effect of this action is to presume herbicide exposure for these individuals and to allow individuals who were exposed to herbicides during reserve service to establish veteran status for VA purposes and eligibility for some VA benefits. The need for this action results from a recent decision by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to acknowledge that individuals who had regular and repeated exposure to C-123 aircraft that the United States Air Force used to spray the herbicides in Vietnam during Operation Ranch Hand were exposed to Agent Orange. PMID:26103644

  7. Synthesis and herbicidal activity of substituted pyrazole isothiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Feng, Jun-Tao; Lin, Kai-Chun; Zhang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Isothiocyanates and substituted pyrazoles were combined to form a series of novel isothiocyanates with highly effective herbicidal activity. The target compounds were analyzed by elemental analysis, 1H-NMR, EI-MS and IR spectroscopy. The synthesized compounds, particularly compounds 3-1 and 3-7, exhibited good herbicidal activities against four weeds. The EC(50) values of compound 3-1 against Echinochloa crusgalli L., Cyperus iria L., Dactylis glomerata L., and Trifolium repens L. were 64.32, 65.83, 62.42, and 67.72 µg/mL, respectively. The EC(50) values of compound 3-7 against E. crusgalli L., C. iria L., D. glomerata L., T. repens L. were 65.33, 64.90, 59.41 and 67.41 µg/mL, respectively. Compounds 3-1 and 3-7 may be further optimized as lead compounds for new herbicides. PMID:23075815

  8. Agricultural herbicide transport in a first-order intermittent stream, Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, J.R.; Linard, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of herbicides in surface waters is a function of many variables, including scale of the watershed, physical and chemical properties of the herbicide, physical and chemical properties of the soil, rainfall intensity, and time of year. In this study, the transport of 6 herbicides and 12 herbicide degradates was examined during the 2004 growing season in an intermediate-scale agricultural watershed (146 ha) that is drained by a first-order intermittent stream, and the mass load for each herbicide in the stream was estimated. The herbicide load during the first week of storm events after application ranged from 17% of annual load for trifluralin to 84% of annual load for acetochlor. The maximum weekly herbicide load in the stream was generally within the first 3 weeks after application for those compounds that were applied within the watershed during 2004, and later for herbicides not applied within the watershed during 2004 but still detected in the stream. The apparent dominant mode of herbicide transport in the stream-determined by analysis amongst herbicide and conservative ion concentrations at different points in the hydrograph and in base flow samples-was either overland runoff or shallow subsurface flow, depending on the elapsed time after application and type of herbicide. The load as a percentage of use (LAPU) for the parent compounds in this study was similar to literature values for those compounds applied by the farmer within the watershed, but smaller for those herbicides that had rainfall as their only source within the watershed.

  9. How benthic diatoms within natural communities respond to eight common herbicides with different modes of action.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-07-01

    Herbicides are common pollutants of rivers in agricultural regions. These contaminants include various types of chemicals with different modes of toxic action. Herbicides can have toxic effects on freshwater benthic diatoms, the base of the aquatic food web. We examined the effects of (non-mixture) herbicide exposure to the health of diatoms for eight common herbicides with three different modes of action; the photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors: atrazine, simazine, hexazinone, tebuthiuron and diuron; two auxinic herbicides: MCPA and 2,4-D; and the EPSP synthase inhibitor: glyphosate. Benthic diatoms within riverine communities were exposed to each herbicide in rapid toxicity tests at concentrations of 50, 200 and 500μgL(-1). The most sensitive taxa were Gomphonema spp. and Encyonema gracilis. Navicula cryptotenella was the most tolerant to herbicide exposure. There was no significant effect of the different herbicide modes of action at the community level. Herbicide mode of action did not alter which taxa were most sensitive within the community and sensitivity rankings of the dominant diatom taxa were similar for each of the eight herbicides. The consistency of the results between herbicides suggests that freshwater benthic diatoms may be suitable in situ indicators for detecting the toxicity of herbicides with differing modes of action.

  10. Transcript markers of herbicide stress in Arabidopsis and their cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low concentrations and short environmental persistence times of some herbicides make it difficult to develop analytical methods to detect herbicide residues in plants or soils. In contrast, genomics may provide tools to identify herbicide exposure to plants in field settings. Usi...

  11. Herbicide-Resistance in Crops and Weeds: A Historical and Current Perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are the principal economic means of weed management on >90% of U.S. farmland. Herbicide-resistant crop cultivars have been used widely since 1995. Pest disciplines and other life sciences have various definitions of resistance that share commonalities. Development of herbicide resistant w...

  12. How benthic diatoms within natural communities respond to eight common herbicides with different modes of action.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-07-01

    Herbicides are common pollutants of rivers in agricultural regions. These contaminants include various types of chemicals with different modes of toxic action. Herbicides can have toxic effects on freshwater benthic diatoms, the base of the aquatic food web. We examined the effects of (non-mixture) herbicide exposure to the health of diatoms for eight common herbicides with three different modes of action; the photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors: atrazine, simazine, hexazinone, tebuthiuron and diuron; two auxinic herbicides: MCPA and 2,4-D; and the EPSP synthase inhibitor: glyphosate. Benthic diatoms within riverine communities were exposed to each herbicide in rapid toxicity tests at concentrations of 50, 200 and 500μgL(-1). The most sensitive taxa were Gomphonema spp. and Encyonema gracilis. Navicula cryptotenella was the most tolerant to herbicide exposure. There was no significant effect of the different herbicide modes of action at the community level. Herbicide mode of action did not alter which taxa were most sensitive within the community and sensitivity rankings of the dominant diatom taxa were similar for each of the eight herbicides. The consistency of the results between herbicides suggests that freshwater benthic diatoms may be suitable in situ indicators for detecting the toxicity of herbicides with differing modes of action. PMID:27037885

  13. Use of controlled release herbicides in waste burial sites

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.

    1981-07-01

    Controlled-release formulations of herbicides have been applied to the soil in the manner traditional for herbicides: on the surface or mixed into the top few inches of soil. The controlled-release formulation allows another option that we propose to use: to place herbicides, contained in controlled-release formulations, in a layer at least a foot below the surface of the soil, in order to prevent root penetration below that level. Ideally, the herbicide will prevent root tip cell division but will not translocate within the plant, thus assuring that the plant will survive, preserving the ground cover. Trifluralin is one of the herbicides which does not translocate and was chosen for use in this study. A number of applications for this technology are possible; particularly in waste management. In the present studies, we used two different forms of polymeric carrier/delivery (PCD) systems to investigate the controlled release of herbicides. In the initial study, a sheet was made of homogeneous mixtures of an individual polymer and trifluralin. We made several of these sheets, using a different polymer each time (with trifluralin) to compare release rates from the various polymers. We also fabricated cylindrical pellets in two sizes from mixtures of Profax/sup a/ PS-1600 polypropylene and trifluralin, formulated to determine the interaction of PCD systems with soil. Also developed is a trifluralin-releasing device with a theoretical effective lifetime approaching 100 years. The system was designed specifically to protect the asphalt layer or clay/aggregate barriers on uranium mill tailings piles. PCD devices composed of pellets could also be implanted over burial sites for radioactive and/or toxic materials, preventing translocation of those materials to plant shoots, and thence into the biosphere.

  14. Temperature-dependent sensitivity of growth and photosynthesis of Scenedesmus obliquus, Navicula pelliculosa and two strains of Microcystis aeruginosa to the herbicide atrazine.

    PubMed

    Chalifour, Annie; Juneau, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    The temperature-dependent sensitivities of two algal species and two strains of cyanobacteria to the photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicide atrazine were evaluated in order to understand how the interaction between acclimation temperature and herbicide will affect growth and photosynthesis of aquatic microorganisms. The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, the diatom Navicula pelliculosa and a toxic and non-toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa were acclimated to three different temperatures (10, 15 and 25°C) and exposed to five concentrations of the herbicide atrazine (0-0.15μM) for 72h. Growth, photosynthetic yields, energy fluxes within photosystem II and pigment content were then measured as potential responses to each treatment. With the exception of N. pelliculosa, the toxicity of atrazine was higher when microorganisms were acclimated to lower temperatures. N. pelliculosa was not only the most tolerant to atrazine, but also had a similar sensitivity to this herbicide at every temperature. The observed differences in growth sensitivity to atrazine at low temperature are associated with the ability of algae and cyanobacteria to cope with high excitation pressure, by increasing its protective carotenoid content and non-photochemical energy dissipation. Our results demonstrate that future guidelines for the protection of aquatic life should consider water temperature as an important factor influencing the toxicity of atrazine to aquatic microorganisms. PMID:21392491

  15. Temperature-dependent sensitivity of growth and photosynthesis of Scenedesmus obliquus, Navicula pelliculosa and two strains of Microcystis aeruginosa to the herbicide atrazine.

    PubMed

    Chalifour, Annie; Juneau, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    The temperature-dependent sensitivities of two algal species and two strains of cyanobacteria to the photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicide atrazine were evaluated in order to understand how the interaction between acclimation temperature and herbicide will affect growth and photosynthesis of aquatic microorganisms. The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, the diatom Navicula pelliculosa and a toxic and non-toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa were acclimated to three different temperatures (10, 15 and 25°C) and exposed to five concentrations of the herbicide atrazine (0-0.15μM) for 72h. Growth, photosynthetic yields, energy fluxes within photosystem II and pigment content were then measured as potential responses to each treatment. With the exception of N. pelliculosa, the toxicity of atrazine was higher when microorganisms were acclimated to lower temperatures. N. pelliculosa was not only the most tolerant to atrazine, but also had a similar sensitivity to this herbicide at every temperature. The observed differences in growth sensitivity to atrazine at low temperature are associated with the ability of algae and cyanobacteria to cope with high excitation pressure, by increasing its protective carotenoid content and non-photochemical energy dissipation. Our results demonstrate that future guidelines for the protection of aquatic life should consider water temperature as an important factor influencing the toxicity of atrazine to aquatic microorganisms.

  16. Residual herbicide study on selected Hanford Site roadsides

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-08-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company routinely treats roadsides with herbicides to control undesirable plant growth. An experiment was conducted to test perennial grass germination in soils adjacent to roadways of the Hanford Site. The primary variable was the distance from the roadside. A simple germination test was executed in a controlled-environment chamber to determine the residual effects of these applications. As expected, the greatest herbicide activity was found directly adjacent to the roadway, approximately 0 to 20 ft (0 to 6.3 m) from the roadway.

  17. Disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents: peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as a final rule its proposal to amend its adjudication regulations by clarifying and expanding the terminology regarding presumptive service connection for acute and subacute peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. This amendment implements a decision by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs based on findings from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Institute of Medicine report, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2010. It also amends VA's regulation governing retroactive awards for certain diseases associated with herbicide exposure as required by court orders in the class action litigation of Nehmer v. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. PMID:24040683

  18. Disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents: peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as a final rule its proposal to amend its adjudication regulations by clarifying and expanding the terminology regarding presumptive service connection for acute and subacute peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. This amendment implements a decision by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs based on findings from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Institute of Medicine report, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2010. It also amends VA's regulation governing retroactive awards for certain diseases associated with herbicide exposure as required by court orders in the class action litigation of Nehmer v. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  19. Natural attenuation of chloroacetinilide herbicides in aquatic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, D.W.; Graham, W.H.; DeNoyelles, F.; Smith, V.H.; ,

    1999-01-01

    A 4-yr research program that studied the transformation of alachlor and metolachlor in aquatic systems using field microcosms is presented. The field microcosms provided an accurate simulation of natural ecosystems while also permitting the controlled creation of numerous contamination scenarios and sufficient replication to allow statistical evaluation of the results. Different treatments were assessed including conditions as diverse as anaerobic, eutrophic waters typical of nutrient-rich wetland to aerobic, oligotrophic waters typical of the epilimnion of Canadian glacial lake. Herbicide transformation rate was most strongly affected by water temperature, oxygen conditions, nutrient levels within the system, and the specific herbicide assessed.

  20. Action of the herbicide butachlor on cholinesterases in the freshwater snail Pila globosa (Swainson).

    PubMed

    Rajyalakshmi, T; Srinivas, T; Swamy, K V; Prasad, N S; Mohan, P M

    1996-11-01

    Butachlor action on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activates in central nervous tissue of the snail Pila globosa was assayed following the method of ELLMAN et al1, in vitro by adding butachlor directly (10-100 mu moles), to tissue homogenates and in in vivo by exposing the snails to sub-lethal concentration (26.6 ppm) and taking out the tissue for experimentation at different intervals (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h) of exposure. The enzyme activities decreased in a dose-dependent manner in vitro, and up to 12-24 h in vivo after which they showed recovery towards the control. The inhibition of cholinesterases by butachlor in vitro indicates a direct action of the herbicide on these enzymes. Presumably butachlor exercises its neurotoxic effects through cholinergic impairment in a way similar to that of organophosphates and carbamates.

  1. Cyanobacterial Toxins as Allelochemicals with Potential Applications as Algaecides, Herbicides and Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Berry, John P.; Gantar, Miroslav; Perez, Mario H.; Berry, Gerald; Noriega, Fernando G.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria (“blue-green algae”) from marine and freshwater habitats are known to produce a diverse array of toxic or otherwise bioactive metabolites. However, the functional role of the vast majority of these compounds, particularly in terms of the physiology and ecology of the cyanobacteria that produce them, remains largely unknown. A limited number of studies have suggested that some of the compounds may have ecological roles as allelochemicals, specifically including compounds that may inhibit competing sympatric macrophytes, algae and microbes. These allelochemicals may also play a role in defense against potential predators and grazers, particularly aquatic invertebrates and their larvae. This review will discuss the existing evidence for the allelochemical roles of cyanobacterial toxins, as well as the potential for development and application of these compounds as algaecides, herbicides and insecticides, and specifically present relevant results from investigations into toxins of cyanobacteria from the Florida Everglades and associated waterways. PMID:18728763

  2. Phytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of imazethapyr herbicide using a battery of bioassays.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Anahí; Peralta Gavensky, Marina; Fassiano, Anabella V; Ríos de Molina, María C; Santos, Marina; March, Hugo; Moretton, Juan; Juárez, Ángela B

    2015-12-01

    The imazethapyr herbicide (formulation Verosil(®)) was evaluated for phytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a battery of bioassays: (1) the growth inhibition of the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, (2) the root growth and germination of the higher plant Lactuca sativa, (3) the genetic damage using the Salmonella/microsome test, and (4) the aneugenic and clastogenic effects on Allium cepa. The Verosil(®) formulation was highly toxic to the non-target green alga (median effective concentration (EC50) = 1.05 ± 0.05 mg active ingredient (a.i.) L(-1)), and concentrations above 10 mg a.i. L(-1) inhibited root elongation in lettuce: relative growth index (RGI) between 0.28 ± 0.01 and 0.66 ± 0.10. No genotoxic effect was observed in S almonella typhimurium at 100 mg a.i. L(-1), either with or without the microsomal fraction. However, significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in anaphases and telophases (bridges, chromosome fragments, and vagrants) were observed in A. cepa at concentrations between 0.01 and 1 mg a.i. L(-1) with respect to the control. The frequencies of micronuclei showed significant differences with respect to the control at concentrations between 0.001 and 0.1 mg a.i. L(-1). A very high mitotic index (MI = 93.8 ± 5.8) was observed associated with a high number of cells in the prophase stage at 100 mg a.i. L(-1), indicating cytotoxicity. These results showed that imazethapyr is toxic to the non-target populations in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. This herbicide might also exert clastogenic and aneugenic mitotic damage in higher plants. Therefore, the imazethapyr formulation may constitute an environmental risk to plants. PMID:26250814

  3. Phytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of imazethapyr herbicide using a battery of bioassays.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Anahí; Peralta Gavensky, Marina; Fassiano, Anabella V; Ríos de Molina, María C; Santos, Marina; March, Hugo; Moretton, Juan; Juárez, Ángela B

    2015-12-01

    The imazethapyr herbicide (formulation Verosil(®)) was evaluated for phytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a battery of bioassays: (1) the growth inhibition of the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, (2) the root growth and germination of the higher plant Lactuca sativa, (3) the genetic damage using the Salmonella/microsome test, and (4) the aneugenic and clastogenic effects on Allium cepa. The Verosil(®) formulation was highly toxic to the non-target green alga (median effective concentration (EC50) = 1.05 ± 0.05 mg active ingredient (a.i.) L(-1)), and concentrations above 10 mg a.i. L(-1) inhibited root elongation in lettuce: relative growth index (RGI) between 0.28 ± 0.01 and 0.66 ± 0.10. No genotoxic effect was observed in S almonella typhimurium at 100 mg a.i. L(-1), either with or without the microsomal fraction. However, significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in anaphases and telophases (bridges, chromosome fragments, and vagrants) were observed in A. cepa at concentrations between 0.01 and 1 mg a.i. L(-1) with respect to the control. The frequencies of micronuclei showed significant differences with respect to the control at concentrations between 0.001 and 0.1 mg a.i. L(-1). A very high mitotic index (MI = 93.8 ± 5.8) was observed associated with a high number of cells in the prophase stage at 100 mg a.i. L(-1), indicating cytotoxicity. These results showed that imazethapyr is toxic to the non-target populations in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. This herbicide might also exert clastogenic and aneugenic mitotic damage in higher plants. Therefore, the imazethapyr formulation may constitute an environmental risk to plants.

  4. Herbicides and herbicide degradates in shallow groundwater and the Cedar River near a municipal well field, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Water samples were collected near a Cedar Rapids, Iowa municipal well field from June 1998 to August 1998 and analyzed for selected triazine and acetanilide herbicides and degradates. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of herbicides and herbicide degradates in the well field during a period following springtime application of herbicides to upstream cropland. The well field is in an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Cedar River. Parent herbicide concentrations generally were greatest in June, and decreased in July and August. Atrazine was most frequently detected and occurred at the greatest concentrations; acetochlor, cyanazine and metolachlor also were detected, but at lesser concentrations than atrazine. Triazine degradate concentrations were relatively small (<0.50 ??g/l) and generally decreased from June to August. Although the rate of groundwater movement is relatively fast (approx. 1 m per day) in the alluvial aquifer near the Cedar River, deethylatrazine (DEA) to atrazine ratios in groundwater samples collected near the Cedar River indicate that atrazine and DEA probably are gradually transported into the alluvial aquifer from the Cedar River. Deisopropylatrazine (DIA) to DEA ratios in water samples indicate most DIA in the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer is produced by atrazine degradation, although some could be from cyanazine degradation. Acetanilide degradates were detected more frequently and at greater concentrations than their corresponding parent herbicides. Ethanesulfonic-acid (ESA) degradates comprised at least 80% of the total acetanilide-degradate concentrations in samples collected from the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer in June, July and August; oxanilic acid degradates comprised less than 20% of the total concentrations. ESA-degradate concentrations generally were smallest in June and greater in July and August. Acetanilide degradate concentrations in groundwater adjacent to the Cedar River indicate acetanilide

  5. Lethal and sub-lethal chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on seagrass.

    PubMed

    Negri, Andrew P; Flores, Florita; Mercurio, Phil; Mueller, Jochen F; Collier, Catherine J

    2015-08-01

    Photosystem II herbicides from agricultural sources have been detected throughout nearshore tropical habitats including seagrass meadows. While PSII herbicides have been shown to inhibit growth in microalgae at low concentrations, the potential impacts of chronic low concentration exposures to seagrass health and growth have not been investigated. Here we exposed two tropical seagrass species Halodule uninervis and Zostera muelleri to elevated diuron concentrations (from 0.3 to 7.2μgl(-1)) over a 79-day period followed by a 2-week recovery period in uncontaminated seawater. PAM fluorometry demonstrated rapid effect of diuron on photosystem II (PSII) in both seagrass species at 0.3μgl(-1). This effect included significant inhibition of photosynthetic efficiency (ΔF/Fm') and inactivation of PSII (Fv/Fm) over the 11 week exposure period. Significant mortality and reductions in growth was only observed at the highest exposure concentration of 7.2μgl(-1) diuron. However, biochemical indicators demonstrated that the health of seagrass after this prolonged exposure was significantly compromised at lower concentrations. For example, the drop in C:N ratios (0.6μgl(-1)) and reduced δ(13)C (1.7μgl(-1)) in seagrass leaves indicated reduced C-assimilation from photosynthesis. Critically, the energetic reserves of the plants (as measured by starch content in the root-rhizome complex) were approximately halved following diuron exposure at and above 1.7μgl(-1). During the 2-week recovery period, the photosynthetic capacity of the seagrass improved with only plants from the highest diuron treatment still exhibiting chronic damage to PSII. This study shows that, although seagrass may survive prolonged herbicide exposures, concentrations ≥0.6μgl(-1) diuron equivalents cause measureable impacts on energetic status that may leave the plants vulnerable to other simultaneous stressors. For example, tropical seagrasses have been heavily impacted by reduced light from coastal

  6. Lethal and sub-lethal chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on seagrass.

    PubMed

    Negri, Andrew P; Flores, Florita; Mercurio, Phil; Mueller, Jochen F; Collier, Catherine J

    2015-08-01

    Photosystem II herbicides from agricultural sources have been detected throughout nearshore tropical habitats including seagrass meadows. While PSII herbicides have been shown to inhibit growth in microalgae at low concentrations, the potential impacts of chronic low concentration exposures to seagrass health and growth have not been investigated. Here we exposed two tropical seagrass species Halodule uninervis and Zostera muelleri to elevated diuron concentrations (from 0.3 to 7.2μgl(-1)) over a 79-day period followed by a 2-week recovery period in uncontaminated seawater. PAM fluorometry demonstrated rapid effect of diuron on photosystem II (PSII) in both seagrass species at 0.3μgl(-1). This effect included significant inhibition of photosynthetic efficiency (ΔF/Fm') and inactivation of PSII (Fv/Fm) over the 11 week exposure period. Significant mortality and reductions in growth was only observed at the highest exposure concentration of 7.2μgl(-1) diuron. However, biochemical indicators demonstrated that the health of seagrass after this prolonged exposure was significantly compromised at lower concentrations. For example, the drop in C:N ratios (0.6μgl(-1)) and reduced δ(13)C (1.7μgl(-1)) in seagrass leaves indicated reduced C-assimilation from photosynthesis. Critically, the energetic reserves of the plants (as measured by starch content in the root-rhizome complex) were approximately halved following diuron exposure at and above 1.7μgl(-1). During the 2-week recovery period, the photosynthetic capacity of the seagrass improved with only plants from the highest diuron treatment still exhibiting chronic damage to PSII. This study shows that, although seagrass may survive prolonged herbicide exposures, concentrations ≥0.6μgl(-1) diuron equivalents cause measureable impacts on energetic status that may leave the plants vulnerable to other simultaneous stressors. For example, tropical seagrasses have been heavily impacted by reduced light from coastal

  7. Herbicides and nitrate in near-surface aquifers in the midcontinental United States, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Burkart, Michael R.; Thurman, E. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Hydrogeologic factors, land use, agricultural practices, local features, and water chemistry were analyzed for possible relation to herbicide and excess-nitrate detections. Herbicides and excess nitrate were detected more frequently in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers than in nearsurface bedrock aquifers. The depth to the top of the aquifer was inversely related to the frequency of detection of herbicides and excess nitrate. The proximity of streams to sampled wells also affected the frequency of herbicide detection. Significant seasonal differences were determined for the frequency of herbicide detection, but not for the frequency of excess nitrate.

  8. Factors affecting herbicide yields in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, June 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hainly, R.A.; Kahn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 199094 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could be refined with more-current land use and land cover information and a more accurate estimate of the percentage of basin area planted in corn. Factors related to herbicide yields can be used to predict herbicide yields in other basins within the Chesapeake Bay watershed and to develop an estimate of herbicide loads to Chesapeake Bay.Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 1990-94 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could

  9. Effect of some herbicides used in Nigeria on Rhizobium phaseoli, Azotobacter vinelandii and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, I A; Okorodudu, E; Lawal, O

    2004-04-01

    The effect of three herbicides namely Agroxone, Atranex 50SC and 2,4-Damine on Azotobacter vinelandii, Rhizobium phaseoli and Bacillus subtilis were studied. These bacteria were isolated from a bean-garden in Lagos. The results revealed that 2, 4-Damine was the most toxic of the three herbicides studied and Azotobacter vinelandii was found to be most sensitive to the herbicides. There was a reduction in LC50 of herbicides with increased number of days. The percentage survival decreased with increased concentration of herbicides and days for Rhizobium phaseoli and Azotobacter vinelandii while an initial reduction in population was followed by increased percentage survival of organisms for Bacillus subtilis.

  10. Influence of herbicide active ingredient, nozzle type, orifice size, spray pressure, and carrier volume rate on spray droplet size characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent concerns on herbicide spray drift and its subsequent impact on the surrounding environment and herbicide efficacy have prompted applicators to focus on methods to reduce off-target movement of herbicides. Herbicide applications are complex processes and as such few studies have been conducted...

  11. Effects of herbicide-treated host plants on the development of Mamestra brassicae L. caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Melanie; Geisthardt, Martin; Brühl, Carsten A

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides are widely used pesticides that affect plants by changing their chemistry. In doing so, herbicides might also influence the quality of plants as food for herbivores. To study the effects of herbicides on host plant quality, 3 plant species (Plantago lanceolata L., P. major L., and Ranunculus acris L.) were treated with sublethal rates of either a sulfonylurea (Atlantis WG, Bayer CropScience) or a glyphosate (Roundup LB Plus, Monsanto) herbicide, and the development of caterpillars of the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae L. that fed on these plants was observed. Of the 6 tested plant-herbicide combinations, 1 combination (R. acris + sulfonylurea herbicide) resulted in significantly lower caterpillar weight, increased time to pupation, and increased overall development time compared with larvae that were fed unsprayed plants. These results might be caused by a lower nutritional value of these host plants or increased concentrations of secondary metabolites that are involved in plant defense. The results of the present and other studies suggest potential risks to herbivores that feed on host plants treated with sublethal rates of herbicides. However, as the effects of herbicides on host plant quality appear to be species-specific and as there are numerous plant-herbicide-herbivore relationships in agricultural landscapes, a general reduction in herbicide contamination of nontarget habitats (e.g., field margins) might mitigate the negative effects of herbicides on host plant quality.

  12. Leaching and persistence of herbicides for kudzu (Pueraria montana) control on pine regeneration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Taylor, John, W.

    2006-03-01

    Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens forests in the southeastern United States. It can climb, overtop, and subsequently kill new seedlings or mature trees. Herbicides are commonly used to control kudzu; however, eradication might require retreatment for 3 to 10 yr in young stands and 7 to 10 yr for mature stands. Clopyralid, picloram, triclopyr, metsulfuron, and tebuthiuron exert various degrees of control, depending on soil type, meteorological conditions, herbicide formulation, seasonal application, characteristics of the kudzu stand, and frequency and number of herbicide. Field residue data for soil or leachate are lacking for all of these herbicides when they are used in actual forest regeneration programs in the Coastal Plain. These data are needed to assess the relative potential for the herbicides to leach into groundwater or to move off-site into sensitive ecological areas of the Coastal Plain in which sandy soils predominate and the groundwater tends to be shallow. As part of an integrated pest management program to control kudzu on forest regeneration areas at the Savannah River Site near New Ellenton, SC, five herbicides were evaluated from the standpoints of herbicide leaching, kudzu control, and plant community development. Three herbicide chemical families were represented. This included pyridinecarboxylic acid herbicides (clopyralid, picloram 1 2,4-D, and triclopyr), a sulfonylurea herbicide (metsulfuron), and a substituted urea herbicide (tebuthiuron).

  13. Management of herbicide resistance in wheat cropping systems: learning from the Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael J; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Herbicide resistance continues to escalate in weed populations infesting global wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crops, threatening grain production and thereby food supply. Conservation wheat production systems are reliant on the use of efficient herbicides providing low-cost, selective weed control in intensive cropping systems. The resistance-driven loss of herbicide resources combined with limited potential for new herbicide molecules means greater emphasis must be placed on preserving existing herbicides. For more than two decades, since the initial recognition of the dramatic consequences of herbicide resistance, the challenge of introducing additional weed control strategies into herbicide-based weed management programmes has been formidable. Throughout this period, herbicide resistance has expanded unabated across the world's wheat production regions. However, in Australia, where herbicide resources have become desperately depleted, the adoption of harvest weed seed control is evidence, at last, of a successful approach to sustainable weed management in wheat production systems. Growers routinely including strategies to target weed seeds during crop harvest, as part of herbicide-based weed management programmes, are now realising significant weed control and crop production benefits. When combined with an attitude of zero weed tolerance, there is evidence of a sustainable weed control future for wheat production systems. The hard-learned lessons of Australian growers can now be viewed by global wheat producers as an example of how to stop the continual loss of herbicide resources in productive cropping systems.

  14. Effects of herbicide-treated host plants on the development of Mamestra brassicae L. caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Melanie; Geisthardt, Martin; Brühl, Carsten A

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides are widely used pesticides that affect plants by changing their chemistry. In doing so, herbicides might also influence the quality of plants as food for herbivores. To study the effects of herbicides on host plant quality, 3 plant species (Plantago lanceolata L., P. major L., and Ranunculus acris L.) were treated with sublethal rates of either a sulfonylurea (Atlantis WG, Bayer CropScience) or a glyphosate (Roundup LB Plus, Monsanto) herbicide, and the development of caterpillars of the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae L. that fed on these plants was observed. Of the 6 tested plant-herbicide combinations, 1 combination (R. acris + sulfonylurea herbicide) resulted in significantly lower caterpillar weight, increased time to pupation, and increased overall development time compared with larvae that were fed unsprayed plants. These results might be caused by a lower nutritional value of these host plants or increased concentrations of secondary metabolites that are involved in plant defense. The results of the present and other studies suggest potential risks to herbivores that feed on host plants treated with sublethal rates of herbicides. However, as the effects of herbicides on host plant quality appear to be species-specific and as there are numerous plant-herbicide-herbivore relationships in agricultural landscapes, a general reduction in herbicide contamination of nontarget habitats (e.g., field margins) might mitigate the negative effects of herbicides on host plant quality. PMID:25143001

  15. Fourier transform of delayed fluorescence as an indicator of herbicide concentration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2014-12-21

    It is well known that delayed fluorescence (DF) from Photosystem II (PSII) of plant leaves can be potentially used to sense herbicide pollution and evaluate the effect of herbicides on plant leaves. The research of using DF as a measure of herbicides in the literature was mainly conducted in time domain and qualitative correlation was often obtained. Fourier transform is often used to analyze signals. Viewing DF signal in frequency domain through Fourier transform may allow separation of signal components and provide a quantitative method for sensing herbicides. However, there is a lack of an attempt to use Fourier transform of DF as an indicator of herbicide. In this work, the relationship between the Fourier transform of DF and herbicide concentration was theoretically modelled and analyzed, which immediately yielded a quantitative method to measure herbicide concentration in frequency domain. Experiments were performed to validate the developed method.

  16. Herbicides in ground water of the Midwest: A regional study of shallow aquifers, 1991-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Stamer, J.K.; Goolsby, D.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    The intensive herbicide use associated with the 'Corn Belt' marks the Midwestern United States as a region where herbicide contamination of ground water could be a problem. To better understand the regional occurrence of herbicides in shallow aquifers of the Midwest, a sampling network of 303 wells across 12 States was developed. The results documented relatively widespread, low-level concentrations of herbicides in the shallow aquifers sampled. The most frequently detected compounds, however, were the transformation products of these herbicides. A relation was determined between herbicide occurrence and the general age of the ground water sampled. Water that recharged ground water within the past 40 years was much more likely to contain herbicides than water recharged earlier.

  17. Citrullus Germplasm Lines Vary in Clomazone Herbicide Tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences between Citrullus germplasm lines in clomazone injury were first observed when the herbicide was used for weed control in fields containing germplasm lines of watermelon breeding project at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC. The objectives of this investigation were to asses...

  18. Tolerance to the Herbicide Clomazone in Watermelon Plant Introductions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pre-emergence herbicide clomazone (trade name: Command 3ME), is widely used in watermelon production in the US for suppression of annual grasses and broadleaf weeds growing in between plastic beds. Exposure of young watermelon plants to clomazone can cause moderate or severe injury that is expr...

  19. Identification of citrullus lanatus germplasm lines tolerant to clomazone herbicide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clomazone herbicide is registered for use in watermelon; however, crop tolerance is marginal and the recommended use rates (0.07 to 0.1 kg ai ha-1) are lower for watermelon than for some other crops. In a greenhouse germplasm evaluation experiment including 56 germplasm accessions and watermelon cu...

  20. Palmer Amaranth Identification and Documentation of Herbicide Resistance in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Palmer amaranth (Amaranthuspalmeri S. Wats.) has greatly disrupted agricultural practices in the US with its rapid growth and rapid evolution of herbicide resistance. This weed species is now suspected in Argentina. To document whether the suspected plant populations are indeed Palmer amaranth, mo...

  1. Sorption of the herbicide aminocyclopyrachlor by cation modified clay minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminocyclopyrachlor is a newly registered herbicide for the control of broadleaf weeds, grasses, vines and woody species in non-crops, turf, sod farms, and residential areas. At typical soil pH levels, aminocyclopyrachlor is in the anionic form. Anionic pesticides are generally weakly retained by mo...

  2. Herbicide-resistant weed management: focus on glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Beckie, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    This review focuses on proactive and reactive management of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds. Glyphosate resistance in weeds has evolved under recurrent glyphosate usage, with little or no diversity in weed management practices. The main herbicide strategy for proactively or reactively managing GR weeds is to supplement glyphosate with herbicides of alternative modes of action and with soil-residual activity. These herbicides can be applied in sequences or mixtures. Proactive or reactive GR weed management can be aided by crop cultivars with alternative single or stacked herbicide-resistance traits, which will become increasingly available to growers in the future. Many growers with GR weeds continue to use glyphosate because of its economical broad-spectrum weed control. Government farm policies, pesticide regulatory policies and industry actions should encourage growers to adopt a more proactive approach to GR weed management by providing the best information and training on management practices, information on the benefits of proactive management and voluntary incentives, as appropriate. Results from recent surveys in the United States indicate that such a change in grower attitudes may be occurring because of enhanced awareness of the benefits of proactive management and the relative cost of the reactive management of GR weeds.

  3. Reactions of Sweet Corn Hybrids to Prevalent Diseases and Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This 27-year summary is of University of Illinois sweet corn nurseries from 1984 to 2010, and includes the reactions of 800 hybrids to eight diseases and three herbicides. Commercially-available and pre-commercial hybrids included 547 shrunken-2 hybrids (317 yellow, 152 bi-color, and 78 white), 117 ...

  4. Assessing off-taraget impacts of herbicide drift on plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plants and plant communities provide vital economic services including production of food and fiber crops for direct human consumption and ecosystem services including wildlife habitat and cycling of nutrients and energy. These services can be impacted if herbicides drift from t...

  5. Species-specific sensitivity of aquatic macrophytes towards two herbicides.

    PubMed

    Cedergreen, Nina; Spliid, Niels Henrik; Streibig, Jens C

    2004-07-01

    The s-triazine herbicide terbutylazine, an inhibitor of photosystem II, is often found in surface waters in concentrations < 1 microg L(-1), but concentrations up to 13 microg L(-1) have been measured. To study the effect on the aquatic flora, we tested the sensitivity of 10 aquatic macrophyte species and a natural epiphyte community in a 2-week laboratory multispecies test at constant terbutylazine concentrations and two irradiance regimes. The data were described by a log-logistic concentration-response model and species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) were created from the EC50 and EC10 values. The 5% hazard concentration (HC5) of the EC10-based SSD for terbutylazine was 1 and 3 microg L(-1); hence the low chronic terbutylazine concentrations measured in the environment are not likely to affect the macrophyte community. To compare the species sensitivity between different groups of herbicides, SSDs were constructed from a published study on the sulfonylurea metsulfuron-methyl, an inhibitor of acetolactate synthase. There was no correlation between species-specific sensitivity to the two herbicides; hence, the combined exposure of different herbicides might affect the macrophyte community more broadly rather than seriously affecting a few susceptible species. Evaluating the standard procedure of leaving at least a factor of 100 between the EC50 of standard tests on Lemna sp. and the predicted environmental concentration seems to be protective for at least 95% of the macrophyte species for both terbutylazine and metsulfuron-methyl. PMID:15223257

  6. Evaluation of Reflex (fomesafen) herbicide for watermelon in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective preemergence herbicides are needed for weed control in watermelon grown from transplants. Reflex (fomesafen) was found to be effective and to exhibit crop safety in southeast USA. Trials were conducted during 2011 and 2012 in southeast Oklahoma to determine if this product would be useful...

  7. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  8. Factors Influencing Observed Tillage Impacts on Herbicide Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, E. A.; Huang, C.; Smith, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    The widespread use and potential human health effects of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate have generated interest in establishing how no-tillage impacts loading of these herbicides to runoff water in comparison to other tillage practices. In this study, potentially confounding factos such as time in tillage practice and type and distribution of residue cover, are weighed against inherent tillage impacts to soil structure in terms of relative effects on herbicide transport with runoff water. In this study, two small watersheds (one in no-till (NT) and one rotational till (RT)) were monitored during the first three years since conversion of the RT watershed from NT. In addition, rainfall simulation was applied to plots within each watershed during the first, third, and fifth years since the conversion. Runoff atrazine and glyphosate losses from RT areas were compared to losses from NT areas as a ratio of RT:NT. Results indicate a trend of increasing RT:NT value with time in tillage. Watershed monitoring indicated greater herbicide loading to runoff water from the NT watershed than the RT watershed during the first year since RT conversion, but this relationship reversed by the third year since conversion to RT. In addition, rainfall simulations were performed on small boxes of NT or RT soil having varying types and levels of residue cover in an attempt to isolate residue cover effects from true tillage effects.

  9. Herbicide resistance in weeds: Survey, characterization, and mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this paper is to present a systematic diagnostic approach towards the characterization of herbicide resistance in a given weed population with regards to profile (single, multiple, cross resistance), magnitude (fold level), mechanism, and related bio-physiological aspects. Diagnosing her...

  10. Herbicide-resistant weed management: focus on glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Beckie, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    This review focuses on proactive and reactive management of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds. Glyphosate resistance in weeds has evolved under recurrent glyphosate usage, with little or no diversity in weed management practices. The main herbicide strategy for proactively or reactively managing GR weeds is to supplement glyphosate with herbicides of alternative modes of action and with soil-residual activity. These herbicides can be applied in sequences or mixtures. Proactive or reactive GR weed management can be aided by crop cultivars with alternative single or stacked herbicide-resistance traits, which will become increasingly available to growers in the future. Many growers with GR weeds continue to use glyphosate because of its economical broad-spectrum weed control. Government farm policies, pesticide regulatory policies and industry actions should encourage growers to adopt a more proactive approach to GR weed management by providing the best information and training on management practices, information on the benefits of proactive management and voluntary incentives, as appropriate. Results from recent surveys in the United States indicate that such a change in grower attitudes may be occurring because of enhanced awareness of the benefits of proactive management and the relative cost of the reactive management of GR weeds. PMID:21548004

  11. Implications of sampling frequency to herbicide conservation effects assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide losses from row crop agriculture represent potential human health hazards. In particular, atrazine concentrations in drinking water must not exceed its maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 3 'g/L. Atrazine, simazine, alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, and glyphosate were monitored along ti...

  12. PREDICTING RISKS TO WILDLIFE FROM THE OFFTARGET MOVEMENT OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    While insecticide applications are generally thought of as the greatest pesticide risk to wildlife, the recent literature would suggest the indirect effects of herbicides on wildlife are much greater. The resulting alteration of habitat and decrease in food sources from the off ...

  13. Cytogenetic studies of three triazine herbicides. I. In vitro studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine, simazine, and cyanazine are widely used pre-emergence and post-emergence triazine herbicides that have made their way into the potable water supply of many agricultural communities. Because of this and the prevalence of contradictory cytogenetic studies in the literatur...

  14. The toxic mechanism of high lethality of herbicide butachlor in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huarong; Yin, Licheng; Zhang, Shicui; Feng, Wenrong

    2010-09-01

    The toxic mechanism of herbicide butachlor to induce extremely high lethality in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys Olivaceus, was analyzed by histopathological examination, antioxidant enzymes activities and ATP content assay. Histopathological examination of gill, liver and kidney of exposed fishes showed that gill was a target organ of butachlor. The butachlor seriously impaired the respiration of gills by a series of lesions such as edema, lifting and detachment of lamellar epithelium, breakdown of pillar cells, and blood congestion. The dysfunction of gill respiration caused suffocation to the exposed flounder with extremely high acute lethality. Antioxidant enzyme activity assay of the in vitro cultured flounder gill (FG) cells exposed to butachlor indicated that butachlor markedly inhibited the antioxidant enzyme activities of Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Furthermore, along with the decline of antioxidant enzyme activities, ATP content in the exposed FG cells decreased, too. This infers that the oxidative stress induced by butachlor can inhibit the production of cellular ATP. Similar decrease of ATP content was also observed in the exposed flounder gill tissues. Taken together, as in FG cells, butachlor possibly induced a short supply of ATP in pillar cells by inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme activities and then affecting the contractibility of the pillar cells, which in turn resulted in the blood congestion and suffocation of exposed flounder.

  15. Effect of sugarcane cropping systems on herbicide losses in surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Nachimuthu, Gunasekhar; Halpin, Neil V; Bell, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Herbicide runoff from cropping fields has been identified as a threat to the Great Barrier Reef ecosystem. A field investigation was carried out to monitor the changes in runoff water quality resulting from four different sugarcane cropping systems that included different herbicides and contrasting tillage and trash management practices. These include (i) Conventional - Tillage (beds and inter-rows) with residual herbicides used; (ii) Improved - only the beds were tilled (zonal) with reduced residual herbicides used; (iii) Aspirational - minimum tillage (one pass of a single tine ripper before planting) with trash mulch, no residual herbicides and a legume intercrop after cane establishment; and (iv) New Farming System (NFS) - minimum tillage as in Aspirational practice with a grain legume rotation and a combination of residual and knockdown herbicides. Results suggest soil and trash management had a larger effect on the herbicide losses in runoff than the physico-chemical properties of herbicides. Improved practices with 30% lower atrazine application rates than used in conventional systems produced reduced runoff volumes by 40% and atrazine loss by 62%. There were a 2-fold variation in atrazine and >10-fold variation in metribuzin loads in runoff water between reduced tillage systems differing in soil disturbance and surface residue cover from the previous rotation crops, despite the same herbicide application rates. The elevated risk of offsite losses from herbicides was illustrated by the high concentrations of diuron (14μgL(-1)) recorded in runoff that occurred >2.5months after herbicide application in a 1(st) ratoon crop. A cropping system employing less persistent non-selective herbicides and an inter-row soybean mulch resulted in no residual herbicide contamination in runoff water, but recorded 12.3% lower yield compared to Conventional practice. These findings reveal a trade-off between achieving good water quality with minimal herbicide contamination and

  16. Measuring Rates of Herbicide Metabolism in Dicot Weeds with an Excised Leaf Assay.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong; Skelton, Joshua J; Riechers, Dean E

    2015-01-01

    In order to isolate and accurately determine rates of herbicide metabolism in an obligate-outcrossing dicot weed, waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus), we developed an excised leaf assay combined with a vegetative cloning strategy to normalize herbicide uptake and remove translocation as contributing factors in herbicide-resistant (R) and -sensitive (S) waterhemp populations. Biokinetic analyses of organic pesticides in plants typically include the determination of uptake, translocation (delivery to the target site), metabolic fate, and interactions with the target site. Herbicide metabolism is an important parameter to measure in herbicide-resistant weeds and herbicide-tolerant crops, and is typically accomplished with whole-plant tests using radiolabeled herbicides. However, one difficulty with interpreting biokinetic parameters derived from whole-plant methods is that translocation is often affected by rates of herbicide metabolism, since polar metabolites are usually not mobile within the plant following herbicide detoxification reactions. Advantages of the protocol described in this manuscript include reproducible, accurate, and rapid determination of herbicide degradation rates in R and S populations, a substantial decrease in the amount of radiolabeled herbicide consumed, a large reduction in radiolabeled plant materials requiring further handling and disposal, and the ability to perform radiolabeled herbicide experiments in the lab or growth chamber instead of a greenhouse. As herbicide resistance continues to develop and spread in dicot weed populations worldwide, the excised leaf assay method developed and described herein will provide an invaluable technique for investigating non-target site-based resistance due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism and detoxification. PMID:26383604

  17. Cross-resistance to herbicides in annual ryegrass (lolium rigidum)

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher, J.T.; Powles, S.B.; Liljegren, D.R.; Holtum, J.A.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Lolium rigidum Gaud. biotype SLR31 is resistant to the herbicide diclofop-methyl and cross-resistant to several sulfonylurea herbicides. Wheat and the cross-resistant ryegrass exhibit similar patterns of resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides, suggesting that the mechanism of resistance may be similar. Cross-resistant ryegrass is also resistant to the wheat-selective imidazolinone herbicide imazamethabenz. The cross-resistant biotype SLR31 metabolized (phenyl-U-{sup 14}C)chlorsulfuron at a faster rate than a biotype which is susceptible to both diclofop-methyl and chlorsulfuron. A third biotype which is resistant to diclofop-methyl but not to chlorsulfuron metabolized chlorsulfuron at the same rate as the susceptible biotype. The increased metabolism of chlorsulfuron observed in the cross-resistant biotype is, therefore, correlated with the patterns of resistance observed in these L. rigidum biotypes. During high performance liquid chromatography analysis the major metabolite of chlorsulfuron in both susceptible and cross-resistant ryegrass coeluted with the major metabolite produced in wheat. The major product is clearly different from the major product in the tolerant dicot species, flax (Linium usitatissimum). The elution pattern of metabolites of chlorsulfuron was the same for both the susceptible and cross-resistant ryegrass but the cross-resistant ryegrass metabolized chlorsulfuron more rapidly. The investigation of the dose response to sulfonylurea herbicides at the whole plant level and the study of the metabolism of chlorsulfuron provide two independent sets of data which both suggest that the resistance to chlorsulfuron in cross-resistant ryegrass biotype SLR31 involves a wheat-like detoxification system.

  18. Synthesis and herbicidal activity of 2-(substituted phenoxyacetoxy)alkyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; He, Hong-Wu; Zuo, Na; He, Hai-Feng; Peng, Hao; Tan, Xiao-Song

    2012-08-01

    A series of 2-(substituted phenoxyacetoxy)alkyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-ones IIa-s were designed and synthesized on the basis of the previous work for the modification of alkylphosphonates I, and their structures were confirmed by (1)H NMR, (31)P NMR, (13)C NMR, IR, MS, and elemental analysis. Their herbicidal activities against seven species of weeds were evaluated in a greenhouse. A part of the title compounds such as IIa-g, IIk, IIo, and IIr exhibited significant postemergence herbicidal activity against Abutilon theophrasti, Brassica juncea, Amaranthus retroflexus, and Eclipta prostrate at a dosage of 150 g ai/ha. Structure-activity relationship analyses indicated that the introduction of a phosphorus-containing heterocyclic ring had a favorable effect on herbicidal activity, and their herbicidal activity could be further increased by a reasonable combination of X, Y, and R in parent structure II. It could be found that the title compounds IIa 2-[(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetoxy](methyl)methyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one and IIr 2-[(4-chloro-2-methyl-phenoxy)acetoxy](methyl)methyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one possess high activity and a broad spectrum against all of the test broadleaf weeds with 70-100% inhibition effect at a dosage of 75 g ai/ha, and the title compounds IIa and IIr are safe for corn and wheat at a dosage of 150 g ai/ha. Furthermore, the title compound IIa possesses low rat toxicity. These results suggest that the title compounds IIa and IIr could be potential and selective postemergence herbicides for further development.

  19. Elucidating modes of activation and herbicide resistance by sequence assembly and molecular modelling of the Acetolactate synthase complex in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Evans, Dyfed; Joshi, Shailesh Vinay

    2016-10-21

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) catalyzes the first portion of the biosynthetic pathway leading to the generation of branched-chain amino acids. As such it is essential for plant health and is a major target for herbicides. ALS is a very poorly characterized molecule in sugarcane. The enzyme is activated and inhibited by a regulatory subunit (known as VAT1 in plants) whose mode of action is entirely unknown. Using Saccharum halepense as a template we have assembled the ALS gene of sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) and have modelled the structure of ALS based on an Arabidopsis template (the first ALS model for a monocot). We have also assembled the ALS regulatory proteins (VAT1 and VAT2) from sugarcane and show that VAT2 is specific to true grasses. Employing a bacterial model, we have generated a structural model for VAT1, which explains why the separate domains of the proteins bind to either leucine or valine but not both. Using co-evolution studies we have determined molecular contacts by which we modelled the docking of VAT1 to ALS. In conclusion, we demonstrate how the binding of VAT1 to ALS activates ALS and show how VAT1 can also confer feedback inhibition to ALS. We validate our ALS model against biochemical data and employ this model to explain the function of a novel herbicide binding mutant in sugarcane. PMID:27452529

  20. The environmental occurrence of herbicides: The importance of degradates in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Linhart, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Numerous studies are being conducted to investigate the occurrence, fate, and effects on human health and the environment from the extensive worldwide use of herbicides to control weeds. Few studies, however, are considering the degradates of these herbicides in their investigations. Our study of herbicides in aquifers across Iowa found herbicide degradates to be prevalent in ground water, being detected in about 75% of the wells sampled. With the exception of atrazine, the frequencies of detection in ground water for a given herbicide increased multifold when its degradates were considered. Furthermore, a majority of the measured concentration for a given herbicide was in the form of its degradates—even for a relatively persistent compound such as atrazine. For this study, degradates comprised from 60 to over 99% of a herbicide's measured concentration. Because herbicide degradates can have similar acute and chronic toxicity as their parent compounds, these compounds have environmental significance as well as providing a more complete understanding of the fate and transport of a given herbicide. Thus, it is essential that degradates are included in any type of herbicide investigation.

  1. A comparison of the herbicide tolerances of rare and common plants in an agricultural landscape.

    PubMed

    Egan, J Franklin; Graham, Ian M; Mortensen, David A

    2014-03-01

    Declining plant biodiversity in agroecosystems has often been attributed to escalating use of chemical herbicides, but other changes in farming systems, including the clearing of seminatural habitat fragments, confound the influence of herbicides. The present study introduces a new approach to evaluate the impacts of herbicide pollution on plant communities at landscape or regional scales. If herbicides are in fact a key factor shaping agricultural plant diversity, one would expect to see the signal of past herbicide impacts in the current plant community composition of an intensively farmed region, with common, successful species more tolerant to widely used herbicides than rare or declining species. Data from an extensive field survey of plant diversity in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA, were compared with herbicide bioassay experiments in a greenhouse to test the hypothesis that common species possess higher herbicide tolerances than rare species. Five congeneric pairs of rare and common species were treated with 3 commonly used herbicide modes of action in bioassay experiments, and few significant differences were found in the tolerances of rare species relative to common species. These preliminary results suggest that other factors beyond herbicide exposure may be more important in shaping the distribution and abundance of plant species diversity across an agricultural landscape.

  2. Pesticide use in the U.S. and policy implications: a focus on herbicides.

    PubMed

    Short, P; Colborn, T

    1999-01-01

    This article examines herbicide use in the United States, providing estimates of poundage, land surface covered, distribution, and recent trends based on federal and state figures. Herbicides are by far the most widely used class of pesticide in the US, where 556 million lbs of herbicide active ingredients (AIs) were applied in 1995. Agriculture accounts for the majority of herbicide use, totaling 461 million lbs of AIs in 1995. Over 60% of the poundage of all agricultural herbicides consist of those that are capable of disrupting the endocrine and/or reproductive systems of animals. In addition, at least 17 types of 'inert ingredients,' which can equal 90% or more of a pesticide product, have been identified as having potential endocrine-disrupting effects. Atrazine is the predominant herbicide used according to poundage, with 68-73 million lbs of AIs applied in 1995. However, 2,4-D is the most widespread herbicide, covering 78 million acres for agricultural uses alone. Both of these herbicides are reported endocrine disruptors. Acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors, namely the sulfonylureas and imidazolinones, are one of the fastest growing classes of herbicides. Many of these herbicides are 100 times more toxic to select plant species than their predecessors, so they can be applied at rates approximately 100 times lower. Consequently, they can affect plant species at concentration levels so low that no standard chemical protocol can detect them. Due in part to these more potent herbicides, the poundage of herbicides used in the US has decreased since the mid-1980s; however, the available data suggest that the number of treated acres has not significantly declined. A thorough assessment of potential exposure to herbicides by wildlife and humans is limited due to the inaccessibility of production and usage data.

  3. Quantitative Evaluation of the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) for Comparing Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kniss, Andrew R; Coburn, Carl W

    2015-01-01

    Various indicators of pesticide environmental risk have been proposed, and one of the most widely known and used is the environmental impact quotient (EIQ). The EIQ has been criticized by others in the past, but it continues to be used regularly in the weed science literature. The EIQ is typically considered an improvement over simply comparing the amount of herbicides applied by weight. Herbicides are treated differently compared to other pesticide groups when calculating the EIQ, and therefore, it is important to understand how different risk factors affect the EIQ for herbicides. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the suitability of the EIQ as an environmental indicator for herbicides. Simulation analysis was conducted to quantify relative sensitivity of the EIQ to changes in risk factors, and actual herbicide EIQ values were used to quantify the impact of herbicide application rate on the EIQ Field Use Rating. Herbicide use rate was highly correlated with the EIQ Field Use Rating (Spearman's rho >0.96, P-value <0.001) for two herbicide datasets. Two important risk factors for herbicides, leaching and surface runoff potential, are included in the EIQ calculation but explain less than 1% of total variation in the EIQ. Plant surface half-life was the risk factor with the greatest relative influence on herbicide EIQ, explaining 26 to 28% of the total variation in EIQ for actual and simulated EIQ values, respectively. For herbicides, the plant surface half-life risk factor is assigned values without any supporting quantitative data, and can result in EIQ estimates that are contrary to quantitative risk estimates for some herbicides. In its current form, the EIQ is a poor measure of herbicide environmental impact.

  4. Quantitative Evaluation of the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) for Comparing Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Kniss, Andrew R.; Coburn, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Various indicators of pesticide environmental risk have been proposed, and one of the most widely known and used is the environmental impact quotient (EIQ). The EIQ has been criticized by others in the past, but it continues to be used regularly in the weed science literature. The EIQ is typically considered an improvement over simply comparing the amount of herbicides applied by weight. Herbicides are treated differently compared to other pesticide groups when calculating the EIQ, and therefore, it is important to understand how different risk factors affect the EIQ for herbicides. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the suitability of the EIQ as an environmental indicator for herbicides. Simulation analysis was conducted to quantify relative sensitivity of the EIQ to changes in risk factors, and actual herbicide EIQ values were used to quantify the impact of herbicide application rate on the EIQ Field Use Rating. Herbicide use rate was highly correlated with the EIQ Field Use Rating (Spearman’s rho >0.96, P-value <0.001) for two herbicide datasets. Two important risk factors for herbicides, leaching and surface runoff potential, are included in the EIQ calculation but explain less than 1% of total variation in the EIQ. Plant surface half-life was the risk factor with the greatest relative influence on herbicide EIQ, explaining 26 to 28% of the total variation in EIQ for actual and simulated EIQ values, respectively. For herbicides, the plant surface half-life risk factor is assigned values without any supporting quantitative data, and can result in EIQ estimates that are contrary to quantitative risk estimates for some herbicides. In its current form, the EIQ is a poor measure of herbicide environmental impact. PMID:26121252

  5. The mode of action and the structure of a herbicide in complex with its target: binding of activated hydantocidin to the feedback regulation site of adenylosuccinate synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Fonné-Pfister, R; Chemla, P; Ward, E; Girardet, M; Kreuz, K E; Honzatko, R B; Fromm, H J; Schär, H P; Grütter, M G; Cowan-Jacob, S W

    1996-01-01

    (+)-Hydantocidin, a recently discovered natural spironucleoside with potent herbicidal activity, is shown to be a proherbicide that, after phosphorylation at the 5' position, inhibits adenylosuccinate synthetase, an enzyme involved in de novo purine synthesis. The mode of binding of hydantocidin 5'-monophosphate to the target enzyme was analyzed by determining the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex at 2.6-A resolution. It was found that adenylosuccinate synthetase binds the phosphorylated compound in the same fashion as it does adenosine 5'-monophosphate, the natural feedback regulator of this enzyme. This work provides the first crystal structure of a herbicide-target complex reported to date. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8790347

  6. The enzymatic and antioxidative stress response of Lemna minor to copper and a chloroacetamide herbicide.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, Michael; Schröder, Christian A; Helmreich, Brigitte; Schröder, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Lemna minor L., a widely used model plant for toxicity tests has raised interest for its application to phytoremediation due to its rapid growth and ubiquitous occurrence. In rural areas, the pollution of water bodies with heavy metals and agrochemicals poses a problem to surface water quality. Among problematic compounds, heavy metals (copper) and pesticides are frequently found in water bodies. To establish duckweed as a potential plant for phytoremediation, enzymatic and antioxidative stress responses of Lemna minor during exposure to copper and a chloroacetamide herbicide were investigated in laboratory studies. The present study aimed at evaluating growth and the antioxidative and glutathione-dependent enzyme activity of Lemna plants and its performance in a scenario for phytoremediation of copper and a chloroacetamide herbicide. Lemna minor was grown in Steinberg medium under controlled conditions. Plants were treated with CuSO4 (ion conc. 50 and 100 μg/L) and pethoxamide (1.25 and 2.5 μg/L). Measurements following published methods focused on plant growth, oxidative stress, and basic detoxification enzymes. Duckweed proved to survive treatment with the respective concentrations of both pollutants very well. Its growth was inhibited scarcely, and no visible symptoms occurred. On the cellular basis, accumulation of O2(-) and H2O2 were detected, as well as stress reactions of antioxidative enzymes. Duckweed detoxification potential for organic pollutants was high and increased significantly with incubation. Pethoxamide was found to be conjugated with glutathione. Copper was accumulated in the fronds at high levels, and transient oxidative defense reactions were triggered. This work confirms the significance of L. minor for the removal of copper from water and the conjugation of the selective herbicide pethoxamide. Both organic and inorganic xenobiotics induced different trends of enzymatic and antioxidative stress response. The strong increase of stress

  7. [Construction of a vector conferring herbicide and pest resistance in tobacco plant].

    PubMed

    Xie, Long-Xu; Xu, Pei-Lin; Nie, Yan-Fang; Tian, Ying-Chuan

    2003-09-01

    A binary plant expression vector, pCM12-slm, carrying the aroAM12 mutant gene encoding bacterial 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the Bts1m recombinant gene consisting of 331 N-terminal amino acids of CryIAc and 284 C-terminal amino acids of CryIAb has been constructed. The truncated Bts1 gene was fused with the PR1b signal peptide sequence and expressed in tobacco plants under the control of 2E-CaMV35S promoter and the omega (omega) translation enhancer sequence from tobacco mosaic virus. The mutant aroAM12 was fused with the transit sequence of tobacco EPSPS and expressed in tobacco plants under the control of the CaMV35S promoter. Tobacco leaves were transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 harboring the pCM12-slm plasmid, and the transgenic plants were selected directly on medium containing the herbicide. Forty glyphosate resistant plants were regenerated, with a transformation frequency of 27%. Transgenic plants were initially assessed for glyphosate resistance by placing leaf discs on shoot induction media containing the herbicide. Rooted plantlets, propagated from selected transgenic tobacco, were transferred to soil in a greenhouse and tested for glyphosate resistance by spraying them with Roundup at a commercial recommended dose. The glyphosate resistance assay indicated that all the transgenic plants showed highly resistant to the herbicide. The PCR assay showed that the aroAM12 gene was present in all of the 40 T0 transfer plants, and Bts1m genes present in 28 of 40 of the transgenic plants. Southern blot analysis further confirmed that the copy number of the transgenes varied from one to three copies in different transgenic plants. Northern blot and immunodot blot showed that the aroAM12 and Bts1m genes were expressed at the transcription and translation levels. Transgenic plants containing both the aroA M12 and Bts1m genes were further assessed for insect resistance. Tobacco leaves of T0 transgenic plants were infested

  8. Sensitivity, variability, and recovery of functional and structural endpoints of an aquatic community exposed to herbicides.

    PubMed

    Knauer, Katja; Hommen, Udo

    2012-04-01

    A mesocosm study with three photosystem-II inhibitors and an equipotent mixture was performed to address the value of functional and structural endpoints in evaluating the impact of herbicides on aquatic systems. The herbicides atrazine, diuron, and isoproturon were dosed in the ratio of their relative potencies as HC30 for the single substance treatments and as 1/3 HC30 for the mixture treatment to obtain comparable effect concentrations. To investigate the effects of the three herbicides and their mixture on photosynthesis of the whole system, the physical-chemical parameters pH, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity were monitored. To address effects on photosynthesis more specifically, the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton and three submersed macrophytes (Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum, and Potamogeton lucens) were investigated applying in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence as an indicator for their activity. As a structural endpoint, the species abundance and community structure of the phytoplankton community was determined. Effects were continuously monitored over a five week period of constant exposure, and during a 3 month post-exposure period. The sensitivity, expressed as maximum effect during constant exposure, was higher for the structural parameters (total and single species abundances and PRC) than for the functional parameters. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the physical-chemical parameters was below 10%, for the photosynthesis measurement of the phytoplankton and macrophytes below 10 and 30%, respectively. Structural parameters, however, yielded higher variability with mean CVs for phytoplankton abundance data and single sensitive species reaching up to 96%. Effects on the phytoplankton photosynthesis measured via in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence were constant during the exposure period; whereas macrophytes recovered quickly from photosynthesis inhibition despite constant exposure. Effects on total system photosynthesis

  9. The enzymatic and antioxidative stress response of Lemna minor to copper and a chloroacetamide herbicide.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, Michael; Schröder, Christian A; Helmreich, Brigitte; Schröder, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Lemna minor L., a widely used model plant for toxicity tests has raised interest for its application to phytoremediation due to its rapid growth and ubiquitous occurrence. In rural areas, the pollution of water bodies with heavy metals and agrochemicals poses a problem to surface water quality. Among problematic compounds, heavy metals (copper) and pesticides are frequently found in water bodies. To establish duckweed as a potential plant for phytoremediation, enzymatic and antioxidative stress responses of Lemna minor during exposure to copper and a chloroacetamide herbicide were investigated in laboratory studies. The present study aimed at evaluating growth and the antioxidative and glutathione-dependent enzyme activity of Lemna plants and its performance in a scenario for phytoremediation of copper and a chloroacetamide herbicide. Lemna minor was grown in Steinberg medium under controlled conditions. Plants were treated with CuSO4 (ion conc. 50 and 100 μg/L) and pethoxamide (1.25 and 2.5 μg/L). Measurements following published methods focused on plant growth, oxidative stress, and basic detoxification enzymes. Duckweed proved to survive treatment with the respective concentrations of both pollutants very well. Its growth was inhibited scarcely, and no visible symptoms occurred. On the cellular basis, accumulation of O2(-) and H2O2 were detected, as well as stress reactions of antioxidative enzymes. Duckweed detoxification potential for organic pollutants was high and increased significantly with incubation. Pethoxamide was found to be conjugated with glutathione. Copper was accumulated in the fronds at high levels, and transient oxidative defense reactions were triggered. This work confirms the significance of L. minor for the removal of copper from water and the conjugation of the selective herbicide pethoxamide. Both organic and inorganic xenobiotics induced different trends of enzymatic and antioxidative stress response. The strong increase of stress

  10. Sensitivity, variability, and recovery of functional and structural endpoints of an aquatic community exposed to herbicides.

    PubMed

    Knauer, Katja; Hommen, Udo

    2012-04-01

    A mesocosm study with three photosystem-II inhibitors and an equipotent mixture was performed to address the value of functional and structural endpoints in evaluating the impact of herbicides on aquatic systems. The herbicides atrazine, diuron, and isoproturon were dosed in the ratio of their relative potencies as HC30 for the single substance treatments and as 1/3 HC30 for the mixture treatment to obtain comparable effect concentrations. To investigate the effects of the three herbicides and their mixture on photosynthesis of the whole system, the physical-chemical parameters pH, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity were monitored. To address effects on photosynthesis more specifically, the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton and three submersed macrophytes (Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum, and Potamogeton lucens) were investigated applying in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence as an indicator for their activity. As a structural endpoint, the species abundance and community structure of the phytoplankton community was determined. Effects were continuously monitored over a five week period of constant exposure, and during a 3 month post-exposure period. The sensitivity, expressed as maximum effect during constant exposure, was higher for the structural parameters (total and single species abundances and PRC) than for the functional parameters. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the physical-chemical parameters was below 10%, for the photosynthesis measurement of the phytoplankton and macrophytes below 10 and 30%, respectively. Structural parameters, however, yielded higher variability with mean CVs for phytoplankton abundance data and single sensitive species reaching up to 96%. Effects on the phytoplankton photosynthesis measured via in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence were constant during the exposure period; whereas macrophytes recovered quickly from photosynthesis inhibition despite constant exposure. Effects on total system photosynthesis

  11. Plan of study to determine the effect of changes in herbicide use on herbicide concentrations in Midwestern streams, 1989-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, Donald A.; Boyer, Laurie L.; Battaglin, William A.

    1994-01-01

    An approach was developed to determine if recent changes in the use of herbicides has affected herbicide concentrations in Midwestern streams. This approach also provides a plan to determine if the abnormally high rainfall and flooding in 1993 has an effect on nitrate concentrations in 1994 in streams that flooded in 1993. The approach involves sampling 53 stream sites, 50 of which were sampled in 1989 and 1990 as part of a reconnaissance to determine the geographic and seasonal distribution of herbicides in 10 Midwestern States. Sites will be sampled twice, once prior to application of herbicides, in March or early April, and once during the first runoff event after application of herbicides. Samples will be analyzed for 11 herbicide and 2 atrazine metabolites by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples will also be analyzed for ESA (an alachlor metabolite), two cyanazine metabolites, and nutrients. Changes to the manufacturers' label have decreased the maximum recommended application rate for atrazine on com and sorghum by about 50 percent since the 1989-90 study. Conversely, the use of other herbicides, such as cyanazine, has increased by more than 25 percent since 1989. Statistical procedures such as Wilcoxon signed rank tests for paired samples will be used to determine if the distributions of herbicide and nitrate concentrations in 1994 are different from those measured in 1989 and 1990.

  12. Leaching of three imidazolinone herbicides during sprinkler irrigation.

    PubMed

    Cessna, Allan J; Elliott, Jane A; Bailey, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Some imidazolinone herbicides have been shown to be mobile in soil, raising concern about their possible movement to ground water. Three imidazolinone herbicides (imazamethabenz-methyl, 497 g ha(-1); imazethapyr, 14.7 g ha(-1); and imazamox, 14.7 g ha(-1)) commonly used in crop production on the Canadian prairies were applied to a tile-drained field to assess their susceptibility to leach when subjected to sprinkler irrigation using a center pivot. Tile-drain flow began when the water table rose above tile-drain depth, and peak flow rates corresponded to the greatest depths of ground water above the tile drains. Interception of irrigation water by the tile drains in each quadrant of the field varied from ∼11 to 20% of the water applied. Under a worst-case scenario in which irrigation began the day after herbicide application and irrigation water was applied at 25 mm d(-1) for 12 d, there was evidence of preferential flow of all three herbicides and hydrolysis of imazamethabenz-methyl to imazamethabenz in the initial samples of tile-drain effluent. In subsequent samples, concentrations (analysis by LC-MS-MS) of the summation of imazamethabenz-methyl (25-24,000 ng L(-1)) plus its hydrolysis product imazamethabenz (63-26,500 ng L(-1)) greatly exceeded those of imazethapyr (<13-1260 ng L) and imazamox (19-599 ng L(-1)), thus reflecting relative application rates. In contrast, estimates of total transport of each herbicide from the root zone, which varied in each quadrant and ranged from 0.06 to 2.3% for imazamethabenz-methyl plus imazamethabenz, 0.71 to 3.1% for imazethapyr, and 0.61 to 2.8% for imazamox, did not reflect application rates. In shallow ground water (piezometer samples), there was inconsistent and infrequent detection all four compounds. With the frequency and amount of rainfall typically encountered in the prairie region of Canada, contamination of shallow ground water with detectable concentrations of the three imidazolinone herbicides would be

  13. Leaching of three imidazolinone herbicides during sprinkler irrigation.

    PubMed

    Cessna, Allan J; Elliott, Jane A; Bailey, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Some imidazolinone herbicides have been shown to be mobile in soil, raising concern about their possible movement to ground water. Three imidazolinone herbicides (imazamethabenz-methyl, 497 g ha(-1); imazethapyr, 14.7 g ha(-1); and imazamox, 14.7 g ha(-1)) commonly used in crop production on the Canadian prairies were applied to a tile-drained field to assess their susceptibility to leach when subjected to sprinkler irrigation using a center pivot. Tile-drain flow began when the water table rose above tile-drain depth, and peak flow rates corresponded to the greatest depths of ground water above the tile drains. Interception of irrigation water by the tile drains in each quadrant of the field varied from ∼11 to 20% of the water applied. Under a worst-case scenario in which irrigation began the day after herbicide application and irrigation water was applied at 25 mm d(-1) for 12 d, there was evidence of preferential flow of all three herbicides and hydrolysis of imazamethabenz-methyl to imazamethabenz in the initial samples of tile-drain effluent. In subsequent samples, concentrations (analysis by LC-MS-MS) of the summation of imazamethabenz-methyl (25-24,000 ng L(-1)) plus its hydrolysis product imazamethabenz (63-26,500 ng L(-1)) greatly exceeded those of imazethapyr (<13-1260 ng L) and imazamox (19-599 ng L(-1)), thus reflecting relative application rates. In contrast, estimates of total transport of each herbicide from the root zone, which varied in each quadrant and ranged from 0.06 to 2.3% for imazamethabenz-methyl plus imazamethabenz, 0.71 to 3.1% for imazethapyr, and 0.61 to 2.8% for imazamox, did not reflect application rates. In shallow ground water (piezometer samples), there was inconsistent and infrequent detection all four compounds. With the frequency and amount of rainfall typically encountered in the prairie region of Canada, contamination of shallow ground water with detectable concentrations of the three imidazolinone herbicides would be

  14. Influence of Environmental Factors, Cultural Practices, and Herbicide Application on Seed Germination and Emergence Ecology of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb.

    PubMed

    Lim, Charlemagne Alexander A; Awan, Tahir Hussain; Sta Cruz, Pompe C; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. (Saramolla grass) is a noxious weed of rice that is difficult to control by chemical or mechanical means once established. A study was conducted to determine the effect of light, temperature, salt, drought, flooding, rice residue mulch, burial depth, and pre-emergence herbicides on seed germination and emergence of I. rugosum. Germination was stimulated by light and inhibited under complete darkness. Optimum temperature for germination was 30/20°C (97.5% germination). Germination reduced from 31 to 3.5% when the osmotic potential of the growing medium decreased from -0.1 to -0.6 MPa and no germination occurred at -0.8 MPa. Germination was 18 and 0.5% at 50 and 100 mM NaCl concentrations, respectively, but was completely inhibited at 150 mM or higher. Residue application at 1-6 t ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 35-88% and shoot biomass by 55-95%. The efficacy of pre-emergence herbicides increased with increasing application rates and decreased with increasing rice residue mulching. The efficacy of herbicides was in the order of oxadiazon> pendimethalin> pretilachlor. At 6 t ha-1, all herbicides, regardless of rates, did not differ from the control treatment. I. rugosum seeds buried at 2 cm or deeper did not emerge; however, they emerged by 4.5 and 0.5% at 0.5 and 1 cm depths, respectively, compared to the 39% germination for soil surface seeding. Flooding at 4 DAS or earlier reduced seedling emergence and shoot biomass while flooding at 8 DAS reduced only seedling emergence. The depth and timing of flooding independently reduced root biomass. Flooding at 4 and 6 cm depths reduced the root biomass. Relative to flooding on the day of sowing, flooding at 8 DAS increased root biomass by 89%. Similarly, flooding on the day of sowing and at 2 DAS reduced the root-shoot biomass ratio. Under the no-flood treatment, increasing rates of pretilachlor from 0.075 to 0.3 kg ai ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 61-79%. At the flooding depth of 2-4 cm

  15. Influence of Environmental Factors, Cultural Practices, and Herbicide Application on Seed Germination and Emergence Ecology of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb.

    PubMed

    Lim, Charlemagne Alexander A; Awan, Tahir Hussain; Sta Cruz, Pompe C; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. (Saramolla grass) is a noxious weed of rice that is difficult to control by chemical or mechanical means once established. A study was conducted to determine the effect of light, temperature, salt, drought, flooding, rice residue mulch, burial depth, and pre-emergence herbicides on seed germination and emergence of I. rugosum. Germination was stimulated by light and inhibited under complete darkness. Optimum temperature for germination was 30/20°C (97.5% germination). Germination reduced from 31 to 3.5% when the osmotic potential of the growing medium decreased from -0.1 to -0.6 MPa and no germination occurred at -0.8 MPa. Germination was 18 and 0.5% at 50 and 100 mM NaCl concentrations, respectively, but was completely inhibited at 150 mM or higher. Residue application at 1-6 t ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 35-88% and shoot biomass by 55-95%. The efficacy of pre-emergence herbicides increased with increasing application rates and decreased with increasing rice residue mulching. The efficacy of herbicides was in the order of oxadiazon> pendimethalin> pretilachlor. At 6 t ha-1, all herbicides, regardless of rates, did not differ from the control treatment. I. rugosum seeds buried at 2 cm or deeper did not emerge; however, they emerged by 4.5 and 0.5% at 0.5 and 1 cm depths, respectively, compared to the 39% germination for soil surface seeding. Flooding at 4 DAS or earlier reduced seedling emergence and shoot biomass while flooding at 8 DAS reduced only seedling emergence. The depth and timing of flooding independently reduced root biomass. Flooding at 4 and 6 cm depths reduced the root biomass. Relative to flooding on the day of sowing, flooding at 8 DAS increased root biomass by 89%. Similarly, flooding on the day of sowing and at 2 DAS reduced the root-shoot biomass ratio. Under the no-flood treatment, increasing rates of pretilachlor from 0.075 to 0.3 kg ai ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 61-79%. At the flooding depth of 2-4 cm

  16. Influence of Environmental Factors, Cultural Practices, and Herbicide Application on Seed Germination and Emergence Ecology of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Charlemagne Alexander A.; Awan, Tahir Hussain; Sta. Cruz, Pompe C.; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. (Saramolla grass) is a noxious weed of rice that is difficult to control by chemical or mechanical means once established. A study was conducted to determine the effect of light, temperature, salt, drought, flooding, rice residue mulch, burial depth, and pre-emergence herbicides on seed germination and emergence of I. rugosum. Germination was stimulated by light and inhibited under complete darkness. Optimum temperature for germination was 30/20°C (97.5% germination). Germination reduced from 31 to 3.5% when the osmotic potential of the growing medium decreased from -0.1 to -0.6 MPa and no germination occurred at -0.8 MPa. Germination was 18 and 0.5% at 50 and 100 mM NaCl concentrations, respectively, but was completely inhibited at 150 mM or higher. Residue application at 1–6 t ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 35–88% and shoot biomass by 55–95%. The efficacy of pre-emergence herbicides increased with increasing application rates and decreased with increasing rice residue mulching. The efficacy of herbicides was in the order of oxadiazon> pendimethalin> pretilachlor. At 6 t ha-1, all herbicides, regardless of rates, did not differ from the control treatment. I. rugosum seeds buried at 2 cm or deeper did not emerge; however, they emerged by 4.5 and 0.5% at 0.5 and 1 cm depths, respectively, compared to the 39% germination for soil surface seeding. Flooding at 4 DAS or earlier reduced seedling emergence and shoot biomass while flooding at 8 DAS reduced only seedling emergence. The depth and timing of flooding independently reduced root biomass. Flooding at 4 and 6 cm depths reduced the root biomass. Relative to flooding on the day of sowing, flooding at 8 DAS increased root biomass by 89%. Similarly, flooding on the day of sowing and at 2 DAS reduced the root–shoot biomass ratio. Under the no-flood treatment, increasing rates of pretilachlor from 0.075 to 0.3 kg ai ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 61–79%. At the flooding depth of 2

  17. Effects of the herbicide metazachlor on macrophytes and ecosystem function in freshwater pond and stream mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Mohr, S; Berghahn, R; Feibicke, M; Meinecke, S; Ottenströer, T; Schmiedling, I; Schmiediche, R; Schmidt, R

    2007-05-01

    The chloroacetamide metazachlor is a commonly used pre-emergent herbicide to inhibit growth of plants especially in rape culture. It occurs in surface and ground water due to spray-drift or run-off in concentrations up to 100 microgL(-1). Direct and indirect effects of metazachlor on aquatic macrophytes were investigated at oligo- to mesotrophic nutrient levels employing eight stream and eight pond indoor mesocosms. Five systems of each type were dosed once with 5, 20, 80, 200 and 500 microgL(-1) metazachlor and three ponds and three streams served as controls. Pronounced direct negative effects on macrophyte biomass of Potamogeton natans, Myriophyllum verticillatum and filamentous green algae as well as associated changes in water chemistry were detected in the course of the summer 2003 in both pond and stream mesocosms. Filamentous green algae dominated by Cladophora glomerata were the most sensitive organisms in both pond and stream systems with EC(50) ranging from 3 (streams) to 9 (ponds) microgL(-1) metazachlor. In the contaminated pond mesocosms with high toxicant concentrations (200 and 500 microgL(-1)), a species shift from filamentous green algae to the yellow-green alga Vaucheria spec. was detected. The herbicide effects for the different macrophyte species were partly masked by interspecific competition. No recovery of macrophytes was observed at the highest metazachlor concentrations in both pond and stream mesocosms until the end of the study after 140 and 170 days. Based on the lowest EC(50) value of 4 microgL(-1) for total macrophyte biomass, it is argued that single exposure of aquatic macrophytes to metazachlor to nominal concentrations >5 microgL(-1) is likely to have pronounced long-term effects on aquatic biota and ecosystem function. PMID:17353057

  18. Identification of a Receptor Protein in Cotton Fibers for the Herbicide 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Delmer, Deborah P.; Read, Stephen M.; Cooper, Geoffrey

    1987-01-01

    The herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) is an effective and apparently specific inhibitor of cellulose synthesis in higher plants. We have synthesized a photoreactive analog of DCB (2,6-dichlorophenylazide [DCPA]) for use as an affinity-labeling probe to identify the DCB receptor in plants. This analog retains herbicide activity and inhibits cellulose synthesis in cotton fibers and tobacco cells in a manner similar to DCB. When cotton fiber extracts are incubated with [3H]DCPA and exposed to ultraviolet light, an 18 kilodalton polypeptide is specifically labeled. About 90% of this polypeptide is found in the 100,000g supernatant, the remainder being membrane-associated. Gel filtration and nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of this polypeptide indicate that it is an acidic protein which has a similar size in its native or denatured state. The amount of 18 kilodalton polypeptide detectable by [3H]DCPA-labeling increases substantially at the onset of secondary wall cellulose synthesis in the fibers. A similar polypeptide, but of lower molecular weight (12,000), has been detected upon labeling of extracts from tomato or from the cellulosic alga Chara corallina. The specificity of labeling of the 18 kilodalton cotton fiber polypeptide, coupled with its pattern of developmental regulation, implicate a role for this protein in cellulose biosynthesis. Being, at most, only loosely associated with membranes, it is unlikely to be the catalytic polypeptide of the cellulose synthase, and we suggest instead that the DCB receptor may function as a regulatory protein for β-glucan synthesis in plants. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16665454

  19. Rapid polyelectrolyte-based membrane immunoassay for the herbicide butachlor.

    PubMed

    Dzantiev, B B; Byzova, N A; Zherdev, A V; Hennion, M C

    2005-01-01

    Oppositely charged water-soluble polyelectrolytes were used in the developed membrane immunoenzyme assay for the herbicide butachlor. High-affinity and rapid binding between polyanion polymethacrylate and polycation poly(N-ethyl-4-vinylpyridinium) was applied to separate reacted and free immunoreactants. Competitive immunoassay format with peroxidase-labeled antigen was realized. The insoluble colored product of the peroxidase reaction was formed by bound labeled immune complexes and was reflectometrically detected. The assay combines short duration (15 min), high sensitivity (0.03 g/mL) and availability for out-of-laboratory testing. Different image processing algorithms were used to determine the herbicide content. Low variation coefficients of the measurements in the proposed quantitative assay, namely 4.8-9.0% for the range of antigen concentrations from 0.1 to 3.0 ng/mL, are evidence of the assay effectiveness. Possibility to control the butachlor content in mineral, artesian, and drinking water was demonstrated.

  20. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services. PMID:25005713

  1. The influence of reduced light intensity on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicide exposure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide pollution events in aquatic ecosystems often coincide with increased turbidity and reduced light intensity. It is therefore important to determine whether reduced light intensity can influence herbicide toxicity, especially to primary producers such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms collected from 4 rivers were exposed to herbicides in 48 h rapid toxicity tests under high light (100 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) and low light (20 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) intensities. The effects of 2 herbicides (atrazine and glyphosate) were assessed on 26 freshwater benthic diatom taxa. There was no significant interaction of light and herbicide effects at the community level or on the majority (22 of 26) of benthic diatom taxa. This indicates that low light levels will likely have only a minor influence on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicides. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2252-2260. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. Effects of herbicides on Behr's metalmark butterfly, a surrogate species for the endangered butterfly, Lange's metalmark.

    PubMed

    Stark, John D; Chen, Xue Dong; Johnson, Catherine S

    2012-05-01

    Lange's metalmark butterfly, Apodemia mormo langei Comstock, is in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat caused by invasive exotic plants which are eliminating its food, naked stem buckwheat. Herbicides are being used to remove invasive weeds from the dunes; however, little is known about the potential effects of herbicides on butterflies. To address this concern we evaluated potential toxic effects of three herbicides on Behr's metalmark, a close relative of Lange's metalmark. First instars were exposed to recommended field rates of triclopyr, sethoxydim, and imazapyr. Life history parameters were recorded after exposure. These herbicides reduced the number of adults that emerged from pupation (24-36%). Each herbicide has a different mode of action. Therefore, we speculate that effects are due to inert ingredients or indirect effects on food plant quality. If these herbicides act the same in A. mormo langei, they may contribute to the decline of this species.

  3. Are shifts in herbicide use reflected in concentration changes in Midwestern rivers?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    In many Midwestern rivers, elevated concentrations of herbicides occur during runoff events for 1-3 months following application. The highest or 'peak' herbicide concentration often occurs during one of these runoff events. Herbicide concentrations in rivers are affected by a number of factors, including herbicide use patterns within the associated basin. Changing agricultural practices, reductions in recommended and permitted herbicide applications, shifts to new herbicides, and greater environmental awareness in the agricultural community have resulted in changes to herbicide use patterns. In the Midwestern United States, alachlor use was much larger in 1989 than in 1995, while acetochlor was not used in 1989, and commonly used in 1995. Use of atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor was about the same in 1989 and 1995. Herbicide concentrations were measured in samples from 53 Midwestern rivers during the first major runoff event that occurred after herbicide application (postapplication) in 1989, 1990, 1994, and 1995. The median concentrations of atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, metribuzin, metolachlor, propazine, and simazine all were significantly higher in 1989/90 than in 1994/95. The median acetochlor concentration was higher in 1995 than in 1994. Estimated daily yields for all herbicides and degradation products measured, with the exception of acetochlor, were higher in 1989/90 than in 1994/95. The differences in concentration and yield do not always parallel changes in herbicide use, suggesting that other changes in herbicide or crop management are affecting concentrations in Midwestern rivers during runoff events.In many Midwestern rivers, elevated concentrations of herbicides occur during runoff events for 1-3 months following application. The highest or `peak' herbicide concentration often occurs during one of these runoff events. Herbicide concentrations in rivers are affected by a number of factors, including herbicide use patterns within the associated

  4. The influence of reduced light intensity on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicide exposure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide pollution events in aquatic ecosystems often coincide with increased turbidity and reduced light intensity. It is therefore important to determine whether reduced light intensity can influence herbicide toxicity, especially to primary producers such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms collected from 4 rivers were exposed to herbicides in 48 h rapid toxicity tests under high light (100 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) and low light (20 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) intensities. The effects of 2 herbicides (atrazine and glyphosate) were assessed on 26 freshwater benthic diatom taxa. There was no significant interaction of light and herbicide effects at the community level or on the majority (22 of 26) of benthic diatom taxa. This indicates that low light levels will likely have only a minor influence on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicides. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2252-2260. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26801964

  5. Three-parameter modeling of the soil sorption of acetanilide and triazine herbicide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mirlaine R; Matias, Stella V B G; Macedo, Renato L G; Freitas, Matheus P; Venturin, Nelson

    2014-02-01

    Herbicides have widely variable toxicity and many of them are persistent soil contaminants. Acetanilide and triazine family of herbicides have widespread use, but increasing interest for the development of new herbicides has been rising to increase their effectiveness and to diminish environmental hazard. The environmental risk of new herbicides can be accessed by estimating their soil sorption (logKoc), which is usually correlated to the octanol/water partition coefficient (logKow). However, earlier findings have shown that this correlation is not valid for some acetanilide and triazine herbicides. Thus, easily accessible quantitative structure-property relationship models are required to predict logKoc of analogues of the these compounds. Octanol/water partition coefficient, molecular weight and volume were calculated and then regressed against logKoc for two series of acetanilide and triazine herbicides using multiple linear regression, resulting in predictive and validated models. PMID:24374777

  6. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services.

  7. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Zaller, Johann G; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-07-09

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services.

  8. Effect of safeners on damage of human erythrocytes treated with chloroacetamide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Bernasinska, Joanna; Duchnowicz, Piotr; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Koceva-Chyla, Aneta

    2013-09-01

    Chloroacetamides are used as pre-emergent substances for growth control of annual grasses and weeds. Since they can be harmful for crop plants, protective compounds (safeners) are used along with herbicides. So far, their effects on human blood cells have not been evaluated, and this study is the very first one devoted to this subject. We examined the harmful effects of chloroacetamides, their metabolites and safeners, used alone or in combination with herbicides, on human erythrocytes measuring the extent of hemolysis, lipid peroxidation and catalase activity. Higher impact of herbicides than their metabolites on all of the investigated parameters was found. Safeners alone did not produce any damage to erythrocytes and did not elicit any changes in oxidative stress parameters. Combination of safener with herbicide did not attenuate hemolysis of erythrocytes compared to the herbicide alone. Safeners reduced lipid peroxidation induced by herbicides, which suggest the role of safeners as antioxidants. PMID:23732483

  9. Genotoxicity of the herbicide butachlor in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, S; Panneerselvam, N; Shanmugam, G

    1995-08-01

    Butachlor, a pre-emergence herbicide was investigated for its ability to induce sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosome aberrations (CA) in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes were treated with three different concentrations (5, 10 and 20 micrograms/ml) of butachlor for 24, 48 and 72 h. Our results indicate a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations at 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment with butachlor. No SCE was promoted by butachlor.

  10. Reductive dechlorination of the nitrogen heterocyclic herbicide picloram

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanand, K.; Nagarajan, A.; Suflita, J.M. )

    1993-07-01

    Halogenated heterocyclic chemicals are widely used for manufacture of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, dyes, and explosives. Often they are environmentally mobile and can contaminate ground water reserves. Picloram, a broad spectrum herbicide, has a half life in the soil of as long as 1 year. This paper reports on the reductive dehalogenation of picloram in anoxic freshwater sediments, though not when sulfate or nitrate was available as a terminal electron acceptor, and its subsequent conversion to an unidentified product. 25 refs., 4 figs, 1 tab.

  11. Effect of herbicide combinations on Bt-maize rhizobacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, José R; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P

    2014-11-28

    Reports of herbicide resistance events are proliferating worldwide, leading to new cultivation strategies using combinations of pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides. We analyzed the impact during a one-year cultivation cycle of several herbicide combinations on the rhizobacterial community of glyphosate-tolerant Bt-maize and compared them to those of the untreated or glyphosate-treated soils. Samples were analyzed using pyrosequencing of the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. The sequences obtained were subjected to taxonomic, taxonomy-independent, and phylogeny-based diversity studies, followed by a statistical analysis using principal components analysis and hierarchical clustering with jackknife statistical validation. The resilience of the microbial communities was analyzed by comparing their relative composition at the end of the cultivation cycle. The bacterial communites from soil subjected to a combined treatment with mesotrione plus s-metolachlor followed by glyphosate were not statistically different from those treated with glyphosate or the untreated ones. The use of acetochlor plus terbuthylazine followed by glyphosate, and the use of aclonifen plus isoxaflutole followed by mesotrione clearly affected the resilience of their corresponding bacterial communities. The treatment with pethoxamid followed by glyphosate resulted in an intermediate effect. The use of glyphosate alone seems to be the less aggressive one for bacterial communities. Should a combined treatment be needed, the combination of mesotrione and s-metolachlor shows the next best final resilience. Our results show the relevance of comparative rhizobacterial community studies when novel combined herbicide treatments are deemed necessary to control weed growth.. PMID:25394507

  12. Triazolyl phenyl disulfides: 8-Amino-7-oxononanoate synthase inhibitors as potential herbicides.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Hoh-Gyu; Choi, Jung-Sup; Lim, Hee Kyung; Lee, Kee-In; Hwang, In Taek

    2015-11-01

    The chemical validation of a potential herbicide target was investigated with 8-amino-7-oxononanoate synthase (AONS, also known as 7-keto-8-aminopelargonate synthase, KAPAS) and triazolyl phenyl disulfide derivatives in vitro and in vivo. AONS activity was completely inhibited by these synthesized compounds, with an IC50 of 48 to 592μM in vitro. Forty five-day old Arabidopsis thaliana plants were completely killed by representative compound KHG23844 {N-(2-fluorophenyl)-3-(phenyldisulphanyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-carboxamide} at the application rate of 250gha(-1) of foliar treatment in greenhouse conditions. Foliar application of 1000gha(-1) KHG23844 induced 2.3-fold higher l-alanine accumulation in the treated A. thaliana plants. Foliar supplement of 1mM biotin at 1 and 2days before KHG23844 application effectively recovered the growth inhibition of A. thaliana plant treated with KHG23844. The results strongly suggested that representative compound KHG23844 and its derivatives are potential AONS inhibitors.

  13. Confirmation of potential herbicidal agents in hulls of rice, Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Hahn, Sang-Joon; Ahmad, Ateeque

    2005-06-01

    An ethyl acetate extract of Oryza sativa (rice) hulls yielded seven compounds: hentriacontane, 1-tetratriacontanol, beta-sitosterol, momilactone A, momilactone B, tricin (a flavonoid), and beta-sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucoside. The structures of these compounds were elucidated with 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using 1D and 2D spectral methods, aided by electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS), fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS), infrared (IR), and ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry. The complete 1H NMR assignments for momilactone A and B and 13C NMR assignments for tricin are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, hentriacontane, 1-tetratriacontanol, and beta-sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucoside were identified for the first time in rice hulls. In biological activity tests using these identified compounds, momilactone A and B showed potent inhibitory activity against duckweed (Lemna paucicostata). 1-Tetratriacontanol and beta-sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucoside also showed about 13-20% inhibitory activity based on chlorophyll reduction. Hentriacontane and beta-sitosterol did not show any herbicidal activity. In a germination assay of three weed species (Leptochloa chinenesis L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., and Cyperus difformis L.) in culture tubes both momilactones A and B had high inhibitory effects. Momilactone B completely inhibited germination of all three weed species at 20 ppm. Germination of L. chinensis L. was completely inhibited by a 4 ppm solution of momilactone B.

  14. Chemical Composition, Herbicidal and Antifungal Activity of Satureja cuneifolia Essential Oils from Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Rellán, David; Verdeguer, Mercedes; Salamone, Adele; Blázquez, María Amparo; Boira, Herminio

    2016-06-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils from Satureja cuneifolia growing in east Spain was analyzed by GC, GC/MS. Forty-five compounds accounting for 99.1% of the total oil were identified. Camphor (47.6%), followed by camphene (13.6%) were the main compounds. Their herbicidal and antifungal activity was tested in vitro against three weeds (Amaranthus hybridus, Portulaca oleracea and Conyza canadensis) and eleven common pathogenic or saprophytic fungi (Phytophthora citrophthora, P. palmivora, Pythium litorale, Verticillium dahlia, Rhizoctonia solani, Penicillium hirsutum, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Phaeoacremonium aleophilum, Phaemoniella chlamydospora, Cylindrocarpon liriodendri and C. macrodidymum). The essential oil was very active against A. hybridus and C. canadensis significantly inhibiting their germination and seedling growth. Minor activity was shown against P. oleracea, depending on the concentration applied. P. palmivora, P. citrophthora and Pa. chlamydospora were the most sensitive fungi to the treatment with the essential oil, whereas R. solani showed no inhibition. Results showed that S. cuneifolia essential oil could be used for biocontrol of weeds and fungal plant diseases. PMID:27534131

  15. Rice transcriptome analysis to identify possible herbicide quinclorac detoxification genes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenying; Di, Chao; Zhou, Shaoxia; Liu, Jia; Li, Li; Liu, Fengxia; Yang, Xinling; Ling, Yun; Su, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world's rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed, and hormone interactions affecting quinclorac signaling has been identified. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and other environmental health problems. In this study, we used 57K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array to identify quinclorac signaling response genes to study the molecular mechanisms of action and detoxification of quinclorac in rice plants. Overall, 637 probe sets were identified with differential expression levels under either 6 or 24 h of quinclorac treatment. Auxin-related genes such as GH3 and OsIAAs responded to quinclorac treatment. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes of detoxification-related family genes were significantly enriched, including cytochrome P450, GST, UGT, and ABC and drug transporter genes. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that top candidate genes of P450 families such as CYP81, CYP709C, and CYP72A were universally induced by different herbicides. Some Arabidopsis genes of the same P450 family were up-regulated under quinclorac treatment. We conducted rice whole-genome GeneChip analysis and the first global identification of quinclorac response genes. This work may provide potential markers for detoxification of quinclorac and biomonitors of environmental chemical pollution. PMID:26483837

  16. Solubilization of herbicides by single and mixed commercial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Galán-Jiménez, M C; Gómez-Pantoja, E; Morillo, E; Undabeytia, T

    2015-12-15

    The solubilization capabilities of micellar solutions of three single surfactants, two alcohol alkoxylates B048 and B266, and the tallow alkyl ethoxylated amine ET15, and their equimolar mixed solutions toward the herbicides flurtamone (FL), metribuzin (MTZ) and mesotrione (MST) were investigated. The solubilization capacity was quantified in terms of the molar solubilization ratio (MSR), critical micellar concentration (CMC), micelle-water partition coefficient (Kmc), binding constant (K1), number of aggregation (Nagg) and Stern-Volmer constant (Ksv). The herbicides were greatly solubilized into different loci of the micelles: FL within the inner hydrophobic core, MST at the micelle/water interface and MTZ in the palisade region. Equimolar binary surfactant mixtures did not improve the solubilization of herbicides over those of single components, with the exception of MTZ by the B266/ET15 system which enhanced solubilization by 10-20%. This enhanced solubilization of MTZ was due to an increased number of micelles that arise from both the intermediate Nagg relative to that of the single surfactants and the lower CMC. The use of Ksv values was a better predictor of the solubilization of polar molecules within binary mixtures of these surfactants than the interaction parameter β(M) from regular solution theory (RST). The results herein suggest that the use of mixed surfactant systems for the solubilization of polar molecules in environmental remediation technologies may be very limited in scope, without clear advantages over the use of single surfactant systems.

  17. The binding of herbicidal halovinyl anilides to the photosystem II Q sub B site and the relationship between affinities and molecular characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Eilers, R.J.; Crouse, G.D.; Durst, G.L.; Streusand, V.J.; Manly, C.J.; Webster, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    A new class of herbicidal halovinyl anilides, which inhibit photosynthetic electron transport, have been shown to inhibit {sup 14}C-atrazine binding in spinach thylakoid membranes. A scatchard analysis of the {sup 14}C-atrazine binding inhibition of the lead compound, LY221204, has shown it to be a competitive inhibitor. Preliminary QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship) studies suggested that 75-80% of the variance in vivo activity could be explained by size and electronic properties and that activity increased with smaller and more electron releasing substituents. To analyze the effects of these properties on intrinsic activity, a larger QSAR study was undertaken. Atrazine binding inhibition data was generated for a group of substituted, non-conjugated vinyl anilides at 1 and 10 {mu}M concentrations and plotted as a function of physicochemical parameters. The results will be presented.

  18. Taking stock of herbicide-resistant crops ten years after introduction.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2005-03-01

    Since transgenic, bromoxynil-resistant cotton and glufosinate-resistant canola were introduced in 1995, planting of transgenic herbicide-resistant crops has grown substantially, revolutionizing weed management where they have been available. Before 1995, several commercial herbicide-resistant crops were produced by biotechnology through selection for resistance in tissue culture. However, non-transgenic herbicide-resistant crops have had less commercial impact. Since the introduction of glyphosate-resistant soybean in 1996, and the subsequent introduction of other glyphosate-resistant crops, where available, they have taken a commanding share of the herbicide-resistant crop market, especially in soybean, cotton and canola. The high level of adoption of glyphosate-resistant crops by North American farmers has helped to significantly reduce the value of the remaining herbicide market. This has resulted in reduced investment in herbicide discovery, which may be problematic for addressing future weed-management problems. Introduction of herbicide-resistant crops that can be used with selective herbicides has apparently been hindered by the great success of glyphosate-resistant crops. Evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds and movement of naturally resistant weed species into glyphosate-resistant crop fields will require increases in the use of other herbicides, but the speed with which these processes compromise the use of glyphosate alone is uncertain. The future of herbicide-resistant crops will be influenced by many factors, including alternative technologies, public opinion and weed resistance. Considering the relatively few recent approvals for field testing new herbicide-resistant crops and recent decisions not to grow glyphosate-resistant sugarbeet and wheat, the introduction and adoption of herbicide-resistant crops during the next 10 years is not likely to be as dramatic as in the past 10 years.

  19. Biomass or growth rate endpoint for algae and aquatic plants: relevance for the aquatic risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Bergtold, Matthias; Dohmen, Gerhard Peter

    2011-04-01

    Ecotoxicological studies with algae and aquatic plants are essential parts of the aquatic risk assessment for crop protection products (CPP). Growth rate is used as a response variable and in addition the effects on biomass and/or yield (in the following biomass) can be measured. The parameter biomass generally provides a lower numerical value compared with the growth rate for systematic and mathematical reasons. Therefore, some regulators prefer to use the EbC50 value (i.e., the concentration at which 50% reduction of biomass is observed) rather than ErC50 (the concentration at which a 50% inhibition of growth rate is observed) as the endpoint for ecotoxicological risk assessment. However, the parameter growth rate is scientifically more appropriate and robust against deviations in test conditions, permitting better interpretation of, and comparison between, studies. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the growth rate and biomass parameters with regard to their protectiveness and suitability for environmental risk assessment of CPP. It has been shown for a number of herbicides that the use of the EC50 value (without distinction between growth rate and biomass endpoints) from laboratory studies in combination with an assessment factor of 10 is sufficiently protective for aquatic plants (except for the herbicide 2,4-D). In this paper we evaluated EbC50 and ErC50 values separately. Data on 19 different herbicides were compiled from the literature or GLP reports. The EbC50 and ErC50 values obtained in laboratory studies were compared with effect concentrations in ecosystem studies (mainly mesocosm). This comparison of laboratory and field data shows that the overall aquatic risk assessment using ErC50 values in combination with the currently applied assessment factor of 10 is sufficient to exclude significant risk to aquatic plants in the environment. PMID:20836059

  20. Clomazone Does Not Inhibit the Conversion of Isopentenyl Pyrophosphate to Geranyl, Farnesyl, or Geranylgeranyl Pyrophosphate in Vitro 1

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Rodney

    1992-01-01

    Clomazone, an herbicide that reduces the levels of leaf carotenoids and chlorophylls, is thought to act by inhibiting isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase or the prenyltransferases responsible for the synthesis of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Cell-free extracts prepared from the oil glands of common sage (Salvia officinalis) are capable of converting isopentenyl pyrophosphate to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Clomazone at 250 micromolar (a level that produced leaf bleaching) had no detectable effect on the activity of the relevant enzymes (isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase and the three prenyltransferases, geranyl, farnesyl, and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthases). Thus, inhibition of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate biosynthesis does not appear to be the mode of action of this herbicide. PMID:16668824

  1. Clomazone does not inhibit the conversion of isopentenyl pyrophosphate to geranyl, farnesyl, or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Croteau, R

    1992-04-01

    Clomazone, an herbicide that reduces the levels of leaf carotenoids and chlorophylls, is thought to act by inhibiting isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase or the prenyltransferases responsible for the synthesis of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Cell-free extracts prepared from the oil glands of common sage (Salvia officinalis) are capable of converting isopentenyl pyrophosphate to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Clomazone at 250 micromolar (a level that produced leaf bleaching) had no detectable effect on the activity of the relevant enzymes (isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase and the three prenyltransferases, geranyl, farnesyl, and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthases). Thus, inhibition of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate biosynthesis does not appear to be the mode of action of this herbicide.

  2. Regression models of herbicide concentrations in outflow from reservoirs in the midwestern USA, 1992-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Reservoirs are used to store water for public water supply, flood control, irrigation, recreation, hydropower, and wildlife habitat, but also often store undesirable substances such as herbicides. The outflow from 76 reservoirs in the midwestern USA, was sampled four times in 1992 and four times in 1993. At least one herbicide was detected in 82.6 percent of all samples, and atrazine was detected in 82.1 percent of all samples. Herbicide properties; topography, land use, herbicide use, and soil type in the contributing drainage area; residence time of water in reservoirs; and timing of inflow, release, and rainfall all can affect the concentration of herbicides in reservoirs. A GIS was used to quantify characteristics of land use, agricultural chemical use, climatic conditions, topographic character, and soil type by reservoir drainage basins. Multiple linear and logistic regression equations were used to model mean herbicide concentrations in reservoir outflow as a function of these characteristics. Results demonstrate a strong association between mean herbicide concentrations in reservoir outflow and herbicide use rates within associated drainage basins. Results also demonstrate the importance of including soils and basin hydrologic characteristics in models used to estimate mean herbicide concentrations.

  3. Herbicides as Weed Control Agents: State of the Art: II. Recent Achievements[C

    PubMed Central

    Kraehmer, Hansjoerg; van Almsick, Andreas; Beffa, Roland; Dietrich, Hansjoerg; Eckes, Peter; Hacker, Erwin; Hain, Ruediger; Strek, Harry John; Stuebler, Hermann; Willms, Lothar

    2014-01-01

    In response to changing market dynamics, the discovery of new herbicides has declined significantly over the past few decades and has only seen a modest upsurge in recent years. Nevertheless, the few introductions have proven to be interesting and have brought useful innovation to the market. In addition, herbicide-tolerant or herbicide-resistant crop technologies have allowed the use of existing nonselective herbicides to be extended into crops. An increasing and now major challenge is being posed by the inexorable increase in biotypes of weeds that are resistant to herbicides. This problem is now at a level that threatens future agricultural productivity and needs to be better understood. If herbicides are to remain sustainable, then it is a must that we adopt diversity in crop rotation and herbicide use as well as increase the use of nonchemical measures to control weeds. Nevertheless, despite the difficulties posed by resistant weeds and increased regulatory hurdles, new screening tools promise to provide an upsurge of potential herbicide leads. Our industry urgently needs to supply agriculture with new, effective resistance-breaking herbicides along with strategies to sustain their utility. PMID:25104721

  4. Herbicides as weed control agents: state of the art: II. Recent achievements.

    PubMed

    Kraehmer, Hansjoerg; van Almsick, Andreas; Beffa, Roland; Dietrich, Hansjoerg; Eckes, Peter; Hacker, Erwin; Hain, Ruediger; Strek, Harry John; Stuebler, Hermann; Willms, Lothar

    2014-11-01

    In response to changing market dynamics, the discovery of new herbicides has declined significantly over the past few decades and has only seen a modest upsurge in recent years. Nevertheless, the few introductions have proven to be interesting and have brought useful innovation to the market. In addition, herbicide-tolerant or herbicide-resistant crop technologies have allowed the use of existing nonselective herbicides to be extended into crops. An increasing and now major challenge is being posed by the inexorable increase in biotypes of weeds that are resistant to herbicides. This problem is now at a level that threatens future agricultural productivity and needs to be better understood. If herbicides are to remain sustainable, then it is a must that we adopt diversity in crop rotation and herbicide use as well as increase the use of nonchemical measures to control weeds. Nevertheless, despite the difficulties posed by resistant weeds and increased regulatory hurdles, new screening tools promise to provide an upsurge of potential herbicide leads. Our industry urgently needs to supply agriculture with new, effective resistance-breaking herbicides along with strategies to sustain their utility.

  5. Glyphosate, other herbicides, and transformation products in Midwestern streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Kuivila, K.M.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    The use of glyphosate has increased rapidly, and there is limited understanding of its environmental fate. The objective of this study was to document the occurrence of glyphosate and the transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in Midwestern streams and to compare their occurrence with that of more commonly measured herbicides such as acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Water samples were collected at sites on 51 streams in nine Midwestern states in 2002 during three runoff events: after the application of pre-emergence herbicides, after the application of post-emergence herbicides, and during harvest season. All samples were analyzed for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The frequency of glyphosate and AMPA detection, range of concentrations in runoff samples, and ratios of AMPA to glyphosate concentrations did not vary throughout the growing season as substantially as for other herbicides like atrazine, probably because of different seasonal use patterns. Glyphosate was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 35 percent of pre-emergence, 40 percent of post-emergence, and 31 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 8.7 μg/1. AMPA was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 53 percent of pre-emergence, 83 percent of post-emergence, and 73 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 3.6 μg/1. Glyphosate was not detected at a concentration at or above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contamination level (MCL) of 700 μg/1 in any sample. Atrazine was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 94 percent of pre-emergence, 96 percent of post-emergence, and 57 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 55 μg/1. Atrazine was detected at or above its MCL (3 μg/1) in 57 percent of pre-emergence and 33 percent of post-emergence samples

  6. Herbicide-related signaling in plants reveals novel insights for herbicide use strategies, environmental risk assessment and global change assessment challenges.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Diana; Serra, Anne-Antonella; Sulmon, Cécile; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Couée, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    Herbicide impact is usually assessed as the result of a unilinear mode of action on a specific biochemical target with a typical dose-response dynamics. Recent developments in plant molecular signaling and crosstalk between nutritional, hormonal and environmental stress cues are however revealing a more complex picture of inclusive toxicity. Herbicides induce large-scale metabolic and gene-expression effects that go far beyond the expected consequences of unilinear herbicide-target-damage mechanisms. Moreover, groundbreaking studies have revealed that herbicide action and responses strongly interact with hormone signaling pathways, with numerous regulatory protein-kinases and -phosphatases, with metabolic and circadian clock regulators and with oxidative stress signaling pathways. These interactions are likely to result in mechanisms of adjustment that can determine the level of sensitivity or tolerance to a given herbicide or to a mixture of herbicides depending on the environmental and developmental status of the plant. Such regulations can be described as rheostatic and their importance is discussed in relation with herbicide use strategies, environmental risk assessment and global change assessment challenges. PMID:27318518

  7. Effect of clomazone herbicide on biochemical and histological aspects of silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) and recovery pattern.

    PubMed

    Crestani, Márcia; Menezes, Charlene; Glusczak, Lissandra; dos Santos Miron, Denise; Spanevello, Roselia; Silveira, Aron; Gonçalves, Fábio Ferreira; Zanella, Renato; Loro, Vânia Lúcia

    2007-05-01

    The effects of the herbicide, clomazone, on acetylcholinesterase (AChE), catalase and TBARS formation in teleost fish (Rhamdia quelen) were studied. The fish were exposed to 0.5 or 1.0 mg L(-1) of clomazone for 12, 24, 48, 96 and 192 h. After 192 h of exposure period, fish were transferred to clean water and kept in the same for 192 h to study the recovery response. Same parameters as that of exposure period were assayed after 96 and 192 h of recovery period. Specific AChE activity was reduced in the brain and muscle after treatments, reaching a maximum inhibition of 47% in the brain and 45% in the muscle after 12h of exposure. Fish exposed to clomazone increased TBARS production in the liver for all exposure periods. The brain presented elevated TBARS levels after 12, 24 and 48 h, but after 96 and 192 h, these levels decreased. The decrease of TBARS levels persisted in brain tissue after 96 h of recovery and returned to the control value after 192 h in clean water. Catalase activity was reduced for all periods of exposure. Histological analysis showed vacuolation in the liver after herbicide exposure. Some of the alterations observed were completely restored after recovery period.

  8. Evaluation of two herbicide techniques on electric transmission rights-of-way: Development of relatively stable shrublands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Glenn D.; Niering, William A.

    1986-01-01

    Postmanagement vegetation patterns were studied on five transmission rights-of-way subjected to over a decade of basal or stem-foliar herbicide applications designed to eliminate tall-growing trees. The basally treated lines had a mean of 100% greater shrub and 50% less herbaceous cover than stem-foliar treated lines due primarily to the lack of overspray damage to nontarget plant species with the basal technique. Persisting tree growth was also 50% less with basal treatments when Sassafras albidum, a rootsuckering problem species on all areas, was excluded. Tree seedling establishment on basally treated rights-of-way was 34% less than on stem-foliar treated lines. The creation of stable shrublands can potentially reduce the amount of future herbicide usage. These findings also lend support to the Initial Floristic Composition concept in vegetation development proposed by Egler. In southern New England, commercial basal applications can effectively control unwanted tree growth on rights-of-way while promoting the development of relatively stable shrublands which tend to inhibit the invasion of tree seedlings.

  9. Persistence of the herbicide butachlor in soil after repeated applications and its effects on soil microbial functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Yu, Yun L; Wang, Xiu G; Chu, Xiao Q; Yang, Xiao E

    2009-02-01

    Effects of repeated applications of the herbicide butachlor (N-(butoxymethyl)-2-chloro -N-2',6'-dimethyl acetanilide) in soil on its persistence and soil microbial functional diversity were investigated under laboratory conditions. The degradation half-lives of butachlor at the recommended dosage in soil were calculated to be 12.5, 4.5, and 3.2 days for the first, second, and third applications, respectively. Throughout this study, no significant inhibition of the Shannon-Wiener index H' was observed. However, the Simpson index 1/D and McIntosh index U were significantly reduced (P < or = 0.05) during the initial 3 days after the first application of butachlor, and thereafter gradually recovered to a similar level to that of the control soil. A similar variation but faster recovery in 1/D and U was observed after the second and third Butachlor applications. Therefore, repeated applications of butachlor led to more rapid degradation of the herbicide, and more rapid recovery of soil microorganisms. It is concluded that repeated butachlor applications in soil had a temporary or short-term inhibitory effect on soil microbial communities.

  10. Glyphosate effects on gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence responses of two Lolium perenne L. biotypes with differential herbicide sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yanniccari, Marcos; Tambussi, Eduardo; Istilart, Carolina; Castro, Ana María

    2012-08-01

    Despite the extensive use of glyphosate, how it alters the physiology and metabolism of plants is still unclear. Photosynthesis is not regarded to be a primary inhibitory target of glyphosate, but it has been reported to be affected by this herbicide. The aim of the current research was to determine the effects of glyphosate on the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis by comparing glyphosate-susceptible and glyphosate-resistant Lolium perenne biotypes. After glyphosate treatment, accumulation of reduced carbohydrates occurred before a decrease in gas exchange. Stomatal conductance and CO(2) assimilation were reduced earlier than chlorophyll fluorescence and the amount of chlorophyll in susceptible plants. In the glyphosate-resistant biotype, stomatal conductance was the only parameter slightly affected only 5 days post-application. In susceptible plants, the initial glyphosate effects on gas exchange could be a response to a feedback regulation of photosynthesis. Since the herbicide affects actively growing tissues regardless of the inhibition of photosynthesis, the demand of assimilates decreased and consequently induced an accumulation of carbohydrates in leaves. We concluded that stomatal conductance could be a very sensitive parameter to assess both the susceptibility/resistance to glyphosate before the phytotoxic symptoms become evident.

  11. Common and distinct gene expression patterns induced by the herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, cinidon-ethyl and tribenuron-methyl in wheat.

    PubMed

    Pasquer, Frédérique; Ochsner, Urs; Zarn, Jürg; Keller, Beat

    2006-12-01

    In wheat, herbicides are used to control weeds. Little is known about the changes induced in the metabolism of tolerant plants after herbicide treatment. The impact of three herbicides [2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), cinidon-ethyl and tribenuron-methyl] on the wheat transcriptome was studied using cDNA microarrays. Gene expression of plants grown in a controlled environment or in the field was studied between 24 h and 2 weeks after treatment. Under controlled conditions, 2,4-D induced genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway soon after treatment. Cinidon-ethyl triggered peroxidase and defence-related gene expression under controlled conditions, probably because reactive oxygen species are released by photo-oxidation of protoporphyrin-IX. The same genes were upregulated in the field as under controlled conditions, albeit at a weaker level. These results show that cinidon-ethyl specifically induces genes involved in plant defence. Under controlled conditions, tribenuron-methyl did not change the expression profile immediately after treatment, but defence-related genes were upregulated after 1 week. Sulfonylurea compounds such as tribenuron-methyl specifically inhibit acetolactate synthase and are rapidly detoxified, but the activity of some of the resulting metabolites could explain later changes in gene expression. Finally, overexpression of the isopropylmalate synthase gene, involved in branched-chain amino acid synthesis, and of defence-related genes was observed in the field after sulfonylurea treatment. PMID:17054088

  12. Second annual advanced forest herbicides course: A summary and some food for thought. R&D technical note No. 53

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.

    1994-12-31

    Excepts from notes and reference materials provided at the advanced forest herbicides course, covering due diligence and the use of an Environmental Management System for companies in Ontario; autecology; herbicide mode of action and toxicology, chemistry and degradation, and metabolism; silvicultural efficacy of forest herbicides; herbicides as components of integrated vegetation management; droplet dispersal; low impact forest vegetation management; off-target movement; buffer zones and constraints; vegetation management; modelling labs; quantifying exposure; risk assessment; and addressing stakeholders` concerns.

  13. Subchronic feeding study of grain from herbicide-tolerant maize DP-Ø9814Ø-6 in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Laura M; Munley, Susan M; Hoban, Denise; Sykes, Greg P; Malley, Linda A; Delaney, Bryan

    2009-09-01

    This 13-week feeding study conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats evaluated the potential health effects from long-term consumption of a rodent diet formulated with grain from genetically modified (GM), herbicide-tolerant maize DP-Ø9814Ø-6 (98140; trade name Optimum GAT (Optimum GAT is a registered trademark of Pioneer Hi-Bred)). Metabolic inactivation of the herbicidal active ingredient glyphosate was conferred by genomic integration and expression of a gene-shuffled acetylase coding sequence, gat4621, from Bacillus licheniformis; tolerance to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicides was conferred by overexpression of a modified allele (zm-hra) of the endogenous maize ALS enzyme that is resilient to inactivation. Milled maize grain from untreated (98140) and herbicide-treated (98140+Gly/SU) plants, the conventional non-transgenic, near-isogenic control (091), and three commercial non-transgenic reference hybrids (33J56, 33P66, and 33R77) was substituted at concentrations of 35-38% w/w into a common rodent chow formula (PMI) Nutrition International, LLC Certified Rodent LabDiet 5002) and fed to rats (12/sex/group) for at least 91 consecutive days. Compared with rats fed diets containing grain from the conventional near-isogenic control maize, no adverse effects were observed in rats fed diets containing grain from 98140 or 98140+Gly/SU maize with respect to standard nutritional performance metrics and OECD 408-compliant toxicological response variables [OECD, 1998. Section 4 (Part 408), Health Effects: Repeated Dose 90-Day Oral Toxicity Study in Rodents, Guideline for the Testing of Chemicals. Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development, Paris, France]. These results support the comparative safety and nutritional value of maize grain from genetically modified Optimum GAT and conventional, non-transgenic hybrid field corn.

  14. New aspects on inhibition of plant acetolactate synthase by chlorsulfuron and imazaquin

    SciTech Connect

    Durner, J.; Gailus, V.; Boeger, P. )

    1991-04-01

    The sulfonylurea herbicide chlorsulfuron and the imidazolinone herbicide imazaquin were shown to be noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitors, respectively, of purified acetolactate synthase from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) with respect to pyrvuate. From double-reciprocal plots of the time-dependent biphasic inhibition by chlorsulfuron, and initial apparent inhibition constant of 68 nanomolar was calculated (a 0 to 4 minute assay was used for the initial inhibition), and a final steady-state dissociation constant of 3 nanomolar was estimated. The corresponding constants for imazaquin were 10 and 0.55 micromolar. Specific binding of ({sup 14}C)chlorsulfuron and ({sup 14}C)imazaquin to purified acetolactate synthase from barley and partially purified enzyme from corn (Zea mays L.) could be demonstrated by gel filtration and equilibrium dialysis. Evidence is presented that the binding of the inhibitors to the enzyme follows the previously described mechanism of slow reversibility once excess inhibitor has been removed. However, after formation of the slowly reversible complex and subsequent dissociation, both chlorsulfuron and imazaquin seem to permanently inactivate acetolactate synthase. These results add a new feature to the mode of action of these herbicides with respect to their high herbicidal potency.

  15. Questions concerning the potential impact of glyphosate-based herbicides on amphibians.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Norman; Reichenbecher, Wolfram; Teichmann, Hanka; Tappeser, Beatrix; Lötters, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Use of glyphosate-based herbicides is increasing worldwide. The authors review the available data related to potential impacts of these herbicides on amphibians and conduct a qualitative meta-analysis. Because little is known about environmental concentrations of glyphosate in amphibian habitats and virtually nothing is known about environmental concentrations of the substances added to the herbicide formulations that mainly contribute to adverse effects, glyphosate levels can only be seen as approximations for contamination with glyphosate-based herbicides. The impact on amphibians depends on the herbicide formulation, with different sensitivity of taxa and life stages. Effects on development of larvae apparently are the most sensitive endpoints to study. As with other contaminants, costressors mainly increase adverse effects. If and how glyphosate-based herbicides and other pesticides contribute to amphibian decline is not answerable yet due to missing data on how natural populations are affected. Amphibian risk assessment can only be conducted case-specifically, with consideration of the particular herbicide formulation. The authors recommend better monitoring of both amphibian populations and contamination of habitats with glyphosate-based herbicides, not just glyphosate, and suggest including amphibians in standardized test batteries to study at least dermal administration.

  16. Herbicides do not ensure for higher wheat yield, but eliminate rare plant species.

    PubMed

    Gaba, Sabrina; Gabriel, Edith; Chadœuf, Joël; Bonneu, Florent; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2016-07-25

    Weed control is generally considered to be essential for crop production and herbicides have become the main method used for weed control in developed countries. However, concerns about harmful environmental consequences have led to strong pressure on farmers to reduce the use of herbicides. As food demand is forecast to increase by 50% over the next century, an in-depth quantitative analysis of crop yields, weeds and herbicides is required to balance economic and environmental issues. This study analysed the relationship between weeds, herbicides and winter wheat yields using data from 150 winter wheat fields in western France. A Bayesian hierarchical model was built to take account of farmers' behaviour, including implicitly their perception of weeds and weed control practices, on the effectiveness of treatment. No relationship was detected between crop yields and herbicide use. Herbicides were found to be more effective at controlling rare plant species than abundant weed species. These results suggest that reducing the use of herbicides by up to 50% could maintain crop production, a result confirmed by previous studies, while encouraging weed biodiversity. Food security and biodiversity conservation may, therefore, be achieved simultaneously in intensive agriculture simply by reducing the use of herbicides.

  17. Integration of agronomic practices with herbicides for sustainable weed management in aerobic rice.

    PubMed

    Anwar, M P; Juraimi, A S; Mohamed, M T M; Uddin, M K; Samedani, B; Puteh, A; Man, Azmi

    2013-01-01

    Till now, herbicide seems to be a cost effective tool from an agronomic view point to control weeds. But long term efficacy and sustainability issues are the driving forces behind the reconsideration of herbicide dependent weed management strategy in rice. This demands reappearance of physical and cultural management options combined with judicious herbicide application in a more comprehensive and integrated way. Keeping those in mind, some agronomic tools along with different manual weeding and herbicides combinations were evaluated for their weed control efficacy in rice under aerobic soil conditions. Combination of competitive variety, higher seeding rate, and seed priming resulted in more competitive cropping system in favor of rice, which was reflected in lower weed pressure, higher weed control efficiency, and better yield. Most of the herbicides exhibited excellent weed control efficiency. Treatments comprising only herbicides required less cost involvement but produced higher net benefit. On the contrary, treatments comprising both herbicide and manual weeding required high cost involvement and thus produced lower net benefit. Therefore, adoption of competitive rice variety, higher seed rate, and seed priming along with spraying different early-postemergence herbicides in rotation at 10 days after seeding (DAS) followed by a manual weeding at 30 DAS may be recommended from sustainability view point.

  18. Lawn Weed Control with Herbicides. Home and Garden Bulletin No. 123.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Information and diagrams are given for identification and treatment of weed grasses and broadleaf weeds. Herbicides are suggested for use against each weed and instructions are given for proper application. Information is given for buying herbicides, and applying sprays and cleaning sprayers. (BB)

  19. Banded applications are highly effective in minimising herbicide migration from furrow-irrigated sugar cane.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Danielle P; Anderson, Jenny S; Davis, Aaron; Lewis, Stephen; Brodie, Jon; Kookana, Rai

    2014-01-01

    Runoff from farm fields is a common source of herbicide residues in surface waters in many agricultural industries around the world. In Queensland, Australia, the runoff of PSII inhibitor herbicides (in particular diuron and atrazine) is a major concern due to their potential impact on the Great Barrier Reef. This study compared the conventional practice of broadcast application of herbicides in sugarcane production across the whole field with the banded application of particular herbicides onto raised beds only using a shielded sprayer. This study found that the application of two moderately soluble herbicides, diuron and atrazine, to only the raised beds decreased the average total load of both herbicides moving off-site by >90% compared with the conventional treatment. This was despite the area being covered with the herbicides by the banded application being only 60% less than with the conventional treatment. The average total amount of atrazine in drainage water was 7.5% of the active ingredient applied in the conventional treatment compared with 1.8% of the active ingredient applied in the banded application treatment. Similarly, the average total amount of diuron in drainage water was 4.6% of that applied in the conventional treatment compared with 0.9% of that applied in the banded application treatment. This study demonstrates that the application of diuron and atrazine to raised beds only is a highly effective way of minimising migration of these herbicides in drainage water from furrow irrigated sugarcane.

  20. Effectiveness of herbicides for control of hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) in winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a field experiment in 2009-10 at Pennsylvania and Maryland locations, and repeated it in 2010-11, to test the effectiveness of post-emergent herbicides applied at fall and spring timings on seeded hairy vetch in winter wheat. We tested 16 herbicide treatment combinations that included ...

  1. A comparison of the herbicide tolerances of rare and common plants in an agricultural landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declining plant biodiversity in agroecosystems has often been attributed to escalating use of chemical herbicides, but other changes in farming practice including the clearing of semi-natural habitat fragments confound the influence of herbicides. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to evalua...

  2. Invasive White Sweetclover (Melilotus officinalis) Control With Herbicides, Cutting and Flaming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White sweetclover is invading Alaska natural areas and control methods are needed. Chlorsulfuron, 2,4-DB, clopyralid, triclopyr, and 2, 4-D controlled white sweetclover seedlings below recommended rates. None of the herbicides reduced established white sweetclover biomass in 2006, but all herbicides...

  3. Gene Amplification Is A Mechanism For Rapid Weed Evolution To Herbicide Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the U.S. and other parts of the world following the introduction of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops were created by introduction of a modified 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene, the herbicide target site. Increased use of ...

  4. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL Pt. 273, App. E Appendix E to Part 273... and chemical resistant throw away type protective clothing that is impervious to herbicides is now... damage nearby plants, crops or shrubbery; also, herbicides or defoliants containing chlorates may be...

  5. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL Pt. 273, App. E Appendix E to Part 273... and chemical resistant throw away type protective clothing that is impervious to herbicides is now... damage nearby plants, crops or shrubbery; also, herbicides or defoliants containing chlorates may be...

  6. Pea (Pisum sativum) Seed Production as an Assay for Reproductive Effects Due to Herbicides.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Even though herbicide drift can affect plant reproduction, current plant testing protocols emphasize effects on vegetative growth. In this study, we determined whether a short–growing season plant can indicate potential effects of herbicides on seed production. Pea (Pisum sativum...

  7. Investigation of 10 herbicides in surface waters of a horticultural production catchment in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Allinson, Graeme; Bui, AnhDuyen; Zhang, Pei; Rose, Gavin; Wightwick, Adam M; Allinson, Mayumi; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Herbicides are regularly applied in horticultural production systems and may migrate off-site, potentially posing an ecological risk to surface waterways. However, few studies have investigated the levels and potential ecotoxicological impact of herbicides in horticultural catchments in southern Australia. This study investigated the presence of 10 herbicides at 18 sites during a 5-month period in horticulturally important areas of the Yarra Valley in southeastern Australia. Seven of the 10 herbicides were detected in the streams, in 39 % of spot water samples, in 25 % of surface sediment samples, and in >70 % of the passive sampler systems deployed. Few samples contained residues of ≥2 herbicides. Simazine was the herbicide most frequently detected in water, sediment, and passive sampler samples and had the highest concentrations in water (0.67 μg/L) and sediment (260 μg/kg dry weight). Generally the concentrations of the herbicides detected were several orders of magnitude lower than reported ecotoxicological effect values, including those for aquatic plants and algae, suggesting that concentrations of individual chemicals in the catchment were unlikely to pose an ecological risk. However, little is known about the combined effects of simultaneous, low-level exposure of multiple herbicides of the same mode of action on Australian aquatic organisms nor their contribution when found in mixtures with other pesticides. Further research is required to adequately assess the risk of pesticides in Victorian aquatic environments. PMID:24935816

  8. Comparative toxicity of 20 herbicides to 5 periphytic algae and the relationship with mode of action.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Taya, Kiyoshi; Yoda, Ikuko

    2016-02-01

    The authors used 5 species of periphytic algae to conduct toxicity assays of 20 herbicides. The 5 tested species represent riverine primary producers most likely to be affected by herbicides. A fluorescence microplate toxicity assay was used as an efficient and economical high-throughput assay. Toxicity characteristics were analyzed, focusing on their relationship to herbicide mode of action. The relative differences between 50% and 10% effect concentrations depended on herbicide mode of action, rather than tested species. Moreover, a clear relationship between sensitive species and herbicide mode of action was also observed. Green alga was most sensitive to herbicides of 2 mode of action groups: inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. Diatoms were most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: 4-hydroxyphenyl-pyruvate-dioxygenase inhibitors. Cyanobacterium was most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: inhibitors of acetolactate synthase. The species sensitivity distribution based on obtained data was also analyzed. The slopes of the species sensitivity distribution significantly differed among modes of action, suggesting that difference in species sensitivity is specific to the mode of action. In particular, differences in species sensitivity were markedly large for inhibitors of acetolactate synthase, protoporphyrinogen oxidase, and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. The results clearly showed that a single algal species cannot represent the sensitivity of an algal assemblage. Therefore, multispecies algal toxicity data are essential for substances with specific modes of action.

  9. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... number). Comments should indicate that they are submitted in response to ``RIN 2900-AO32--Disease... possible associations between the occurrence of a disease in humans and exposure to an herbicide...

  10. Herbicides do not ensure for higher wheat yield, but eliminate rare plant species.

    PubMed

    Gaba, Sabrina; Gabriel, Edith; Chadœuf, Joël; Bonneu, Florent; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Weed control is generally considered to be essential for crop production and herbicides have become the main method used for weed control in developed countries. However, concerns about harmful environmental consequences have led to strong pressure on farmers to reduce the use of herbicides. As food demand is forecast to increase by 50% over the next century, an in-depth quantitative analysis of crop yields, weeds and herbicides is required to balance economic and environmental issues. This study analysed the relationship between weeds, herbicides and winter wheat yields using data from 150 winter wheat fields in western France. A Bayesian hierarchical model was built to take account of farmers' behaviour, including implicitly their perception of weeds and weed control practices, on the effectiveness of treatment. No relationship was detected between crop yields and herbicide use. Herbicides were found to be more effective at controlling rare plant species than abundant weed species. These results suggest that reducing the use of herbicides by up to 50% could maintain crop production, a result confirmed by previous studies, while encouraging weed biodiversity. Food security and biodiversity conservation may, therefore, be achieved simultaneously in intensive agriculture simply by reducing the use of herbicides. PMID:27453451

  11. GLOBAL EXPRESSION PROFILING AS A ROOL TO DEVELOP MOLECULAR MARKERS LINKED TO HERBICIDE STRESS IN ARABIDOPSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicide drift (unintentional physical movement from target to off-target plants) is a cause of crop loss in US. Low-dose, high-potency herbicides that have short environmental persistence times constrain efforts to develop or identify metabolite or biochemical markers of exposu...

  12. Herbicides do not ensure for higher wheat yield, but eliminate rare plant species

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sabrina; Gabriel, Edith; Chadœuf, Joël; Bonneu, Florent; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Weed control is generally considered to be essential for crop production and herbicides have become the main method used for weed control in developed countries. However, concerns about harmful environmental consequences have led to strong pressure on farmers to reduce the use of herbicides. As food demand is forecast to increase by 50% over the next century, an in-depth quantitative analysis of crop yields, weeds and herbicides is required to balance economic and environmental issues. This study analysed the relationship between weeds, herbicides and winter wheat yields using data from 150 winter wheat fields in western France. A Bayesian hierarchical model was built to take account of farmers’ behaviour, including implicitly their perception of weeds and weed control practices, on the effectiveness of treatment. No relationship was detected between crop yields and herbicide use. Herbicides were found to be more effective at controlling rare plant species than abundant weed species. These results suggest that reducing the use of herbicides by up to 50% could maintain crop production, a result confirmed by previous studies, while encouraging weed biodiversity. Food security and biodiversity conservation may, therefore, be achieved simultaneously in intensive agriculture simply by reducing the use of herbicides. PMID:27453451

  13. NOVEL CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND CARBON SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION OF ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six acetanilide herbicides are currently registered for use in the U.S. Over the past several years, ethanesufonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) degradatoin products of these acetanilide herbicides have been found in U.S. ground waters and surface waters. "Alachlor ESA and ...

  14. MEASURED CONCENTRATIONS OF HERBICIDES AND MODEL PREDICTIONS OF ATRAZINE FATE IN THE PATUXENT RIVER ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    McConnell, Laura L., Jennifer A. Harman-Fetcho and James D. Hagy, III. 2004. Measured Concentrations of Herbicides and Model Predictions of Atrazine Fate in the Patuxent River Estuary. J. Environ. Qual. 33(2):594-604. (ERL,GB X1051).

    The environmental fate of herbicides i...

  15. Herbicide washoff from forest canopy through fall depends on rainfall dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fate of herbicides, atrazine and metolachlor, released to the atmosphere and deposited in rain was studied following their field application in a small agricultural watershed located in Maryland. We monitored delivery of herbicides in the rain in both open and closed canopy areas of a forested ripa...

  16. Controlling herbicide-resistant weeds: consider incorporating alfalfa in a corn/soybean rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide resistant weeds (HRW) are a serious problem in the U.S. In 1968, the first confirmed case of herbicide resistance in weeds was reported in Washington state. In the 46 years since, the number of HRW in the U.S. has increased dramatically. A major reason for the recent increase in HRW has be...

  17. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR ALACHLOR ESA AND OTHER ACENTANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propa...

  18. A composite transcriptional signature differentiates responses towards closely related herbicides in Arabidopsis thaliana and brassica napus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, genome-wide expression profiling based on Affymetrix ATH1 arrays was used to identify discriminating responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to five herbicides, which contain active ingredients targeting two different branches of amino acid biosynthesis. One herbicide co...

  19. The Effects of Simazine, a Chlorotriazine Herbicide, on Female Pubertal Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several chlorotriazine herbicides, such as atrazine and its metabolites, have been shown to target the neuroendocrine regulation of male and female reproductive development. Simazine is a pre-emergence herbicide used to control broad-leaf weeds and annual grasses on citrus, nuts ...

  20. Protective responses induced by herbicide safeners in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Victoria L.; Cummins, Ian; Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Edwards, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Safeners are agrochemicals which enhance tolerance to herbicides in cereals including wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by elevating the expression of xenobiotic detoxifying enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs). When wheat plants were spray-treated with three safener chemistries, namely cloquintocet mexyl, mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl, an apparently identical subset of GSTs derived from the tau, phi and lambda classes accumulated in the foliage. Treatment with the closely related mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl enhanced seedling shoot growth, but this effect was not determined with the chemically unrelated cloquintocet mexyl. Focussing on cloquintocet mexyl, treatments were found to only give a transient induction of GSTs, with the period of elevation being dose dependent. Examining the role of safener metabolism in controlling these responses, it was determined that cloquintocet mexyl was rapidly hydrolysed to the respective carboxylic acid. Studies with cloquintocet showed that the acid was equally effective at inducing GSTs as the ester and appeared to be the active safener. Studies on the tissue induction of GSTs showed that whilst phi and tau class enzymes were induced in all tissues, the induction of the lambda enzymes was restricted to the meristems. To test the potential protective effects of cloquintocet mexyl in wheat on chemicals other than herbicides, seeds were pre-soaked in safeners prior to sowing on soil containing oil and a range of heavy metals. Whilst untreated seeds were unable to germinate on the contaminated soil, safener treatments resulted in seedlings briefly growing before succumbing to the pollutants. Our results show that safeners exert a range of protective and growth promoting activities in wheat that extend beyond enhancing tolerance to herbicides. PMID:23564986

  1. Acute toxicity of the herbicide bromoxynil to Daphnia magna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhl, Kevin J.; Hamilton, Steven J.; Schmulbach, James C.

    1993-01-01

    The acute toxicities of technical-grade bromoxynil octanoate (BO) and two commercial formulations, Buctril® and Bronate®, to < 24-h-old neonate Daphnia magna (Straus) were determined in soft, hard, and oligosaline water. In addition, effects of life stage, feeding, aging the herbicide, and exposure duration on BO toxicity to daphnids were investigated. Regardless of formulation, life stage, and water quality, BO was found to be extremely to highly toxic to daphnids in standard tests; 48-h EC50 values ranged from 41 to 161 m̈g/L. Bromoxynil octanoate was the most toxic to neonates in soft water and the least toxic in hard water. The acute toxicities of the three bromoxynil herbicides to a given age group of daphnids were similar within the same water type. Overall, neonates and 7-d-old adults were more sensitive than 14- or 15-d-old adults to each herbicide. Feeding daphnids during the toxicity test significantly decreased BO toxicity compared to not feeding them. Aging BO (as Buctril) in hard water decreased its toxicity, and the rate of deactivation was rapid, with an estimated half-life of biological activity of 13 h. Daphnids immobilized by exposures to toxic BO concentrations for ≤ 6 h recovered their mobility, whereas exposures of 18 and 24 h to BO produced toxic effects in daphnids similar to those exposed for 48 h. These results indicated that standard continuous exposure tests may not adequately predict the acute toxicity of BO to freshwater animals in the field.

  2. Herbicide and nitrate distribution in central Iowa rainfall

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, J.L.; Prueger, J.H.; Pfeiffer, R.L.; Wesley, C.K.

    1996-03-01

    Herbicides are detected in rainfall; however, these are a small fraction of the total applied. This study was designed to evaluate monthly and annual variation in atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N{prime}-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine), alachlor (2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)acetamide), metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide), and NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in rainfall over Walnut Creek watershed south of Ames, IA. The study began in 1991 and continued through 1994. Within the watershed, two wet/dry precipitation samplers were positioned 4 km apart. Detections varied during the year with >90% of the herbicide detections occurring in April through early July. Concentrations varied among events from nondetectable amounts to concentrations of 154 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1}, which occurred when atrazine was applied during an extremely humid day immediately followed by rainfall of <10 mm that washed spray drift from the atmosphere. This was a local scale phenomenon, because the other collector had a more typical concentration of 1.7 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1} with an 8-mm rainfall. VAriation between the two collectors suggests that local scale meteorological processes affect herbicide movement. Yearly atrazine deposition totals were >100 {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} representing <0.1% of the amount applied. Nitrate-N concentrations in precipitation were uniformly distributed throughout the year and without annual variation in the concentrations. Deposition rates of NO{sub 3}-N were about 1.2 g m{sup {minus}2}. Annual loading onto the watershed was about 25% of the amount applied from all forms of N fertilizers. Movement and rates of deposition provide an understanding of the processes and magnitude of the impact of agriculture on the environment. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA)...

  4. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA)...

  5. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996-2012.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996-2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the 'conventional alternative' have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased awareness of

  6. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996–2012

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996–2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the ‘conventional alternative’ have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased

  7. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996-2012.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996-2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the 'conventional alternative' have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased awareness of

  8. Predicting herbicide and biocide concentrations in rivers across Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemyss, Devon; Honti, Mark; Stamm, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Pesticide concentrations vary strongly in space and time. Accordingly, intensive sampling is required to achieve a reliable quantification of pesticide pollution. As this requires substantial resources, loads and concentration ranges in many small and medium streams remain unknown. Here, we propose partially filling the information gap for herbicides and biocides by using a modelling approach that predicts stream concentrations without site-specific calibration simply based on generally available data like land use, discharge and nation-wide consumption data. The simple, conceptual model distinguishes herbicide losses from agricultural fields, private gardens and biocide losses from buildings (facades, roofs). The herbicide model is driven by river discharge and the applied herbicide mass; the biocide model requires precipitation and the footprint area of urban areas containing the biocide. The model approach allows for modelling concentrations across multiple catchments at the daily, or shorter, time scale and for small to medium-sized catchments (1 - 100 km2). Four high resolution sampling campaigns in the Swiss Plateau were used to calibrate the model parameters for six model compounds: atrazine, metolachlor, terbuthylazine, terbutryn, diuron and mecoprop. Five additional sampled catchments across Switzerland were used to directly compare the predicted to the measured concentrations. Analysis of the first results reveals a reasonable simulation of the concentration dynamics for specific rainfall events and across the seasons. Predicted concentration ranges are reasonable even without site-specific calibration. This indicates the transferability of the calibrated model directly to other areas. However, the results also demonstrate systematic biases in that the highest measured peaks were not attained by the model. Probable causes for these deviations are conceptual model limitations and input uncertainty (pesticide use intensity, local precipitation, etc

  9. [Oxidative stress and antioxidant therapy with alpha-lipoic acid inclusion in acute poisoning by herbicide based on 2,4-dichlorphenoxyacetic acid].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, O A; Balan, H M; Bubalo, N N; Mymrenko, T V

    2014-01-01

    In patients with acute poisoning amine salt herbicide 2,4-D develops oxidative stress with simultaneous inhibition of intracellular and extracellular antioxidant factors. These changes are more pronounced with neurological disorders that occur in conjunction with a toxic damage of liver or heart. The inclusion of a comprehensive detoxification therapy alpha-lipoic acid not only promotes a more pronounced therapeutic effect but also an earlier recourse cytolytic syndrome, a marked recovery of levels of malondialdehyde and indices of antioxidant system (superoxide dismutase and ceruloplasmin) than for patients in the comparison group. PMID:24908976

  10. A Clomazone Immunoassay to Study the Environmental Fate of the Herbicide in Rice (Oryza sativa) Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, M.; Mathó, C.; Cantou, G.; Sanborn, J. R.; Last, J. A.; Hammock, B. D.; Roel, A.; González, D.; González-Sapienza, G.

    2010-01-01

    The environmental impact of rice agriculture is poorly studied in developing countries, mainly, due to limitations of the analytical capacity. Here we report the development of a clomazone ELISA as a fast and cost-effective tool to monitor the dissipation of this herbicide along the harvest. Antibodies were prepared using different strategies of hapten conjugation, and the best hapten/antibody pair was selected. It proved to be a reliable tool to measure the herbicide in the 2.0-20 ng/mL range in field samples, with excellent correlation with HPLC results. The assay was used to study the dissipation of the herbicide in floodwater of experimental rice paddies in Uruguay. Large differences in the residual amount of herbicide were observed depending on the flooding practices. Due to its robustness and simplicity, the assay may be useful to delineate and monitor management practices that can contribute to minimizing the release of the herbicide in the environment. PMID:20302341

  11. Synergistic effects of a combined exposure to herbicides and an insecticide in Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazanti, L.; Sparling, D.W.; Rice, C.; Bialek, K.; Stevenson, C.; Teels, B.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Combinations of the herbicides atrazine and metolachlor and the insecticide chlorpyrifos were tested under both laboratory and field conditions to determine their individual and combined effects on amphibian populations. In the lab Hyla versicolor tadpoles experienced 100% mortality when exposed to a high combination of the pesticides (2.0 mg/L atrazine, 2.54 mg/L metolachlor, 1.0 mg/L chlorpyrifos) whereas low concentrations of the pesticides (0.2 mg/L atrazine, 0.25 mg/L metolachlor, 0.1 mg/L chlorpyrifos) or high concentrations of either herbicides or insecticide alone caused lethargy, reduced growth and delayed metamorphosis but no significant mortality. In the field high herbicide, low insecticide and low herbicide, low insecticide mixtures significantly reduced amphibian populations compared to controls but in the low herbicide, low insecticide wetlands amphibian populations were able to recover through recruitment by the end of the season.

  12. Effects of sampling strategies on estimates of annual mean herbicide concentrations in midwestern rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Hay, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of 10 sampling strategies on estimates of annual mean concentrations of the herbicides atrazine, alachlor, and cyanazine in selected midwestern rivers were tested. The accuracy of the strategies was computed by comparing time-weighted annual mean herbicide concentrations calculated from water samples collected from 17 locations on midwestern rivers, with simulated annual mean concentrations calculated for each sampling strategy, using Monte Carlo simulations. Monthly sampling was the most accurate strategy tested. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires quarterly sampling for municipalities using surface water as a source of drinking water. Due to the seasonality of herbicide occurrence and transport, quarterly sampling underestimates annual mean herbicide concentrations in over 40% of the simulations. Three of the strategies tested showed that, relative to quarterly sampling, a more accurate representation of annual mean concentrations could be obtained by sampling more frequently during spring and early summer runoff and assuming zero herbicide concentration during late summer and winter months.

  13. Herbicide-resistant weeds: from research and knowledge to future needs.

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Beckie, Hugh J; Gaines, Todd A; Goggin, Danica E; Kaundun, Shiv S; Lacoste, Myrtille; Neve, Paul; Nissen, Scott J; Norsworthy, Jason K; Renton, Michael; Shaner, Dale L; Tranel, Patrick J; Wright, Terry; Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic herbicides have been used globally to control weeds in major field crops. This has imposed a strong selection for any trait that enables plant populations to survive and reproduce in the presence of the herbicide. Herbicide resistance in weeds must be minimized because it is a major limiting factor to food security in global agriculture. This represents a huge challenge that will require great research efforts to develop control strategies as alternatives to the dominant and almost exclusive practice of weed control by herbicides. Weed scientists, plant ecologists and evolutionary biologists should join forces and work towards an improved and more integrated understanding of resistance across all scales. This approach will likely facilitate the design of innovative solutions to the global herbicide resistance challenge.

  14. Herbicides in surface waters of the midwestern United States: The effect of spring flush

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Goolsby, D.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Kolpin, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Approximately three-fourths of all preemergent herbicides used in the United States are applied to row crops over a 12-state area, called the "corn belt" (I). The application of these compounds may cause widespread degradation of water quality (2). Because herbicides are water soluble, there is the potential for leaching into groundwater and surface water (3, 4), as well as aerial transport and Occurrence in precipitation (5). Monitoring studies in the Midwest have shown widespread detection of herbicides in groundwater and in surface water (3,4); however, little is known about the regional impact of herbicide application (6). The objective of our research was to assess the mag. nitude and persistence of herbicide runoff in the spring flush at the regional scale. 

  15. Herbicide-resistant weeds: from research and knowledge to future needs

    PubMed Central

    Busi, Roberto; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Beckie, Hugh J; Gaines, Todd A; Goggin, Danica E; Kaundun, Shiv S; Lacoste, Myrtille; Neve, Paul; Nissen, Scott J; Norsworthy, Jason K; Renton, Michael; Shaner, Dale L; Tranel, Patrick J; Wright, Terry; Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic herbicides have been used globally to control weeds in major field crops. This has imposed a strong selection for any trait that enables plant populations to survive and reproduce in the presence of the herbicide. Herbicide resistance in weeds must be minimized because it is a major limiting factor to food security in global agriculture. This represents a huge challenge that will require great research efforts to develop control strategies as alternatives to the dominant and almost exclusive practice of weed control by herbicides. Weed scientists, plant ecologists and evolutionary biologists should join forces and work towards an improved and more integrated understanding of resistance across all scales. This approach will likely facilitate the design of innovative solutions to the global herbicide resistance challenge. PMID:24478803

  16. Screening of photosynthetic pigments for herbicidal activity with a new computational molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, R Navanietha; Chandran, Saravanan; Pal, Parimal; Berchmans, Sheela

    2013-12-01

    There is an immense interest among the researchers to identify new herbicides which are effective against the herbs without affecting the environment. In this work, photosynthetic pigments are used as the ligands to predict their herbicidal activity. The enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase is a good target for the herbicides. Homology modeling of the target enzyme is done using Modeler 9.11 and the model is validated. Docking studies were performed with AutoDock Vina algorithm to predict the binding of the natural pigments such as β-carotene, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin to the target. β-carotene, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin have higher binding energies indicating the herbicidal activity of the pigments. This work reports a procedure to screen herbicides with computational molecular approach. These pigments will serve as potential bioherbicides in the future. PMID:24050696

  17. Effects of the bipyridylium herbicides diquat dibromide and paraquat dichloride on growth and development of Neobellieria bullata (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Darvas, B; Zdárek, J; Timár, T; el-Din, M H

    1990-12-01

    Diet containing diquat dibromide (1,000 or 2,000 ppm) caused an extension of the first-instar stadium of Neobellieria bullata (Parker); the first molt was primarily disturbed. Pupariation was delayed when early-wandering larvae had been injected with diquat dibromide (18 micrograms/larva; approximately to 150 ppm). This effect of diquat dibromide was eliminated by simultaneous injection of 20-OH ecdysone (0.02 micrograms/larva). After larvae in the red spiracle stage were injected with diquat dibromide (5 micrograms/larva; approximately 42 ppm), evagination of the pupal head was inhibited. Paraquat dichloride was less active than diquat dibromide and appears to be a safer herbicide for use around decomposer fly species.

  18. Herbicide monitoring in soil, runoff waters and sediments in an olive orchard.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Maria Jesus; De Luna, Elena; Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Hermosin, M Carmen

    2016-11-01

    Occurrences of surface water contamination by herbicides in areas where olive orchards are established reveal a need to understand soil processes affecting herbicide fate at field scale for this popular Mediterranean crop. A monitoring study with two herbicides (terbuthylazine and oxyfluorfen) in the first 2cm of soil, runoff waters, and sediments, was carried out after under natural rainfall conditions following winter herbicide application. At the end of the 107day field experiment, no residues of the soil applied terbuthylazine were recovered, whereas 42% of the oxyfluorfen applied remained in the top soil. Very low levels of both herbicides were measured in runoff waters; however, concentrations were slightly higher for terbuthylazine (0.53% of applied) than for oxyfluorfen (0.03% of applied), relating to their respective water solubilities. Congruent with soil residue data, 38.15% of the applied oxyfluorfen was found in runoff-sediment, compared to only 0.46% for terbuthylazine. Accordingly, the herbicide soil distribution coefficients measured within runoff field tanks was much greater for oxyfluorfen (Kd=3098) than for terbuthylazine (Kd=1.57). The herbicide oxyfluorfen is co-transported with sediment in runoff, remaining trapped and/or adsorbed to soil particle aggregates, due in part to its low water solubility. In contrast, terbuthylazine soil dissipation may be associated more so with leaching processes, favored by its high water solubility, low sorption, and slow degradation. By comparing these two herbicides, our results reaffirm the importance of herbicide physico-chemical properties in dictating their behavior in soil and also suggest that herbicides with low solubility, as seen in the case oxyfluorfen, remain susceptible to offsite transport associated with sediments. PMID:27351146

  19. Episodic Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racsmany, Mihaly; Conway, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    Six experiments examined the proposal that an item of long-term knowledge can be simultaneously inhibited and activated. In 2 directed forgetting experiments items to-be-forgotten were found to be inhibited in list-cued recall but activated in lexical decision tasks. In 3 retrieval practice experiments, unpracticed items from practiced categories…

  20. Anthelmintic effect of herbicidal dinitroanilines on the nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sant'anna, Viviane; de Souza, Wanderley; Vommaro, Rossiane C

    2016-08-01

    Dinitroanilines are known herbicides that impair the polymerization of microtubules. This study investigated the effects of oryzalin and trifluralin on the viability, morphology, and ultrastructure of different life stages of Caenorhabditis elegans. Both drugs reduced the survival of the adult population in 50% after three days of treatment with concentrations of approximately 30 μM and 57 μM, respectively. The development of new adults was monitored for seven days and treatment with both drugs also showed a decrease in the adult population. 25 μM Oryzalin or trifluralin inhibited the hatching of eggs by nearly 100%. Both drugs showed remarkable larvicidal activity at 25 μM against the larvae at first and second stages (L1-L2) and at third and fourth stages (L3-L4) after 24 h. Treatment with dinitroanilines led to incomplete egg embryo development. The oryzalin and trifluralin treatments caused the detachment of cuticular layers of adults and larvae and the formation of a large number of intracellular membrane whirls and lipid bodies in the hypodermal cells and non-contractile muscles of adults. Both drugs also provoked the bagging process, which generated lesions in the uterus of the adults. In addition, trifluralin caused the detachment of certain areas of the cuticle adjacent to the hypodermis in a large number of nematodes. Our results suggest that dinitroanilines are a potentially new alternative for anthelmintic chemotherapy. PMID:27118457