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Sample records for accase inhibiting herbicides

  1. Synonymous mutation gene design to overexpress ACCase in creeping bentgrass to obtain resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Heckart, Douglas L; Schwartz, Brian M; Raymer, Paul L; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-08-01

    Overexpression of a native gene can cause expression of both introduced and native genes to be silenced by posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mechanisms. PTGS mechanisms rely on sequence identity between the transgene and native genes; therefore, designing genes with mutations that do not cause amino acid changes, known as synonymous mutations, may avoid PTGS. For proof of concept, the sequence of acetyl-coA carboxylase (ACCase) from creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) was altered with synonymous mutations. A native bentgrass ACCase was cloned and used as a template for the modified gene. Wild-type (WT) and modified genes were further modified with a non-synonymous mutation, coding for an isoleucine to leucine substitution at position 1781, known to confer resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. Five-hundred calli of creeping bentgrass 'Penn A-4' were inoculated with Agrobacterium containing either the WT or modified genes, with or without the herbicide-resistance mutation. Six herbicide-resistant-transgenic events containing the modified gene with the 1781 mutation were obtained. Transcription of the modified ACCase was confirmed in transgenic plants, showing that gene-silencing mechanisms were avoided. Transgenic plants were confirmed to be resistant to the ACCase-inhibiting herbicide, sethoxydim, providing evidence that the modified gene was functional. The result is a novel herbicide-resistance trait and shows that overexpression of a native enzyme with a gene designed with synonymous mutations is possible. PMID:27116460

  2. Molecular survey of turfgrass species for mutations conferring resistance to ACCase inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The control of grassy weeds in turfgrass is often problematic due to lack of herbicide selectivity. Seven different naturally occurring mutation sites have been reported to confer resistance to Acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase inhibiting herbicides. One or more of these mutation sites may hold potentia...

  3. Multiple resistance to ACCase and AHAS-inhibiting herbicides in shortawn foxtail (Alopecurus aequalis Sobol.) from China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenlei; Yuan, Guohui; Liu, Weitang; Bi, Yaling; Du, Long; Zhang, Chao; Li, Qi; Wang, Jinxin

    2015-10-01

    Shortawn foxtail (Alopecurus aequalis) is a troublesome grass weed infesting winter wheat and oilseed rape productions in China. Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl and mesosulfuron-methyl failed to control shortawn foxtail of AHSX-1 population collected from a wheat field in Shou County, Anhui province. Molecular analyses revealed that Asp2078Gly mutation of ACCase and Trp574Leu mutation of AHAS were present in plants of the AHSX-1 population. The homozygous plants were isolated and cultured until seed maturity. Whole-plant herbicide bioassays were conducted in the greenhouse using the purified seeds of F1 generation. Dose-response experiments showed that the AHSX-1 population has evolved a very high level resistance to fenoxaprop-p-ethyl (RI = 275) and mesosulfuron-methyl (RI = 788). To determine the sensitivity to other herbicides, assays were conducted at the single recommended rate of each herbicide. Based on the results, the AHSX-1 population was considered to be highly resistant to clodinafop-propargyl, pyroxsulam and flucarbazone-sodium, moderately or highly resistant to quizalofop-p-ethyl, clethodim, sethoxydim and pinoxaden, and susceptible to isoproturon and chlorotoluron. This is the first report of Asp2078Gly mutation in shortawn foxtail and the two robust dCAPS markers designed could quickly detect Asp2078 and Trp574 mutations in ACCase and AHAS gene of shortawn foxtail, respectively. PMID:26453232

  4. Effect of herbicide resistance endowing Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly ACCase gene mutations on ACCase kinetics and growth traits in Lolium rigidum

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Aiub, Martin M.; Yu, Qin; Han, Heping; Powles, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of herbicide resistance evolution in plants depends on fitness traits endowed by alleles in both the presence and absence (resistance cost) of herbicide selection. The effect of two Lolium rigidum spontaneous homozygous target-site resistance-endowing mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Asp-2078-Gly) on both ACCase activity and various plant growth traits have been investigated here. Relative growth rate (RGR) and components (net assimilation rate, leaf area ratio), resource allocation to different organs, and growth responses in competition with a wheat crop were assessed. Unlike plants carrying the Ile-1781-Leu resistance mutation, plants homozygous for the Asp-2078-Gly mutation exhibited a significantly lower RGR (30%), which translated into lower allocation of biomass to roots, shoots, and leaves, and poor responses to plant competition. Both the negligible and significant growth reductions associated, respectively, with the Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly resistance mutations correlated with their impact on ACCase activity. Whereas the Ile-1781-Leu mutation showed no pleiotropic effects on ACCase kinetics, the Asp-2078-Gly mutation led to a significant reduction in ACCase activity. The impaired growth traits are discussed in the context of resistance costs and the effects of each resistance allele on ACCase activity. Similar effects of these two particular ACCase mutations on the ACCase activity of Alopecurus myosuroides were also confirmed. PMID:26019257

  5. Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly Mutations in ACCase Gene, Endow Cross-resistance to APP, CHD, and PPZ in Phalaris minor from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo; Fernandez, Pablo; Alcantara, Ricardo; Gherekhloo, Javid; Osuna, Maria Dolores; De Prado, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides that inhibit acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) are commonly used in Mexico to control weedy grasses such as little seed canarygrass (Phalaris minor). These herbicides are classified into three major families (ariloxyphenoxypropionates (APP), cyclohexanodiones (CHD), and, recently, phenylpyrazolines (PPZ)). In this work, the resistance to ACCase (APP, CHD, and PPZ) inhibiting herbicides was studied in a biotype of Phalaris minor (P. minor) from Mexico, by carrying out bioassays at the whole-plant level and investigating the mechanism behind this resistance. Dose-response and ACCase in vitro activity assays showed cross-resistance to all ACCase herbicides used. There was no difference in the absorption, translocation, and metabolism of the 14C-diclofop-methyl between the R and S biotypes. The PCR generated CT domain fragments of ACCase from the R biotype and an S reference were sequenced and compared. The Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly point mutations were identified. These mutations could explain the loss of affinity for ACCase by the ACCase-inhibing herbicides. This is the first report showing that this substitution confers resistance to APP, CHD, and PPZ herbicides in P. minor from Mexico. The mutations have been described previously only in a few cases; however, this is the first study reporting on a pattern of cross-resistance with these mutations in P. minor. The findings could be useful for better management of resistant biotypes carrying similar mutations. PMID:26370967

  6. Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicides (also referred to as Protox- or PPO-inhibiting herbicides) were commercialized in the 1960s and their market share reached approximately 10% (total herbicide active ingredient output) in the late 1990’s. The wide-spread adoption of glyphosate-resista...

  7. ACCase mutations in Avena sterilis populations and their impact on plant fitness.

    PubMed

    Papapanagiotou, Aristeidis P; Paresidou, Maria I; Kaloumenos, Nikolaos S; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G

    2015-09-01

    Avena sterilis (sterile oat) populations originating from wheat-growing regions of Greece, developed resistance to fenoxaprop, clodinafop and other herbicides. The partial ACCase gene sequence revealed six point mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Trp-1999-Cys, Trp-2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Cys-2088-Arg) in 24 out of the 26 resistant (R) populations, confirming the molecular mechanism of resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. However, DNA sequence of two R populations did not reveal any known ACCase mutations, suggesting possible presence of unknown mutation or metabolism-based mechanism of resistance. The Cys-2088-Arg mutation is the first record for ACCase mutant conferring target-site resistance in A. sterilis worldwide. The evaluation of 12 R and 6 susceptible (S) populations under non-competitive field conditions did not indicate consistent mean growth rate differences, whereas the pot evaluation of the same (12 R and 6 S) populations grown in competition with wheat or in pure stands showed significant growth (fresh weight and panicle number) differences between six S populations and between six R populations containing the same ACCase mutation (Ile-2041-Asn). Finally, one S and five R (Trp-1999-Cys, Trp-2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Cys-2088-Arg) populations grown under field competitive conditions indicated fresh weight and panicle number differences in competition with other populations as compared with pure stands. These findings suggest clearly that the inconsistent fitness differences between R and S A. sterilis populations are not related with the ACCase resistance trait but they may result from other non-resistance fitness traits selected in their different geographical locations. PMID:26267051

  8. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha(-1)) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha(-1)) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar (14)C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of (14)C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  9. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D.; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha-1) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha-1) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar 14C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of 14C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  10. DNA Analysis of Herbarium Specimens of the Grass Weed Alopecurus myosuroides Reveals Herbicide Resistance Pre-Dated Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Délye, Christophe; Deulvot, Chrystel; Chauvel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) alleles carrying one point mutation that confers resistance to herbicides have been identified in arable grass weed populations where resistance has evolved under the selective pressure of herbicides. In an effort to determine whether herbicide resistance evolves from newly arisen mutations or from standing genetic variation in weed populations, we used herbarium specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides to seek mutant ACCase alleles carrying an isoleucine-to-leucine substitution at codon 1781 that endows herbicide resistance. These specimens had been collected between 1788 and 1975, i.e., prior to the commercial release of herbicides inhibiting ACCase. Among the 734 specimens investigated, 685 yielded DNA suitable for PCR. Genotyping the ACCase locus using the derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (dCAPS) technique identified one heterozygous mutant specimen that had been collected in 1888. Occurrence of a mutant codon encoding a leucine residue at codon 1781 at the heterozygous state was confirmed in this specimen by sequencing, clearly demonstrating that resistance to herbicides can pre-date herbicides in weeds. We conclude that point mutations endowing resistance to herbicides without having associated deleterious pleiotropic effects can be present in weed populations as part of their standing genetic variation, in frequencies higher than the mutation frequency, thereby facilitating their subsequent selection by herbicide applications. PMID:24146749

  11. Pollen Expression of Herbicide Target Site Resistance Genes in Annual Ryegrass (Lolium rigidum).

    PubMed Central

    Richter, J.; Powles, S. B.

    1993-01-01

    Herbicide resistance can occur either through target-site insensitivity or by nontarget site-based mechanisms. Two herbicide-resistant biotypes of Lolium rigidum Gaud., one resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides (biotype WLR1) and the other resistant to acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicides (biotype WLR96) through target-site insensitivity at the whole plant and enzymic levels, were found to express this resistance in the pollen. Pollen produced by resistant biotypes grew uninhibited when challenged with herbicide, whereas that from a susceptible biotype was inhibited. A third biotype, SLR31, resistant to ACCase-inhibiting and certain ALS-inhibiting herbicides at the whole plant level through nontarget site-based mechanisms, did not exhibit this expression in the pollen. The technique described may form the basis for a rapid screen for certain nuclear-encoded, target site-based herbicide-resistance mechanisms. PMID:12231886

  12. Dominant mutations causing alterations in acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase confer tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W B; Marshall, L C; Burton, J D; Somers, D A; Wyse, D L; Gronwald, J W; Gengenbach, B G

    1990-01-01

    A partially dominant mutation exhibiting increased tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides was isolated by exposing susceptible maize (Zea mays) tissue cultures to increasingly inhibitory concentrations of sethoxydim (a cyclohexanedione). The selected tissue culture (S2) was greater than 40-fold more tolerant to sethoxydim and 20-fold more tolerant to haloxyfop (an aryloxyphenoxypropionate) than the nonselected wild-type tissue culture. Regenerated S2 plants were heterozygous for the mutant allele and exhibited a high-level, but not complete, tolerance to both herbicides. Homozygous mutant families derived by self-pollinating the regenerated S2 plants exhibited no injury after treatment with 0.8 kg of sethoxydim per ha, which was greater than 16-fold the rate lethal to wild-type plants. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) is the target enzyme of cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides. ACCase activities of the nonselected wild-type and homozygous mutant seedlings were similar in the absence of herbicide. ACCase activity from homozygous tolerant plants required greater than 100-fold more sethoxydim and 16-fold more haloxyfop for 50% inhibition than ACCase from wild-type plants. These results indicate that tolerance to sethoxydim and haloxyfop is controlled by a partially dominant nuclear mutation encoding a herbicide-insensitive alteration in maize ACCase. Images PMID:1976254

  13. Sethoxydim treatment inhibits lipid metabolism and enhances the accumulation of anthocyanins in rape (Brassica napus L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Belkebir, Aicha; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel

    2013-09-01

    Cyclohexanediones (e.g., sethoxydim) are known to be inhibitors of plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) of monocotyledonous plants and provoke plant death. When rape leaves were treated with 10(-3) M sethoxydim, growth rate, chlorophyll and lipid contents were reduced, but plant resisted to herbicide. [1-(14)C] Acetate labelling showed that lipid synthesis was affected by sethoxydim, probably through inhibition of chloroplast homomeric ACCase activity, and the fatty acid synthase activity (FAS) was reduced because of malonyl-CoA deficiency. In contrast, sethoxydim treatment provoked an increase in phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity with an accumulation of cinnamic acid, naringenin and anthocyanins. The accumulation of anthocyanins seems to reduce the damaging effect of the herbicide stress. Thus, in plant cell, the flux of carbon seems to be oriented towards protective mechanisms, and the two ACCases could have an important role in this orientation. PMID:25149245

  14. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  15. Molecular basis of ALS- and/or ACCase-inhibitor resistance in shortawn foxtail (Alopecurus aequalis Sobol.).

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenwen; Pan, Lang; Li, Jun; Wang, Qiong; Feng, Yujuan; Dong, Liyao

    2015-07-01

    Alopecurus aequalis, a predominant weed species in wheat and oilseed rape fields, can no longer be controlled by mesosulfuron-methyl application after continuous use over several years. Based on dose-response studies, the putative resistant populations, JTJY-1 and JHHZ-1, were found to be resistant to mesosulfuron-methyl, with resistance index values of 5.5 and 14, respectively. Sensitivity assays of the mesosulfuron-methyl-resistant populations to other herbicides revealed that the JTJY-1 population had moderate or high cross resistance to sulfonylureas (SUs) and triazolopyrimidines (TPs), but displayed a low level resistance to imidazolinones (IMIs). JTJY-1 also had high multi-resistance to ACCase inhibitors, but remained susceptible to photosystem II inhibitors. The JHHZ-1 population was resistant to all ALS inhibitors tested, but was sensitive to ACCase inhibitors and photosystem II inhibitors. To clarify the molecular basis of resistance in JTJY-1 and JHHZ-1 population, the ALS and ACCase gene were sequenced. Two ALS mutations (Pro-197-Thr or Trp-574-Leu) were detected in the mesosulfuron-methyl-resistant plants. The ACCase gene analysis revealed that the resistant JTJY-1 population had an Ile-1781-Leu mutation. Furthermore, the presence of two different target site resistance (TSR) mechanisms (ALS and ACCase mutations) existing simultaneously in individual A. aequalis was firstly documented in the presented study. PMID:26071810

  16. Growth Inhibition of Pathogenic Bacteria by Sulfonylurea Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Kreisberg, Jason F.; Ong, Nicholas T.; Krishna, Aishwarya; Joseph, Thomas L.; Wang, Jing; Ong, Catherine; Ooi, Hui Ann; Sung, Julie C.; Siew, Chern Chiang; Chang, Grace C.; Biot, Fabrice; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W.; Chan, Joey; Sivalingam, Suppiah P.; Zhang, Lian-Hui; Verma, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Emerging resistance to current antibiotics raises the need for new microbial drug targets. We show that targeting branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis using sulfonylurea herbicides, which inhibit the BCAA biosynthetic enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS), can exert bacteriostatic effects on several pathogenic bacteria, including Burkholderia pseudomallei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Our results suggest that targeting biosynthetic enzymes like AHAS, which are lacking in humans, could represent a promising antimicrobial drug strategy. PMID:23263008

  17. Triazine herbicides inhibit relaxin signaling and disrupt nitric oxide homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Eun; Lim, Sa Rang; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Bae, Jeehyeon

    2016-09-15

    Triazines are herbicides that are widely used worldwide, and we previously observed that the maternal exposure of mice to simazine (50 or 500μg/kg) resulted in smaller ovaries and uteri of their female offspring. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism that may account for the reproductive dysfunction induced by simazine. We found that following maternal exposure, simazine is transmitted to the offspring, as evidenced by its presence in the offspring ovaries. Analyses of the simazine-exposed offspring revealed that the expression of the relaxin hormone receptor, relaxin-family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), prominently decreased in their ovaries and uteri. In addition, downstream target genes of the relaxin pathway including nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2 (Nos2), Nos3, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Mmp9), and vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) were downregulated in their ovaries. Moreover, AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) levels and their phosphorylated active forms decreased in simazine-exposed ovaries. In vitro exposure of the human ovarian granulosa cells (KGN) and uterine endometrium cells (Hec-1A) to very low concentrations (0.001 to 1nM) of triazines including atrazine, terbuthylazine, and propazine repressed NO production with a concurrent reduction in RXFP1, NOS2, and NOS3. The inhibitory action of triazines on NO release was dependent on RXFP1, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, and ERK. Radioligand-binding assay also confirmed that triazines competitively inhibited the binding of relaxin to its receptor. Therefore, the present study suggests that triazine herbicides act as endocrine disrupters by interfering with relaxin hormone signaling. Thus, further evaluation of their impact on human health is imperative. PMID:27431321

  18. Acetolactate Synthase-Inhibiting Herbicide-Resistant Rice Flatsedge (Cyperus iria): Cross Resistance and Molecular Mechanism of Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overuse of acetolactate synthase (ALS) –inhibiting herbicides in rice has led to evolution of halosulfuron-resistant rice flatsedge (Cyperus iria L.) in Arkansas (AR) and Mississippi (MS), USA. Resistant accessions were cross-resistant to labeled field rates of ALS-inhibiting herbicides from four d...

  19. Inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase by two classes of grass-selective herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Rendina, A.R.; Craig-Kennard, A.C.; Beaudoin, J.D.; Breen, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The selective grass herbicides diclofop, haloxyfop, and trifop (((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acids) and alloxydim, sethoxydim, and clethodim (cyclohexanediones) are potent, reversible inhibitors of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) partially purified from barley, corn, and wheat. Although inhibition of the wheat enzyme by clethodim and diclofop is noncompetitive versus each of the substrates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), diclofop and clethodim are nearly competitive versus acetyl-CoA since the level of inhibition is most sensitive to the concentration of acetyl-CoA (K{sub is} < K{sub ii}). To conclusively show whether the herbicides interact at the biotin carboxylation site or the carboxyl transfer site, the inhibition of isotope exchange and partial reactions catalyzed at each site was studied with the wheat enzyme. Only the ({sup 14}C)acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA exchange and decarboxylation of ({sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA reactions are strongly inhibited by clethodim and diclofop, suggesting that the herbicides interfere with the carboxyl transfer site rather than the biotin carboxylation site of the enzyme. Double-inhibition studies with diclofop and clethodim suggest that the ((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acid and cyclohexanedione herbicides may bind to the same region of the enzyme.

  20. Physiological Basis for Differential Sensitivities of Plant Species to Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides 1

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Timothy D.; Becerril, José M.; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Duke, Mary V.; Jacobs, Judy M.; Jacobs, Nicholas J.; Duke, Stephen O.

    1991-01-01

    With a leaf disc assay, 11 species were tested for effects of the herbicide acifluorfen on porphyrin accumulation in darkness and subsequent electrolyte leakage and photobleaching of chlorophyll after exposure to light. Protoporphyrin IX (Proto IX) was the only porphyrin that was substantially increased by the herbicide in any of the species. However, there was a wide range in the amount of Proto IX accumulation caused by 0.1 millimolar acifluorfen between species. Within species, there was a reduced effect of the herbicide in older tissues. Therefore, direct quantitative comparisons between species are difficult. Nevertheless, when data from different species and from tissues of different age within a species were plotted, there was a curvilinear relationship between the amount of Proto IX caused to accumulate during 20 hours of darkness and the amount of electrolyte leakage or chlorophyll photobleaching caused after 6 and 24 hours of light, respectively, following the dark period. Herbicidal damage plateaued at about 10 nanomoles of Proto IX per gram of fresh weight. Little difference was found between in vitro acifluorfen inhibition of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (Protox) of plastid preparations of mustard, cucumber, and morning glory, three species with large differences in their susceptibility at the tissue level. Mustard, a highly tolerant species, produced little Proto IX in response to the herbicide, despite having a highly susceptible Protox. Acifluorfen blocked carbon flow from δ-aminolevulinic acid to protochlorophyllide in mustard, indicating that it inhibits Protox in vivo. Increasing δ-aminolevulinic acid concentrations (33-333 micromolar) supplied to mustard with 0.1 millimolar acifluorfen increased Proto IX accumulation and herbicidal activity, demonstrating that mustard sensitivity to Proto IX was similar to other species. Differential susceptibility to acifluorfen of the species examined in this study appears to be due in large part to

  1. Fermentation and alternative oxidase contribute to the action of amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Zabalza, Ana; van Dongen, Joost T; Royuela, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Acetolactate synthase inhibitors (ALS-inhibitors) and glyphosate (GLP) are two classes of herbicide that act by the specific inhibition of an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of branched-chain or aromatic amino acids, respectively. The physiological effects that are detected after application of these two classes of herbicides are not fully understood in relation to the primary biochemical target inhibition, although they have been well documented. Interestingly, the two herbicides' toxicity includes some common physiological effects suggesting that they kill the treated plants by a similar pattern despite targeting different enzymes. The induction of aerobic ethanol fermentation and alternative oxidase (AOX) are two examples of these common effects. The objective of this work was to gain further insight into the role of fermentation and AOX induction in the toxic consequences of ALS-inhibitors and GLP. For this, Arabidopsis T-DNA knockout mutants of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 1 and AOX1a were used. The results found in wild-type indicate that both GLP and ALS-inhibitors reduce ATP production by inducing fermentation and alternative respiration. The main physiological effects in the process of herbicide activity upon treated plants were accumulation of carbohydrates and total free amino acids. The effects of the herbicides on these parameters were less pronounced in mutants compared to wild-type plants. The role of fermentation and AOX regarding pyruvate availability is also discussed. PMID:25544587

  2. Similarities and differences in global gene expression profiles between herbicide- and pathogen-induced PSII inhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogens, and photosynthesis inhibiting herbicides, can both damage photosystem II (PSII), causing it to be highly sensitive to damage by light energy, and to release high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This photoinhibition of PSII could possibly be the source of the strong oxidativ...

  3. Sensitivity of locally naturalized Panicum species to HPPD- and ALS-inhibiting herbicides in maize.

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, B; Geeroms, T; Claerhout, S; Reheul, D; Bulcke, R

    2012-01-01

    Until recently the Panicum species Panicum schinzii Hack. (Transvaal millet), Panicum dichotomiflorum Michx. (Fall panicum) and Panicum capillare L. (Witchgrass) were completely overlooked in Belgium. Since 1970, these species have gradually spread and are now locally naturalized and abundant in and along maize fields. One of the possible raisons for their expansion in maize fields might be a lower sensitivity to postemergence herbicides acting against panicoid grasses, in particular those inhibiting 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) and acetolactate synthase (ALS). A dose-response pot experiment was conducted in the greenhouse to evaluate the effectiveness of five HPPD-inhibiting herbicides (sulcotrione, mesotrione, isoxaflutole, topramezone, tembotrione) and two ALS-inhibiting herbicides (nicosulfuron, foramsulfuron) for controlling Belgian populations of P. schinzii, P. dichotomiflorum and P. capillare. Shortly after sowing, half of all pots were covered with a film of activated charcoal to evaluate foliar activity of the applied herbicides. In another dose-response pot experiment, sensitivity of five local P. dichotomiflorum populations to HPPD-inhibitors and nicosulfuron was investigated. Finally, the influence of leaf stage at time of herbicide application on efficacy of topramezone and nicosulfuron for Panicum control was evaluated. Large interspecific differences in sensitivity to HPPD-inhibiting herbicides were observed. Panicum schinzii was sensitive (i.e., required a dose lower than the maximum authorized field dose to achieve 90% reduction in biomass) to tembotrione but moderately sensitive (i.e. required maximum field dose) to topramezone and poorly sensitive (i.e. required three-fold higher dose than maximum field dose) to mesotrione and sulcotrione. However, P. dichotomiflorum, a species that morphologically closely resembles P. schinzii, was sensitive to mesotrione and topramezone but moderately sensitive to tembotrione. All Panicum

  4. RESISTANCE TO ALS-INHIBITING HERBICIDES IN WEED POPULATIONS FROM BELGIAN WHEAT FIELDS.

    PubMed

    S, Claerhout; B, De Cauwer

    2015-01-01

    In modern agriculture, most farmers rely on herbicides for weed control. The intensive use of herbicides in crops has led to the development of herbicide resistance in numerous weeds worldwide. In Belgium, farmers have encountered problems with controlling populations of Alopecurus myosuroides, Matricaria recutita, Stellaria media and Popover rhoeas in some wheat fields with the conventionally used acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides. Dose response assays were conducted in the greenhouse to test the sensitivity of these populations to the key ALS-inhibiting herbicides mesosulfuron-methyl + iodosulfuron-methyl for A. myosuroides and metsulfuron-methyl and florasulam for M. recutita, S. media and P. rhoeas. The ED₉₀- and ED₅₀-values (effective dose for resp. 90% and 50% biomass reduction) were compared with those of sensitive reference populations and the resistance index (RI) was calculated. High levels of resistance were detected forA. myosuroides (RI: 24.3) after treatment with mesosulfuron-methyl and for M. recutita (RI: 36.4 to 49.5), S. media (RI > 20) and P. rhoeas (RI: 23.6) after treatment with metsulfuron-methyl. However, the metsulfuron-methyl resistant populations of M. recutita and S. media were sufficiently controlled with florasulam at the maximum authorised field dose. This was not the case for P. rhoeas. The metsulfuron-methyl resistant P. rhoeas population were also high-level resistant against florasulam (RI: 29.5). Integrated weed management practices (crop rotation, herbicide mixing, ...) should be applied to reduce the selection pressure for resistant weeds. PMID:27145589

  5. Comparison of toxicity to terrestrial plants with algal growth inhibition by herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Frank, M.L.

    1984-10-01

    The toxicities of 21 different herbicides to algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris) and to terrestrial plants (radishes, barley, and bush beans or soybeans) were compared to order to determine the feasibility of using a short-term (96-h) algal growth inhibition test for identifying chemicals having potential toxicity in a 4-week terrestrial plant bioassay. The toxicity of each test chemical, usually in combination with a commercial formulation, was evaluated at six nominal concentrations, between 0 and 100 mg/L growth medium in the algal bioassay or between 0 and 100 mg/kg substate in the terrestrial plant bioassay, in terms of both (1) the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC), i.e., the highest concentration tested at which no significant (P < 0.05, one-sided test) reduction in algal growth rate or in terrestrial plant yield, relative to controls, was observed; and (2) the concentration at which algal growth rate or terrestrial plant yield was reduced by 50% or more relative to controls. There was generally poor agreement between results from the two types of bioassays; results from algal growth inhibition tests were not significantly correlated with results from the terrestrial plant bioassays. Overall, there was an approximately 50% chance of an algal bioassay, using Selenastrum capricornutum, successfully screening (detecting) herbicide levels that reduced terrestrial plant yield. The results indicated that algal growth inhibition tests cannot be used generically to predict phytotoxicity of herbicides to terrestrial plant species. 7 references, 14 tables.

  6. Two roles of thylakoid lipids in modifying the activity of herbicides which inhibit photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Kupatt, C.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Thylakoid lipids may modify the activity of herbicides which inhibit electron transport at the Q/sub B/ protein of photosystem II in two ways: (1) lipids can act as a hydrophobic barrier to a binding site localized close to the loculus of the membrane, and (2) changes in lipid composition can reduce the ability of inhibitors to block electron transport, possibly due to a change in the conformation of the Q/sub B/ protein. The herbicide binding site was localized close to the locular side of the thylakoid membrane by determining the activity of a number of substituted phenylurea and s-triazine herbicides in inverted and non-inverted thylakoids. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis showed that inversion of thylakoids reduced the requirement of molecular lipophilicity deemed necessary for phenylurea activity in non-inverted membranes, whereas s-triazines exhibited no differences in the lipophilicity requirement in thylakoid membranes of either orientation. The binding affinity of /sup 14/C-diuron was reduced in bicarbonate-depleted thylakoids relative to reconstituted or control membranes, as is the case with atrazine binding. These observations support a model of the herbicide binding site containing both common and herbicide family specific binding domains. Thylakoids isolated either from detached lambs quarters (Chenopodium album L.) leaves, treated with SAN 6706, or from soybean (Glycine max L.), with norflurazon or pyrazon applied preemergence, exhibited decreased susceptibility to atrazine. The ability of lipid-modifying treatments to decrease the atrazine susceptibility of field-grown soybeans was also investigated.

  7. Sensitivity of Echinochloa muricata and Echinochloa crus-galli to HPPD- and ALS-inhibiting herbicides in corn.

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, B; Rombaut, R; Bulcke, R; Reheul, D

    2011-01-01

    Until recently Echinochloa muricata var. microstachya Wiegand (rough barnyardgrass), an alien species native to North America, was completely overlooked in Belgium due to its close morphological resemblance to Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) P. Beauv. (barnyardgrass). E. muricata var. microstachya has gradually spread and is now locally naturalized and abundant in and along maize fields. One of the possible reasons for its expansion in maize fields, besides e.g. the lack of crop rotation, might be a lower sensitivity to postemergence herbicides acting against panicoid grasses, in particular 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD)-inhibiting herbicides and acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicides. Dose-response pot experiments were conducted in the greenhouse to evaluate the effectiveness of four HPPD-inhibitor herbicides [topramezone (ARIETTA), mesotrione (CALLISTO), tembotrione (LAUDIS), sulcotrione (MIKADO) and the ALS-inhibitor herbicide nicosulfuron (KELVIN) for controlling local populations of E. crus-galli and E. muricata. Pots were planted with 25 seeds, thinned afterwards to 5 plants (one week after sowing) and irrigated by overhead sprinklers. Herbicides were applied at the 3-4 leaf stage (BBCH stage 13-14). Fresh biomass was harvested 28 d after treatment. In another dose-response pot experiment, the influence of leaf stage at time of herbicide application on efficacy of topramezone for (rough) barnyardgrass control was evaluated. Sensitivity to HPPD-inhibitor herbicides topramezone and sulcotrione was significantly lower for E. muricata populations than for E. crus-galli populations. However, nicosulfuron sensitivity of both species was similar. Compared to E. crus-galli, sensitivity of E. muricata to topramezone was more dependent on leaf stage. Due to the intragenus variability in sensitivity to HPPD-inhibitor herbicides, higher awareness is required for presence of E. muricata plants in maize fields in order to avoid insufficient

  8. Organochlorine insecticide, herbicide and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) inhibition of NaK-ATPase in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Paul W.; Friedhoff, Jacqueline M.; Wedemeyer, Gary A.

    1972-01-01

    The current widespread presence of chlorinated insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) and herbicides in world waterways has elicited much interest in the mechanisms of their toxicity in fishes. Inhibition of Na+,K+-activated adenosinetriphosphatase (NaK-ATPase) and Mg++-dependent ATPase (Mg-ATPase) by DDT, endosulfan and dicofol has been demonstrated in gill, brain and kidney microsomes of rainbow trout (1,2). Intestinal and gill ATPases in marine teleosts were recently reported to be sensitive to organochlorines (3). CutkonTp et al (4) noted inhibition of NaK-ATPase and Mg-ATPase in bluegill brain, liver, muscle and kidney by DDT and related chlorinated hydrocarbons. Inhibition of ATPases by PCB's has been recently shown in bluegill kidney, brain and liver (5). In the present study, we have further examined the NaK-ATPase enzyme system in trout gill as a site for the possible toxicity of selected organopolychlors, i.e., chlorinated insecticides, herbicides and PCB's.

  9. Photosystem II-inhibitors play a limited role in sweet corn response to 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase-inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postemergence (POST) application of 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) inhibitors in combination with a photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor, such as atrazine, is common practice in sweet corn production. Given the sensitivity of sweet corn to HPPD-inhibiting herbicides, the objective of this wo...

  10. Evolution of herbicide resistance mechanisms in grass weeds.

    PubMed

    Matzrafi, Maor; Gadri, Yaron; Frenkel, Eyal; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2014-12-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are becoming increasingly common, threatening global food security. Here, we present BrIFAR: a new model system for the functional study of mechanisms of herbicide resistance in grass weeds. We have developed a large collection of Brachypodium accessions, the BrI collection, representing a wide range of habitats. Wide screening of the responses of the accessions to four major herbicide groups (PSII, ACCase, ALS/AHAS and EPSPS inhibitors) identified 28 herbicide-resistance candidate accessions. Target-site resistance to PSII inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a known history of herbicide applications. An amino acid substitution in the psbA gene (serine264 to glycine) conferred resistance and also significantly affected the flowering and shoot dry weight of the resistant accession, as compared to the sensitive accession. Non-target site resistance to ACCase inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a history of herbicide application and from a nature reserve. In-vitro enzyme activity tests and responses following pre-treatment with malathion (a cytochrome-P450 inhibitor) indicated sensitivity at the enzyme level, and give strong support to diclofop-methyl and pinoxaden enhanced detoxification as NTS resistance mechanism. BrIFAR can promote better understanding of the evolution of mechanisms of herbicide resistance and aid the implementation of integrative management approaches for sustainable agriculture. PMID:25443832

  11. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  12. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  13. Herbicide Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lanzilotta, R. P.; Pramer, David

    1970-01-01

    A strain of Fusarium solani isolated from soil by enrichment techniques used propanil (3′, 4′-dichloropropionanilide) as a sole source of organic carbon and energy for growth in pure culture. The primary product of the transformation of propanil by F. solani was isolated and identified as 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). This compound accumulated in the medium to a level (80 μg/ml) which stopped further herbicide utilization. Herbicide utilization by F. solani was influenced by various environmental and nutritional factors. It was more sensitive to acid than alkaline pH. Added glucose and yeast extract increased the rate of propanil decomposition, and the reduced aeration retarded growth of the fungus and herbicide utilization. The growth of F. solani on propionate was inhibited by added DCA. Images PMID:5437305

  14. Discovery of (2-benzoylethen-1-ol)-containing 1,2-benzothiazine derivatives as novel 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) inhibiting-based herbicide lead compounds.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kang; Hua, Xue-Wen; Tao, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Yang; Liu, Na; Ma, Yi; Li, Yong-Hong; Xu, Xiao-Hua; Kong, Chui-Hua

    2016-01-15

    A series of (2-benzoylethen-1-ol)-containing benzothiazine derivatives was synthesized, and their herbicidal activities were first evaluated. The bioassay results indicated that some of 3-benzoyl-4-hydroxy-2-methyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-1,1-dioxide derivatives displayed good herbicidal activity in greenhouse testing, especially, compound 4w had good pre-emergent herbicidal activities against Brassica campestris, Amaranthus retroflexus and Echinochloa crusgalli even at a dosage of 187.5 g ha(-1). More importantly, compound 4w displayed significant inhibitory activity against Arabidopsis thaliana HPPD and was identified as the most potent candidate with IC50 value of 0.48 μM, which is better than the commercial herbicide sulctrione (IC50=0.53 μM) and comparable with the commercial herbicide mesotrione (IC50=0.25 μM). The structure-activity relationships was studied and provided some useful information for improving herbicidal activity. The present work indicated that (2-benzoylethen-1-ol)-containing 1,2-benzothiazine motif could be a potential lead structure for further development of novel HPPD inhibiting-based herbicides. PMID:26682702

  15. Structural Basis of Cyanobacterial Photosystem II Inhibition by the Herbicide Terbutryn*

    PubMed Central

    Broser, Matthias; Glöckner, Carina; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Buchta, Joachim; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Dau, Holger; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2011-01-01

    Herbicides that target photosystem II (PSII) compete with the native electron acceptor plastoquinone for binding at the QB site in the D1 subunit and thus block the electron transfer from QA to QB. Here, we present the first crystal structure of PSII with a bound herbicide at a resolution of 3.2 Å. The crystallized PSII core complexes were isolated from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The used herbicide terbutryn is found to bind via at least two hydrogen bonds to the QB site similar to photosynthetic reaction centers in anoxygenic purple bacteria. Herbicide binding to PSII is also discussed regarding the influence on the redox potential of QA, which is known to affect photoinhibition. We further identified a second and novel chloride position close to the water-oxidizing complex and in the vicinity of the chloride ion reported earlier (Guskov, A., Kern, J., Gabdulkhakov, A., Broser, M., Zouni, A., and Saenger, W. (2009) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 334–342). This discovery is discussed in the context of proton transfer to the lumen. PMID:21367867

  16. Factors affecting differential sweet corn sensitivity to HPPD-inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutation of a cytochrome P450 (CYP) allele on the short arm of chromosome five affects sensitivity in sweet corn to mesotrione and tembotrione+isoxadifen applied POST. Hybrids that are homozygous for the functional allele (i.e. CYPCYP) are tolerant of both herbicides and rarely injured at registered...

  17. Competitive Inhibition of High-Affinity Oryzalin Binding to Plant Tubulin by the Phosphoric Amide Herbicide Amiprophos-Methyl.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, J. V.; Kim, H. H.; Hanesworth, V. R.; Hugdahl, J. D.; Morejohn, L. C.

    1994-01-01

    Amiprophos-methyl (APM), a phosphoric amide herbicide, was previously reported to inhibit the in vitro polymerization of isolated plant tubulin (L.C. Morejohn, D.E. Fosket [1984] Science 224: 874-876), yet little other biochemical information exists concerning this compound. To characterize further the mechanism of action of APM, its interactions with tubulin and microtubules purified from cultured cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright Yellow-2) were investigated. Low micromolar concentrations of APM depolymerized preformed, taxol-stabilized tobacco microtubules. Remarkably, at the lowest APM concentration examined, many short microtubules were redistributed into fewer but 2.7-fold longer microtubules without a substantial decrease in total polymer mass, a result consistent with an end-to-end annealing of microtubules with enhanced kinetic properties. Quasi-equilibrium binding measurements showed that tobacco tubulin binds [14C]oryzalin with high affinity to produce a tubulin-oryzalin complex having a dissociation constant (Kd) = 117 nM (pH 6.9; 23[deg]C). Also, an estimated maximum molar binding stoichiometry of 0.32 indicates pharamacological heterogeneity of tobacco dimers and may be related to structural heterogeneity of tobacco tubulin subunits. APM inhibits competitively the binding of [14C]oryzalin to tubulin with an inhibition constant (Ki) = 5 [mu]M, indicating the formation of a moderate affinity tubulin-APM complex that may interact with the ends of microtubules. APM concentrations inhibiting tobacco cell growth were within the threshold range of APM concentrations that depolymerized cellular microtubules, indicating that growth inhibition is caused by microtubules depolymerization. APM had no apparent effect on microtubules in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. Because cellular microtubules were depolymerized at APM and oryzalin concentrations below their respective Ki and Kd values, both herbicides are proposed to depolymerize microtubules by a

  18. Effect of the protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicide fomesafen on liver uroporphyrin and heptacarboxylic porphyrin in two mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Krijt, J; Vokurka, M; Sanitrak, J; Janousek, V; van Holsteijn, I; Blaauboer, B J

    1994-07-01

    The effect of the protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicide fomesafen on liver porphyrin accumulation was studied in long-term high-dose experiments. Fomesafen caused liver accumulation of uroporphyrin and heptacarboxylic porphyrin when fed at 0.25% in the diet to male ICR mice for 5 months (fomesafen-treated mice: 52 nmol uroporphyrin, 21 nmol heptacarboxylic porphyrin/g liver; control mice: traces of uroporphyrin, heptacarboxylic porphyrin not detected). Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity was depressed to about 25% of control values. Iron treatment accelerated the development of this porphyria cutanea tarda-like experimental porphyria both in ICR and C57B1/6J mice. In contrast to other uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase inhibitors, fomesafen treatment did not increase the cytochrome P450IA-related activities and the amount of P450IA2 protein was shown to be significantly decreased by Western immunoblotting. Thus, fomesafen is a unique chemical that inhibits both the oxidation of protoporphyrinogen as well as the conversion of uroporphyrinogen to coproporphyrinogen. However, the accumulation of highly carboxylated porphyrins is evident only after prolonged treatment with high doses of the herbicide. PMID:8045477

  19. psbA mutation (Asn266 to Thr) in Senecio vulgaris L. confers resistance to several PS II-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Park, Kee Woong; Mallory-Smith, Carol A

    2006-09-01

    DNA sequence analysis of the psbA gene encoding the D1 protein of photosystem II (PS II), the target site of PS II-inhibiting herbicides, identified a point mutation (Asn266 to Thr) in a bromoxynil-resistant Senecio vulgaris L. population collected from peppermint fields in Oregon. Although this mutation has been previously reported in Synechocystis, this is the first report of this particular point mutation in a higher plant exhibiting resistance to PS II-inhibiting herbicides. The resistant population displayed high-level resistance to bromoxynil and terbacil (R/S ratio 10.1 and 9.3, respectively) and low-level resistance to metribuzin and hexazinone (R/S ratio 4.2 and 2.6, respectively) when compared with the susceptible population. However, the population was not resistant to the triazine herbicides atrazine and simazine or to the urea herbicide diuron. A chlorophyll fluorescence assay confirmed the resistance levels and patterns of cross-resistance of the whole-plant studies. The resistant S. vulgaris plants produced fewer seeds. Differences in cross-resistance patterns to PS II-inhibiting herbicides and the difference in fitness cost could be exploited in a weed management program. PMID:16791906

  20. Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds.

    PubMed

    Heap, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species × site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avena spp., Lolium spp., Phalaris spp., Setaria spp. and Alopecurus myosuroides, infesting more than 25 million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyza canadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus tuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30 years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide. PMID:24302673

  1. 2,4-D resistance in wild radish: reduced herbicide translocation via inhibition of cellular transport

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Cawthray, Gregory R.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to auxinic herbicides is increasing in a range of dicotyledonous weed species, but in most cases the biochemical mechanism of resistance is unknown. Using 14C-labelled herbicide, the mechanism of resistance to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in two wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) populations was identified as an inability to translocate 2,4-D out of the treated leaf. Although 2,4-D was metabolized in wild radish, and in a different manner to the well-characterized crop species wheat and bean, there was no difference in metabolism between the susceptible and resistant populations. Reduced translocation of 2,4-D in the latter was also not due to sequestration of the herbicide, or to reduced uptake by the leaf epidermis or mesophyll cells. Application of auxin efflux or ABCB transporter inhibitors to 2,4-D-susceptible plants caused a mimicking of the reduced-translocation resistance phenotype, suggesting that 2,4-D resistance in the populations under investigation could be due to an alteration in the activity of a plasma membrane ABCB-type auxin transporter responsible for facilitating long-distance transport of 2,4-D. PMID:26994475

  2. 2,4-D resistance in wild radish: reduced herbicide translocation via inhibition of cellular transport.

    PubMed

    Goggin, Danica E; Cawthray, Gregory R; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-05-01

    Resistance to auxinic herbicides is increasing in a range of dicotyledonous weed species, but in most cases the biochemical mechanism of resistance is unknown. Using (14)C-labelled herbicide, the mechanism of resistance to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in two wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) populations was identified as an inability to translocate 2,4-D out of the treated leaf. Although 2,4-D was metabolized in wild radish, and in a different manner to the well-characterized crop species wheat and bean, there was no difference in metabolism between the susceptible and resistant populations. Reduced translocation of 2,4-D in the latter was also not due to sequestration of the herbicide, or to reduced uptake by the leaf epidermis or mesophyll cells. Application of auxin efflux or ABCB transporter inhibitors to 2,4-D-susceptible plants caused a mimicking of the reduced-translocation resistance phenotype, suggesting that 2,4-D resistance in the populations under investigation could be due to an alteration in the activity of a plasma membrane ABCB-type auxin transporter responsible for facilitating long-distance transport of 2,4-D. PMID:26994475

  3. Wide distribution of the waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus) delta-G210 PPX2 mutation, which confers resistance to PPO-inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance in waterhemp to herbicides that inhibit protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) previously was shown to result from the deletion of a glycine codon at position 210 (delta G210) in the PPO-encoding gene, PPX2. Research was conducted to determine if this same mechanism accounted for resistance in ...

  4. RNA-Seq analysis of rye-grass transcriptomic response to an herbicide inhibiting acetolactate-synthase identifies transcripts linked to non-target-site-based resistance.

    PubMed

    Duhoux, Arnaud; Carrère, Sébastien; Gouzy, Jérôme; Bonin, Ludovic; Délye, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides that disrupts agricultural weed control is a worldwide concern for food security. NTSR is considered a polygenic adaptive trait driven by differential gene regulation in resistant plants. Little is known about its genetic determinism, which precludes NTSR diagnosis and evolutionary studies. We used Illumina RNA-sequencing to investigate transcriptomic differences between plants from the global major weed rye-grass sensitive or resistant to the acetolactate-synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicide pyroxsulam. Plants were collected before and along a time-course after herbicide application. De novo transcriptome assembly yielded a resource (LOLbase) including 92,381 contigs representing potentially active transcripts that were assigned putative annotations. Early effects of ALS inhibition consistent with the literature were observed in resistant and sensitive plants, proving LOLbase data were relevant to study herbicide response. Comparison of resistant and sensitive plants identified 30 candidate NTSR contigs. Further validation using 212 plants resistant or sensitive to pyroxsulam and/or to the ALS inhibitors iodosulfuron + mesosulfuron confirmed four contigs (two cytochromes P450, one glycosyl-transferase and one glutathione-S-transferase) were NTSR markers which combined expression levels could reliably identify resistant plants. This work confirmed that NTSR is driven by differential gene expression and involves different mechanisms. It provided tools and foundation for subsequent NTSR investigations. PMID:25636204

  5. IAA Producing Enterobacter sp. I-3 as a Potent Bio-herbicide Candidate for Weed Control: A Special Reference with Lettuce Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Man; Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Kang, Sang-Mo; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-06-01

    Development of bio-herbicides is an emerging method to weed management in agricultural field. Very few studies were conducted on identification of microbial bio-herbicides to weed control. The present study was aimed to isolate and identify the effective bio-herbicide potential bacterium from soil and assess their role on plant growth inhibition. Three-hundred and one rhizobacteria were isolated from agriculture field soil samples collected from various parts of Republic of Korea. Two bacterial strains, I-4-5 and I-3 were significantly reduced the seedling growth of radish when compared to their controls. The highest rate of seedling growth inhibition was observed in I-3 bacterial isolate treatment in lettuce and radish. The mechanism of an effective bio-herbicide I-3 to plant growth inhibition was determined by analyzing IAA in their culture medium. IAA biosynthesis pathway of Enterobacter sp. I-3 was identified as tryptophan-dependent pathway and its production was increased due to addition of tryptophan in culture medium as quantified by using GC-MS SIM. In an in vitro study revealed that I-3 bacterial culture exudate combined with tryptophan significantly decreased leaf length, leaf width, root length and increased the number of lateral roots of lettuce. Indeed, the genomic DNA of I-3 bacterium was isolated and 16S rDNA was sequenced to find out the name of the bacterium. Based on phylogenetic analysis, I-3 isolate was identified and named into Enterobacter sp. I-3. The results of this study suggest that the utilization of Enterobacter sp. I-3 to crop field can be act as a potential bio-herbicide against weed growth. PMID:25805908

  6. Specific and differential inhibition of very-long-chain fatty acid elongases from Arabidopsis thaliana by different herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Trenkamp, Sandra; Martin, William; Tietjen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In higher plants, very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are the main constituents of hydrophobic polymers that prevent dessication at the leaf surface and provide stability to pollen grains. Of the 21 genes encoding VLCFA elongases (VLCFAEs) from Arabidopsis thaliana, 17 were expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Six VLCFAEs, including three known elongases (FAE1, KCS1, and KCS2) and three previously uncharacterized gene products (encoded by At5g43760, At1g04220, and At1g25450) were found to be enzymatically active with endogenous yeast fatty acid substrates and to some extent with externally supplied unsaturated substrates. The spectrum of VLCFAs accumulated in expressing yeast strains was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Marked specificity was found among elongases tested with respect to their elongation products, which encompassed saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids 20–30 carbon atoms in length. The active VLCFAEs revealed highly distinct patterns of differential sensitivity to oxyacetamides, chloroacetanilides, and other compounds tested, whereas yeast endogenous VLCFA production, which involves its unrelated elongase (ELO) in sphingolipid synthesis, was unaffected. Several compounds inhibited more than one VLCFAE, and some inhibited all six active enzymes. These findings pinpoint VLCFAEs as the target of the widely used K3 class herbicides, which have been in commercial use for 50 years, provide important clues as to why spontaneous resistance to this class is rare, and point to complex patterns of substrate specificity and product spectrum among members of the Arabidopsis VLCFAE family. PMID:15277688

  7. Interactions between the root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 and acetolacetate synthase-inhibiting herbicides in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widespread acceptance of reduced-tillage farming in cereal cropping systems in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the U.S. has resulted in increased use of herbicides for weed control. However, soil residual levels of widely used imidazalone herbicides limit the cultivation barley, which is more sen...

  8. Both foliar and residual applications of herbicides that inhibit amino acid biosynthesis induce alternative respiration and aerobic fermentation in pea roots.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz, O; Gil-Monreal, M; Zulet, A; Zabalza, A; Royuela, M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this work was to ascertain whether there is a general pattern of carbon allocation and utilisation in plants following herbicide supply, independent of the site of application: sprayed on leaves or supplied to nutrient solution. The herbicides studied were the amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides (ABIH): glyphosate, an inhibitor of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, and imazamox, an inhibitor of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. All treated plants showed impaired carbon metabolism; carbohydrate accumulation was detected in both leaves and roots of the treated plants. The accumulation in roots was due to lack of use of available sugars as growth was arrested, which elicited soluble carbohydrate accumulation in the leaves due to a decrease in sink strength. Under aerobic conditions, ethanol fermentative metabolism was enhanced in roots of the treated plants. This fermentative response was not related to a change in total respiration rates or cytochrome respiratory capacity, but an increase in alternative oxidase capacity was detected. Pyruvate accumulation was detected after most of the herbicide treatments. These results demonstrate that both ABIH induce the less-efficient, ATP-producing pathways, namely fermentation and alternative respiration, by increasing the key metabolite, pyruvate. The plant response was similar not only for the two ABIH but also after foliar or residual application. PMID:26560850

  9. NOVEL HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-dose, high-potency herbicides are defined as those herbicides with a maximum label application rate of 0.5 pounds of active ingredient per acre. Several classes of chemicals fall into this category, including the acetolactate synthase (ALSase) inhibitor herbicides, imidazoli...

  10. Evolution and diversity of the mechanisms endowing resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate-synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.).

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Pernin, Fanny; Scarabel, Laura

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the diversity of mechanisms conferring resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.) and the processes underlying the selection for resistance. Six mutant ALS alleles, Arg₁₉₇, His₁₉₇, Leu₁₉₇, Ser₁₉₇, Thr₁₉₇ and Leu₅₇₄ were identified in five Italian populations. Different alleles were found in a same population or a same plant. Comparison of individual plant phenotype (herbicide sensitivity) and genotype (amino-acid substitution(s) at codon 197) showed that all mutant ALS alleles conferred dominant resistance to the field rate of the sulfonylurea tribenuron and moderate or no resistance to the field rate of the triazolopyrimidine florasulam. Depending on the allele, dominant or partially dominant resistance to the field rate of the imidazolinone imazamox was observed. Putative non-target-site resistance mechanisms were also likely present in the populations investigated. The derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence assays targeting ALS codons crucial for herbicide sensitivity developed in this work will facilitate the detection of resistance due to mutant ALS alleles. Nucleotide variation around codon 197 indicated that mutant ALS alleles evolved by multiple, independent appearances. Resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas clearly evolved by redundant evolution of a set of mutant ALS alleles and likely of non-target-site mechanisms. PMID:21421378

  11. HERBICIDES: CAROTENOID BIOSYNTHESIS INHIBITORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physiological functions of carotenoids are essential for the health of plants. In particular, their ability to quench excess energy due to photoexcitation of chlorophyll under high light intensity is necessary to stabilize the photosynthetic apparatus. Inhibiting this pathway with herbicides i...

  12. Imidazolinone herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The imidazolinone herbicides are widely used to manage weeds in leguminous crops, imidazolinone-resistant crops, forestry, aquatics and rights of way. This chapter briefly describes the discovery, selectivity and biological activity of the imidazolinones. The imidazolinones were discovered in the ...

  13. In vitro exposure to the herbicide atrazine inhibits T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production and significantly increases the frequency of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Thueson, Lindsay E; Emmons, Tiffany R; Browning, Dianna L; Kreitinger, Joanna M; Shepherd, David M; Wetzel, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    The herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-[ethylamino]-6-[isopropylamino]-s-triazine) is the most common water contaminant in the United States. Atrazine is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and is classified as an estrogen disrupting compound because it elevates estrogen levels via induction of the enzyme aromatase. Previous studies have shown that atrazine exposure alters the function of innate immune cells such as NK cells, DC, mast cells, and macrophages. In this study we have examined the impact of in vitro atrazine exposure on the activation, proliferation, and effector cytokine production by primary murine CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We found that atrazine exposure significantly inhibited CD4(+) T cell proliferation and accumulation as well as the expression of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the effects were more pronounced in cells from male animals. These effects were partially mimicked by pharmacological reagents that elevate intracellular cAMP levels and addition of exogenous rmIL-2 further inhibited proliferation and CD25 expression. Consistent with these findings, atrazine exposure during T cell activation resulted in a 2- to 5-fold increase in the frequency of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells. PMID:25433234

  14. Insights into molecular assembly of ACCase heteromeric complex in Chlorella variabilis--a homology modelling, docking and molecular dynamic simulation study.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-07-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase), a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyses the first committed step of fatty acid biosynthesis, is considered as a potential target for improving lipid accumulation in oleaginous feedstocks, including microalgae. ACCase is composed of three distinct conserved domains, and understanding the structural details of each catalytic domain assumes great significance to gain insights into the molecular basis of the complex formation and mechanism of biotin transport. In the absence of a crystal structure for any single heteromeric ACCase till date, here we report the first heteromeric association model of ACCase from an oleaginous green microalga, Chlorella variabilis, using a combination of homology modelling, docking and molecular dynamic simulations. The binding site of the docked biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT) were predicted to be contiguous but distinct in biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) molecule. Simulation studies revealed considerable flexibility for the BC and CT domains in the BCCP-bound forms, thus indicating the adaptive behaviour of BCCP. Further, principal component analysis revealed that in the presence of BCCP, the BC and CT domains exhibited an open-state conformation via the outward clockwise rotation of the binding helices. These conformational changes might be responsible for binding of BCCP domain and its translocation to the respective active sites. Various rearrangements of inter-domain hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) contributed to conformational changes in the structures. H-bond interactions between the interacting residue pairs involving Glu201BCCP/Arg255BC and Asp224BCCP/Gln228CT were found to be essential for the intermolecular assembly. The present findings are consistent with previous biochemical studies. PMID:23677812

  15. Selective inhibition of Erwinia amylovora by the herbicidally-active Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) produced by Pseudomonas bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6, and identified as 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, specifically inhibits the germination of a wide range of grassy weeds. The present study was undertaken to determine if GAF has antimicrobial activity in addition to it...

  16. Synthesis, in vitro protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibition, and herbicidal activity of N-(benzothiazol-5-yl)hexahydro-1H-isoindole-1,3-diones and N-(benzothiazol-5-yl)hexahydro-1H-isoindol-1-ones.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong-You; Jiang, Li-Li; Zuo, Yang; Wang, Zhi-Fang; Xi, Zhen; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2014-10-01

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (EC 1.3.3.4) is one of the most significant targets for a large family of herbicides. As part of our continuous efforts to search for novel protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicides, N-(benzothiazol-5-yl)tetrahydroisoindole-1,3-dione was selected as a lead compound for structural optimization, leading to the syntheses of a series of novel N-(benzothiazol-5-yl)hexahydro-1H-isoindole-1,3-diones (1a-o) and N-(benzothiazol-5-yl)hexahydro-1H-isoindol-1-ones (2a-i). These newly prepared compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, (1) H NMR, and ESI-MS, and the structures of 1h and 2h were further confirmed by X-ray diffraction analyses. The bioassays indicated that some compounds displayed comparable or higher protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibition activities in comparison with the commercial control. Very promising, compound 2a, ethyl 2-((6-fluoro-5-(4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-oxo-1H-isoindol-2(3H)-yl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-sulfanyl)acetate, was recognized as the most potent candidate with K(i) value of 0.0091 μm. Further greenhouse screening results demonstrated that some compounds exhibited good herbicidal activity against Chenopodium album at the dosage of 150 g/ha. PMID:24803371

  17. Treatment influence on herbicide resistance level of Belgian Alopecurus myosuroides populations (black-grass).

    PubMed

    Marechal, P Y; Henriet, F; Bodson, B

    2009-01-01

    Black-grass is a common grass weed, widely spread in Northern Europe and also in Belgium. For ages, it has been an increasing problem in industrial crops, especially winter cereals. Therefore, farmers started to spray herbicide intensively and soon cases of failure occurred for different molecules and different modes of action. Black-grass populations have been tested in greenhouses to assess the influence of an herbicide treatment as to the resistance level regarding three different herbicides: chlortoluron, fenoxaprop-P and mesosulfuron+iodosulfuron. Black-grass seeds were collected in field trials in six locations in Belgium, on individuals which have survived the herbicide treatment. Each population comes from trial plots, measuring 2 meters wide by 5 meters long and characterized by a single or a combination of products. Herbicides sprayed were isoproturon, flufenacet+diflufenican, ACCase inhibitors and ALS inhibitors. Seeds were also collected in the untreated plots. The population present in these last ones corresponds to the former population, before the herbicide selection pressure was applied. In the glasshouse assay, this population was used as the standard population to compare with other populations issued from the same field. The 'R' rating system was set up with this population to assess the evolution of resistance level, year in, year out. Rothamsted and Peldon populations were also included as cross-reference. Each field population presented different behaviours towards herbicide applied in greenhouses and some cases of resistance can be highlighted. Generally, a reduction of treatment efficiency between field and greenhouse results was clearly visible for the whole of studied active ingredients. Indeed, a distribution shift of the populations towards higher resistance classes could be observed. This is particularly remarkable for active ingredients sharing the same mode of action. For example, it has been found that populations already sprayed

  18. Some arguments in favor of a Myriophyllum aquaticum growth inhibition test in a water-sediment system as an additional test in risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Tunić, Tanja; Knežević, Varja; Kerkez, Đurđa; Tubić, Aleksandra; Šunjka, Dragana; Lazić, Sanja; Brkić, Dragica; Teodorović, Ivana

    2015-09-01

    The present study compares the practicability, reproducibility, power, and sensitivity of a Myriophyllum aquaticum growth inhibition test in a water-sediment system with the recently accepted Myriophyllum spicatum test in an equivalent testing system and the standard Lemna sp. test. Special consideration was given to endpoints based on M. aquaticum control plant growth and variability of relative growth rate and yield: shoot length, fresh weight, dry weight, and root weight. Sensitivity analysis was based on tests performed with 3,5-dichlorophenol, atrazine, isoproturon, trifluralin, 2,4-dichlorophenoloxyacetic acid, and dicamba. Growth rates for average M. aquaticum control plants were 0.119 d(-1) and 0.112 d(-1), with average estimated doubling time 6.33 d and 6.74 d for relative growth rate fresh weight and shoot length, respectively. Intrinsic variability of M. aquaticum endpoints was low: 12.9%, 12.5%, and 17.8% for relative growth rate shoot length, relative growth rate fresh weight and yield fresh weight, respectively. The power of the test was fairly high. When the most sensitive endpoints were used for comparison, the 2 Myriophyllum species were similarly sensitive, more sensitive (in the case of auxin simulators), or at least equally sensitive as Lemna minor to other tested herbicides. The M. aquaticum 10-d test with a 7-d exposure period in a water-sediment system has acceptable sensitivity and can provide repeatable, reliable, and reproducible results; therefore, it should not be disregarded as a good and representative additional test in environmental risk assessment. PMID:25943248

  19. Quantitative Distribution and Metabolism of Auxin Herbicides in Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Peter C.; Morris, Roy O.

    1970-01-01

    The internal concentrations of four auxin herbicides— 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dicamba, picloram, and naphthaleneacetic acid—were measured in the roots of treated pea seedlings. Intact seedlings were immersed in solutions of labeled herbicides at concentrations sufficient to produce toxic symptoms (inhibition of elongation, radial enlargement, and lateral root proliferation). Measurements of volume and herbicide content of segments taken sequentially along the root showed that an acropetal concentration gradient of each herbicide was established within the root immediately following treatment. Although there was a net loss of herbicide in the following 24 hours, the gradient was maintained. Initially, the concentration of herbicide in the root tips exceeded that in the external medium. In support of the contention that toxic symptoms due to herbicide treatment are caused by the presence of unmetabolized chemical at the site of action, it was found that metabolism was negligible for all herbicides except naphthaleneacetic acid. PMID:16657529

  20. Herbicide Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lanzilotta, R. P.; Pramer, David

    1970-01-01

    Replacement cultures liberated 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) from 3,4-dichloropropionanilide (propanil). The kinetics of the conversion suggest a requirement for de novo enzyme synthesis, but the system was not influenced by chloramphenicol or puromycin. Enzyme activity was detected when acetanilide (Km = 0.195 mm) was used to replace propanil as substrate. Fungal acylamidase (E.C. 3.5.1., an aryl acylamine amidohydrolase) was concentrated by salt precipitation and characterized. The Fusarium solani acylamidase exhibited an optimum at pH 7.5 to 9.0 and was inactivated in 10 min at 50 C. The enzyme was not sensitive to methyl-carbamate or organophosphate insecticides, but the herbicide, Ramrod (N-isopropyl-2-chloroacetanilide), acted as a competitive inhibitor of acetanilide hydrolysis (Ki = 0.167 mm). Hydrolysis rates were decreased by various para substitutions of acetanilide. Chloro substitution in the acyl moiety of acetanilide also reduced the rate of hydrolysis. 3,4-Dichloroacetanilide was less susceptible to enzyme action than acetanilide, but 3,4-dichloropropionanilide was hydrolyzed much more rapidly than propionanilide. The fungal acylamidase was highly specific for N-acetylarylamines. It did not catalyze hydrolysis of formanilide, butyranilide, dicryl, Karsil, fenuron, monuron, or isopropyl-N-phenylcarbamate. It appears to differ from acylamidases that have been isolated from rice, rat liver, chick kidney, and Neurospora. PMID:5437306

  1. Herbicides as probes in plant biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are small molecules that inhibit specific molecular target sites within plant biochemical pathways and/or physiological processes. Inhibition of these sites often has catastrophic consequences that are lethal to plants. The affinity of these compounds for their respective target sites ...

  2. Herbicide Resistant Weed Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metribuzin and rimsulfuron are the only two herbicides registered for postemergence broadleaf weed control in potatoes, and represent the two classes of herbicides, triazines and ALS inhibitors, with the most reported cases of resistant weeds world wide. Other postemergence grass herbicides belongin...

  3. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m '), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm ) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows of

  4. Phytotoxicity of Four Photosystem II Herbicides to Tropical Seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J.; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/Fm′), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows of

  5. Blood, sweat, tears and success of technology transfer long-term controlled-release of herbicides: Root-growth-inhibiting biobarrier technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van Voris, P.; Cataldo, D.A.; Burton, F.G.; Skeins, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Through the unique combination of polymers with a herbicidally active dinitroaniline, a cylinderical pellet (9mm long and 9mm in diameter) was developed that continuously releases a herbicide for a period of up to 100 years. Equilibrium concentration of the herbicide in soil adjacent to the pellet and the bioactive lifetime of the device cam be adjusted by changing the size of the pellet; the type of polymer; the type, quality, and quantity of carrier; and/or the concentration and type of dinitroaniline used. Commercial products that have been developed under a Federal Technology Transfer Program that utilize this technology include: (1) ROOT-SHIELD, a root repelling sewer gasket for concrete, clay, and PVC sewer lines, (2) BIOBARRIER, a spun-bonded polypropylene geotextile fabric developed to prevent root growth from invading septic tanks; penetrating under roadways, and along the edge of sidewalks, airport runways, and tennis courts, and for landscaped areas; and (3) ROOT-GUARD, a plastic drip irrigation emitter designed to protect buried drip irrigation systems from being plugged by roots. 17 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Occurrence, genetic control and evolution of non-target-site based resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in the dicot weed Papaver rhoeas.

    PubMed

    Scarabel, Laura; Pernin, Fanny; Délye, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is a major issue for the chemical control of weeds. Whilst predominant in grass weeds, NTSR remains largely uninvestigated in dicot weeds. We investigated the occurrence, inheritance and genetic control of NTSR to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Papaver rhoeas (corn poppy) using progenies from plants with potential NTSR to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox. NTSR to imazamox was inherited from parents over two successive generations. NTSR to tritosulfuron (a sulfonylurea) was observed in F1 generations and inherited in F2 generations. NTSR to florasulam (a triazolopyrimidine) emerged in F2 generations. Our findings suggest NTSR was polygenic and gradually built-up by accumulation over generations of loci with moderate individual effects in single plants. We also demonstrated that ALS alleles conferring herbicide resistance can co-exist with NTSR loci in P. rhoeas plants. Previous research focussed on TSR in P. rhoeas, which most likely caused underestimation of NTSR significance in this species. This may also apply to other dicot species. From our data, resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas appears complex, and involves well-known mutant ALS alleles and a set of unknown NTSR loci that confer resistance to ALS inhibitors from different chemical families. PMID:26259184

  7. Microbial degradation of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljinder; Singh, Kashmir

    2016-03-01

    Herbicides remain the most effective, efficient and economical way to control weeds; and its market continues to grow even with the plethora of generic products. With the development of herbicide-tolerant crops, use of herbicides is increasing around the world that has resulted in severe contamination of the environment. The strategies are now being developed to clean these substances in an economical and eco-friendly manner. In this review, an attempt has been made to pool all the available literature on the biodegradation of key herbicides, clodinafop propargyl, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, metolachlor, diuron, glyphosate, imazapyr, pendimethalin and paraquat under the following objectives: (1) to highlight the general characteristic and mode of action, (2) to enlist toxicity in animals, (3) to pool microorganisms capable of degrading herbicides, (4) to discuss the assessment of herbicides degradation by efficient microbes, (5) to highlight biodegradation pathways, (6) to discuss the molecular basis of degradation, (7) to enlist the products of herbicides under degradation process, (8) to highlight the factors effecting biodegradation of herbicides and (9) to discuss the future aspects of herbicides degradation. This review may be useful in developing safer and economic microbiological methods for cleanup of soil and water contaminated with such compounds. PMID:25159042

  8. Herbicidal agents from actinomycetes against selected crop plants and weeds.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Dharumadurai; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Panneerselvam, Annamalai

    2010-04-01

    About 64 total actinomycetes were isolated from various coastal soils. Sixteen actinomycete isolates were screened for herbicidal principles. Out of these, five potent isolates were selected for characterisation and identification. Based on their morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics, the actinomycete isolates were identified as Glyomyces, Saccharomonospra and Streptomyces sp. The Streptomycetes isolates were tested for herbicidal principles by germination inhibition assay. About 10 crop seeds were tested for herbicidal activity with Streptomycetes isolates. The crop seeds did not show growth inhibition. Four weed seeds were tested for herbicidal activity with Streptomyces isolates. Streptomyces inhibits the growth of Echinochilora crusgalli, but it could not inhibit the growth of Echinochilora colonum, Parthenium sp., or Ageratum conizoites. The present study concludes that Streptomyces isolates will be a bioherbicide against E. crusgalli. Further study is required to confirm the activity of Streptomyces isolates against E. crusgalli under field conditions. PMID:20182949

  9. Bioactivity of Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed management in most agroecosystems has become largely dependent on synthetic herbicides because of their high level efficacy and relatively low cost compared to other weed control technologies. By volume, herbicides are the most abundantly used category of pesticides applied in agriculture. Th...

  10. Herbicides and plant hormesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide hormesis is commonly observed at sub-toxic doses of herbicides and other phytotoxins. The occurrence and magnitude of this phenomenon is influenced by plant growth stage and physiological status, environmental factors, the endpoint measured, and the timing between treatment and endpoint me...

  11. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  12. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  13. Commercial Herbicides Can Trigger the Oxidative Inactivation of Acetohydroxyacid Synthase.

    PubMed

    Lonhienne, Thierry; Nouwens, Amanda; Williams, Craig M; Fraser, James A; Lee, Yu-Ting; West, Nicholas P; Guddat, Luke W

    2016-03-18

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitors are highly successful commercial herbicides. New kinetic data show that the binding of these compounds leads to reversible accumulative inhibition of AHAS. Crystallographic data (to a resolution of 2.17 Å) for an AHAS-herbicide complex shows that closure of the active site occurs when the herbicidal inhibitor binds, thus preventing exchange with solvent. This feature combined with new kinetic data shows that molecular oxygen promotes an accumulative inhibition leading to the conclusion that the exceptional potency of these herbicides is augmented by subversion of an inherent oxygenase side reaction. The reactive oxygen species produced by this reaction are trapped in the active site, triggering oxidation reactions that ultimately lead to the alteration of the redox state of the cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), a feature that accounts for the observed reversible accumulative inhibition. PMID:26924714

  14. The aquatic ecotoxicology of triazine herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    Triazine herbicides control plant growth by inhibiting photophosphorylation, but typically do not cause permanent cell damage or death. Effects on aquatic plants are reversible; photosynthesis resumes when the herbicide disappears from the water, and sometimes even while it is still present. Effects on aquatic plant communities are further ameliorated by species replacements, so the communities as a whole are less sensitive than their most sensitive species. Atrazine, a representative triazine herbicide, is toxic to aquatic plants (algae and macrophytes) at concentrations in the range of 20 to 200 {mu}g/L or less. Aquatic invertebrates and fish are much less sensitive than plants, with acute toxicity occurring at 1000 {mu}g/L or higher. Ecologically significant effects in aquatic ecosystems are likely only if plant communities are severely damaged by prolonged exposure to high atrazine concentrations.

  15. Inhibition of para-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase by Analogues of the Herbicide Nitisinone As a Strategy to Decrease Homogentisic Acid Levels, the Causative Agent of Alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Laschi, Marcella; Bernardini, Giulia; Dreassi, Elena; Millucci, Lia; Geminiani, Michela; Braconi, Daniela; Marzocchi, Barbara; Botta, Maurizio; Manetti, Fabrizio; Santucci, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare multisystem metabolic disease caused by deficient activity of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), which leads to the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Currently, there is no treatment for AKU. The sole drug with some beneficial effects is the herbicide nitisinone (1), an inhibitor of p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4-HPPD). 1 has been used as a life-saving drug in infants with type I tyrosinemia despite severe side effects due to the buildup of tyrosine. Four clinical trials of nitisinone to treat AKU have shown that 1 consistently decreases HGA levels, but also caused the accumulation of tyrosine in blood serum. Moreover, the human preclinical toxicological data for 1 are incomplete. In this work, we performed pharmacodynamics and toxicological evaluations of 1, providing the first report of LD50 values in human cells. Intracellular tyrosinemia was also evaluated. Three additional 4-HPPD inhibitors with a more favorable profile than that of 1 in terms of IC50, LD50, and tyrosine accumulation were also identified among commercially available compounds. These may be promising starting points for the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AKU. PMID:26947423

  16. Herbicide-resistant crops and weed resistance to herbicides.

    PubMed

    Owen, Micheal D K; Zelaya, Ian A

    2005-03-01

    The adoption of genetically modified (GM) crops has increased dramatically during the last 3 years, and currently over 52 million hectares of GM crops are planted world-wide. Approximately 41 million hectares of GM crops planted are herbicide-resistant crops, which includes an estimated 33.3 million hectares of herbicide-resistant soybean. Herbicide-resistant maize, canola, cotton and soybean accounted for 77% of the GM crop hectares in 2001. However, sugarbeet, wheat, and as many as 14 other crops have transgenic herbicide-resistant cultivars that may be commercially available in the near future. There are many risks associated with the production of GM and herbicide-resistant crops, including problems with grain contamination, segregation and introgression of herbicide-resistant traits, marketplace acceptance and an increased reliance on herbicides for weed control. The latter issue is represented in the occurrence of weed population shifts, the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed populations and herbicide-resistant crops becoming volunteer weeds. Another issue is the ecological impact that simple weed management programs based on herbicide-resistant crops have on weed communities. Asiatic dayflower (Commelina cumminus L) common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L) and wild buckwheat (Polygonum convolvulus L) are reported to be increasing in prominence in some agroecosystems due to the simple and significant selection pressure brought to bear by herbicide-resistant crops and the concomitant use of the herbicide. Finally, evolution of herbicide-resistant weed populations attributable to the herbicide-resistant crop/herbicide program has been observed. Examples of herbicide-resistant weeds include populations of horseweed (Conyza canadensis (L) Cronq) resistant to N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine (glyphosate). An important question is whether or not these problems represent significant economic issues for future agriculture. PMID:15668920

  17. Herbicide-resistant crops, resistant weeds, and herbicide drift

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New herbicide-resistance traits in corn and soybean may bring new management challenges for fruit and vegetable growers in the Mid-Atlantic region. Herbicide-resistant crops are an important weed management technology in row crop agriculture that allow growers to apply an herbicide to control weed...

  18. ANALYTICAL MASS SPECTROMETRY OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicides are chemical substances that are applied to agricultural soils, gardens, lawns, or plants to destroy or to prevent the growth of undesirable vegetation. The herbicides included in this review are generally syntehtic organic compuonds that are ingredients in commercial...

  19. Herbicide Resistance in Datura innoxia1

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Praveen K.; King, John

    1988-01-01

    Cells resistant to the sulfonylurea herbicides chlorsulfuron and sulfometuron methyl were isolated from a predominantly haploid cell suspension culture of Datura innoxia P. Mill. Exponentially growing cell colonies (aggregates of about 40 cells) were mutagenized with ethyl methane sulfonate, subcultured for 10 days to allow growth recovery and plated on a medium containing either chlorsulfuron or sulfometuron methyl at a concentration (10−8 molar) which killed wild type cells. Surviving clones were picked up after 3 to 4 weeks, further proliferated as callus or cell suspension cultures, and tested for their resistance to both the sulfonylureas and imidazolinones, a chemically different class of herbicides. The variants were stable and showed high (100- to 1000-fold) resistance to the sulfonylureas. While some also exhibited cross resistance to imidazolinones, others showed no cross-resistance at all or, as in one case, greater sensitivity than wild type cells to the imidazolinones. Both classes of herbicides tested inhibited acetolactate synthase activity isolated from wild type cells. The acetolactate synthase of the resistant variants, however, was found to be resistant to the sulfonylureas and also to the imidazolinone(s) in those cells showing cross-resistance to the latter. The lack of cross-resistance observed in some cases provides evidence that the two groups of herbicides have slightly different sites on the acetolactate synthase molecule. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16666001

  20. Rationale for a natural products approach to herbicide discovery.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Duke, Stephen O

    2012-04-01

    Weeds continue to evolve resistance to all the known modes of herbicidal action, but no herbicide with a new target site has been commercialized in nearly 20 years. The so-called 'new chemistries' are simply molecules belonging to new chemical classes that have the same mechanisms of action as older herbicides (e.g. the protoporphyrinogen-oxidase-inhibiting pyrimidinedione saflufenacil or the very-long-chain fatty acid elongase targeting sulfonylisoxazoline herbicide pyroxasulfone). Therefore, the number of tools to manage weeds, and in particular those that can control herbicide-resistant weeds, is diminishing rapidly. There is an imminent need for truly innovative classes of herbicides that explore chemical spaces and interact with target sites not previously exploited by older active ingredients. This review proposes a rationale for a natural-products-centered approach to herbicide discovery that capitalizes on the structural diversity and ingenuity afforded by these biologically active compounds. The natural process of extended-throughput screening (high number of compounds tested on many potential target sites over long periods of times) that has shaped the evolution of natural products tends to generate molecules tailored to interact with specific target sites. As this review shows, there is generally little overlap between the mode of action of natural and synthetic phytotoxins, and more emphasis should be placed on applying methods that have proved beneficial to the pharmaceutical industry to solve problems in the agrochemical industry. PMID:22232033

  1. Impairment of carbon metabolism induced by the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Orcaray, Luis; Zulet, Amaia; Zabalza, Ana; Royuela, Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate reduces plant growth and causes plant death by inhibiting the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. The objective of this work was to determine whether glyphosate-treated plants show a carbon metabolism pattern comparable to that of plants treated with herbicides that inhibit branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. Glyphosate-treated plants showed impaired carbon metabolism with an accumulation of carbohydrates in the leaves and roots. The growth inhibition detected after glyphosate treatment suggested impaired metabolism that impedes the utilization of available carbohydrates or energy at the expected rate. These effects were common to both types of amino acid biosynthesis inhibitors. Under aerobic conditions, ethanolic fermentative metabolism was enhanced in the roots of glyphosate-treated plants. This fermentative response was not related to changes in the respiratory rate or to a limitation of the energy charge. This response, which was similar for both types of herbicides, might be considered a general response to stress conditions. PMID:21944839

  2. Weed control without herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing weeds without herbicides is challenging and requires an integration of tactics and a change in how weeds problems are approached. Weeds should be managed in a holistic, intentional and proactive manner. Growers that successfully manage weeds in organic systems examine why certain weed speci...

  3. Postemergence herbicides for calendula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calendula is an alternative oilseed crop whose seed oil is valued as a substitute for tung oil and a replacement for petroleum-based volatile organic compounds in paints and other coatings. Calendula is not yet grown extensively as an agronomic crop, and its tolerances to most herbicides are unknown...

  4. ANNUAL HERBICIDE LOADINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticides, Herbicides, Fungicides...etc, are used for a variety of purposes, including control of household, lawn, and garden pests; for control of mosquitoes and other insect vectors of animal and human diseases; for control of brush in rangelands, on roadsides, and along power...

  5. Brassica greens herbicide screening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to screen herbicides for potential use in brassica greens. Plots were in a RBD with 4 replications. The study was direct seeded on May 19, 2009 with a seeding rate of 272,000 seeds/acre (‘Savanna’ mustard). Treatments included trifluralin PPI + DCPA pre-emergence ap...

  6. Effects of Photosystem II Interfering Herbicides Atrazine and Bentazon on the Soybean Transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atrazine and bentazon are both photosystem II inhibiting herbicides that interfere with photosynthetic electron transport provoking oxidative stress. While atrazine is lethal to soybean, bentazon does not kill soybeans because of the capability of soybeans to metabolize the herbicide. Gene expressio...

  7. Thymoquinone effectively alleviates lung fibrosis induced by paraquat herbicide through down-regulation of pro-fibrotic genes and inhibition of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pourgholamhossein, Fatemeh; Sharififar, Fariba; Rasooli, Rokhsana; Pourgholi, Leyla; Nakhaeipour, Fatemeh; Samareh-Fekri, Hojjat; Iranpour, Maryam; Mandegary, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The potential preventive and therapeutic effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and its molecular mechanism were evaluated in paraquat (PQ)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. TQ was administered orally at the doses of 20 and 40mg/kg during the course and after development of fibrosis. Pathological changes, expressions of genes involved in fibrogenesis, hydroxyproline (HP) and oxidative stress parameters were determined in the lung tissues. TQ dose-dependently recovered the pathological changes induced by PQ. TQ decreased hydroxyproline content, lipid peroxidation and restored the antioxidant enzymes to the normal values. In molecular level, expressions of TGF-β1, α-SMA, collagen 1a1 and collagen 4a1 genes were also returned to the control level by TQ. This study indicated that TQ has the preventive and therapeutic potentials for the treatment of lung fibrosis by inhibition of oxidative stress and down-regulation of profibrotic genes. PMID:27375216

  8. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/Fm′) by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l−1 (ametryn) to 132 μg l−1 (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/Fm′. PMID:26616444

  9. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-11-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/Fm‧) by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l-1 (ametryn) to 132 μg l-1 (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/Fm‧.

  10. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Adam D; Collier, Catherine J; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/F(m)') by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l(-1) (ametryn) to 132 μg l(-1) (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/F(m)'. PMID:26616444

  11. INTERACTION OF OZONE AND HERBICIDES IN SOYBEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify potentially damaging herbicide-ozone interactions on soybean so that injury could be reduced by judicious selection of herbicides and tolerant cultivars. The involvement of herbicide influence on stomatal aperture affecting ozone ...

  12. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  13. Current state of herbicides in herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M

    2014-09-01

    Current herbicide and herbicide trait practices are changing in response to the rapid spread of glyphosate-resistant weeds. Growers urgently needed glyphosate when glyphosate-resistant crops became available because weeds were becoming widely resistant to most commonly used selective herbicides, making weed management too complex and time consuming for large farm operations. Glyphosate made weed management easy and efficient by controlling all emerged weeds at a wide range of application timings. However, the intensive use of glyphosate over wide areas and concomitant decline in the use of other herbicides led eventually to the widespread evolution of weeds resistant to glyphosate. Today, weeds that are resistant to glyphosate and other herbicide types are threatening current crop production practices. Unfortunately, all commercial herbicide modes of action are over 20 years old and have resistant weed problems. The severity of the problem has prompted the renewal of efforts to discover new weed management technologies. One technology will be a new generation of crops with resistance to glyphosate, glufosinate and other existing herbicide modes of action. Other technologies will include new chemical, biological, cultural and mechanical methods for weed management. From the onset of commercialization, growers must now preserve the utility of new technologies by integrating their use with other weed management technologies in diverse and sustainable systems. PMID:24446395

  14. Herbicides interfere with antigrazer defenses in Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuexia; Sun, Yunfei; Zhang, Xingxing; Heng, Hailu; Nan, Haihong; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-11-01

    The extensive application of herbicides has led to a serious threat of herbicide contamination to aquatic ecosystem. Herbicide exposure affects aquatic communities not only by exerting toxicity on single species but also by changing interspecific interactions. This study investigated the antigrazer defenses of the common green alga Scenedesmus obliquus against different herbicides [glyphosate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and atrazine] at various concentrations (0-2.0 mg L(-1)). In the presence of grazer (Daphnia)-derived cues, S. obliquus populations without herbicides formed high proportions of multicelled (e.g., four- and eight-celled) colonies. This result confirms that S. obliquus exhibits a morphological defense against grazing risk. At the low concentration range of 0.002-0.02 mg L(-1), the three herbicides exerted no influence on the growth and photosynthetic efficiency of S. obliquus, and multicelled colonies showed constant proportions. At the high concentration range of 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1), atrazine significantly inhibited the algal growth and photosynthesis whereas glyphosate or 2,4-D did not. Nonetheless, these levels of glyphosate or 2,4-D remarkably decreased the proportion of multicelled colonies, with reduced numbers of cells per particle in Daphnia filtrate-treated population. No eight-celled colony was formed after treatment with atrazine at 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1) despite the addition of Daphnia filtrate. These results suggest that herbicide exposure impairs antigrazer colonial morphs in phytoplankton although it is not sufficient to hamper algal growth. This phenomenon can increase the risk of predation by herbivores, thereby disrupting the inducible phytoplankton community. Furthermore, the predator-prey interactions between herbivores and phytoplankton can be potentially changed more seriously than previously considered. PMID:27501311

  15. Mechanism of sulfonylurea herbicide resistance in the broadleaf weed, Kochia scoparia

    SciTech Connect

    Saari, L.L.; Cotterman, J.C.; Primiani, M.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Selection of kochia (Kochia scoparia) biotypes resistant to the sulfonylurea herbicide chlorsulfuron has occurred through the continued use of this herbicide in monoculture cereal-growing areas in the United States. The apparent sulfonylurea resistance observed in kochia was confirmed in greenhouse tests. Fresh and dry weight accumulation in the resistance kochia was 2- to >350-fold higher in the presence of four sulfonylurea herbicides as compared to the susceptible biotype. Acetolactate synthase (ALS) activity isolated from sulfonylurea-resistant kochia was less sensitive to inhibition by three classes of ALS-inhibiting herbicides, sulfonylureas, imidazolinones, and sulfonanilides. The decrease in ALS sensitivity to inhibition (as measured by the ratio of resistant I{sub 50} to susceptible I{sub 50}) was 5- to 28-fold, 2- to 6-fold, and 20-fold for sulfonylurea herbicides, imidazolinone herbicides, and a sulfonanilide herbicide, respectively. No differences were observed in the ALS-specific activities or the rates of ({sup 14}C)chlorsulfuron uptake, translocation, and metabolism between susceptible and resistant kochia biotypes. The K{sub m} values for pyruvate using ALS from susceptible and resistant kochia were 2.13 and 1.74 mM, respectively. Based on these results, the mechanism of sulfonylurea resistance in this kochia biotype is due solely to a less sulfonylurea-sensitive ALS enzyme.

  16. Monitoring of herbicide effect in maize based on electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseresnyés, I.; Fekete, G.; Végh, K.; Székács, A.; Mörtl, M.; Rajkai, K.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the herbicide acetochlor on root growth was studied by a non-destructive electrical impedance and capacitance method in pot experiments on maize. Acetochlor was applied both as single active ingredient and mixed with safener AD-67 in two dosages. Without safener addition, acetochlor had a permanent inhibiting effect on plant root expansion. The safener AD-67 was capable of providing protective effect against herbicide application. High correlations between root electrical impedance or capacitance and the root dry mass or surface area under our laboratory conditions were confirmed by plant harvest method. Root electrical impedance and capacitance measurements proved to be valid for monitoring the effect of the herbicide influencing root development and for distinguishing plant groups subjected to different stress conditions.

  17. The potential benefits of herbicide regulation: a cautionary note for the Great Barrier Reef catchment area.

    PubMed

    Davis, A M; Lewis, S E; Brodie, J E; Benson, Ash

    2014-08-15

    Industry transitions away from traditional photosystem II inhibiting (PSII) herbicides towards an 'alternative' herbicide suite are now widely advocated as a key component of improved environmental outcomes for Australia's Great Barrier Reef and improved environmental stewardship on the part of the Queensland sugar industry. A systematic desktop risk analysis found that based on current farming practices, traditional PSII herbicides can pose significant environmental risks. Several of the 'alternatives' that can directly fill a specific pre-emergent ('soil residual') weed control function similar to regulated PSII herbicides also, however, presented a similar environmental risk profile, regardless of farming systems and bio-climatic zones being considered. Several alternatives with a pre-emergent residual function as well as alternative post-emergent (contact or 'knockdown') herbicides were, predicted to pose lower environmental risks than the regulated PSII herbicides to most trophic levels, although environmental risks could still be present. While several herbicides may well be viable alternatives in terms of weed control, they can still present equal or possibly higher risks to the environment. Imposing additional regulations (or even de-registrations) on particular herbicides could result in marginal, and possibly perverse environmental impacts in the long term, if usage shifts to alternative herbicides with similar risk profiles. Regardless of any regulatory efforts, improved environmental sustainability outcomes in pesticide practices within the Great Barrier Reef catchment area will hinge primarily on the continuing adoption of integrated, strategic pest management systems and technologies applied to both traditional and 'alternative' herbicides. One of the emerging policy challenges is ensuring the requisite technical and extension support for cane growers to ensure effective adoption of rapidly evolving farming system technologies, in a very dynamic and

  18. Introduction of the anti-apoptotic baculovirus p35 gene in passion fruit induces herbicide tolerance, reduced bacterial lesions, but does not inhibits passion fruit woodiness disease progress induced by cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV).

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Daniele Scandiucci; Coelho, Marly C Felipe; Souza, Manoel T; Marques, Abi; Ribeiro, E Bergmann Morais

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of anti-apoptotic genes into plants leads to resistance to environmental stress and broad-spectrum disease resistance. The anti-apoptotic gene (p35) from a baculovirus was introduced into the genome of passion fruit plants by biobalistics. Eleven regenerated plants showed the presence of the p35 gene by PCR and/or dot blot hybridization. Transcriptional analysis of regenerated plants showed the presence of specific p35 transcripts in 9 of them. Regenerated plants containing the p35 gene were inoculated with the cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), the bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv passiflorae, and the herbicide, glufosinate, (Syngenta). None of the plants showed resistance to CABMV. Regenerated plants (p35+) showed less than half of local lesions showed by non-transgenic plants when inoculated with X. axonopodis and some p35+ plants showed increased tolerance to the glufosinate herbicide when compared to non-transgenic plants. PMID:17016672

  19. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor herbicide effects on pythium root rot of sugarcane, pythium species, and the soil microbial community.

    PubMed

    Daugrois, J H; Hoy, J W; Griffin, J L

    2005-03-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of three protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor herbicides, azafenidin, flumioxazin, and sulfentrazone, on Pythium root rot of sugarcane and the soil microbial community were evaluated in greenhouse experiments. Herbicides were applied as foliar and soil treatments. There were no consistent effects on plant growth or disease parameters. However, some herbicide treatments affected the relative frequency of isolation of Pythium spp. from roots and reduced colonization by the pathogenic species Pythium arrhenomanes. A comparison of sole carbon source utilization profiles indicated that soil-applied herbicides altered the functional diversity of the soil microbial community, with some variation depending on herbicide used. All three herbicides inhibited the in vitro mycelial growth of P. arrhenomanes, P. aphanidermatum, and P. ultimum. Active ingredients were less inhibitory than formulated product for azafenidin and flumioxazin but not for sulfentrazone. PMID:18943113

  20. Determination of damages of photosynthetic metabolism caused by herbicides using a delayed fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingrui; Xing, Da; Zhou, Xiaoming; Li, Qiang

    2007-11-01

    The structure and function of chloroplast in plant can be affected by herbicide, resulting in the decrease in photosynthetic capacity. The photosystem II (PSII) in plants is considered to be the primary site where light-induced delayed fluorescence (DF) is produced. In this study, a simple analytical model of DF has been developed to diagnose the damages of photosynthesis caused by herbicides based on the charge recombination theory. Using a home-made portable DF detection system, we have studied the effects of two different kinds of herbicides on decay kinetics of DF in soybean (Glycine max (L.), Jinghuang No. 3). Current investigations have demonstrated that the analytic equation of DF decay dynamics we proposed here can accurately determine the extent of damage of herbicides to photosynthetic metabolism and truly reflect the mechanism and site about which herbicides inhibit photosynthetic electron transport chain. Therefore, the decay kinetics of DF with proper calibration may provide a promisingly new and practical means for pharmacological analysis of herbicides and damage-diagnosis of photosynthetic metabolism. The DF technique could be potentially useful for detecting the effects of herbicide on plant performance in vivo and screening new generation of promising herbicides with low toxicity and superhigh efficiency.

  1. Natural Compounds as Next-Generation Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Franck E.; Duke, Stephen O.

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action (MOAs) are badly needed due to the rapidly evolving resistance to commercial herbicides, but a new MOA has not been introduced in over 20 years. The greatest pest management challenge for organic agriculture is the lack of effective natural product herbicides. The structural diversity and evolved biological activity of natural phytotoxins offer opportunities for the development of both directly used natural compounds and synthetic herbicides with new target sites based on the structures of natural phytotoxins. Natural phytotoxins are also a source for the discovery of new herbicide target sites that can serve as the focus of traditional herbicide discovery efforts. There are many examples of strong natural phytotoxins with MOAs other than those used by commercial herbicides, which indicates that there are molecular targets of herbicides that can be added to the current repertoire of commercial herbicide MOAs. PMID:24784133

  2. Towards the D1 protein application for the development of sensors specific for herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Piletskaya, E.; Piletsky, S.; Lavrik, N.; Masuchi, Y.; Karube, I.

    1998-12-01

    One of the most widespread groups of pesticides are the triazine herbicides. These substances inhibit photosynthesis by blocking electron transport in plant chloroplasts. The possibility of the chloroplast D1 protein application for determination of the herbicide concentration in solution was investigated. Potentiometry and cyclic voltammetry have been selected to monitor specific interaction between the D1 protein and herbicide. It was found that membranes with well-defined structure, like Langmuir-Blongett film are more suitable for sensitive sensor construction than cross-linked membranes. After addition of atrazine, the current through these multilayers appeared to increase 5 fold. The effect was found to be fast and irreversible. It has been proposed that the toxic action of herbicides on chloroplasts, traditionally interpreted by inhibition of electron flow along the chloroplast membrane, may also be the result of the thylakoid membrane depolarization.

  3. Herbicide activity of monosulfuron and its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhi-Jin; Ai, Ying-Wei; Qian, Chuan-Fan; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Monosulfuron was developed for weed control in the field of wheat (Triticum, aestivum L.) and millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) with the application rate ranging from 15 to 60 g ai/hm2. Herbicidal activity of monosulfuron was evaluated systematically by bioassay using maize (Zea mays L.) taproot as indicator and weed fresh weight of Acalypha australis L. and Echinochloa phyllopogon. Maize CAU 3138 was the most tolerant cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 (concentration of 50% inhibition) of 85 microg/kg, Yedan 13 was one of the most sensitive cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 of 6.4 microg/kg. Monosulfuron inhibited the growth of Acalypha australis L. strongly comparing with that of Echinochloa phyllopogon. Monosulfuron was a good acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor in vitro, the I50 (50% of inhibition) of monosulfuron, chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron for CAU 3138 were 32, 2, 19 and 26 nmol/L respectively, for Yedan 13 the I50 were 15, 3, 17 and 65 nmol/L respectively. In vivo ALS inhibition occurred only in higher concentration of 4 sulfonylurea herbicide tested. Comparison study of this test indicated that the mode of action of monosulfuron was the same as that of other sulfonylurea herbicides such as chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron, they were all inhibitors targeted at the ALS. PMID:16083111

  4. Herbicide-Resistant: Toward an understanding of resistance development and the impact of herbicide resistant crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the past half century, herbicides have been the principal means of economic weed management in commercial crops in the US. Although weed resistance to herbicides was anticipated, weeds with resistance to herbicides did not appear until over 20 years after the initiation of herbicide use. Weed co...

  5. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    PubMed

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations. PMID:26479195

  6. Transformation of herbicides under transient anoxia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resurgence in the use of soil-applied residual herbicides to augment performance of failing post-emergence herbicides has predictably reignited concerns over potential offsite movement, carryover damage onsite, or potential herbicide failure due to accelerated degradation. Many of the key processes ...

  7. Irrigation affects herbicide penetration of shrub canopies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nursery growers can apply herbicides in either granular or sprayed formulations. Despite greater risk for injury, sprayed preemergence herbicides are often less expensive than an equivalent granular formulation, easier to apply, and result in more uniform application. When herbicides are sprayed o...

  8. Best management practices for herbicide resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of the recent focus on herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide resistant weeds are not new to agriculture; the first herbicide resistant weed was documented in 1957, with the first widespread resistance occurring in common groundsel with atrazine in the early 1970’s. Glyphosate resistant weed...

  9. Amino-substituted para-Benzoquinones as Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nain-Perez, Amalyn; Barbosa, Luiz C A; Picanço, Marcelo C; Giberti, Samuele; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Although quinones present a large array of biological activities, a few studies on the herbicidal potential of 2,5-bis(alkyl/arylamino)-1,4-benzoquinones have been reported to date. In this work, starting from benzoquinone, 13 2,5-bis(alkyl/arylamino)-1,4-benzoquinones were prepared in 46 - 93% yield. The products were fully characterized by spectroscopic analyses and their phytotoxicity against Cucumis sativus and Sorghum bicolor seedlings was investigated. At 100 ppm, compounds caused 10 - 88% growth inhibition of the dicotyledonous species, whereas the monocotyledon was less affected. Most compounds exerted little inhibitory effect on a cyanobacterial model strain. However, at 100 μm, compounds 8 - 10 caused about 50% inhibition of algal growth, and compounds 1 and 2 reduced cell viability in the 1 - 10 μm range. The ability of benzoquinone derivatives to interfere with the light-driven ferricyanide reduction by isolated spinach chloroplasts was evaluated. Some substances showed a moderate effect as uncouplers, but no relationship was found between this property and their biological activity, indicating that the herbicidal effect is not associated with the inhibition of the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Phytotoxic compounds were not toxic to insects, strengthening the possibility that they may serve as lead for the development of eco-friendly herbicides. PMID:27389616

  10. Modelling the effect of fluctuating herbicide concentrations on algae growth.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Coutu, Sylvain; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    Herbicide concentrations fluctuate widely in watercourses after crop applications and rain events. The level of concentrations in pulses can exceed the water chronic quality criteria. In the present study, we proposed modelling the effects of successive pulse exposure on algae. The deterministic model proposed is based on two parameters: (i) the typical growth rate of the algae, obtained by monitoring growth rates of several successive batch cultures in growth media, characterizing both the growth of the control and during the recovery periods; (ii) the growth rate of the algae exposed to pulses, determined from a dose-response curve obtained with a standard toxicity test. We focused on the herbicide isoproturon and on the freshwater alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus, and we validated the model prediction based on effect measured during five sequential pulse exposures in laboratory. The comparison between the laboratory and the modelled effects illustrated that the results yielded were consistent, making the model suitable for effect prediction of the herbicide photosystem II inhibitor isoproturon on the alga S. vacuolatus. More generally, modelling showed that both pulse duration and level of concentration play a crucial role. The application of the model to a real case demonstrated that both the highest peaks and the low peaks with a long duration affect principally the cell density inhibition of the alga S. vacuolatus. It is therefore essential to detect these characteristic pulses when monitoring of herbicide concentrations are conducted in rivers. PMID:25499055

  11. Phytotoxicity of four herbicides on Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria natans and Elodea nuttallii.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiyun; Li, Xiaolu; Xu, Xiaohua; Gao, Shixiang

    2009-01-01

    The physiological effects of 4 herbicides (butachlor, quinclorac, bensulfuron-methyl and atrazine) on 3 submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria natans and Elodea nuttallii) were tested in laboratory. The variables of the relative growth rate and the photosynthetic pigment content showed that all of the tested herbicides affected the growth of the plants obviously, even at the lowest concentration (0.0001 mg/L). Except for the C. demersum treated with quinclorac at 0.005 and 0.01 mg/L, the relative growth rates of the plants were inhibited significantly (p < 0.01). Statistical analysis of chlorophyll a (Chl-a) contents was carried out with both the t-test and one-way ANOVA to determine the difference between the treatment and control. The results showed that Chl-a contents of the plants in all treatment groups were affected by herbicides significantly, except for the C. demersum treated with bensulfuron-methyl at 0.0005 mg/L. The decrease in Chl-a content was positively correlated to the dosage of the herbicides in most treatment groups. It was suggested that herbicides in water bodies might potentially affect the growth of aquatic macrophytes. Since the Chl-a content of submerged macrophytes responded to the stress of herbicides sensitively and directly, it could be used as a biomaker in environmental monitoring or in the ecological risk assessment of herbicide contamination. PMID:19634441

  12. Nanoencapsulation Enhances the Post-Emergence Herbicidal Activity of Atrazine against Mustard Plants

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia Bueno Reis; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been recently developed as a modified release system for atrazine, an herbicide that can have harmful effects in the environment. Here, the post-emergence herbicidal activity of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine was evaluated using mustard (Brassica juncea) as target plant species model. Characterization of atrazine-loaded PCL nanocapsules by nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a concentration of 7.5 x 1012 particles mL-1 and an average size distribution of 240.7 nm. The treatment of mustard plants with nanocapsules carrying atrazine at 1 mg mL-1 resulted in a decrease of net photosynthesis and PSII maximum quantum yield, and an increase of leaf lipid peroxidation, leading to shoot growth inhibition and the development of severe symptoms. Time course analysis until 72 h after treatments showed that nanoencapsulation of atrazine enhanced the herbicidal activity in comparison with a commercial atrazine formulation. In contrast to the commercial formulation, ten-fold dilution of the atrazine-containing nanocapsules did not compromise the herbicidal activity. No effects were observed when plants were treated with nanocapsules without herbicide compared to control leaves sprayed with water. Overall, these results demonstrated that atrazine-containing PCL nanocapsules provide very effective post-emergence herbicidal activity. More importantly, the use of nanoencapsulated atrazine enables the application of lower dosages of the herbicide, without any loss of efficiency, which could provide environmental benefits. PMID:26186597

  13. Nanoencapsulation Enhances the Post-Emergence Herbicidal Activity of Atrazine against Mustard Plants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia Bueno Reis; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been recently developed as a modified release system for atrazine, an herbicide that can have harmful effects in the environment. Here, the post-emergence herbicidal activity of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine was evaluated using mustard (Brassica juncea) as target plant species model. Characterization of atrazine-loaded PCL nanocapsules by nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a concentration of 7.5 x 10(12) particles mL(-1) and an average size distribution of 240.7 nm. The treatment of mustard plants with nanocapsules carrying atrazine at 1 mg mL(-1) resulted in a decrease of net photosynthesis and PSII maximum quantum yield, and an increase of leaf lipid peroxidation, leading to shoot growth inhibition and the development of severe symptoms. Time course analysis until 72 h after treatments showed that nanoencapsulation of atrazine enhanced the herbicidal activity in comparison with a commercial atrazine formulation. In contrast to the commercial formulation, ten-fold dilution of the atrazine-containing nanocapsules did not compromise the herbicidal activity. No effects were observed when plants were treated with nanocapsules without herbicide compared to control leaves sprayed with water. Overall, these results demonstrated that atrazine-containing PCL nanocapsules provide very effective post-emergence herbicidal activity. More importantly, the use of nanoencapsulated atrazine enables the application of lower dosages of the herbicide, without any loss of efficiency, which could provide environmental benefits. PMID:26186597

  14. Comparisons of herbicide treated and cultivated herbicide-resistant corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four glyphosate resistant corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids, a glufosinate-ammonium resistant hybrid, and a conventional atrazine resistant hybrid grown at Stoneville, MS in 2005, 2006, and 2007 with furrow irrigation were treated with thier respective herbicides and their growth, yeild, and mycotoxin inci...

  15. Interactions of Synthetic Herbicides with Plant Disease and Microbial Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic herbicides have the potential to influence plant disease by several mechanisms. They can enhance disease or protect plants from pathogens due to direct effects on the microbe, to effects on the plant, or to effects on both organisms. The particular effect is a function of many factors in...

  16. Response of multiple herbicide resistant strain of diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, exposed to atrazine and DCMU.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Datta, Pallavi; Tirkey, Archna

    2011-04-01

    Effect of two photosynthetic inhibitor herbicides, atrazine (both purified and formulated) and [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea] (DCMU), on the growth, macromolecular contents, heterocyst frequency, photosynthetic O2 evolution and dark O2 uptake of wild type and multiple herbicide resistant (MHR) strain of diazotrophic cyanobacterium A. variabilis was studied. Cyanobacterial strains showed gradual inhibition in growth with increasing dosage of herbicides. Both wild type and MHR strain tolerated < 6.0 mg L(-1) of atrazine (purified), < 2.0 mg L(-1) of atrazine (formulated) and < 0.4 mg L(-1) of DCMU indicating similar level of herbicide tolerance. Atrazine (pure) (8.0 mg L(-1)) and 4.0 mg L(-1) of atrazine (formulated) were growth inhibitory concentrations (lethal) for both wild type and MHR strain indicating formulated atrazine was more toxic than the purified form. Comparatively lower concentrations of DCMU were found to be lethal for wild type and MHR strain, respectively. Thus, between the two herbicides tested DCMU was more growth toxic than atrazine. At sublethal dosages of herbicides, photosynthetic O2 evolution showed highest inhibition followed by chlorophyll a, phycobhiliproteins and heterocyst differentiation as compared to carotenoid, protein and respiratory O2 uptake. PMID:21614895

  17. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Watson, Susan B; Asolkar, Ratnakar N; Boddy, Louis G

    2015-01-01

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in response between plants treated with sarmentine and herbicidal soaps such as pelargonic acid (nonanoic acid). However, little was known about the mechanism of action leading to the rapid desiccation of foliage treated by sarmentine. In cucumber cotyledon disc-assays, sarmentine induced rapid light-independent loss of membrane integrity at 100 μM or higher concentration, whereas 3 mM pelargonic acid was required for a similar effect. Sarmentine was between 10 and 30 times more active than pelargonic acid on wild mustard, velvetleaf, redroot pigweed and crabgrass. Additionally, the potency of 30 μM sarmentine was greatly stimulated by light, suggesting that this natural product may also interfere with photosynthetic processes. This was confirmed by observing a complete inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport at that concentration. Sarmentine also acted as an inhibitor of photosystem II (PSII) on isolated thylakoid membranes by competing for the binding site of plastoquinone. This can be attributed in part to structural similarities between herbicides like sarmentine and diuron. While this mechanism of action accounts for the light stimulation of the activity of sarmentine, it does not account for its ability to destabilize membranes in darkness. In this respect, sarmentine has some structural similarity to crotonoyl-CoA, the substrate of enoyl-ACP reductase, a key enzyme in the early steps of fatty acid synthesis. Inhibitors of this enzyme, such as triclosan, cause rapid loss of membrane integrity in the dark. Sarmentine inhibited the activity of enoyl-ACP reductase, with an I 50app of 18.3 μM. Therefore, the herbicidal activity of sarmentine appears to be a

  18. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Franck E.; Owens, Daniel K.; Watson, Susan B.; Asolkar, Ratnakar N.; Boddy, Louis G.

    2015-01-01

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in response between plants treated with sarmentine and herbicidal soaps such as pelargonic acid (nonanoic acid). However, little was known about the mechanism of action leading to the rapid desiccation of foliage treated by sarmentine. In cucumber cotyledon disc-assays, sarmentine induced rapid light-independent loss of membrane integrity at 100 μM or higher concentration, whereas 3 mM pelargonic acid was required for a similar effect. Sarmentine was between 10 and 30 times more active than pelargonic acid on wild mustard, velvetleaf, redroot pigweed and crabgrass. Additionally, the potency of 30 μM sarmentine was greatly stimulated by light, suggesting that this natural product may also interfere with photosynthetic processes. This was confirmed by observing a complete inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport at that concentration. Sarmentine also acted as an inhibitor of photosystem II (PSII) on isolated thylakoid membranes by competing for the binding site of plastoquinone. This can be attributed in part to structural similarities between herbicides like sarmentine and diuron. While this mechanism of action accounts for the light stimulation of the activity of sarmentine, it does not account for its ability to destabilize membranes in darkness. In this respect, sarmentine has some structural similarity to crotonoyl-CoA, the substrate of enoyl-ACP reductase, a key enzyme in the early steps of fatty acid synthesis. Inhibitors of this enzyme, such as triclosan, cause rapid loss of membrane integrity in the dark. Sarmentine inhibited the activity of enoyl-ACP reductase, with an I50app of 18.3 μM. Therefore, the herbicidal activity of sarmentine appears to be a

  19. Crops with target-site herbicide resistance for Orobanche and Striga control.

    PubMed

    Gressel, Jonathan

    2009-05-01

    It is necessary to control root parasitic weeds before or as they attach to the crop. This can only be easily achieved chemically with herbicides that are systemic, or with herbicides that are active in soil. Long-term control can only be attained if the crops do not metabolise the herbicide, i.e. have target-site resistance. Such target-site resistances have allowed foliar applications of herbicides inhibiting enol-pyruvylshikimate phosphate synthase (EPSPS) (glyphosate), acetolactate synthase (ALS) (e.g. chlorsulfuron, imazapyr) and dihydropteroate synthase (asulam) for Orobanche control in experimental conditions with various crops. Large-scale use of imazapyr as a seed dressing of imidazolinone-resistant maize has been commercialised for Striga control. Crops with two target-site resistances will be more resilient to the evolution of resistance in the parasite, if well managed. PMID:19280593

  20. Herbicide poisoning: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Supradip; Singh, Amandeep; Dewan, Himanshu; Walia, Gunwant; Bansal, Abhishek

    2012-01-01

    Despite widespread availability, reports of herbicide poisoning from India are not common. Diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of proper history, non-specific clinical features and lack of diagnostic tests. A case of Paraquat poisoning is reported where diagnosis could be established only after the recovery of the patient. The literature is reviewed. PMID:22557836

  1. Introduction to Weeds and Herbicides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is an introduction to weed control and herbicide use. An initial discussion of the characteristics of weeds includes scientific naming, weed competition with crops, weed dispersal and dormancy, and conditions affecting weed seed germination. The main body of the…

  2. Herbicides as ripeners for sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At the start of the sugarcane harvest season in Louisiana, late-September or early-October, sucrose content in sugarcane is relatively low compared to late in the harvest season. In order for early-harvested sugarcane to be profitable, chemicals, primarily herbicides, have been evaluated for their e...

  3. Up and coming organic herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a recent national survey, weed control research was designated as the top research priority by organic producers. Organic weed control methods include crop rotations, cover crops, planting systems, mulches, mechanical methods, flaming, and organic herbicides. Although mechanical weed control th...

  4. Herbicide Effects on Plant Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of herbicides on plant disease is an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of integrated pest management. Furthermore, these interactions can be crucial contributors to the success or failure of the biocontrol of weeds with microbes. Indirectly, through their strong effects on pla...

  5. Transgenic Crops for Herbicide Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since their introduction in 1995, crops made resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate with transgenes are widely available and used in much of the world. As of 2008, over 80% of the transgenic crops grown world-wide have this transgenic trait. This technology has had m...

  6. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  7. Herbicide Phosphinothricin Causes Direct Stimulation Hormesis

    PubMed Central

    Dragićević, Milan; Platiša, Jelena; Nikolić, Radomirka; Todorović, Slađana; Bogdanović, Milica; Mitić, Nevena; Simonović, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Herbicide phosphinothricin (PPT) inhibits glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in nitrogen assimilation, thus causing ammonia accumulation, glutamine depletion and eventually plant death. However, the growth response of Lotus corniculatus L. plants immersed in solutions with a broad range of PPT concentrations is biphasic, with pronounced stimulating effect on biomass production at concentrations ≤ 50 μM and growth inhibition at higher concentrations. The growth stimulation at low PPT concentrations is a result of activation of chloroplastic isoform GS2, while the growth suppression is caused by inhibition of both cytosolic GS1 and GS2 at higher PPT concentrations. Since the results are obtained in cell-free system (e.g. protein extracts), to which the principles of homeostasis are not applicable, this PPT effect is an unambiguous example of direct stimulation hormesis. A detailed molecular mechanism of concentration-dependent interaction of both PPT and a related GS inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine, with GS holoenzymes is proposed. The mechanism is in concurrence with all experimental and literature data. PMID:23983663

  8. Binding sites associated with inhibition of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Shipman, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of experimental and theoretical evidence has been integrated into coherent molecular mechanisms for the action of photosystem II herbicides. Photosystem II herbicides act by inhibiting electron transfers between the first and second plastoquinones on the reducing side of photosystem II. Each herbicide molecule must have a flat polar component with hydrophobic substituents to be active. The hydrophobic substituents serve to partition the molecule into lipid regions of the cell and to fit the hydrophobic region of the herbicide binding site. The flat polar portion of the herbicide is used for electrostatic binding to the polar region of the herbicide binding site. Theoretical calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of herbicides to model proteinaceous binding sites.

  9. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase as a molecular target for diphenyl ether herbicides.

    PubMed Central

    Matringe, M; Camadro, J M; Labbe, P; Scalla, R

    1989-01-01

    Diphenyl ether herbicides induce an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX in plant tissues. By analogy to human porphyria, the accumulation could be attributed to decreased (Mg or Fe)-chelatase or protoporphyrinogen oxidase activities. Possible effects of acifluorfen-methyl on these enzymes were investigated in isolated corn (maize, Zea mays) etioplasts, potato (Solanum tuberosum) and mouse mitochondria, and yeast mitochondrial membranes. Acifluorfen-methyl was strongly inhibitory to protoporphyrinogen oxidase activities whatever their origins [concn. causing 50% inhibition (IC50) = 4 nM for the corn etioplast enzyme]. By contrast, it was roughly 100,000 times less active on (Mg or Fe)-chelatase activities (IC50 = 80-100 microM). Our results lead us to propose protoporphyrinogen oxidase as a cellular target for diphenyl ether herbicides. PMID:2775186

  10. Combined thermal and herbicide stress in functionally diverse coral symbionts.

    PubMed

    van Dam, J W; Uthicke, S; Beltran, V H; Mueller, J F; Negri, A P

    2015-09-01

    Most reef building corals rely on symbiotic microalgae (genus Symbiodinium) to supply a substantial proportion of their energy requirements. Functional diversity of different Symbiodinium genotypes, endorsing the host with physiological advantages, has been widely reported. Yet, the influence of genotypic specificity on the symbiont's susceptibility to contaminants or cumulative stressors is unknown. Cultured Symbiodinium of presumed thermal-tolerant clade D tested especially vulnerable to the widespread herbicide diuron, suggesting important free-living populations may be at risk in areas subjected to terrestrial runoff. Co-exposure experiments where cultured Symbiodinium were exposed to diuron over a thermal stress gradient demonstrated how fast-growing clade C1 better maintained photosynthetic capability than clade D. The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action, considering combined thermal stress and herbicide contamination, revealed response additivity for inhibition of photosynthetic yield in both tested cultures, emphasizing the need to account for cumulative stressor impacts in ecological risk assessment and resource management. PMID:25989453

  11. Phytotoxicity of chiral herbicide bromacil: Enantioselectivity of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Jia; Li, Meichao; Wen, Yuezhong

    2016-04-01

    With the wide application of chiral herbicides and the frequent detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides, it is of great importance to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis in an enantiomeric level. In the present study, the enantioselective phytotoxicity of bromacil (BRO), typical photosynthesis inhibition herbicide, on Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. The results showed that S-BRO exhibited a greater inhibition of electron transmission in photosystem I (PSI) of A. thaliana than R-BRO by inhibiting the transcription of fnr 1. S-BRO also changed the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Y (II), Y (NO), and Y (NPQ) to a greater extent than R-Bro. Transcription of genes psbO2, Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 was down-regulated in an enantioselective rhythm and S-BRO caused more serious influence, indicating that S-BRO did worse damage to the photosystem II (PSII) of A. thaliana than R-BRO. This study suggested that S-BRO disturbed the photosynthesis of plants to a larger extent than R-BRO and provided a new sight to evaluate the phytotoxicity of chiral herbicides. PMID:26802342

  12. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  13. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F.; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  14. Are Nutrient Stresses Associated with Enantioselectivity of the Chiral Herbicide Imazethapyr in Arabidopsis thaliana?

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Chen, Hui; Zou, Yuqin; Qiu, Jiguo; Wen, Yuezhong; Xu, Dongmei

    2015-12-01

    Plant growth can be inhibited by herbicides and is strongly limited by the availability of nutrients, which can influence human health through the food chain. Until now, however, cross talk between the enantioselectivity of herbicides and nutrient stresses has been poorly understood. We analyzed trace element and macroelement contents in shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana treated by the chiral herbicide imazethapyr (IM) and observed that multiple-nutrient stress (trace elements Mn, Cu, and Fe and macroelements P, K, Ca, and Mg) was enantioselective. The (R)-IM treatments resulted in Mn 23.37%, Cu 63.53%, P 30.61%, K 63.70%, Ca 34.32%, and Mg 36.14% decreases compared with the control. Interestingly, it was also found that herbicidally active (R)-IM induced notable aggregation of nutrient elements in leaves and roots compared with the control and (S)-IM. Through gene expression analyses, it was found that herbicidally active (R)-IM induced the up- or down-regulation of genes involved in the transport of nutrient elements. We propose that (R)-IM affected the uptake and translocation of nutrient elements in A. thaliana, which destroyed the balance of nutrient elements in the plant. This finding reminds us to reconsider the effect of nutrient stresses in risk assessment of herbicides. PMID:26566036

  15. Perspectives on transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in the United States almost 20 years after introduction.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2015-05-01

    Herbicide-resistant crops have had a profound impact on weed management. Most of the impact has been by glyphosate-resistant maize, cotton, soybean and canola. Significant economic savings, yield increases and more efficacious and simplified weed management have resulted in widespread adoption of the technology. Initially, glyphosate-resistant crops enabled significantly reduced tillage and reduced the environmental impact of weed management. Continuous use of glyphosate with glyphosate-resistant crops over broad areas facilitated the evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds, which have resulted in increases in the use of tillage and other herbicides with glyphosate, reducing some of the initial environmental benefits of glyphosate-resistant crops. Transgenic crops with resistance to auxinic herbicides, as well as to herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, stacked with glyphosate and/or glufosinate resistance, will become available in the next few years. These technologies will provide additional weed management options for farmers, but will not have all of the positive effects (reduced cost, simplified weed management, lowered environmental impact and reduced tillage) that glyphosate-resistant crops had initially. In the more distant future, other herbicide-resistant crops (including non-transgenic ones), herbicides with new modes of action and technologies that are currently in their infancy (e.g. bioherbicides, sprayable herbicidal RNAi and/or robotic weeding) may affect the role of transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in weed management. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:25052888

  16. Herbicides in streams. Midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, Donald A.; Thurman, E. Michael; Kolpin, Dana W.

    1991-01-01

    Results from a 2-year study of 149 streams geographically distributed across the corn-producing region of 10 midwestern States show that detectable concentrations of herbicides persist year round in most streams. Some herbicides exceeded proposed maximum contaminant levels for drinking water for periods of several weeks to several months following application. Atrazine was the most frequently detected and most persistent herbicide measured, followed by desethylatrazine and metolachlor. The seasonal distribution of atrazine indicates that aquifers contributing base flow to many of the streams are contaminated with herbicides.

  17. Ethylmethanesulfonate saturation mutagenesis in Arabidopsis to determine frequency of herbicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Jander, Georg; Baerson, Scott R; Hudak, Jebecka A; Gonzalez, Kathleen A; Gruys, Kenneth J; Last, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    Plant resistance to glyphosate has been reported far less frequently than resistance to sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides. However, these studies tend to be anecdotal, without side by side comparisons for a single species or natural isolate. In this study, we tested the frequencies of resistance of three herbicides in a controlled ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) saturation mutagenesis experiment, allowing a direct comparison of the frequencies at which resistant mutant plants arise. The 100% growth inhibition dose rates of glyphosate, chlorsulfuron (a sulfonylurea herbicide), and imazethapyr (an imidazolinone herbicide) were determined for Arabidopsis. Populations of EMS-mutagenized M(2) seedlings were sprayed with twice the 100% growth inhibition dose of glyphosate, chlorsulfuron, or imazethapyr, and herbicide-resistant mutants were identified. Although there were no glyphosate-resistant mutants among M(2) progeny of 125,000 Columbia and 125,000 Landsberg erecta M(1) lines, chlorsulfuron resistance and imazethapyr resistance each appeared at frequencies of 3.2 x 10(-5). Given the observed frequency of herbicide resistance mutations, we calculate that there are at least 700 mutations in each EMS-mutagenized Arabidopsis line and that fewer than 50,000 M(1) lines are needed to have a 95% chance of finding a mutation in any given G:C base pair in the genome. As part of this study, two previously unreported Arabidopsis mutations conferring resistance to imidazolinone herbicides, csr1-5 (Ala-122-Thr) and csr1-6 (Ala-205-Val), were discovered. Neither of these mutations caused enhanced resistance to chlorsulfuron in Arabidopsis. PMID:12529522

  18. Cardiovascular effects of herbicides and formulated adjuvants on isolated rat aorta and heart.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yin-Ching; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Wang, Shun-Cheng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2007-06-01

    Various formulations of agricultural chemicals, including solutions, wettable powders, and emulsifiable concentrates, contain adjuvants of solvents and surfactants in addition to active ingredients. Among these formulations, herbicides are among the most commonly used pesticides globally. Some pesticides have been demonstrated to cause severe circulatory failure in poisoned humans. To clarify the potential risk of herbicides and their adjuvants influence on the cardiovascular system, four technical grade (TG) herbicides and their end products (EP), including paraquat, glyphosate, glufosinate, and atrazine, as well as their formulated adjuvants isopropylamine (IPA), polyoxyethylene alkylether sulfate (AES), ethyl acetate (EA), xylene, petrolium-170 (P-170), and solvesso-100 (S-100), were assessed to determine their effects on isolated rat aorta and heart. The results revealed that the vasorelaxation effects of the herbicide EPs exceeded those of TGs, and atrazine produced more significant vasorelaxation in rat aortas than the other herbicides tested. The formulated adjuvants of IPA did not affect the aorta; however, AES, EA, xylene, P-170 and S-100 caused significant vasorelaxation. Herbicide EPs-induced vasorelaxation was generally endothelium-dependent. Furthermore, the TG and EP of paraquat, and the TG of glufosinate and glyphosate were found to have no effect on the isolated heart. However, the normal twitch tensions of the isolated heart were significantly inhibited by EPs of glyphosate and glufosinate, and by TG and EP of atrazine. Although, the adjuvants of IPA appeared unaffected, however, AES, EA, xylene, P-170 and S-100 caused complete inhibition and contraction on the isolated hearts. These results indicated that the adjuvants of herbicides might enhance hypotension and contributed to cardiovascular disorders during intoxication. PMID:17267167

  19. A comparative study of drug resistance mechanism associated with active site and non-active site mutations: I388N and D425G mutants of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2012-03-01

    A major concern in the development of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-inhibiting (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) herbicides is the emergence of resistance as a result of the selection of distinct mutations within the CT domain. Mutations associated with resistance have been demonstrated to include both active sites and non-active sites, including Ile-1781-Leu, Trp- 2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Gly-2096-Ala (numbered according to the Alopecurus myosuroides plastid ACCase). In the present study, extensive computational simulations, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) calculations, were carried out to compare the molecular mechanisms of active site mutation (I388N) and non-active site mutation (D425G) in Alopecurus myosuroides resistance to some commercial herbicides targeting ACCase, including haloxyfop (HF), diclofop (DF) and fenoxaprop (FR). All of the computational model and energetic results indicated that both I388N and D425G mutations have effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket. The π-π interaction between ligand and Phe377 and Tyr161' residues, which make an important contribution to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation. As a result, the mutant-type ACCase has a lower affinity for the inhibitor than the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural and mechanistic insights obtained from the present study will deepen our understanding of the interactions between ACCase and herbicides, which provides a molecular basis for the future design of a promising inhibitor with low resistance risk. PMID:22242795

  20. Mesotrione: a new selective herbicide for use in maize.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G; Bartlett, D W; Fraser, T E; Hawkes, T R; Holt, D C; Townson, J K; Wichert, R A

    2001-02-01

    Mesotrione is a new herbicide being developed for the selective pre- and post-emergence control of a wide range of broad-leaved and grass weeds in maize (Zea mays). It is a member of the benzoylcyclohexane-1,3-dione family of herbicides, which are chemically derived from a natural phytotoxin obtained from the Californian bottlebrush plant, Callistemon citrinus. The compound acts by competitive inhibition of the enzyme 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), a component of the biochemical pathway that converts tyrosine to plastoquinone and alpha-tocopherol. Mesotrione is an extremely potent inhibitor of HPPD from Arabidopsis thaliana, with a Ki value of c 6-18 pM. It is rapidly taken up by weed species following foliar application, and is distributed within the plants by both acropetal and basipetal movement. Maize is tolerant to mesotrione as a consequence of selective metabolism by the crop plant. Slower uptake of mesotrione, relative to susceptible weed species, may also contribute to its utility as a selective herbicide for use in maize. PMID:11455642

  1. Herbicidal and Cytotoxic Constituents from Aralia armata (Wall.) Seem.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yuan, Yunfei; Zhao, Huanhuan; Wu, Jiao; Zhang, Weiyun; Zhou, Lijuan

    2016-04-01

    Two new triterpenoids, 3β-hydroxyoleana-11,13(18)-diene-28,30-dioic acid (1) and 3-oxooleana-11,13(18)-diene-28,30-dioic acid (2), one novel triterpenoid glycoside, 3β-O-(6'-O-methyl-β-d-glucuronopyranosyl)oleana-11,13(18)-dien-28-oic acid (3) along with six known compounds (4 - 9) were isolated from the stem bark of Aralia armata (Wall.) Seem. Their structures were elucidated through extensive spectroscopic methods. The herbicidal activities of these compounds against Bidens pilosa L., an invasive weed in P. R. China, were evaluated. Compounds 3, 5, and 6 exhibited more significant herbicidal activities on B. pilosa than the positive-control pendimethalin. Their possible use as herbicidal chemicals or model compounds deserved more attention. The effects of compounds 1 - 9 on Spodoptera litura cultured cell line Sl-1 cell proliferation and its morphology were also evaluated. The results indicated that compounds 1 - 5 affected Sl-1 cell proliferation. Compound 3 showed more obvious proliferation inhibition activities on Sl-1 cell than the positive-control rotenone. With regard to the effect on morphology, compound 2 significantly changed Sl-1 cell, resulting in cell blebbing and vacuole forming. Triterpenoids aremedicinally and agriculturally important, and cytotoxicity of the three new compounds 1 - 3 deserved further studies. PMID:26948515

  2. Impact of corn gluten meal as an organic herbicide on squash plant survival and yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic vegetable producers rank weeds as one of their most troublesome, time consuming, and costly production problems. Corn gluten meal (CGM) is an organically approved, non-selective preemergence or preplant-incorporated, herbicide that inhibits root development, decreases shoot length, and reduc...

  3. The impact of altered herbicide residues in transgenic herbicide-resistant crops on standard setting for herbicide residues.

    PubMed

    Kleter, Gijs A; Unsworth, John B; Harris, Caroline A

    2011-10-01

    The global area covered with transgenic (genetically modified) crops has rapidly increased since their introduction in the mid-1990s. Most of these crops have been rendered herbicide resistant, for which it can be envisaged that the modification has an impact on the profile and level of herbicide residues within these crops. In this article, the four main categories of herbicide resistance, including resistance to acetolactate-synthase inhibitors, bromoxynil, glufosinate and glyphosate, are reviewed. The topics considered are the molecular mechanism underlying the herbicide resistance, the nature and levels of the residues formed and their impact on the residue definition and maximum residue limits (MRLs) defined by the Codex Alimentarius Commission and national authorities. No general conclusions can be drawn concerning the nature and level of residues, which has to be done on a case-by-case basis. International residue definitions and MRLs are still lacking for some herbicide-crop combinations, and harmonisation is therefore recommended. PMID:21898904

  4. Control of Butterfly Bush with Postemergence Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) is classified as invasive in several parts of the United States. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of four herbicides and two application methods on postemergence butterfly bush control. The four herbicides included: Roundup (glyphosate)...

  5. Tillage and Herbicide Influence on Pigweed Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton producers have struggled with broadleaf weed control for many years. Historically, postemergence-directed herbicides required a height differential provided using a preemergence or preplant-incorporated herbicide to suppress weed growth during the first few weeks following planting. However,...

  6. Post-emergence herbicides useful in calendula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Easy and effective weed control is required by growers who are considering new industrial crops. Post-emergence herbicides typically are the products of choice by today’s growers. Unfortunately, post-emergence herbicides with proven safety margins are not known for calendula (Calendula officinalis),...

  7. Managing the evolution of herbicide resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds are widespread threats to the sustainability, productivity, and profitability of many cropping systems. Efforts to combat their spread through herbicide rotation schedules have been marginally effective at best. Despite the scope of the problem, we lack sound empirical...

  8. Herbicide residues in grapes and wine.

    PubMed

    Ying, G G; Williams, B

    1999-05-01

    The persistence of several common herbicides from grapes to wine has been studied. Shiraz, Tarrango and Doradillo grapes were separately sprayed with either norflurazon, oxyfluorfen, oxadiazon or trifluralin-persistent herbicides commonly used for weed control in vineyards. The dissipation of the herbicides from the grapes was followed for 28 days following treatment. Results showed that norflurazon was the most persist herbicide although there were detectable residues of all the herbicides on both red and white grapes at the end of the study period. The penetration of herbicides into the flesh of the grapes was found to be significantly greater for white grapes than for red grapes. Small-lot winemaking experiments showed that norflurazon persisted at levels close to the initial concentration through vinification and into the finished wine. The other herbicides degraded, essentially via first-order kinetics, within the period of "first fermentation" and had largely disappeared after 28 days. The use of charcoal together with filter pads, or with diatomaceous earth was shown to be very effective in removing herbicide residues from the wine. A 5% charcoal filter removed more than 96% of the norflurazon persisting in the treated wine. PMID:10227191

  9. Glyphosate: A Once in a Century Herbicide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since its commercial introduction in 1974, glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine) has become the dominant herbicide worldwide. There are several reasons for its success. Glyphosate is a highly effective broad spectrum herbicide, yet it is very toxicologically and environmentally safe. Glyphosate ...

  10. Precision Herbicide Application Technologies To Decrease Herbicide Losses in Furrow Irrigation Outflows in a Northeastern Australian Cropping System.

    PubMed

    Davis, Aaron M; Pradolin, Jordan

    2016-05-25

    This study compared water quality benefits of using precision herbicide application technologies in relation to traditional spraying approaches across several pre- and postemergent herbicides in furrow-irrigated canefarming systems. The use of shielded sprayers (herbicide banding) provided herbicide load reductions extending substantially beyond simple proportionate decreases in amount of active herbicide ingredient applied to paddocks. These reductions were due largely to the extra management control available to irrigating growers in relation to where both herbicides and irrigation water can be applied to paddocks, coupled with knowledge of herbicide toxicological and physicochemical properties. Despite more complex herbicide mixtures being applied in banded practices, banding provided capacity for greatly reduced environmental toxicity in off-paddock losses. Similar toxicological and loss profiles of alternative herbicides relative to recently regulated pre-emergent herbicides highlight the need for a carefully considered approach to integrating alternative herbicides into improved pest management. PMID:26795709

  11. Mitigation of plant penetration into radioactive waste utilizing herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the use of herbicides as an effective method of precluding plant root penetration into buried radioactive wastes. The discussed surface applications are selective herbicides to control broadleaf vegetation in grasses; nonselective herbicides, which control all vegetation; and slow-release forms of these herbicides to prolong effectiveness.

  12. Response of multiple seeded cocklebur and other cocklebur types to herbicide treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hamed K; Johnson, Bobbie J; Pantone, Dan J; Wax, Loyd M; Hine, Ron; Shier, W Thomas

    2005-07-01

    Multiple seeded cocklebur has been found in the last decade in Texas, and described as a biotype of Xanthium strumarium L with up to 25 seeds per bur instead of the usual two. The multiple seeded bur typically produces up to nine seedlings, causing concern that it may be harder to control than normal seeded common cocklebur. The efficacies of a series of fungal and conventional commercial herbicides have been compared in the greenhouse on seedlings of multiple seeded cocklebur from Texas (MSC-TX) and normal common cockleburs from Texas (NCC-TX), Arkansas (NCC-AR), Illinois (NCC-ILL) and two from Mississippi (NCC-MS#1, NCC-MS#2). Three measures of herbicidal activity (reductions in plant height and dry weight, and mortality) were used. The fungal herbicide Alternaria helianthi (Hansf) Tubaki & Nishihara at 1 x 10(5) conidia ml(-1) + 2 g liter(-1) Silwet L-77 with an 8-h dew period was an effective herbicide with all biotypes, as were the commercial chemical herbicides chlorimuron (14.8 g ha(-1)), imazaquin (29.6 g ha(-1)), sodium hydrogen methylarsonate (MSMA; 279.1 g ha(-1)) and imazethapyr (39.5 g ha(-1)). The membrane-disrupting organic arsenical MSMA was effective with all biotypes, whereas commercial chemical herbicides which act by inhibiting branched-chain amino acid synthesis (chlorimuron, imazaquin and imazethapyr) were less effective against normal seeded common cocklebur biotypes with short stature. These studies showed that multiple seeded cocklebur was at least as susceptible to the biological agent A helianthi and to the conventional commercial herbicides studied as were normal seeded cockleburs, suggesting that existing methods should be adequate to control this novel biotype. PMID:15712354

  13. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  14. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  15. Production of herbicide-resistant medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza transformed with the bar gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yang, Shi Xin; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Dong Qing; Zhang, Yong; Deng, Ke Jun; Zheng, Xue Lian

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we successfully performed Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Salvia miltiorrhiza and produced herbicide-resistant transformants. Leaf discs of S. miltiorrhiza were infected with Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105 harboring pCAMBIA 3301. The pCAMBIA 3301 includes an intron-containing gus reporter and a bar selection marker. To increase stable transformation efficiency, a two-step selection was employed which consists of herbicide resistance and gus expression. Here, we put more attention to the screening step of herbicide resistance. The current study provides an efficient screening system for the transformed plant of S. miltiorrhiza harboring bar gene. To determine the most suitable phosphinothricin concentration for plant selection, non-transformed leaf discs were grown on selection media containing six different phosphinothricin concentrations (0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/l). Based on the above results of non-transformed calluses, the sensitivity of phosphinothricin (0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6 mg/l) was tested in the screening of transgenic S. miltiorrhiza. We identified that 0.6 mg/l phosphinothricin should be suitable for selecting putatively transformed callus because non-transformed callus growth was effectively inhibited under this concentrations. When sprayed with Basta, the transgenic S. miltiorrhiza plants were tolerant to the herbicide. Hence, we report successful transformation of the bar gene conferring herbicide resistance to S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26364310

  16. Estimating the combined toxicity of flufenacet and imazaquin to sorghum with pore water herbicide concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donghong; Zhang, Qian; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Dunli; Yu, Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Combined toxicity of herbicides to non-target crops is usually resulted from their successive application. The present study was conducted to assess the combined toxicity of flufenacet (FLU) and imazaquin (IMA) to sorghum with their concentration in soil pore water. The concentrations that inhibited growth by 50% (IC50) of FLU and IMA individually and their combination estimated from the herbicide concentrations in soil pore water notably differed from those based on the amended concentrations, due to the decline in bioavailability resulting from adsorption of the herbicides onto soil. According to the amended concentrations, the combined effect of FLU and IMA in soil on sorghum growth was identified as additive action. Based on the concentration in soil pore water, however, it was determined to be antagonism, which was identical to that observed in a test using culture solution. The results revealed that pore water herbicide concentration might be an effective tool to assess the combined toxicity of herbicides in soil to rotational crops. PMID:26969061

  17. Effects of four rice paddy herbicides on algal cell viability and the relationship with population recovery.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Ishihara, Satoru; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Iwafune, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    Paddy herbicides are a high-risk concern for aquatic plants, including algae, because they easily flow out from paddy fields into rivers, with toxic effects. The effect on algal population dynamics, including population recovery after timed exposure, must be assessed. Therefore, we demonstrated concentration-response relationships of four paddy herbicides for algal growth inhibition and mortality, and the relationship between the effect on algal cell viability and population recovery following exposure. We used SYTOX Green dye assay and flow cytometry to assess cell viability of the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Live cells could be clearly distinguished from dead cells during herbicide exposure. Our results showed that pretilachlor and quinoclamine had both algicidal and algistatic effects, whereas bensulfuron-methyl only had an algistatic effect, and pentoxazone only had an algicidal effect. Then, a population recovery test following a 72-h exposure was conducted. The algal population recovered in all tests, but the periods required for recovery differed among exposure concentrations and herbicides. The periods required for recovery were inconsistent with the dead cell ratio at the beginning of the recovery test; that is, population recovery could not be described only by cell viability. Consequently, the temporal effect of herbicides and subsequent recovery of the algal population could be described not only by the toxicity characteristics but also by toxicokinetics, such as rate of uptake, transport to the target site, and elimination of the substance from algal cells. PMID:21590715

  18. Hybridization using cytoplasmic male sterility, cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance, and herbicide tolerance from nuclear genes

    SciTech Connect

    Beversdorf, W.D.; Erickson, L.R.; Grant, I.

    1987-04-14

    An improved process is described for producing a substantially homogeneous population of plants of a predetermined hybrid variety of crop which is capable of undergoing self-pollination and cross-pollination. The process comprises: growing in a first planting area a substantially random population of cytoplasmic male sterile plants which exhibit cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide which is attributable solely to homozygous dominant nuclear genes and male fertile plants which are homozygous recessive maintainer plants for the cytoplasmic male sterile plants and which lack the cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide attributable solely to the homozygous dominant nuclear genes.

  19. Synthesis and herbicidal activity evaluation of novel α-amino phosphonate derivatives containing a uracil moiety.

    PubMed

    Che, Jian-yi; Xu, Xiao-yun; Tang, Zi-long; Gu, Yu-cheng; Shi, De-qing

    2016-02-15

    A series of novel α-amino phosphonate derivatives containing a uracil moiety 3a-3l were designed and synthesized by a Lewis acid (magnesium perchlorate) catalyzed the Kabachnik-Fields reaction. The bioassays {in vitro, in vivo [Glass House 1 (GH1) and Glass House 2 (GH2)]} showed that most of compounds 3 exhibited excellent and selective herbicidal activities; for example, in GH1 test, compounds 3b, 3d, 3f, 3h and 3j showed excellent and wide spectrum herbicidal activities at the dose of 1000 g/ha, and compounds 3b and 3j exhibited 100% inhibition activities against the four plants in both post- and pre-emergence treatments. Moreover, most of compounds 3 showed higher inhibition against Amaranthus retroflexus and Digitaria sanguinalis than Glyphosate did in pre-emergence treatment. In GH2 test, the four compounds (3b, 3d, 3h and 3j) exhibited 100% inhibition against Solanum nigrum, Amaranthus retroflexus and Ipomoea hederacea in post-emergence treatment and displayed 100% inhibition against Solanum nigrum, Amaranthus retroflexus in pre-emergence treatment at the rate of 250 g/ha, and compound 3b showed the best and broad spectrum herbicidal activities against the six test plants. However, the four compounds displayed weaker herbicidal activities against Lolium perenne and Echinochloa crus-galli than the other four plants at the rate of 250 g/ha in both pre- and post-emergence treatments. So, compounds 3 can be used as a lead compound for further structure optimization for developing potential selective herbicidal agent. Their preliminary structure-activity relationships were also investigated. PMID:26786699

  20. Herbicide safeners: uses, limitations, metabolism, and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Abu-Qare, Aqel W; Duncan, Harry J

    2002-09-01

    Several methods were examined to minimize crops injury caused by herbicides. Thus increase their selectivity. A selective herbicide is one that controls weeds at rates that do not injure the crop. Herbicides are selective in a particular crop within certain limits imposed by the herbicide, the plant, the application rate, the method and time of application, and environment conditions. Herbicide safeners are compounds of diverse chemical families. They are applied with herbicides to protect crops against their injury. Using chemical safeners offer practical, efficient and simple method of improving herbicide selectivity. This method has been applied successfully in cereal crops such as maize, rice and sorghum, against pre-emergence thiocarbamate and chloroacetanilide herbicides. Some reports indicate promising results for the development of safeners for post-emergence herbicides in broadleaved crops. Various hypotheses were proposed explaining mechanisms of action of herbicide safeners: interference with uptake and translocation of the herbicide, alteration in herbicide metabolism, and competition at site of action of the herbicide. Even though progress was made in the development of herbicide safeners and in understanding their mechanisms of action, more research is needed to elucidate clearly how these chemicals act and why their activity is restricted to particular crops and herbicides. PMID:12222792

  1. Combined photobacterium toxicity of herbicide mixtures containing one insecticide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Shen; Song, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Hai-Ling; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zhang, Jing

    2009-04-01

    To test whether the dose-addition (DA) model can predict the combined toxicity of the mixtures of herbicides that coexisted with insecticide(s), we selected five herbicides (simetryn, prometon, bromacil, velpar, and diquat) and one organophosphorus insecticide (dichlorvos) as the test components. The inhibition toxicities of the six pesticides as well as those of their mixtures to Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 were determined by using the microplate toxicity test procedure. The dose-response curves (DRCs) between the observed inhibition toxicities and the doses of the pesticides or the mixtures were modeled by using the nonlinear least square fitting. It was shown that all dose-response relationships were effectively described by the Weibull function. To fully explore the combined toxicities of mixtures including various concentration compositions, we designed three equivalent-effect concentration ratio (EECR) mixtures and six uniform design concentration ratio (UDCR) mixtures. The combined toxicity of a mixture is identified by inspecting whether the DRC predicted by the dose addition (DA) or independent action (IA) locates in the 95% confidence interval of the DRC of the mixture. Furthermore, the possible reason for the three mixtures to depart from the DA action was the very high concentration ratio of diquat in the mixtures. PMID:19215957

  2. Glyphosate surfactant herbicide poisoning and management.

    PubMed

    Mahendrakar, Kranthi; Venkategowda, Pradeep M; Rao, S Manimala; Mutkule, Dnyaneshwar P

    2014-05-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide in agriculture, forestry, industrial weed control and aquatic environments. Glyphosate potential as herbicide was first reported in 1971. It is a non-selective herbicide. It can cause a wide range of clinical manifestations in human beings like skin and throat irritation to hypotension, oliguria and death. We are reporting a case of a 35-year-old male patient who was admitted to our tertiary care hospital following intentional ingestion of around 200 ml of herbicide containing glyphosate. Initially, gastric lavage done and the patient was managed with intubation and mechanical ventilation, noradrenaline and vasopressin infusion, continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration and intravenous (IV) lipid emulsion (20% intralipid 100 ml), patient was successfully treated and discharged home. This case report emphasizes on timely systemic supportive measure as a sole method of treatment since this poison has no known specific antidote and the use of IV lipid emulsion for a successful outcome. PMID:24914265

  3. Mode of Action Studies on a Chiral Diphenyl Ether Peroxidizing Herbicide

    PubMed Central

    Hallahan, Beverly J.; Camilleri, Patrick; Smith, Alison; Bowyer, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The nitrodiphenyl ether herbicide 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitroacetophenone oxime-O-(acetic acid, methyl ester) (DPEI) induced an abnormal accumulation of protoporphyrin IX in darkness in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and spectrofluorimetry. It also inhibited the increase in cell density of the alga in light-grown cultures with an I50 (concentration required to decrease cell density increase to 50% of the noninhibited control value) of 0.16 μm. The relative ability of four peroxidizing diphenyl ether herbicides to cause tetrapyrrole accumulation in C. reinhardtii correlated qualitatively with their ability to inhibit the increase in cell density in light-grown cultures. The purified S(−) enantiomer of the optically active phthalide DPE 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-3-methylphthalide (DPEIII), which has greater herbicidal activity than the R(+) isomer, induces a 4- to 5-fold greater tetrapyrrole accumulation than the R(+) isomer. The I50 for inhibition of increase in cell density in light-grown cultures of C. reinhardtii by the S(−) isomer (0.019 μm) is less than 25% of that for the R(+) isomer. DPEIII inhibits protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase activity in pea (Pisum sativum) etioplast lysates, with the S(−) enantiomer showing considerably greater potency than the R(+) isomer and the racemic mixture showing a potency intermediate between the two. The results indicate that the site at which DPEs inhibit protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase shows chiral discrimination and provide further evidence for the link between inhibition of this enzyme, protoporphyrin IX accumulation, and the phytotoxicity of DPE herbicides. PMID:16653107

  4. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  5. Improving production of malonyl coenzyme A-derived metabolites by abolishing Snf1-dependent regulation of Acc1.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACCase) plays a central role in carbon metabolism and has been the site of action for the development of therapeutics or herbicides, as its product, malonyl-CoA, is a precursor for production of fatty acids and other compounds. Control of Acc1 activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs mainly at two levels, i.e., regulation of transcription and repression by Snf1 protein kinase at the protein level. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for improving the activity of ACCase in S. cerevisiae by abolishing posttranslational regulation of Acc1 via site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that introduction of two site mutations in Acc1, Ser659 and Ser1157, resulted in an enhanced activity of Acc1 and increased total fatty acid content. As Snf1 regulation of Acc1 is particularly active under glucose-limited conditions, we evaluated the effect of the two site mutations in chemostat cultures. Finally, we showed that our modifications of Acc1 could enhance the supply of malonyl-CoA and therefore successfully increase the production of two industrially important products derived from malonyl-CoA, fatty acid ethyl esters and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. IMPORTANCE ACCase is responsible for carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA, which is a crucial step in the control of fatty acid metabolism. ACCase opened the door for pharmaceutical treatments of obesity and diabetes as well as the development of new herbicides. ACCase is also recognized as a promising target for developing cell factories, as its malonyl-CoA product serves as a universal precursor for a variety of high-value compounds in white biotechnology. Yeast ACCase is a good model in understanding the enzyme's catalysis, regulation, and inhibition. The present study describes the importance of protein phosphorylation in regulation of yeast ACCase and identifies potential regulation sites. This study led to the generation of a more efficient ACCase, which

  6. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops. PMID:26296738

  7. Potential organic herbicides for squash production: Pelargonic acid herbicides AXXE® and Scythe®

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide season-long weed control. Although corn gluten meal has shown promise as an early-season pre-emergent organic herbicide in squash production, any uncontrolled weeds can inflict serious yield reducti...

  8. Potential organic herbicides for squash production: Pelargonic acid herbicides AXXE (registered trademark) and Scythe (registered trademark)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide season- long weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of potential organic herbicides on weed control efficacy, crop injury, and y...

  9. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  10. Dominance variation across six herbicides of the Arabidopsis thaliana csr1-1 and csr1-2 resistance alleles.

    PubMed

    Roux, Fabrice; Matéjicek, Annick; Gasquez, Jacques; Reboud, Xavier

    2005-11-01

    Dominance of a resistance trait can be defined as a measure of the relative position of the phenotype of the heterozygote RS compared with the phenotype of the two corresponding homozygotes, SS and RR. This parameter has been shown to have primary importance in the dynamics of pesticide resistance evolution. Literature on insecticide resistance suggests that dominance levels in the presence of insecticide vary greatly from completely recessive to completely dominant. With insecticides, both the chemical applied and the dosages used have been demonstrated to affect the dominance. By contrast, almost all herbicide resistances have been found to be inherited as partially to totally dominant traits. This discrepancy between weeds and insects may partly result from the methodologies applied to measure the dominance, ie a single dose for herbicide versus several doses for insecticide. Using two well-known resistances (csr1-1 and csr1-2) to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Arabidopsis thaliana (L) Heynh (mouse-ear cress), we used several herbicide doses to determine the dominance level to six ALS-inhibiting herbicides. The dominance level in the presence of herbicide varied from completely dominant to completely recessive, depending on the resistance allele and the herbicide tested. The dominance of the csr1-1 and csr1-2 resistance alleles ranged from 0 (completely recessive) to 1.1 (dominant) and from 0 to 0.3 (partially dominant), respectively. The recessivity of some resistance alleles in the presence of herbicide could lead to the development of improved resistance management in order to delay or avoid herbicide resistance evolution, especially in the control of outcrossing weed species. PMID:16007690

  11. Can we predict community-wide effects of herbicides from toxicity tests on macrophyte species?

    PubMed

    Coutris, Claire; Merlina, Georges; Silvestre, Jérôme; Pinelli, Eric; Elger, Arnaud

    2011-01-17

    Macrophyte communities play an essential role in the way freshwater ecosystems function. It is thus of great concern to understand how environmental factors, especially anthropogenic ones, influence their composition and diversity. The aim of this study was to examine whether the effects of a herbicide mixture (50% atrazine, 35% isoproturon, 15% alachlor) on single macrophyte species can be used to predict its impact at a community level. In a first experiment we tested the sensitivity of six species (Azolla filiculoides, Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea canadensis, Lemna minor, Myriophyllum spicatum and Vallisneria spiralis) grown separately and exposed to 0.6-600 μg L(-1) of the herbicide mixture. In a second experiment, conducted in microcosms, we tested the effects of herbicides on macrophyte assemblages composed of the same six species exposed to 0, 6 or 60 μg L(-1) of the herbicide mixture. Species grown separately exhibited growth inhibition at 60 and 600 μg L(-1). At 600 μg L(-1) the sensitivity differed significantly between species. V. spiralis was the most resistant species, C. demersum, M. spicatum and E. canadensis exhibited intermediate sensitivities, and A. filiculoides and L. minor were the most sensitive species. In microcosms, community biomass and Shannon evenness index were reduced after 8 weeks at 60 μg L(-1). Communities also exhibited changes in their composition: the relative and absolute abundance of C. demersum increased at 6 μg L(-1), while the relative abundance of V. spiralis increased at 60 μg L(-1). These results are in agreement with the individual responses of these species to the herbicides. It is therefore concluded that short-term effects of herbicides on simple macrophyte communities can be predicted from the sensitivity of individual species. However, further investigations are required to examine whether longer term effects can be predicted as well, especially in more complex communities. PMID:20926143

  12. Inheritance and molecular characterization of broad range tolerance to herbicides targeting acetohydroxyacid synthase in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Sala, Carlos A; Bulos, Mariano

    2012-02-01

    Ahasl1 is a multilallelic locus where all the induced and natural mutations for herbicide tolerance were described thus far in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). The allele Ahasl1-1 confers moderate tolerance to imidazolinone (IMI), Ahasl1-2, and Ahasl1-3 provides high levels of tolerance solely to sulfonylurea (SU) and IMI, respectively. An Argentinean wild sunflower population showing plants with high level of tolerance to either an IMI and a SU herbicide was discovered and used to develop an inbred line designated RW-B. The objectives of this work were to determine the relative level and pattern of cross-tolerance to different AHAS-inhibiting herbicides, the mode of inheritance, and the molecular basis of herbicide tolerance in this line. Slight or no symptoms observed after application of different herbicides indicated that RW-B possesses a completely new pattern of tolerance to AHAS-inhibiting herbicides in sunflower. Biomass response to increasing doses of metsulfuron or imazapyr demonstrated a higher level of tolerance in RW-B with respect to Ahasl1-1/Ahasl1-1 and Ahasl1-2/Ahasl1-2 lines. On the basis of genetic analyses and cosegregation test, it was concluded that tolerance to imazapyr in the original population is inherited as a single, partially dominant nuclear gene and that this gene is controlling the tolerance to four different AHAS-inhibiting herbicides. Pseudo-allelism test permitted us to conclude that the tolerant allele present in RW-B is an allelic variant of Ahasl1-1 and was designated as Ahasl1-4. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence indicated that the Ahasl1-4 allele sequence of RW-B has a leucine codon (TTG) at position 574 (relative to the Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS sequence), whereas the enzyme from susceptible lines has a tryptophan residue (TGG) at this position. The utilization of this new allele in the framework of weed control and crop rotation is discussed. PMID:21959907

  13. Cross-resistance pattern and alternative herbicides for Cyperus difformis resistant to sulfonylurea herbicides in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kuk, Yong In; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kwon, Oh Do; Lee, Do Jin; Burgos, Nilda R; Jung, Sunyo; Guh, Ja Ock

    2004-01-01

    A Cyperus difformis L accession from Chonnam province, Korea was tested for resistance to the sulfonylurea herbicide, imazosulfuron. The accession was confirmed to be resistant (R) and was cross-resistant to other sulfonylurea herbicides, bensulfuron-methyl, cyclosulfamuron and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, the pyrimidinyl thiobenzoate herbicide, bispyribac-sodium, and the imidazolinone herbicide imazapyr, but not to imazaquin. Multiple resistance was tested using twelve herbicides with target sites other than acetolactate synthase (ALS). The R biotype could be controlled by other herbicides with different modes of action such as butachlor, carfentrazone-ethyl, clomeprop, dithiopyr, esprocarb, mefenacet, oxadiazon, pretilachlor, pyrazolate and thiobencarb, applied to soil at recommended rates. Several sulfonylurea herbicide-based mixtures can control both the R and S biotypes of C difformis, except sulfonylurea plus dimepiperate, molinate or pyriftalid, and pyrazolate plus butachlor. Although mixtures of sulfonylurea herbicides might be more effective, they should be avoided and used only in special cases. In terms of in vitro ALS activity, the R biotype was 1139-, 3583-, 1482-, 416-, 5- and 9-fold more resistant to bensulfuron-methyl, cyclosulfamuron, imazosulfuron, pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, bispyribac-sodium and imazapyr, respectively, than the S biotype. The in vivo ALS activity of the R biotype was also less affected by the sulfonylurea herbicides, imazosulfuron and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, than the S biotype. Results of in vitro and in vivo ALS assays indicated that the resistance mechanism of C difformis to ALS inhibitor herbicides was primarily due to an alteration in the target enzyme, ALS. Greenhouse experiments showed delayed flowering and reduced seed production of the R biotype, which could possibly result in reduced fitness. This unusual observation needs to be confirmed in field situations. PMID:14727745

  14. Concentration of Selected Sulfonylurea, Sulfonamide, and Imidazolinone Herbicides, Other Pesticides, and Nutrients in 71 Streams, 5 Reservoir Outflows, and 25 Wells in the Midwestern United States, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Furlong, Edward T.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Sulfonylurea (SU), sulfonamide (SA), and imidazolinone (IMI) herbicides are recently developed herbicides that function by inhibiting the action of a key plant enzyme, stopping plant growth, and eventually killing the plant. These compounds generally have low mammalian toxicity, but crop and non-crop plants demonstrate a wide range in sensitivity to SUs, SAs, and IMIs, with over a 10,000-fold difference in observed toxicity levels for some compounds. SUs, SAs, and IMIs are applied either pre- or post-emergence to crops commonly at 1/50th or less of the rate of other herbicides. Little is known about their occurrence, fate, or transport in surface water or ground water in the United States. To obtain information on the occurrence of SU, SA, and IMI herbicides in the Midwestern United States, 214 water samples were collected from 76 surface-water and 25 ground-water sites in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 16 SU, SA, and IMI herbicides by using highperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples also were analyzed for 46 pesticides and pesticide degradation products and 13 herbicides and 10 herbicide degradates. At least 1 of the 16 SUs, SAs, or IMIs was detected at or above the method reporting limit of 0.010 microgram per liter (ug/L) in 83 percent of 133 stream samples. Imazethapyr was detected most frequently (69 percent of samples), followed by flumetsulam (65 percent of samples) and nicosulfuron (53 percent of samples). At least one SU, SA, or IMI herbicide was detected at or above the method reporting limit in 6 of 8 reservoir samples and 5 of 25 ground-water samples. SU, SA, and IMI herbicides occurred less frequently and at a fraction (often 1/50th or less) of the concentrations of other herbicides such as atrazine. Acetochlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor were all detected in 95 percent or more of 136 stream samples.

  15. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  16. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  17. Mode of Action Studies on Nitrodiphenyl Ether Herbicides 1

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, John R.; Hallahan, Beverly J.; Camilleri, Patrick; Howard, Joy

    1989-01-01

    The nitrodiphenyl ether herbicide 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitroacetophenone oxime-o-(acetic acid, methyl ester) (DPEI) induces light- and O2-dependent lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll (Chl) bleaching in the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. Under conditions of O2-limitation, these effects are diminished by prometyne and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), both inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport. Mutants in which photosynthetic electron transport is blocked are also resistant to DPEI under conditions of O2-limitation. Light- and O2-dependent lipid peroxidation and Chl bleaching are also induced by 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-3-methoxyphthalide (DPEII), a diphenyl ether whose redox properties preclude reduction by photosystem I. However, these effects of DPEII are also inhibited by DCMU. Under conditions of high aeration, DCMU does not protect Scenedesmus cells from Chl bleaching induced by DPEI, but does protect against paraquat. DPEI, but not paraquat, induces tetrapyrrole formation in treated cells in the dark. This is also observed in a mutant lacking photosystem I but is suppressed under conditions likely to lead to O2 limitation. Our results indicate that, in contrast to paraquat, the role of photosynthetic electron transport in diphenyl ether toxicity in Scenedesmus is not to reduce the herbicide to a radical species which initiates lipid peroxidation. Its role is probably to maintain a sufficiently high O2 concentration, through water-splitting, in the algal suspension. PMID:16666600

  18. Environmental impact of herbicide regimes used with genetically modified herbicide-resistant maize.

    PubMed

    Devos, Yann; Cougnon, Mathias; Vergucht, Sofie; Bulcke, Robert; Haesaert, Geert; Steurbaut, Walter; Reheul, Dirk

    2008-12-01

    With the potential advent of genetically modified herbicide-resistant (GMHR) crops in the European Union, changes in patterns of herbicide use are predicted. Broad-spectrum, non-selective herbicides used with GMHR crops are expected to substitute for a set of currently used herbicides, which might alter the agro-environmental footprint from crop production. To test this hypothesis, the environmental impact of various herbicide regimes currently used with non-GMHR maize in Belgium was calculated and compared with that of possible herbicide regimes applied in GMHR maize. Impacts on human health and the environment were calculated through the pesticide occupational and environmental risk (POCER) indicator. Results showed that the environmental impact of herbicide regimes solely relying on the active ingredients glyphosate (GLY) or glufosinate-ammonium (GLU) is lower than that of herbicide regimes applied in non-GMHR maize. Due to the lower potential of GLY and GLU to contaminate ground water and their lower acute toxicity to aquatic organisms, the POCER exceedence factor values for the environment were reduced approximately by a sixth when GLY or GLU is used alone. However, the environmental impact of novel herbicide regimes tested may be underestimated due to the assumption that active ingredients used with GMHR maize would be used alone. Data retrieved from literature suggest that weed control efficacy is increased and resistance development delayed when GLY or GLU is used together with other herbicides in the GMHR system. Due to the partial instead of complete replacement of currently used herbicide regimes, the beneficial environmental impact of novel herbicide regimes might sometimes be reduced or counterbalanced. Despite the high weed control efficacy provided by the biotechnology-based weed management strategy, neither indirect harmful effects on farmland biodiversity through losses in food resources and shelter, nor shifts in weed communities have been

  19. Cultural control of weeds in herbicide-free annual forages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adoption of zero tillage systems improves soil water conservation, allowing for increased crop intensification and diversification in the semiarid northern Great Plains. Zero tillage systems rely primarily on herbicides for weed management, increasing selection pressure for herbicide resistance...

  20. Effect of cover crop and premergence herbicides on the control of ALS-Resistant Palmer Amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Palmer amaranth is a troublesome species across most of the southeastern United States. Resistance to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicides has made control of Palmer amaranth even more difficult for peanut producers. Field studies were conducted in 2007 and 2008 to determine the impac...

  1. Herbicide-Resistant Crops: Utilities and Limitations for Herbicide-Resistant Weed Management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds. PMID:20586458

  2. Reduced herbicide leaching by in situ adsorption of herbicide-micelle formulations to soils.

    PubMed

    Katz, Haim; Mishael, Yael G

    2014-01-01

    Aiming to reduce herbicide leaching, "in situ" adsorption of herbicide-micelle formulations to soils was explored. Sulfentrazone or metolachlor were solubilized in cationic micelles, and these herbicide-micelle formulations were applied to sandy and alluvial soils. Sulfentrazone adsorption to the soils was negligible; however, its adsorption via its solubilization in micelles and their adsorption to the soil was significant and in good agreement with the Freundlich and Langmuir models. Adsorption of solubilized herbicide to the sandy soil was higher than to the alluvial soil. The low ratio between the surfactant concentration and the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the alluvial soil brought upon micelle decomposition and reduction in herbicide adsorption. Therefore, an optimized ratio between surfactant and soil CEC was chosen to maximize herbicide retention. Even upon adding relatively low loadings of surfactant (0.075-0.3% w/w soil), herbicide leaching through the soils was significantly reduced (2-5-fold) in comparison with the commercial formulations. PMID:24295204

  3. Growth regulation and other secondary effects of herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As all herbicides act on pathways or processes crucial to plants, in an inhibitory or stimulatory way, low doses of any herbicide might be used to beneficially modify plant growth, development, or composition. Glyphosate, the most used herbicide all over the world, is widely applied at low rates to ...

  4. Discovery of new herbicide modes of action with natural phytotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 20 modes of action (MOAs) are utilized by commercial herbicides, and almost 30 years have passed since the last new MOA was introduced. Rapidly increasing evolution of resistance to herbicides with these MOAs has greatly increased the need for herbicides with new MOAs. Combinatorial chemistry ...

  5. Tolerance evaluation of vegetatively established Miscanthus x giganteus to herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of the recent focus on herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide resistant weeds are not new to agriculture; the first herbicide resistant weed was documented in 1957, with the first widespread resistance occurring in common groundsel with atrazine in the early 1970’s. Glyphosate resistant weed...

  6. Strengths and Weaknesses of Two New Potato Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Outlook (dimethenamid-p) and Chateau (flumioxazin) are two new preemergence herbicides labeled for use in potatoes. Both herbicides are restricted to preemergence applications only and improve nightshade control when tank mixed with other potato herbicides. Dimethenamid-p is particularly strong on ...

  7. Alkylating reactivity and herbicidal activity of chloroacetamides.

    PubMed

    Jablonkai, Istvan

    2003-04-01

    The relationship between S- and N-alkylating reactivity and herbicidal activity within a series of chloroacetamides, including several commercial herbicides and newly synthesised analogues was studied. The S-alkylating reactivity of selected chloroacetamides, as well as those of atrazine and chlorfenprop-methyl, was determined by in vitro GSH conjugation at a ratio of GSH to alkylating agent of 25:1. A spectrophotometric reaction using 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine was used to characterise the N-alkylating reactivity of the chemicals. Our results indicate that a reduced level of N-alkylating reactivity correlates with an improved herbicidal efficacy at a practical rate. However, the phytoxicity of the molecules is not simply dependent on chemical reactivities, but strictly related to the molecular structure, indicating that lipophilicity, uptake, mobility and induction of detoxifying enzymes may also be decisive factors in the mode of action. PMID:12701706

  8. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by herbicide inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Takamasa; Tsubata, Yukari; Okimoto, Tamio; Hoshino, Teppei; Hamaguchi, Shun-Ichi; Isobe, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia is caused by aspiration or inhalation of oily substances. Generally, lipoid pneumonia has non-specific clinical and radiological presentations and may be misdiagnosed as bacterial pneumonia. Our patient, a 68-year-old man who had been diagnosed with pneumonia on three previous occasions, was admitted to our hospital with a fourth similar episode. Computed tomography of the chest revealed extensive consolidations with air bronchograms in lung fields on the right side. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) increased ghost-like macrophages that stained positive for lipid. Our patient reported that he had sprayed herbicide in large quantities without wearing a mask. We analysed the BALF and herbicide by gas chromatography and diagnosed exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by inhalation of herbicide. Clinicians should be aware of lipoid pneumonia, which may present as infectious pneumonia. PMID:27516888

  9. Forecasting residual herbicide concentrations in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Gavan; Scanlan, Craig; van Zwieten, Lukas; Rose, Mick; Rose, Terry

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of herbicides remaining in soil at the time of planting can adversely impact agricultural production and lead to off-site impacts in streams and groundwater. Being able to forecast the likelihood of residual concentrations at specific times in the future offers the potential to improve environmental and economic outcomes. Here we develop a solution for the full transient probability density function for herbicide concentrations in soil as a function of rainfall variability. Quasi-analytical solutions that account for rainfall seasonality are also demonstrated. In addition, new rapid and relatively cost-effective bioassays to quantify herbicide concentrations in near real-time, offers opportunities for data assimilation approaches to improve forecast risks.

  10. Comparative effects of herbicides on photosynthesis and growth of tropical estuarine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Marie; Heimann, Kirsten; Negri, Andrew P

    2008-09-01

    Pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorometry is ideally suited to measure the sub-lethal impacts of photosystem II (PSII)-inhibiting herbicides on microalgae, but key relationships between effective quantum yield [Y(II)] and the traditional endpoints growth rate (micro) and biomass increase are unknown. The effects of three PSII-inhibiting herbicides; diuron, hexazinone and atrazine, were examined on two tropical benthic microalgae; Navicula sp. (Heterokontophyta) and Nephroselmis pyriformis (Chlorophyta). The relationships between Y(II), micro and biomass increase were consistent (r2 > or =0.90) and linear (1:1), validating the utility of PAM fluorometry as a rapid and reliable technique to measure sub-lethal toxicity thresholds of PSII-inhibiting herbicides in these microalgae. The order of toxicity (EC50 range) was: diuron (16-33 nM) > hexazinone (25-110 nM) > atrazine (130-620 nm) for both algal species. Growth rate and photosynthesis were affected at diuron concentrations that have been detected in coastal areas of the Great Barrier Reef. PMID:18632118

  11. Cellular membranes, the sites for the antifungal activity of the herbicide sethoxydim.

    PubMed

    Pakdaman, B S; Goltapeh, E Mohammadi; Sepehrifar, R; Pouriesa, M; Fard, M Rahimi; Moradi, F; Modarres, S A M

    2007-08-01

    The fungicidal effect of sethoxydim on the canola (Brassica napus var. Olifera) white stem rot pathogen (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) encouraged us to conduct a series of studies on the mechanism of the antifungal activity of this herbicide commonly applied in Iranian fields under canola cultivation. Present preliminary studies on the changes in the level of Malondialdehyde (MDA) as the main product generated through peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids indicated the disintegration of the fungal bilayer of plasma membrane as the result of the herbicidal treatment. Also, it was demonstrated that the amount of hydrogen peroxide in the treated samples was higher than the control samples with no herbicidal treatment. Therefore, our present results confirm the disintegration of the plasma membrane as one of the mechanism for the antifungal impact of sethoxydim. As with weed plants, the phytotoxic impact of this herbicide has been attributed to the inhibition of the first enzyme in the lipid biosynthesis pathway, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, therefore, it would be very interesting to study on this subject and the relations between the sensitivity of different fungi and their DNA and protein sequences of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:19070118

  12. Effects of exposure duration of herbicides on natural stream periphyton communities and recovery.

    PubMed

    Gustavson, K; Møhlenberg, F; Schlüter, L

    2003-07-01

    To improve risk estimates for herbicides in streams, the sensitivity of natural periphyton communities to four herbicides (metribuzin, hexazinone, isoproturon, and pendimethalin) was examined in experiments including varying exposure duration and a recovery phase. Effect parameters included assimilation of 14C and concentration of diagnostic pigments as proxies for photosynthetic activity and algal group composition, respectively. The results indicated that isoproturon, metribuzin, and hexazinone affected the photosynthetic activity of periphyton at distinctly lower concentrations than the effect concentrations published for standard single-species growth-tests with phytoplankton species. Pendimethalin did not show effects on the photosynthetic activity of periphyton at the concentrations tested. The effect concentration (EC50) of isoproturon and metribuzin decreased by one to two orders of magnitude when the duration of exposure increased from 1 h to 24 h, while hexazinone had a stimulating effect on the photosynthetic activity of periphyton after 1 h exposure and inhibiting effect after 24 h exposure. The photosynthetic activity after exposure to metribuzin for 1, 2, 6, 18, 23, or 48 h recovered almost completely after 48 h in herbicide-free water. However, different periphyton groups responded differently to metribuzin exposure: Chlorophytes were severely affected by exposure and did not recover, whereas diatoms and especially cyanobacteria recovered well. Overall the study showed that the effects of herbicides on periphyton are strongly affected by the duration of exposure, and even short-term exposure may have distinct effects on the periphyton community. PMID:12948172

  13. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of Triketone-Quinoline Hybrids as Novel 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Yan; Cao, Run-Jie; Chen, Tao; Wu, Feng-Xu; Hao, Ge-Fei; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-06-17

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.27, HPPD) is one of the most important targets for herbicide discovery. In the search for new HPPD inhibitors with novel scaffolds, triketone-quinoline hybrids were designed and subsequently optimized on the basis of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed potent inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana HPPD (AtHPPD), and some of them exhibited broad-spectrum and promising herbicidal activity at the rate of 150 g ai/ha by postemergence application. Most promisingly, compound III-l, 3-hydroxy-2-(2-methoxy-7-(methylthio)quinoline-3-carbonyl)cyclohex-2-enone (Ki = 0.009 μM, AtHPPD), had broader spectrum of weed control than mesotrione. Furthermore, compound III-l was much safer to maize at the rate of 150 g ai/ha than mesotrione, demonstrating its great potential as herbicide for weed control in maize fields. Therefore, triketone-quinoline hybrids may serve as new lead structures for novel herbicide discovery. PMID:26006257

  14. Toxicity of synthetic herbicides containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties towards Pseudomonas putida mt-2 and its response at the level of membrane fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Syguda, Anna; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-02-01

    One of the attempts to create more effective herbicidal compounds includes the use of ionic liquids. Herbicidal ionic liquids have more effective biological activity, they are less volatile, more thermally stable, and exhibit superior efficiency in comparison to typically employed herbicides, allowing the reduction of the herbicide dose applied per hectare. However, studies on the environmental toxicity of this group of compounds are very rarely available. Environmental toxicity is an important factor, showing the concentration of compounds that has negative effects on soil bacteria including those responsible for biodegradation processes. Therefore, potential toxicity of four herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs) precursors containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties was tested with the well investigated model organism for toxicity and adaptation, Pseudomonas putida mt-2. Results were compared to those obtained for commercial 2,4-D and MCPA herbicides. Next to growth inhibition, given as EC50, changes in the isomerisation of cis to trans unsaturated fatty acids were applied as proxy for cellular stress adaptation to toxic substances. The results revealed that all investigated precursors of HILs showed lower toxicity compared to commercialized synthetic herbicides 2,4-D and MCPA. The collected data on toxicity of HILs together with their physico-chemical properties might be useful for assessing the potential risk of the environmental pollution as well as guidelines for setting the legislation for their future use. PMID:26347932

  15. Selectable markers: antibiotic and herbicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Julia L; Pastori, Gabriela M; Davey, Michael R; Jones, Huw D

    2005-01-01

    The low efficiencies of most plant transformation methods necessitate the use of selectable marker genes to identify those cells that successfully integrate and express transferred DNA. Genes conferring resistance to various antibiotics or herbicides are commonly used in laboratory transformation research. They encode proteins that detoxify corresponding selection agents and allow the preferential growth of transformed cells. This chapter describes the application of two selection systems on the transformation of wheat. One is based on the nptII gene and corresponding aminoglycoside antibiotics, the other is based on the bar gene and corresponding glufosinate ammonium herbicides. PMID:15310922

  16. Response of pearl millet to HPPD-inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Annual grass control is a limiting factor to production of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum). Previous studies indicate that pearl millet displayed is tolerant to mesotrione applied PRE, but limited tolerance was observed from POST applications of mesotrione. Field and greenhouse studies were conduc...

  17. Realistic environmental mixtures of micropollutants in surface, drinking, and recycled water: herbicides dominate the mixture toxicity toward algae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2014-06-01

    Mixture toxicity studies with herbicides have focused on a few priority components that are most likely to cause environmental impacts, and experimental mixtures were often designed as equipotent mixtures; however, real-world mixtures are made up of chemicals with different modes of toxic action at arbitrary concentration ratios. The toxicological significance of environmentally realistic mixtures has only been scarcely studied. Few studies have simultaneously compared the mixture effect of water samples with designed reference mixtures comprised of the ratios of analytically detected concentrations in toxicity tests. In the present study, the authors address the effect of herbicides and other chemicals on inhibition of photosynthesis and algal growth rate. The authors tested water samples including secondary treated wastewater effluent, recycled water, drinking water, and storm water in the combined algae assay. The detected chemicals were mixed in the concentration ratios detected, and the biological effects of the water samples were compared with the designed mixtures of individual detected chemicals to quantify the fraction of effect caused by unknown chemicals. The results showed that herbicides dominated the algal toxicity in these environmentally realistic mixtures, and the contribution by the non-herbicides was negligible. A 2-stage model, which used concentration addition within the groups of herbicides and non-herbicides followed by the model of independent action to predict the mixture effect of the two groups, could predict the experimental mixture toxicity effectively, but the concentration addition model for herbicides was robust and sufficient for complex mixtures. Therefore, the authors used the bioanalytical equivalency concept to derive effect-based trigger values for algal toxicity for monitoring water quality in recycled and surface water. All water samples tested would be compliant with the proposed trigger values associated with the

  18. A Rapid and Simple Bioassay Method for Herbicide Detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Ng, Alan; King, Russell; Durnford, Dion G.

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, has been used in bioassay detection of a variety of toxic compounds such as pesticides and toxic metals, but mainly using liquid culture systems. In this study, an algal lawn—agar system for semi-quantitative bioassay of herbicidal activities has been developed. Sixteen different herbicides belonging to 11 different categories were applied to paper disks and placed on green alga lawns in Petri dishes. Presence of herbicide activities was indicated by clearing zones around the paper disks on the lawn 2–3 days after application. The different groups of herbicides induced clearing zones of variable size that depended on the amount, mode of action, and chemical properties of the herbicides applied to the paper disks. This simple, paper-disk-algal system may be used to detect the presence of herbicides in water samples and act as a quick and inexpensive semi-quantitative screening for assessing herbicide contamination. PMID:19578512

  19. Response of Soybean to Halosulfuron Herbicide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, halosulfuron injury in soybean through off-target movement of halosulfuron when applied to rice fields has been reported. Sulfonylurea-tolerant (ST) soybean varieties have enhanced tolerance for sulfonylurea herbicides and might provide an option of mitigating injury to soybean from halosu...

  20. PHENOXYALKANOIC ACID HERBICIDES IN MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of leachates from six U.S. municipal landfills revealed the presence of chlorinated 2-phenoxypropionic acid herbicides; however, none of the more widely used acetic acid analogues was present at quantifiable levels. ll of the leachates contained MCPP. ,4-DP and silvex we...

  1. Managing weeds in potato rotations without herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing weeds without herbicides requires an integration of methods and strategies and a change in how weeds are perceived. Weeds should be managed in a holistic, intentional and proactive manner. Successful weed management in organic systems attempts to understand the interactions between the crop...

  2. Mustard meal as an organic herbicide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard meal (MM) is phytotoxic and a potential pre-emergent and preplant-incorporated organic herbicide for controlling germinating and emerging weed seedlings: unfortunately, MM may also adversely impact seedling survival of certain direct-seeded vegetable crops. Field research was conducted in s...

  3. Herbicide options for suppressing bermudagrass in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bermudagrass is a problematic weed in Louisiana sugarcane. The most effective herbicide options are limited to the fallow period prior to planting. Frequently, efforts to eliminate bermudagrass from fields during the fallow season are unsuccessful. This subjects newly planted sugarcane to competitio...

  4. Herbicide drift affects plant and arthropod communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field edges, old fields, and other semi-natural habitats in agricultural landscapes support diverse plant communities that help sustain pollinators, predators, and other beneficial arthropods. These plant and arthropod communities may be at persistent ecotoxicological risk from herbicides applied to...

  5. Kudzu response to foliar applied herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical control is presently the most cost-effective means to control kudzu, however, many of the herbicides labeled for kudzu control have substantial non-target toxicity, poor selectivity, high cost, long soil persistence, high soil mobility and / or high use rates. The present study evaluated ot...

  6. Herbicides as stimulators regulators and ripeners

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of low doses of herbicide as plant growth regulators to increase sugar concentrations (ripen) in sugarcane prior to harvest plays an important role in the profitable and sustainable production of sugarcane in the U.S. as well as in other sugarcane industries around the world. Several studies...

  7. The 1975 Insecticide, Herbicide, Fungicide Quick Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Bill G.; Thomson, W. T.

    This is a quick guide for choosing a chemical to use to control a certain pest on a specific crop. Information in the book was obtained from manufacturers' labels and from the USDA and FDA pesticide summary. The book is divided into four parts: (1) insecticides, (2) herbicides, (3) fungicides, and (4) conversion tables. Each of the first three…

  8. Herbicide dissipation from low density polyethylene mulch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to examine herbicide dissipation when applied to low density polyethylene (LDPE) mulch for dry scenarios vs. washing off with water. In field studies, halosulfuron, paraquat, carfentrazone, glyphosate, and flumioxazin were applied to black 1.25-mil LDPE at...

  9. Ammonium pelargonate as a potential organic herbicide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control is a serious concern for commercial vegetable producers because of the limited number of herbicides available for this group of minor crops and the potential for crop injury. Organic producers of vegetables have an even greater challenge since their weed control tools are limited to cu...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicides comprise over 75% of all the agricultural pesticide use in the United States. This amounts to over 500 million pounds of active ingredients applied each year. The US EPA has the responsibility to register these products and label them for use such that unintended effec...

  11. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  12. Short-term effects of herbicides on primary productivity of periphyton in lotic environments.

    PubMed

    Day, K E

    1993-06-01

    : Freshwater algae are quite sensitive to herbicides that enter running water ecosystems through direct application, aerial drift, and/or watershed run-off. However, due to a lack of suitable methodologies, few studies examine the effects of such contamination on naturally occurring attached algal communities under field conditions (i. e., exposure regimes using pulsed doses or brief episodes of peak concentrations to simulate surface run-off during storm events). This paper describes a method for determining the acute short-term effects of four herbicides (hexazinone, atrazine, tebuthiuron and metolachlor) on the net primary productivity (NPP) of periphytic algae in the field using a portable bankside incubator; NPP was measured by monitoring changes in oxygen production (mg O2 per m(2)) upper surface of rock substrate per h and mg O2 h per mg chlorophyll using the light-dark technique. All herbicides with photosynthetic inhibition as a mode of action significantly reduced NPP. The lowest observed effect concentrations (LOECs) for the herbicides were 43 μg hexazinone l(-1), 109 μg atrazine l(-1) and 137 μg tebuthiuron l(-1). The no observed effect concentrations (NOECs) for these chemicals were <43 μg hexazinone l(-1), 93 μg atrazine l(-1) and 52 μg tebuthiuron l(-1). Metolachlor did not significantly reduce NPP at the concentrations that were tested (range 19.6-274 μg l(-1)). However, community respiration (which included respiration by invertebrates) was significantly reduced at the highest metolachlor concentration (274 μg l(-1)). Community respiration was not significantly affected by any concentration of the other three herbicides used. PMID:24201554

  13. Evaluation of three herbicide resistance genes for use in genetic transformations and for potential crop protection in algae production.

    PubMed

    Brueggeman, Andrew J; Bruggeman, Andrew J; Kuehler, Daniel; Weeks, Donald P

    2014-09-01

    Genes conferring resistance to the herbicides glyphosate, oxyfluorfen and norflurazon were developed and tested for use as dominant selectable markers in genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and as potential tools for the protection of commercial-scale algal production facilities against contamination by organisms sensitive to these broad-spectrum herbicides. A synthetic glyphosate acetyltransferase (GAT) gene, when fitted with a strong Chlamydomonas promoter, conferred a 2.7×-fold increase in tolerance to the EPSPS inhibitor, glyphosate, in transgenic cells compared with progenitor WT cells. A mutant Chlamydomonas protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox, PPO) gene previously shown to produce an enzyme insensitive to PPO-inhibiting herbicides, when genetically engineered, generated transgenic cells able to tolerate up to 136× higher levels of the PPO inhibitor, oxyfluorfen, than nontransformed cells. Genetic modification of the Chlamydomonas phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene-based gene sequences found in various norflurazon-resistant organisms allowed production of transgenic cells tolerant to 40× higher levels of norflurazon than nontransgenic cells. The high efficiency of all three herbicide resistance genes in producing transgenic cells demonstrated their suitability as dominant selectable markers for genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas and, potentially, other eukaryotic algae. However, the requirement for high concentrations of glyphosate and its associated negative effects on cell growth rates preclude its consideration for use in large-scale production facilities. In contrast, only low doses of norflurazon and oxyfluorfen (~1.5 μm and ~0.1 μm, respectively) are required for inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that these two herbicides may prove effective in large-scale algal production facilities in suppressing growth of organisms sensitive to these herbicides. PMID:24796724

  14. Controlled release of water-soluble herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Riggle, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pine kraft lignin was used to control the release of metribuzin (4-amino-6-tert-butyl-3-(methylthio)-as-triazin-5(4H)-one) and alachlor (2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N-methoxy-methyl acetanalide). Soil thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis using /sup 14/C-metribuzin and /sup 14/C-alachlor demonstrated that NB-5203-58 series and PC940 series kraft lignins could retard the mobility of both herbicides after multiple soil TLC plate developments with water. Soil column chromatography analysis demonstrated that PC940C could retard the mobility of both herbicides after soil column water leaching by positioning the herbicides in the top portion of the soil column where the PC940C-herbicide mixture had been applied. There was a concentration effect where, as more PC940C was used, more /sup 14/C-labelled herbicide was retained in the top portion of the soil columns. Soil column chromatography and soil TLC plate analysis demonstrated that /sup 3/H-PC940C was immobile. Finally, PC940C significantly reduced metribuzin related phytotoxicity to field and greenhouse grown soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) which had been treated with PC940C rates of 0.77 and 1.15 L/ha and metribuzin rates of 0.42 and 0.84 kg/ha. The results for /sup 14/C-metribuzin and /sup 14/C-alachlor as well as the reduction in metribuzin related phytotoxicity to soybeans suggests that PC940C can effectively control the release of metribuzin and alachlor.

  15. The herbicide Glyphosate affects nitrification in the Elbe estuary, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Tina; Lassen, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Elbe River is one of the biggest European rivers discharging into the North Sea. It also transports high amounts of nutrients and pollutants like pesticides. Important source regions of both nutrients and pollutants are located within the river catchment, which is dominated by agricultural land-use. From these agricultural soils, pesticides can be carried via the river and estuary into the North Sea. Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) is the most commonly used herbicide worldwide and mainly used to regulate unwanted plant growth and for the expedition of crop ripening. In Germany, ~ 6000 tons of glyphosate are applied yearly in agriculture and private use. Glyphosate is degradable by microorganisms and has a half-life in water of 35 to 60 days. This herbicide specifically inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of essential aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Nitrifying bacteria, which play an important role in the internal nitrogen cycling in the Elbe estuary, also possess this enzyme. The aim of our study was to quantify the concentration of glyphosate in water and sediment samples of the Elbe to get an overview about relevant environmental levels and to assess the impact of glyphosate on inhibition of nitrifying activities. To quantify the effect of glyphosate on nitrification activity, natural samples as well as pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europea (strain Nm50) were incubated with different concentrations of glyphosate over a period of some weeks. The nitrifying activity was determined according to changes of the nitrite and nitrate concentration as well as the cell number. Glyphosate was detectable in water and sediment samples in the Elbe estuary with up to 5 ppb mainly in the Port of Hamburg region. In both incubation experiments an inhibiting effect of glyphosate on nitrification could be shown. The incubated natural water sample was affected by a glyphosate

  16. A Miniature Bioassay for Testing the Acute Phytotoxicity of Photosystem II Herbicides on Seagrass

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Mercurio, Phil; O’Brien, Jake; Ralph, Peter J.; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/Fm’) was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/Fm’ by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes), indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m-2 s-1). High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future. PMID:25674791

  17. Characterization of S-Triazine Herbicide Metabolism by a Nocardioides sp. Isolated from Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Topp, Edward; Mulbry, Walter M.; Zhu, Hong; Nour, Sarah M.; Cuppels, Diane

    2000-01-01

    Atrazine, a herbicide widely used in corn production, is a frequently detected groundwater contaminant. Nine gram-positive bacterial strains able to use this herbicide as a sole source of nitrogen were isolated from four farms in central Canada. The strains were divided into two groups based on repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR genomic fingerprinting with ERIC and BOXA1R primers. Based on 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, both groups were identified as Nocardioides sp. strains. None of the isolates mineralized [ring-U-14C]atrazine. There was no hybridization to genomic DNA from these strains using atzABC cloned from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP or trzA cloned from Rhodococcus corallinus. S-Triazine degradation was studied in detail in Nocardioides sp. strain C190. Oxygen was not required for atrazine degradation by whole cells or cell extracts. Based on high-pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometric analyses of products formed from atrazine in incubations of whole cells with H218O, sequential hydrolytic reactions converted atrazine to hydroxyatrazine and then to the end product N-ethylammelide. Isopropylamine, the putative product of the second hydrolytic reaction, supported growth as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. The triazine hydrolase from strain C190 was isolated and purified and found to have a Km for atrazine of 25 μM and a Vmax of 31 μmol/min/mg of protein. The subunit molecular mass of the protein was 52 kDa. Atrazine hydrolysis was not inhibited by 500 μM EDTA but was inhibited by 100 μM Mg, Cu, Co, or Zn. Whole cells and purified triazine hydrolase converted a range of chlorine or methylthio-substituted herbicides to the corresponding hydroxy derivatives. In summary, an atrazine-metabolizing Nocardioides sp. widely distributed in agricultural soils degrades a range of s-triazine herbicides by means of a novel s-triazine hydrolase. PMID:10919761

  18. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of Als1 and Als2 mutations conferring tolerance to acetolactate synthase herbicides in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Kay L; Strachan, Stephen D; Ferry, Nancy M; Albert, Henrik H; Castle, Linda A; Sebastian, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sulfonylurea (SU) herbicides are effective because they inhibit acetolactate synthase (ALS), a key enzyme in branched-chain amino acid synthesis required for plant growth. A soybean line known as W4-4 was developed through rounds of seed mutagenesis and was demonstrated to have a high degree of ALS-based resistance to both post-emergence and pre-emergence applications of a variety of SU herbicides. This report describes the molecular and phenotypic characterization of the Als1 and Als2 mutations that confer herbicide resistance to SUs and other ALS inhibitors. RESULTS The mutations are shown to occur in two different ALS genes that reside on different chromosomes: Als1 (P178S) on chromosome 4 and Als2 (W560L) on chromosome 6 (P197S and W574L in Arabidopsis thaliana). CONCLUSION Although the Als1 and Als2 genes are unlinked, the combination of these two mutations is synergistic for improved tolerance of soybeans to ALS-inhibiting herbicides. © 2014 DuPont Pioneer. Pest Management Science published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:24425499

  19. Synthesis, Herbicidal Activity, and QSAR of Novel N-Benzothiazolyl- pyrimidine-2,4-diones as Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yang; Wu, Qiongyou; Su, Sun-Wen; Niu, Cong-Wei; Xi, Zhen; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-01-27

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO, E.C. 1.3.3.4) is known as a key action target for several structurally diverse herbicides. As a continuation of our research work on the development of new PPO-inhibiting herbicides, a series of novel 3-(2'-halo-5'-substituted-benzothiazol-1'-yl)-1-methyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diones 9 were designed and synthesized. The bioassay results indicated that a number of the newly synthesized compounds exhibited higher inhibition activity against tobacco PPO (mtPPO) than the controls, saflufenacil and sulfentrazone. Compound 9F-5 was identified as the most potent inhibitor with a Ki value of 0.0072 μM against mtPPO, showing about 4.2-fold and 1.4-fold higher potency than sulfentrazone (Ki = 0.03 μM) and saflufenacil (Ki = 0.01 μM), respectively. An additional green house assay demonstrated that compound 9F-6 (Ki = 0.012 μM) displayed the most promising postemergence herbicidal activity with a broad spectrum even at a concentration as low as 37.5 g of active ingredient (ai)/ha. Maize exhibits relative tolerance against compound 9F-6 at the dosage of 150 g ai/ha, but it is susceptible to saflufenacil even at 75 g ai/ha. Thus, compound 9F-6 exhibits the potential to be a new herbicide for weed control in maize fields. PMID:26728549

  20. Remote sensing study of the influence of herbicides on the spectral reflectance of pea plant leaves (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, D.; Alexieva, V.; Yanev, T.; Ivanov, S.

    Results from a remote sensing study of spectral reflectance of leaves of pea plants Pisum sativum L treated by the herbicides atrazine 2 4-D glyphosate fluridone and chlorsulfuron are reported According to the classification of the Herbicide Action Committee reflecting their mode of action they belong to different groups photosystem II bloker - C1 atrazine synthetic auxins - O 2 4-D inhibition of EPSP synthase - G glyphosate photobleaching - F1 fluridone and inhibition of acetoctate synthase - B chlorsulfuron The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at three low concentrations 1 mu M 0 1 mu M and 0 01 mu M with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice The spectral measurements of the leaf spectral reflectance were carried out in laboratory using a multichannel spectrometer in the visible and near infrared regions of the spectrum 480 div 810 nm Data was registered in 128 channels at a high spectral resolution of 2 6 nm halfwidth and a spatial resolution of 2 mm 2 The reflectance spectra were obtained from the leaf-reflected radiation referenced against a standard white screen To assess the changes arising in the leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action the developed by us approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods was applied The spectral reflectance characteristics SRC were investigated in three spectral intervals 520 div 580 nm region of maximal

  1. Maize, switchgrass, and ponderosa pine biochar added to soil increased herbicide sorption and decreased herbicide efficacy.

    PubMed

    Clay, Sharon A; Krack, Kaitlynn K; Bruggeman, Stephanie A; Papiernik, Sharon; Schumacher, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Biochar, a by-product of pyrolysis made from a wide array of plant biomass when producing biofuels, is a proposed soil amendment to improve soil health. This study measured herbicide sorption and efficacy when soils were treated with low (1% w/w) or high (10% w/w) amounts of biochar manufactured from different feedstocks [maize (Zea mays) stover, switchgrass (Panicum vigatum), and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)], and treated with different post-processing techniques. Twenty-four hour batch equilibration measured sorption of (14)C-labelled atrazine or 2,4-D to two soil types with and without biochar amendments. Herbicide efficacy was measured with and without biochar using speed of seed germination tests of sensitive species. Biochar amended soils sorbed more herbicide than untreated soils, with major differences due to biochar application rate but minor differences due to biochar type or post-process handling technique. Biochar presence increased the speed of seed germination compared with herbicide alone addition. These data indicate that biochar addition to soil can increase herbicide sorption and reduce efficacy. Evaluation for site-specific biochar applications may be warranted to obtain maximal benefits without compromising other agronomic practices. PMID:27153402

  2. Herbicide Metabolites in Surface Water and Groundwater: Introduction and Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several future research topics for herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water are outlined in this chapter. They are herbicide usage, chemical analysis of metabolites, and fate and transport of metabolites in surface and ground water. These three ideas follow the themes in this book, which are the summary of a symposium of the American Chemical Society on herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water. First, geographic information systems allow the spatial distribution of herbicide-use data to be combined with geochemical information on fate and transport of herbicides. Next these two types of information are useful in predicting the kinds of metabolites present and their probable distribution in surface and ground water. Finally, methods development efforts may be focused on these specific target analytes. This chapter discusses these three concepts and provides an introduction to this book on the analysis, chemistry, and fate and transport of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water.

  3. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the results of research in which novel activated carbons have been examined for their efficacy in water treatment and, specifically, for the adsorption of a common herbicide and wood preservative, sodium pentachlorophenolate. To place this work in context, the introduction will discuss first some of the considerations of using activated carbons for water treatment, and then certain aspects of the authors research that has led to this particular topic.

  4. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  5. Phytotoxicity of Delayed Applications of Dinitroaniline Herbicides in Strip-Tillage Peanut Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dinitroaniline herbicides are typically applied preplant incorporated or preemergence (PRE) immediately after seeding peanut. Situations frequently arise where dinitroaniline herbicides are not applied in a timely manner in strip-tillage peanut production. In these cases, dinitroaniline herbicides...

  6. Chromatographic methods for analysis of triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hana Hassan; Elbashir, Abdalla A; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to different detectors, and in combination with different sample extraction methods, are most widely used for analysis of triazine herbicides in different environmental samples. Nowadays, many variations and modifications of extraction and sample preparation methods such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), stir bar sportive extraction (SBSE), headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO), ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME), and others have been introduced and developed to obtain sensitive and accurate methods for the analysis of these hazardous compounds. In this review, several analytical properties such as linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, and accuracy for each developed method are discussed, and excellent results were obtained for the most of developed methods combined with GC and HPLC techniques for the analysis of triazine herbicides. This review gives an overview of recent publications of the application of GC and HPLC for analysis of triazine herbicides residues in various samples. PMID:25849823

  7. Toxicity of herbicides in highway runoff.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinjiang; Fong, Stephanie; Deanovic, Linda; Young, Thomas M

    2005-09-01

    Previous field monitoring at two highway sites found highway-applied herbicides in storm water runoff at maximum concentrations ranging from 10 microg/L for glyphosate and diuron to as high as 200 microg/L for oryzalin. To determine whether these herbicides at these concentrations can cause any toxicity to aquatic organisms, a standard toxicity study was conducted. Storm water was collected along Highway 37, Sonoma County, California, USA, and the herbicides isoxaben, oryzalin, diuron, clopyralid, and glyphosate were spiked into the storm water at the highest concentrations observed during the five previous field-monitoring campaigns. Three different toxicity studies were conducted and the results showed the following: No significant reduction in reproduction or increase in mortality relative to the control for an 8-d Ceriodaphnia (water flea) toxicity test; no significant increase in mortality or decrease in biomass compared to the control during a 7-d Pimephales (fish) toxicity test; and, in a 96-h Selenastrum (algae) toxicity test, both the 10-microg/L diuron treatment and the combined 50-microg/L isoxaben plus 200-microg/L oryzalin treatment produced significant (p < 0.05) reductions in algal growth compared to the controls, although the 30-microg/L clopyralid or 10-microg/L glyphosate treatments did not exhibit any toxic effects. PMID:16193763

  8. Synthesis and biological activity of enantiomeric pairs of phosphosulfonate herbicides.

    PubMed

    Spangler, L A; Mikolajczyk, M; Burdge, E L; Kielbasiński, P; Smith, H C; Lyzwa, P; Fisher, J D; Omelańczuk, J

    1999-01-01

    The phosphosulfonates are a new class of soil-active herbicides which control a variety of annual grass and broadleaf weeds. Chirality at the phosphorus atom afforded the opportunity to explore stereospecific requirements for herbicidal activity. Chiral (hydroxymethyl)phosphinate intermediates were enzymatically resolved (Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase) from the racemic mixtures and then used to prepare two pairs of enantiomeric phosphosulfonates. Biological testing of the enantiomeric phosphosulfonate herbicides demonstrated that, in each case, the herbicidal activity was attributed to the (+) enantiomer and that the (+) enantiomer is more active than the racemate. PMID:10563892

  9. Occurrence of sulfonylurea, sulfonamide, imidazolinone, and other herbicides in rivers, reservoirs and ground water in the Midwestern United States, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Furlong, E.T.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Peter, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfonylurea (SU), sulfonamide (SA), and imidazolinone (IMI) herbicides are relatively new classes of chemical compounds that function by inhibiting the action of a plant enzyme, stopping plant growth, and eventually killing the plant. These compounds generally have low mammalian toxicity, but plants demonstrate a wide range in sensitivity to SUs, SAs, and IMIs with over a 10000-fold difference in observed toxicity levels for some compounds. SUs, SAs, and IMIs are applied either pre- or post-emergence to crops commonly at 1/50th or less of the rate of other herbicides. Little is known about their occurrence, fate, or transport in surface water or ground water in the USA. To obtain information on the occurrence of SU, SA, and IMI herbicides in the Midwestern United States, 212 water samples were collected from 75 surface-water and 25 ground-water sites in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 16 SU, SA and IMI herbicides by USGS Methods Research and Development Program staff using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples were also analyzed for 47 pesticides or pesticide degradation products. At least one of the 16 SUs, SAs or IMIs was detected above the method reporting limit (MRL) of 0.01 ??g/l in 83% of 130 stream samples. Imazethapyr was detected most frequently (71% of samples) followed by flumetsulam (63% of samples) and nicosulfuron (52% of samples). The sum of SU, SA and IMI concentrations exceeded 0.5 ??g/l in less than 10% of stream samples. Acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine and metolachlor were all detected in 90% or more of 129 stream samples. The sum of the concentration of these five herbicides exceeded 50 ??g/l in approximately 10% of stream samples. At least one SU, SA, or IMI herbicide was detected above the MRL in 24% of 25 ground-water samples and 86% of seven reservoir samples. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. Microalgae fiber optic biosensors for herbicide monitoring using sol-gel technology.

    PubMed

    Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Maneiro, Emilia; Pérez-Conde, Concepción; Moreno-Bondi, Maria Cruz; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-08-15

    Three microalgal species (Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (D.c.), Scenedesmus intermedius (S.i.) and Scenedesmus sp. (S.s.)) were encapsulated in silicate sol-gel matrices and the increase in the amount of chlorophyll fluorescence signal was used to quantify simazine. Influence of several parameters on the preparation of the sensing layers has been evaluated: effect of pH on sol-gel gelation time; effect of algae density on sensor response; influence of glycerol (%) on the membrane stability. Long term stability was also tested and the fluorescence signal from biosensors remained stable for at least 3 weeks. D.c. biosensor presented the lowest detection limits for simazine (3.6 microg L(-1)) and the broadest dynamic calibration range (19-860 microg L(-1)) with IC(50) 125+/-14 microg L(-1). Biosensor was validated by HPLC with UV/DAD detection. The biosensor showed response to those herbicides that inhibit the photosynthesis at photosystem II (triazines: simazine, atrazine, propazine, terbuthylazine; urea based herbicides: linuron). However, no significant increases of fluorescence response was obtained for similar concentrations of 2,4-D (hormonal herbicide) or Cu(II). The combined use of two biosensors that use two different genotypes, sensitive and resistant to simazine, jointly allowed improving microalgae biosensor specificity. PMID:19497732

  11. Broad 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor herbicide tolerance in soybean with an optimized enzyme and expression cassette.

    PubMed

    Siehl, Daniel L; Tao, Yumin; Albert, Henrik; Dong, Yuxia; Heckert, Matthew; Madrigal, Alfredo; Lincoln-Cabatu, Brishette; Lu, Jian; Fenwick, Tamara; Bermudez, Ericka; Sandoval, Marian; Horn, Caroline; Green, Jerry M; Hale, Theresa; Pagano, Peggy; Clark, Jenna; Udranszky, Ingrid A; Rizzo, Nancy; Bourett, Timothy; Howard, Richard J; Johnson, David H; Vogt, Mark; Akinsola, Goke; Castle, Linda A

    2014-11-01

    With an optimized expression cassette consisting of the soybean (Glycine max) native promoter modified for enhanced expression driving a chimeric gene coding for the soybean native amino-terminal 86 amino acids fused to an insensitive shuffled variant of maize (Zea mays) 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), we achieved field tolerance in transgenic soybean plants to the HPPD-inhibiting herbicides mesotrione, isoxaflutole, and tembotrione. Directed evolution of maize HPPD was accomplished by progressively incorporating amino acids from naturally occurring diversity and novel substitutions identified by saturation mutagenesis, combined at random through shuffling. Localization of heterologously expressed HPPD mimicked that of the native enzyme, which was shown to be dually targeted to chloroplasts and the cytosol. Analysis of the native soybean HPPD gene revealed two transcription start sites, leading to transcripts encoding two HPPD polypeptides. The N-terminal region of the longer encoded peptide directs proteins to the chloroplast, while the short form remains in the cytosol. In contrast, maize HPPD was found almost exclusively in chloroplasts. Evolved HPPD enzymes showed insensitivity to five inhibitor herbicides. In 2013 field trials, transgenic soybean events made with optimized promoter and HPPD variant expression cassettes were tested with three herbicides and showed tolerance to four times the labeled rates of mesotrione and isoxaflutole and two times the labeled rates of tembotrione. PMID:25192697

  12. Influence of Chloroplast Development on the Activation of the Diphenyl Ether Herbicide Acifluorfen-Methyl

    PubMed Central

    Halling, Blaik P.; Peters, George R.

    1987-01-01

    The activity of acifluorfen-methyl (AFM); methyl 5-(2-chloro-4-[trifluoromethyl] phenoxy)-2-nitrobenzoate in excised cucumber cotyledons (Cucumis sativus L.) was examined. AFM induced membrane disruption, was significantly greater when etiolated cotyledons were illuminated 16 hours at 150 microeinsteins per square meter per second photosynthetically active radiation versus incubation under illumination of 4-fold greater intensity. These results were unexpected since the loss of membrane integrity is initiated by photodynamic reactions. Untreated, etiolated cotyledons were not able to accumulate chlorophyll under the higher light intensity while control and herbicide treated cotyledons greened significantly under the lower intensity illumination suggesting that some process associated with greening stimulated AFM activity. Inhibition of greening by cycloheximide also reduced AFM activity. Intermittent lighting induced greening in AFM treated cotyledons without causing any detectable loss of plasmalemma integrity. Utilization of this system for pretreatment of cotyledons prior to continuous illumination revealed that activity was greater when tissue was greened in the presence of AFM than when herbicide treatments were made after a greening period of the same duration. The results indicate that the pigments in situ in etiolated tissue are sufficient, without greening, to initiate membrane disruption by AFM. However, greening increases the herbicidal efficacy greatly. Furthermore, the stimulation appears to be due to specific interactions between AFM and the developing plastid and is not attributable solely to an increase in endogenous photosensitizers. PMID:16665570

  13. Additive toxicity of herbicide mixtures and comparative sensitivity of tropical benthic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Marie; Heimann, Kirsten; Quayle, Pamela; Negri, Andrew P

    2010-11-01

    Natural waters often contain complex mixtures of unknown contaminants potentially posing a threat to marine communities through chemical interactions. Here, acute effects of the photosystem II-inhibiting herbicides diuron, tebuthiuron, atrazine, simazine, and hexazinone, herbicide breakdown products (desethyl-atrazine (DEA) and 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA)) and binary mixtures, were investigated using three tropical benthic microalgae; Navicula sp. and Cylindrotheca closterium (Ochrophyta) and Nephroselmis pyriformis (Chlorophyta), and one standard test species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Ochrophyta), in a high-throughput Maxi-Imaging-PAM bioassay (Maxi-IPAM). The order of toxicity was; diuron > hexazinone > tebuthiuron > atrazine > simazine > DEA > 3,4-DCA for all species. The tropical green alga N. pyriformis was up to 10-fold more sensitive than the diatoms tested here and reported for coral symbionts, and is recommended as a standard tropical test species for future research. All binary mixtures exhibited additive toxicity, and the use of herbicide equivalents (HEq) is therefore recommended in order to incorporate total-maximum-load measures for environmental regulatory purposes. PMID:20800855

  14. Genetic mapping of non-target site resistance to a sulfonylurea herbicide (Envoke®) in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) is responsible for a rate limiting step in the synthesis of essential branched chain amino acids. Resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides, such as trifloxysulfuron sodium (Envoke®), can be due to mutations in the target gene itself. Alternatively, plants may exhibit herb...

  15. Multiple Mechanisms Increase Levels of Resistance in Rapistrum rugosum to ALS Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Hatami, Zahra M.; Gherekhloo, Javid; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia M.; Osuna, Maria D.; Alcántara, Ricardo; Fernández, Pablo; Sadeghipour, Hamid R.; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Rapistrum rugosum (turnip weed) is a common weed of wheat fields in Iran, which is most often controlled by tribenuron-methyl (TM), a sulfonylurea (SU) belonging to the acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicides group. Several cases of unexplained control failure of R. rugosum by TM have been seen, especially in Golestan province-Iran. Hence, there is lack of research in evaluation of the level of resistance of the R. rugosum populations to TM, using whole plant dose-response and enzyme assays, then investigating some potential resistance mechanisms Results revealed that the resistance factor (RF) for resistant (R) populations was 2.5–6.6 fold higher than susceptible (S) plant. Neither foliar retention, nor 14C-TM absorption and translocation were the mechanisms responsible for resistance in turnip weed. Metabolism of TM was the second resistant mechanism in two populations (Ag-R5 and G-1), in which three metabolites were found. The concentration of TM for 50% inhibition of ALS enzyme activity in vitro showed a high level of resistance to the herbicide (RFs were from 28 to 38) and cross-resistance to sulfonyl-aminocarbonyl-triazolinone (SCT), pyrimidinyl-thiobenzoate (PTB) and triazolopyrimidine (TP), with no cross-resistance to imidazolinone (IMI). Substitution Pro 197 to Ser 197 provided resistance to four of five ALS-inhibiting herbicides including SU, TP, PTB, and SCT with no resistance to IMI. These results documented the first case of R. rugosum resistant population worldwide and demonstrated that both RST and NRST mechanisms are involved to the resistance level to TM. PMID:26941749

  16. Multiple Mechanisms Increase Levels of Resistance in Rapistrum rugosum to ALS Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Hatami, Zahra M; Gherekhloo, Javid; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia M; Osuna, Maria D; Alcántara, Ricardo; Fernández, Pablo; Sadeghipour, Hamid R; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Rapistrum rugosum (turnip weed) is a common weed of wheat fields in Iran, which is most often controlled by tribenuron-methyl (TM), a sulfonylurea (SU) belonging to the acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicides group. Several cases of unexplained control failure of R. rugosum by TM have been seen, especially in Golestan province-Iran. Hence, there is lack of research in evaluation of the level of resistance of the R. rugosum populations to TM, using whole plant dose-response and enzyme assays, then investigating some potential resistance mechanisms Results revealed that the resistance factor (RF) for resistant (R) populations was 2.5-6.6 fold higher than susceptible (S) plant. Neither foliar retention, nor (14)C-TM absorption and translocation were the mechanisms responsible for resistance in turnip weed. Metabolism of TM was the second resistant mechanism in two populations (Ag-R5 and G-1), in which three metabolites were found. The concentration of TM for 50% inhibition of ALS enzyme activity in vitro showed a high level of resistance to the herbicide (RFs were from 28 to 38) and cross-resistance to sulfonyl-aminocarbonyl-triazolinone (SCT), pyrimidinyl-thiobenzoate (PTB) and triazolopyrimidine (TP), with no cross-resistance to imidazolinone (IMI). Substitution Pro 197 to Ser 197 provided resistance to four of five ALS-inhibiting herbicides including SU, TP, PTB, and SCT with no resistance to IMI. These results documented the first case of R. rugosum resistant population worldwide and demonstrated that both RST and NRST mechanisms are involved to the resistance level to TM. PMID:26941749

  17. Development of whole cell biosensors for the detection of herbicides in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The development of novel whole cell biosensors for the on-line detection of herbicides in drinking water is described. Novel whole cell biosensors were developed using redox mediators to monitor the metabolic activity of whole cells. Photosynthetic microorganisms were chosen as the biocatalyst since many of the commercially available herbicides were known to inhibit the photosynthetic electron transport chain (PETC). The biocatalyst selected for the preliminary investigations was the cyanobacterium Synechococcus. To monitor similar PETC activity in the eukaryotic green alga Chlorella the non-ionic quinones were required. The organism Synechococcus and the mediator potassium ferricyanide were the most appropriate mediator/whole cell combination for the continued development of a whole cell biosensor (WCB). Investigations were undertaken to determine the mechanism by which potassium ferricyanide was able to monitor the photosynthetic activity of Synechococcus. Studies revealed that no PETC components were located on the cytoplasmic membrane, all such activity appeared solely on the intracytoplasmic membrane, potassium ferricyanide did not access the PETC directly, but rather interacted with membrane bound NADPH dehydrogenases, located in the CM. Therefore, any agents known to disturb photosynthetic electron transport should be readily detected as a reduction in current. The sensors were capable of detecting herbicides from the nitriles, ureas, anilides and triazine families at concentrations of 1--3 ppM. All herbicides were readily detected at a concentration of 25 ppB with the nitriles (ioxynil and bromoxynil), the anilide (propanil) and the urea (chlortoluron) readily detected at levels as low as 10 ppB. The sensors were also capable of detecting pentachlorophenol at a concentration of 100 ppB. A procedure was developed which enabled the production of a biocatalyst with a shelf-life of 1--2 months.

  18. Isolation and characterization of Bradyrhizobium sp. SR1 degrading two β-triketone herbicides.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, Sana; Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Calvayrac, Christophe; Rocaboy-Faquet, Emilie; Riboul, David; Cooper, Jean-François; Barthelmebs, Lise

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a bacterial strain able to use sulcotrione, a β-triketone herbicide, as sole source of carbon and energy was isolated from soil samples previously treated with this herbicide. Phylogenetic study based on16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the isolate has 100 % of similarity with several Bradyrhizobium and was accordingly designated as Bradyrhizobium sp. SR1. Plasmid profiling revealed the presence of a large plasmid (>50 kb) in SR1 not cured under nonselective conditions. Its transfer to Escherichia coli by electroporation failed to induce β-triketone degrading capacity, suggesting that degrading genes possibly located on this plasmid cannot be expressed in E. coli or that they are not plasmid borne. The evaluation of the SR1 ability to degrade various synthetic (mesotrione and tembotrione) and natural (leptospermone) triketones showed that this strain was also able to degrade mesotrione. Although SR1 was able to entirely dissipate both herbicides, degradation rate of sulcotrione was ten times higher than that of mesotrione, showing a greater affinity of degrading-enzyme system to sulcotrione. Degradation pathway of sulcotrione involved the formation of 2-chloro-4-mesylbenzoic acid (CMBA), previously identified in sulcotrione degradation, and of a new metabolite identified as hydroxy-sulcotrione. Mesotrione degradation pathway leads to the accumulation of 4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoic acid (MNBA) and 2-amino-4 methylsulfonylbenzoic acid (AMBA), two well-known metabolites of this herbicide. Along with the dissipation of β-triketones, one could observe the decrease in 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) inhibition, indicating that toxicity was due to parent molecules, and not to the formed metabolites. This is the first report of the isolation of bacterial strain able to transform two β-triketones. PMID:25903192

  19. Herbicides and herbicide degradation products in upper midwest agricultural streams during august base-flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Lee, K.E.; Porter, S.D.; Terrio, P.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Herbicide concentrations in streams of the U.S. Midwest have been shown to decrease through the growing season due to a variety of chemical and physical factors. The occurrence of herbicide degradation products at the end of the growing season is not well known. This study was conducted to document the occurrence of commonly used herbicides and their degradation products in Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota streams during base-flow conditions in August 1997. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide (94%), was present at relatively low concentrations (median 0.17 μg L−1). Metolachlor was detected in 59% and cyanazine in 37% of the samples. Seven of nine compounds detected in more than 50% of the samples were degradation products. The total concentration of the degradation products (median of 4.4 μg L−1) was significantly greater than the total concentration of parent compounds (median of 0.26 μg L−1). Atrazine compounds were present less frequently and in significantly smaller concentrations in streams draining watersheds with soils developed on less permeable tills than in watersheds with soils developed on more permeable loess. The detection and concentration of triazine compounds was negatively correlated with antecedent rainfall (April–July). In contrast, acetanalide compounds were positively correlated with antecedant rainfall in late spring and early summer that may transport the acetanalide degradates into ground water and subsequently into nearby streams. The distribution of atrazine degradation products suggests regional differences in atrazine degradation processes.

  20. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in ...

  1. Racer as a potential organic herbicide: Application volumes and herbicide rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Racer (40% ammonium pelargonate/ammonium nonanoate) is labeled for non-food use and efforts are currently underway to label it as a bio-herbicide for organically grown food crops. The main component of Racer is ammonium pelargonate which occurs in nature and is primarily formed from biodegradation ...

  2. Herbicide volatilization trumps runoff losses, a multi-year investigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface runoff and volatilization are two processes critical to herbicide off-site transport. To determine the relevance of these off-site transport mechanisms, runoff and turbulent vapor fluxes were simultaneously monitored on the same site for eight years. Site location, herbicide formulations, ...

  3. Confirmation of resistance to herbicides and evaluation of resistance levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As cases of resistance to herbicides escalate worldwide, there is increasing demand from growers to test for weed resistance and how to manage it. Scientists have developed resistance testing protocols for numerous herbicides and weed species. Growers need immediate answers and scientists are faced ...

  4. Are Herbicide Resistant Crops The Answer To Controlling Cascuta?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide tolerant crop technology could provide new management strategies for the control of parasitic plants. Three herbicide-tolerant oilseed rape genotypes were used to examine the response of attached C. campestris to glyphosate, imazamox and glufosinate. C. campestris was allowed to establi...

  5. TOXICITY, BIOCONCENTRATION, AND METABOLISM OF FIVE HERBICIDES IN FRESHWATER FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute and early life-stage toxicities were determined for the herbicides alachlor, bromacil, dinoseb, diuron, and propanil with the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Uptake, bioconcentration potential, and elimination of 14C-labeled herbicides were studied in the same species...

  6. Weed resistance challenges and management under herbicide resistant cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last six decades, herbicides have been the mainstay of weed management in cropping systems around the world, especially in the Western Hemisphere. A direct consequence of intensive use of herbicides is the development of resistance in weed populations. The extreme popularity of transgenic g...

  7. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual Grass Seed Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Auxinic herbicides, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, that act as plant growth regulators are commonly used for broadleaf weed control in cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley), grasslands, and non-croplands. If applied at later growth stages, while cereals are developing reproductive parts, the herbicides can...

  8. ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS BY LC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propachlor, flufen...

  9. Thirteen year summary of field-scale herbicide volatilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Once lost to the atmosphere, herbicide transport can result in unintended re-deposition to inhabited areas, streams, rivers, and lakes. To better understand factors governing herbicide volatilization and to determine its impact relative to other loss pathways, field-scale turbulent volatilization fl...

  10. Herbicide resistant crops: history, development, and current technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in biotechnology have led to development and commercialization of several herbicide-resistant crops (HRCs) in the mid-1990s. HRCs survive herbicide treatment that previously would have killed the crop along with targeted weeds. Both transgenic (created through stable integration of a foreig...

  11. Factors Influencing Observed Tillage Impacts on Herbicide Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widespread use and potential human health effects of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate have generated interest in establishing how no-tillage impacts loading of these herbicides to runoff water in comparison to other tillage practices. In this study, potentially confounding factors such as ...

  12. Herbicide-resistant crop biotechnology: potential and pitfalls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide-resistant crops are an important agricultural biotechnology that can enable farmers to effectively control weeds without harming their crops. Glyphosate-resistant (i.e. Roundup Ready) crops have been the most commercially successful varieties of herbicide-resistant crops and have been plan...

  13. Spatial variation in sorption and dissipation is herbicide-dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eroded landforms, soil properties that influence herbicide fate are highly variable with landscape position. Understanding the variation in herbicide sorption and dissipation is essential to characterize weed control efficacy and availability for off-site transport. We evaluated the sorption and/...

  14. Kudzu Suppression by Herbicides in Two-Year Field trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are currently the principle means of halting the spread of kudzu (Pueraria montana var lobata) and reclaiming kudzu-infested lands. The efficacy of several herbicides on this invasive weed has been well-established, but these chemicals can be prohibitively expensive, come with significan...

  15. Crop competitive ability contributes to herbicide performance in sweet corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop variety effect on herbicide performance is not well characterized, particularly for sweet corn, a crop that varies greatly among hybrids in competitive ability with weeds. Field studies were used to determine the effect of crop competitive ability on season-long herbicide performance in sweet c...

  16. Post-directed application of potential organic herbicides for onions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic onion producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of potential organic herbicides on weed control efficacy, crop injury, and yields. The experime...

  17. Pelargonic acid as a post-directed herbicide for onions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic onion producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of a potential organic herbicide on weed control efficacy, crop injury, and yields. The experim...

  18. Herbicide Leaching Column for a Weed Science Teaching Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an experiment which enables weed science students to observe first-hand the process of herbicide leaching in soils. Features of this technique which demonstrate the movement of herbicide within a column of soil are outlined. Diagrams are provided of the apparatus employed in the exercise. (ML)

  19. Cross and Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance of Palmer amaranth (PA) to ALS inhibitor herbicides was discovered in Georgia in 2000 and resistance to glyphosate was in 2005. A study was conducted to evaluate two different families of ALS herbicides, imazapic (imidazolinone) and diclosulam (sulfonanilides) for absorption and mobility ...

  20. Pelargonic acid as a herbicide in sweet bell peppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonic acid, although not certified as organic, is naturally occurring in many plants, animals, and foods. It is also phytotoxic to plants as a contact herbicide, injuring and killing plants by destroying the cell membrane. Vegetable producers would benefit from additional herbicide options tha...

  1. Rationale for a natural products approach to herbicide discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weeds continue to evolve resistance to all the known modes of herbicidal action, but no herbicide with a new target site has been commercialized in nearly 20 years. The so-called ‘new chemistries’ are simply molecules belonging to new chemical classes that have the same mechanisms of action as olde...

  2. Manuka oil a natural herbicide with preemergence activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural herbicides approved in organic agriculture are primarily non-selective burn-down essential oils applied POST. Multiple applications are often required due to their low efficacy. To address this problem, the in vivo herbicidal activity of manuka oil, the essential oil distilled from Leptosp...

  3. POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE NEW SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first sulfonylurea herbicide, chlorsulfuron was introduced in 1982. embers of this new herbicide class are known for their high toxicity toward plant growth, low application rate, extremely low toxicity to humans and other animals, and phytotoxicity reported due to the inhibi...

  4. Herbicide Incorporation by Irrigation and Tillage Impact on Runoff Loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Runoff from farm fields is a common source of herbicide residues detected in surface waters. Soil incorporation by post-herbicide application irrigation has the potential to reduce runoff risks and improve weed control efficacy. To assess runoff impacts, we conducted rainfall simulations following p...

  5. Groundwater resources impact assessment for triazine herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, E.; Barrett, M.R.; Behl, E.

    1996-10-01

    The Environmental Fate and Ground Water Branch of EPA`s Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) has conducted a Water Resources Impact Assessment of the potential for triazine herbicides to be transported to ground and surface waters (only ground-water is discussed in this paper). The herbicides discussed in this document include atrazine, cyanazine, simazine, and prometon. Part of OPP`s regulatory mission is to prevent contamination of ground and surface water resources resulting from the normal use of registered pesticides. OPP has recently produced several resource documents to support such activities at the federal, state, and local levels (e.g., the Pesticides and Ground-Water Strategy and the Pesticides in Ground Water Database). This Water Resources Impact Assessment will also be useful in assisting state and regional agencies in customizing risk reduction strategies and to implement proposed pollution prevention measures. Major conclusions include: Atrazine is the most frequently detected pesticide in ground water in virtually the entire Midwestern United States, and especially in Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. The Pesticides in Ground Water Database 1992 Report indicates that atrazine has been detected in 32 out of the 40 states that have reported monitoring data, and in 1,512 wells (6%) of the wells sampled. Based on EPA`s National Pesticide Survey (NPS), 4.7% of rural domestic drinking water wells in the U.S. (490,000 wells) are estimated to contain atrazine, mostly at concentrations less than 0.12 {mu}g/L (the MCL for atrazine is 3 {mu}g/L). Triazine herbicides other than atrazine (simazine, cyanazine, and prometon) have had much less impact on ground-water quality than atrazine, primarily because they are less intensively used.

  6. Degradation of the 32 kD herbicide binding protein in far red light. [Spirodella oligorrhiza

    SciTech Connect

    Gaba, V.; Marder, J.B.; Greenberg, B.M.; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M.

    1987-06-01

    White light (400-700 nanometers) supports the activity of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II while far red light (greater than or equal to700 nanometers) supports PSI almost exclusively. In intact fronds of Spirodela oligorrhiza, turnover of the 32 kilodaltons herbicide binding protein is stimulated under both these light conditions, although not in the dark or at wavelengths > 730 nanometers. As is the case in white light, the far red light induced degradation of the protein is inhibited by DCMU. The means by which far red light operates is unclear. Hypotheses considered include: PSI activated proteolysis, PSI-induced formation of semiquinone anions, and PSI-generated free radicals.

  7. Herbicide concentrations in the Mississippi River Basin-the importance of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates.

    PubMed

    Rebich, R A; Coupe, R H; Thurman, E M

    2004-04-01

    The proportion of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates, specifically the ethane sulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OA) acids, averaged 70% of the total herbicide concentration in samples from the Upper Mississippi River. In samples from the Missouri River and the Ohio River, the proportion of chloroacetanilide degradates in the total herbicide concentration was much less, 24% and 41%, respectively. The amount of tile drainage throughout the Mississippi River Basin appeared to be related to the occurrence and distribution of chloroacetanilide degradates in water samples. Pesticide concentrations in streams of the Mississippi River Basin have been well characterized. However, recent research demonstrates that in order to more fully understand the fate and transport of pesticides, the major pesticide degradates need to be included in the analysis. From March 1999 through May 2001, water samples from four major junctures of the Mississippi River Basin were collected and analyzed for a suite of herbicides and their degradate compounds. Each sampling site was selected to represent a major part of the Mississippi River: upper and lower Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio Rivers. Each basin has unique landscape variables, geology, hydrology, precipitation, and land use, which is reflected in the pesticide content at the most downstream sample site near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Atrazine was the most frequently detected herbicide (detected in 97% of the samples), followed by metolachlor (60%), and acetochlor (31%). The most frequently detected degradates were metolachlor ESA (69%), followed by deethylatrazine (62%), metolachlor OA (37%), and alachlor ESA (37%). Metolachlor ESA was detected more frequently than its parent compound (69 vs. 60%), as was alachlor ESA (37 vs. 9%). After an improvement was made in the analytical method, metolachlor ESA was detected in every sample, metolachlor OA in 89% of the samples, alachlor ESA in 84%, acetochlor ESA in 71%, and acetochlor

  8. Herbicide concentrations in the Mississippi River Basin - The importance of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rebich, R.A.; Coupe, R.H.; Thurman, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The proportion of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates, specifically the ethane sulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OA) acids, averaged 70% of the total herbicide concentration in samples from the Upper Mississippi River. In samples from the Missouri River and the Ohio River, the proportion of chloroacetanilide degradates in the total herbicide concentration was much less, 24% and 41%, respectively. The amount of tile drainage throughout the Mississippi River Basin appeared to be related to the occurrence and distribution of chloroacetanilide degradates in water samples. Pesticide concentrations in streams of the Mississippi River Basin have been well characterized. However, recent research demonstrates that in order to more fully understand the fate and transport of pesticides, the major pesticide degradates need to be included in the analysis. From March 1999 through May 2001, water samples from four major junctures of the Mississippi River Basin were collected and analyzed for a suite of herbicides and their degradate compounds. Each sampling site was selected to represent a major part of the Mississippi River: upper and lower Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio Rivers. Each basin has unique landscape variables, geology, hydrology, precipitation, and land use, which is reflected in the pesticide content at the most downstream sample site near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Atrazine was the most frequently detected herbicide (detected in 97% of the samples), followed by metolachlor (60%), and acetochlor (31%). The most frequently detected degradates were metolachlor ESA (69%), followed by deethylatrazine (62%), metolachlor OA (37%), and alachlor ESA (37%). Metolachlor ESA was detected more frequently than its parent compound (69 vs. 60%), as was alachlor ESA (37 vs. 9%). After an improvement was made in the analytical method, metolachlor ESA was detected in every sample, metolachlor OA in 89% of the samples, alachlor ESA in 84%, acetochlor ESA in 71%, and acetochlor

  9. Antifungal and Herbicidal Effects of Fruit Essential Oils of Four Myrtus communis Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kordali, Saban; Usanmaz, Ayse; Cakir, Ahmet; Komaki, Amanmohammad; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils isolated by hydrodistillation from the fruits of four selected Myrtus communis L. genotypes from Turkey was characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. 1,8-Cineole (29.20-31.40%), linalool (15.67-19.13%), α-terpineol (8.40-18.43%), α-pinene (6.04-20.71%), and geranyl acetate (3.98-7.54%) were found to be the major constituents of the fruit essential oils of all M. communis genotypes investigated. The oils were characterized by high amounts of oxygenated monoterpenes, representing 73.02-83.83% of the total oil compositions. The results of the fungal growth inhibition assays showed that the oils inhibited the growth of 19 phytopathogenic fungi. However, their antifungal activity was generally lower than that of the commercial pesticide benomyl. The herbicidal effects of the oils on the seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus L., Chenopodium album L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Lactuca serriola L., and Rumex crispus L. were also determined. The oils completely or partly inhibited the seed germinations and seedling growths of the plants. The findings of the present study suggest that the M. communis essential oils might have potential to be used as natural herbicides as well as fungicides. PMID:26765354

  10. Betaine and Carnitine Derivatives as Herbicidal Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Pernak, Juliusz; Niemczak, Michał; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Fochtman, Przemysław; Marcinkowska, Katarzyna; Praczyk, Tadeusz

    2016-08-16

    This study focused on the synthesis and subsequent characterization of herbicidal ionic liquids based on betaine and carnitine, two derivatives of amino acids, which were used as cations. Four commonly used herbicides (2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP and Dicamba) were used as anions in simple (single anion) and oligomeric (two anions) salts. The obtained salts were subjected to analyzes regarding physicochemical properties (density, viscosity, refractive index, thermal decomposition profiles and solubility) as well as evaluation of their herbicidal activity under greenhouse and field conditions, toxicity towards rats and biodegradability. The obtained results suggest that the synthesized herbicidal ionic liquids displayed low toxicity (classified as category 4 compounds) and showed similar or improved efficacy against weed compared to reference herbicides. The highest increase was observed during field trials for salts containing 2,4-D as the anion, which also exhibited the highest biodegradability (>75 %). PMID:27374836

  11. Comparison between the short-term and the long-term toxicity of six triazine herbicides on photobacteria Q67.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang-Wei; Liu, Shu-Shen; Ge, Hui-Lin; Liu, Yan

    2009-04-01

    The bioluminescence inhibition of six triazine herbicides including desmetryne (DES), simetryn (SIM), velpar (VEL), prometon (PRO), metribuzin (MET), and aminotriazine (AMI) on Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 (Q67) was determined to investigate the effects of exposure duration on the ecotoxicological relevance of triazine herbicides. Based on the short-term microplate toxicity analysis (MTA), a long-term MTA was established to assess the impact of exposure time on the toxicities of the herbicides. The results show that the long-term toxicities of DES and SIM are similar to their short-term toxicities, and the long-term toxicities of VEL, PRO, and MET are higher than their short-term toxicities, while AMI without short-term toxicity has a high long-term toxicity. In addition, a parabolic relationship was found between the pEC(50) (the negative logarithm of the EC(50), log 1/EC(50)) and the logarithm of octanol-water partition coefficient (logK(ow)). To better understand their toxicity process, the time-dependent toxicities of the six herbicides on Q67 were determined over a period of 12 h during which measurements were taken every 30 min to generate an integral effect surface related to both concentration and duration. PMID:19203776

  12. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  13. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  14. Effects of herbicide applications in wheat fields

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Sugandha; Hayat, Shamshul; Alyemeni, Mohammed Nasser; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    The present review encompasses the physiological and yield constraints of herbicide applications with special reference to wheat productivity. Post-independence lagging of Indian agriculture to feed its population led to haphazard use of chemical pesticides and weedicides which deteriorated the productivity pay-off particularly of wheat and rice. Past some decades witnessed the potential use of certain phytohormones in augmenting abiotic stress to get rid of yield gap and productivity constraints. We summed up with reviewing the potential role of these natural regulators in overcoming above mentioned drawbacks to substitute or to integrate these chemicals with the use of plant hormones. PMID:22516826

  15. Fate of Herbicides and Their Degradation Products Entering a Forested Riparian Buffer Following Herbicides Application to an Adjacent Corn Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of two herbicides, atrazine and metolachlor, were followed as they entered and moved through a forested riparian wetland located in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain of Maryland. The herbicides were applied as pre-emergent treatments to a 20-ha corn field directly upgradient of the riparian w...

  16. Research methods in weed science: herbicide absorption and translocation in plants using radioisotopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide absorption and translocation in plants is a key component in the study of herbicide physiology, mode of action, selectivity, resistance mechanisms, and in the registration process. Radioactive herbicides have been in use for over half-a-century in the research and study of herbicide absorp...

  17. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: The Challenge of Herbicides for Aquatic Weeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Dean F.; Martin, Barbara B.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses problems in selecting the correct herbicide for use in controlling aquatic weeds, considering specificity, size of the market, fear of trace contaminants, and herbicide resistance in weeds. Also summarizes some successful herbicides, providing a table listing mode of action of some herbicides used for control of aquatic plants. (JN)

  18. Spatial variation in sorption-desorption of the herbicide saflufenacil in an eroded prairie landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide interactions with soil determine their availability for plant uptake, transport, and degradation. The kinetics and extent of herbicide partitioning and transformation in soil are affected by properties of the herbicide and of the soil. The herbicide saflufenacil was registered in the US in...

  19. Herbicidal effects of harmaline from Peganum harmala on photosynthesis of Chlorella pyrenoidosa: probed by chlorophyll fluorescence and thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Shao, Hua; Pan, Xiangliang; Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Daoyong

    2014-10-01

    The herbicidal effects of harmaline extracted from Peganum harmala seed on cell growth and photosynthesis of green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated using chlorophyll a fluorescence and thermoluminescence techniques. Exposure to harmaline inhibited cell growth, pigments contents and oxygen evolution of C. pyrenoidosa. Oxygen evolution was more sensitive to harmaline toxicity than cell growth or the whole photosystem II (PSII) activity, maybe it was the first target site of harmaline. The JIP-test parameters showed that harmaline inhibited the donor side of PSII. Harmaline decreased photochemical efficiency and electron transport flow of PSII but increased the energy dissipation. The charge recombination was also affected by harmaline. Amplitude of the fast phase decreased and the slow phase increased at the highest level of harmaline. Electron transfer from QA(-) to QB was inhibited and backward electron transport flow from QA(-) to oxygen evolution complex was enhanced at 10 μg mL(-1) harmaline. Exposure to 10 μg mL(-1) harmaline caused appearance of C band in thermoluminescence. Exposure to 5 μg mL(-1) harmaline inhibited the formation of proton gradient. The highest concentration of harmaline treatment inhibited S3QB(-) charge recombination but promoted formation of QA(-)YD(+) charge pairs. P. harmala harmaline may be a promising herbicide because of its inhibition of cell growth, pigments synthesis, oxygen evolution and PSII activities. PMID:25307462

  20. Washoff of Residual Photosystem II Herbicides from Sugar Cane Trash under a Rainfall Simulator.

    PubMed

    Dang, Aaditi; Silburn, Mark; Craig, Ian; Shaw, Melanie; Foley, Jenny

    2016-05-25

    Herbicides are often applied to crop residues, but their fate has not been well studied. We measured herbicide washoff from sugar cane trash during simulated rainfall, at 1, 8, and 40 days after spraying (DAS), to provide insight into herbicide fate and for use in modeling. Herbicides included are commonly used in the sugar industry, either in Australia or in Brazil. Concentrations of all herbicides and applied Br tracer in washoff declined exponentially over time. The rate of washoff during rainfall declined with increasing DAS. Cumulative washoff as a function of rainfall was similar for most herbicides, although the most soluble herbicides did have more rapid washoff. Some but not all herbicides became more resistant to washoff with increasing DAS. Of the total mass washed off, 80% washed off in the first 30 mm (∼40 min) of rainfall for most herbicides. Little herbicide remained on the trash after rainfall, implying nearly complete washoff. PMID:26964670

  1. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs. PMID:26167668

  2. Herbicidal treatments for control of Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M

    1977-01-01

    In order to test herbicides for the destruction of illicit stands of cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.) a series of commercially available herbicides were sprayed on glasshouse-grown plants having 2 to 6 leaves. The following herbicides caused complete kill or severe injury to cannabis plants: (a) herbicides with root and foliage activity--ametryn, atrazine, metribuzin, prometryn, terbutryne, diuron, fluometuron, linuron, methabenzthiazuron, phenobenzuron, ethofumesate, karbutilate, methazole and oxadiazon; and (b) foliar-acting herbicides with brief or no soil persistence--amitrole, bentazon, 2,4-D, diquat + paraquat, glyphosate and phenmedipham. In field experiments herbicides of the latter group, and ioxynil, metribuzin, and a MSMA-cacodylate mixture, caused death or severe damage to young cannabis plants. Glyphosate, ioxynil and bentazon destroyed developed cannabis plants. In glasshouse and field experiments the following herbicides applied to young cannabis plants caused marked deformations of stems, leaves and/or inflorescences: barban, butralin, dalapon, difenzoquat, dinitramine, diphenamid, IPC, napropamide, penoxalin, triffuralin, and U-27267. PMID:585583

  3. Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.; Squillace, P.

    1994-01-01

    Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer and quantification of herbicide bank storage during high streamflow were investigated at a research site on the Cedar River flood plain, 10 km southeast of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. During high streamflow in March 1990, alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background in water from wells as distant as 20, 50, and 10 m from the river's edge, respectively. During high streamflow in May 1990, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background as distant as 20, 50, 10, and 20 m from the river's edge, respectively. Herbicide bank storage took place during high streamflow when hydraulic gradients were from the river to the alluvial aquifer and the laterally infiltrating river water contained herbicide concentrations larger than background concentrations in the aquifer. The herbicide bank storage can be quantified by multiplying herbicide concentration by the "effective area" that a well represented and an assumed porosity of 0.25. During March 1990, herbicide bank storage values were calculated to be 1.7,79, and 4.0 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor, respectively. During May 1990, values were 7.1, 54, 11, and 19 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor, respectively. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  4. Adsorption of sugar beet herbicides to Finnish soils.

    PubMed

    Autio, Sari; Siimes, Katri; Laitinen, Pirkko; Rämö, Sari; Oinonen, Seija; Eronen, Liisa

    2004-04-01

    Three sugar beet herbicides, ethofumesate, phenmedipham and metamitron, are currently used on conventional sugar beet cultivation, while new varieties of herbicide resistant (HR) sugar beet, tolerant of glyphosate or glufosinate-ammonium, are under field testing in Finland. Little knowledge has so far been available on the adsorption of these herbicides to Finnish soils. The adsorption of these five herbicides was studied using the batch equilibrium method in 21 soil samples collected from different depths. Soil properties like organic carbon content, texture, pH and partly the phosphorus and oxide content of the soils were tested against the adsorption coefficients of the herbicides. In general, the herbicides studied could be arranged according to their adsorption coefficients as follows: glyphosate>phenmedipham>ethofumesate approximately glufosinate-ammonium>metamitron, metamitron meaning the highest risk of leaching. None of the measured soil parameters could alone explain the adsorption mechanism of these five herbicides. The results can be used in model assessments of risk for leaching to ground water resulting from weed control of sugar beet in Finland. PMID:14761694

  5. Influence of environmental factors on the germination of Urena lobata L. and its response to herbicides.

    PubMed

    Awan, Tahir Hussain; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh; Sta Cruz, Pompe C

    2014-01-01

    Urena lobata is becoming a noxious and invasive weed in rangelands, pastures, and undisturbed areas in the Philippines. This study determined the effects of seed scarification, light, salt and water stress, amount of rice residue, and seed burial depth on seed germination and emergence of U. lobata; and evaluated the weed's response to post-emergence herbicides. Germination was stimulated by both mechanical and chemical seed scarifications. The combination of the two scarification methods provided maximum (99%) seed germination. Germination was slightly stimulated when seeds were placed in light (65%) compared with when seeds were kept in the dark (46%). Sodium chloride concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 mM and osmotic potential ranging from 0 to -1.6 MPa affected the germination of U. lobata seeds significantly. The osmotic potential required for 50% inhibition of the maximum germination was -0.1 MPa; however, some seeds germinated at -0.8 MPa, but none germinated at -1.6 MPa. Seedling emergence and biomass increased with increase in rice residue amount up to 4 t ha(-1), but declined beyond this amount. Soil surface placement of weed seeds resulted in the highest seedling emergence (84%), which declined with increase in burial depth. The burial depth required for 50% inhibition of maximum emergence was 2 cm; emergence was greatly reduced (93%) at burial depth of 4 cm or more. Weed seedling biomass also decreased with increase in burial depth. Bispyribac-sodium, a commonly used herbicide in rice, sprayed at the 4-leaf stage of the weed, provided 100% control, which did not differ much with 2,4-D (98%), glyphosate (97%), and thiobencarb + 2,4-D (98%). These herbicides reduced shoot and root biomass by 99-100%. PMID:24658143

  6. Triazolopyrimidines as a New Herbicidal Lead for Combating Weed Resistance Associated with Acetohydroxyacid Synthase Mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Chao; Qu, Ren-Yu; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Jing-Fang; Cong-Wei, Niu; Zhen, Xi; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-06-22

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS; also known as acetolactate synthase; EC 2.2.1.6, formerly EC 4.1.3.18) is the first common enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the branched-chain amino acids in plants and a wide range of microorganisms. Weed resistance to AHAS-inhibiting herbicides, increasing at an exponential rate, is becoming a global problem and leading to an urgent demand of developing novel compounds against both resistant and wild AHAS. In the present work, a series of novel 2-aroxyl-1,2,4-triazolopyrimidine derivatives (a total of 55) were designed and synthesized with the aim to discover an antiresistant lead compound. Fortunately, the screening results indicated that many of the newly synthesized compounds showed a better, even excellent, inhibition effect against both the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS and P197L mutants. Among them, compounds 5-3 to 5-17, compounds 5-19 to 5-26, compounds 5-28 to 5-45, and compound 5-48 have the lower values of resistance factor (RF) and display a potential power to overcome resistance associated with the P197L mutation in the enzyme levels. Further greenhouse in vivo assay showed that compounds 5-15 and 5-20 displayed "moderate" to "good" herbicidal activity against both the wild type-and the resistant (P197L mutation) Descurainia sophia, even at a rate as low as 0.9375 (g of ai/ha). The above results indicated that these two compounds could be used as new leads for the future development of antiresistance herbicides. PMID:27265721

  7. Influence of Environmental Factors on the Germination of Urena lobata L. and Its Response to Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Tahir Hussain; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh; Cruz, Pompe C. Sta.

    2014-01-01

    Urena lobata is becoming a noxious and invasive weed in rangelands, pastures, and undisturbed areas in the Philippines. This study determined the effects of seed scarification, light, salt and water stress, amount of rice residue, and seed burial depth on seed germination and emergence of U. lobata; and evaluated the weed's response to post-emergence herbicides. Germination was stimulated by both mechanical and chemical seed scarifications. The combination of the two scarification methods provided maximum (99%) seed germination. Germination was slightly stimulated when seeds were placed in light (65%) compared with when seeds were kept in the dark (46%). Sodium chloride concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 mM and osmotic potential ranging from 0 to −1.6 MPa affected the germination of U. lobata seeds significantly. The osmotic potential required for 50% inhibition of the maximum germination was −0.1 MPa; however, some seeds germinated at −0.8 MPa, but none germinated at −1.6 MPa. Seedling emergence and biomass increased with increase in rice residue amount up to 4 t ha−1, but declined beyond this amount. Soil surface placement of weed seeds resulted in the highest seedling emergence (84%), which declined with increase in burial depth. The burial depth required for 50% inhibition of maximum emergence was 2 cm; emergence was greatly reduced (93%) at burial depth of 4 cm or more. Weed seedling biomass also decreased with increase in burial depth. Bispyribac-sodium, a commonly used herbicide in rice, sprayed at the 4-leaf stage of the weed, provided 100% control, which did not differ much with 2,4-D (98%), glyphosate (97%), and thiobencarb + 2,4-D (98%). These herbicides reduced shoot and root biomass by 99–100%. PMID:24658143

  8. Herbicide contamination and dispersion pattern in lowland springs.

    PubMed

    Laini, Alex; Bartoli, Marco; Lamastra, Lucrezia; Capri, Ettore; Balderacchi, Matteo; Trevisan, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Herbicides reduce the diversity of flora and fauna in freshwater ecosystems and also contaminate groundwater due to leaching. Herbicide contamination can be a serious threat for all groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDE), altering their chemical and biological quality. Successful management to protect GDE is dependent on detailed knowledge of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical features of the surrounding environment. We consider the possible diffuse contamination by herbicides of groundwater and of GDE as lowland springs, semi-artificial ecosystems with elevated biodiversity. The main objectives of the present work were thus: (1) to map herbicide contamination in lowland springs, (2) to evaluate the potential risk for biota and (3) to quantify the extent of the area from which the herbicide use can affect the water quality of lowland springs. In June and August 2009, nearly 23 springs within the Po River Plain (Northern Italy) were sampled and analyzed for five herbicides used to control weeds in maize. Hydrogeological properties, half-lives of the herbicides and their concentrations in both groundwater and springs were used to quantify the area from which the contamination could originate. Such evaluation was performed by means of GIS techniques. Terbuthylazine were the only herbicide found, together with its metabolite desethylterbuthylazine. In 16 out of 84 measurements, their concentrations were above the threshold for drinking water; however, they were always below the ecotoxicological end-points of aquatic flora and fauna. Spatial analyses reveal that the theoretical area from which herbicides can contaminate spring water is within a distance varying between a few and 1800 m. Our findings indicate that conservation plans should focus on the fields adjacent to or surrounding the springs and should address the optimization of irrigation practices, restoration of buffer strips, crop rotation and in general more sustainable agricultural practices in the

  9. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.; Gilbert, C.W.; Guy, R.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa Q/sub B/ protein of chloroplast membranes. 42 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  10. Layered double hydroxides as supports for the slow release of acid herbicides.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Lucelena P; Celis, Rafael; Cornejo, Juan; Valim, João B

    2006-08-01

    A Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was intercalated with the anionic herbicides 2,4-D, MCPA, and picloram by using three different methodologies: (i) direct synthesis (DS), (ii) regeneration (RE), and (iii) ion exchange (IE). The resulting complexes were characterized and assayed by batch release and column leaching tests, aiming at the controlled release of these herbicides. All the tested LDH-herbicide complexes displayed similar slow herbicide release properties in water, although the IE method seemed to result in complexes with a greater fraction of herbicide in a readily available form. Apparently, the LDH-herbicide complexes released most of the active ingredient present in the complexes at the end of the batch release experiment. This was attributed to the replacement of the intercalated herbicide by carbonate and hydroxyl anions from the aqueous solution. Compared to the free herbicides, the application of the three LDH-herbicide complexes (RE) to soil columns resulted in reduction in the maximum herbicide concentration in leachates and led to the retardation of herbicide leaching through the soil. All LDH-herbicide complexes presented an herbicidal efficacy similar to that of the free (technical) herbicides. Our results indicated the potential applicability of LDHs as supports for the preparation of slow release formulations of acid herbicides such as 2,4-D, MCPA, or picloram. PMID:16881703

  11. Herbicide resistance in Aster squamatus conferred by a less sensitive form of acetolactate synthase.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Maria D; Fischer, Albert J; De Prado, Rafael

    2003-11-01

    A biotype of Aster squamatus (Sprengel) Hieronymus with suspected resistance to the ALS-inhibiting herbicide imazapyr was detected in a chicken farm in the province of Seville, Spain, which had been treated once a year with imazapyr for 10 years. Resistance to imazapyr in this biotype was studied using dose-response experiments, absorption and translocation assays, metabolism studies and ALS activity assays. The rate of imazapyr required to inhibit A squamatus growth by 50% (ED50) was 15 times higher for the R (resistant) than for the S (susceptible) biotype. Cross-resistance existed for the ALS-inhibitors imazamox, imazethapyr, amidosulfuron, nicosulfuron, rimsulfuron, triasulfuron and tribenuron, but not for bensulfuron. Control of A squamatus using alternative herbicides was poor with clopyralid, intermediate with quinclorac, amitrole and MCPA, and excellent with 2,4-D, glufosinate and glyphosate. Absorption of [14C]imazapyr increased over time for both the R and S biotypes, and translocation from the treated leaf to shoots and roots was similar in both biotypes, with most of the radioactivity remaining in the treated leaf. No metabolites of imazapyr were detected in either biotype. Sensitivity of the ALS enzyme (target site) to imazapyr was lower for the R biotype (I50(R) = 4.28 x I50(S)). The mechanism of imazapyr resistance in this R biotype appears to be an altered ALS conferring decreased sensitivity to imazapyr at the whole-plant level. PMID:14620047

  12. Effects of a diphenyl-ether herbicide, oxyfluorfen, on human BFU-E/CFU-E development and haemoglobin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rio, B; Parent-Massin, D; Lautraite, S; Hoellinger, H

    1997-02-01

    The diphenyl-ether herbicides exert their phytotoxic activity by preventing chlorophyll formation in plants as a result of inhibition of protoporphyrinogen oxidase. This enzyme is the last step of the common pathway for chlorophyll and haem biosynthesis. The aim of this work is to determine whether herbicide inhibitors of plant protoporphyrinogen oxidase could act on the human protoporphyrinogen oxidase involved in haemoglobin synthesis and cause heamatologic diseases. Human erythroblastic progenitors (BFU-E/CFU-E: Burst Forming Unit-Erythroid and Colony Forming Unit-Erythroid) were exposed to oxyfluorfen, a diphenyl-ether herbicide in the presence of erythropoietin, and the haematoxicity evaluated in vitro by scoring the development of BFU-E/CFU-E colonies after 7 and 14 days of culture. The toxic effect on differentiation has been evaluated using four criteria: morphology, total protein, total porphyrin, and haemoglobin content. The study of BFU-E/CFU-E proliferation and differentiation showed a cytotoxic effect of oxyfluorfen only at very high concentrations. In contrast, haemoglobin synthesis can be inhibited by concentration of oxyfluorfen (10(-4) M) that have no adverse effect on cellular proliferation. PMID:9051416

  13. Detection of bromacil herbicide in ponderosa pine

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Spall, W.D.; LaCombe, D.M.

    1981-08-01

    Bromacil is a substituted uracil herbicide, 5-bromo-3-sec-butyl-6-methyluracil. Because it is readily absorbed through the root system of plants, bromacil usually is applied to the soil as an aqueous solution or suspension during or just before periods of active plnt growth. Until recently, bromacil was used as part of a vegetation control program along roadways at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The prescribed method of application was to spray a four-foot wide strip of bromacil solution along the edges of roadways with a spray-bar. During the late spring and early summer of 1978, bromacil was determined to be the proximate cause of damage to numerous trees at substantial distances away from roadways at Los Alamos. This paper describes the investigation that was undertaken to determine the cause of the tree mortality.

  14. [Microbial degradation of glyphosate herbicides (review)].

    PubMed

    Sviridov, A V; Shushkova, T V; Ermakova, I T; Ivanova, E V; Epiktetov, D O; Leont'evskii, A A

    2015-01-01

    This review analyzes the issues associated with biodegradation of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), one of the most widespread herbicides. Glyphosate can accumulate in natural environments and can be toxic not only for plants but also for animals and bacteria. Microbial transformation and mineralization ofglyphosate, as the only means of its rapid degradation, are discussed in detail. The different pathways of glyphosate catabolism employed by the known destructing bacteria representing different taxonomic groups are described. The potential existence of alternative glyphosate degradation pathways, apart from those mediated by C-P lyase and glyphosate oxidoreductase, is considered. Since the problem of purifying glyphosate-contaminated soils and water bodies is a topical issue, the possibilities of applying glyphosate-degrading bacteria for their bioremediation are discussed. PMID:26027353

  15. Response of avian communities to herbicide-induced vegetation changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Meslow, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between avian communities and herbicide modification of vegetation were analyzed on early-growth clear-cuts in western Oregon that had received phenoxy herbicide treatment 1 or 4 years previously. For both 1 and 4 years post-spray, vegetation development was greater in the third height interval (> 3.0 m) on untreated sites. All measures of vegetative diversity on untreated sites exceeded those on treated sites. Overall density and diversity of birds were similar between treated and untreated sites. Several bird species altered their foraging behavior on treated sites, i.e., birds using deciduous trees increased use of shrubs on treated sites. The primary effect of herbicide application was a reduction in the complexity of vegetation, a condition due primarity to the removal of deciduous trees. Small patches of deciduous trees scattered in clear-cuts treated with phenoxy herbicides can maintain an avian community similar to that on untreated sites.

  16. SWEET CORN CULTIVAR INFLUENCES BIOLOGICALLY EFFECTIVE HERBICIDE DOSE [ABSTRACT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Competitive crop cultivars are considered a component of integrated weed management systems; however specific knowledge of interactions among crop cultivars and other management tactics, such as biologically effective herbicide dose, is limited. Observed variation in crop tolerance and weed supp...

  17. Investigation of Anaerobic Herbicide Degradation in Agricultural Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic microbial pesticide degradation has received little attention, particularly in agricultural soils that receive routine inputs of halogenated herbicides. Seasonal rainfall in many regions can produce zones of periodic anaerobiosis in soil. Redox gradients within soil aggregates can also for...

  18. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor. PMID:12491727

  19. Sorption and leaching potential of acidic herbicides in Brazilian soils.

    PubMed

    Spadotto, Claudio A; Hornsby, Arthur G; Gomes, Marco A F

    2005-01-01

    Leaching of acidic herbicides (2,4-D, flumetsulam, and sulfentrazone) in soils was estimated by comparing the original and modified AF (Attenuation Factor) models for multi-layered soils (AFi). The original AFi model was modified to include the concept of pH-dependence for Kd (sorption coefficient) based on pesticide dissociation and changes in the accessibility of soil organic functional groups able to interact with the pesticide. The original and modified models, considering soil and herbicide properties, were applied to assess the leaching potential of selected herbicides in three Brazilian soils. The pH-dependent Kd values estimated for all three herbicides were observed to be always higher than pH-independent Kd values calculated using average Koc data, and therefore the original AFi model overestimated the overall leaching potential for the soils studied. PMID:15656159

  20. Impacts of forest herbicides on wildlife: Toxicity and habitat alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Meslow, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper begins with a review of both laboratory and field studies on tbe possible direct toxic effects of herbicides on terrestrial vertebrates, primarily birds and mammals. Alteration of the palatability of forage and changes in reproductive success are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the use of herbicides in forestry; studies dealing with agricultural systems are referenced where appropriate. The indirect effects of herbicides on wildlife-habitat are then conceptualized and quantified using data from a 3-year study on effects of phenoxy and glyphosate herbicides on bird and small mammal communities in western Oregon. Data on density and habitat use are presented and compared with data available from other geographic regions.

  1. Oxidative damage mediated by herbicides on yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Daniela; Possenti, Silvia; Laschi, Marcella; Geminiani, Michela; Lusini, Paola; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2008-05-28

    Agricultural herbicides are among the most commonly used pesticides worldwide, posing serious concerns for both humans, exposed to these chemicals through many routes, and the environment. To clarify the effects of three herbicides as commercial formulations (namely, Pointer, Silglif, and Proper Energy), parameters related to oxidative issues were investigated on an autochthonous wine yeast strain. It was demonstrated that herbicides were able to affect the enzymatic activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase, as well as to induce carbonylation and thiol oxidation as post-translational modifications of proteins. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an optimal model system to study responses to xenobiotics and oxidative stress. Thus, the results obtained could further the understanding of mechanisms underlying the toxicity of herbicides. PMID:18442254

  2. Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) Control with Preemergence and Postemergence Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted during 2005 and 2006 at Stoneville, MS to determine control of ragweed parthenium with several preemergence (PRE) and postemergence (POST) herbicides registered for use in corn, cotton, peanut, rice, and soybean. Norflurazon, pendimethalin, clomazone, ...

  3. Allergic contact dermatitis due to a herbicide (barban).

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, D J; Lane, P R

    1985-01-01

    Canadian farmers are using increasing amounts of herbicides. Often they do not use adequate skin protection. Two cases of severe allergic contact dermatitis due to the herbicide barban are described. Patch testing with various substances, including barban, confirmed the diagnosis. Sensitization studies in guinea pigs and in one of the authors showed that barban is a potent sensitizer. It is recommended that if skin contact with barban occurs the skin be washed immediately with soap and water. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3971254

  4. Synthesis and herbicidal activities of benzothiazole N,O-acetals.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiqin; Zhou, Fengxing; Wei, Shaopeng

    2015-10-01

    A new series of N,O-acetals were prepared via a simple one-pot reaction by the condensation of 2-amino-methybenzothiazole with aldehydes and alcohols. The title compounds were obtained in moderate to good yields in the presence of acid catalyst. Bioassay results indicated that some synthesized compounds had good herbicidal activity against both dicotyledon and monocotyledon weeds. This investigation provided a new type of herbicidal lead compounds, as well as its facile preparation method. PMID:26318996

  5. Protoporphyrin IX Content Correlates with Activity of Photobleaching Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Becerril, Jose M.; Duke, Stephen O.

    1989-01-01

    Several laboratories have demonstrated recently that photobleaching herbicides such as acifluorfen and oxadiazon cause accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), a photodynamic pigment capable of herbicidal activity. We investigated, in acifluorfen-treated tissues, the in vivo stability of PPIX, the kinetics of accumulation, and the correlation between concentration of PPIX and herbicidal damage. During a 20 hour dark period, PPIX levels rose from barely detectable concentrations to 1 to 2 nanomoles per 50 cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cotyledon discs treated with 10 micromolar acifluorfen. When placed in 500 micromoles per square meter per second PAR, PPIX levels decayed logarithmically, with an initial half-life of about 2.5 hours. PPIX levels at each time after exposure to light correlated positively with the cellular damage that occurred during the following 1 hour in both green and yellow (tentoxin-treated) cucumber cotyledon tissues. PPIX levels in discs incubated for 20 hours in darkness correlated positively with the acifluorfen concentration in which they were incubated. In cucumber, the level of herbicidal damage caused by several p-nitrodiphenyl other herbicides, a p-chlorodiphenylether herbicide, and oxadiazon correlated positively with the amount of PPIX induced to accumulate by each of the herbicide treatments. Similar results were obtained with acifluorfen-treated pigweed and velvetleaf primary leaf tissues. In cucumber, PPIX levels increased within 15 and 30 minutes after exposure of discs to 10 micromolar acifluorfen in the dark and light, respectively. These data strengthen the view that PPIX is responsible for all or a major part of the photobleaching activity of acifluorfen and related herbicides. PMID:16666869

  6. Kinetic studies on two isoforms of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from maize leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, D; Price, L J; Alban, C; Dehaye, L; Job, D; Cole, D J; Pallett, K E; Harwood, J L

    1996-01-01

    The steady-state kinetics of two multifunctional isoforms of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) from maize leaves (a major isoform, ACCase1 and a minor isoform, ACCase2) have been investigated with respect to reaction mechanism, inhibition by two graminicides of the aryloxyphenoxypropionate class (quizalofop and fluazifop) and some cellular metabolites. Substrate interaction and product inhibition patterns indicated that ADP and P(i) products from the first partial reaction were not released before acetyl-CoA bound to the enzymes. Product inhibition patterns did not match exactly those predicted for an ordered Ter Ter or a random Ter Ter mechanism, but were close to those postulated for an ordered mechanism. ACCase2 was about 1/2000 as sensitive as ACCase1 to quizalofop but only about 1/150 as sensitive to fluazifop. Fitting inhibition data to the Hill equation indicated that binding of quizalofop or fluazifop to ACCase1 was non-cooperative, as shown by the Hill constant (n(app)) values of 0.86 and 1.16 for quizalofop and fluazifop respectively. Apparent inhibition constant values (K' from the Hill equation) for ACCase1 were 0.054 microM for quizalofop and 21.8 microM for fluazifop. On the other hand, binding of quizalofop or fluazifop to ACCase2 exhibited positive co-operativity, as shown by the (napp) values of 1.85 and 1.59 for quizalofop and fluazifop respectively. K' values for ACCase2 were 1.7 mM for quizalofop and 140 mM for fluazifop. Kinetic parameters for the co-operative binding of quizalofop to maize ACCase2 were close to those of another multifunctional ACCase of limited sensitivity to graminicide, ACC220 from pea. Inhibition of ACCase1 by quizalofop was mixed-type with respect to acetyl-CoA or ATP, but the concentration of acetyl-CoA had the greater effect on the level of inhibition. Neither ACCase1 nor ACCase2 was appreciably sensitive to CoA esters of palmitic acid (16:0) or oleic acid (18:1). Approximate IC50 values were 10 microM (ACCase2) and 50

  7. Modelling the biodegradation kinetics of the herbicide propanil and its metabolite 3,4-dichloroaniline.

    PubMed

    Marques, Ricardo; Oehmen, Adrian; Carvalho, Gilda; Reis, Maria A M

    2015-05-01

    This study models the biodegradation kinetics of two toxic xenobiotic compounds in enriched mixed cultures: a commonly applied herbicide (3,4-dichloropropionanilide or propanil) and its metabolite (3,4-dichloroaniline or DCA). The dependence of the metabolite degradation kinetics on the presence of the parent compound was investigated, as well as the influence of the feeding operation strategy. Model equations were proposed incorporating substrate inhibition of the parent compound and the metabolite during dump feed operation of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The kinetic parameters of the biomass were compared to step feed degradation of the SBR. The relationship between propanil and DCA degradation rates with the concentration of each compound was studied. A statistical comparison was carried out between the model predictions and experimental results. Substrate inhibition by both propanil and DCA was prominent during dump feed operation but insignificant during step feed. With both feeding strategies, the metabolite degradation was found to be dependent on the concentration of both the parent compound and the metabolite, suggesting that the DCA degrading enzymatic activity was independent of the detachment of the propionate moiety from the propanil molecule. After incorporating this finding into the model equations, the model was able to describe well the propanil and DCA degradation profiles, with an r (2) correlation >0.95 for each case. A kinetic model was developed for the degradation of the herbicide propanil and its metabolite DCA. An exponential inhibition term was incorporated to describe the substrate inhibition during dump feeding. The kinetics of metabolite degradation was dependent of the sum of the concentrations of metabolite and parent compound, which could also be of relevance to future xenobiotic modelling applications from wastewater. PMID:25422118

  8. Simulating the dissipation of two herbicides using micro paddy lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Nhung, Dang Thi Tuyet; Phong, Thai Khanh; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Iwafune, Takashi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc

    2009-11-01

    A set of packed micro paddy lysimeters, placed in a greenhouse, was used to simulate the dissipation of two herbicides, simetryn and thiobencarb, in a controlled environment. Data from a field monitoring study in 2003, including the soil condition and water balances, were used in the simulation. The herbicides were applied and monitored over a period of 21 d. The water balances under two water management scenarios, intermittent irrigation management (AI) and continuous irrigation management (CI), were simulated. In the AI scenario, the pattern of herbicide dissipation in the surface water of the field were simulated, following the first-order kinetics. In the CI scenario, similarity was observed in most lysimeter and field concentrations, but there were differences in some data points. Dissipation curves of both herbicides in the surface water of the two simulated scenarios were not significantly different (P>0.05) from the field data except for intercept of the thiobencarb curve in the CI scenario. The distribution of simetryn and thiobencarb in the soil profile after simulation were also similar to the field data. The highest concentrations of both herbicides were found on the topsoil layer at 0-2.5 cm depth. Only a small amount of herbicides moved down to the deeper soil layers. Micro paddy lysimeters are thus a good alternative for the dissipation study of pesticides in the paddy environment. PMID:19811801

  9. Herbicidal treatments for control of Papaver somniferum L.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-five commercially available herbicides were evaluated for possible use to destroy illicit opium poppy crops (Papaver somniferum). In the first stage, herbicides were sprayed on poppy plants grown in containers. The following compounds killed poppy plants: (a) herbicides with typical foliar activity--amitrole, bromoxynil, 2,4-D, glyphosate, ioxynil and paraquat; and (b) herbicides with root and foliar activity--the triazines ametryn, atrazine, metribuzin, prometryn, simazine and terbutryn; the substituted ureas benzthiazuron, chloroxuron, diuron, fluometuron, linuron, methabenzthiazuron, neburon and phenobenzuron; and the miscellaneous compounds karbutilate, methazole, oxadiazon and pyrazon. Severe but sublethal injury was caused by cycloate, EPTC, molinate, pobulate, cacodylate + MSMA, ethofumesate, perfluidone and phenmedipham. Abnormal development of vegetative or reproductive parts of the plant was induced by benefin, butralin, dinitramine, pendimethalin, trifluralin, diphenamid, napropamide, dalapon and propham. Efficient herbicides with negligible persistence in soil at the doses applied were evaluated on poppy plants in the field at various stages of growth. Small plants were severely injured by 2,4-D, killed rapidly by bromoxynil, ioxynil, paraquat (in mixture + diquat), and more slowly by glyphosate and metribuzin. The resistance to herbicides increased with the age of the poppy plant. Severe damage with partial kill of developed plants was obtained with bromoxynil, ioxynil, glyphosate, and paraquat + diquat; the last treatment produced the fastest effect. PMID:6905769

  10. Remote Sensing Study of the Influence of Different Herbicides on the Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Fluorescence of Pea Plants (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Yanev, Tony; Iliev, Ilko; Alexieva, Vera; Tsaneva, Mariana

    The effective use of airborne and satellite-based remote sensor systems in resource management, agriculture, mineral exploration and environmental monitoring requires an understanding of the nature and limitations of the high-resolution remote sensing data and of various strategies for processing and interpreting it. In developing the necessary knowledge base, ground-based measurements are the expedient source of information. In this study, remote sensing techniques were applied in laboratory for detection of the influence of herbicides 2.4-D, glyphosate, fluridone and acifluorfen on the leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence of pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). According to the classification of the Herbicide Resistance Action Committee with reference to their mode of action they belong to different groups: synthetic auxins - O (2.4-D), inhibition of EPSP synthase - G (glyphosate), photobleaching - F1 (fluridone), and inhibition of PPO - E (acifluorfen). During the last 40 years, these herbicides are among the ones used most widely in agriculture worldwide. The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at two low concentrations (1 µM, 0.1 µM) with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice. High-resolution spectral data for leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence were collected from freshly detached leaves using three multichannel spectrometers. Spectral reflectance characteristics were obtained from the leaf reflectance referenced against a standard (white diffuse screen) in the visible and near infrared ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum (450÷850 nm). Fluorescence spectra were taken in the spectral range 650-850 nm. To assess the changes arising in leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action we developed and applied an analytical approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods. The spectral characteristics were analyzed in

  11. Toxicity of chlorinated phenoxyacetic acid herbicides in the experimental eukaryotic model Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of pH and of growth phase and size of the yeast cell population.

    PubMed

    Cabral, M G; Viegas, C A; Teixeira, M C; Sá-Correia, I

    2003-04-01

    The inhibitory effect of the herbicides 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth is strongly dependent on medium pH (range 2.5-6.5). Consistent with the concept that the toxic form is the liposoluble undissociated form, at values close to their pK(a) (3.07 and 2.73, respectively) the toxicity is high, decreasing with the increase of external pH. In addition, the toxicity of identical concentrations of the undissociated acid form is pH independent, as observed with 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), an intermediate of 2,4-D degradation. Consequently, at pH values above 3.5 (approximately one unit higher than 2,4-D pK(a)), 2,4-DCP becomes more toxic than the original herbicide. A dose-dependent inhibition of growth kinetics and increased duration of growth latency is observed following sudden exposure of an unadapted yeast cell population to the presence of the herbicides. This contrasts with the effect of 2,4-DCP, which essentially affects growth kinetics. Experimental evidences suggest that the acid herbicides toxicity is not exclusively dependent on the liposolubility of the toxic form, as may essentially be the case of 2,4-DCP. An unadapted yeast cell population at the early stationary-phase of growth under nutrient limitation is significantly more resistant to short-term herbicide induced death than an exponential-phase population. Consequently, the duration of growth latency is reduced, as observed with the increase of the size of the herbicide stressed population. However, these physiological parameters have no significant effect either on growth kinetics, following growth resumption under herbicide stress, or on the growth curve of yeast cells previously adapted to the herbicides, indicating that their role is exerted at the level of cell adaptation. PMID:12586155

  12. Metabolism-Based Herbicide Resistance and Cross-Resistance in Crop Weeds: A Threat to Herbicide Sustainability and Global Crop Production1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Weedy plant species that have evolved resistance to herbicides due to enhanced metabolic capacity to detoxify herbicides (metabolic resistance) are a major issue. Metabolic herbicide resistance in weedy plant species first became evident in the 1980s in Australia (in Lolium rigidum) and the United Kingdom (in Alopecurus myosuroides) and is now increasingly recognized in several crop-weed species as a looming threat to herbicide sustainability and thus world crop production. Metabolic resistance often confers resistance to herbicides of different chemical groups and sites of action and can extend to new herbicide(s). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glycosyl transferase, and glutathione S-transferase are often implicated in herbicide metabolic resistance. However, precise biochemical and molecular genetic elucidation of metabolic resistance had been stalled until recently. Complex cytochrome P450 superfamilies, high genetic diversity in metabolic resistant weedy plant species (especially cross-pollinated species), and the complexity of genetic control of metabolic resistance have all been barriers to advances in understanding metabolic herbicide resistance. However, next-generation sequencing technologies and transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling are now revealing the genes endowing metabolic herbicide resistance in plants. This Update presents an historical review to current understanding of metabolic herbicide resistance evolution in weedy plant species. PMID:25106819

  13. Balance between herbicidal activity and toxicity effect: a case study of the joint effects of triazine and phenylurea herbicides on Selenastrum capricornutum and Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongming; Lin, Zhifen; Yao, Zhifeng; Gao, Ya; Cong, Yongping; Yu, Hongxia

    2014-05-01

    The use of herbicide mixtures has become a cost-effective strategy against the evolution of herbicide resistance to protect global food production. Much research has focused on investigating either the herbicidal activities or the toxicity effects of herbicides; however, few of them have investigated both factors. This study investigates the balance between herbicidal activity for Selenastrum capricornutum and toxicity effect toward Photobacterium phosphoreum by determining the joint effects of triazine (simetryn, atrazine, prometon and prometryn) and phenylurea (fenuron, monuron, monolinuron and diuron) herbicides. The results showed that among the four triazines, only simetryn exhibited a unique effect (formation of a pi-sigma bond with the D1 microalga protein and an H-bond with the Luc photobacterial protein); and among 16 triazine-phenylurea binary mixtures, only the mixtures containing simetryn resulted in TU1 values (herbicidal activities of mixtures on S. capricornutum) >TU2 values (toxicity effects of mixtures on P. phosphoreum). However, the other 12 mixtures, which did not contain simetryn, showed the opposite result (TU1herbicide mixtures was proposed. Meanwhile, some suggestions are provided firstly for herbicide combinations based on the balance between herbicidal activity and toxicity effect, which will encourage thoughtful efforts for how to best combine herbicides in a sustainable way. PMID:24681700

  14. Finding minimal herbicide concentrations in ground water? Try looking for their degradates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Linhart, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted regarding the occurrence of herbicides in the hydrologic system, their fate, and their effects on human health and the environment. Few studies, however, have considered herbicide transformation products (degradates). In this study of Iowa ground water, herbicide degradates were frequently detected. In fact, herbicide degradates were eight of the 10 most frequently detected compounds. Furthermore, a majority of a herbicide's measured concentration was in the form of its degradates — ranging from 55 to over 99%. The herbicide detection frequencies and concentrations varied significantly among the major aquifer types sampled. These differences, however, were much more pronounced when herbicide degradates were included. Aquifer types presumed to have the most rapid recharge rates (alluvial and bedrock/karst region aquifers) were those most likely to contain detectable concentrations of herbicide compounds. Two indirect estimates of ground-water age (depth of well completion and dissolved-oxygen concentration) were used to separate the sampled wells into general vulnerability classes (low, intermediate, and high). The results show that the herbicide detection frequencies and concentrations varied significantly among the vulnerability classes regardless of whether or not herbicide degradates were considered. Nevertheless, when herbicide degradates were included, the frequency of herbicide compound detection within the highest vulnerability class approached 90%, and the median total herbicide residue concentration increased over an order of magnitude, relative to the parent compounds alone, to 2 μg/l. The results from this study demonstrate that obtaining data on herbicide degradates is critical for understanding the fate of herbicides in the hydrologic system. Furthermore, the prevalence of herbicide degradates documented in this study suggests that to accurately determine the overall effect on human health and the environment of

  15. Proximity to crops and residential to agricultural herbicides in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, M.H.; Lubin, J.; Giglierano, J.; Colt, J.S.; Wolter, C.; Bekiroglu, N.; Camann, D.; Hartge, P.; Nuckols, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Rural residents can be exposed to agricultural pesticides through the proximity of their homes to crop fields. Previously, we developed a method to create historical crop maps using a geographic information system. The aim of the present study was to determine whether crop maps are useful for predicting levels of crop herbicides in carpet dust samples from residences. From homes of participants in a case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Iowa (1998-2000), we collected vacuum cleaner dust and measured 14 herbicides with high use on corn and soybeans in Iowa. Of 112 homes, 58% of residences had crops within 500 m of their home, an intermediate distance for primary drift from aerial and ground applications. Detection rates for herbicides ranged from 0% for metribuzin and cyanazine to 95% for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Six herbicides used almost exclusively in agriculture were detected in 28% of homes. Detections and concentrations were highest in homes with an active farmer. Increasing acreage of corn and soybean fields within 750 m of homes was associated with significantly elevated odds of detecting agricultural herbicides compared with homes with no crops within 750 m (adjusted odds ratio per 10 acres = 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.11). Herbicide concentrations also increased significantly with increasing acreage within 750 m. We evaluated the distance of crop fields from the home at < 100, 101-250, 251-500, and 501-750 m. Including the crop buffer distance parameters in the model did not significantly improve the fit compared with a model with total acres within 750 m. Our results indicate that crop maps may be a useful method for estimating levels of herbicides in homes from nearby crop fields.

  16. Degradates provide insight to spatial and temporal trends of herbicides in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Schnoebelen, D.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    During 2001, 86 municipal wells in Iowa were sampled and analyzed for 21 herbicide parent compounds and 24 herbicide degradates. The frequency of detection increased from 17% when only herbicide parent compounds were considered to 53% when both herbicide parents and degradates were considered. Thus, the transport of herbicide compounds to ground water is substantially underestimated when herbicide degradates are not considered. A significant difference in the results among the major aquifer types was apparent only when both herbicide parent compounds and their degradates were considered. In addition, including herbicide degradates greatly improved the statistical relation to the age of the water being sampled. When herbicide parent compounds are considered, only 40% of the wells lacking a herbicide detection could be explained by the age of the water predating herbicide use. However, when herbicide degradates were also considered, 80% of the ground water samples lacking a detection could be explained by the age of the water predating herbicide use. Finally, a temporal pattern in alachlor concentrations in ground water could only be identified when alachlor degradates were considered.

  17. Herbicides and transformation products in surface waters of the Midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Porter, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    Most herbicides applied to crops are adsorbed by plants or transformed (degraded) in the soil, but small fractions are lost from fields and either move to streams in overland runoff, near surface flow, or subsurface drains, or they infiltrate slowly to ground water. Herbicide transformation products (TPs) can be more or less mobile and more or less toxic in the environment than their source herbicides. To obtain information on the concentrations of selected herbicides and TPs in surface waters of the Midwestern United States, 151 water samples were collected from 71 streams and five reservoir outflows in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 13 herbicides and 10 herbicide TPs. Herbicide TPs were found to occur as frequently or more frequently than source herbicides and at concentrations that were often larger than their source herbicides. Most samples contained a mixture of more than 10 different herbicides or TPs. The ratios of TPs to herbicide concentrations can be used to determine the source of herbicides in streams. Results of a two-component mixing model suggest that on average 90 percent or more of the herbicide mass in Midwestern streams during early summer runoff events originates from the runoff and 10 percent or less comes from increased ground water discharge.

  18. Influence of herbicide-resistant canola on the environmental impact of weed management.

    PubMed

    Brimner, Theresa A; Gallivan, Gordon James; Stephenson, Gerald R

    2005-01-01

    The growth of herbicide-resistant canola varieties increased from 10% of the canola area in Canada in 1996, when the technology was first introduced, to 80% in 2000. From 1995 to 2000, the amount of herbicide active ingredient applied per hectare of canola declined by 42.8% and the Environmental Impact (EI) per hectare, calculated using the Environmental Impact Quotient for individual herbicides and the amounts of active ingredients applied, declined 36.8%. The amount of herbicide active ingredient per hectare applied to conventional canola was consistently higher than that applied to herbicide-resistant canola each year between 1996 and 2000. Similarly, the EI of herbicide use per hectare in conventional canola was higher than that of herbicide-resistant canola during the same time period. Since 1996, herbicide use has shifted from broadcast applications of soil-active herbicides to post-emergence applications of herbicides with broad-spectrum foliar activity. The decline in herbicide use and EI since the introduction of herbicide-resistant varieties was due to increased use of chemicals with lower application rates, a reduced number of applications and a decreased need for herbicide combinations. PMID:15593073

  19. Microorganisms capable of metabolizing the herbicide metolachlor.

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, A; Zhang, R W; Bollag, J M

    1987-01-01

    We screened several strains of microorganisms and microbial populations for their ability to mineralize or transform the herbicide metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)-acetami de] because such cultures would potentially be useful in the cleanup of contaminated sites. Although we used various inocula and enrichment culture techniques, we were not able to isolate microorganisms that could mineralize metolachlor. However, strains of Bacillus circulans, Bacillus megaterium, Fusarium sp., Mucor racemosus, and an actinomycete were found to transform metolachlor. Several metabolites could be determined with high-performance liquid chromatography. The tolerance of the strains to high concentrations of metolachlor was also evaluated for the usefulness of the strains for decontamination. Tolerance of the actinomycete to metolachlor concentrations over 200 ppm (200 micrograms/ml) was low and could not be increased by doubling the sucrose concentration in the growth medium or by using a large biomass as inoculum. However, a Fusarium sp. could grow and transform metolachlor up to a concentration of 300 ppm. PMID:3105457

  20. EK-2612, a new cyclohexane-1,3-dione possessing selectivity between rice (Oryza sativa) and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli).

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Joon; Kim, Jin-Seog; Hong, Kyoung Sik; Hwang, In-Taek; Kim, Kyoung Mahn; Kim, Hyeong-Rae; Cho, Kwang Yun

    2004-09-01

    A newly synthesized experimental compound, EK-2612 is one of the class of cyclohexane-1,3-diones which are commonly known to be grasskillers. A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the herbicidal performances of EK-2612 on several grass species in comparison with tralkoxydim, a commercialized cyclohexanedione derivative. Like tralkoxydim, the compound EK-2612 showed excellent control efficacy on most grass weeds tested through foliar application rates between 250 and 63 g AI ha(-1). Unlike tralkoxydim, however, EK-2612 showed a good rice safety, and there was no rice damage observed at the level below 125 g AI ha(-1), while rice injury developed at the same application rates of tralkoxydim. With this rice safety, EK-2612 controlled barnyardgrass effectively up to the two-leaf stage under both submerged and dried paddy conditions. An in vitro ACCase assay indicated that EK-2612 is a strong ACCase inhibitor; however, the dose-response was not substantially different in rice and barnryardgrass, showing I50 values of 0.1 and 0.12 microM, respectively. These results suggest that the compound EK-2612 is targeting plant ACCase, but the whole-plant rice safety is not attributable to a different inhibition of the target site in rice from that in barnyardgrass. PMID:15382506

  1. A red and far-red light receptor mutation confers resistance to the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Sharkhuu, Altanbadralt; Narasimhan, Meena L; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Bressan, Ray A; Weller, Steve; Gehring, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Glyphosate is a widely applied broad-spectrum systemic herbicide that inhibits competitively the penultimate enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) from the shikimate pathway, thereby causing deleterious effects. A glyphosate-resistant Arabidopsis mutant (gre1) was isolated and genetic analyses indicated that a dysfunctional red (R) and far-red (FR) light receptor, phytochrome B (phyB), caused this phenotype. This finding is consistent with increased glyphosate sensitivity and glyphosate-induced shikimate accumulation in low R:FR light, and the induction of genes encoding enzymes of the shikimate pathway in high R:FR light. Expression of the shikimate pathway genes exhibited diurnal oscillation and this oscillation was altered in the phyB mutant. Furthermore, transcript analysis suggested that this diurnal oscillation was not only dependent on phyB but was also due to circadian regulatory mechanisms. Our data offer an explanation of the well documented observation that glyphosate treatment at various times throughout the day, with their specific composition of light quality and intensity, results in different efficiencies of the herbicide. PMID:24654847

  2. Studies on the mechanisms of action of the herbicide safener CGA-92194

    SciTech Connect

    Zama, P.

    1986-01-01

    CGA-92194 is a herbicide safener that is used as a seed dressing agent to protect grain sorghum against metolachlor injury. The potential adverse phytotoxic effects and the mechanisms of the protective action of this safener were studied in laboratory experiments. Adverse phytotoxicity was assessed by comparing CGA-92194 and the herbicide safeners cyometrinil and flurazole for their effects on CO/sub 2/ fixation, protein, DNA, RNA and lipid synthesis of enzymatically isolated leaf cells of soybean. The safening action mechanisms of CGA-92194 were studied by examining the potential interactions of this safener with metolachlor at the levels of uptake and macromolecular syntheses in enzymatically isolated leaf mesophyll protoplasts of grain sorghum. When CGA-92194 and metolachlor were given simultaneously, CGA-92194 enhanced /sup 14/C-metolachlor uptake into the sorghum protoplasts in a concentration-dependent pattern. Treatments with metolachlor and CGA-92194 in combination inhibited the incorporation of /sup 14/C-uracil, /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 14/C-acetate into sorghum protoplast macromolecules less than metolachlor given alone, suggesting the potential involvement of a competitive antagonism in CGA-92194 mechanism of action. The metabolic activity and growth of sorghum seedlings grown from CGA-92194-pretreated seeds were lower than that of seedlings grown from untreated seeds at 10 or 20 days after planting. These results indicate that a safener-induced stimulation of the spontaneous or enzymatic conjugation of metolachlor with GSH is most likely involved in CGA-92194 protective action.

  3. A red and far-red light receptor mutation confers resistance to the herbicide glyphosate

    PubMed Central

    Sharkhuu, Altanbadralt; Narasimhan, Meena L; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Bressan, Ray A; Weller, Steve; Gehring, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely applied broad-spectrum systemic herbicide that inhibits competitively the penultimate enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) from the shikimate pathway, thereby causing deleterious effects. A glyphosate-resistant Arabidopsis mutant (gre1) was isolated and genetic analyses indicated that a dysfunctional red (R) and far-red (FR) light receptor, phytochrome B (phyB), caused this phenotype. This finding is consistent with increased glyphosate sensitivity and glyphosate-induced shikimate accumulation in low R:FR light, and the induction of genes encoding enzymes of the shikimate pathway in high R:FR light. Expression of the shikimate pathway genes exhibited diurnal oscillation and this oscillation was altered in the phyB mutant. Furthermore, transcript analysis suggested that this diurnal oscillation was not only dependent on phyB but was also due to circadian regulatory mechanisms. Our data offer an explanation of the well documented observation that glyphosate treatment at various times throughout the day, with their specific composition of light quality and intensity, results in different efficiencies of the herbicide. PMID:24654847

  4. Toxicity of the herbicide linuron as assessed by bacterial and mitochondrial model systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sandra M A; Videira, Romeu A; Fernandes, Maria A S; Santos, Maria S; Moreno, António J M; Vicente, Joaquim A F; Jurado, Amália S

    2014-08-01

    Linuron is one of the most intensively used herbicides with predictable effects on the environment and non-target organisms. In the present study, two in vitro biological models (a Bacillus sp. and rat liver mitochondria) were used to evaluate linuron toxicity at a cell/subcellular level. Linuron inhibited bacterial growth and NADH-supported respiration, similar IC₅₀ values being estimated for both toxic responses (74 and 98 μM, respectively). At concentrations up to 120 μM, linuron perturbed the respiration and phosphorylation efficiency of rat liver mitochondria, reflected by an increase of state 4 respiration and a decrease of the transmembrane potential, state 3 and FCCP-uncoupled respiration, when malate/glutamate or succinate were used as respiratory substrates. Consequently, a decrease of the respiratory control and ADP/O ratio was observed. This study suggests that linuron membrane interactions with adverse repercussions in the activity of membrane enzymatic complexes, such as those which constitute the prokaryotic and mitochondrial respiratory systems, may underlie the toxic effects exerted by that herbicide on non-target organisms. Moreover, this work contributes to the establishment of our bacterial model system as a good tool for chemical toxicity screening. PMID:24747295

  5. Herbicidal activity of Peumus boldus and Drimys winterii essential oils from Chile.

    PubMed

    Verdeguer, Mercedes; García-Rellán, David; Boira, Herminio; Pérez, Eduardo; Gandolfo, Sandra; Blázquez, María Amparo

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil composition of Peumus boldus and Drimys winterii was analyzed by means of capillary GC-FID and GC-MS. More than 96% of the total oil components (43 and 54 compounds, respectively) were identified, with ascaridole (51.17 ± 9.51), p-cymene (16.31 ± 2.52) and 1,8-cineole (14.45 ± 2.99) as the main compounds in P. boldus and g-eudesmol (21.65 ± 0.41), followed of elemol (12.03 ± 0.34) and terpinen-4-ol (11.56 ± 1.06) in D. winterii. The herbicidal activity was tested against Amaranthus hybridus and Portulaca oleracea. P. boldus essential oil was the most phytotoxic against both weeds, inhibiting seed germination and seedling growth at all concentrations assayed (0.125-1 µL/mL). D. winterii essential oil did not show any effect on A. hybridus germination and only affected P. oleracea germination at the highest concentration. The results suggest the possible use of the essential oil from P. boldus as a natural herbicide. PMID:21221059

  6. Broad 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitor Herbicide Tolerance in Soybean with an Optimized Enzyme and Expression Cassette[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Siehl, Daniel L.; Tao, Yumin; Albert, Henrik; Dong, Yuxia; Heckert, Matthew; Madrigal, Alfredo; Lincoln-Cabatu, Brishette; Lu, Jian; Fenwick, Tamara; Bermudez, Ericka; Sandoval, Marian; Horn, Caroline; Green, Jerry M.; Hale, Theresa; Pagano, Peggy; Clark, Jenna; Udranszky, Ingrid A.; Rizzo, Nancy; Bourett, Timothy; Howard, Richard J.; Johnson, David H.; Vogt, Mark; Akinsola, Goke; Castle, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    With an optimized expression cassette consisting of the soybean (Glycine max) native promoter modified for enhanced expression driving a chimeric gene coding for the soybean native amino-terminal 86 amino acids fused to an insensitive shuffled variant of maize (Zea mays) 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), we achieved field tolerance in transgenic soybean plants to the HPPD-inhibiting herbicides mesotrione, isoxaflutole, and tembotrione. Directed evolution of maize HPPD was accomplished by progressively incorporating amino acids from naturally occurring diversity and novel substitutions identified by saturation mutagenesis, combined at random through shuffling. Localization of heterologously expressed HPPD mimicked that of the native enzyme, which was shown to be dually targeted to chloroplasts and the cytosol. Analysis of the native soybean HPPD gene revealed two transcription start sites, leading to transcripts encoding two HPPD polypeptides. The N-terminal region of the longer encoded peptide directs proteins to the chloroplast, while the short form remains in the cytosol. In contrast, maize HPPD was found almost exclusively in chloroplasts. Evolved HPPD enzymes showed insensitivity to five inhibitor herbicides. In 2013 field trials, transgenic soybean events made with optimized promoter and HPPD variant expression cassettes were tested with three herbicides and showed tolerance to four times the labeled rates of mesotrione and isoxaflutole and two times the labeled rates of tembotrione. PMID:25192697

  7. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells. PMID:25752428

  8. A point mutation of valine-311 to methionine in Bacillus subtilis protoporphyrinogen oxidase does not greatly increase resistance to the diphenyl ether herbicide oxyfluorfen.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eunjoo; Houn, Thavrak; Kuk, Yongin; Kim, Eun-Seon; Chandru, Hema Kumar; Baik, Myunggi; Back, Kyoungwhan; Guh, Ja-Ock; Han, Oksoo

    2003-10-01

    In an effort to asses the effect of Val311Met point mutation of Bacillus subtilis protoporphyrinogen oxidase on the resistance to diphenyl ether herbicides, a Val311Met point mutant of B. subtilis protoporphyrinogen oxidase was prepared, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant Val311Met mutant protoporphyrinogen oxidase was kinetically characterized. The mutant protoporphyrinogen oxidase showed very similar kinetic patterns to wild type protoporphyrinogen oxidase, with slightly decreased activity dependent on pH and the concentrations of NaCl, Tween 20, and imidazole. When oxyfluorfen was used as a competitive inhibitor, the Val311Met mutant protoporphyrinogen oxidase showed an increased inhibition constant about 1.5 times that of wild type protoporphyrinogen oxidase. The marginal increase of the inhibition constant indicates that the Val311Met point mutation in B. subtilis protoporphyrinogen oxidase may not be an important determinant in the mechanism that protects protoporphyrinogen oxidase against diphenyl ether herbicides. PMID:12941291

  9. Reducing the risks of herbicide resistance: best management practices and recommendations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are the foundation of weed control in commercial crop production. However, herbicide-resistant weed populations are developing rapidly in response to selection pressure. Critical practices include reducing selection through diversification of weed control techniques, minimizing spread of ...

  10. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions. PMID:26328425

  11. ASSESSING THE RISKS OF NON-TARGET TERRESTRIAL PLANTS FROM HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of chemical herbicides to reduce weed competition is a major contributing factor to the high productivity of conventional intensive agricultural cropping systems. However, because of their inherent phytotoxicity, movement of herbicides from target crops and soils can adverse...

  12. Redstem filaree control in sugarbeets with micro-rate herbicide treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field experiments were conducted at the University of Wyoming Powell Research and Extension Center to evaluate redstem filaree control and sugarbeet response to several herbicide treatments. Preplant herbicides used were ethofumesate and pyrazon applied alone or in combination. Postemergence herbici...

  13. HERBICIDE AND NITRATE IN SURFACE AND GROUNDWATER: RESULTS FROM THE IOWA MSEA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Iowa Management System Evaluation Area (MSEA) program sponsored multidisciplinary research at plot, field and watershed scales. Water monitoring studies targeting herbicide and nitrate transport were conducted in different hydrogeologic settings. In central and northeast Iowa, herbicides were tr...

  14. Catchment-scale herbicides transport: Theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Thomet, M.; Botter, G.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper proposes and tests a model which couples the description of hydrologic flow and transport of herbicides at catchment scales. The model accounts for streamflow components' age to characterize short and long term fluctuations of herbicide flux concentrations in stream waters, whose peaks exceeding a toxic threshold are key to exposure risk of aquatic ecosystems. The model is based on a travel time formulation of transport embedding a source zone that describes near surface herbicide dynamics. To this aim we generalize a recently proposed scheme for the analytical derivation of travel time distributions to the case of solutes that can be partially taken up by transpiration and undergo chemical degradation. The framework developed is evaluated by comparing modeled hydrographs and atrazine chemographs with those measured in the Aabach agricultural catchment (Switzerland). The model proves reliable in defining complex transport features shaped by the interplay of long term processes, related to the persistence of solute components in soils, and short term dynamics related to storm inter-arrivals. The effects of stochasticity in rainfall patterns and application dates on concentrations and loads in runoff are assessed via Monte Carlo simulations, highlighting the crucial role played by the first rainfall event occurring after herbicide application. A probabilistic framework for critical determinants of exposure risk to aquatic communities is defined. Modeling of herbicides circulation at catchment scale thus emerges as essential tools for ecological risk assessment.

  15. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yahnke, Amy E.; Grue, Christian E.; Hayes, Marc P.; Troiano, Alexandra T.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

  16. Phenylurea herbicide sorption to biochars and agricultural soil

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DAOYUAN; MUKOME, FUNGAI N. D.; YAN, DENGHUA; WANG, HAO; SCOW, KATE M.; PARIKH, SANJAI J.

    2016-01-01

    Biochar is increasingly been used as a soil amendment to improve water holding capacity, reduce nutrient leaching, increase soil pH and also as a means to reduce contamination through sorption of heavy metals or organic pollutants. The sorption behavior of three phenylurea herbicides (monuron, diuron, linuron) on five biochars (Enhanced Biochar, Hog Waste, Turkey Litter, Walnut Shell and Wood Feedstock) and an agricultural soil (Yolo silt loam) was investigated using a batch equilibration method. Sorption isotherms of herbicides to biochars were well described by the Freundlich model (R2 = 0.93 -- 0.97). The adsorption KF values ranged from 6.94 to 1306.95 mg kg−1 and indicated the sorption of herbicides in the biochars and Yolo soil was in the sequence of linuron > diuron > monuron and walnut shell biochar > wood feedstock biochar > turkey litter biochar > enhanced biochar > hog waste biochar > Yolo soil. These data show that sorption of herbicides to biochar can have both positive (reduced off-site transport) and negative (reduced herbicide efficacy) implications and specific biochar properties, such as H/C ratio and surface area, should be considered together with soil type, agriculture chemical and climate condition in biochar application to agricultural soil to optimize the system for both agricultural and environmental benefits. PMID:26065514

  17. Mode of Action Studies on Nitrodiphenyl Ether Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, John R.; Smith, Beverly J.; Camilleri, Patrick; Lee, Susan A.

    1987-01-01

    5-[2-Chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitroacetophenone oxime-o-(acetic acid, methyl ester) (DPEI), is a potent nitrodiphenyl ether herbicide which causes rapid leaf wilting, membrane lipid peroxidation, and chlorophyll destruction in a process which is both light- and O2-dependent. These effects resemble those of other nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides. Unlike paraquat, the herbicidal effects of DPEI are only slightly reduced by pretreatment with the photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. DPEI is a weak inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport (I50 15 micromolar for water to paraquat) in vitro, with at least one site of action at the cytochrome b6f complex. Ultrastructural studies and measurements of ethane formation resulting from lipid peroxidation indicate that mutants of barley lacking photosystem I (PSI) (viridis-zb63) or photosystem II (viridis-zd69) are resistant to paraquat but susceptible to DPEI. The results indicate that electron transfer through both photosystems is not essential for the toxic effects of nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides. Furthermore, the results show that neither cyclic electron transport around PSI, nor the diversion of electrons from PSI to O2 when NADPH consumption is blocked are essential for the phytotoxicity of nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665297

  18. EEI pulls out of herbicide fight: utilities plan alliance

    SciTech Connect

    Utroska, D.

    1980-07-01

    The Edison Electric Institute has decided it will not go into battle against the Environmental Protection Agency over the agency's suspension and possible cancellation of the herbicide 2,4,5-T. The herbicide is used extensively by electric utilities for woody brush control along transmission and distribution rights-of-way. Edison Electric Institute determined that the cost to participate in the hearing was not in line with the total amount of information the company could offer. Although Dow Chemical Co., the principal manufacturer of the chemical, still plans to testify at the hearing on benefits, several utility companies are attempting to organize a consortium of interested utilities to testify instead of the manufacturer. The Environmental Protection Agency's recent questioning of another herbicide, 2,4-D, has prompted greater interest in 2,4,5-T support. The chemical 2,4-D constitutes the base for many of the most important alternate herbicides. With both 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T banned, many feel the herbicide industry would collapse. Interest in 2,4,5-T began in 1976 when a causal relationship between spontaneous abortions and forest spraying with dioxin was suggested by eight women living in Alsea, Oregon. (SAC)

  19. Cloud based, Open Source Software Application for Mitigating Herbicide Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, D.; Scott, B.

    2014-12-01

    The spread of herbicide resistant weeds has resulted in the need for clearly marked fields. In response to this need, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service launched a program named Flag the Technology in 2011. This program uses color-coded flags as a visual alert of the herbicide trait technology within a farm field. The flag based program also serves to help avoid herbicide misapplication and prevent herbicide drift damage between fields with differing crop technologies. This program has been endorsed by Southern Weed Science Society of America and is attracting interest from across the USA, Canada, and Australia. However, flags have risk of misplacement or disappearance due to mischief or severe windstorms/thunderstorms, respectively. This presentation will discuss the design and development of a cloud-based, free application utilizing open-source technologies, called Flag the Technology Cloud (FTTCloud), for allowing agricultural stakeholders to color code their farm fields for indicating herbicide resistant technologies. The developed software utilizes modern web development practices, widely used design technologies, and basic geographic information system (GIS) based interactive interfaces for representing, color-coding, searching, and visualizing fields. This program has also been made compatible for a wider usability on different size devices- smartphones, tablets, desktops and laptops.

  20. The structure-activity relationship in herbicidal monosubstituted sulfonylureas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng-Ming; Ma, Yi; Guddat, Luke; Cheng, Pei-Quan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Pang, Siew S; Dong, Yu-Hui; Lai, Cheng-Ming; Wang, Ling-Xiu; Jia, Guo-Feng; Li, Yong-Hong; Wang, Su-Hua; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Wei-Guang; Wang, Bao-Lei

    2012-05-24

    The herbicide sulfonylurea (SU) belongs to one of the most important class of herbicides worldwide. It is well known for its ecofriendly, extreme low toxicity towards mammals and ultralow dosage application. The original inventor, G Levitt, set out structure-activity relationship (SAR) guidelines for SU structural design to attain superhigh bioactivity. A new approach to SU molecular design has been developed. After the analysis of scores of SU products by X-ray diffraction methodology and after greenhouse herbicidal screening of 900 novel SU structures synthesized in the authors laboratory, it was found that several SU structures containing a monosubstituted pyrimidine moiety retain excellent herbicidal characteristics, which has led to partial revision of the Levitt guidelines. Among the novel SU molecules, monosulfuron and monosulfuron-ester have been developed into two new herbicides that have been officially approved for field application and applied in millet and wheat fields in China. A systematic structural study of the new substrate-target complex and the relative mode of action in comparison with conventional SU has been carried out. A new mode of action has been postulated.

  1. Syntheses and herbicidal activities of novel triazolinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan-Ping; Jiang, Li-Li; Wang, Guo-Dong; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2008-03-26

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (Protox, EC 1.3.3.4) has been identified as one of the most important action targets of herbicides. To search for novel Protox inhibitors, a series of title compounds 1, 2, and 3 were designed and synthesized by introducing three types of pharmacophores, cyclic imide, phenylurea, and ( E)-methyl 2-methoxyimino-2- o-tolylacetate, into the scaffold of triazolinone. The bioassay results indicated that the resulting cyclic imide-type triazolinones 1 displayed much better herbicidal activities than phenylurea-type triazolinones 2. Most fortunately, compound 3, methyl 2-[3-methyl-(2-fluoro-4-chloro-5-ethylsulfonamidephenyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-oxo-1 H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl]methylenephenyl-2-( E)-methoxyiminoacetate, was found to be the most promising candidate due to its comparable herbicidal activity at 75-150 g of active ingredient/ha with the commercial product sulfentrazone. On the basis of test results of herbicidal spectrum and crop selectivity, compound 3 could be developed as a postemergent herbicide used for the control of broadleaf weeds in rice fields. PMID:18298068

  2. Mechanisms of Tolerance and High Degradation Capacity of the Herbicide Mesotrione by Escherichia coli Strain DH5-α

    PubMed Central

    Olchanheski, Luiz R.; Dourado, Manuella N.; Beltrame, Flávio L.; Zielinski, Acácio A. F.; Demiate, Ivo M.; Pileggi, Sônia A. V.; Azevedo, Ricardo A.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Pileggi, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The intensive use of agrochemicals has played an important role in increasing agricultural production. One of the impacts of agrochemical use has been changes in population structure of soil microbiota. The aim of this work was to analyze the adaptive strategies that bacteria use to overcome oxidative stress caused by mesotrione, which inhibits 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. We also examined antioxidative stress systems, saturation changes of lipid membranes, and the capacity of bacteria to degrade mesotrione. Escherichia coli DH5-á was chosen as a non-environmental strain, which is already a model bacterium for studying metabolism and adaptation. The results showed that this bacterium was able to tolerate high doses of the herbicide (10× field rate), and completely degraded mesotrione after 3 h of exposure, as determined by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Growth rates in the presence of mesotrione were lower than in the control, prior to the period of degradation, showing toxic effects of this herbicide on bacterial cells. Changes in the saturation of the membrane lipids reduced the damage caused by reactive oxygen species and possibly hindered the entry of xenobiotics in the cell, while activating glutathione-S-transferase enzyme in the antioxidant system and in the metabolizing process of the herbicide. Considering that E. coli DH5-α is a non-environmental strain and it had no previous contact with mesotrione, the defense system found in this strain could be considered non-specific. This bacterium system response may be a general adaptation mechanism by which bacterial strains resist to damage from the presence of herbicides in agricultural soils. PMID:24924203

  3. Rapid exposure assessment of PSII herbicides in surface water using a novel chlorophyll a fluorescence imaging assay.

    PubMed

    Muller, Renee; Schreiber, Ulrich; Escher, Beate I; Quayle, Pamela; Bengtson Nash, Susan M; Mueller, Jochen F

    2008-08-15

    Recently a new Maxi-Imaging-PAM (Max-I-PAM) instrument for phytotoxicity assessment via chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was introduced. This new instrument allows rapid detection of the effects of PS II inhibiting herbicides which are high use agricultural chemicals frequently detected in surface waters in Australia and elsewhere. Several studies have applied the new instrument for detection of phytotoxicants in water using microalgae suspensions; however, these use preliminary protocols and to date no validated method is available for high throughput testing of environmental samples in 96-well plates. Here we developed and applied a new protocol allowing dose-response assessment of four samples within 2 h (8 dilutions in duplicate). The technique was found to be sensitive, with a detection limit of 2.3 ng l(-1) for the herbicide diuron when testing solid phase extracts (SPE) of 1000 ml water samples, and reproducible both between experiments (coefficient of variation (CV)=0.30) and within the 96-well plate (CV=0.06). Relative potencies were determined for four reference PS II impacting herbicides (diuron>hexazinone>atrazine>simazine). Extracts from 1000 ml environmental samples and diuron spiked ultrapure water as well as passive sampler extracts were evaluated and good agreement was found between diuron equivalent concentrations calculated from bioassay results (DEQ(IPAM)) and DEQ(CHEM) values calculated from LCMS chemical analysis of the four reference compounds in the same samples. Overall, the technique provides a valuable bioanalytical tool for rapid and inexpensive effects-based assessment of PS II impacting herbicides in environmental mixtures. PMID:18501956

  4. Mechanisms of tolerance and high degradation capacity of the herbicide mesotrione by Escherichia coli strain DH5-α.

    PubMed

    Olchanheski, Luiz R; Dourado, Manuella N; Beltrame, Flávio L; Zielinski, Acácio A F; Demiate, Ivo M; Pileggi, Sônia A V; Azevedo, Ricardo A; Sadowsky, Michael J; Pileggi, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The intensive use of agrochemicals has played an important role in increasing agricultural production. One of the impacts of agrochemical use has been changes in population structure of soil microbiota. The aim of this work was to analyze the adaptive strategies that bacteria use to overcome oxidative stress caused by mesotrione, which inhibits 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. We also examined antioxidative stress systems, saturation changes of lipid membranes, and the capacity of bacteria to degrade mesotrione. Escherichia coli DH5-á was chosen as a non-environmental strain, which is already a model bacterium for studying metabolism and adaptation. The results showed that this bacterium was able to tolerate high doses of the herbicide (10× field rate), and completely degraded mesotrione after 3 h of exposure, as determined by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Growth rates in the presence of mesotrione were lower than in the control, prior to the period of degradation, showing toxic effects of this herbicide on bacterial cells. Changes in the saturation of the membrane lipids reduced the damage caused by reactive oxygen species and possibly hindered the entry of xenobiotics in the cell, while activating glutathione-S-transferase enzyme in the antioxidant system and in the metabolizing process of the herbicide. Considering that E. coli DH5-α is a non-environmental strain and it had no previous contact with mesotrione, the defense system found in this strain could be considered non-specific. This bacterium system response may be a general adaptation mechanism by which bacterial strains resist to damage from the presence of herbicides in agricultural soils. PMID:24924203

  5. 77 FR 76170 - Presumption of Exposure to Herbicides for Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Not Supported

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... accept and review all Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veteran claims based on herbicide exposure on a case-by... widely used herbicide was Agent Orange. Agent Orange was contaminated with the highly toxic chemical 2, 3..., 105 Stat. 11, established a presumption of herbicide exposure for veterans who had served in...

  6. Herbicide-Resistance in Crops and Weeds: A Historical and Current Perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are the principal economic means of weed management on >90% of U.S. farmland. Herbicide-resistant crop cultivars have been used widely since 1995. Pest disciplines and other life sciences have various definitions of resistance that share commonalities. Development of herbicide resistant w...

  7. Agricultural herbicide transport in a first-order intermittent stream, Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, J.R.; Linard, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of herbicides in surface waters is a function of many variables, including scale of the watershed, physical and chemical properties of the herbicide, physical and chemical properties of the soil, rainfall intensity, and time of year. In this study, the transport of 6 herbicides and 12 herbicide degradates was examined during the 2004 growing season in an intermediate-scale agricultural watershed (146 ha) that is drained by a first-order intermittent stream, and the mass load for each herbicide in the stream was estimated. The herbicide load during the first week of storm events after application ranged from 17% of annual load for trifluralin to 84% of annual load for acetochlor. The maximum weekly herbicide load in the stream was generally within the first 3 weeks after application for those compounds that were applied within the watershed during 2004, and later for herbicides not applied within the watershed during 2004 but still detected in the stream. The apparent dominant mode of herbicide transport in the stream-determined by analysis amongst herbicide and conservative ion concentrations at different points in the hydrograph and in base flow samples-was either overland runoff or shallow subsurface flow, depending on the elapsed time after application and type of herbicide. The load as a percentage of use (LAPU) for the parent compounds in this study was similar to literature values for those compounds applied by the farmer within the watershed, but smaller for those herbicides that had rainfall as their only source within the watershed.

  8. Dissipation and Movement of Soil-applied Herbicide Combinations in Corn, Dry Bean and Sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pre-emergent herbicides are used to control weeds in most of our crops. Combinations of herbicides are applied to broaden the spectrum of weeds controlled. Although many studies have been done on the behavior of individual herbicides in the soil, there are few studies that examine the fate of mult...

  9. Transcript markers of herbicide stress in Arabidopsis and their cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low concentrations and short environmental persistence times of some herbicides make it difficult to develop analytical methods to detect herbicide residues in plants or soils. In contrast, genomics may provide tools to identify herbicide exposure to plants in field settings. Usi...

  10. How benthic diatoms within natural communities respond to eight common herbicides with different modes of action.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-07-01

    Herbicides are common pollutants of rivers in agricultural regions. These contaminants include various types of chemicals with different modes of toxic action. Herbicides can have toxic effects on freshwater benthic diatoms, the base of the aquatic food web. We examined the effects of (non-mixture) herbicide exposure to the health of diatoms for eight common herbicides with three different modes of action; the photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors: atrazine, simazine, hexazinone, tebuthiuron and diuron; two auxinic herbicides: MCPA and 2,4-D; and the EPSP synthase inhibitor: glyphosate. Benthic diatoms within riverine communities were exposed to each herbicide in rapid toxicity tests at concentrations of 50, 200 and 500μgL(-1). The most sensitive taxa were Gomphonema spp. and Encyonema gracilis. Navicula cryptotenella was the most tolerant to herbicide exposure. There was no significant effect of the different herbicide modes of action at the community level. Herbicide mode of action did not alter which taxa were most sensitive within the community and sensitivity rankings of the dominant diatom taxa were similar for each of the eight herbicides. The consistency of the results between herbicides suggests that freshwater benthic diatoms may be suitable in situ indicators for detecting the toxicity of herbicides with differing modes of action. PMID:27037885

  11. Why have no new herbicide modes of action appeared in recent years?

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2012-04-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action are badly needed to manage the evolution of resistance of weeds to existing herbicides. Yet no major new mode of action has been introduced to the market place for about 20 years. There are probably several reasons for this. New potential products may have remained dormant owing to concerns that glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops have reduced the market for a new herbicide. The capture of a large fraction of the herbicide market by glyphosate with GR crops led to significantly diminished herbicide discovery efforts. Some of the reduced herbicide discovery research was also due to company consolidations and the availability of more generic herbicides. Another problem might be that the best herbicide molecular target sites may have already been discovered. However, target sites that are not utilized, for which there are inhibitors that are highly effective at killing plants, suggests that this is not true. Results of modern methods of target site discovery (e.g. gene knockout methods) are mostly not public, but there is no evidence of good herbicides with new target sites coming from these approaches. In summary, there are several reasons for a long dry period for new herbicide target sites; however, the relative magnitude of each is unclear. The economic stimulus to the herbicide industry caused by the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds, especially GR weeds, may result in one or more new modes of action becoming available in the not too distant future. PMID:22190296

  12. Vegetable Response to Herbicides Applied to Low-Density Polyethylene Mulch Prior to Transplant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few herbicides are available for weed control in vegetables. The elimination of methyl bromide increases the need for herbicides. An experiment was conducted to evaluate crop injury from herbicides applied to LDPE mulch prior to transplant. Irrigation (1 cm) or no irrigation following crop transplan...

  13. Detection of herbicides in water and their interactions with chlorella kessleri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Thorsten; Duling, Viviane; Anders, Angelika

    1999-09-01

    For the first time the herbicides ethidimuron, amizol and methabenzthiazuron were detected in water by means of time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The suitability of the algae chlorella kessleri as a biological indicator was tested. By using time resolved LIF, the herbicides' absorption spectra and their effects on the fluorescence properties of the algae it was possible to distinguish between the three herbicides.

  14. Presumption of Herbicide Exposure and Presumption of Disability During Service for Reservists Presumed Exposed to Herbicide. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-06-19

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its regulation governing individuals presumed to have been exposed to certain herbicides. Specifically, VA is expanding the regulation to include an additional group consisting of individuals who performed service in the Air Force or Air Force Reserve under circumstances in which they had regular and repeated contact with C-123 aircraft known to have been used to spray an herbicide agent ("Agent Orange'') during the Vietnam era. In addition, the regulation will establish a presumption that members of this group who later develop an Agent Orange presumptive condition were disabled during the relevant period of service, thus establishing that this service constituted "active, naval, military or air service.'' The effect of this action is to presume herbicide exposure for these individuals and to allow individuals who were exposed to herbicides during reserve service to establish veteran status for VA purposes and eligibility for some VA benefits. The need for this action results from a recent decision by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to acknowledge that individuals who had regular and repeated exposure to C-123 aircraft that the United States Air Force used to spray the herbicides in Vietnam during Operation Ranch Hand were exposed to Agent Orange. PMID:26103644

  15. [Ultrastructural changes caused by a herbicide, picloram in technical dosage (70,4%), in a plankton alga, Dunaliella bioculta (Volvocales)].

    PubMed

    Amancio, S

    1976-11-01

    A study on the effects of an auxin-like herbicide-picloram (techinical grade 70,4%)--was carried out on a planktonic green Alga, Dunaliella bioculata. At concentrations about 250 mug/ml, the cellular growth decreases while at 400 mug/ml it is completely inhibited. Concentrations of 250-300 mug/ml induce the fall of flagella and an increase of the cellular volume; granulous inclusions-nuclear bodies-are observed inside the nucleus; Golgi apparatus is abnormally developed. The vascuolar system is particularly disturbed: its volume increases; vesicles, cytoplasmic and membrane fragments and osmiophilic granulations can be observed inside vacuoles under the electron microscope. PMID:825243

  16. Use of controlled release herbicides in waste burial sites

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.

    1981-07-01

    Controlled-release formulations of herbicides have been applied to the soil in the manner traditional for herbicides: on the surface or mixed into the top few inches of soil. The controlled-release formulation allows another option that we propose to use: to place herbicides, contained in controlled-release formulations, in a layer at least a foot below the surface of the soil, in order to prevent root penetration below that level. Ideally, the herbicide will prevent root tip cell division but will not translocate within the plant, thus assuring that the plant will survive, preserving the ground cover. Trifluralin is one of the herbicides which does not translocate and was chosen for use in this study. A number of applications for this technology are possible; particularly in waste management. In the present studies, we used two different forms of polymeric carrier/delivery (PCD) systems to investigate the controlled release of herbicides. In the initial study, a sheet was made of homogeneous mixtures of an individual polymer and trifluralin. We made several of these sheets, using a different polymer each time (with trifluralin) to compare release rates from the various polymers. We also fabricated cylindrical pellets in two sizes from mixtures of Profax/sup a/ PS-1600 polypropylene and trifluralin, formulated to determine the interaction of PCD systems with soil. Also developed is a trifluralin-releasing device with a theoretical effective lifetime approaching 100 years. The system was designed specifically to protect the asphalt layer or clay/aggregate barriers on uranium mill tailings piles. PCD devices composed of pellets could also be implanted over burial sites for radioactive and/or toxic materials, preventing translocation of those materials to plant shoots, and thence into the biosphere.

  17. The sulfonylurea herbicide sulfometuron methyl is an extremely potent and selective inhibitor of acetolactate synthase in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    LaRossa, R A; Schloss, J V

    1984-07-25

    The sulfonylurea herbicide sulfometuron methyl inhibits the growth of several bacterial species. In the presence of L-valine, sulfometuron methyl inhibits Salmonella typhimurium, this inhibition can be reversed by L-isoleucine. Reversal of growth retardation by L-isoleucine, accumulation of guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (magic spot), and relA mutant hypersensitivity suggest sulfometuron methyl interference with branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. Growth inhibition of S. typhimurium is mediated by sulfometuron methyl's inhibition of acetolactate synthase, the first common enzyme in the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathway. Sulfometuron methyl exhibits slow-binding inhibition of acetolactate synthase isozyme II from S. typhimurium with an initial Ki of 660 +/- 60 nM and a final, steady-state Ki of 65 +/- 25 nM. Inhibition of acetolactate synthase by sulfometuron methyl is substantially more rapid (10 times) in the presence of pyruvate with a maximal first-order rate constant for conversion from initial to final steady-state inhibition of 0.25 +/- 0.07 min-1 (minimal half-time of 2.8 min). Mutants of S. typhimurium able to grow in the presence of sulfometuron methyl were obtained. They have acetolactate synthase activity that is insensitive to sulfometuron methyl because of mutations in or near ilvG, the structural gene for acetolactate synthase isozyme II. PMID:6378902

  18. Cyanobacterial Toxins as Allelochemicals with Potential Applications as Algaecides, Herbicides and Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Berry, John P.; Gantar, Miroslav; Perez, Mario H.; Berry, Gerald; Noriega, Fernando G.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria (“blue-green algae”) from marine and freshwater habitats are known to produce a diverse array of toxic or otherwise bioactive metabolites. However, the functional role of the vast majority of these compounds, particularly in terms of the physiology and ecology of the cyanobacteria that produce them, remains largely unknown. A limited number of studies have suggested that some of the compounds may have ecological roles as allelochemicals, specifically including compounds that may inhibit competing sympatric macrophytes, algae and microbes. These allelochemicals may also play a role in defense against potential predators and grazers, particularly aquatic invertebrates and their larvae. This review will discuss the existing evidence for the allelochemical roles of cyanobacterial toxins, as well as the potential for development and application of these compounds as algaecides, herbicides and insecticides, and specifically present relevant results from investigations into toxins of cyanobacteria from the Florida Everglades and associated waterways. PMID:18728763

  19. Residual herbicide study on selected Hanford Site roadsides

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-08-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company routinely treats roadsides with herbicides to control undesirable plant growth. An experiment was conducted to test perennial grass germination in soils adjacent to roadways of the Hanford Site. The primary variable was the distance from the roadside. A simple germination test was executed in a controlled-environment chamber to determine the residual effects of these applications. As expected, the greatest herbicide activity was found directly adjacent to the roadway, approximately 0 to 20 ft (0 to 6.3 m) from the roadway.

  20. Natural attenuation of chloroacetinilide herbicides in aquatic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, D.W.; Graham, W.H.; DeNoyelles, F., Jr.; Smith, V.H.

    1999-01-01

    A 4-yr research program that studied the transformation of alachlor and metolachlor in aquatic systems using field microcosms is presented. The field microcosms provided an accurate simulation of natural ecosystems while also permitting the controlled creation of numerous contamination scenarios and sufficient replication to allow statistical evaluation of the results. Different treatments were assessed including conditions as diverse as anaerobic, eutrophic waters typical of nutrient-rich wetland to aerobic, oligotrophic waters typical of the epilimnion of Canadian glacial lake. Herbicide transformation rate was most strongly affected by water temperature, oxygen conditions, nutrient levels within the system, and the specific herbicide assessed.

  1. Disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents: peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as a final rule its proposal to amend its adjudication regulations by clarifying and expanding the terminology regarding presumptive service connection for acute and subacute peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. This amendment implements a decision by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs based on findings from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Institute of Medicine report, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2010. It also amends VA's regulation governing retroactive awards for certain diseases associated with herbicide exposure as required by court orders in the class action litigation of Nehmer v. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. PMID:24040683

  2. AHAS herbicide resistance endowing mutations: effect on AHAS functionality and plant growth

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qin; Han, Heping; Vila-Aiub, Martin M.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two amino acid substitutions at seven conserved amino acid residues in the acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) gene have been identified to date that confer target-site resistance to AHAS-inhibiting herbicides in biotypes of field-evolved resistant weed species. However, the effect of resistance mutations on AHAS functionality and plant growth has been investigated for only a very few mutations. This research investigates the effect of various AHAS resistance mutations in Lolium rigidum on AHAS functionality and plant growth. The enzyme kinetics of AHAS from five purified L. rigidum populations, each homozygous for the resistance mutations Pro-197-Ala, Pro-197-Arg, Pro-197-Gln, Pro-197-Ser or Trp-574-Leu, were characterized and the pleiotropic effect of three mutations on plant growth was assessed via relative growth rate analysis. All these resistance mutations endowed a herbicide-resistant AHAS and most resulted in higher extractable AHAS activity, with no-to-minor changes in AHAS kinetics. The Pro-197-Arg mutation slightly (but significantly) increased the Km for pyruvate and remarkably increased sensitivity to feedback inhibition by branched chain amino acids. Whereas the Pro-197-Ser and Trp-574-Leu mutations exhibited no significant effects on plant growth, the Pro-197-Arg mutation resulted in lower growth rates. It is clear that, at least in L. rigidum, these five AHAS resistance mutations have no major impact on AHAS functionality and hence probably no plant resistance costs. These results, in part, explain why so many Pro-197 AHAS resistance mutations in AHAS have evolved and why the Pro-197-Ser and the Trp-574-Leu AHAS resistance mutations are frequently found in many weed species. PMID:20627897

  3. Phytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of imazethapyr herbicide using a battery of bioassays.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Anahí; Peralta Gavensky, Marina; Fassiano, Anabella V; Ríos de Molina, María C; Santos, Marina; March, Hugo; Moretton, Juan; Juárez, Ángela B

    2015-12-01

    The imazethapyr herbicide (formulation Verosil(®)) was evaluated for phytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a battery of bioassays: (1) the growth inhibition of the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, (2) the root growth and germination of the higher plant Lactuca sativa, (3) the genetic damage using the Salmonella/microsome test, and (4) the aneugenic and clastogenic effects on Allium cepa. The Verosil(®) formulation was highly toxic to the non-target green alga (median effective concentration (EC50) = 1.05 ± 0.05 mg active ingredient (a.i.) L(-1)), and concentrations above 10 mg a.i. L(-1) inhibited root elongation in lettuce: relative growth index (RGI) between 0.28 ± 0.01 and 0.66 ± 0.10. No genotoxic effect was observed in S almonella typhimurium at 100 mg a.i. L(-1), either with or without the microsomal fraction. However, significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in anaphases and telophases (bridges, chromosome fragments, and vagrants) were observed in A. cepa at concentrations between 0.01 and 1 mg a.i. L(-1) with respect to the control. The frequencies of micronuclei showed significant differences with respect to the control at concentrations between 0.001 and 0.1 mg a.i. L(-1). A very high mitotic index (MI = 93.8 ± 5.8) was observed associated with a high number of cells in the prophase stage at 100 mg a.i. L(-1), indicating cytotoxicity. These results showed that imazethapyr is toxic to the non-target populations in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. This herbicide might also exert clastogenic and aneugenic mitotic damage in higher plants. Therefore, the imazethapyr formulation may constitute an environmental risk to plants. PMID:26250814

  4. Herbicides and herbicide degradates in shallow groundwater and the Cedar River near a municipal well field, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Water samples were collected near a Cedar Rapids, Iowa municipal well field from June 1998 to August 1998 and analyzed for selected triazine and acetanilide herbicides and degradates. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of herbicides and herbicide degradates in the well field during a period following springtime application of herbicides to upstream cropland. The well field is in an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Cedar River. Parent herbicide concentrations generally were greatest in June, and decreased in July and August. Atrazine was most frequently detected and occurred at the greatest concentrations; acetochlor, cyanazine and metolachlor also were detected, but at lesser concentrations than atrazine. Triazine degradate concentrations were relatively small (<0.50 ??g/l) and generally decreased from June to August. Although the rate of groundwater movement is relatively fast (approx. 1 m per day) in the alluvial aquifer near the Cedar River, deethylatrazine (DEA) to atrazine ratios in groundwater samples collected near the Cedar River indicate that atrazine and DEA probably are gradually transported into the alluvial aquifer from the Cedar River. Deisopropylatrazine (DIA) to DEA ratios in water samples indicate most DIA in the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer is produced by atrazine degradation, although some could be from cyanazine degradation. Acetanilide degradates were detected more frequently and at greater concentrations than their corresponding parent herbicides. Ethanesulfonic-acid (ESA) degradates comprised at least 80% of the total acetanilide-degradate concentrations in samples collected from the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer in June, July and August; oxanilic acid degradates comprised less than 20% of the total concentrations. ESA-degradate concentrations generally were smallest in June and greater in July and August. Acetanilide degradate concentrations in groundwater adjacent to the Cedar River indicate acetanilide

  5. Herbicides and nitrate in near-surface aquifers in the midcontinental United States, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Burkart, Michael R.; Thurman, E. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Hydrogeologic factors, land use, agricultural practices, local features, and water chemistry were analyzed for possible relation to herbicide and excess-nitrate detections. Herbicides and excess nitrate were detected more frequently in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers than in nearsurface bedrock aquifers. The depth to the top of the aquifer was inversely related to the frequency of detection of herbicides and excess nitrate. The proximity of streams to sampled wells also affected the frequency of herbicide detection. Significant seasonal differences were determined for the frequency of herbicide detection, but not for the frequency of excess nitrate.

  6. Factors affecting herbicide yields in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, June 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hainly, R.A.; Kahn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 199094 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could be refined with more-current land use and land cover information and a more accurate estimate of the percentage of basin area planted in corn. Factors related to herbicide yields can be used to predict herbicide yields in other basins within the Chesapeake Bay watershed and to develop an estimate of herbicide loads to Chesapeake Bay.Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 1990-94 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could

  7. Influence of herbicide active ingredient, nozzle type, orifice size, spray pressure, and carrier volume rate on spray droplet size characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent concerns on herbicide spray drift and its subsequent impact on the surrounding environment and herbicide efficacy have prompted applicators to focus on methods to reduce off-target movement of herbicides. Herbicide applications are complex processes and as such few studies have been conducted...

  8. Leaching and persistence of herbicides for kudzu (Pueraria montana) control on pine regeneration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Taylor, John, W.

    2006-03-01

    Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens forests in the southeastern United States. It can climb, overtop, and subsequently kill new seedlings or mature trees. Herbicides are commonly used to control kudzu; however, eradication might require retreatment for 3 to 10 yr in young stands and 7 to 10 yr for mature stands. Clopyralid, picloram, triclopyr, metsulfuron, and tebuthiuron exert various degrees of control, depending on soil type, meteorological conditions, herbicide formulation, seasonal application, characteristics of the kudzu stand, and frequency and number of herbicide. Field residue data for soil or leachate are lacking for all of these herbicides when they are used in actual forest regeneration programs in the Coastal Plain. These data are needed to assess the relative potential for the herbicides to leach into groundwater or to move off-site into sensitive ecological areas of the Coastal Plain in which sandy soils predominate and the groundwater tends to be shallow. As part of an integrated pest management program to control kudzu on forest regeneration areas at the Savannah River Site near New Ellenton, SC, five herbicides were evaluated from the standpoints of herbicide leaching, kudzu control, and plant community development. Three herbicide chemical families were represented. This included pyridinecarboxylic acid herbicides (clopyralid, picloram 1 2,4-D, and triclopyr), a sulfonylurea herbicide (metsulfuron), and a substituted urea herbicide (tebuthiuron).

  9. Effects of herbicide-treated host plants on the development of Mamestra brassicae L. caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Melanie; Geisthardt, Martin; Brühl, Carsten A

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides are widely used pesticides that affect plants by changing their chemistry. In doing so, herbicides might also influence the quality of plants as food for herbivores. To study the effects of herbicides on host plant quality, 3 plant species (Plantago lanceolata L., P. major L., and Ranunculus acris L.) were treated with sublethal rates of either a sulfonylurea (Atlantis WG, Bayer CropScience) or a glyphosate (Roundup LB Plus, Monsanto) herbicide, and the development of caterpillars of the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae L. that fed on these plants was observed. Of the 6 tested plant-herbicide combinations, 1 combination (R. acris + sulfonylurea herbicide) resulted in significantly lower caterpillar weight, increased time to pupation, and increased overall development time compared with larvae that were fed unsprayed plants. These results might be caused by a lower nutritional value of these host plants or increased concentrations of secondary metabolites that are involved in plant defense. The results of the present and other studies suggest potential risks to herbivores that feed on host plants treated with sublethal rates of herbicides. However, as the effects of herbicides on host plant quality appear to be species-specific and as there are numerous plant-herbicide-herbivore relationships in agricultural landscapes, a general reduction in herbicide contamination of nontarget habitats (e.g., field margins) might mitigate the negative effects of herbicides on host plant quality. PMID:25143001

  10. Herbicides in ground water of the Midwest: A regional study of shallow aquifers, 1991-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Stamer, J.K.; Goolsby, D.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    The intensive herbicide use associated with the 'Corn Belt' marks the Midwestern United States as a region where herbicide contamination of ground water could be a problem. To better understand the regional occurrence of herbicides in shallow aquifers of the Midwest, a sampling network of 303 wells across 12 States was developed. The results documented relatively widespread, low-level concentrations of herbicides in the shallow aquifers sampled. The most frequently detected compounds, however, were the transformation products of these herbicides. A relation was determined between herbicide occurrence and the general age of the ground water sampled. Water that recharged ground water within the past 40 years was much more likely to contain herbicides than water recharged earlier.

  11. Effects of Certain Herbicides and Their Combinations on Nitrate and Nitrite Reduction 1

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Lowell A.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made concerning the effect of various herbicides, when used alone or in combination, on nitrite accumulation in excised leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., var. `Centurk'). Treatment of leaves with photosynthetic inhibitor herbicides, known to interfere with the transfer of light energy, caused accumulation of nitrite under illuminated, aerobic conditions. When certain other herbicides, which do not interfere with the photosynthetic process, were applied to leaves and incubated under dark, aerobic conditions, nitrite accumulations were enhanced over those treated with photosynthetic inhibitors or the controls. The combination of photosynthetic inhibitor herbicides and certain other “nonphotosynthetic inhibitor” herbicides caused relatively large amounts of nitrite to accumulate in light or in darkness. Nitrite accumulation occurs when nitrate and nitrite reduction are not in balance. The proposed actions of the herbicides used in this study are discussed. This discussion provides a rationale for the accumulation of nitrite by the herbicide-treated leaves. PMID:16660947

  12. Preemergence herbicides forpotential use in potato (Solanum tuberosum) production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field trials were conducted in 2009 and 2010 near Paterson, WA and Ontario, OR to evaluate weed control and potato tolerance to preemergence applied pyroxasulfone, saflufenacil, and KSU12800 herbicides. Pyroxasulfone at 0.09 to 0.15 kg ai ha-1 and saflufenacil at 0.05 to 0.07 kg ha-1 applied PRE alo...

  13. Analysis of Herbicide Transport from Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental impacts caused by herbicide loss from agricultural production are well documented in the surface runoff-prone claypan region. The most widely known impact was for atrazine, which caused the Mark Twain Lake to be listed in the original 303(d) list for impaired waters. While this lake ha...

  14. PRENATAL EFFECTS OF HERBICIDES: EVALUATION BY THE PRENATAL DEVELOPMENT INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The herbicides 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T and many of the esters of these compounds produced cleft palates in CD-1 mice. Silvex and Agent Orange also produced cleft palates. Depending on the dose and means of administration variable responses relating to the production of cleft palates, e...

  15. Assessing off-taraget impacts of herbicide drift on plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plants and plant communities provide vital economic services including production of food and fiber crops for direct human consumption and ecosystem services including wildlife habitat and cycling of nutrients and energy. These services can be impacted if herbicides drift from t...

  16. Cotton Response to Herbicide Technologies, Row Patterns, and Tillage Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton producers must make decisions related to cotton varieties, herbicide systems, tillage systems, and row patterns. A study was conducted to compare a conventional variety, a glyphosate tolerant variety, and a glufosinate tolerant variety in both conventional tillage and conservation tillage sys...

  17. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  18. Effect of preemergence herbicides on early seeded watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides approved for watermelon may result in crop injury under cool or wet conditions. To obtain market prices associated with early harvest, planting may occur when conditions are sub optimal for seed germination and plant growth. Consequently, early planting may contribute to crop injury fro...

  19. Citrullus Germplasm Lines Vary in Clomazone Herbicide Tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences between Citrullus germplasm lines in clomazone injury were first observed when the herbicide was used for weed control in fields containing germplasm lines of watermelon breeding project at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC. The objectives of this investigation were to asses...

  20. Herbicide hormesis-can it be useful in crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yield-enhancing effects of some pesticides may change the focus in their use in crop production, from crop protection to crop enhancement. While such beneficial uses of pesticides are specifically en vogue for fungicides and seed treatments, the use of herbicides for crop enhancement has not yet...

  1. Reactions of Sweet Corn Hybrids to Prevalent Diseases and Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This 27-year summary is of University of Illinois sweet corn nurseries from 1984 to 2010, and includes the reactions of 800 hybrids to eight diseases and three herbicides. Commercially-available and pre-commercial hybrids included 547 shrunken-2 hybrids (317 yellow, 152 bi-color, and 78 white), 117 ...

  2. Palmer Amaranth Identification and Documentation of Herbicide Resistance in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Palmer amaranth (Amaranthuspalmeri S. Wats.) has greatly disrupted agricultural practices in the US with its rapid growth and rapid evolution of herbicide resistance. This weed species is now suspected in Argentina. To document whether the suspected plant populations are indeed Palmer amaranth, mo...

  3. Preemergence herbicides affect critical period of weed control in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective weed control systems must eliminate emerged weeds as well as account for subsequent weed emergence. Two common questions associated with herbicide control are: 1) how long can weeds compete with a crop for resources before yield is reduced and 2) when do weeds that emerge late in the seaso...

  4. A survey of weeds and herbicides in Georgia Pecan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey was conducted in 2012 in Georgia to determine the most troublesome weeds in pecan orchards and document common weed control practices using herbicides. Weed control practices and infestations in pecan were divided between winter and summer seasons. The most troublesome pecan winter weed s...

  5. FATE OF SELECTED HERBICIDES IN A TERRESTRIAL LABORATORY MICROCOSM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and metabolism of 14C-labeled herbicides (simazine, bromacil, trifluralin, and 2,4,5-T) applied as a foliar spray (0.28 kg/ha) was examined in a terrestrial microcosm chamber (TMC). These chemicals were compared to a reference compound, the insecticide dieldrin. The...

  6. Evaluation of Reflex (fomesafen) herbicide for watermelon in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective preemergence herbicides are needed for weed control in watermelon grown from transplants. Reflex (fomesafen) was found to be effective and to exhibit crop safety in southeast USA. Trials were conducted during 2011 and 2012 in southeast Oklahoma to determine if this product would be useful...

  7. Vinegar as a broadcast herbicide for spring-transplanted onions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The weed control challenges for onion production are formidable; however, these challenges are even greater for those considering organic crop production. Organic onion producers need additional organic herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Field research was conducted...

  8. PREDICTING RISKS TO WILDLIFE FROM THE OFFTARGET MOVEMENT OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    While insecticide applications are generally thought of as the greatest pesticide risk to wildlife, the recent literature would suggest the indirect effects of herbicides on wildlife are much greater. The resulting alteration of habitat and decrease in food sources from the off ...

  9. Cytogenetic studies of three triazine herbicides. I. In vitro studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine, simazine, and cyanazine are widely used pre-emergence and post-emergence triazine herbicides that have made their way into the potable water supply of many agricultural communities. Because of this and the prevalence of contradictory cytogenetic studies in the literatur...

  10. Atmospheric Delivery of Herbicides to Riparian Buffer Zones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have evaluated the ability of a riparian buffer to intercept herbicides from the air and deliver them directly by rainfall to a receiving stream in the buffer zone. The study was conducted over a four year period at a site in an agricultural watershed in Maryland. The rain collections included ...

  11. Sorption of the herbicide aminocyclopyrachlor by cation modified clay minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminocyclopyrachlor is a newly registered herbicide for the control of broadleaf weeds, grasses, vines and woody species in non-crops, turf, sod farms, and residential areas. At typical soil pH levels, aminocyclopyrachlor is in the anionic form. Anionic pesticides are generally weakly retained by mo...

  12. Implications of sampling frequency to herbicide conservation effects assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide losses from row crop agriculture represent potential human health hazards. In particular, atrazine concentrations in drinking water must not exceed its maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 3 'g/L. Atrazine, simazine, alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, and glyphosate were monitored along ti...

  13. RAPID ASSAYS OF PLANT RESPONSES TO HERBICIDE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a search for rapid responses to chemical stress, uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthetic inhibitors were tested on nitrite and nitrate assimilation. In addition, three herbicides--Atrazine, 2,4-D and Dinoseb--were tested for their effectiveness on affecting ...

  14. Spatial variability of triazine herbicides in the Lower Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    During May 15-17, 1990, an intense rainstorm moved across Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio where triazine herbicides are heavily used for growing agricultural crops. Following the storm, the peak concentrations of triazine herbicides in some secondary tributaries to the Upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers were as high as 36 ??g/L. This runoff water was funneled into the Lower Mississippi River at the Upper Mississippi-Ohio River confluence at Cairo, IL. The spatial variability of this runoff event was measured by collecting midchannel water samples for triazine herbicide analysis from 1 to 2 m below the surface of the Mississippi River every ???16 km from Baton Rouge, LA, upriver to the Mississippi-Ohio River confluence during May 26-29, 1990. All samples were analyzed for triazine herbicides by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The results showed a background level of ???2.7 ??g/L, an upriver gradient of 0.2 ??g/L per 100 km, and longitudinal spatial variability that is hypothesized to be the result of cross-channel gradients and "slugs" of water from various upriver tributaries with length scales of 100-150 km and amplitudes of ???1 ??g/L.

  15. METABOLICALLY - BASED RESISTANCE TO THE HERBICIDE PROPANIL IN ECHINOCHLOA SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Propanil is an acylanilide herbicide introduced in the early 1960's to control dicotyledonous weeds and grasses including, Echinochloa species in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.). Since then, propanil has been used extensively in rice production in the United States and in several other countries....

  16. Herbicide dissipation from low density polyethylene mulch utilizing analytical techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Georgia, most of the low density polyethylene mulch (LDPM) is laid for spring vegetable production followed by a second crop in the autumn, with a potential third crop the following spring. Between these vegetable plantings, farmers often use contact and residual herbicides to control weeds that ...

  17. Tolerance to the Herbicide Clomazone in Watermelon Plant Introductions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pre-emergence herbicide clomazone (trade name: Command 3ME), is widely used in watermelon production in the US for suppression of annual grasses and broadleaf weeds growing in between plastic beds. Exposure of young watermelon plants to clomazone can cause moderate or severe injury that is expr...

  18. KSU12800; A new herbicide for vineyards and orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    KSU12800 is a new heteroaryl azole herbicide that controls selected broadleaf and grass weeds. It controls several important weeds including pigweeds, lambsquarters, hairy nightshade, mustards, clovers, and thistles. In addition, KSU12800 is active against several grasses. KSU12800 has soil and foli...

  19. TOLERANCE OF MEADOW FOXTAIL (ALOPECURUS PRATENSIS) TO TWO SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meadow foxtail is a rhizomatous grass widely grown for hay and pasture in wet meadows of the western United States and Canada. I compared the influence various rates of these two sulfonylurea herbicides on meadow foxtail biomass. Treatments of 0.035, 0.070, 0.105, and 0.140 kg/ai ha of chlorsulfur...

  20. Herbicide-resistant weed management: focus on glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Beckie, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    This review focuses on proactive and reactive management of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds. Glyphosate resistance in weeds has evolved under recurrent glyphosate usage, with little or no diversity in weed management practices. The main herbicide strategy for proactively or reactively managing GR weeds is to supplement glyphosate with herbicides of alternative modes of action and with soil-residual activity. These herbicides can be applied in sequences or mixtures. Proactive or reactive GR weed management can be aided by crop cultivars with alternative single or stacked herbicide-resistance traits, which will become increasingly available to growers in the future. Many growers with GR weeds continue to use glyphosate because of its economical broad-spectrum weed control. Government farm policies, pesticide regulatory policies and industry actions should encourage growers to adopt a more proactive approach to GR weed management by providing the best information and training on management practices, information on the benefits of proactive management and voluntary incentives, as appropriate. Results from recent surveys in the United States indicate that such a change in grower attitudes may be occurring because of enhanced awareness of the benefits of proactive management and the relative cost of the reactive management of GR weeds. PMID:21548004

  1. Factors Influencing Observed Tillage Impacts on Herbicide Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, E. A.; Huang, C.; Smith, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    The widespread use and potential human health effects of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate have generated interest in establishing how no-tillage impacts loading of these herbicides to runoff water in comparison to other tillage practices. In this study, potentially confounding factos such as time in tillage practice and type and distribution of residue cover, are weighed against inherent tillage impacts to soil structure in terms of relative effects on herbicide transport with runoff water. In this study, two small watersheds (one in no-till (NT) and one rotational till (RT)) were monitored during the first three years since conversion of the RT watershed from NT. In addition, rainfall simulation was applied to plots within each watershed during the first, third, and fifth years since the conversion. Runoff atrazine and glyphosate losses from RT areas were compared to losses from NT areas as a ratio of RT:NT. Results indicate a trend of increasing RT:NT value with time in tillage. Watershed monitoring indicated greater herbicide loading to runoff water from the NT watershed than the RT watershed during the first year since RT conversion, but this relationship reversed by the third year since conversion to RT. In addition, rainfall simulations were performed on small boxes of NT or RT soil having varying types and levels of residue cover in an attempt to isolate residue cover effects from true tillage effects.

  2. Effect of sugarcane cropping systems on herbicide losses in surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Nachimuthu, Gunasekhar; Halpin, Neil V; Bell, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Herbicide runoff from cropping fields has been identified as a threat to the Great Barrier Reef ecosystem. A field investigation was carried out to monitor the changes in runoff water quality resulting from four different sugarcane cropping systems that included different herbicides and contrasting tillage and trash management practices. These include (i) Conventional - Tillage (beds and inter-rows) with residual herbicides used; (ii) Improved - only the beds were tilled (zonal) with reduced residual herbicides used; (iii) Aspirational - minimum tillage (one pass of a single tine ripper before planting) with trash mulch, no residual herbicides and a legume intercrop after cane establishment; and (iv) New Farming System (NFS) - minimum tillage as in Aspirational practice with a grain legume rotation and a combination of residual and knockdown herbicides. Results suggest soil and trash management had a larger effect on the herbicide losses in runoff than the physico-chemical properties of herbicides. Improved practices with 30% lower atrazine application rates than used in conventional systems produced reduced runoff volumes by 40% and atrazine loss by 62%. There were a 2-fold variation in atrazine and >10-fold variation in metribuzin loads in runoff water between reduced tillage systems differing in soil disturbance and surface residue cover from the previous rotation crops, despite the same herbicide application rates. The elevated risk of offsite losses from herbicides was illustrated by the high concentrations of diuron (14μgL(-1)) recorded in runoff that occurred >2.5months after herbicide application in a 1(st) ratoon crop. A cropping system employing less persistent non-selective herbicides and an inter-row soybean mulch resulted in no residual herbicide contamination in runoff water, but recorded 12.3% lower yield compared to Conventional practice. These findings reveal a trade-off between achieving good water quality with minimal herbicide contamination and

  3. Measuring Rates of Herbicide Metabolism in Dicot Weeds with an Excised Leaf Assay.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong; Skelton, Joshua J; Riechers, Dean E

    2015-01-01

    In order to isolate and accurately determine rates of herbicide metabolism in an obligate-outcrossing dicot weed, waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus), we developed an excised leaf assay combined with a vegetative cloning strategy to normalize herbicide uptake and remove translocation as contributing factors in herbicide-resistant (R) and -sensitive (S) waterhemp populations. Biokinetic analyses of organic pesticides in plants typically include the determination of uptake, translocation (delivery to the target site), metabolic fate, and interactions with the target site. Herbicide metabolism is an important parameter to measure in herbicide-resistant weeds and herbicide-tolerant crops, and is typically accomplished with whole-plant tests using radiolabeled herbicides. However, one difficulty with interpreting biokinetic parameters derived from whole-plant methods is that translocation is often affected by rates of herbicide metabolism, since polar metabolites are usually not mobile within the plant following herbicide detoxification reactions. Advantages of the protocol described in this manuscript include reproducible, accurate, and rapid determination of herbicide degradation rates in R and S populations, a substantial decrease in the amount of radiolabeled herbicide consumed, a large reduction in radiolabeled plant materials requiring further handling and disposal, and the ability to perform radiolabeled herbicide experiments in the lab or growth chamber instead of a greenhouse. As herbicide resistance continues to develop and spread in dicot weed populations worldwide, the excised leaf assay method developed and described herein will provide an invaluable technique for investigating non-target site-based resistance due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism and detoxification. PMID:26383604

  4. The toxic mechanism of high lethality of herbicide butachlor in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huarong; Yin, Licheng; Zhang, Shicui; Feng, Wenrong

    2010-09-01

    The toxic mechanism of herbicide butachlor to induce extremely high lethality in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys Olivaceus, was analyzed by histopathological examination, antioxidant enzymes activities and ATP content assay. Histopathological examination of gill, liver and kidney of exposed fishes showed that gill was a target organ of butachlor. The butachlor seriously impaired the respiration of gills by a series of lesions such as edema, lifting and detachment of lamellar epithelium, breakdown of pillar cells, and blood congestion. The dysfunction of gill respiration caused suffocation to the exposed flounder with extremely high acute lethality. Antioxidant enzyme activity assay of the in vitro cultured flounder gill (FG) cells exposed to butachlor indicated that butachlor markedly inhibited the antioxidant enzyme activities of Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Furthermore, along with the decline of antioxidant enzyme activities, ATP content in the exposed FG cells decreased, too. This infers that the oxidative stress induced by butachlor can inhibit the production of cellular ATP. Similar decrease of ATP content was also observed in the exposed flounder gill tissues. Taken together, as in FG cells, butachlor possibly induced a short supply of ATP in pillar cells by inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme activities and then affecting the contractibility of the pillar cells, which in turn resulted in the blood congestion and suffocation of exposed flounder.

  5. Modification of Herbicide Binding to Photosystem II in Two Biotypes of Senecio vulgaris L

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Klaus; Radosevich, Steven R.; Arntzen, Charles J.

    1979-01-01

    The present study compares the binding and inhibitory activity of two photosystem II inhibitors: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (diuron [DCMU]) and 2-chloro-4-(ethylamine)-6-(isopropyl amine)-S-triazene (atrazine). Chloroplasts isolated from naturally occurring triazine-susceptible and triazine-resistant biotypes of common groundsel (Senecio vulgaris L.) showed the following characteristics. (a) Diuron strongly inhibited photosynthetic electron transport from H2O to 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol in both biotypes. Strong inhibition by atrazine was observed only with the susceptible chloroplasts. (b) Hill plots of electron transport inhibition data indicate a noncooperative binding of one inhibitor molecule at the site of action for both diuron and atrazine. (c) Susceptible chloroplasts show a strong diuron and atrazine binding (14C-radiolabel assays) with binding constants (K) of 1.4 × 10−8 molar and 4 × 10−8 molar, respectively. In the resistant chloroplasts the diuron binding was slightly decreased (K = 5 × 10−8 molar), whereas no specific atrazine binding was detected. (d) In susceptible chloroplasts, competitive binding between radioactively labeled diuron and non-labeled atrazine was observed. This competition was absent in the resistant chloroplasts. We conclude that triazine resistance of both intact plants and isolated chloroplasts of Senecio vulgaris L. is based upon a minor modification of the protein in the photosystem II complex which is responsible for herbicide binding. This change results in a specific loss of atrazine (triazine)-binding capacity. PMID:16661120

  6. Cross-resistance to herbicides in annual ryegrass (lolium rigidum)

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher, J.T.; Powles, S.B.; Liljegren, D.R.; Holtum, J.A.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Lolium rigidum Gaud. biotype SLR31 is resistant to the herbicide diclofop-methyl and cross-resistant to several sulfonylurea herbicides. Wheat and the cross-resistant ryegrass exhibit similar patterns of resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides, suggesting that the mechanism of resistance may be similar. Cross-resistant ryegrass is also resistant to the wheat-selective imidazolinone herbicide imazamethabenz. The cross-resistant biotype SLR31 metabolized (phenyl-U-{sup 14}C)chlorsulfuron at a faster rate than a biotype which is susceptible to both diclofop-methyl and chlorsulfuron. A third biotype which is resistant to diclofop-methyl but not to chlorsulfuron metabolized chlorsulfuron at the same rate as the susceptible biotype. The increased metabolism of chlorsulfuron observed in the cross-resistant biotype is, therefore, correlated with the patterns of resistance observed in these L. rigidum biotypes. During high performance liquid chromatography analysis the major metabolite of chlorsulfuron in both susceptible and cross-resistant ryegrass coeluted with the major metabolite produced in wheat. The major product is clearly different from the major product in the tolerant dicot species, flax (Linium usitatissimum). The elution pattern of metabolites of chlorsulfuron was the same for both the susceptible and cross-resistant ryegrass but the cross-resistant ryegrass metabolized chlorsulfuron more rapidly. The investigation of the dose response to sulfonylurea herbicides at the whole plant level and the study of the metabolism of chlorsulfuron provide two independent sets of data which both suggest that the resistance to chlorsulfuron in cross-resistant ryegrass biotype SLR31 involves a wheat-like detoxification system.

  7. Assessment of potential aquatic herbicide impacts to California aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Siemering, Geoffrey S; Hayworth, Jennifer D; Greenfield, Ben K

    2008-10-01

    A series of legal decisions culminated in 2002 with the California State Water Resources Control Board funding the San Francisco Estuary Institute to develop and implement a 3-year monitoring program to determine the potential environmental impacts of aquatic herbicide applications. The monitoring program was intended to investigate the behavior of all aquatic pesticides in use in California, to determine potential impacts in a wide range of water-body types receiving applications, and to help regulators determine where to direct future resources. A tiered monitoring approach was developed to achieve a balance between program goals and what was practically achievable within the project time and budget constraints. Water, sediment, and biota were collected under "worst-case" scenarios in close association with herbicide applications. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat dibromide, glyphosate, fluridone, triclopyr, and 2,4-D were monitored. A range of chemical analyses, toxicity tests, and bioassessments were conducted. At each site, risk quotients were calculated to determine potential impacts. For sediment-partitioning herbicides, sediment quality triad analysis was performed. Worst-case scenario monitoring and special studies showed limited short-term and no long-term toxicity directly attributable to aquatic herbicide applications. Risk quotient calculations called for additional risk characterizations; these included limited assessments for glyphosate and fluridone and more extensive risk assessments for diquat dibromide, chelated copper products, and copper sulfate. Use of surfactants in conjunction with aquatic herbicides was positively associated with greater ecosystem impacts. Results therefore warrant full risk characterization for all adjuvant compounds. PMID:18293029

  8. Elucidating modes of activation and herbicide resistance by sequence assembly and molecular modelling of the Acetolactate synthase complex in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Evans, Dyfed; Joshi, Shailesh Vinay

    2016-10-21

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) catalyzes the first portion of the biosynthetic pathway leading to the generation of branched-chain amino acids. As such it is essential for plant health and is a major target for herbicides. ALS is a very poorly characterized molecule in sugarcane. The enzyme is activated and inhibited by a regulatory subunit (known as VAT1 in plants) whose mode of action is entirely unknown. Using Saccharum halepense as a template we have assembled the ALS gene of sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) and have modelled the structure of ALS based on an Arabidopsis template (the first ALS model for a monocot). We have also assembled the ALS regulatory proteins (VAT1 and VAT2) from sugarcane and show that VAT2 is specific to true grasses. Employing a bacterial model, we have generated a structural model for VAT1, which explains why the separate domains of the proteins bind to either leucine or valine but not both. Using co-evolution studies we have determined molecular contacts by which we modelled the docking of VAT1 to ALS. In conclusion, we demonstrate how the binding of VAT1 to ALS activates ALS and show how VAT1 can also confer feedback inhibition to ALS. We validate our ALS model against biochemical data and employ this model to explain the function of a novel herbicide binding mutant in sugarcane. PMID:27452529

  9. Synthesis and structure--activity relationships of substituted cinnamic acids and amide analogues: a new class of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Vishnoi, Shipra; Agrawal, Vikash; Kasana, Virendra K

    2009-04-22

    In the present investigation, substituted cinnamic acids (3-hydroxy, 4-hydroxy, 2-nitro, 3-nitro, 4-nitro, 3-chloro, and 4-methoxy) and their amide analogues with four different types of substituted anilines have been synthesized. The synthesized compounds have been screened for their germination inhibition activity on radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. Japanese White) seeds at 50, 100, and 200 ppm concentrations, and the activity was compared with standard herbicide, metribuzin formulation (sencor). Significant activity was exhibited by all of the compounds. It was observed that with the increase in concentration of the test solution, the activity also increased. All of the compounds showed more than 70% inhibition at 100 ppm concentration except 4-hydroxy cinnamanilide. The compound, 2-chloro (4'-hydroxy) cinnamanilide was the best among the tested compounds, and it was found to be at par with the standard, metribuzin at all concentrations. Thus, it can be concluded that substituted cinnamic acids and their amide analogues may be developed as potential herbicides. PMID:19368353

  10. The mode of action and the structure of a herbicide in complex with its target: binding of activated hydantocidin to the feedback regulation site of adenylosuccinate synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Fonné-Pfister, R; Chemla, P; Ward, E; Girardet, M; Kreuz, K E; Honzatko, R B; Fromm, H J; Schär, H P; Grütter, M G; Cowan-Jacob, S W

    1996-01-01

    (+)-Hydantocidin, a recently discovered natural spironucleoside with potent herbicidal activity, is shown to be a proherbicide that, after phosphorylation at the 5' position, inhibits adenylosuccinate synthetase, an enzyme involved in de novo purine synthesis. The mode of binding of hydantocidin 5'-monophosphate to the target enzyme was analyzed by determining the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex at 2.6-A resolution. It was found that adenylosuccinate synthetase binds the phosphorylated compound in the same fashion as it does adenosine 5'-monophosphate, the natural feedback regulator of this enzyme. This work provides the first crystal structure of a herbicide-target complex reported to date. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8790347

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) for Comparing Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Kniss, Andrew R.; Coburn, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Various indicators of pesticide environmental risk have been proposed, and one of the most widely known and used is the environmental impact quotient (EIQ). The EIQ has been criticized by others in the past, but it continues to be used regularly in the weed science literature. The EIQ is typically considered an improvement over simply comparing the amount of herbicides applied by weight. Herbicides are treated differently compared to other pesticide groups when calculating the EIQ, and therefore, it is important to understand how different risk factors affect the EIQ for herbicides. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the suitability of the EIQ as an environmental indicator for herbicides. Simulation analysis was conducted to quantify relative sensitivity of the EIQ to changes in risk factors, and actual herbicide EIQ values were used to quantify the impact of herbicide application rate on the EIQ Field Use Rating. Herbicide use rate was highly correlated with the EIQ Field Use Rating (Spearman’s rho >0.96, P-value <0.001) for two herbicide datasets. Two important risk factors for herbicides, leaching and surface runoff potential, are included in the EIQ calculation but explain less than 1% of total variation in the EIQ. Plant surface half-life was the risk factor with the greatest relative influence on herbicide EIQ, explaining 26 to 28% of the total variation in EIQ for actual and simulated EIQ values, respectively. For herbicides, the plant surface half-life risk factor is assigned values without any supporting quantitative data, and can result in EIQ estimates that are contrary to quantitative risk estimates for some herbicides. In its current form, the EIQ is a poor measure of herbicide environmental impact. PMID:26121252

  12. The enzymatic and antioxidative stress response of Lemna minor to copper and a chloroacetamide herbicide.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, Michael; Schröder, Christian A; Helmreich, Brigitte; Schröder, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Lemna minor L., a widely used model plant for toxicity tests has raised interest for its application to phytoremediation due to its rapid growth and ubiquitous occurrence. In rural areas, the pollution of water bodies with heavy metals and agrochemicals poses a problem to surface water quality. Among problematic compounds, heavy metals (copper) and pesticides are frequently found in water bodies. To establish duckweed as a potential plant for phytoremediation, enzymatic and antioxidative stress responses of Lemna minor during exposure to copper and a chloroacetamide herbicide were investigated in laboratory studies. The present study aimed at evaluating growth and the antioxidative and glutathione-dependent enzyme activity of Lemna plants and its performance in a scenario for phytoremediation of copper and a chloroacetamide herbicide. Lemna minor was grown in Steinberg medium under controlled conditions. Plants were treated with CuSO4 (ion conc. 50 and 100 μg/L) and pethoxamide (1.25 and 2.5 μg/L). Measurements following published methods focused on plant growth, oxidative stress, and basic detoxification enzymes. Duckweed proved to survive treatment with the respective concentrations of both pollutants very well. Its growth was inhibited scarcely, and no visible symptoms occurred. On the cellular basis, accumulation of O2(-) and H2O2 were detected, as well as stress reactions of antioxidative enzymes. Duckweed detoxification potential for organic pollutants was high and increased significantly with incubation. Pethoxamide was found to be conjugated with glutathione. Copper was accumulated in the fronds at high levels, and transient oxidative defense reactions were triggered. This work confirms the significance of L. minor for the removal of copper from water and the conjugation of the selective herbicide pethoxamide. Both organic and inorganic xenobiotics induced different trends of enzymatic and antioxidative stress response. The strong increase of stress

  13. Combined effects of the herbicide terbuthylazine and temperature on different flagellates from the Northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Emanuela; Mazzotti, Matilde; Guerrini, Franca; Pistocchi, Rossella

    2013-03-15

    The triazinic herbicide terbuthylazine (TBA) is becoming an emergent contaminant in Italian rivers and in coastal and groundwater. A preliminary analysis of the sensitivity of marine flagellates to TBA was performed by monitoring the photosynthetic efficiency of nine species (belonging to the Dinophyceae or Raphidophyceae class) isolated from the Adriatic Sea. Different sensitivity levels for each flagellate were observed and the most sensitive microalgae, based on PSII inhibition, were: Gonyaulax spinifera>Fibrocapsa japonica>Lingulodinium polyedrum while the most resistant were two species belonging to the Prorocentrum genus. Then the response of two microalgae to drivers, such as temperature and terbuthylazine, applied in combination was also investigated. Two potentially toxic flagellates, Prorocentrum minimum and G. spinifera, were exposed, under different temperature conditions (15, 20 and 25°C), to TBA concentrations that did not completely affect PSII. For both flagellates, effects of TBA on algal growth, measured through cell density and carbon analysis, as well as on the photosynthetic activity are reported. All parameters analyzed showed a negative effect of TBA from the exponential phase. TBA effect on algal growth was significantly enhanced at the optimal temperature conditions (20 and 25°C), while no difference between control and herbicide treatments were detected for G. spinifera grown at 15°C, which represented a stress condition for this species. The maximum inhibition of photosynthetic efficiency was found at 20°C for both organisms. Both flagellates increased cell carbon and nitrogen content in herbicide treatments compared to the control, except G. spinifera grown at 15°C. Chlorophyll-a production was increased only in G. spinifera exposed to 5 μg L(-1) of TBA and the effect was enhanced with the increase of temperature. Herbicide-induced variations in cellular components determined changes in cellular carbon:nitrogen (C:N) and

  14. Plan of study to determine the effect of changes in herbicide use on herbicide concentrations in Midwestern streams, 1989-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, Donald A.; Boyer, Laurie L.; Battaglin, William A.

    1994-01-01

    An approach was developed to determine if recent changes in the use of herbicides has affected herbicide concentrations in Midwestern streams. This approach also provides a plan to determine if the abnormally high rainfall and flooding in 1993 has an effect on nitrate concentrations in 1994 in streams that flooded in 1993. The approach involves sampling 53 stream sites, 50 of which were sampled in 1989 and 1990 as part of a reconnaissance to determine the geographic and seasonal distribution of herbicides in 10 Midwestern States. Sites will be sampled twice, once prior to application of herbicides, in March or early April, and once during the first runoff event after application of herbicides. Samples will be analyzed for 11 herbicide and 2 atrazine metabolites by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples will also be analyzed for ESA (an alachlor metabolite), two cyanazine metabolites, and nutrients. Changes to the manufacturers' label have decreased the maximum recommended application rate for atrazine on com and sorghum by about 50 percent since the 1989-90 study. Conversely, the use of other herbicides, such as cyanazine, has increased by more than 25 percent since 1989. Statistical procedures such as Wilcoxon signed rank tests for paired samples will be used to determine if the distributions of herbicide and nitrate concentrations in 1994 are different from those measured in 1989 and 1990.

  15. Influence of Environmental Factors, Cultural Practices, and Herbicide Application on Seed Germination and Emergence Ecology of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb.

    PubMed

    Lim, Charlemagne Alexander A; Awan, Tahir Hussain; Sta Cruz, Pompe C; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. (Saramolla grass) is a noxious weed of rice that is difficult to control by chemical or mechanical means once established. A study was conducted to determine the effect of light, temperature, salt, drought, flooding, rice residue mulch, burial depth, and pre-emergence herbicides on seed germination and emergence of I. rugosum. Germination was stimulated by light and inhibited under complete darkness. Optimum temperature for germination was 30/20°C (97.5% germination). Germination reduced from 31 to 3.5% when the osmotic potential of the growing medium decreased from -0.1 to -0.6 MPa and no germination occurred at -0.8 MPa. Germination was 18 and 0.5% at 50 and 100 mM NaCl concentrations, respectively, but was completely inhibited at 150 mM or higher. Residue application at 1-6 t ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 35-88% and shoot biomass by 55-95%. The efficacy of pre-emergence herbicides increased with increasing application rates and decreased with increasing rice residue mulching. The efficacy of herbicides was in the order of oxadiazon> pendimethalin> pretilachlor. At 6 t ha-1, all herbicides, regardless of rates, did not differ from the control treatment. I. rugosum seeds buried at 2 cm or deeper did not emerge; however, they emerged by 4.5 and 0.5% at 0.5 and 1 cm depths, respectively, compared to the 39% germination for soil surface seeding. Flooding at 4 DAS or earlier reduced seedling emergence and shoot biomass while flooding at 8 DAS reduced only seedling emergence. The depth and timing of flooding independently reduced root biomass. Flooding at 4 and 6 cm depths reduced the root biomass. Relative to flooding on the day of sowing, flooding at 8 DAS increased root biomass by 89%. Similarly, flooding on the day of sowing and at 2 DAS reduced the root-shoot biomass ratio. Under the no-flood treatment, increasing rates of pretilachlor from 0.075 to 0.3 kg ai ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 61-79%. At the flooding depth of 2-4 cm

  16. Influence of Environmental Factors, Cultural Practices, and Herbicide Application on Seed Germination and Emergence Ecology of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Charlemagne Alexander A.; Awan, Tahir Hussain; Sta. Cruz, Pompe C.; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. (Saramolla grass) is a noxious weed of rice that is difficult to control by chemical or mechanical means once established. A study was conducted to determine the effect of light, temperature, salt, drought, flooding, rice residue mulch, burial depth, and pre-emergence herbicides on seed germination and emergence of I. rugosum. Germination was stimulated by light and inhibited under complete darkness. Optimum temperature for germination was 30/20°C (97.5% germination). Germination reduced from 31 to 3.5% when the osmotic potential of the growing medium decreased from -0.1 to -0.6 MPa and no germination occurred at -0.8 MPa. Germination was 18 and 0.5% at 50 and 100 mM NaCl concentrations, respectively, but was completely inhibited at 150 mM or higher. Residue application at 1–6 t ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 35–88% and shoot biomass by 55–95%. The efficacy of pre-emergence herbicides increased with increasing application rates and decreased with increasing rice residue mulching. The efficacy of herbicides was in the order of oxadiazon> pendimethalin> pretilachlor. At 6 t ha-1, all herbicides, regardless of rates, did not differ from the control treatment. I. rugosum seeds buried at 2 cm or deeper did not emerge; however, they emerged by 4.5 and 0.5% at 0.5 and 1 cm depths, respectively, compared to the 39% germination for soil surface seeding. Flooding at 4 DAS or earlier reduced seedling emergence and shoot biomass while flooding at 8 DAS reduced only seedling emergence. The depth and timing of flooding independently reduced root biomass. Flooding at 4 and 6 cm depths reduced the root biomass. Relative to flooding on the day of sowing, flooding at 8 DAS increased root biomass by 89%. Similarly, flooding on the day of sowing and at 2 DAS reduced the root–shoot biomass ratio. Under the no-flood treatment, increasing rates of pretilachlor from 0.075 to 0.3 kg ai ha-1 reduced weed emergence by 61–79%. At the flooding depth of 2

  17. Leaching of three imidazolinone herbicides during sprinkler irrigation.

    PubMed

    Cessna, Allan J; Elliott, Jane A; Bailey, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Some imidazolinone herbicides have been shown to be mobile in soil, raising concern about their possible movement to ground water. Three imidazolinone herbicides (imazamethabenz-methyl, 497 g ha(-1); imazethapyr, 14.7 g ha(-1); and imazamox, 14.7 g ha(-1)) commonly used in crop production on the Canadian prairies were applied to a tile-drained field to assess their susceptibility to leach when subjected to sprinkler irrigation using a center pivot. Tile-drain flow began when the water table rose above tile-drain depth, and peak flow rates corresponded to the greatest depths of ground water above the tile drains. Interception of irrigation water by the tile drains in each quadrant of the field varied from ∼11 to 20% of the water applied. Under a worst-case scenario in which irrigation began the day after herbicide application and irrigation water was applied at 25 mm d(-1) for 12 d, there was evidence of preferential flow of all three herbicides and hydrolysis of imazamethabenz-methyl to imazamethabenz in the initial samples of tile-drain effluent. In subsequent samples, concentrations (analysis by LC-MS-MS) of the summation of imazamethabenz-methyl (25-24,000 ng L(-1)) plus its hydrolysis product imazamethabenz (63-26,500 ng L(-1)) greatly exceeded those of imazethapyr (<13-1260 ng L) and imazamox (19-599 ng L(-1)), thus reflecting relative application rates. In contrast, estimates of total transport of each herbicide from the root zone, which varied in each quadrant and ranged from 0.06 to 2.3% for imazamethabenz-methyl plus imazamethabenz, 0.71 to 3.1% for imazethapyr, and 0.61 to 2.8% for imazamox, did not reflect application rates. In shallow ground water (piezometer samples), there was inconsistent and infrequent detection all four compounds. With the frequency and amount of rainfall typically encountered in the prairie region of Canada, contamination of shallow ground water with detectable concentrations of the three imidazolinone herbicides would be

  18. Effects of the herbicide metazachlor on macrophytes and ecosystem function in freshwater pond and stream mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Mohr, S; Berghahn, R; Feibicke, M; Meinecke, S; Ottenströer, T; Schmiedling, I; Schmiediche, R; Schmidt, R

    2007-05-01

    The chloroacetamide metazachlor is a commonly used pre-emergent herbicide to inhibit growth of plants especially in rape culture. It occurs in surface and ground water due to spray-drift or run-off in concentrations up to 100 microgL(-1). Direct and indirect effects of metazachlor on aquatic macrophytes were investigated at oligo- to mesotrophic nutrient levels employing eight stream and eight pond indoor mesocosms. Five systems of each type were dosed once with 5, 20, 80, 200 and 500 microgL(-1) metazachlor and three ponds and three streams served as controls. Pronounced direct negative effects on macrophyte biomass of Potamogeton natans, Myriophyllum verticillatum and filamentous green algae as well as associated changes in water chemistry were detected in the course of the summer 2003 in both pond and stream mesocosms. Filamentous green algae dominated by Cladophora glomerata were the most sensitive organisms in both pond and stream systems with EC(50) ranging from 3 (streams) to 9 (ponds) microgL(-1) metazachlor. In the contaminated pond mesocosms with high toxicant concentrations (200 and 500 microgL(-1)), a species shift from filamentous green algae to the yellow-green alga Vaucheria spec. was detected. The herbicide effects for the different macrophyte species were partly masked by interspecific competition. No recovery of macrophytes was observed at the highest metazachlor concentrations in both pond and stream mesocosms until the end of the study after 140 and 170 days. Based on the lowest EC(50) value of 4 microgL(-1) for total macrophyte biomass, it is argued that single exposure of aquatic macrophytes to metazachlor to nominal concentrations >5 microgL(-1) is likely to have pronounced long-term effects on aquatic biota and ecosystem function. PMID:17353057

  19. Three-parameter modeling of the soil sorption of acetanilide and triazine herbicide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mirlaine R; Matias, Stella V B G; Macedo, Renato L G; Freitas, Matheus P; Venturin, Nelson

    2014-02-01

    Herbicides have widely variable toxicity and many of them are persistent soil contaminants. Acetanilide and triazine family of herbicides have widespread use, but increasing interest for the development of new herbicides has been rising to increase their effectiveness and to diminish environmental hazard. The environmental risk of new herbicides can be accessed by estimating their soil sorption (logKoc), which is usually correlated to the octanol/water partition coefficient (logKow). However, earlier findings have shown that this correlation is not valid for some acetanilide and triazine herbicides. Thus, easily accessible quantitative structure-property relationship models are required to predict logKoc of analogues of the these compounds. Octanol/water partition coefficient, molecular weight and volume were calculated and then regressed against logKoc for two series of acetanilide and triazine herbicides using multiple linear regression, resulting in predictive and validated models. PMID:24374777

  20. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services. PMID:25005713

  1. The influence of reduced light intensity on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicide exposure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide pollution events in aquatic ecosystems often coincide with increased turbidity and reduced light intensity. It is therefore important to determine whether reduced light intensity can influence herbicide toxicity, especially to primary producers such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms collected from 4 rivers were exposed to herbicides in 48 h rapid toxicity tests under high light (100 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) and low light (20 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) intensities. The effects of 2 herbicides (atrazine and glyphosate) were assessed on 26 freshwater benthic diatom taxa. There was no significant interaction of light and herbicide effects at the community level or on the majority (22 of 26) of benthic diatom taxa. This indicates that low light levels will likely have only a minor influence on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicides. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2252-2260. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26801964

  2. Effects of herbicides on Behr's metalmark butterfly, a surrogate species for the endangered butterfly, Lange's metalmark.

    PubMed

    Stark, John D; Chen, Xue Dong; Johnson, Catherine S

    2012-05-01

    Lange's metalmark butterfly, Apodemia mormo langei Comstock, is in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat caused by invasive exotic plants which are eliminating its food, naked stem buckwheat. Herbicides are being used to remove invasive weeds from the dunes; however, little is known about the potential effects of herbicides on butterflies. To address this concern we evaluated potential toxic effects of three herbicides on Behr's metalmark, a close relative of Lange's metalmark. First instars were exposed to recommended field rates of triclopyr, sethoxydim, and imazapyr. Life history parameters were recorded after exposure. These herbicides reduced the number of adults that emerged from pupation (24-36%). Each herbicide has a different mode of action. Therefore, we speculate that effects are due to inert ingredients or indirect effects on food plant quality. If these herbicides act the same in A. mormo langei, they may contribute to the decline of this species. PMID:22310058

  3. Are shifts in herbicide use reflected in concentration changes in Midwestern rivers?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    In many Midwestern rivers, elevated concentrations of herbicides occur during runoff events for 1-3 months following application. The highest or 'peak' herbicide concentration often occurs during one of these runoff events. Herbicide concentrations in rivers are affected by a number of factors, including herbicide use patterns within the associated basin. Changing agricultural practices, reductions in recommended and permitted herbicide applications, shifts to new herbicides, and greater environmental awareness in the agricultural community have resulted in changes to herbicide use patterns. In the Midwestern United States, alachlor use was much larger in 1989 than in 1995, while acetochlor was not used in 1989, and commonly used in 1995. Use of atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor was about the same in 1989 and 1995. Herbicide concentrations were measured in samples from 53 Midwestern rivers during the first major runoff event that occurred after herbicide application (postapplication) in 1989, 1990, 1994, and 1995. The median concentrations of atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, metribuzin, metolachlor, propazine, and simazine all were significantly higher in 1989/90 than in 1994/95. The median acetochlor concentration was higher in 1995 than in 1994. Estimated daily yields for all herbicides and degradation products measured, with the exception of acetochlor, were higher in 1989/90 than in 1994/95. The differences in concentration and yield do not always parallel changes in herbicide use, suggesting that other changes in herbicide or crop management are affecting concentrations in Midwestern rivers during runoff events.In many Midwestern rivers, elevated concentrations of herbicides occur during runoff events for 1-3 months following application. The highest or `peak' herbicide concentration often occurs during one of these runoff events. Herbicide concentrations in rivers are affected by a number of factors, including herbicide use patterns within the associated

  4. Effect of safeners on damage of human erythrocytes treated with chloroacetamide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Bernasinska, Joanna; Duchnowicz, Piotr; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Koceva-Chyla, Aneta

    2013-09-01

    Chloroacetamides are used as pre-emergent substances for growth control of annual grasses and weeds. Since they can be harmful for crop plants, protective compounds (safeners) are used along with herbicides. So far, their effects on human blood cells have not been evaluated, and this study is the very first one devoted to this subject. We examined the harmful effects of chloroacetamides, their metabolites and safeners, used alone or in combination with herbicides, on human erythrocytes measuring the extent of hemolysis, lipid peroxidation and catalase activity. Higher impact of herbicides than their metabolites on all of the investigated parameters was found. Safeners alone did not produce any damage to erythrocytes and did not elicit any changes in oxidative stress parameters. Combination of safener with herbicide did not attenuate hemolysis of erythrocytes compared to the herbicide alone. Safeners reduced lipid peroxidation induced by herbicides, which suggest the role of safeners as antioxidants. PMID:23732483

  5. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services.

  6. Hydrothermal electrocatalytic oxidation for the treatment of herbicides wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hanshuang; Lv, Baoying; Gao, Junxia; Zhao, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    A hydrothermal electrocatalytic oxidation (HTECO) method is adopted to treat the biorefractory and toxic 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) herbicides wastewater on nano-Pt/Ti electrode in the existence of H2O2. Comparisons for the removal of 2,4-D and total organic carbon (TOC) have been carried out between HTECO with individual electrochemical oxidation (EO) and hydrothermal catalytic oxidation (HTCO), showing that high mineralization efficiency was obtained in HTECO process. The possible factors resulting in the high removal efficiency in HTECO process have been studied by investigating the properties of the electrode and solution in hydrothermal condition, the amount of active radicals, the decay kinetic, and evolution of main intermediates of 2,4-D. Thus, an enhanced mechanism for HTECO method for the treatment of herbicides wastewater has been obtained. PMID:26865489

  7. Synthesis and herbicidal activity of phenyl-substituted benzoylpyrazoles.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Thomas L; Ouse, David G; Benko, Zoltan L; Garvin, Gail M; Jackson, Johnny L; McQuiston, Jeffrey M; Ricks, Michael J; Thibault, Thomas D; Turner, James A; Vanheertum, John C; Weimer, Monte R

    2002-12-01

    A novel series of substituted 3-phenyl benzoylpyrazoles were prepared and tested as potential grass herbicides. The targeted materials were prepared by three newly developed synthetic routes, which allowed a comprehensive study of the SAR (structure-activity relationships) of this series. The best combination of grass weed activity (Avena fatua L, Setaria viridis (L) Beauv and Alopecurus myosuroides Huds) and wheat selectivity was obtained with an alkoxy group in the 4-position of the phenyl ring. Activity was further enhanced by the presence of tert-butyl on the pyrazole and a methyl group at the C-2 position of the benzoyl moiety. The alkoxy-substituted 3-phenylbenzoylpyrazoles are a novel class of herbicides with potential utility for control of important grass weeds in cereals. PMID:12476990

  8. Reductive dechlorination of the nitrogen heterocyclic herbicide picloram

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanand, K.; Nagarajan, A.; Suflita, J.M. )

    1993-07-01

    Halogenated heterocyclic chemicals are widely used for manufacture of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, dyes, and explosives. Often they are environmentally mobile and can contaminate ground water reserves. Picloram, a broad spectrum herbicide, has a half life in the soil of as long as 1 year. This paper reports on the reductive dehalogenation of picloram in anoxic freshwater sediments, though not when sulfate or nitrate was available as a terminal electron acceptor, and its subsequent conversion to an unidentified product. 25 refs., 4 figs, 1 tab.

  9. Effect of herbicide combinations on Bt-maize rhizobacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, José R; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P

    2014-11-28

    Reports of herbicide resistance events are proliferating worldwide, leading to new cultivation strategies using combinations of pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides. We analyzed the impact during a one-year cultivation cycle of several herbicide combinations on the rhizobacterial community of glyphosate-tolerant Bt-maize and compared them to those of the untreated or glyphosate-treated soils. Samples were analyzed using pyrosequencing of the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. The sequences obtained were subjected to taxonomic, taxonomy-independent, and phylogeny-based diversity studies, followed by a statistical analysis using principal components analysis and hierarchical clustering with jackknife statistical validation. The resilience of the microbial communities was analyzed by comparing their relative composition at the end of the cultivation cycle. The bacterial communites from soil subjected to a combined treatment with mesotrione plus s-metolachlor followed by glyphosate were not statistically different from those treated with glyphosate or the untreated ones. The use of acetochlor plus terbuthylazine followed by glyphosate, and the use of aclonifen plus isoxaflutole followed by mesotrione clearly affected the resilience of their corresponding bacterial communities. The treatment with pethoxamid followed by glyphosate resulted in an intermediate effect. The use of glyphosate alone seems to be the less aggressive one for bacterial communities. Should a combined treatment be needed, the combination of mesotrione and s-metolachlor shows the next best final resilience. Our results show the relevance of comparative rhizobacterial community studies when novel combined herbicide treatments are deemed necessary to control weed growth.. PMID:25394507

  10. The binding of herbicidal halovinyl anilides to the photosystem II Q sub B site and the relationship between affinities and molecular characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Eilers, R.J.; Crouse, G.D.; Durst, G.L.; Streusand, V.J.; Manly, C.J.; Webster, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    A new class of herbicidal halovinyl anilides, which inhibit photosynthetic electron transport, have been shown to inhibit {sup 14}C-atrazine binding in spinach thylakoid membranes. A scatchard analysis of the {sup 14}C-atrazine binding inhibition of the lead compound, LY221204, has shown it to be a competitive inhibitor. Preliminary QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship) studies suggested that 75-80% of the variance in vivo activity could be explained by size and electronic properties and that activity increased with smaller and more electron releasing substituents. To analyze the effects of these properties on intrinsic activity, a larger QSAR study was undertaken. Atrazine binding inhibition data was generated for a group of substituted, non-conjugated vinyl anilides at 1 and 10 {mu}M concentrations and plotted as a function of physicochemical parameters. The results will be presented.

  11. Effects of the herbicide hexazinone on nutrient cycling in a low-pH blueberry soil.

    PubMed

    Vienneau, D M; Sullivan, C A; House, S K; Stratton, G W

    2004-04-01

    The herbicide hexazinone was applied as the commercial formulation Velpar L at field-rate (FR) concentrations of FR (14.77 microg ai g(-1)), FRx5 (73.85 microg ai g(-1)), FRx10 (147.70 microg ai g(-1)), FRx50 (738.50 microg ai g(-1)), and FRx100 (1477.00 microg ai g(-1)) to acidic soil, pH 4.12, taken from a lowbush blueberry field. Hexazinone was tested for inhibitory effects on various transformations of the nitrogen cycle and soil respiration. Nitrogen fixation was unaffected by hexazinone levels up to FRx100 following a 4-week incubation period. Ammonification was initially inhibited by all levels of hexazinone, but after 4 weeks, ammonification in all treatment systems was equal to or greater than the control. Nitrification was more sensitive to hexazinone; however, application at a field-rate level caused no inhibition. Inhibitory effects were noted above FR after a 2-month endpoint analysis and above FRx5 after a 6-month endpoint analysis. Hexazinone concentrations up to and including FRx100 stimulated denitrification. Soil respiration was also stimulated over a 3-week period when applied at a level up to 100 times the recommended field rate. In general, it was found that when applied at the recommended field application rate, hexazinone does not adversely affect the nitrogen cycle or soil respiration in acidic lowbush blueberry soils. PMID:15037997

  12. Chemical Composition, Herbicidal and Antifungal Activity of Satureja cuneifolia Essential Oils from Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Rellán, David; Verdeguer, Mercedes; Salamone, Adele; Blázquez, María Amparo; Boira, Herminio

    2016-06-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils from Satureja cuneifolia growing in east Spain was analyzed by GC, GC/MS. Forty-five compounds accounting for 99.1% of the total oil were identified. Camphor (47.6%), followed by camphene (13.6%) were the main compounds. Their herbicidal and antifungal activity was tested in vitro against three weeds (Amaranthus hybridus, Portulaca oleracea and Conyza canadensis) and eleven common pathogenic or saprophytic fungi (Phytophthora citrophthora, P. palmivora, Pythium litorale, Verticillium dahlia, Rhizoctonia solani, Penicillium hirsutum, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Phaeoacremonium aleophilum, Phaemoniella chlamydospora, Cylindrocarpon liriodendri and C. macrodidymum). The essential oil was very active against A. hybridus and C. canadensis significantly inhibiting their germination and seedling growth. Minor activity was shown against P. oleracea, depending on the concentration applied. P. palmivora, P. citrophthora and Pa. chlamydospora were the most sensitive fungi to the treatment with the essential oil, whereas R. solani showed no inhibition. Results showed that S. cuneifolia essential oil could be used for biocontrol of weeds and fungal plant diseases. PMID:27534131

  13. Taking stock of herbicide-resistant crops ten years after introduction.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2005-03-01

    Since transgenic, bromoxynil-resistant cotton and glufosinate-resistant canola were introduced in 1995, planting of transgenic herbicide-resistant crops has grown substantially, revolutionizing weed management where they have been available. Before 1995, several commercial herbicide-resistant crops were produced by biotechnology through selection for resistance in tissue culture. However, non-transgenic herbicide-resistant crops have had less commercial impact. Since the introduction of glyphosate-resistant soybean in 1996, and the subsequent introduction of other glyphosate-resistant crops, where available, they have taken a commanding share of the herbicide-resistant crop market, especially in soybean, cotton and canola. The high level of adoption of glyphosate-resistant crops by North American farmers has helped to significantly reduce the value of the remaining herbicide market. This has resulted in reduced investment in herbicide discovery, which may be problematic for addressing future weed-management problems. Introduction of herbicide-resistant crops that can be used with selective herbicides has apparently been hindered by the great success of glyphosate-resistant crops. Evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds and movement of naturally resistant weed species into glyphosate-resistant crop fields will require increases in the use of other herbicides, but the speed with which these processes compromise the use of glyphosate alone is uncertain. The future of herbicide-resistant crops will be influenced by many factors, including alternative technologies, public opinion and weed resistance. Considering the relatively few recent approvals for field testing new herbicide-resistant crops and recent decisions not to grow glyphosate-resistant sugarbeet and wheat, the introduction and adoption of herbicide-resistant crops during the next 10 years is not likely to be as dramatic as in the past 10 years. PMID:15660452

  14. Rice transcriptome analysis to identify possible herbicide quinclorac detoxification genes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenying; Di, Chao; Zhou, Shaoxia; Liu, Jia; Li, Li; Liu, Fengxia; Yang, Xinling; Ling, Yun; Su, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world's rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed, and hormone interactions affecting quinclorac signaling has been identified. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and other environmental health problems. In this study, we used 57K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array to identify quinclorac signaling response genes to study the molecular mechanisms of action and detoxification of quinclorac in rice plants. Overall, 637 probe sets were identified with differential expression levels under either 6 or 24 h of quinclorac treatment. Auxin-related genes such as GH3 and OsIAAs responded to quinclorac treatment. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes of detoxification-related family genes were significantly enriched, including cytochrome P450, GST, UGT, and ABC and drug transporter genes. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that top candidate genes of P450 families such as CYP81, CYP709C, and CYP72A were universally induced by different herbicides. Some Arabidopsis genes of the same P450 family were up-regulated under quinclorac treatment. We conducted rice whole-genome GeneChip analysis and the first global identification of quinclorac response genes. This work may provide potential markers for detoxification of quinclorac and biomonitors of environmental chemical pollution. PMID:26483837

  15. Solubilization of herbicides by single and mixed commercial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Galán-Jiménez, M C; Gómez-Pantoja, E; Morillo, E; Undabeytia, T

    2015-12-15

    The solubilization capabilities of micellar solutions of three single surfactants, two alcohol alkoxylates B048 and B266, and the tallow alkyl ethoxylated amine ET15, and their equimolar mixed solutions toward the herbicides flurtamone (FL), metribuzin (MTZ) and mesotrione (MST) were investigated. The solubilization capacity was quantified in terms of the molar solubilization ratio (MSR), critical micellar concentration (CMC), micelle-water partition coefficient (Kmc), binding constant (K1), number of aggregation (Nagg) and Stern-Volmer constant (Ksv). The herbicides were greatly solubilized into different loci of the micelles: FL within the inner hydrophobic core, MST at the micelle/water interface and MTZ in the palisade region. Equimolar binary surfactant mixtures did not improve the solubilization of herbicides over those of single components, with the exception of MTZ by the B266/ET15 system which enhanced solubilization by 10-20%. This enhanced solubilization of MTZ was due to an increased number of micelles that arise from both the intermediate Nagg relative to that of the single surfactants and the lower CMC. The use of Ksv values was a better predictor of the solubilization of polar molecules within binary mixtures of these surfactants than the interaction parameter β(M) from regular solution theory (RST). The results herein suggest that the use of mixed surfactant systems for the solubilization of polar molecules in environmental remediation technologies may be very limited in scope, without clear advantages over the use of single surfactant systems. PMID:26311582

  16. Herbicides as Weed Control Agents: State of the Art: II. Recent Achievements[C

    PubMed Central

    Kraehmer, Hansjoerg; van Almsick, Andreas; Beffa, Roland; Dietrich, Hansjoerg; Eckes, Peter; Hacker, Erwin; Hain, Ruediger; Strek, Harry John; Stuebler, Hermann; Willms, Lothar

    2014-01-01

    In response to changing market dynamics, the discovery of new herbicides has declined significantly over the past few decades and has only seen a modest upsurge in recent years. Nevertheless, the few introductions have proven to be interesting and have brought useful innovation to the market. In addition, herbicide-tolerant or herbicide-resistant crop technologies have allowed the use of existing nonselective herbicides to be extended into crops. An increasing and now major challenge is being posed by the inexorable increase in biotypes of weeds that are resistant to herbicides. This problem is now at a level that threatens future agricultural productivity and needs to be better understood. If herbicides are to remain sustainable, then it is a must that we adopt diversity in crop rotation and herbicide use as well as increase the use of nonchemical measures to control weeds. Nevertheless, despite the difficulties posed by resistant weeds and increased regulatory hurdles, new screening tools promise to provide an upsurge of potential herbicide leads. Our industry urgently needs to supply agriculture with new, effective resistance-breaking herbicides along with strategies to sustain their utility. PMID:25104721

  17. Regression models of herbicide concentrations in outflow from reservoirs in the midwestern USA, 1992-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Reservoirs are used to store water for public water supply, flood control, irrigation, recreation, hydropower, and wildlife habitat, but also often store undesirable substances such as herbicides. The outflow from 76 reservoirs in the midwestern USA, was sampled four times in 1992 and four times in 1993. At least one herbicide was detected in 82.6 percent of all samples, and atrazine was detected in 82.1 percent of all samples. Herbicide properties; topography, land use, herbicide use, and soil type in the contributing drainage area; residence time of water in reservoirs; and timing of inflow, release, and rainfall all can affect the concentration of herbicides in reservoirs. A GIS was used to quantify characteristics of land use, agricultural chemical use, climatic conditions, topographic character, and soil type by reservoir drainage basins. Multiple linear and logistic regression equations were used to model mean herbicide concentrations in reservoir outflow as a function of these characteristics. Results demonstrate a strong association between mean herbicide concentrations in reservoir outflow and herbicide use rates within associated drainage basins. Results also demonstrate the importance of including soils and basin hydrologic characteristics in models used to estimate mean herbicide concentrations.

  18. Herbicides as weed control agents: state of the art: II. Recent achievements.

    PubMed

    Kraehmer, Hansjoerg; van Almsick, Andreas; Beffa, Roland; Dietrich, Hansjoerg; Eckes, Peter; Hacker, Erwin; Hain, Ruediger; Strek, Harry John; Stuebler, Hermann; Willms, Lothar

    2014-11-01

    In response to changing market dynamics, the discovery of new herbicides has declined significantly over the past few decades and has only seen a modest upsurge in recent years. Nevertheless, the few introductions have proven to be interesting and have brought useful innovation to the market. In addition, herbicide-tolerant or herbicide-resistant crop technologies have allowed the use of existing nonselective herbicides to be extended into crops. An increasing and now major challenge is being posed by the inexorable increase in biotypes of weeds that are resistant to herbicides. This problem is now at a level that threatens future agricultural productivity and needs to be better understood. If herbicides are to remain sustainable, then it is a must that we adopt diversity in crop rotation and herbicide use as well as increase the use of nonchemical measures to control weeds. Nevertheless, despite the difficulties posed by resistant weeds and increased regulatory hurdles, new screening tools promise to provide an upsurge of potential herbicide leads. Our industry urgently needs to supply agriculture with new, effective resistance-breaking herbicides along with strategies to sustain their utility. PMID:25104721

  19. Glyphosate, other herbicides, and transformation products in Midwestern streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Kuivila, K.M.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    The use of glyphosate has increased rapidly, and there is limited understanding of its environmental fate. The objective of this study was to document the occurrence of glyphosate and the transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in Midwestern streams and to compare their occurrence with that of more commonly measured herbicides such as acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Water samples were collected at sites on 51 streams in nine Midwestern states in 2002 during three runoff events: after the application of pre-emergence herbicides, after the application of post-emergence herbicides, and during harvest season. All samples were analyzed for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The frequency of glyphosate and AMPA detection, range of concentrations in runoff samples, and ratios of AMPA to glyphosate concentrations did not vary throughout the growing season as substantially as for other herbicides like atrazine, probably because of different seasonal use patterns. Glyphosate was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 35 percent of pre-emergence, 40 percent of post-emergence, and 31 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 8.7 μg/1. AMPA was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 53 percent of pre-emergence, 83 percent of post-emergence, and 73 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 3.6 μg/1. Glyphosate was not detected at a concentration at or above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contamination level (MCL) of 700 μg/1 in any sample. Atrazine was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 94 percent of pre-emergence, 96 percent of post-emergence, and 57 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 55 μg/1. Atrazine was detected at or above its MCL (3 μg/1) in 57 percent of pre-emergence and 33 percent of post-emergence samples

  20. Herbicide-related signaling in plants reveals novel insights for herbicide use strategies, environmental risk assessment and global change assessment challenges.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Diana; Serra, Anne-Antonella; Sulmon, Cécile; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Couée, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    Herbicide impact is usually assessed as the result of a unilinear mode of action on a specific biochemical target with a typical dose-response dynamics. Recent developments in plant molecular signaling and crosstalk between nutritional, hormonal and environmental stress cues are however revealing a more complex picture of inclusive toxicity. Herbicides induce large-scale metabolic and gene-expression effects that go far beyond the expected consequences of unilinear herbicide-target-damage mechanisms. Moreover, groundbreaking studies have revealed that herbicide action and responses strongly interact with hormone signaling pathways, with numerous regulatory protein-kinases and -phosphatases, with metabolic and circadian clock regulators and with oxidative stress signaling pathways. These interactions are likely to result in mechanisms of adjustment that can determine the level of sensitivity or tolerance to a given herbicide or to a mixture of herbicides depending on the environmental and developmental status of the plant. Such regulations can be described as rheostatic and their importance is discussed in relation with herbicide use strategies, environmental risk assessment and global change assessment challenges. PMID:27318518

  1. Transformation of Brassica napus canola cultivars with Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase genes and analysis of herbicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Miki, B L; Labbé, H; Hattori, J; Ouellet, T; Gabard, J; Sunohara, G; Charest, P J; Iyer, V N

    1990-10-01

    A survey of selected crop species and weeds was conducted to evaluate the inhibition of the enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) and seedling growth in vitro by the sulfonylurea herbicides chlorsulfuron, DPX A7881, DPX L5300, DPX M6316 and the imidazolinone herbicides AC243,997, AC263,499, AC252,214. Particular attention was given to the Brassica species including canola cultivars and cruciferous weeds such as B. kaber (wild mustard) and Thlaspi arvense (stinkweed). Transgenic lines of B. napus cultivars Westar and Profit, which express the Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type AHAS gene or the mutant gene csr1-1 at levels similar to the resident AHAS genes, were generated and compared. The mutant gene was essential for resistance to the sulfonylurea chlorsulfuron but not to DPX A7881, which appeared to be tolerated by certain Brassica species. Cross-resistance to the imidazolinones did not occur. The level of resistance to chlorsulfuron in transgenic canola greatly exceeded the levels that were toxic to the Brassica species or cruciferous weeds. Direct selection of transgenic lines with chlorsulfuron sprayed at field levels under greenhouse conditions was achieved. PMID:24221001

  2. Evaluation of two herbicide techniques on electric transmission rights-of-way: Development of relatively stable shrublands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Glenn D.; Niering, William A.

    1986-01-01

    Postmanagement vegetation patterns were studied on five transmission rights-of-way subjected to over a decade of basal or stem-foliar herbicide applications designed to eliminate tall-growing trees. The basally treated lines had a mean of 100% greater shrub and 50% less herbaceous cover than stem-foliar treated lines due primarily to the lack of overspray damage to nontarget plant species with the basal technique. Persisting tree growth was also 50% less with basal treatments when Sassafras albidum, a rootsuckering problem species on all areas, was excluded. Tree seedling establishment on basally treated rights-of-way was 34% less than on stem-foliar treated lines. The creation of stable shrublands can potentially reduce the amount of future herbicide usage. These findings also lend support to the Initial Floristic Composition concept in vegetation development proposed by Egler. In southern New England, commercial basal applications can effectively control unwanted tree growth on rights-of-way while promoting the development of relatively stable shrublands which tend to inhibit the invasion of tree seedlings.

  3. Common and distinct gene expression patterns induced by the herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, cinidon-ethyl and tribenuron-methyl in wheat.

    PubMed

    Pasquer, Frédérique; Ochsner, Urs; Zarn, Jürg; Keller, Beat

    2006-12-01

    In wheat, herbicides are used to control weeds. Little is known about the changes induced in the metabolism of tolerant plants after herbicide treatment. The impact of three herbicides [2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), cinidon-ethyl and tribenuron-methyl] on the wheat transcriptome was studied using cDNA microarrays. Gene expression of plants grown in a controlled environment or in the field was studied between 24 h and 2 weeks after treatment. Under controlled conditions, 2,4-D induced genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway soon after treatment. Cinidon-ethyl triggered peroxidase and defence-related gene expression under controlled conditions, probably because reactive oxygen species are released by photo-oxidation of protoporphyrin-IX. The same genes were upregulated in the field as under controlled conditions, albeit at a weaker level. These results show that cinidon-ethyl specifically induces genes involved in plant defence. Under controlled conditions, tribenuron-methyl did not change the expression profile immediately after treatment, but defence-related genes were upregulated after 1 week. Sulfonylurea compounds such as tribenuron-methyl specifically inhibit acetolactate synthase and are rapidly detoxified, but the activity of some of the resulting metabolites could explain later changes in gene expression. Finally, overexpression of the isopropylmalate synthase gene, involved in branched-chain amino acid synthesis, and of defence-related genes was observed in the field after sulfonylurea treatment. PMID:17054088

  4. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase: high affinity tetrahydrophthalimide radioligand for the inhibitor/herbicide-binding site in mouse liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Birchfield, N B; Casida, J E

    1996-01-01

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox), the last common enzyme in heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis, is the target of several classes of herbicides acting as inhibitors in both plants and mammals. N-(4-Chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)phenyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro phthalimide (a potent protox inhibitor referred to as THP) was synthesized as a candidate radioligand ([3H]-THP) by selective catalytic reduction of 3,6-dihydrophthalic anhydride (DHPA) with tritium gas followed by condensation in 45% yield with 4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)aniline. Insertion of tritium at the 3 and 6 carbons of DHPA as well as the expected 4 and 5 carbons resulted in high specific activity [3H]THP (92 Ci/mmol). This radioligand undergoes rapid, specific, saturable, and reversible binding to the inhibitor/herbicide binding site of the protox component of cholate-solubilized mouse liver mitochondria with an apparent Kd of 0.41 nM and Bmax of 0.40 pmol/mg of protein. In the standard assay, mouse preparation (150 micrograms of protein) and [3H]THP (0.5 nM) are incubated in 500 microL of phosphate buffer at pH 7.2 for 15 min at 25 degrees C followed by addition of ammonium sulfate and filtration with glass fiber filters. The potencies of five nitrodiphenyl ethers and two other herbicides as inhibitors of [3H]THP binding correlate well with those for inhibition of protox activity (r2 = 0.97, n = 7), thus validating the binding assay as relevant to enzyme inhibition. It is also suitable to determine in vivo block as illustrated by an approximately 50% decrease in [3H]THP binding in liver mitochondria from mice treated ip with oxyfluorfen at 4 mg/kg. This is the first report of a binding assay for protox in mammals. The high affinity and specific activity of [3H]THP facilitate quantitation of protox and therefore research on a sensitive inhibition site for porphyrin biosynthesis. PMID:8902268

  5. Second annual advanced forest herbicides course: A summary and some food for thought. R&D technical note No. 53

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.

    1994-12-31

    Excepts from notes and reference materials provided at the advanced forest herbicides course, covering due diligence and the use of an Environmental Management System for companies in Ontario; autecology; herbicide mode of action and toxicology, chemistry and degradation, and metabolism; silvicultural efficacy of forest herbicides; herbicides as components of integrated vegetation management; droplet dispersal; low impact forest vegetation management; off-target movement; buffer zones and constraints; vegetation management; modelling labs; quantifying exposure; risk assessment; and addressing stakeholders` concerns.

  6. Degradation of the Herbicide Metolachlor in Drummer Soil Under Different Redox Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the role of microorganisms and effect of soil environmental conditions on herbicide fate is critical for stewardship of herbicide use in cropping systems. As compared to the modernized perceptions of soil redox status, diminutive progress has been made in characterizing the impact of a...

  7. RESPONSE OF YELLOW BLUESTEM PASTURES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDE APPLICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prescribed burning and herbicide application are commonly used for management of introduced pastures in the Southern Plains but their quantitative impact is not well documented. We determined the impact of prescribed burning or herbicide application on forb populations, the production and nutritive...

  8. Herbicide Transport to Surface Runoff on Claypan Soils: Scaling from Plots to Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The offsite movement of herbicides into streams and lakes is a serious non-point source pollution problem. Claypan soils, which have a significant runoff potential because of low permeability, are especially susceptible to soil and herbicide losses. Previous plot scale (0.92 ac) monitoring showed t...

  9. GLOBAL EXPRESSION PROFILING AS A ROOL TO DEVELOP MOLECULAR MARKERS LINKED TO HERBICIDE STRESS IN ARABIDOPSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicide drift (unintentional physical movement from target to off-target plants) is a cause of crop loss in US. Low-dose, high-potency herbicides that have short environmental persistence times constrain efforts to develop or identify metabolite or biochemical markers of exposu...

  10. Ecotoxicological evaluation of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocapsules containing triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Z; Grillo, R; Jonsson, M; Santos, N Z P; Feitosa, L O; Lima, R; Fraceto, L F

    2014-07-01

    The triazine class of herbicides includes the compounds ametryn, atrazine, and simazine, which are used to control weeds in plantations of crops such as maize, sorghum, and sugar cane. Despite their acceptance in agriculture, these herbicides can be dangerous to the environment, depending on their toxicity, the degree of contamination, and the duration of exposure. Controlled release systems are increasingly used to mitigate problems of toxicity and minimize environmental impacts, and can also increase herbicide efficiency. The objective of this work was to prepare poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocapsules containing ametryn and atrazine, and evaluate their toxicity to aquatic organisms as well as in cytogenetic tests employing human lymphocyte cultures. The PCL nanocapsules were prepared according to the interfacial deposition of pre-formed polymer method. Ecotoxicological assays were performed with the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the microcrustacean Daphnia similis. The cytogenetic tests consisted of observing mitotic index alterations after exposing lymphocyte cell cultures to different formulations. Encapsulation of the herbicides in the nanocapsules resulted in lower toxicity to the alga and higher toxicity to the microcrustacean, compared to the herbicides alone. The cytogenetic tests showed that formulations of nanocapsules containing the herbicides were less toxic than the herbicides alone. The findings indicate the potential of the nanocapsule formulations in agricultural applications, where they could help to reduce the quantities of herbicides used as well as impacts on the environment and human health. PMID:24757962

  11. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR ALACHLOR ESA AND OTHER ACENTANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propa...

  12. MEASURED CONCENTRATIONS OF HERBICIDES AND MODEL PREDICTIONS OF ATRAZINE FATE IN THE PATUXENT RIVER ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    McConnell, Laura L., Jennifer A. Harman-Fetcho and James D. Hagy, III. 2004. Measured Concentrations of Herbicides and Model Predictions of Atrazine Fate in the Patuxent River Estuary. J. Environ. Qual. 33(2):594-604. (ERL,GB X1051).

    The environmental fate of herbicides i...

  13. The Effects of Simazine, a Chlorotriazine Herbicide, on Female Pubertal Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several chlorotriazine herbicides, such as atrazine and its metabolites, have been shown to target the neuroendocrine regulation of male and female reproductive development. Simazine is a pre-emergence herbicide used to control broad-leaf weeds and annual grasses on citrus, nuts ...

  14. Herbicides do not ensure for higher wheat yield, but eliminate rare plant species

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sabrina; Gabriel, Edith; Chadœuf, Joël; Bonneu, Florent; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Weed control is generally considered to be essential for crop production and herbicides have become the main method used for weed control in developed countries. However, concerns about harmful environmental consequences have led to strong pressure on farmers to reduce the use of herbicides. As food demand is forecast to increase by 50% over the next century, an in-depth quantitative analysis of crop yields, weeds and herbicides is required to balance economic and environmental issues. This study analysed the relationship between weeds, herbicides and winter wheat yields using data from 150 winter wheat fields in western France. A Bayesian hierarchical model was built to take account of farmers’ behaviour, including implicitly their perception of weeds and weed control practices, on the effectiveness of treatment. No relationship was detected between crop yields and herbicide use. Herbicides were found to be more effective at controlling rare plant species than abundant weed species. These results suggest that reducing the use of herbicides by up to 50% could maintain crop production, a result confirmed by previous studies, while encouraging weed biodiversity. Food security and biodiversity conservation may, therefore, be achieved simultaneously in intensive agriculture simply by reducing the use of herbicides. PMID:27453451

  15. A comparison of the herbicide tolerances of rare and common plants in an agricultural landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declining plant biodiversity in agroecosystems has often been attributed to escalating use of chemical herbicides, but other changes in farming practice including the clearing of semi-natural habitat fragments confound the influence of herbicides. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to evalua...

  16. Post-directed application of a potential organic herbicide for bell peppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of a potential organic herbicide on weed control efficacy, crop injury, an...

  17. p-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase, a Herbicide Target Site for Natural B-Triketones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control relies primarily on the use of synthetic herbicides. However, concerns over their potential impact on the environment and health necessitate the development of alternative and safer weed management tools. Natural herbicides present themselves as a potential bridge between traditional...

  18. Molecular Bases for Sensitivity to Tubulin-Binding Herbicides in Green Foxtail[w

    PubMed Central

    Délye, Christophe; Menchari, Yosra; Michel, Séverine; Darmency, Henri

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the molecular bases for resistance to several classes of herbicides that bind tubulins in green foxtail (Setaria viridis L. Beauv.). We identified two α- and two β-tubulin genes in green foxtail. Sequence comparison between resistant and sensitive plants revealed two mutations, a leucine-to-phenylalanine change at position 136 and a threonine-to-isoleucine change at position 239, in the gene encoding α2-tubulin. Association of mutation at position 239 with herbicide resistance was demonstrated using near-isogenic lines derived from interspecific pairings between green foxtail and foxtail millet (Setaria italica L. Beauv.), and herbicide sensitivity bioassays combined with allele-specific PCR-mediated genotyping. Association of mutation at position 136 with herbicide resistance was demonstrated using herbicide sensitivity bioassays combined with allele-specific PCR-mediated genotyping. Both mutations were associated with recessive cross resistance to dinitroanilines and benzoic acids, no change in sensitivity to benzamides, and hypersensitivity to carbamates. Using three-dimensional modeling, we found that the two mutations are adjacent and located into a region involved in tubulin dimer-dimer contact. Comparison of three-dimensional α-tubulin models for organisms with contrasted sensitivity to tubulin-binding herbicides enabled us to propose that residue 253 and the vicinity of the side chain of residue 251 are critical determinants for the differences in herbicide sensitivity observed between organisms, and that positions 16, 24, 136, 239, 252, and 268 are involved in modulating sensitivity to these herbicides. PMID:15531712

  19. Laboratory study on leachability of five herbicides in South Australian soils.

    PubMed

    Ying, G G; Williams, B

    2000-03-01

    Norflurazon, oxadiazon, oxyfluorfen, trifluralin and simazine are herbicides widely used in the vineyards of the Barossa Valley, South Australia. The leaching behaviour of norflurazon, oxadiazon, oxyfluorfen and trifluralin was investigated on four key soils in the Barossa Valley. Leaching potential on packed soil columns and actual mobility using intact soil columns were investigated. On the packed soil columns, norflurazon was the most leachable herbicide. More of the herbicides were detected in the leachates from the sandy soils (Mountadam and Nuriootpa) than from the clayey soils (Lyndoch and Tanunda). Organic matter is generally low in soils in the Barossa region. Porosity and saturated conductivity significantly affect herbicide movement and in the sandy Mountadam and Nuriootpa soils, the water flux is greater than for the higher clay content Lyndoch and Tanunda soils. Increasing the time interval between herbicide application and the incidence of "rainfall" reduced the amounts of herbicides found in the leachates. The use of intact soil columns and including simazine for comparison showed that both norflurazon and simazine were present in the leachates. Simazine was the first herbicide to appear in leachates. Sectioning of the intact soil columns after leaching clearly demonstrated that norflurazon and simazine reached the bottom of the soil columns for all soils studied. Greater amounts of norflurazon were retained in the soil columns compared with simazine. The other herbicides were mostly retained in the initial sections of the soil columns. PMID:10736764

  20. Sensitivity to P450-metabolized herbicides in sweet corn: genetic basis and implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews research that our group has conducted the last six years to resolve the issue of sweet corn sensitivity to postemergence herbicides. As a result, commercial sweet corn breeders are currently selecting against the allele(s) that condition herbicide sensitivity by screening with nic...

  1. Organic onions and potential organic herbicides for post-directed applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic onion producers need organic herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of potential organic herbicides on weed control efficacy, crop injury, and yields. The experiment i...

  2. Lawn Weed Control with Herbicides. Home and Garden Bulletin No. 123.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Information and diagrams are given for identification and treatment of weed grasses and broadleaf weeds. Herbicides are suggested for use against each weed and instructions are given for proper application. Information is given for buying herbicides, and applying sprays and cleaning sprayers. (BB)

  3. Herbicide Resistant Weeds: Do Economic Thresholds Still Have a Role in Weed Management?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concern over the development of herbicide resistant weeds has prompted a closer look at the validity of using economic thresholds (ET) as a basis for making treatment decisions. In situations where herbicide resistance is suspected, growers are often advised to employ control measures to completely ...

  4. Comparative toxicity of 20 herbicides to 5 periphytic algae and the relationship with mode of action.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Taya, Kiyoshi; Yoda, Ikuko

    2016-02-01

    The authors used 5 species of periphytic algae to conduct toxicity assays of 20 herbicides. The 5 tested species represent riverine primary producers most likely to be affected by herbicides. A fluorescence microplate toxicity assay was used as an efficient and economical high-throughput assay. Toxicity characteristics were analyzed, focusing on their relationship to herbicide mode of action. The relative differences between 50% and 10% effect concentrations depended on herbicide mode of action, rather than tested species. Moreover, a clear relationship between sensitive species and herbicide mode of action was also observed. Green alga was most sensitive to herbicides of 2 mode of action groups: inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. Diatoms were most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: 4-hydroxyphenyl-pyruvate-dioxygenase inhibitors. Cyanobacterium was most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: inhibitors of acetolactate synthase. The species sensitivity distribution based on obtained data was also analyzed. The slopes of the species sensitivity distribution significantly differed among modes of action, suggesting that difference in species sensitivity is specific to the mode of action. In particular, differences in species sensitivity were markedly large for inhibitors of acetolactate synthase, protoporphyrinogen oxidase, and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. The results clearly showed that a single algal species cannot represent the sensitivity of an algal assemblage. Therefore, multispecies algal toxicity data are essential for substances with specific modes of action. PMID:26174500

  5. Transformation kinetics and mechanism of the sulfonylurea herbicides pyrazosulfuron ethyl and halosulfuron methyl in aqueous solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrazosulfuron ethyl (PE) and halosulfuron methyl (HM) are two new highly active sulfonylurea herbicides which have been widely used for weed control in a variety of vegetables and other crops. These two herbicides have similar molecular structure, differing only in the substitutions on the pyrazole...

  6. Controlling herbicide-resistant weeds: consider incorporating alfalfa in a corn/soybean rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide resistant weeds (HRW) are a serious problem in the U.S. In 1968, the first confirmed case of herbicide resistance in weeds was reported in Washington state. In the 46 years since, the number of HRW in the U.S. has increased dramatically. A major reason for the recent increase in HRW has be...

  7. Herbicides do not ensure for higher wheat yield, but eliminate rare plant species.

    PubMed

    Gaba, Sabrina; Gabriel, Edith; Chadœuf, Joël; Bonneu, Florent; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Weed control is generally considered to be essential for crop production and herbicides have become the main method used for weed control in developed countries. However, concerns about harmful environmental consequences have led to strong pressure on farmers to reduce the use of herbicides. As food demand is forecast to increase by 50% over the next century, an in-depth quantitative analysis of crop yields, weeds and herbicides is required to balance economic and environmental issues. This study analysed the relationship between weeds, herbicides and winter wheat yields using data from 150 winter wheat fields in western France. A Bayesian hierarchical model was built to take account of farmers' behaviour, including implicitly their perception of weeds and weed control practices, on the effectiveness of treatment. No relationship was detected between crop yields and herbicide use. Herbicides were found to be more effective at controlling rare plant species than abundant weed species. These results suggest that reducing the use of herbicides by up to 50% could maintain crop production, a result confirmed by previous studies, while encouraging weed biodiversity. Food security and biodiversity conservation may, therefore, be achieved simultaneously in intensive agriculture simply by reducing the use of herbicides. PMID:27453451

  8. Herbicide Transport to Surface Runoff from a Claypan Soil: Scaling from Plots to Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streams and drinking water reservoirs throughout the claypan soil region of Missouri and Illinois are particularly vulnerable to herbicide contamination from surface runoff during the spring time period. This study follows a plot-scale study conducted on claypan soils to quantify herbicide losses fr...

  9. Integration of Agronomic Practices with Herbicides for Sustainable Weed Management in Aerobic Rice

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, M. P.; Juraimi, A. S.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Uddin, M. K.; Samedani, B.; Puteh, A.; Man, Azmi

    2013-01-01

    Till now, herbicide seems to be a cost effective tool from an agronomic view point to control weeds. But long term efficacy and sustainability issues are the driving forces behind the reconsideration of herbicide dependent weed management strategy in rice. This demands reappearance of physical and cultural management options combined with judicious herbicide application in a more comprehensive and integrated way. Keeping those in mind, some agronomic tools along with different manual weeding and herbicides combinations were evaluated for their weed control efficacy in rice under aerobic soil conditions. Combination of competitive variety, higher seeding rate, and seed priming resulted in more competitive cropping system in favor of rice, which was reflected in lower weed pressure, higher weed control efficiency, and better yield. Most of the herbicides exhibited excellent weed control efficiency. Treatments comprising only herbicides required less cost involvement but produced higher net benefit. On the contrary, treatments comprising both herbicide and manual weeding required high cost involvement and thus produced lower net benefit. Therefore, adoption of competitive rice variety, higher seed rate, and seed priming along with spraying different early-postemergence herbicides in rotation at 10 days after seeding (DAS) followed by a manual weeding at 30 DAS may be recommended from sustainability view point. PMID:24223513

  10. Invasive White Sweetclover (Melilotus officinalis) Control With Herbicides, Cutting and Flaming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White sweetclover is invading Alaska natural areas and control methods are needed. Chlorsulfuron, 2,4-DB, clopyralid, triclopyr, and 2, 4-D controlled white sweetclover seedlings below recommended rates. None of the herbicides reduced established white sweetclover biomass in 2006, but all herbicides...

  11. Beyond Patch Spraying: Site-specific Weed Mmanagement With Multiple Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Site-specific weed management can include both limiting herbicide to areas of the field where weed pressure is above the economic threshold (patch spraying) and varying the choice of herbicide for most cost-effective weed control of local populations. The benefits of patch spraying with multiple, po...

  12. Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) control as affected by herbicide, method of application, and winter cover crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies evaluated cover crop effect, herbicide application method, and residual PRE herbicides on control of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth (PA) in cotton in Macon County GA during 2008 and 2009. Tillage methods were conventional, strip tillage in rolled wheat, or strip tillage in rolled rye. ...

  13. Effectiveness of herbicides for control of hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) in winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a field experiment in 2009-10 at Pennsylvania and Maryland locations, and repeated it in 2010-11, to test the effectiveness of post-emergent herbicides applied at fall and spring timings on seeded hairy vetch in winter wheat. We tested 16 herbicide treatment combinations that included ...

  14. Gene Amplification Is A Mechanism For Rapid Weed Evolution To Herbicide Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the U.S. and other parts of the world following the introduction of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops were created by introduction of a modified 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene, the herbicide target site. Increased use of ...

  15. Why are there no new herbicide modes of action in recent years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides with new modes of action are badly needed to manage evolution of resistance of weeds to existing herbicides. Yet, no major new mode of action has been introduced to the market place for about 20 years. There are probably several reasons for this. New potential products may have remaine...

  16. An Overview of Glyphosate Mode of Action: Why Is It Such A Great Herbicide?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AN OVERVIEW OF GLYPHOSATE MODE OF ACTION: WHY IS IT SUCH A GREAT HERBICIDE? Dale Shaner, Plant Physiologist, USDA-ARS, Fort Collins, CO 80526. Glyphosate dominates world herbicide usage due to its broad spectrum, ease of use and environmental attributes. The introduction of glyphosate resistant ...

  17. NOVEL CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND CARBON SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION OF ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six acetanilide herbicides are currently registered for use in the U.S. Over the past several years, ethanesufonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) degradatoin products of these acetanilide herbicides have been found in U.S. ground waters and surface waters. "Alachlor ESA and ...

  18. Herbicide washoff from forest canopy through fall depends on rainfall dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fate of herbicides, atrazine and metolachlor, released to the atmosphere and deposited in rain was studied following their field application in a small agricultural watershed located in Maryland. We monitored delivery of herbicides in the rain in both open and closed canopy areas of a forested ripa...

  19. Herbicide transport trends in Goodwater Creek experimental watershed II: acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, and metribuzin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers in the Midwestern United States continue to be reliant on soil-applied herbicides for weed control in row crop production, and herbicide contamination of surface waters. Runoff-prone watersheds remain an environmental problem. The primary objective of this study was to analyze trends in conc...

  20. Weed control and phytotoxicity of delayed applications dinitroaniline herbicides in strip-tillage peanut production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Situations occasionally arise where dinitroaniline herbicides are not applied in a timely manner to peanut; either preplant or immediately after seeding. This is particularly frequent in strip-tillage peanut production. In those cases, questions arise if dinitroaniline herbicides can be applied da...

  1. A composite transcriptional signature differentiates responses towards closely related herbicides in Arabidopsis thaliana and brassica napus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, genome-wide expression profiling based on Affymetrix ATH1 arrays was used to identify discriminating responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to five herbicides, which contain active ingredients targeting two different branches of amino acid biosynthesis. One herbicide co...

  2. Pea (Pisum sativum) Seed Production as an Assay for Reproductive Effects Due to Herbicides.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Even though herbicide drift can affect plant reproduction, current plant testing protocols emphasize effects on vegetative growth. In this study, we determined whether a short–growing season plant can indicate potential effects of herbicides on seed production. Pea (Pisum sativum...

  3. Action Spectrum of the Activity of Acifluorfen-methyl, a Diphenyl Ether Herbicide, in Chlamydomonas eugametos1

    PubMed Central

    Ensminger, Michael P.; Hess, F. Dan

    1985-01-01

    Light is required for the herbicide activity of diphenyl ether herbicides. An action spectrum of acifluorfen-methyl activity with Chlamydomonas eugametos (Moewus) determined that cell death occurred at two peaks of light; 450 and 670 nanometers. These data indicate both chlorophyll and carotenoids, but not riboflavin, are involved in herbicide toxicity. PMID:16664086

  4. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA)...

  5. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA)...

  6. New aspects on inhibition of plant acetolactate synthase by chlorsulfuron and imazaquin

    SciTech Connect

    Durner, J.; Gailus, V.; Boeger, P. )

    1991-04-01

    The sulfonylurea herbicide chlorsulfuron and the imidazolinone herbicide imazaquin were shown to be noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitors, respectively, of purified acetolactate synthase from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) with respect to pyrvuate. From double-reciprocal plots of the time-dependent biphasic inhibition by chlorsulfuron, and initial apparent inhibition constant of 68 nanomolar was calculated (a 0 to 4 minute assay was used for the initial inhibition), and a final steady-state dissociation constant of 3 nanomolar was estimated. The corresponding constants for imazaquin were 10 and 0.55 micromolar. Specific binding of ({sup 14}C)chlorsulfuron and ({sup 14}C)imazaquin to purified acetolactate synthase from barley and partially purified enzyme from corn (Zea mays L.) could be demonstrated by gel filtration and equilibrium dialysis. Evidence is presented that the binding of the inhibitors to the enzyme follows the previously described mechanism of slow reversibility once excess inhibitor has been removed. However, after formation of the slowly reversible complex and subsequent dissociation, both chlorsulfuron and imazaquin seem to permanently inactivate acetolactate synthase. These results add a new feature to the mode of action of these herbicides with respect to their high herbicidal potency.

  7. Herbicide and nitrate distribution in central Iowa rainfall

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, J.L.; Prueger, J.H.; Pfeiffer, R.L.; Wesley, C.K.

    1996-03-01

    Herbicides are detected in rainfall; however, these are a small fraction of the total applied. This study was designed to evaluate monthly and annual variation in atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N{prime}-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine), alachlor (2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)acetamide), metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide), and NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in rainfall over Walnut Creek watershed south of Ames, IA. The study began in 1991 and continued through 1994. Within the watershed, two wet/dry precipitation samplers were positioned 4 km apart. Detections varied during the year with >90% of the herbicide detections occurring in April through early July. Concentrations varied among events from nondetectable amounts to concentrations of 154 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1}, which occurred when atrazine was applied during an extremely humid day immediately followed by rainfall of <10 mm that washed spray drift from the atmosphere. This was a local scale phenomenon, because the other collector had a more typical concentration of 1.7 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1} with an 8-mm rainfall. VAriation between the two collectors suggests that local scale meteorological processes affect herbicide movement. Yearly atrazine deposition totals were >100 {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} representing <0.1% of the amount applied. Nitrate-N concentrations in precipitation were uniformly distributed throughout the year and without annual variation in the concentrations. Deposition rates of NO{sub 3}-N were about 1.2 g m{sup {minus}2}. Annual loading onto the watershed was about 25% of the amount applied from all forms of N fertilizers. Movement and rates of deposition provide an understanding of the processes and magnitude of the impact of agriculture on the environment. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Protective responses induced by herbicide safeners in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Victoria L.; Cummins, Ian; Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Edwards, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Safeners are agrochemicals which enhance tolerance to herbicides in cereals including wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by elevating the expression of xenobiotic detoxifying enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs). When wheat plants were spray-treated with three safener chemistries, namely cloquintocet mexyl, mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl, an apparently identical subset of GSTs derived from the tau, phi and lambda classes accumulated in the foliage. Treatment with the closely related mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl enhanced seedling shoot growth, but this effect was not determined with the chemically unrelated cloquintocet mexyl. Focussing on cloquintocet mexyl, treatments were found to only give a transient induction of GSTs, with the period of elevation being dose dependent. Examining the role of safener metabolism in controlling these responses, it was determined that cloquintocet mexyl was rapidly hydrolysed to the respective carboxylic acid. Studies with cloquintocet showed that the acid was equally effective at inducing GSTs as the ester and appeared to be the active safener. Studies on the tissue induction of GSTs showed that whilst phi and tau class enzymes were induced in all tissues, the induction of the lambda enzymes was restricted to the meristems. To test the potential protective effects of cloquintocet mexyl in wheat on chemicals other than herbicides, seeds were pre-soaked in safeners prior to sowing on soil containing oil and a range of heavy metals. Whilst untreated seeds were unable to germinate on the contaminated soil, safener treatments resulted in seedlings briefly growing before succumbing to the pollutants. Our results show that safeners exert a range of protective and growth promoting activities in wheat that extend beyond enhancing tolerance to herbicides. PMID:23564986

  9. Modeling potential herbicide loss to surface waters on the Swiss plateau.

    PubMed

    Siber, Rosi; Stamm, Christian; Reichert, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Lack of sufficiently detailed data often limits the applicability of complex transport-reaction models for estimating potential herbicide loss to surface waters. Therefore, there is also a need for simple models that are easy to apply but still capture the main features of the underlying processes. In this study, a simple regression model was developed to assess the vulnerability of catchments in the Swiss Plateau to diffuse herbicide loss to surface waters. The model is designed as a screening tool to rank the catchments in a relative sense and not to calculate Predicted Environmental Concentrations (PEC) of pesticides. The main goal is to capture two dominating factors controlling diffuse herbicide transport into streams and rivers. These factors are herbicide application and fast flow processes that are mainly responsible for herbicide transport. In a first step vulnerability of sites to herbicide loss is estimated based on site-specific conditions irrespective of actual herbicide application. In the second step, this vulnerability assessment is combined with actual herbicide application data to estimate the potential herbicide loss. The fast flow index (FFI), derived from discharge data using a base flow separation method, was applied as a proxy for the amount of fast flow occurring. The influence of catchment attributes (including topographic, climatic and soil data) on the FFI was analyzed using a multiple regression approach based on data from 57 catchments of the Swiss Plateau. By combining regression analysis with mechanistic knowledge, a two factor non-linear model based on river density and soil permeability as dominant input factors was selected as the best model for FFI prediction given the available data. Higher dimensional models had to be excluded because the strong correlation between the potential input factors led to unrealistic dependences while only minimally improving the quality of the fit. The spatial pattern of the predicted FFI as a

  10. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996-2012.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996-2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the 'conventional alternative' have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased awareness of

  11. Synergistic effects of a combined exposure to herbicides and an insecticide in Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazanti, L.; Sparling, D.W.; Rice, C.; Bialek, K.; Stevenson, C.; Teels, B.

    2003-01-01

    Combinations of the herbicides atrazine and metolachlor and the insecticide chlorpyrifos were tested under both laboratory and field conditions to determine their individual and combined effects on amphibian populations. In the lab Hyla versicolor tadpoles experienced 100% mortality when exposed to a high combination of the pesticides (2.0 mg/L atrazine, 2.54 mg/L metolachlor, 1.0 mg/L chlorpyrifos) whereas low concentrations of the pesticides (0.2 mg/L atrazine, 0.25 mg/L metolachlor, 0.1 mg/L chlorpyrifos) or high concentrations of either herbicides or insecticide alone caused lethargy, reduced growth and delayed metamorphosis but no significant mortality. In the field high herbicide, low insecticide and low herbicide, low insecticide mixtures significantly reduced amphibian populations compared to controls but in the low herbicide, low insecticide wetlands amphibian populations were able to recover through recruitment by the end of the season.

  12. Effects of sampling strategies on estimates of annual mean herbicide concentrations in midwestern rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Hay, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of 10 sampling strategies on estimates of annual mean concentrations of the herbicides atrazine, alachlor, and cyanazine in selected midwestern rivers were tested. The accuracy of the strategies was computed by comparing time-weighted annual mean herbicide concentrations calculated from water samples collected from 17 locations on midwestern rivers, with simulated annual mean concentrations calculated for each sampling strategy, using Monte Carlo simulations. Monthly sampling was the most accurate strategy tested. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires quarterly sampling for municipalities using surface water as a source of drinking water. Due to the seasonality of herbicide occurrence and transport, quarterly sampling underestimates annual mean herbicide concentrations in over 40% of the simulations. Three of the strategies tested showed that, relative to quarterly sampling, a more accurate representation of annual mean concentrations could be obtained by sampling more frequently during spring and early summer runoff and assuming zero herbicide concentration during late summer and winter months.

  13. Herbicides in surface waters of the midwestern United States: The effect of spring flush

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Goolsby, D.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Kolpin, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Approximately three-fourths of all preemergent herbicides used in the United States are applied to row crops over a 12-state area, called the "corn belt" (I). The application of these compounds may cause widespread degradation of water quality (2). Because herbicides are water soluble, there is the potential for leaching into groundwater and surface water (3, 4), as well as aerial transport and Occurrence in precipitation (5). Monitoring studies in the Midwest have shown widespread detection of herbicides in groundwater and in surface water (3,4); however, little is known about the regional impact of herbicide application (6). The objective of our research was to assess the mag. nitude and persistence of herbicide runoff in the spring flush at the regional scale. 

  14. Oxidative damage induced by herbicides is mediated by thiol oxidation and hydroperoxides production.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Fiorani, Mara; Azzolini, Catia; Marzocchi, Barbara; Proietti, Fabrizio; Collodel, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2010-08-01

    Toxicological and environmental issues are associated with the extensive use of agricultural pesticides, although the knowledge of their toxic effects as commercial formulations is still far from being complete. This work investigated the impact of three herbicides as commercial formulations on the oxidative status of a wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. With yeast being a well-established model of eukaryotic cells, especially as far as regards the stress response, these results may be indicative of potential damages on higher eukaryotes. It was found that herbicide-mediated toxicity towards yeast cells could be the result of an increased production of hydroperoxides (like in the case of the herbicides Pointer and Silglif) or advanced oxidation protein products and lipid peroxidation (especially in the case of the herbicide Proper Energy). Through a redox-proteomic approach it was found also that, besides a common signature, each herbicide showed a specific pattern for protein thiols oxidation. PMID:20528566

  15. Predicting herbicide and biocide concentrations in rivers across Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemyss, Devon; Honti, Mark; Stamm, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Pesticide concentrations vary strongly in space and time. Accordingly, intensive sampling is required to achieve a reliable quantification of pesticide pollution. As this requires substantial resources, loads and concentration ranges in many small and medium streams remain unknown. Here, we propose partially filling the information gap for herbicides and biocides by using a modelling approach that predicts stream concentrations without site-specific calibration simply based on generally available data like land use, discharge and nation-wide consumption data. The simple, conceptual model distinguishes herbicide losses from agricultural fields, private gardens and biocide losses from buildings (facades, roofs). The herbicide model is driven by river discharge and the applied herbicide mass; the biocide model requires precipitation and the footprint area of urban areas containing the biocide. The model approach allows for modelling concentrations across multiple catchments at the daily, or shorter, time scale and for small to medium-sized catchments (1 - 100 km2). Four high resolution sampling campaigns in the Swiss Plateau were used to calibrate the model parameters for six model compounds: atrazine, metolachlor, terbuthylazine, terbutryn, diuron and mecoprop. Five additional sampled catchments across Switzerland were used to directly compare the predicted to the measured concentrations. Analysis of the first results reveals a reasonable simulation of the concentration dynamics for specific rainfall events and across the seasons. Predicted concentration ranges are reasonable even without site-specific calibration. This indicates the transferability of the calibrated model directly to other areas. However, the results also demonstrate systematic biases in that the highest measured peaks were not attained by the model. Probable causes for these deviations are conceptual model limitations and input uncertainty (pesticide use intensity, local precipitation, etc

  16. Herbicidal inhibitors of amino acid biosynthesis and herbicide-tolerant crops.

    PubMed

    Tan, S; Evans, R; Singh, B

    2006-03-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitors interfere with branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis by inhibiting AHAS. Glyphosate affects aromatic amino acid biosynthesis by inhibiting 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Glufosinate inhibits glutamine synthetase and blocks biosynthesis of glutamine. AHAS gene variants that confer tolerance to AHAS inhibitors have been discovered in plants through selection or mutagenesis. Imidazolinone-tolerant crops have been commercialized based on these AHAS gene variants. A modified maize EPSPS gene and CP4-EPSPS gene from Agrobacterium sp. have been used to transform plants for target-based tolerance to glyphosate. A gox gene isolated from Ochrobactrum anthropi has also been employed to encode glyphosate oxidoreductase to detoxify glyphosate in plants. Glyphosate-tolerant crops with EPSPS transgene alone or both EPSPS and gox transgenes have been commercialized. Similarly, bar and pat genes isolated from Streptomyces hygroscopicus and S. viridochromogenes, respectively, have been inserted into plants to encode phosphinothricin N-acetyltransferase to detoxify glufosinate. Glufosinate-tolerant crops have been commercialized using one of these two transgenes. PMID:16547651

  17. Amaranthus palmeri resistance and differential tolerance of Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus hybridus to ALS-inhibitor herbicides.

    PubMed

    Burgos, N R; Kuk, Y I; Talbert, R E

    2001-05-01

    Suspected imazaquin-resistant accessions of Amaranthus palmeri were studied to determine the magnitude of resistance and cross-resistance to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides and compare differential tolerance of A palmeri and Amaranthus hybridus to ALS inhibitors. Five of seven A palmeri accessions were resistant to imazaquin. The most imazaquin-resistant accession, accession 7, also showed 74, 39 and 117 times higher resistance than the susceptible biotype to chlorimuron, diclosulam and pyrithiobac, respectively. Resistance to imazaquin and cross-resistance to other ALS inhibitors in A palmeri was due to a less-sensitive ALS enzyme. A palmeri was 70 times more tolerant to imazaquin than A hybridus. A palmeri was also seven times more tolerant to pyrithiobac than A hybridus. Differences in ALS enzyme sensitivity could not fully account for the high tolerance of A palmeri to imazaquin compared to A hybridus. Both species were equally affected by chlorimuron and diclosulam. PMID:11374163

  18. Herbicide monitoring in soil, runoff waters and sediments in an olive orchard.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Maria Jesus; De Luna, Elena; Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Hermosin, M Carmen

    2016-11-01

    Occurrences of surface water contamination by herbicides in areas where olive orchards are established reveal a need to understand soil processes affecting herbicide fate at field scale for this popular Mediterranean crop. A monitoring study with two herbicides (terbuthylazine and oxyfluorfen) in the first 2cm of soil, runoff waters, and sediments, was carried out after under natural rainfall conditions following winter herbicide application. At the end of the 107day field experiment, no residues of the soil applied terbuthylazine were recovered, whereas 42% of the oxyfluorfen applied remained in the top soil. Very low levels of both herbicides were measured in runoff waters; however, concentrations were slightly higher for terbuthylazine (0.53% of applied) than for oxyfluorfen (0.03% of applied), relating to their respective water solubilities. Congruent with soil residue data, 38.15% of the applied oxyfluorfen was found in runoff-sediment, compared to only 0.46% for terbuthylazine. Accordingly, the herbicide soil distribution coefficients measured within runoff field tanks was much greater for oxyfluorfen (Kd=3098) than for terbuthylazine (Kd=1.57). The herbicide oxyfluorfen is co-transported with sediment in runoff, remaining trapped and/or adsorbed to soil particle aggregates, due in part to its low water solubility. In contrast, terbuthylazine soil dissipation may be associated more so with leaching processes, favored by its high water solubility, low sorption, and slow degradation. By comparing these two herbicides, our results reaffirm the importance of herbicide physico-chemical properties in dictating their behavior in soil and also suggest that herbicides with low solubility, as seen in the case oxyfluorfen, remain susceptible to offsite transport associated with sediments. PMID:27351146

  19. Pulmonary Proteome and Protein Networks in Response to the Herbicide Paraquat in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Il Kyu; Jeong, Mihye; You, Are-Sun; Park, Kyung Hun; Li, Qing X.

    2015-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) has been one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. PQ, when ingested, is toxic to humans and may cause acute respiratory distress syndrome. To investigate molecular perturbation in lung tissues caused by PQ, Sprague Dawley male rats were fed with PQ at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight for 20 times in four weeks. The effects of PQ on cellular processes and biological pathways were investigated by analyzing proteome in the lung tissues in comparison with the control. Among the detected proteins, 321 and 254 proteins were over-represented and under-represented, respectively, in the PQ-exposed rat lung tissues in comparison with the no PQ control. All over- and under-represented proteins were subjected to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to create 25 biological networks and 38 pathways of interacting protein clusters. Over-represented proteins were involved in the C-jun-amino-terminal kinase pathway, caveolae-mediated endocytosis signaling, cardiovascular-cancer-respiratory pathway, regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, non-small cell lung cancer signaling, pulmonary hypertension, glutamate receptor, immune response and angiogenesis. Under-represented proteins occurred in the p53 signaling pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, cartilage development and angiogenesis inhibition in the PQ-treated lungs. The results suggest that PQ may generate reactive oxygen species, impair the MAPK/p53 signaling pathway, activate angiogenesis and depress apoptosis in the lungs. PMID:26538867

  20. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G T T; Erlenkamp, G; Jäck, O; Küberl, A; Bott, M; Fiorani, F; Gohlke, H; Groth, G

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world's most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2',3',4',3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2',3',4'-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15-45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468