Science.gov

Sample records for accelerate cloud rendering

  1. Temporally rendered automatic cloud extraction (TRACE) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrero, Dennis M.; Yale, James G.; Davis, Roger E.; Rollins, John M.

    1999-10-01

    Smoke/obscurant testing requires that 2D cloud extent be extracted from visible and thermal imagery. These data are used alone or in combination with 2D data from other aspects to make 3D calculations of cloud properties, including dimensions, volume, centroid, travel, and uniformity. Determining cloud extent from imagery has historically been a time-consuming manual process. To reduce time and cost associated with smoke/obscurant data processing, automated methods to extract cloud extent from imagery were investigated. The TRACE system described in this paper was developed and implemented at U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, UT by the Science and Technology Corporation--Acuity Imaging Incorporated team with Small Business Innovation Research funding. TRACE uses dynamic background subtraction and 3D fast Fourier transform as primary methods to discriminate the smoke/obscurant cloud from the background. TRACE has been designed to run on a PC-based platform using Windows. The PC-Windows environment was chosen for portability, to give TRACE the maximum flexibility in terms of its interaction with peripheral hardware devices such as video capture boards, removable media drives, network cards, and digital video interfaces. Video for Windows provides all of the necessary tools for the development of the video capture utility in TRACE and allows for interchangeability of video capture boards without any software changes. TRACE is designed to take advantage of future upgrades in all aspects of its component hardware. A comparison of cloud extent determined by TRACE with manual method is included in this paper.

  2. Application of cellular automata approach for cloud simulation and rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Immanuel, W.; Paul Mary Deborrah, S.; Samuel Selvaraj, R.

    2014-03-15

    Current techniques for creating clouds in games and other real time applications produce static, homogenous clouds. These clouds, while viable for real time applications, do not exhibit an organic feel that clouds in nature exhibit. These clouds, when viewed over a time period, were able to deform their initial shape and move in a more organic and dynamic way. With cloud shape technology we should be able in the future to extend to create even more cloud shapes in real time with more forces. Clouds are an essential part of any computer model of a landscape or an animation of an outdoor scene. A realistic animation of clouds is also important for creating scenes for flight simulators, movies, games, and other. Our goal was to create a realistic animation of clouds.

  3. Efficient hardware accelerated rendering of multiple volumes by data dependent local render functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Helko; Geller, Dieter; Weese, Jürgen; Kiefer, Gundolf

    2007-03-01

    The inspection of a patient's data for diagnostics, therapy planning or therapy guidance involves an increasing number of 3D data sets, e.g. acquired by different imaging modalities, with different scanner settings or at different times. To enable viewing of the data in one consistent anatomical context fused interactive renderings of multiple 3D data sets are desirable. However, interactive fused rendering of typical medical data sets using standard computing hardware remains a challenge. In this paper we present a method to render multiple 3D data sets. By introducing local rendering functions, i.e. functions that are adapted to the complexity of the visible data contained in the different regions of a scene, we can ensure that the overall performance for fused rendering of multiple data sets depends on the actual amount of visible data. This is in contrast to other approaches where the performance depends mainly on the number of rendered data sets. We integrate the method into a streaming rendering architecture with brick-based data representations of the volume data. This enables efficient handling of data sets that do not fit into the graphics board memory and a good utilization of the texture caches. Furthermore, transfer and rendering of volume data that does not contribute to the final image can be avoided. We illustrate the benefits of our method by experiments with clinical data.

  4. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2012-11-30

    Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

  5. Artist's Rendering of Multiple Whirlpools in a Sodium Gas Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image depicts the formation of multiple whirlpools in a sodium gas cloud. Scientists who cooled the cloud and made it spin created the whirlpools in a Massachusetts Institute of Technology laboratory, as part of NASA-funded research. This process is similar to a phenomenon called starquakes that appear as glitches in the rotation of pulsars in space. MIT's Wolgang Ketterle and his colleagues, who conducted the research under a grant from the Biological and Physical Research Program through NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., cooled the sodium gas to less than one millionth of a degree above absolute zero (-273 Celsius or -460 Fahrenheit). At such extreme cold, the gas cloud converts to a peculiar form of matter called Bose-Einstein condensate, as predicted by Albert Einstein and Satyendra Bose of India in 1927. No physical container can hold such ultra-cold matter, so Ketterle's team used magnets to keep the cloud in place. They then used a laser beam to make the gas cloud spin, a process Ketterle compares to stroking a ping-pong ball with a feather until it starts spirning. The spinning sodium gas cloud, whose volume was one- millionth of a cubic centimeter, much smaller than a raindrop, developed a regular pattern of more than 100 whirlpools.

  6. Accelerating fourier volume rendering by polar coordinate data representation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jan-Ray; Lee, Shun-Zhi; Lee, Huai-Che

    2012-12-01

    Volume rendering is an important tool to visualize three-dimensional data in biomedicine by projecting the data to a two-dimensional plane. The projection is done by ray casting and its complexity is proportional to the number of three-dimensional data points. To reduce complexity, Fourier volume rendering (FVR) uses slice projection theorem to facilitate the integration of voxels along the ray casting path. In this paper, we proposed a new method for FVR that stored and processed the frequency domain data in polar coordinate. By exploiting three aspects of data processing which is previously impossible in rectilinear coordinate, our new method is much faster than the previous methods. The first aspect is data regularity. When data are stored in polar coordinate, extracting a slice involves accessing data stored in adjacent memory location. This regularity makes memory access more efficient. The second aspect is to utilize the high data density near the origin in polar coordinate. We can obtain two benefits from this aspect. The first allows us to extract a slice by nearest-neighbor interpolation instead of more complex interpolation but without sacrificing image quality. The second allows us to trade off between image quality and memory storage. The third aspect is to recognize that converting from rectilinear coordinate to polar coordinate is a one-time process. Therefore, we can use a better interpolation kernel with larger support in coordinate conversion. In turn, most of the computation is shifted to the preprocessing stage and interactive rendering can be made very fast. In the experiments, we show that the speed in interactive visualization for our new method is independent of the size of the interpolation kernel, therefore, achieving comparable image quality at a faster rate than previous methods. PMID:22771165

  7. Hardware-accelerated autostereogram rendering for interactive 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petz, Christoph; Goldluecke, Bastian; Magnor, Marcus

    2003-05-01

    Single Image Random Dot Stereograms (SIRDS) are an attractive way of depicting three-dimensional objects using conventional display technology. Once trained in decoupling the eyes' convergence and focusing, autostereograms of this kind are able to convey the three-dimensional impression of a scene. We present in this work an algorithm that generates SIRDS at interactive frame rates on a conventional PC. The presented system allows rotating a 3D geometry model and observing the object from arbitrary positions in real-time. Subjective tests show that the perception of a moving or rotating 3D scene presents no problem: The gaze remains focused onto the object. In contrast to conventional SIRDS algorithms, we render multiple pixels in a single step using a texture-based approach, exploiting the parallel-processing architecture of modern graphics hardware. A vertex program determines the parallax for each vertex of the geometry model, and the graphics hardware's texture unit is used to render the dot pattern. No data has to be transferred between main memory and the graphics card for generating the autostereograms, leaving CPU capacity available for other tasks. Frame rates of 25 fps are attained at a resolution of 1024x512 pixels on a standard PC using a consumer-grade nVidia GeForce4 graphics card, demonstrating the real-time capability of the system.

  8. Ice Clouds in Martian Arctic (Accelerated Movie)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Clouds scoot across the Martian sky in a movie clip consisting of 10 frames taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    This clip accelerates the motion. The camera took these 10 frames over a 10-minute period from 2:52 p.m. to 3:02 p.m. local solar time at the Phoenix site during Sol 94 (Aug. 29), the 94th Martian day since landing.

    Particles of water-ice make up these clouds, like ice-crystal cirrus clouds on Earth. Ice hazes have been common at the Phoenix site in recent days.

    The camera took these images as part of a campaign by the Phoenix team to see clouds and track winds. The view is toward slightly west of due south, so the clouds are moving westward or west-northwestward.

    The clouds are a dramatic visualization of the Martian water cycle. The water vapor comes off the north pole during the peak of summer. The northern-Mars summer has just passed its peak water-vapor abundance at the Phoenix site. The atmospheric water is available to form into clouds, fog and frost, such as the lander has been observing recently.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Nighttime Clouds in Martian Arctic (Accelerated Movie)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    An angry looking sky is captured in a movie clip consisting of 10 frames taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The clip accelerates the motion. The images were take around 3 a.m. local solar time at the Phoenix site during Sol 95 (Aug. 30), the 95th Martian day since landing.

    The swirling clouds may be moving generally in a westward direction over the lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. ClipCard: Sharable, Searchable Visual Metadata Summaries on the Cloud to Render Big Data Actionable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, P.; Davis, D.; Cunningham, R.

    2013-12-01

    Research firm IDC estimates that approximately 90 percent of the Enterprise Big Data go un-analyzed, as 'dark data' - an enormous corpus of undiscovered, untagged information residing on data warehouses, servers and Storage Area Networks (SAN). In the geosciences, these data range from unpublished model runs to vast survey data assets to raw sensor data. Many of these are now being collected instantaneously, at a greater volume and in new data formats. Not all of these data can be analyzed, nor processed in real time, and their features may not be well described at the time of collection. These dark data are a serious data management problem for science organizations of all types, especially ones with mandated or required data reporting and compliance requirements. Additionally, data curators and scientists are encouraged to quantify the impact of their data holdings as a way to measure research success. Deriving actionable insights is the foremost goal of Big Data Analytics (BDA), which is especially true with geoscience, given its direct impact on most of the pressing global issues. Clearly, there is a pressing need for innovative approaches to making dark data discoverable, measurable, and actionable. We report on ClipCard, a Cloud-based SaaS analytic platform for instant summarization, quick search, visualization and easy sharing of metadata summaries form the Dark Data at hierarchical levels of detail, thus rendering it 'white', i.e., actionable. We present a use case of the ClipCard platform, a cloud-based application which helps generate (abstracted) visual metadata summaries and meta-analytics for environmental data at hierarchical scales within and across big data containers. These summaries and analyses provide important new tools for managing big data and simplifying collaboration through easy to deploy sharing APIs. The ClipCard application solves a growing data management bottleneck by helping enterprises and large organizations to summarize, search

  11. Cloud-based Monte Carlo modelling of BSSRDF for the rendering of human skin appearance (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, Alexander; Rushmeier, Holly E.; Meglinski, Igor; Bykov, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new Monte Carlo based approach for the modelling of Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF) for accurate rendering of human skin appearance. The variations of both skin tissues structure and the major chromophores are taken into account correspondingly to the different ethnic and age groups. The computational solution utilizes HTML5, accelerated by the graphics processing units (GPUs), and therefore is convenient for the practical use at the most of modern computer-based devices and operating systems. The results of imitation of human skin reflectance spectra, corresponding skin colours and examples of 3D faces rendering are presented and compared with the results of phantom studies.

  12. Comparative analysis of video processing and 3D rendering for cloud video games using different virtualization technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, Adedayo; Alcaraz-Calero, Jose M.; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive empirical performance evaluation of 3D video processing employing the physical/virtual architecture implemented in a cloud environment. Different virtualization technologies, virtual video cards and various 3D benchmarks tools have been utilized in order to analyse the optimal performance in the context of 3D online gaming applications. This study highlights 3D video rendering performance under each type of hypervisors, and other factors including network I/O, disk I/O and memory usage. Comparisons of these factors under well-known virtual display technologies such as VNC, Spice and Virtual 3D adaptors reveal the strengths and weaknesses of the various hypervisors with respect to 3D video rendering and streaming.

  13. Accelerating Time-Varying Hardware Volume Rendering Using TSP Trees and Color-Based Error Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, David; Chiang, Ling-Jen; Shen, Han-Wei; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new hardware volume rendering algorithm for time-varying data. The algorithm uses the Time-Space Partitioning (TSP) tree data structure to identify regions within the data that have spatial or temporal coherence. By using this coherence, the rendering algorithm can improve performance when the volume data is larger than the texture memory capacity by decreasing the amount of textures required. This coherence can also allow improved speed by appropriately rendering flat-shaded polygons instead of textured polygons, and by not rendering transparent regions. To reduce the polygonization overhead caused by the use of the hierarchical data structure, we introduce an optimization method using polygon templates. The paper also introduces new color-based error metrics, which more accurately identify coherent regions compared to the earlier scalar-based metrics. By showing experimental results from runs using different data sets and error metrics, we demonstrate that the new methods give substantial improvements in volume rendering performance.

  14. The acceleration of high-velocity clouds in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Cowie, L. L.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Interstellar clouds passed by blast waves emanating from supernova explosions will be accelerated by the ram pressure of the expanding interior shocked gas. We present numerical and analytical solutions for cloud acceleration in this environment, comparing the results with recent observations of faint, high-velocity (greater than 100 km/sec) filaments observed in Cygnus and Vela. Photons from the conductive interface between the clouds and the surrounding medium can provide the ionizing flux necessary for observable optical emission. Several predictions are made, the most important of which is that fast clouds of neutral hydrogen with column densities of about 10 quintillion per sq cm should be observable in 21 cm studies of SNRs.

  15. Progress in Modeling Electron Cloud Effects in HIF Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Molvik, A. W.; Azevedo, A.; Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M. A.; Stoltz, P. H.

    2003-10-01

    Stray electrons can arise in positive-charge accelerators for heavy ion fusion (or other applications) from ionization of gas (ambient or released from walls), or via secondary emission. Their accumulation is affected by the beam potential and duration, and the accelerating and confining fields. We present electron orbit simulations which show the resultant e-cloud distribution; ion simulations with prescribed e-clouds which show the effect on ion beam quality; a gyro-averaged model for including electron dynamics in ion simulations, and its implementation status; and progress in merging the capabilities of WARP (3-D PIC code for HIF) (D.P. Grote, A. Friedman, I. Haber, Proc. 1996 Comp. Accel. Physics Conf., AIP Proc. 391), 51 (1996), with those of POSINST (e-clouds in high-energy accelerators) (M.A. Furman, LBNL-41482/CBP Note 247/LHC Project Report 180, May 20, 1998).

  16. GPU-accelerated micromagnetic simulations using cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermain, C. L.; Rowlands, G. E.; Buhrman, R. A.; Ralph, D. C.

    2016-03-01

    Highly parallel graphics processing units (GPUs) can improve the speed of micromagnetic simulations significantly as compared to conventional computing using central processing units (CPUs). We present a strategy for performing GPU-accelerated micromagnetic simulations by utilizing cost-effective GPU access offered by cloud computing services with an open-source Python-based program for running the MuMax3 micromagnetics code remotely. We analyze the scaling and cost benefits of using cloud computing for micromagnetics.

  17. Effect of Accelerator Impedance on Electron Cloud Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Brian; Muggli, Patric; Fischer, Wolfram; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Katsouleas, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Interaction between a beam and electron clouds (e-cloud) present in circular accelerators is known to limit accelerator performances through instabilities, beam loss, beam-blowup, and the resulting reduced luminosity. The RHIC beam is most susceptible to instabilities as it crosses energy transition (γt=22.9) and it is posited that ring impedance could play a role in the development of instabilities during this transition. We use the quasi-static particle in cell code QuickPIC to describe the interaction between the RHIC Au beam and the electron cloud. In QuickPIC the electron cloud density is uniform around the ring and the beam has a constant beta function given by the accelerator circumference and the beam tune. We incorporate in the current QuickPIC version the ring impedance for a circular accelerator and we take a first look at the effect this impedance has on the beam and e-cloud interaction for typical RHIC parameters.

  18. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  19. On the efficient acceleration of clouds in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Tim; Proga, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    In the broad line region of active galactic nuclei (AGN), acceleration occurs naturally when a cloud condenses out of the hot confining medium due to the increase in line opacity as the cloud cools. However, acceleration by radiation pressure is not very efficient when the flux is time-independent, unless the flow is 1D. Here, we explore how acceleration is affected by a time-varying flux, as AGN are known to be highly variable. If the period of flux oscillations is longer than the thermal time-scale, we expect the gas to cool during the low flux state, and therefore line opacity should quickly increase. The cloud will receive a small kick due to the increased radiation force. We perform hydrodynamical simulations using ATHENA to confirm this effect and quantify its importance. We find that despite the flow becoming turbulent in 2D due to hydrodynamic instabilities, a 20 per cent modulation of the flux leads to a net increase in acceleration - by more than a factor of 2 - in both 1D and 2D. We show that this acceleration is sufficient to produce the observed line widths, although we only consider optically thin clouds. We discuss the implications of our results for photoionization modelling and reverberation mapping.

  20. Dynamic real-time 4D cardiac MDCT image display using GPU-accelerated volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry M

    2009-09-01

    Intraoperative cardiac monitoring, accurate preoperative diagnosis, and surgical planning are important components of minimally-invasive cardiac therapy. Retrospective, electrocardiographically (ECG) gated, multidetector computed tomographical (MDCT), four-dimensional (3D + time), real-time, cardiac image visualization is an important tool for the surgeon in such procedure, particularly if the dynamic volumetric image can be registered to, and fused with the actual patient anatomy. The addition of stereoscopic imaging provides a more intuitive environment by adding binocular vision and depth cues to structures within the beating heart. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a comprehensive stereoscopic 4D cardiac image visualization and manipulation platform, based on the opacity density radiation model, which exploits the power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) in the rendering pipeline. In addition, we present a new algorithm to synchronize the phases of the dynamic heart to clinical ECG signals, and to calculate and compensate for latencies in the visualization pipeline. A dynamic multiresolution display is implemented to enable the interactive selection and emphasis of volume of interest (VOI) within the entire contextual cardiac volume and to enhance performance, and a novel color and opacity adjustment algorithm is designed to increase the uniformity of the rendered multiresolution image of heart. Our system provides a visualization environment superior to noninteractive software-based implementations, but with a rendering speed that is comparable to traditional, but inferior quality, volume rendering approaches based on texture mapping. This retrospective ECG-gated dynamic cardiac display system can provide real-time feedback regarding the suspected pathology, function, and structural defects, as well as anatomical information such as chamber volume and morphology. PMID:19467840

  1. Simulating Electron Clouds in Heavy-Ion Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik,A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2005-04-07

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a concern for most accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly-, weakly-, and un-magnetized. They describe their approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. They present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam and an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrates the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  2. Fast perspective volume ray casting method using GPU-based acceleration techniques for translucency rendering in 3D endoluminal CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Hee; Lee, Jeongjin; Lee, Ho; Kye, Heewon; Shin, Yeong Gil; Kim, Soo Hong

    2009-08-01

    Recent advances in graphics processing unit (GPU) have enabled direct volume rendering at interactive rates. However, although perspective volume rendering for opaque isosurface is rapidly performed using conventional GPU-based method, perspective volume rendering for non-opaque volume such as translucency rendering is still slow. In this paper, we propose an efficient GPU-based acceleration technique of fast perspective volume ray casting for translucency rendering in computed tomography (CT) colonography. The empty space searching step is separated from the shading and compositing steps, and they are divided into separate processing passes in the GPU. Using this multi-pass acceleration, empty space leaping is performed exactly at the voxel level rather than at the block level, so that the efficiency of empty space leaping is maximized for colon data set, which has many curved or narrow regions. In addition, the numbers of shading and compositing steps are fixed, and additional empty space leapings between colon walls are performed to increase computational efficiency further near the haustral folds. Experiments were performed to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed scheme compared with the conventional GPU-based method, which has been known to be the fastest algorithm. The experimental results showed that the rendering speed of our method was 7.72fps for translucency rendering of 1024x1024 colonoscopy image, which was about 3.54 times faster than that of the conventional method. Since our method performed the fully optimized empty space leaping for any kind of colon inner shapes, the frame-rate variations of our method were about two times smaller than that of the conventional method to guarantee smooth navigation. The proposed method could be successfully applied to help diagnose colon cancer using translucency rendering in virtual colonoscopy. PMID:19541296

  3. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  4. See-Through Imaging of Laser-Scanned 3d Cultural Heritage Objects Based on Stochastic Rendering of Large-Scale Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Okamoto, N.; Umegaki, R.; Wang, S.; Uemura, M.; Okamoto, A.; Koyamada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for the precise 3D see-through imaging, or transparent visualization, of the large-scale and complex point clouds acquired via the laser scanning of 3D cultural heritage objects. Our method is based on a stochastic algorithm and directly uses the 3D points, which are acquired using a laser scanner, as the rendering primitives. This method achieves the correct depth feel without requiring depth sorting of the rendering primitives along the line of sight. Eliminating this need allows us to avoid long computation times when creating natural and precise 3D see-through views of laser-scanned cultural heritage objects. The opacity of each laser-scanned object is also flexibly controllable. For a laser-scanned point cloud consisting of more than 107 or 108 3D points, the pre-processing requires only a few minutes, and the rendering can be executed at interactive frame rates. Our method enables the creation of cumulative 3D see-through images of time-series laser-scanned data. It also offers the possibility of fused visualization for observing a laser-scanned object behind a transparent high-quality photographic image placed in the 3D scene. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to festival floats of high cultural value. These festival floats have complex outer and inner 3D structures and are suitable for see-through imaging.

  5. Accelerating and democratizing science through cloud-based services.

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.

    2011-05-01

    Many businesses today save time and money, and increase their agility, by outsourcing mundane IT tasks to cloud providers. The author argues that similar methods can be used to overcome the complexities inherent in increasingly data-intensive, computational, and collaborative scientific research. He describes Globus Online, a system that he and his colleagues are developing to realize this vision. he scientific community today has unprecedented opportunities to effect transformational change in how individuals and teams engage in discovery. The driving force is a set of interrelated new capabilities that, when harnessed, can enable dramatic acceleration in the discovery process: greater availability of massive data, exponentially faster computers, ultra-high-speed networks, and deep interdisciplinary collaboration. The opportunity - and challenge - is to make these capabilities accessible not just to a few 'big science' projects but to every researcher at every level. Here, I argue that the key to seizing this opportunity is embracing software delivery methods that haven't been widely adopted in research, notably software as a service (SaaS) - a technology that forms an important part of what people refer to as the cloud. I also describe projects in the Computation Institute at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory that aim to realize this vision, focusing initially on data movement and management.

  6. Parallel rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    This article provides a broad introduction to the subject of parallel rendering, encompassing both hardware and software systems. The focus is on the underlying concepts and the issues which arise in the design of parallel rendering algorithms and systems. We examine the different types of parallelism and how they can be applied in rendering applications. Concepts from parallel computing, such as data decomposition, task granularity, scalability, and load balancing, are considered in relation to the rendering problem. We also explore concepts from computer graphics, such as coherence and projection, which have a significant impact on the structure of parallel rendering algorithms. Our survey covers a number of practical considerations as well, including the choice of architectural platform, communication and memory requirements, and the problem of image assembly and display. We illustrate the discussion with numerous examples from the parallel rendering literature, representing most of the principal rendering methods currently used in computer graphics.

  7. Multivariate volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  8. Simulation on buildup of electron cloud in a proton circular accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai-Wei; Liu, Yu-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beams are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerators. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detailed processes of the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by electron clouds. The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an intense proton accelerator facility now being built, whose accelerator complex includes two main parts: an H-linac and a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The RCS accumulates the 80 MeV proton beam and accelerates it to 1.6 GeV with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. During beam injection with lower energy, the emerging electron cloud may cause serious instability and beam loss on the vacuum pipe. A simulation code has been developed to simulate the build-up, distribution and density of electron cloud in CSNS/RCS. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275221, 11175193)

  9. Cloud Computing and Validated Learning for Accelerating Innovation in IoT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suciu, George; Todoran, Gyorgy; Vulpe, Alexandru; Suciu, Victor; Bulca, Cristina; Cheveresan, Romulus

    2015-01-01

    Innovation in Internet of Things (IoT) requires more than just creation of technology and use of cloud computing or big data platforms. It requires accelerated commercialization or aptly called go-to-market processes. To successfully accelerate, companies need a new type of product development, the so-called validated learning process.…

  10. Quantum rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Gomez, Richard B.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, computer graphics has emerged as a critical component of the scientific and engineering process, and it is recognized as an important computer science research area. Computer graphics are extensively used for a variety of aerospace and defense training systems and by Hollywood's special effects companies. All these applications require the computer graphics systems to produce high quality renderings of extremely large data sets in short periods of time. Much research has been done in "classical computing" toward the development of efficient methods and techniques to reduce the rendering time required for large datasets. Quantum Computing's unique algorithmic features offer the possibility of speeding up some of the known rendering algorithms currently used in computer graphics. In this paper we discuss possible implementations of quantum rendering algorithms. In particular, we concentrate on the implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm for Z-buffering, ray-tracing, radiosity, and scene management techniques. We also compare the theoretical performance between the classical and quantum versions of the algorithms.

  11. Cloud computing approaches to accelerate drug discovery value chain.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vibhav; Arora, Suchir; Gupta, Chitra

    2011-12-01

    Continued advancements in the area of technology have helped high throughput screening (HTS) evolve from a linear to parallel approach by performing system level screening. Advanced experimental methods used for HTS at various steps of drug discovery (i.e. target identification, target validation, lead identification and lead validation) can generate data of the order of terabytes. As a consequence, there is pressing need to store, manage, mine and analyze this data to identify informational tags. This need is again posing challenges to computer scientists to offer the matching hardware and software infrastructure, while managing the varying degree of desired computational power. Therefore, the potential of "On-Demand Hardware" and "Software as a Service (SAAS)" delivery mechanisms cannot be denied. This on-demand computing, largely referred to as Cloud Computing, is now transforming the drug discovery research. Also, integration of Cloud computing with parallel computing is certainly expanding its footprint in the life sciences community. The speed, efficiency and cost effectiveness have made cloud computing a 'good to have tool' for researchers, providing them significant flexibility, allowing them to focus on the 'what' of science and not the 'how'. Once reached to its maturity, Discovery-Cloud would fit best to manage drug discovery and clinical development data, generated using advanced HTS techniques, hence supporting the vision of personalized medicine. PMID:21843145

  12. Mean-state acceleration of cloud-resolving models and large eddy simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jones, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2015-10-29

    In this study, large eddy simulations and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are routinely used to simulate boundary layer and deep convective cloud processes, aid in the development of moist physical parameterization for global models, study cloud-climate feedbacks and cloud-aerosol interaction, and as the heart of superparameterized climate models. These models are computationally demanding, placing practical constraints on their use in these applications, especially for long, climate-relevant simulations. In many situations, the horizontal-mean atmospheric structure evolves slowly compared to the turnover time of the most energetic turbulent eddies. We develop a simple scheme to reduce this time scale separation to accelerate themore » evolution of the mean state. Using this approach we are able to accelerate the model evolution by a factor of 2–16 or more in idealized stratocumulus, shallow and deep cumulus convection without substantial loss of accuracy in simulating mean cloud statistics and their sensitivity to climate change perturbations. As a culminating test, we apply this technique to accelerate the embedded CRMs in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model by a factor of 2, thereby showing that the method is robust and stable to realistic perturbations across spatial and temporal scales typical in a GCM.« less

  13. Mean-state acceleration of cloud-resolving models and large eddy simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2015-10-29

    In this study, large eddy simulations and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are routinely used to simulate boundary layer and deep convective cloud processes, aid in the development of moist physical parameterization for global models, study cloud-climate feedbacks and cloud-aerosol interaction, and as the heart of superparameterized climate models. These models are computationally demanding, placing practical constraints on their use in these applications, especially for long, climate-relevant simulations. In many situations, the horizontal-mean atmospheric structure evolves slowly compared to the turnover time of the most energetic turbulent eddies. We develop a simple scheme to reduce this time scale separation to accelerate the evolution of the mean state. Using this approach we are able to accelerate the model evolution by a factor of 2–16 or more in idealized stratocumulus, shallow and deep cumulus convection without substantial loss of accuracy in simulating mean cloud statistics and their sensitivity to climate change perturbations. As a culminating test, we apply this technique to accelerate the embedded CRMs in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model by a factor of 2, thereby showing that the method is robust and stable to realistic perturbations across spatial and temporal scales typical in a GCM.

  14. Time-Critical Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Arie

    1998-01-01

    For the past twelve months, we have conducted and completed a joint research entitled "Time- Critical Volume Rendering" with NASA Ames. As expected, High performance volume rendering algorithms have been developed by exploring some new faster rendering techniques, including object presence acceleration, parallel processing, and hierarchical level-of-detail representation. Using our new techniques, initial experiments have achieved real-time rendering rates of more than 10 frames per second of various 3D data sets with highest resolution. A couple of joint papers and technique reports as well as an interactive real-time demo have been compiled as the result of this project.

  15. SUPERNOVA REMNANT KES 17: AN EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATOR INSIDE A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, Joseph D.; Castro, Daniel; Slane, Patrick O.; Temim, Tea; Hughes, John P.; Rakowski, Cara E-mail: cara.rakowski@gmail.com

    2013-11-10

    The supernova remnant Kes 17 (SNR G304.6+0.1) is one of a few but growing number of remnants detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we analyze recent radio, X-ray, and γ-ray observations of this object, determining that efficient cosmic ray acceleration is required to explain its broadband non-thermal spectrum. These observations also suggest that Kes 17 is expanding inside a molecular cloud, though our determination of its age depends on whether thermal conduction or clump evaporation is primarily responsible for its center-filled thermal X-ray morphology. Evidence for efficient cosmic ray acceleration in Kes 17 supports recent theoretical work concluding that the strong magnetic field, turbulence, and clumpy nature of molecular clouds enhance cosmic ray production in supernova remnants. While additional observations are needed to confirm this interpretation, further study of Kes 17 is important for understanding how cosmic rays are accelerated in supernova remnants.

  16. Cosmic-ray acceleration during the impact of shocks on dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung

    1993-01-01

    In order to elucidate the properties of diffusive shock acceleration in nonuniform environments, an extensive set of simulations of the dynamical interactions between plane nonradiative shocks and dense gas clouds was carried out initially in static equilibrium with their environments. These time-dependent calculations are based on the two-fluid model for diffusive cosmic ray transport, and include the dynamically active energetic proton component of the cosmic rays as well as passive electron and magnetic field components. Except when the incident shock is itself already dominated by cosmic ray pressure, it is found that the presence of the cloud adds little to the net acceleration efficiency of the original shock and can, in fact, reduce slightly the net amount of energy transferred to cosmic rays after a given time. It is found that, in 2D cloud simulations, the always-weak bow shock and the shock inside the cloud are less important to acceleration during the interaction than the tail shock.

  17. Speeding up CRMs for cloud-climate interaction studies by acceleration of mean state tendencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are routinely used to simulate boundary-layer and deep convective cloud processes, aid in the development of moist physical parameterization for global models, study cloud-climate feedbacks and cloud-aerosol interaction, and as the heart of superparameterized climate models. CRMs are computationally demanding, placing practical constraints on their use in these applications, especially for long, climate-relevant simulations. In many situations, the horizontal-mean atmospheric structure evolves slowly compared to the turnover time of the most energetic turbulent eddies. We use this time scale separation to accelerate the time-integration of a CRM, the System for Atmospheric Modelling. Our approach uses a large time step to evolve the horizontally averaged state variables, followed by a short time step to calculate the turbulent fluctuations about the mean state. Using this approach, we are able to accelerate the model evolution by a factor of 8 or more in idealized stratocumulus, shallow and deep cumulus convection without substantial loss of accuracy in simulating mean cloud statistics and their sensitivity to climate change perturbations. We show how to adapt the approach to challenges arising from rapidly falling precipitation and from advecting scalars with a variety of lifetimes.

  18. Significant acceleration of 2D-3D registration-based fusion of ultrasound and x-ray images by mesh-based DRR rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Markus; John, Matthias; Borsdorf, Anja; Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Nöttling, Alois; Kiefer, Philipp; Seeburger, Jörg; Neumuth, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    For transcatheter-based minimally invasive procedures in structural heart disease ultrasound and X-ray are the two enabling imaging modalities. A live fusion of both real-time modalities can potentially improve the workflow and the catheter navigation by combining the excellent instrument imaging of X-ray with the high-quality soft tissue imaging of ultrasound. A recently published approach to fuse X-ray fluoroscopy with trans-esophageal echo (TEE) registers the ultrasound probe to X-ray images by a 2D-3D registration method which inherently provides a registration of ultrasound images to X-ray images. In this paper, we significantly accelerate the 2D-3D registration method in this context. The main novelty is to generate the projection images (DRR) of the 3D object not via volume ray-casting but instead via a fast rendering of triangular meshes. This is possible, because in the setting for TEE/X-ray fusion the 3D geometry of the ultrasound probe is known in advance and their main components can be described by triangular meshes. We show that the new approach can achieve a speedup factor up to 65 and does not affect the registration accuracy when used in conjunction with the gradient correlation similarity measure. The improvement is independent of the underlying registration optimizer. Based on the results, a TEE/X-ray fusion could be performed with a higher frame rate and a shorter time lag towards real-time registration performance. The approach could potentially accelerate other applications of 2D-3D registrations, e.g. the registration of implant models with X-ray images.

  19. Accelerating 3D radiative transfer for realistic OCO-2 cloud-aerosol scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Massie, S. T.; Platnick, S. E.; Song, S.

    2014-12-01

    The recently launched NASA OCO-2 satellite is expected to provide important information about the carbon dioxide distribution in the troposphere down to Earth's surface. Among the challenges in accurately retrieving CO2 concentration from the hyperspectral observations in each of the three OCO-2 bands are cloud and aerosol impacts on the observed radiances. Preliminary studies based on idealized cloud fields have shown that they can lead to spectrally dependent radiance perturbations which differ from band to band and may lead to biases in the derived products. Since OCO-2 was inserted into the A-Train, it is only natural to capitalize on sensor synergies with other instruments, in this case on the cloud and aerosol scene context that is provided by MODIS and CALIOP. Our approach is to use cloud imagery (especially for inhomogeneous scenes) for predicting the hyperspectral observations within a collocated OCO-2 footprint and comparing with the observations, which allows a systematic assessment of the causes for biases in the retrievals themselves, and their manifestation in spectral residuals for various different cloud types and distributions. Simulating a large number of cases with line-by-line calculations using a 3D code is computationally prohibitive even on large parallel computers. Therefore, we developed a number of acceleration approaches. In this contribution, we will analyze them in terms of their speed and accuracy, using cloud fields from airborne imagery collected during a recent NASA field experiment (SEAC4RS) as proxy for different types of inhomogeneous cloud fields. The broader goal of this effort is to improve OCO-2 retrievals in the vicinity of cloud fields, and to extend the range of conditions under which the instrument will provide useful results.

  20. High fidelity 3-dimensional models of beam-electron cloud interactions in circular accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiz Zarrin Ghalam, Ali

    Electron cloud is a low-density electron profile created inside the vacuum chamber of circular machines with positively charged beams. Electron cloud limits the peak current of the beam and degrades the beams' quality through luminosity degradation, emittance growth and head to tail or bunch to bunch instability. The adverse effects of electron cloud on long-term beam dynamics becomes more and more important as the beams go to higher and higher energies. This problem has become a major concern in many future circular machines design like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Due to the importance of the problem several simulation models have been developed to model long-term beam-electron cloud interaction. These models are based on "single kick approximation" where the electron cloud is assumed to be concentrated at one thin slab around the ring. While this model is efficient in terms of computational costs, it does not reflect the real physical situation as the forces from electron cloud to the beam are non-linear contrary to this model's assumption. To address the existing codes limitation, in this thesis a new model is developed to continuously model the beam-electron cloud interaction. The code is derived from a 3-D parallel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) model (QuickPIC) originally used for plasma wakefield acceleration research. To make the original model fit into circular machines environment, betatron and synchrotron equations of motions have been added to the code, also the effect of chromaticity, lattice structure have been included. QuickPIC is then benchmarked against one of the codes developed based on single kick approximation (HEAD-TAIL) for the transverse spot size of the beam in CERN-LHC. The growth predicted by QuickPIC is less than the one predicted by HEAD-TAIL. The code is then used to investigate the effect of electron cloud image charges on the long-term beam dynamics, particularly on the

  1. Dispersion of a cloud of particles in the accelerated flow behind a moving shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Gustaaf; Dittmann, Thomas; Don, Wai-Sun

    2010-11-01

    We discuss the dynamics and dispersion of bronze particles that are initially arranged in varying cloud shapes and are accelerated in the supersonic flow behind a moving normal shock. Particle clouds with a particle volume concentration of 4% are arranged initially in a rectangular, triangular and circular shape, whose angle with respect to the incoming flow are also varied. Simulations are performed with a recently developed high-order resolution Eulerian-Lagrangian method, that approximates the Euler equations governing the gas dynamics with the improved high order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme, while individual particles are traced in the Lagrangian frame using high-order time integration schemes. The purpose of these simulations is two-fold: we are aiming to match a published shocktube experiment of the dispersion of an initially, nominally rectangular cloud shape behind a moving shock and we are aiming to validate our high-order methods against these experiments. The dynamics and resulting dispersion patterns of the developing particle-laden flows are distinctly different between different cloud shapes but we will report statistical similarities and correlations between cloud spread and energy budgets of the particle phases.

  2. Shock-Cloud Interaction and Particle Acceleration in the Southwestern Limb of SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, M.; Acero, F.; Dubner, G.; Decourchelle, A.; Orlando, S.; Bocchino, F.

    2014-02-01

    The supernova remnant SN 1006 is a powerful source of high-energy particles and evolves in a relatively tenuous and uniform environment despite interacting with an atomic cloud in its northwestern limb. The X-ray image of SN 1006 reveals an indentation in the southwestern part of the shock front and the H I maps show an isolated (southwestern) cloud, having the same velocity as the northwestern cloud, whose morphology fits perfectly in the indentation. We performed spatially resolved spectral analysis of a set of small regions in the southwestern nonthermal limb and studied the deep X-ray spectra obtained within the XMM-Newton SN 1006 Large Program. We also analyzed archive H I data, obtained by combining single-dish and interferometric observations. We found that the best-fit value of N H derived from the X-ray spectra significantly increases in regions corresponding to the southwestern cloud, while the cutoff energy of the synchrotron emission decreases. The N H variation corresponds perfectly with the H I column density of the southwestern cloud, as measured from the radio data. The decrease in the cutoff energy at the indentation clearly reveals that the back side of the cloud is actually interacting with the remnant. The southwestern limb therefore presents a unique combination of efficient particle acceleration and high ambient density, thus being the most promising region for γ-ray hadronic emission in SN 1006. We estimate that such emission will be detectable with the Fermi telescope within a few years.

  3. SHOCK-CLOUD INTERACTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THE SOUTHWESTERN LIMB OF SN 1006

    SciTech Connect

    Miceli, M.; Orlando, S.; Bocchino, F.; Acero, F.; Decourchelle, A.

    2014-02-20

    The supernova remnant SN 1006 is a powerful source of high-energy particles and evolves in a relatively tenuous and uniform environment despite interacting with an atomic cloud in its northwestern limb. The X-ray image of SN 1006 reveals an indentation in the southwestern part of the shock front and the H I maps show an isolated (southwestern) cloud, having the same velocity as the northwestern cloud, whose morphology fits perfectly in the indentation. We performed spatially resolved spectral analysis of a set of small regions in the southwestern nonthermal limb and studied the deep X-ray spectra obtained within the XMM-Newton SN 1006 Large Program. We also analyzed archive H I data, obtained by combining single-dish and interferometric observations. We found that the best-fit value of N {sub H} derived from the X-ray spectra significantly increases in regions corresponding to the southwestern cloud, while the cutoff energy of the synchrotron emission decreases. The N {sub H} variation corresponds perfectly with the H I column density of the southwestern cloud, as measured from the radio data. The decrease in the cutoff energy at the indentation clearly reveals that the back side of the cloud is actually interacting with the remnant. The southwestern limb therefore presents a unique combination of efficient particle acceleration and high ambient density, thus being the most promising region for γ-ray hadronic emission in SN 1006. We estimate that such emission will be detectable with the Fermi telescope within a few years.

  4. Enhanced quasi-static particle-in-cell simulation of electron cloud instabilities in circular accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bing

    Electron cloud instabilities have been observed in many circular accelerators around the world and raised concerns of future accelerators and possible upgrades. In this thesis, the electron cloud instabilities are studied with the quasi-static particle-in-cell (PIC) code QuickPIC. Modeling in three-dimensions the long timescale propagation of beam in electron clouds in circular accelerators requires faster and more efficient simulation codes. Thousands of processors are easily available for parallel computations. However, it is not straightforward to increase the effective speed of the simulation by running the same problem size on an increasingly number of processors because there is a limit to domain size in the decomposition of the two-dimensional part of the code. A pipelining algorithm applied on the fully parallelized particle-in-cell code QuickPIC is implemented to overcome this limit. The pipelining algorithm uses multiple groups of processors and optimizes the job allocation on the processors in parallel computing. With this novel algorithm, it is possible to use on the order of 102 processors, and to expand the scale and the speed of the simulation with QuickPIC by a similar factor. In addition to the efficiency improvement with the pipelining algorithm, the fidelity of QuickPIC is enhanced by adding two physics models, the beam space charge effect and the dispersion effect. Simulation of two specific circular machines is performed with the enhanced QuickPIC. First, the proposed upgrade to the Fermilab Main Injector is studied with an eye upon guiding the design of the upgrade and code validation. Moderate emittance growth is observed for the upgrade of increasing the bunch population by 5 times. But the simulation also shows that increasing the beam energy from 8GeV to 20GeV or above can effectively limit the emittance growth. Then the enhanced QuickPIC is used to simulate the electron cloud effect on electron beam in the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac

  5. Collaborative Research: Simulation of Beam-Electron Cloud Interactions in Circular Accelerators Using Plasma Models

    SciTech Connect

    Katsouleas, Thomas; Decyk, Viktor

    2009-10-14

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54888, "Simulation of Beam-Electron Cloud Interactions in Circular Accelerators Using Plasma Models" Viktor K. Decyk, University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 The primary goal of this collaborative proposal was to modify the code QuickPIC and apply it to study the long-time stability of beam propagation in low density electron clouds present in circular accelerators. The UCLA contribution to this collaborative proposal was in supporting the development of the pipelining scheme for the QuickPIC code, which extended the parallel scaling of this code by two orders of magnitude. The USC work was as described here the PhD research for Ms. Bing Feng, lead author in reference 2 below, who performed the research at USC under the guidance of the PI Tom Katsouleas and the collaboration of Dr. Decyk The QuickPIC code [1] is a multi-scale Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code. The outer 3D code contains a beam which propagates through a long region of plasma and evolves slowly. The plasma response to this beam is modeled by slices of a 2D plasma code. This plasma response then is fed back to the beam code, and the process repeats. The pipelining is based on the observation that once the beam has passed a 2D slice, its response can be fed back to the beam immediately without waiting for the beam to pass all the other slices. Thus independent blocks of 2D slices from different time steps can be running simultaneously. The major difficulty was when particles at the edges needed to communicate with other blocks. Two versions of the pipelining scheme were developed, for the the full quasi-static code and the other for the basic quasi-static code used by this e-cloud proposal. Details of the pipelining scheme were published in [2]. The new version of QuickPIC was able to run with more than 1,000 processors, and was successfully applied in modeling e-clouds by our collaborators in this proposal [3-8]. Jean-Luc Vay at Lawrence Berkeley

  6. Acceleration and novelty: community restoration speeds recovery and transforms species composition in Andean cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sarah Jane; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M

    2016-01-01

    Community-based tropical forest restoration projects, often promoted as a win-win solution for local communities and the environment, have increased dramatically in number in the past decade. Many such projects are underway in Andean cloud forests, which, given their extremely high biodiversity and history of extensive clearing, are understudied. This study investigates the efficacy of community-based tree-planting projects to accelerate cloud forest recovery, as compared to unassisted natural regeneration. This study takes place in northwest Andean Ecuador, where the majority of the original, highly diverse cloud forests have been cleared, in five communities that initiated tree-planting projects to restore forests in 2003. In 2011, we identified tree species along transects in planted forests (n = 5), naturally regenerating forests (n = 5), and primary forests (n = 5). We also surveyed 120 households about their restoration methods, tree preferences, and forest uses. We found that tree diversity was higher in planted than in unplanted secondary forest, but both were less diverse than primary forests. Ordination analysis showed that all three forests had distinct species compositions, although planted forests shared more species with primary forests than did unplanted forests. Planted forests also contained more animal-dispersed species in both the planted canopy and in the unplanted, regenerating understory than unplanted forests, and contained the highest proportion of species with use value for local people. While restoring forest increased biodiversity and accelerated forest recovery, restored forests may also represent novel ecosystems that are distinct from the region's previous ecosystems and, given their usefulness to people, are likely to be more common in the future. PMID:27039520

  7. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF ACCELERATED PARTICLES ESCAPING A SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M. E-mail: byk@astro.ioffe.ru

    2011-04-20

    We present a model of gamma-ray emission from core-collapse supernovae (SNe) originating from the explosions of massive young stars. The fast forward shock of the supernova remnant (SNR) can accelerate particles by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in a cavern blown by a strong, pre-SN stellar wind. As a fundamental part of nonlinear DSA, some fraction of the accelerated particles escape the shock and interact with a surrounding massive dense shell producing hard photon emission. To calculate this emission, we have developed a new Monte Carlo technique for propagating the cosmic rays (CRs) produced by the forward shock of the SNR, into the dense, external material. This technique is incorporated in a hydrodynamic model of an evolving SNR which includes the nonlinear feedback of CRs on the SNR evolution, the production of escaping CRs along with those that remain trapped within the remnant, and the broadband emission of radiation from trapped and escaping CRs. While our combined CR-hydro-escape model is quite general and applies to both core collapse and thermonuclear SNe, the parameters we choose for our discussion here are more typical of SNRs from very massive stars whose emission spectra differ somewhat from those produced by lower mass progenitors directly interacting with a molecular cloud.

  8. Simulating Electron Clouds in High-Current Ion Accelerators with Solenoid Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W; Grote, D; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Vay, J; Seidl, P; Roy, P; Coleman, J; Armijo, J; Haber, I

    2006-08-15

    Contamination from electrons is a concern for the solenoid-focused ion accelerators being developed for experiments in high-energy-density physics (HEDP). These electrons are produced directly by beam ions hitting lattice elements and intercepting diagnostics, or indirectly by ionization of desorbed neutral gas, and they are believed responsible for time dependence of the beam radius, emittance, and focal distance seen on the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP has been upgraded to included the physics needed to simulate electron-cloud phenomena. We present preliminary self-consistent simulations of STX experiments suggesting that the observed time dependence of the beam stems from a complicated interaction of beam ions, desorbed neutrals, and electrons.

  9. Simulating Electron Clouds in High-Current Ion Accelerators withSolenoid Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Vay, J.-L.; Seidl, P.A.; Roy, P.K.; Coleman, J.E.; Armijo, J.; Haber, I.

    2006-09-20

    Contamination from electrons is a concern for the solenoid-focused ion accelerators being developed for experiments in high-energy-density physics (HEDP). These electrons are produced directly by beam ions hitting lattice elements and intercepting diagnostics, or indirectly by ionization of desorbed neutral gas, and they are believed responsible for time dependence of the beam radius, emittance, and focal distance seen on the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP has been upgraded to included the physics needed to simulate electron-cloud phenomena. We present preliminary self-consistent simulations of STX experiments suggesting that the observed time dependence of the beam stems from a complicated interaction of beam ions, desorbed neutrals, and electrons.

  10. Scalable rendering on PC clusters

    SciTech Connect

    WYLIE,BRIAN N.; LEWIS,VASILY; SHIRLEY,DAVID NOYES; PAVLAKOS,CONSTANTINE

    2000-04-25

    This case study presents initial results from research targeted at the development of cost-effective scalable visualization and rendering technologies. The implementations of two 3D graphics libraries based on the popular sort-last and sort-middle parallel rendering techniques are discussed. An important goal of these implementations is to provide scalable rendering capability for extremely large datasets (>> 5 million polygons). Applications can use these libraries for either run-time visualization, by linking to an existing parallel simulation, or for traditional post-processing by linking to an interactive display program. The use of parallel, hardware-accelerated rendering on commodity hardware is leveraged to achieve high performance. Current performance results show that, using current hardware (a small 16-node cluster), they can utilize up to 85% of the aggregate graphics performance and achieve rendering rates in excess of 20 million polygons/second using OpenGL{reg_sign} with lighting, Gouraud shading, and individually specified triangles (not t-stripped).

  11. Computer animation of clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.

    1994-01-28

    Computer animation of outdoor scenes is enhanced by realistic clouds. I will discuss several different modeling and rendering schemes for clouds, and show how they evolved in my animation work. These include transparency-textured clouds on a 2-D plane, smooth shaded or textured 3-D clouds surfaces, and 3-D volume rendering. For the volume rendering, I will present various illumination schemes, including the density emitter, single scattering, and multiple scattering models.

  12. Observation of Electron Cloud Instabilities and Emittance Dilution at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring Test Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzapple, R. L.; Billing, M. G.; Campbell, R. C.; Dugan, G. F.; Flanagan, J.; McArdle, K. E.; Miller, M. I.; Palmer, M. A.; Ramirez, G. A.; Sonnad, K. G.; Totten, M. M.; Tucker, S. L.; Williams, H. A.

    2016-04-01

    Electron cloud related emittance dilution and instabilities of bunch trains limit the performance of high intensity circular colliders. One of the key goals of the Cornell electron-positron storage ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) research program is to improve our understanding of how the electron cloud alters the dynamics of bunches within the train. Single bunch beam diagnotics have been developed to measure the beam spectra, vertical beam size, two important dynamical effects of beams interacting with the electron cloud, for bunch trains on a turn-by-turn basis. Experiments have been performed at CesrTA to probe the interaction of the electron cloud with stored positron bunch trains. The purpose of these experiments was to characterize the dependence of beam-electron cloud interactions on the machine parameters such as bunch spacing, vertical chromaticity, and bunch current. The beam dynamics of the stored beam, in the presence of the electron cloud, was quantified using: 1) a gated beam position monitor (BPM) and spectrum analyzer to measure the bunch-by-bunch frequency spectrum of the bunch trains; 2) an x-ray beam size monitor to record the bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn vertical size of each bunch within the trains. In this paper we report on the observations from these experiments and analyze the effects of the electron cloud on the stability of bunches in a train under many different operational conditions.

  13. Compressive rendering: a rendering application of compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Sen, Pradeep; Darabi, Soheil

    2011-04-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in compressed sensing (CS), the new theory that shows how a small set of linear measurements can be used to reconstruct a signal if it is sparse in a transform domain. Although CS has been applied to many problems in other fields, in computer graphics, it has only been used so far to accelerate the acquisition of light transport. In this paper, we propose a novel application of compressed sensing by using it to accelerate ray-traced rendering in a manner that exploits the sparsity of the final image in the wavelet basis. To do this, we raytrace only a subset of the pixel samples in the spatial domain and use a simple, greedy CS-based algorithm to estimate the wavelet transform of the image during rendering. Since the energy of the image is concentrated more compactly in the wavelet domain, less samples are required for a result of given quality than with conventional spatial-domain rendering. By taking the inverse wavelet transform of the result, we compute an accurate reconstruction of the desired final image. Our results show that our framework can achieve high-quality images with approximately 75 percent of the pixel samples using a nonadaptive sampling scheme. In addition, we also perform better than other algorithms that might be used to fill in the missing pixel data, such as interpolation or inpainting. Furthermore, since the algorithm works in image space, it is completely independent of scene complexity. PMID:21311092

  14. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  15. The conversion of CESR to operate as the Test Accelerator, CesrTA. Part 3: electron cloud diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billing, M. G.; Conway, J. V.; Crittenden, J. A.; Greenwald, S.; Li, Y.; Meller, R. E.; Strohman, C. R.; Sikora, J. P.; Calvey, J. R.; Palmer, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it ideal for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper is the third in a series of four describing the conversion of CESR to the test accelerator, CESRTA. The first two papers discuss the overall plan for the conversion of the storage ring to an instrument capable of studying advanced accelerator physics issues [1] and the details of the vacuum system upgrades [2]. This paper focusses on the necessary development of new instrumentation, situated in four dedicated experimental regions, capable of studying such phenomena as electron clouds (ECs) and methods to mitigate EC effects. The fourth paper in this series describes the vacuum system modifications of the superconducting wigglers to accommodate the diagnostic instrumentation for the study of EC behavior within wigglers. While the initial studies of CESRTA focussed on questions related to the International Linear Collider damping ring design, CESRTA is a very versatile storage ring, capable of studying a wide range of accelerator physics and instrumentation questions.

  16. Fast volume rendering for medical image.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hu; Xin-He, Xu

    2005-01-01

    In orders to improve the rendering speed of ray casting and make this technique a practical routine in medical applications, two new and improved techniques are described in this paper. First, an integrated method using "proximity clouds" technique is applied to speed up ray casting. The second technique for speeding up the 3D rendering is done through a parallel implementation based on "single computer multi CPU" model Four groups of CT data sets have been used to validate the improvement of the rendering speed. The result shown that the interactive rendering speed is up to 6-10 fps, which is almost real-time making our algorithm practical in medical visualization routine. PMID:17281409

  17. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J.; de Verdiere, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  18. Characterization of electron clouds in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator using TE-wave transmission

    SciTech Connect

    De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Billing, M.; Palmer, M.; Sikora, J.; Carlson, B.

    2010-01-02

    A relatively new technique for measuring the electron cloud density in storage rings has been developed and successfully demonstrated [S. De Santis, J.M. Byrd, F. Caspers, A. Krasnykh, T. Kroyer, M.T.F. Pivi, and K.G. Sonnad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 094801 (2008).]. We present the experimental results of a systematic application of this technique at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator. The technique is based on the phase modulation of the TE mode transmitted in a synchrotron beam pipe caused by the periodic variation of the density of electron plasma. Because of the relatively simple hardware requirements, this method has become increasingly popular and has been since successfully implemented in several machines. While the principles of this technique are straightforward, quantitative derivation of the electron cloud density from the measurement requires consideration of several effects, which we address in detail.

  19. Status report on the 'Merging' of the Electron-Cloud Code POSINST with the 3-D Accelerator PIC CODE WARP

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Azevedo, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Stoltz, P.H.

    2004-04-19

    We have integrated the electron-cloud code POSINST [1] with WARP [2]--a 3-D parallel Particle-In-Cell accelerator code developed for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion--so that the two can interoperate. Both codes are run in the same process, communicate through a Python interpreter (already used in WARP), and share certain key arrays (so far, particle positions and velocities). Currently, POSINST provides primary and secondary sources of electrons, beam bunch kicks, a particle mover, and diagnostics. WARP provides the field solvers and diagnostics. Secondary emission routines are provided by the Tech-X package CMEE.

  20. Accelerating statistical image reconstruction algorithms for fan-beam x-ray CT using cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Somesh; Rao, A. Ravishankar; Sheinin, Vadim

    2011-03-01

    Statistical image reconstruction algorithms potentially offer many advantages to x-ray computed tomography (CT), e.g. lower radiation dose. But, their adoption in practical CT scanners requires extra computation power, which is traditionally provided by incorporating additional computing hardware (e.g. CPU-clusters, GPUs, FPGAs etc.) into a scanner. An alternative solution is to access the required computation power over the internet from a cloud computing service, which is orders-of-magnitude more cost-effective. This is because users only pay a small pay-as-you-go fee for the computation resources used (i.e. CPU time, storage etc.), and completely avoid purchase, maintenance and upgrade costs. In this paper, we investigate the benefits and shortcomings of using cloud computing for statistical image reconstruction. We parallelized the most time-consuming parts of our application, the forward and back projectors, using MapReduce, the standard parallelization library on clouds. From preliminary investigations, we found that a large speedup is possible at a very low cost. But, communication overheads inside MapReduce can limit the maximum speedup, and a better MapReduce implementation might become necessary in the future. All the experiments for this paper, including development and testing, were completed on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) for less than $20.

  1. Experimental demonstration of plasma-drag acceleration of a dust cloud to hypervelocities.

    PubMed

    Ticoş, C M; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G A; Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Dorf, L A; Shukla, P K

    2008-04-18

    Simultaneous acceleration of hundreds of dust particles to hypervelocities by collimated plasma flows ejected from a coaxial gun is demonstrated. Graphite and diamond grains with radii between 5 and 30 microm, and flying at speeds up to 3.7 km/s, have been recorded with a high-speed camera. The observations agree well with a model for plasma-drag acceleration of microparticles much larger than the plasma screening length. PMID:18518115

  2. Rendering the Topological Spines

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves-Rivera, D.

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  3. Numerical model for the acceleration of a dust cloud by the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.-D.; Russell, C. T.; Lai, H. R.; Wei, H. Y.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we investigate the behavior of two massive fluids: protons in the solar wind and charged dust. For simplification we temporarily ignore the charging process of dust particles. The mass of charged dust can be 103 amu to grams, but we only model the lighter ones because the behavior of grains more massive than 105 are similar. A multi-fluid MHD code is used to simulate the large scale structure formed around a dust cloud released into the solar wind, and its evolution. Dust clouds as we are simulating can be made by meteoroid-meteoroid collisions with size from 1 to 100 m in diameter. These are dangerous if they hit the Earth's atmosphere. Detecting them in space can help detect where such objects are in near Earth space.

  4. Interactive stereoscopic rendering of volumetric environments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ming; Zhang, Nan; Qu, Huamin; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an efficient stereoscopic rendering algorithm supporting interactive navigation through large-scale 3D voxel-based environments. In this algorithm, most of the pixel values of the right image are derived from the left image by a fast 3D warping based on a specific stereoscopic projection geometry. An accelerated volumetric ray casting then fills the remaining gaps in the warped right image. Our algorithm has been parallelized on a multiprocessor by employing effective task partitioning schemes and achieved a high cache coherency and load balancing. We also extend our stereoscopic rendering to include view-dependent shading and transparency effects. We have applied our algorithm in two virtual navigation systems, flythrough over terrain and virtual colonoscopy, and reached interactive stereoscopic rendering rates of more than 10 frames per second on a 16-processor SGI Challenge. PMID:15382695

  5. Rapid Circumstellar Disk Evolution and an Accelerating Star Formation Rate in the Infrared Dark Cloud M17 SWex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Broos, Patrick S.; Orbin, Wesley T.; King, Robert R.; Naylor, Tim; Whitney, Barbara A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a catalog of 840 X-ray sources and first results from a 100 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging study of the filamentary infrared (IR) dark cloud G014.225–00.506, which forms the central regions of a larger cloud complex known as the M17 southwest extension (M17 SWex). In addition to the rich population of protostars and young stellar objects with dusty circumstellar disks revealed by archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we discover a population of X-ray-emitting, intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars that lack IR excess emission from circumstellar disks. We model the IR spectral energy distributions of this source population to measure its mass function and place new constraints on the destruction timescales for the inner dust disk for 2–8 M ⊙ stars. We also place a lower limit on the star formation rate (SFR) and find that it is quite high (\\dot{M}≥slant 0.007 M ⊙ yr‑1), equivalent to several Orion Nebula Clusters in G14.225–0.506 alone, and likely accelerating. The cloud complex has not produced a population of massive, O-type stars commensurate with its SFR. This absence of very massive (≳20 M ⊙) stars suggests that either (1) M17 SWex is an example of a distributed mode of star formation that will produce a large OB association dominated by intermediate-mass stars but relatively few massive clusters, or (2) the massive cores are still in the process of accreting sufficient mass to form massive clusters hosting O stars.

  6. Vector quantization for volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    Volume rendering techniques typically process volumetric data in raw, uncompressed form. As algorithmic and architectural advances improve rendering speeds, however, larger data sets will be evaluated requiring consideration of data storage and transmission issues. In this paper, we analyze the data compression requirements for volume rendering applications and present a solution based on vector quantization. The proposed system compresses volumetric data and then renders images directly from the new data format. Tests on a fluid flow data set demonstrate that good image quality may be achieved at a compression ratio of 17:1 with only a 5 percent cost in additional rendering time.

  7. Software for Acoustic Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Joel D.

    2003-01-01

    SLAB is a software system that can be run on a personal computer to simulate an acoustic environment in real time. SLAB was developed to enable computational experimentation in which one can exert low-level control over a variety of signal-processing parameters, related to spatialization, for conducting psychoacoustic studies. Among the parameters that can be manipulated are the number and position of reflections, the fidelity (that is, the number of taps in finite-impulse-response filters), the system latency, and the update rate of the filters. Another goal in the development of SLAB was to provide an inexpensive means of dynamic synthesis of virtual audio over headphones, without need for special-purpose signal-processing hardware. SLAB has a modular, object-oriented design that affords the flexibility and extensibility needed to accommodate a variety of computational experiments and signal-flow structures. SLAB s spatial renderer has a fixed signal-flow architecture corresponding to a set of parallel signal paths from each source to a listener. This fixed architecture can be regarded as a compromise that optimizes efficiency at the expense of complete flexibility. Such a compromise is necessary, given the design goal of enabling computational psychoacoustic experimentation on inexpensive personal computers.

  8. Sea modeling and rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean

    2010-10-01

    More and more defence and civil applications require simulation of marine synthetic environment. Currently, the "Future Anti-Surface-Guided-Weapon" (FASGW) or "anti-navire léger" (ANL) missile needs this kind of modelling. This paper presents a set of technical enhancement of the SE-Workbench that aim at better representing the sea profile and the interaction with targets. The operational scenario variability is a key criterion: the generic geographical area (e.g. Persian Gulf, coast of Somalia,...), the type of situation (e.g. peace keeping, peace enforcement, anti-piracy, drug interdiction,...)., the objectives (political, strategic, or military objectives), the description of the mission(s) (e.g. antipiracy) and operation(s) (e.g. surveillance and reconnaissance, escort, convoying) to achieve the objectives, the type of environment (Weather, Time of day, Geography [coastlines, islands, hills/mountains]). The paper insists on several points such as the dual rendering using either ray tracing [and the GP GPU optimization] or rasterization [and GPU shaders optimization], the modelling of sea-surface based on hypertextures and shaders, the wakes modelling, the buoyancy models for targets, the interaction of coast and littoral, the dielectric infrared modelling of water material.

  9. Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.

    1993-07-01

    In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

  10. Accelerating Astronomy & Astrophysics in the New Era of Parallel Computing: GPUs, Phi and Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.; Dindar, Saleh; Peters, Jorg

    2015-08-01

    The realism of astrophysical simulations and statistical analyses of astronomical data are set by the available computational resources. Thus, astronomers and astrophysicists are constantly pushing the limits of computational capabilities. For decades, astronomers benefited from massive improvements in computational power that were driven primarily by increasing clock speeds and required relatively little attention to details of the computational hardware. For nearly a decade, increases in computational capabilities have come primarily from increasing the degree of parallelism, rather than increasing clock speeds. Further increases in computational capabilities will likely be led by many-core architectures such as Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and Intel Xeon Phi. Successfully harnessing these new architectures, requires significantly more understanding of the hardware architecture, cache hierarchy, compiler capabilities and network network characteristics.I will provide an astronomer's overview of the opportunities and challenges provided by modern many-core architectures and elastic cloud computing. The primary goal is to help an astronomical audience understand what types of problems are likely to yield more than order of magnitude speed-ups and which problems are unlikely to parallelize sufficiently efficiently to be worth the development time and/or costs.I will draw on my experience leading a team in developing the Swarm-NG library for parallel integration of large ensembles of small n-body systems on GPUs, as well as several smaller software projects. I will share lessons learned from collaborating with computer scientists, including both technical and soft skills. Finally, I will discuss the challenges of training the next generation of astronomers to be proficient in this new era of high-performance computing, drawing on experience teaching a graduate class on High-Performance Scientific Computing for Astrophysics and organizing a 2014 advanced summer

  11. The physics of volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Radiation transfer is an important topic in several physical disciplines, probably most prominently in astrophysics. Computer scientists use radiation transfer, among other things, for the visualization of complex data sets with direct volume rendering. In this article, I point out the connection between physical radiation transfer and volume rendering, and I describe an implementation of direct volume rendering in the astrophysical radiation transfer code RADMC-3D. I show examples for the use of this module on analytical models and simulation data.

  12. 11. Photographic copy of rendering (February 15, 1913, original rendering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of rendering (February 15, 1913, original rendering in Archives, Public Affairs Department, Sears Merchandise Group, Hoffman Estates, Illinois), Artist unknown. OVERALL VIEW OF MAIL ORDER PLANT, VIEW TO SOUTH - Sears Roebuck & Company Mail Order Plant, Bounded by Lexington & Grenshaw Streets, Kedzie Avenue & Independence Boulevard, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  13. Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54888, "Simulation of Beam-Electron Cloud Interactions in Circular Accelerators Using Plasma Models"

    SciTech Connect

    Decyk, Viktor K

    2012-11-27

    The primary goal of this collaborative proposal was to modify the code QuickPIC and apply it to study the long-time stability of beam propagation in low density electron clouds present in circular accelerators. The UCLA contribution to this collaborative proposal was in supporting the development of the pipelining scheme for the QuickPIC code, which extended the parallel scaling of this code by two orders of magnitude.

  14. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING THE COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION AT YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS INTERACTING WITH INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS: POSSIBLE APPLICATIONS TO RX J1713.7-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Fukui, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we investigate general properties of a blast wave shock interacting with interstellar clouds. The pre-shock cloudy medium is generated as a natural consequence of the thermal instability that simulates realistic clumpy interstellar clouds and their diffuse surrounding. The shock wave that sweeps the cloudy medium generates a turbulent shell through the vorticity generations that are induced by shock-cloud interactions. In the turbulent shell, the magnetic field is amplified as a result of turbulent dynamo action. The energy density of the amplified magnetic field can locally grow comparable to the thermal energy density, particularly at the transition layers between clouds and the diffuse surrounding. In the case of a young supernova remnant (SNR) with a shock velocity {approx}> 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}, the corresponding strength of the magnetic field is approximately 1 mG. The propagation speed of the shock wave is significantly stalled in the clouds because of the high density, while the shock maintains a high velocity in the diffuse surrounding. In addition, when the shock wave hits the clouds, reflection shock waves are generated that propagate back into the shocked shell. From these simulation results, many observational characteristics of the young SNR RX J1713.7-3946 that is suggested to be interacting with molecular clouds can be explained as follows. The reflection shocks can accelerate particles in the turbulent downstream region where the magnetic field strength reaches 1 mG, which causes short-time variability of synchrotron X-rays. Since the shock velocity is stalled locally in the clouds, the temperature in the shocked cloud is suppressed far below 1 keV. Thus, thermal X-ray line emission would be faint even if the SNR is interacting with molecular clouds. We also find that the photon index of the {pi}{sup 0}-decay gamma rays generated by cosmic-ray protons can be 1.5 (corresponding energy flux

  15. Toward Understanding the Cosmic-Ray Acceleration at Young Supernova Remnants Interacting with Interstellar Clouds: Possible Applications to RX J1713.7-3946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Fukui, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we investigate general properties of a blast wave shock interacting with interstellar clouds. The pre-shock cloudy medium is generated as a natural consequence of the thermal instability that simulates realistic clumpy interstellar clouds and their diffuse surrounding. The shock wave that sweeps the cloudy medium generates a turbulent shell through the vorticity generations that are induced by shock-cloud interactions. In the turbulent shell, the magnetic field is amplified as a result of turbulent dynamo action. The energy density of the amplified magnetic field can locally grow comparable to the thermal energy density, particularly at the transition layers between clouds and the diffuse surrounding. In the case of a young supernova remnant (SNR) with a shock velocity >~ 103 km s-1, the corresponding strength of the magnetic field is approximately 1 mG. The propagation speed of the shock wave is significantly stalled in the clouds because of the high density, while the shock maintains a high velocity in the diffuse surrounding. In addition, when the shock wave hits the clouds, reflection shock waves are generated that propagate back into the shocked shell. From these simulation results, many observational characteristics of the young SNR RX J1713.7-3946 that is suggested to be interacting with molecular clouds can be explained as follows. The reflection shocks can accelerate particles in the turbulent downstream region where the magnetic field strength reaches 1 mG, which causes short-time variability of synchrotron X-rays. Since the shock velocity is stalled locally in the clouds, the temperature in the shocked cloud is suppressed far below 1 keV. Thus, thermal X-ray line emission would be faint even if the SNR is interacting with molecular clouds. We also find that the photon index of the π0-decay gamma rays generated by cosmic-ray protons can be 1.5 (corresponding energy flux is νF νvpropν0.5) because

  16. New Uses for Rendered Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The history of rendering shows that current uses for rendered protein are a result of value-adding research. Feed nutritionists discovered how to use this formerly very low value by-product as an important component of formulated livestock feed. Today the feed market is mature and has been severel...

  17. Massively parallel visualization: Parallel rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.D.; Krogh, M.; White, W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume renderer use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Machines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  18. Fast rendering of forest ecosystems with dynamic global illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Jay Edward

    Real-time rendering of large-scale, forest ecosystems remains a challenging problem, in that important global illumination effects, such as leaf transparency and inter-object light scattering, are difficult to capture, given tight timing constraints and scenes that typically contain hundreds of millions of primitives. We propose a new lighting model, adapted from a model previously used to light convective clouds and other participating media, together with GPU ray tracing, in order to achieve these global illumination effects while maintaining near real-time performance. The lighting model is based on a lattice-Boltzmann method in which reflectance, transmittance, and absorption parameters are taken from measurements of real plants. The lighting model is solved as a preprocessing step, requires only seconds on a single GPU, and allows dynamic lighting changes at run-time. The ray tracing engine, which runs on one or multiple GPUs, combines multiple acceleration structures to achieve near real-time performance for large, complex scenes. Both the preprocessing step and the ray tracing engine make extensive use of NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA).

  19. Interactive pre-integrated volume rendering of medical datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kye, Heewon; Hong, Helen; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2005-04-01

    The pre-integrated volume rendering which produces high-quality images with less sampling has become one of the most efficient and important techniques in volume rendering field. In this paper, we propose an acceleration technique of pre-integrated rendering of dynamically classified volumes. Using the overlapped-min-max block, empty space skipping of ray casting can be applied in pre-integrated volume rendering. In addition, a new pre-integrated lookup table brings much fast rendering of high-precision data without degrading image quality. We have implemented our approaches not only on the consumer graphics hardware but also on CPU, and show the performance gains using several medical data sets.

  20. Exposure Render: An Interactive Photo-Realistic Volume Rendering Framework

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, Thomas; Post, Frits H.; Botha, Charl P.

    2012-01-01

    The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR) by integrating a number of visually plausible but often effect-specific rendering techniques, for instance modeling of light occlusion and depth of field. Besides yielding more attractive renderings, especially the more realistic lighting has a positive effect on perceptual tasks. Although these new rendering techniques yield impressive results, they exhibit limitations in terms of their exibility and their performance. Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT), coupled with physically based light transport, is the de-facto standard for synthesizing highly realistic images in the graphics domain, although usually not from volumetric data. Due to the stochastic sampling of MCRT algorithms, numerous effects can be achieved in a relatively straight-forward fashion. For this reason, we have developed a practical framework that applies MCRT techniques also to direct volume rendering (DVR). With this work, we demonstrate that a host of realistic effects, including physically based lighting, can be simulated in a generic and flexible fashion, leading to interactive DVR with improved realism. In the hope that this improved approach to DVR will see more use in practice, we have made available our framework under a permissive open source license. PMID:22768292

  1. Fast data parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, F.A.; Hansen, C.D.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes a parallel method for polygonal rendering on a massively parallel SIMD machine. This method, based on a simple shading model, is targeted for applications which require very fast polygon rendering for extremely large sets of polygons such as is found in many scientific visualization applications. The algorithms described in this paper are incorporated into a library of 3D graphics routines written for the Connection Machine. The routines are implemented on both the CM-200 and the CM-5. This library enables a scientists to display 3D shaded polygons directly from a parallel machine without the need to transmit huge amounts of data to a post-processing rendering system.

  2. RenderMan design principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apodaca, Tony; Porter, Tom

    1989-01-01

    The two worlds of interactive graphics and realistic graphics have remained separate. Fast graphics hardware runs simple algorithms and generates simple looking images. Photorealistic image synthesis software runs slowly on large expensive computers. The time has come for these two branches of computer graphics to merge. The speed and expense of graphics hardware is no longer the barrier to the wide acceptance of photorealism. There is every reason to believe that high quality image synthesis will become a standard capability of every graphics machine, from superworkstation to personal computer. The significant barrier has been the lack of a common language, an agreed-upon set of terms and conditions, for 3-D modeling systems to talk to 3-D rendering systems for computing an accurate rendition of that scene. Pixar has introduced RenderMan to serve as that common language. RenderMan, specifically the extensibility it offers in shading calculations, is discussed.

  3. Text Rendering: Beginning Literary Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Sandra L.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that "text rendering"--responding to oral readings by saying back remembered words or phrases--forces students to prolong their initial responses to texts and opens initial response to the influence of other readers. Argues that silence following oral readings allows words to sink into students' minds, creating individual images and…

  4. Microbial pathogen quality criteria of rendered products.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Pramod K; Biswas, Sagor; Kass, Philip

    2016-06-01

    The North American rendering industry processes approximately 24 million metric tons (Mt) of raw materials and produces more than 8 million Mt of rendered products. More than 85 % of rendered products produced annually in the USA are used for producing animal feed. Pathogen contamination in rendered products is an important and topical issue. Although elevated temperatures (115-140 °C) for 40-90 min during the standard rendering processes are mathematically sufficient to completely destroy commonly found pathogens, the presence of pathogens in rendered products has nevertheless been reported. Increased concern over the risk of microbial contamination in rendered products may require additional safeguards for producing pathogen-free rendered products. This study provides an overview of rendered products, existing microbial pathogen quality criteria of rendered products (MPQCR), limitations, and the scope of improving the MPQCR. PMID:27121572

  5. Remote volume rendering pipeline for mHealth applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Petkov, Kaloian; Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Zhao, Xin; Park, Ji Hwan; Kaufman, Arie; Cha, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a novel remote volume rendering pipeline for medical visualization targeted for mHealth (mobile health) applications. The necessity of such a pipeline stems from the large size of the medical imaging data produced by current CT and MRI scanners with respect to the complexity of the volumetric rendering algorithms. For example, the resolution of typical CT Angiography (CTA) data easily reaches 512^3 voxels and can exceed 6 gigabytes in size by spanning over the time domain while capturing a beating heart. This explosion in data size makes data transfers to mobile devices challenging, and even when the transfer problem is resolved the rendering performance of the device still remains a bottleneck. To deal with this issue, we propose a thin-client architecture, where the entirety of the data resides on a remote server where the image is rendered and then streamed to the client mobile device. We utilize the display and interaction capabilities of the mobile device, while performing interactive volume rendering on a server capable of handling large datasets. Specifically, upon user interaction the volume is rendered on the server and encoded into an H.264 video stream. H.264 is ubiquitously hardware accelerated, resulting in faster compression and lower power requirements. The choice of low-latency CPU- and GPU-based encoders is particularly important in enabling the interactive nature of our system. We demonstrate a prototype of our framework using various medical datasets on commodity tablet devices.

  6. Fast DRR splat rendering using common consumer graphics hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Spoerk, Jakob; Bergmann, Helmar; Wanschitz, Felix; Dong, Shuo; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2007-11-15

    Digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) are a vital part of various medical image processing applications such as 2D/3D registration for patient pose determination in image-guided radiotherapy procedures. This paper presents a technique to accelerate DRR creation by using conventional graphics hardware for the rendering process. DRR computation itself is done by an efficient volume rendering method named wobbled splatting. For programming the graphics hardware, NVIDIAs C for Graphics (Cg) is used. The description of an algorithm used for rendering DRRs on the graphics hardware is presented, together with a benchmark comparing this technique to a CPU-based wobbled splatting program. Results show a reduction of rendering time by about 70%-90% depending on the amount of data. For instance, rendering a volume of 2x10{sup 6} voxels is feasible at an update rate of 38 Hz compared to 6 Hz on a common Intel-based PC using the graphics processing unit (GPU) of a conventional graphics adapter. In addition, wobbled splatting using graphics hardware for DRR computation provides higher resolution DRRs with comparable image quality due to special processing characteristics of the GPU. We conclude that DRR generation on common graphics hardware using the freely available Cg environment is a major step toward 2D/3D registration in clinical routine.

  7. Font rendering on a GPU-based raster image processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recker, John L.; Beretta, Giordano B.; Lin, I.-Jong

    2010-01-01

    Historically, in the 35 years of digital printing research, raster image processing has always lagged behind marking engine technology, i.e., we have never been able to deliver rendered digital pages as fast as digital print engines can consume them. This trend has resulted in products based on throttled digital printers or expensive raster image processors (RIP) with hardware acceleration. The current trend in computer software architecture is to leverage graphic processing units (GPU) for computing tasks whenever appropriate. We discuss the issues for rendering fonts on such an architecture and present an implementation.

  8. Chromium Renderserver: Scalable and Open Source Remote RenderingInfrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook,Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2007-12-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure thatprovides the ability for one or more users to run and view image outputfrom unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote,parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardwareaccelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocolsand clientviewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to theproblem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote deliveryof parallel hardware-accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis ofseveral different optimizations that are generally applicable to avariety of rendering architectures. CRRSis fully operational, Open Sourcesoftware.

  9. Remote visualization system based on particle based volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Takuma; Idomura, Yasuhiro; Miyamura, Hiroko; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naohisa; Koyamada, Koji

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel remote visualization system based on particle-based volume rendering (PBVR),1 which enables interactive analyses of extreme scale volume data located on remote computing systems. The re- mote PBVR system consists of Server, which generates particles for rendering, and Client, which processes volume rendering, and the particle data size becomes significantly smaller than the original volume data. Depending on network bandwidth, the level of detail of images is flexibly controlled to attain high frame rates. Server is highly parallelized on various parallel platforms with hybrid programing model. The mapping process is accelerated by two orders of magnitudes compared with a single CPU. The structured and unstructured volume data with ~108 cells is processed within a few seconds. Compared with commodity Client/Server visualization tools, the total processing cost is dramatically reduced by using proposed system.

  10. Image space adaptive volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Andrew; Dingliana, John

    2012-01-01

    We present a technique for interactive direct volume rendering which provides adaptive sampling at a reduced memory requirement compared to traditional methods. Our technique exploits frame to frame coherence to quickly generate a two-dimensional importance map of the volume which guides sampling rate optimisation and allows us to provide interactive frame rates for user navigation and transfer function changes. In addition our ray casting shader detects any inconsistencies in our two-dimensional map and corrects them on the fly to ensure correct classification of important areas of the volume.

  11. Efficient space-leaping method for volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungup; Kim, Hyeongdo; Kim, Myeongsun; Jeong, Changsung

    1999-03-01

    Volume rendering is a technique that visualize 2D image of object from 3D volume data on image screen. Ray casting algorithm, one of popular volume rendering techniques, generate image with detail and high quality compared with other volume rendering algorithms but since this is a highly time consuming process given large number of voxels, many acceleration techniques have been developed. Here we introduce new acceleration technique, efficient space leaping method. Our new space leaping method traverse volume data and projects 3D location of voxel onto image screen to find pixels that have non-zero value in final volume image and locations of non-empty voxels that are closest to ray. During this process, adaptive run-length encoding and line drawing algorithm are used to traverse volume data and find pixels with non-zero value efficiently. Then we cast rays not through entire screen pixel but only through projected screen pixels and start rendering process from non-empty voxel location directly. This new method shows significant time savings applied to surface extraction without loss of image quality.

  12. 3D virtual colonoscopy with real-time volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ming; Li, Wei J.; Kreeger, Kevin; Bitter, Ingmar; Kaufman, Arie E.; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Dongqing; Wax, Mark R.

    2000-04-01

    In our previous work, we developed a virtual colonoscopy system on a high-end 16-processor SGI Challenge with an expensive hardware graphics accelerator. The goal of this work is to port the system to a low cost PC in order to increase its availability for mass screening. Recently, Mitsubishi Electric has developed a volume-rendering PC board, called VolumePro, which includes 128 MB of RAM and vg500 rendering chip. The vg500 chip, based on Cube-4 technology, can render a 2563 volume at 30 frames per second. High image quality of volume rendering inside the colon is guaranteed by the full lighting model and 3D interpolation supported by the vg500 chip. However, the VolumePro board is lacking some features required by our interactive colon navigation. First, VolumePro currently does not support perspective projection which is paramount for interior colon navigation. Second, the patient colon data is usually much larger than 2563 and cannot be rendered in real-time. In this paper, we present our solutions to these problems, including simulated perspective projection and axis aligned boxing techniques, and demonstrate the high performance of our virtual colonoscopy system on low cost PCs.

  13. Linked-View Parallel Coordinate Plot Renderer

    2011-06-28

    This software allows multiple linked views for interactive querying via map-based data selection, bar chart analytic overlays, and high dynamic range (HDR) line renderings. The major component of the visualization package is a parallel coordinate renderer with binning, curved layouts, shader-based rendering, and other techniques to allow interactive visualization of multidimensional data.

  14. Volume Rendering of Heliospheric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hick, P. P.; Jackson, B. V.; Bailey, M. J.; Buffington, A.

    2001-12-01

    We demonstrate some of the techniques we currently use for the visualization of heliospheric volume data. Our 3D volume data usually are derived from tomographic reconstructions of the solar wind density and velocity from remote sensing observations (e.g., Thomson scattering and interplanetary scintillation observations). We show examples of hardware-based volume rendering using the Volume Pro PCI board (from TeraRecon, Inc.). This board updates the display at a rate of up to 30 frames per second using a parallel projection algorithm, allowing the manipulation of volume data in real-time. In addition, the manipulation of 4D volume data (the 4th dimension usually representing time) enables the visualization in real-time of an evolving (time-dependent) data set. We also show examples of perspective projections using IDL. This work was supported through NASA grant NAG5-9423.

  15. Volume Rendering of AMR Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadens, M.; Pomarède, D.; Chapon, D.; Teyssier, R.; Bournaud, F.; Renaud, F.; Grandjouan, N.

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution simulations often rely on the Adaptive Mesh Resolution (AMR) technique to optimize memory consumption versus attainable precision. While this technique allows for dramatic improvements in terms of computing performance, the analysis and visualization of its data outputs remain challenging. The lack of effective volume renderers for the octree-based AMR used by the RAMSES simulation program has led to the development of the solutions presented in this paper. Two custom algorithms are discussed, based on the splatting and the ray-casting techniques. Their usage is illustrated in the context of the visualization of a high-resolution, 6000-processor simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy. Performance obtained in terms of memory management and parallelism speedup are presented.

  16. Multiple ray cluster rendering for interactive integral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shaohui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Mingcai; Li, Weiming; Hong, Tao; Nam, Dongkyung; Lee, Jin-Ho; Wu, Enhua; Wang, Haitao; Kim, Ji-Yeun

    2013-04-22

    In this paper, we present an efficient Computer Generated Integral Imaging (CGII) method, called multiple ray cluster rendering (MRCR). Based on the MRCR, an interactive integral imaging system is realized, which provides accurate 3D image satisfying the changeable observers' positions in real time. The MRCR method can generate all the elemental image pixels within only one rendering pass by ray reorganization of multiple ray clusters and 3D content duplication. It is compatible with various graphic contents including mesh, point cloud, and medical data. Moreover, multi-sampling method is embedded in MRCR method for acquiring anti-aliased 3D image result. To our best knowledge, the MRCR method outperforms the existing CGII methods in both the speed performance and the display quality. Experimental results show that the proposed CGII method can achieve real-time computational speed for large-scale 3D data with about 50,000 points. PMID:23609712

  17. Acceleration of the Water Cycle over the Colorado Headwaters Region from Eight Year Cloud Resolving Simulations of the WRF Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, R.; Ikeda, K.; Liu, C.; Gochis, D. J.; Dudhia, J.; Thompson, G.; Chen, F.; Tewari, M.; Gutmann, E. D.; Grubisic, V.; Arsenault, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    A number of studies have indicated that one of the expected results of climate change will be an acceleration of the water cycle due to the enhanced moisture available due to a warmer climate. The representation of the water cycle in most climate models, however, is relatively poor due in part to the relatively coarse resolution as well as the difficulty of representing convection using existing convective parameterizations and the poor representation of complex topography. As a result, there is some uncertainty regarding the magnitude of the acceleration and its seasonal dependence. To overcome these deficiencies, a high resolution (4 km) cloud resolving simulation of the current climate (continuous eight years starting 2001) and a perturbed moister climate using the Pseudo Global Warming approach was performed using the WRF Climate model over the Colorado Headwaters region. The current simulation was driven by the North American Regional Reanalysis with 32 km resolution and 3 hourly updates. The future simulation was driven by the same NARR reanalysis with enhanced moisture and temperature from a CCSM A1B AR4 simulation of the global future climate out to 50 years. The headwaters region of Colorado that includes, among others, the Colorado, Platte, Rio Grande and Arkansas Rivers, is one of the key source regions for water in the Southwest as ~85% of the streamflow for the Colorado River comes from snowmelt in this region. The performance of the WRF model for precipitation, temperature and snowpack was verified to be reasonable for both winter and summer during the 2001-2008 period using SNOTEL observations at ~100 sites. Based on this good performance, an analysis of the residence time and fluxes the various components of the water cycle was performed. This paper will this analysis for water in its various phases as a function of season and region both above and below ground due to the warmer and moister climate. A comparison will also be made to current climate

  18. Approaching the exa-scale: a real-world evaluation of rendering extremely large data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Patchett, John M; Ahrens, James P; Lo, Li - Ta; Browniee, Carson S; Mitchell, Christopher J; Hansen, Chuck

    2010-10-15

    Extremely large scale analysis is becoming increasingly important as supercomputers and their simulations move from petascale to exascale. The lack of dedicated hardware acceleration for rendering on today's supercomputing platforms motivates our detailed evaluation of the possibility of interactive rendering on the supercomputer. In order to facilitate our understanding of rendering on the supercomputing platform, we focus on scalability of rendering algorithms and architecture envisioned for exascale datasets. To understand tradeoffs for dealing with extremely large datasets, we compare three different rendering algorithms for large polygonal data: software based ray tracing, software based rasterization and hardware accelerated rasterization. We present a case study of strong and weak scaling of rendering extremely large data on both GPU and CPU based parallel supercomputers using Para View, a parallel visualization tool. Wc use three different data sets: two synthetic and one from a scientific application. At an extreme scale, algorithmic rendering choices make a difference and should be considered while approaching exascale computing, visualization, and analysis. We find software based ray-tracing offers a viable approach for scalable rendering of the projected future massive data sizes.

  19. GPU-based Volume Rendering for Medical Image Visualization.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yang; Gu, Lixu

    2005-01-01

    During the quick advancements of medical image visualization and augmented virtual reality application, the low performance of the volume rendering algorithm is still a "bottle neck". To facilitate the usage of well developed hardware resource, a novel graphics processing unit (GPU)-based volume ray-casting algorithm is proposed in this paper. Running on a normal PC, it performs an interactive rate while keeping the same image quality as the traditional volume rendering algorithm does. Recently, GPU-accelerated direct volume rendering has positioned itself as an efficient tool for the display and visual analysis of volume data. However, for large sized medical image data, it often shows low efficiency for too large memories requested. Furthermore, it always holds a drawback of writing color buffers multi-times per frame. The proposed algorithm improves the situation by implementing ray casting operation completely in GPU. It needs only one slice plane from CPU and one 3Dtexture to store data when GPU calculates the two terminals of the ray and carries out the color blending operation in its pixel programs. So both the rendering speed and the memories consumed are improved, and the algorithm can deal most medical image data on normal PCs in the interactive speed. PMID:17281405

  20. RenderToolbox3: MATLAB tools that facilitate physically based stimulus rendering for vision research

    PubMed Central

    Heasly, Benjamin S.; Cottaris, Nicolas P.; Lichtman, Daniel P.; Xiao, Bei; Brainard, David H.

    2014-01-01

    RenderToolbox3 provides MATLAB utilities and prescribes a workflow that should be useful to researchers who want to employ graphics in the study of vision and perhaps in other endeavors as well. In particular, RenderToolbox3 facilitates rendering scene families in which various scene attributes and renderer behaviors are manipulated parametrically, enables spectral specification of object reflectance and illuminant spectra, enables the use of physically based material specifications, helps validate renderer output, and converts renderer output to physical units of radiance. This paper describes the design and functionality of the toolbox and discusses several examples that demonstrate its use. We have designed RenderToolbox3 to be portable across computer hardware and operating systems and to be free and open source (except for MATLAB itself). RenderToolbox3 is available at https://github.com/DavidBrainard/RenderToolbox3. PMID:24511145

  1. Direct Volume Rendering of Curvilinear Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Wilhelms, J.; Challinger, J.; Alper, N.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Direct volume rendering can visualize sampled 3D scalar data as a continuous medium, or extract features. However, it is generally slow. Furthermore, most algorithms for direct volume rendering have assumed rectilinear gridded data. This paper discusses methods for using direct volume rendering when the original volume is curvilinear, i.e. is divided into six-sided cells which are not necessarily equilateral hexahedra. One approach is to ray-cast such volumes directly. An alternative approach is to interpolate the sample volumes to a rectilinear grid, and use this regular volume for rendering. Advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches in terms of speed and image quality are explored.

  2. Parallel rendering techniques for massively parallel visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Krogh, M.; Painter, J.

    1995-07-01

    As the resolution of simulation models increases, scientific visualization algorithms which take advantage of the large memory. and parallelism of Massively Parallel Processors (MPPs) are becoming increasingly important. For large applications rendering on the MPP tends to be preferable to rendering on a graphics workstation due to the MPP`s abundant resources: memory, disk, and numerous processors. The challenge becomes developing algorithms that can exploit these resources while minimizing overhead, typically communication costs. This paper will describe recent efforts in parallel rendering for polygonal primitives as well as parallel volumetric techniques. This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume render use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Ma.chines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  3. [An improved fast algorithm for ray casting volume rendering of medical images].

    PubMed

    Tao, Ling; Wang, Huina; Tian, Zhiliang

    2006-10-01

    Ray casting algorithm can obtain better quality images in volume rendering, however, it presents some problems such as powerful computing capacity and slow rendering velocity. Therefore, a new fast algorithm of ray casting volume rendering is proposed in this paper. This algorithm reduces matrix computation by the matrix transformation characteristics of re-sampling points in two coordinate system, so re-sampled computational process is accelerated. By extending the Bresenham algorithm to three dimension and utilizing boundary box technique, this algorithm avoids the sampling in empty voxel and greatly improves the efficiency of ray casting. The experiment results show that the improved acceleration algorithm can produce the required quality images, at the same time reduces the total operations remarkably, and speeds up the volume rendering. PMID:17121341

  4. Color rendering of color camera data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, Brian A.

    1986-01-01

    Conditions under which a computational procedure can be applied to arbitrary camera sensors to permit estimation of the human photoreceptor response are considered. The adopted procedures recover the effective surface reflectance at the time of measurement, and the reflectance estimates depend not only on the surface, but upon the viewing geometry. The present method for color rendering assumes that the observer's state of adaptation at the time of viewing the original and the rendered images is the same. The analysis aids in specifying which classes of surfaces are required to be accurately rendered, and for which surfaces some error can be tolerated.

  5. Object-oriented parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Heiland, R.W.

    1994-09-01

    Since many scientific datasets can be visualized using some polygonal representation, a polygon renderer has broad use for scientific visualization. With today`s high performance computing applications producing very large datasets, a parallel polygon renderer is a necessary tool for keeping the compute-visualize cycle at a minimum. This paper presents a DOIV on renderer that combines the shared-memory and message-passing models of parallel programming. It uses the Global Arrays library, a shared-memory programming toolkit for distributed memory machines. The experience of using an object oriented approach for software design and development is also discussed.

  6. Capturing, processing, and rendering real-world scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, Lars S.; Lastra, Anselmo A.; McAllister, David K.; Popescu, Voicu; McCue, Chris; Fuchs, Henry

    2000-12-01

    While photographs vividly capture a scene from a single viewpoint, it is our goal to capture a scene in such a way that a viewer can freely move to any viewpoint, just as he or she would in an actual scene. We have built a prototype system to quickly digitize a scene using a laser rangefinder and a high-resolution digital camera that accurately captures a panorama of high-resolution range and color information. With real-world scenes, we have provided data to fuel research in many area, including representation, registration, data fusion, polygonization, rendering, simplification, and reillumination. The real-world scene data can be used for many purposes, including immersive environments, immersive training, re-engineering and engineering verification, renovation, crime-scene and accident capture and reconstruction, archaeology and historic preservation, sports and entertainment, surveillance, remote tourism and remote sales. We will describe our acquisition system, the necessary processing to merge data from the multiple input devices and positions. We will also describe high quality rendering using the data we have collected. Issues about specific rendering accelerators and algorithms will also be presented. We will conclude by describing future uses and methods of collection for real- world scene data.

  7. High Performance GPU-Based Fourier Volume Rendering.

    PubMed

    Abdellah, Marwan; Eldeib, Ayman; Sharawi, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Fourier volume rendering (FVR) is a significant visualization technique that has been used widely in digital radiography. As a result of its (N (2)log⁡N) time complexity, it provides a faster alternative to spatial domain volume rendering algorithms that are (N (3)) computationally complex. Relying on the Fourier projection-slice theorem, this technique operates on the spectral representation of a 3D volume instead of processing its spatial representation to generate attenuation-only projections that look like X-ray radiographs. Due to the rapid evolution of its underlying architecture, the graphics processing unit (GPU) became an attractive competent platform that can deliver giant computational raw power compared to the central processing unit (CPU) on a per-dollar-basis. The introduction of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) technology enables embarrassingly-parallel algorithms to run efficiently on CUDA-capable GPU architectures. In this work, a high performance GPU-accelerated implementation of the FVR pipeline on CUDA-enabled GPUs is presented. This proposed implementation can achieve a speed-up of 117x compared to a single-threaded hybrid implementation that uses the CPU and GPU together by taking advantage of executing the rendering pipeline entirely on recent GPU architectures. PMID:25866499

  8. Sort-First, Distributed Memory Parallel Visualization and Rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Humphreys, Greg; Paul, Brian; Brederson, J. Dean

    2003-07-15

    While commodity computing and graphics hardware has increased in capacity and dropped in cost, it is still quite difficult to make effective use of such systems for general-purpose parallel visualization and graphics. We describe the results of a recent project that provides a software infrastructure suitable for general-purpose use by parallel visualization and graphics applications. Our work combines and extends two technologies: Chromium, a stream-oriented framework that implements the OpenGL programming interface; and OpenRM Scene Graph, a pipelined-parallel scene graph interface for graphics data management. Using this combination, we implement a sort-first, distributed memory, parallel volume rendering application. We describe the performance characteristics in terms of bandwidth requirements and highlight key algorithmic considerations needed to implement the sort-first system. We characterize system performance using a distributed memory parallel volume rendering application, a nd present performance gains realized by using scene specific knowledge to accelerate rendering through reduced network bandwidth. The contribution of this work is an exploration of general-purpose, sort-first architecture performance characteristics as applied to distributed memory, commodity hardware, along with a description of the algorithmic support needed to realize parallel, sort-first implementations.

  9. Foundations for Measuring Volume Rendering Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter L.; Uselton, Samuel P.; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide a foundation for objectively comparing volume rendered images. The key elements of the foundation are: (1) a rigorous specification of all the parameters that need to be specified to define the conditions under which a volume rendered image is generated; (2) a methodology for difference classification, including a suite of functions or metrics to quantify and classify the difference between two volume rendered images that will support an analysis of the relative importance of particular differences. The results of this method can be used to study the changes caused by modifying particular parameter values, to compare and quantify changes between images of similar data sets rendered in the same way, and even to detect errors in the design, implementation or modification of a volume rendering system. If one has a benchmark image, for example one created by a high accuracy volume rendering system, the method can be used to evaluate the accuracy of a given image.

  10. A practical approach to spectral volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Steven; Möller, Torsten; Tory, Melanie; Drew, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    To make a spectral representation of color practicable for volume rendering, a new low-dimensional subspace method is used to act as the carrier of spectral information. With that model, spectral light material interaction can be integrated into existing volume rendering methods at almost no penalty. In addition, slow rendering methods can profit from the new technique of postillumination-generating spectral images in real-time for arbitrary light spectra under a fixed viewpoint. Thus, the capability of spectral rendering to create distinct impressions of a scene under different lighting conditions is established as a method of real-time interaction. Although we use an achromatic opacity in our rendering, we show how spectral rendering permits different data set features to be emphasized or hidden as long as they have not been entirely obscured. The use of postillumination is an order of magnitude faster than changing the transfer function and repeating the projection step. To put the user in control of the spectral visualization, we devise a new widget, a "light-dial," for interactively changing the illumination and include a usability study of this new light space exploration tool. Applied to spectral transfer functions, different lights bring out or hide specific qualities of the data. In conjunction with postillumination, this provides a new means for preparing data for visualization and forms a new degree of freedom for guided exploration of volumetric data sets. PMID:15747643

  11. Search Cloud

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this page, ... Top 110 zoster vaccine Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search cloud ...

  12. Search Cloud

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search cloud ...

  13. Standardized rendering from IR surveillance motion imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokoski, F. J.

    2014-06-01

    Government agencies, including defense and law enforcement, increasingly make use of video from surveillance systems and camera phones owned by non-government entities.Making advanced and standardized motion imaging technology available to private and commercial users at cost-effective prices would benefit all parties. In particular, incorporating thermal infrared into commercial surveillance systems offers substantial benefits beyond night vision capability. Face rendering is a process to facilitate exploitation of thermal infrared surveillance imagery from the general area of a crime scene, to assist investigations with and without cooperating eyewitnesses. Face rendering automatically generates greyscale representations similar to police artist sketches for faces in surveillance imagery collected from proximate locations and times to a crime under investigation. Near-realtime generation of face renderings can provide law enforcement with an investigation tool to assess witness memory and credibility, and integrate reports from multiple eyewitnesses, Renderings can be quickly disseminated through social media to warn of a person who may pose an immediate threat, and to solicit the public's help in identifying possible suspects and witnesses. Renderings are pose-standardized so as to not divulge the presence and location of eyewitnesses and surveillance cameras. Incorporation of thermal infrared imaging into commercial surveillance systems will significantly improve system performance, and reduce manual review times, at an incremental cost that will continue to decrease. Benefits to criminal justice would include improved reliability of eyewitness testimony and improved accuracy of distinguishing among minority groups in eyewitness and surveillance identifications.

  14. Point Cloud Visualization in AN Open Source 3d Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Calle, M.; Gómez-Deck, D.; Koehler, O.; Pulido, F.

    2011-09-01

    During the last years the usage of 3D applications in GIS is becoming more popular. Since the appearance of Google Earth, users are familiarized with 3D environments. On the other hand, nowadays computers with 3D acceleration are common, broadband access is widespread and the public information that can be used in GIS clients that are able to use data from the Internet is constantly increasing. There are currently several libraries suitable for this kind of applications. Based on these facts, and using libraries that are already developed and connected to our own developments, we are working on the implementation of a real 3D GIS with analysis capabilities. Since a 3D GIS such as this can be very interesting for tasks like LiDAR or Laser Scanner point clouds rendering and analysis, special attention is given to get an optimal handling of very large data sets. Glob3 will be a multidimensional GIS in which 3D point clouds could be explored and analysed, even if they are consist of several million points.The latest addition to our visualization libraries is the development of a points cloud server that works regardless of the cloud's size. The server receives and processes petitions from a 3d client (for example glob3, but could be any other, such as one based on WebGL) and delivers the data in the form of pre-processed tiles, depending on the required level of detail.

  15. Collaborative Graphic Rendering for Improving Visual Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoxin; Pei, Guodong

    Handheld devices such as UMPC, though convenient, bear weakness of size constraint for display. To mitigate such a problem and enhance user experience for owners of small devices, in this paper we design a collaborative rendering platform. When running game graphic applications at a handheld, the generated OpenGL graphic commands are intercepted and then delivered to a device with a larger display. The graphics are rendered and displayed at that device. The performance of the collaborative rendering platform is determined by graphic computing resources and network bandwidth. Analysis and simulation prove that other than providing a better display, the collaborative system can improve game experience also by increasing frame rates. In particular, at a low computing cost, a further collaboration between GPUs of collaborators can improve frame rate by eliminating the negative impact from network delay on applications that require GPU feedback.

  16. Mobile Volume Rendering: Past, Present and Future.

    PubMed

    Noguera, José M; Jiménez, J Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Volume rendering has been a relevant topic in scientific visualization for the last decades. However, the exploration of reasonably big volume datasets requires considerable computing power, which has limited this field to the desktop scenario. But the recent advances in mobile graphics hardware have motivated the research community to overcome these restrictions and to bring volume graphics to these ubiquitous handheld platforms. This survey presents the past and present work on mobile volume rendering, and is meant to serve as an overview and introduction to the field. It proposes a classification of the current efforts and covers aspects such as advantages and issues of the mobile platforms, rendering strategies, performance and user interfaces. The paper ends by highlighting promising research directions to motivate the development of new and interesting mobile volume solutions. PMID:26731459

  17. A Parallel Rendering Algorithm for MIMD Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.; Orloff, Tobias

    1991-01-01

    Applications such as animation and scientific visualization demand high performance rendering of complex three dimensional scenes. To deliver the necessary rendering rates, highly parallel hardware architectures are required. The challenge is then to design algorithms and software which effectively use the hardware parallelism. A rendering algorithm targeted to distributed memory MIMD architectures is described. For maximum performance, the algorithm exploits both object-level and pixel-level parallelism. The behavior of the algorithm is examined both analytically and experimentally. Its performance for large numbers of processors is found to be limited primarily by communication overheads. An experimental implementation for the Intel iPSC/860 shows increasing performance from 1 to 128 processors across a wide range of scene complexities. It is shown that minimal modifications to the algorithm will adapt it for use on shared memory architectures as well.

  18. Smooth transitions between bump rendering algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.G. Max, N.L. |

    1993-01-04

    A method is described for switching smoothly between rendering algorithms as required by the amount of visible surface detail. The result will be more realism with less computation for displaying objects whose surface detail can be described by one or more bump maps. The three rendering algorithms considered are bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF), bump-mapping, and displacement-mapping. The bump-mapping has been modified to make it consistent with the other two. For a given viewpoint, one of these algorithms will show a better trade-off between quality, computation time, and aliasing than the other two. Thus, it needs to be determined for any given viewpoint which regions of the object(s) will be rendered with each algorithm The decision as to which algorithm is appropriate is a function of distance, viewing angle, and the frequency of bumps in the bump map.

  19. Rendered virtual view image objective quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang; Li, Xiangchun; Zhang, Yi; Peng, Kai

    2013-08-01

    The research on rendered virtual view image (RVVI) objective quality assessment is important for integrated imaging system and image quality assessment (IQA). Traditional IQA algorithms cannot be applied directly on the system receiver-side due to interview displacement and the absence of original reference. This study proposed a block-based neighbor reference (NbR) IQA framework for RVVI IQA. Neighbor views used for rendering are employed for quality assessment in the proposed framework. A symphonious factor handling noise and interview displacement is defined and applied to evaluate the contribution of the obtained quality index in each block pair. A three-stage experiment scheme is also presented to testify the proposed framework and evaluate its homogeneity performance when comparing to full reference IQA. Experimental results show the proposed framework is useful in RVVI objective quality assessment at system receiver-side and benchmarking different rendering algorithms.

  20. Volume Rendering for Curvilinear and Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N; Williams, P; Silva, C; Cook, R

    2003-03-05

    We discuss two volume rendering methods developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first, cell projection, renders the polygons in the projection of each cell. It requires a global visibility sort in order to composite the cells in back to front order, and we discuss several different algorithms for this sort. The second method uses regularly spaced slice planes perpendicular to the X, Y, or Z axes, which slice the cells into polygons. Both methods are supplemented with anti-aliasing techniques to deal with small cells that might fall between pixel samples or slice planes, and both have been parallelized.

  1. Cloud classification using whole-sky imager data

    SciTech Connect

    Buch, K.A. Jr.; Sun, C.H.; Thorne, L.R.

    1996-04-01

    Clouds are one of the most important moderators of the earth radiation budget and one of the least understood. The effect that clouds have on the reflection and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation is strongly influenced by their shape, size, and composition. Physically accurate parameterization of clouds is necessary for any general circulation model (GCM) to yield meaningful results. The work presented here is part of a larger project that is aimed at producing realistic three-dimensional (3D) volume renderings of cloud scenes based on measured data from real cloud scenes. These renderings will provide the important shape information for parameterizing GCMs. The specific goal of the current study is to develop an algorithm that automatically classifies (by cloud type) the clouds observed in the scene. This information will assist the volume rendering program in determining the shape of the cloud. Much work has been done on cloud classification using multispectral satellite images. Most of these references use some kind of texture measure to distinguish the different cloud types and some also use topological features (such as cloud/sky connectivity or total number of clouds). A wide variety of classification methods has been used, including neural networks, various types of clustering, and thresholding. The work presented here uses binary decision trees to distinguish the different cloud types based on cloud features vectors.

  2. Rapid Decimation for Direct Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Jonathan; VanGelder, Allen; Verma, Vivek; Wilhelms, Jane

    1997-01-01

    An approach for eliminating unnecessary portions of a volume when producing a direct volume rendering is described. This reduction in volume size sacrifices some image quality in the interest of rendering speed. Since volume visualization is often used as an exploratory visualization technique, it is important to reduce rendering times, so the user can effectively explore the volume. The methods presented can speed up rendering by factors of 2 to 3 with minor image degradation. A family of decimation algorithms to reduce the number of primitives in the volume without altering the volume's grid in any way is introduced. This allows the decimation to be computed rapidly, making it easier to change decimation levels on the fly. Further, because very little extra space is required, this method is suitable for the very large volumes that are becoming common. The method is also grid-independent, so it is suitable for multiple overlapping curvilinear and unstructured, as well as regular, grids. The decimation process can proceed automatically, or can be guided by the user so that important regions of the volume are decimated less than unimportant regions. A formal error measure is described based on a three-dimensional analog of the Radon transform. Decimation methods are evaluated based on this metric and on direct comparison with reference images.

  3. Text What?! What Is Text Rendering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Haley, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Text rendering is a method of deconstructing text that allows students to make decisions regarding the importance of the text, select the portions that are most meaningful to them, and then share it with classmates--all without fear of being ridiculed. The research on students constructing meaning from text is clear. In order for knowledge to…

  4. 3-D Volume Rendering of Sand Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of resin-impregnated Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) specimens are assembled to provide 3-D volume renderings of density patterns formed by dislocation under the external loading stress profile applied during the experiments. Experiments flown on STS-79 and STS-89. Principal Investigator: Dr. Stein Sture

  5. Rendering Visible: Painting and Sexuate Subjectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I examine Luce Irigaray's aesthetic of sexual difference, which she develops by extrapolating from Paul Klee's idea that the role of painting is to render the non-visible rather than represent the visible. This idea is the premise of her analyses of phenomenology and psychoanalysis and their respective contributions to understanding…

  6. Color rendering indices in global illumination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler-Moroder, David; Dür, Arne

    2009-02-01

    Human perception of material colors depends heavily on the nature of the light sources used for illumination. One and the same object can cause highly different color impressions when lit by a vapor lamp or by daylight, respectively. Based on state-of-the-art colorimetric methods we present a modern approach for calculating color rendering indices (CRI), which were defined by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) to characterize color reproduction properties of illuminants. We update the standard CIE method in three main points: firstly, we use the CIELAB color space, secondly, we apply a Bradford transformation for chromatic adaptation, and finally, we evaluate color differences using the CIEDE2000 total color difference formula. Moreover, within a real-world scene, light incident on a measurement surface is composed of a direct and an indirect part. Neumann and Schanda1 have shown for the cube model that interreflections can influence the CRI of an illuminant. We analyze how color rendering indices vary in a real-world scene with mixed direct and indirect illumination and recommend the usage of a spectral rendering engine instead of an RGB based renderer for reasons of accuracy of CRI calculations.

  7. Shapes and textures for rendering coral

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.L. ); Wyvill, G. )

    1990-10-18

    A growth algorithm has been developed to build coral shapes out of a tree of spheres. A volume density defined by the spheres is contoured to give a soft object.'' The resulting contour surfaces are rendered by ray tracing, using a generalized volume texture to produce shading and bump mapped'' normal perturbations. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  8. 3D in the Fast Lane: Render as You Go with the Latest OpenGL Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Jeff; Murphy, Sam

    1997-01-01

    NT OpenGL hardware allows modelers and animators to work at relatively inexpensive NT workstations in their own offices or homes previous to shared space and workstation time in expensive studios. Rates seven OpenGL boards and two QuickDraw 3D accelerator boards for Mac users on overall value, wireframe and texture rendering, 2D acceleration, and…

  9. Tomographic image reconstruction and rendering with texture-mapping hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Cabral, B.K.; Foran, J.

    1994-07-01

    The image reconstruction problem, also known as the inverse Radon transform, for x-ray computed tomography (CT) is found in numerous applications in medicine and industry. The most common algorithm used in these cases is filtered backprojection (FBP), which, while a simple procedure, is time-consuming for large images on any type of computational engine. Specially-designed, dedicated parallel processors are commonly used in medical CT scanners, whose results are then passed to graphics workstation for rendering and analysis. However, a fast direct FBP algorithm can be implemented on modern texture-mapping hardware in current high-end workstation platforms. This is done by casting the FBP algorithm as an image warping operation with summing. Texture-mapping hardware, such as that on the Silicon Graphics Reality Engine (TM), shows around 600 times speedup of backprojection over a CPU-based implementation (a 100 Mhz R4400 in this case). This technique has the further advantages of flexibility and rapid programming. In addition, the same hardware can be used for both image reconstruction and for volumetric rendering. The techniques can also be used to accelerate iterative reconstruction algorithms. The hardware architecture also allows more complex operations than straight-ray backprojection if they are required, including fan-beam, cone-beam, and curved ray paths, with little or no speed penalties.

  10. Direct Volume Rendering with Shading via Three-Dimensional Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Gelder, Allen; Kim, Kwansik

    1996-01-01

    A new and easy-to-implement method for direct volume rendering that uses 3D texture maps for acceleration, and incorporates directional lighting, is described. The implementation, called Voltx, produces high-quality images at nearly interactive speeds on workstations with hardware support for three-dimensional texture maps. Previously reported methods did not incorporate a light model, and did not address issues of multiple texture maps for large volumes. Our research shows that these extensions impact performance by about a factor of ten. Voltx supports orthographic, perspective, and stereo views. This paper describes the theory and implementation of this technique, and compares it to the shear-warp factorization approach. A rectilinear data set is converted into a three-dimensional texture map containing color and opacity information. Quantized normal vectors and a lookup table provide efficiency. A new tesselation of the sphere is described, which serves as the basis for normal-vector quantization. A new gradient-based shading criterion is described, in which the gradient magnitude is interpreted in the context of the field-data value and the material classification parameters, and not in isolation. In the rendering phase, the texture map is applied to a stack of parallel planes, which effectively cut the texture into many slabs. The slabs are composited to form an image.

  11. Tomographic image reconstruction and rendering with texture-mapping hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Stephen G.; Cabral, Brian K.; Foran, Jim

    1994-07-01

    The image reconstruction problem, also known as the inverse Radon transform, for x-ray computed tomography (CT) is found in numerous applications in medicine and industry. The most common algorithm used in these cases is filtered backprojection (FBP), which, while a simple procedure, is time-consuming for large images on any type of computational engine. Specially designed, dedicated parallel processors are commonly used in medical CT scanners, whose results are then passed to a graphics workstation for rendering and analysis. However, a fast direct FBP algorithm can be implemented on modern texture-mapping hardware in current high-end workstation platforms. This is done by casting the FBP algorithm as an image warping operation with summing. Texture- mapping hardware, such as that on the silicon Graphics Reality Engine, shows around 600 times speedup of backprojection over a CPU-based implementation (a 100 Mhz R4400 in our case). This technique has the further advantages of flexibility and rapid programming. In addition, the same hardware can be used for both image reconstruction and for volumetric rendering. Our technique can also be used to accelerate iterative reconstruction algorithms. The hardware architecture also allows more complex operations than straight-ray backprojection if they are required, including fan-beam, cone-beam, and curved ray paths, with little or no speed penalties.

  12. Remote interactive direct volume rendering of AMR data

    SciTech Connect

    Kreylos, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Shalf, John M.; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2002-03-28

    We describe a framework for direct volume rendering of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) data that operates directly on the hierarchical grid structure, without the need to resample data onto a single, uniform rectilinear grid. The framework can be used for a range of renderers optimized for particular hardware architectures: a hardware-assisted renderer for single-processor graphics workstations, and a massively parallel software-only renderer for supercomputers. It is also possible to use the framework for distributed rendering servers. By exploiting the multiresolution structure of AMR data, the hardware-assisted renderers can render large AMR data sets at interactive rates, even if the data is stored remotely.

  13. Volume rendering: application in static field conformal radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourland, J. Daniel; Camp, Jon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    1992-09-01

    Lesions in the head which are large or irregularly shaped present challenges for radiosurgical treatment by linear accelerator or other radiosurgery modalities. To treat these lesions we are developing static field, conformal stereotactic radiosurgery. In this procedure seven to eleven megavoltage x-ray beams are aimed at the target volume. Each beam is designed from the beam's-eye view, and has its own unique geometry: gantry angle, table angle, and shape which conforms to the projected cross-section of the target. A difficulty with this and other 3- D treatment plans is the visualization of the treatment geometry and proposed treatment plan. Is the target volume geometrically covered by the arrangement of beams, and is the dose distribution adequate? To answer these questions we have been investigating the use of ANALYZETM volume rendering to display the target anatomy and the resultant dose distribution.

  14. Remote rendering using vtk and vic.

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.; Papka, M.E.

    2000-09-19

    This paper presents a remote rendering application that involves the extension of the Visualization Toolkit (vtk) and the Video Conferencing Tool (vie) for use in remote rendering complete with interaction from the remote site using the vie user interface. Vtk is an open source C++ library, with Tel, Python, and Java bindings for computer graphics, image processing, and visualization [3]. Vtk provides a higher level of support, beyond the traditional low-level libraries, for creating visualization applications. Vtk includes algorithms to support the visualization of scalars, vectors, and tensors. Vic is a flexible tool built by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for real-time video conferencing over the Internet [2]. Vie's user interface is built as Tcl/Tk script embedded in the applications. This allows developers to prototype changes to the interface in a simple and straightforward manner.

  15. A rendering approach for stereoscopic web pages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianlong; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Ronggang; Chen, Qinshui

    2014-03-01

    Web technology provides a relatively easy way to generate contents for us to recognize the world, and with the development of stereoscopic display technology, the stereoscopic devices will become much more popular. The combination of web technology and stereoscopic display technology will bring revolutionary visual effect. The Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) web pages, in which text, image and video may have different depth, can be displayed on stereoscopic display devices. This paper presents the approach about how to render two viewing S3D web pages including text, images, widgets: first, an algorithm should be developed in order to display stereoscopic elements like text, widgets by using 2D graphic library; second, a method should be presented to render stereoscopic web page based on current framework of the browser; third, a rough solution is invented to fix the problem that comes out in the method.

  16. A Task Adaptive parallel graphics renderer

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, S.

    1992-12-21

    This paper presents a graphics renderer which incorporates new partitioning methodologies of memory and work for efficient execution on a parallel computer. The Task Adaptive domain decomposition scheme is an image space method involving dynamic partitioning of rectangular pixel area tasks. The author shows that this method requires little overhead, allows coherence within a parallel context, handles worst case scenarios effectively, and executes efficiently with little processor synchronization necessary. Previous research in the area of memory and work decompositions for graphics rendering has been primarily limited to simulation studies and little practical experience. The algorithm presented here has been implemented on a scalable distributed memory multiprocessor and tested on a variety of input scenes. The author presents a theoretical and practical analysis in order to contrast its predicted and actual success. The implementation analysis indicates that load imbalance is the major cause of performance degradation at the higher processor counts. Even so, on a variety of test scenes, an average rendering speedup of 79 was achieved utilizing 96 processors on the BBN TC2000 multiprocessor with a processor efficiency range of 66% to 94%.

  17. Distributed ray casting for high-speed volume rendering. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brightbill, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    The volume rendering technique known as ray casting or ray tracing is notoriously slow for large volume sizes, yet provides superior images. A technique is needed to accelerate ray tracing volumes without depending on special purpose or parallel computers. The realization and improvements in distributed computing over the past two decades has motivated its use in this work. This thesis explores a technique to speedup ray casting by distributed programming. The work investigates the possibility of dividing the volume among general purpose workstations and casting rays (using Levoy's front-to-back algorithm) through each subvolume independently. The final step being the composition of all subvolume rendered images. Results indicate a 75 percent savings in rendering time by distributed processing over eight processors versus a single processor.

  18. Anatomical annotation on vascular structure in volume rendered images.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhengang; Nimura, Yukitaka; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kajita, Yasukazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    The precise annotation of vascular structure is desired in computer-assisted systems to help surgeons identify each vessel branch. This paper proposes a method that annotates vessels on volume rendered images by rendering their names on them using a two-pass rendering process. In the first rendering pass, vessel surface models are generated using such properties as centerlines, radii, and running directions. Then the vessel names are drawn on the vessel surfaces. Finally, the vessel name images and the corresponding depth buffer are generated by a virtual camera at the viewpoint. In the second rendering pass, volume rendered images are generated by a ray casting volume rendering algorithm that considers the depth buffer generated in the first rendering pass. After the two-pass rendering is finished, an annotated image is generated by blending the volume rendered image with the surface rendered image. To confirm the effectiveness of our proposed method, we performed a computer-assisted system for the automated annotation of abdominal arteries. The experimental results show that vessel names can be drawn on the corresponding vessel surface in the volume rendered images at a computing cost that is nearly the same as that by volume rendering only. The proposed method has enormous potential to be adopted to annotate the vessels in the 3D medical images in clinical applications, such as image-guided surgery. PMID:23562139

  19. Image-based color ink diffusion rendering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Ming; Wang, Ren-Jie

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes an image-based painterly rendering algorithm for automatically synthesizing an image with color ink diffusion. We suggest a mathematical model with a physical base to simulate the phenomenon of color colloidal ink diffusing into absorbent paper. Our algorithm contains three main parts: a feature extraction phase, a Kubelka-Munk (KM) color mixing phase, and a color ink diffusion synthesis phase. In the feature extraction phase, the information of the reference image is simplified by luminance division and color segmentation. In the color mixing phase, the KM theory is employed to approximate the result when one pigment is painted upon another pigment layer. Then, in the color ink diffusion synthesis phase, the physically-based model that we propose is employed to simulate the result of color ink diffusion in absorbent paper using a texture synthesis technique. Our image-based ink diffusing rendering (IBCIDR) algorithm eliminates the drawback of conventional Chinese ink simulations, which are limited to the black ink domain, and our approach demonstrates that, without using any strokes, a color image can be automatically converted to the diffused ink style with a visually pleasing appearance. PMID:17218741

  20. A Multiresolution Image Cache for Volume Rendering

    SciTech Connect

    LaMar, E; Pascucci, V

    2003-02-27

    The authors discuss the techniques and implementation details of the shared-memory image caching system for volume visualization and iso-surface rendering. One of the goals of the system is to decouple image generation from image display. This is done by maintaining a set of impostors for interactive display while the production of the impostor imagery is performed by a set of parallel, background processes. The system introduces a caching basis that is free of the gap/overlap artifacts of earlier caching techniques. instead of placing impostors at fixed, pre-defined positions in world space, the technique is to adaptively place impostors relative to the camera viewpoint. The positions translate with the camera but stay aligned to the data; i.e., the positions translate, but do not rotate, with the camera. The viewing transformation is factored into a translation transformation and a rotation transformation. The impostor imagery is generated using just the translation transformation and visible impostors are displayed using just the rotation transformation. Displayed image quality is improved by increasing the number of impostors and the frequency that impostors are re-rendering is improved by decreasing the number of impostors.

  1. Acoustic-tactile rendering of visual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pubudu Madhawa; Pappas, Thrasyvoulos N.; Atkins, Joshua; West, James E.; Hartmann, William M.

    2012-03-01

    In previous work, we have proposed a dynamic, interactive system for conveying visual information via hearing and touch. The system is implemented with a touch screen that allows the user to interrogate a two-dimensional (2-D) object layout by active finger scanning while listening to spatialized auditory feedback. Sound is used as the primary source of information for object localization and identification, while touch is used both for pointing and for kinesthetic feedback. Our previous work considered shape and size perception of simple objects via hearing and touch. The focus of this paper is on the perception of a 2-D layout of simple objects with identical size and shape. We consider the selection and rendition of sounds for object identification and localization. We rely on the head-related transfer function for rendering sound directionality, and consider variations of sound intensity and tempo as two alternative approaches for rendering proximity. Subjective experiments with visually-blocked subjects are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches. Our results indicate that intensity outperforms tempo as a proximity cue, and that the overall system for conveying a 2-D layout is quite promising.

  2. Volume rendering of segmented image objects.

    PubMed

    Bullitt, Elizabeth; Aylward, Stephen R

    2002-08-01

    This paper describes a new method of combining ray-casting with segmentation. Volume rendering is performed at interactive rates on personal computers, and visualizations include both "superficial" ray-casting through a shell at each object's surface and "deep" ray-casting through the confines of each object. A feature of the approach is the option to smoothly and interactively dilate segmentation boundaries along all axes. This ability, when combined with selective "turning off" of extraneous image objects, can help clinicians detect and evaluate segmentation errors that may affect surgical planning. We describe both a method optimized for displaying tubular objects and a more general method applicable to objects of arbitrary geometry. In both cases, select three-dimensional points are projected onto a modified z buffer that records additional information about the projected objects. A subsequent step selectively volume renders only through the object volumes indicated by the z buffer. We describe how our approach differs from other reported methods for combining segmentation with ray-casting, and illustrate how our method can be useful in helping to detect segmentation errors. PMID:12472272

  3. 6. Photocopy of architectural rendering off front facade, circa 1849. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of architectural rendering off front facade, circa 1849. Original rendering at Fair Street Reformed Dutch Church, Kingston, New York. - Second Reformed Dutch Church, 209 Fair Street, Kingston, Ulster County, NY

  4. 7. Photocopy of architectural rendering of side elevation, circa 1849. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of architectural rendering of side elevation, circa 1849. Original rendering at Fair Street Reformed Dutch Church, Kingston, New York. - Second Reformed Dutch Church, 209 Fair Street, Kingston, Ulster County, NY

  5. High-quality anatomical structure enhancement for cardiac image dynamic volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2008-03-01

    Dynamic volume rendering of the beating heart is an important element in cardiac disease diagnosis and therapy planning, providing the clinician with insight into the internal cardiac structure and functional behavior. Most clinical applications tend to focus upon a particular set of organ structures, and in the case of cardiac imaging, it would be helpful to embed anatomical features into the dynamic volume that are of particular importance to an intervention. A uniform transfer function (TF), such as is generally employed in volume rendering, cannot effectively isolate such structures because of the lack of spatial information and the small intensity differences between adjacent tissues. Explicit segmentation is a powerful way to approach this problem, which usually yields a single binary mask volume (MV), where a unit value in a voxel within the MV acts as a tag label representing the anatomical structure of interest (ASOI). These labels are used to determine the TF employed to adjust the ASOI display. Traditional approaches for rendering such segmented volumetric datasets usually deliver unsatisfactory results, such as noninteractive rendering speed, low image quality, intermixing artifacts along the rendered subvolume boundaries, and speckle noise. In this paper, we introduce a new "color coding" approach, based on the graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated raycasting algorithm and a pre-integrated voxel classification method, to address this problem. The mask tag labels derived from segmentation are first smoothed with a Gaussian filter, and multiple TFs are designed for each of the MVs and the source cardiac volume respectively, mapping the voxel's intensity to color and opacity at each sampling point along the casting ray. The resultant values are composited together using a boundary color adjustment technique, which acts as "coding" the segmented anatomical structure information into the rendered source volume of the beating heart. Our algorithm

  6. Visualisation of Complex 3d City Models on Mobile Webbrowsers Using Cloud-Based Image Provisioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, M.; Nebiker, S.

    2015-08-01

    Rendering large city models with high polygon count and a vast amount of textures at interactive frame rates is a rather difficult to impossible task as it highly depends on the client hardware, which is often insufficient, even if out-of-core rendering techniques and level of detail approaches are used. Rendering complex city models on mobile devices is even more challenging. An approach of rendering and caching very large city models in the cloud using ray-tracing based image provisioning is introduced. This allows rendering large scenes efficiently, including on mobile devices. With this approach, it is possible to render cities with nearly unlimited number of polygons and textures.

  7. Clip art rendering of smooth isosurfaces.

    PubMed

    Stroila, Matei; Eisemann, Elmar; Hart, John

    2008-01-01

    Clip art is a simplified illustration form consisting of layered filled polygons or closed curves used to convey 3D shape information in a 2D vector graphics format. This paper focuses on the problem of direct conversion of smooth surfaces, ranging from the free-form shapes of art and design to the mathematical structures of geometry and topology, into a clip art form suitable for illustration use in books, papers and presentations. We show how to represent silhouette, shadow, gleam and other surface feature curves as the intersection of implicit surfaces, and derive equations for their efficient interrogation via particle chains. We further describe how to sort, orient, identify and fill the closed regions that overlay to form clip art. We demonstrate the results with numerous renderings used to illustrate the paper itself. PMID:17993708

  8. Efficient volume rendering using octree space subdivision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumhauer, Peter; Tsygankov, Michael; Reich, Christian; Evgrafov, Anton

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes a discrete ray-tracing algorithm, which employs the adaptive hierarchical spatial subdivision (octree) technique for 3D uniform binary voxel space representation. The binary voxel space contains voxels of two kinds: 'surface' and 'non-surface.' Surface voxels include property information like the surface normal and color. The usage of octrees dramatically reduces the memory amount required to store 3D models. The average compression ratio is in the range between 1:24 up to 1:50 compared to uncompressed voxels. A fast ray casting algorithm called BOXER was developed, which allows rendering 256 X 256 X 256 and 512 X 512 X 512 volumes nearly in real-time on standard Intel-based PCs.

  9. Resolution-independent surface rendering using programmable graphics hardware

    DOEpatents

    Loop, Charles T.; Blinn, James Frederick

    2008-12-16

    Surfaces defined by a Bezier tetrahedron, and in particular quadric surfaces, are rendered on programmable graphics hardware. Pixels are rendered through triangular sides of the tetrahedra and locations on the shapes, as well as surface normals for lighting evaluations, are computed using pixel shader computations. Additionally, vertex shaders are used to aid interpolation over a small number of values as input to the pixel shaders. Through this, rendering of the surfaces is performed independently of viewing resolution, allowing for advanced level-of-detail management. By individually rendering tetrahedrally-defined surfaces which together form complex shapes, the complex shapes can be rendered in their entirety.

  10. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  11. Arctic Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...     View Larger Image Stratus clouds are common in the Arctic during the summer months, and are ... formats available at JPL August 23, 2000 - Stratus clouds help modulate the arctic climate. project:  ...

  12. 4-D display of satellite cloud images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.

    1987-01-01

    A technique has been developed to display GOES satellite cloud images in perspective over a topographical map. Cloud heights are estimated using temperatures from an infrared (IR) satellite image, surface temperature observations, and a climatological model of vertical temperature profiles. Cloud levels are discriminated from each other and from the ground using a pattern recognition algorithm based on the brightness variance technique of Coakley and Bretherton. The cloud regions found by the pattern recognizer are rendered in three-dimensional perspective over a topographical map by an efficient remap of the visible image. The visible shades are mixed with an artificial shade based on the geometry of the cloud-top surface, in order to enhance the texture of the cloud top.

  13. Rendering Three-Dimensional Solar Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen

    1997-01-01

    An X-ray or EUV image of the corona or chromosphere is a 2D representation of an extended 3D complex for which a general inversion process is impossible. A specific model must be incorporated in order to understand the full 3D structure. We approach this problem by modeling a set of optically-thin 3D plasma flux tubes which we render these as synthetic images. The resulting images allow the interpretation of the X-ray/EUV observations to obtain information on (1) the 3D structure of X-ray images, i.e., the geometric structure of the flux tubes, and on (2) the internal structure using specific plasma characteristics, i.e., the physical structure of the flux tubes. The data-analysis technique uses magnetograms to characterize photospheric magnetic fields and extrapolation techniques to form the field lines. Using a new set of software tools, we have generated 3D flux tube structures around these field lines and integrated the plasma emission along the line of sight to obtain a rendered image. A set of individual flux-tube images is selected by a non-negative least-squares technique to Provide a match with an observed X-ray image. The scheme minimizes the squares of the differences between the synthesized image and the observed image with a non-negative constraint on the coefficients of the brightness of the individual flux-tube loops. The derived images are used to determine the specific photospheric foot points and physical data, i.e., scaling laws for densities and loop lengths. The development has led to Computer efficient integration and display software that is compatible for comparison with observations (e.g., Yohkoh SXT data, NIXT, or EIT). This analysis is important in determining directly the magnetic field configuration, which provides the structure of coronal loops, and indirectly the electric currents or waves, which provide the energy for the heating of the plasma. We have used very simple assumptions (i.e., potential magnetic fields and isothermal

  14. TransCut: interactive rendering of translucent cutouts.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongping; Sun, Xin; Ren, Zhong; Lin, Stephen; Tong, Yiying; Guo, Baining; Zhou, Kun

    2013-03-01

    We present TransCut, a technique for interactive rendering of translucent objects undergoing fracturing and cutting operations. As the object is fractured or cut open, the user can directly examine and intuitively understand the complex translucent interior, as well as edit material properties through painting on cross sections and recombining the broken pieces—all with immediate and realistic visual feedback. This new mode of interaction with translucent volumes is made possible with two technical contributions. The first is a novel solver for the diffusion equation (DE) over a tetrahedral mesh that produces high-quality results comparable to the state-of-art finite element method (FEM) of Arbree et al. but at substantially higher speeds. This accuracy and efficiency is obtained by computing the discrete divergences of the diffusion equation and constructing the DE matrix using analytic formulas derived for linear finite elements. The second contribution is a multiresolution algorithm to significantly accelerate our DE solver while adapting to the frequent changes in topological structure of dynamic objects. The entire multiresolution DE solver is highly parallel and easily implemented on the GPU. We believe TransCut provides a novel visual effect for heterogeneous translucent objects undergoing fracturing and cutting operations. PMID:23307612

  15. Direct volume rendering methods for cell structures.

    PubMed

    Martišek, Dalibor; Martišek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The study of the complicated architecture of cell space structures is an important problem in biology and medical research. Optical cuts of cells produced by confocal microscopes enable two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of observed cells. This paper discuses new possibilities for direct volume rendering of these data. We often encounter 16 or more bit images in confocal microscopy of cells. Most of the information contained in these images is unsubstantial for the human vision. Therefore, it is necessary to use mathematical algorithms for visualization of such images. Present software tools as OpenGL or DirectX run quickly in graphic station with special graphic cards, run very unsatisfactory on PC without these cards and outputs are usually poor for real data. These tools are black boxes for a common user and make it impossible to correct and improve them. With the method proposed, more parameters of the environment can be set, making it possible to apply 3D filters to set the output image sharpness in relation to the noise. The quality of the output is incomparable to the earlier described methods and is worth increasing the computing time. We would like to offer mathematical methods of 3D scalar data visualization describing new algorithms that run on standard PCs very well. PMID:22511504

  16. Hybrid Rendering with Scheduling under Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Georg; Krüger, Jens

    2014-05-01

    As scientific data of increasing size is generated by today's simulations and measurements, utilizing dedicated server resources to process the visualization pipeline becomes necessary. In a purely server-based approach, requirements on the client-side are minimal as the client only displays results received from the server. However, the client may have a considerable amount of hardware available, which is left idle. Further, the visualization is put at the whim of possibly unreliable server and network conditions. Server load, bandwidth and latency may substantially affect the response time on the client. In this paper, we describe a hybrid method, where visualization workload is assigned to server and client. A capable client can produce images independently. The goal is to determine a workload schedule that enables a synergy between the two sides to provide rendering results to the user as fast as possible. The schedule is determined based on processing and transfer timings obtained at runtime. Our probabilistic scheduler adapts to changing conditions by shifting workload between server and client, and accounts for the performance variability in the dynamic system. PMID:25309115

  17. Hybrid Rendering with Scheduling under Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Georg; Krüger, Jens

    2014-01-01

    As scientific data of increasing size is generated by today’s simulations and measurements, utilizing dedicated server resources to process the visualization pipeline becomes necessary. In a purely server-based approach, requirements on the client-side are minimal as the client only displays results received from the server. However, the client may have a considerable amount of hardware available, which is left idle. Further, the visualization is put at the whim of possibly unreliable server and network conditions. Server load, bandwidth and latency may substantially affect the response time on the client. In this paper, we describe a hybrid method, where visualization workload is assigned to server and client. A capable client can produce images independently. The goal is to determine a workload schedule that enables a synergy between the two sides to provide rendering results to the user as fast as possible. The schedule is determined based on processing and transfer timings obtained at runtime. Our probabilistic scheduler adapts to changing conditions by shifting workload between server and client, and accounts for the performance variability in the dynamic system. PMID:25309115

  18. Material model for physically based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robart, Mathieu; Paulin, Mathias; Caubet, Rene

    1999-09-01

    In computer graphics, a complete knowledge of the interactions between light and a material is essential to obtain photorealistic pictures. Physical measurements allow us to obtain data on the material response, but are limited to industrial surfaces and depend on measure conditions. Analytic models do exist, but they are often inadequate for common use: the empiric ones are too simple to be realistic, and the physically-based ones are often to complex or too specialized to be generally useful. Therefore, we have developed a multiresolution virtual material model, that not only describes the surface of a material, but also its internal structure thanks to distribution functions of microelements, arranged in layers. Each microelement possesses its own response to an incident light, from an elementary reflection to a complex response provided by its inner structure, taking into account geometry, energy, polarization, . . ., of each light ray. This model is virtually illuminated, in order to compute its response to an incident radiance. This directional response is stored in a compressed data structure using spherical wavelets, and is destined to be used in a rendering model such as directional radiosity.

  19. Exploratory nuclear microprobe data visualisation using 3- and 4-dimensional biological volume rendering tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Ren, Minqin; van Kan, Jeroen A.; Watt, Frank; White, Dan

    2007-07-01

    The emergence of Confocal Microscopy (CM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as everyday tools in cellular level biology has stimulated development of 3D data visualisation software. Conventional 2-dimensional images of cell (optical) sections obtained in a transmission electron or optical microscopes and more sophisticated multidimensional imaging methods require processing software capable of 3D rendering and mathematically transforming data in 3-, 4-, or more dimensions. The richness of data obtained from the different nuclear microscopy imaging techniques and often parallel information channels (X-ray, secondary electron, Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) is often not obvious because subtleties and interrelations in the data could not be rendered in a human interpretable way. In this exploratory study we have applied the BioImageXD software, originally developed for rendering of multidimensional CM data, to some different nuclear microscopy data. Cells-on-Silicon STIM data from a human breast cancer cell line and elemental maps from lesions on rabbit aorta have been visualised. Mathematical filtering and averaging combined with hardware accelerated 3D rendering enabled dramatically clear visualisation of inter-cellular regions comprising extra cellular matrix proteins that were otherwise difficult to visualise, and also sub cellular structures. For elemental mapping, the use of filtered correlation surfaces and colour channels clearly revealed the interrelations in the data structures that are not easily discernible in the PIXE elemental maps.

  20. Visual Quality Adjustment for Volume Rendering in a Head-Tracked Virtual Environment.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Claudia; Weyers, Benjamin; Hentschel, Bernd; Kuhlen, Torsten W

    2016-04-01

    To avoid simulator sickness and improve presence in immersive virtual environments (IVEs), high frame rates and low latency are required. In contrast, volume rendering applications typically strive for high visual quality that induces high computational load and, thus, leads to low frame rates. To evaluate this trade-off in IVEs, we conducted a controlled user study with 53 participants. Search and count tasks were performed in a CAVE with varying volume rendering conditions which are applied according to viewer position updates corresponding to head tracking. The results of our study indicate that participants preferred the rendering condition with continuous adjustment of the visual quality over an instantaneous adjustment which guaranteed for low latency and over no adjustment providing constant high visual quality but rather low frame rates. Within the continuous condition, the participants showed best task performance and felt less disturbed by effects of the visualization during movements. Our findings provide a good basis for further evaluations of how to accelerate volume rendering in IVEs according to user's preferences. PMID:26780811

  1. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Computer Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This is a computer rendering of the fully developed Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). In 1999, the AXAF was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It is designed to observe x-rays from high energy regions of the Universe, such as hot gas in the renmants of exploded stars. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-ray such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW).

  2. Volume rendering for interactive 3D segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toennies, Klaus D.; Derz, Claus

    1997-05-01

    Combined emission/absorption and reflection/transmission volume rendering is able to display poorly segmented structures from 3D medical image sequences. Visual cues such as shading and color let the user distinguish structures in the 3D display that are incompletely extracted by threshold segmentation. In order to be truly helpful, analyzed information needs to be quantified and transferred back into the data. We extend our previously presented scheme for such display be establishing a communication between visual analysis and the display process. The main tool is a selective 3D picking device. For being useful on a rather rough segmentation, the device itself and the display offer facilities for object selection. Selective intersection planes let the user discard information prior to choosing a tissue of interest. Subsequently, a picking is carried out on the 2D display by casting a ray into the volume. The picking device is made pre-selective using already existing segmentation information. Thus, objects can be picked that are visible behind semi-transparent surfaces of other structures. Information generated by a later connected- component analysis can then be integrated into the data. Data examination is continued on an improved display letting the user actively participate in the analysis process. Results of this display-and-interaction scheme proved to be very effective. The viewer's ability to extract relevant information form a complex scene is combined with the computer's ability to quantify this information. The approach introduces 3D computer graphics methods into user- guided image analysis creating an analysis-synthesis cycle for interactive 3D segmentation.

  3. Beyond the Renderer: Software Architecture for Parallel Graphics and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    As numerous implementations have demonstrated, software-based parallel rendering is an effective way to obtain the needed computational power for a variety of challenging applications in computer graphics and scientific visualization. To fully realize their potential, however, parallel renderers need to be integrated into a complete environment for generating, manipulating, and delivering visual data. We examine the structure and components of such an environment, including the programming and user interfaces, rendering engines, and image delivery systems. We consider some of the constraints imposed by real-world applications and discuss the problems and issues involved in bringing parallel rendering out of the lab and into production.

  4. 13. BUILDING #5, HOSPITAL, RENDERING OF EAST ELEVATION, APPROXIMATELY 1946 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. BUILDING #5, HOSPITAL, RENDERING OF EAST ELEVATION, APPROXIMATELY 1946 - Sioux Falls Veterans Administration Medical & Regional Office Center, 2501 West Twenty-second, Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, SD

  5. 9. RENDERING OF PROPOSED FALLS BRIDGE Photocopy of historic photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. RENDERING OF PROPOSED FALLS BRIDGE Photocopy of historic photograph (photographer unknown, December 1894) - Falls Bridge, Spanning Schuylkill River, connecting East & West River Drives, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Intelligent Smart Cloud Computing for Smart Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Su-Mi; Yoon, Yong-Ik

    The cloud computing technology causes much attention in IT field. The developments using this technology have done actively. The cloud computing is more evolved than the existing offer. So, the current cloud computing only has a process that responds user requirements when users demand their needs. For intelligently adapting the needs, this paper suggests a intelligent smart cloud model that is based on 4S/3R. This model can handle intelligently to meet users needs through collecting user's behaviors, prospecting, building, delivering, and rendering steps. It is because users have always mobile devices including smart phones so that is collecting user's behavior by sensors mounted on the devices. The proposed service model using intelligent smart cloud computing will show the personalized and customized services to be possible in various fields.

  7. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  8. Photorealistic rendering application to the design of LED flash lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jyh-Long

    2012-10-01

    LED flash module becomes popular in current mobile communication devices, such as for the smart phones and tablet. As a lighting apparatus for image taking, photo rendering performance is crucial. We explore the LED flash lens design with a stress of photorealistic rendering application toward a high-performance LED flash illumination.

  9. Government scientists find new uses for rendered fat and protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rendering industry depends heavily on the utilization of their products in formulated animal feed; few other economically significant outlets for rendered fat and protein exist. The Fats Oils and Animal Coproducts Research Unit (FOAC), a group of scientists within the USDA’s Agricultural Resear...

  10. 104. Photocopy of architect's rendering from Renwick's office, signed lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. Photocopy of architect's rendering from Renwick's office, signed lower left 'Painted by Louis R. Townsend July 1848' both renderings displayed in Regents' Room of 'castle.' SOUTH FRONT, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 18 CFR 1308.17 - Failure to render timely decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to render timely decision. 1308.17 Section 1308.17 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY CONTRACT DISPUTES Contracting Officers § 1308.17 Failure to render timely decision. Any failure...

  12. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  13. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    PubMed Central

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  14. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama; Raths, David; Schaffhauser, Dian; Skelly, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    For many IT shops, the cloud offers an opportunity not only to improve operations but also to align themselves more closely with their schools' strategic goals. The cloud is not a plug-and-play proposition, however--it is a complex, evolving landscape that demands one's full attention. Security, privacy, contracts, and contingency planning are all…

  15. Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  16. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Your learning curriculum needs a new technological platform, but you don't have the expertise or IT equipment to pull it off in-house. The answer is a learning system that exists online, "in the cloud," where learners can access it anywhere, anytime. For trainers, cloud-based coursework often means greater ease of instruction resulting in greater…

  17. Effects of display rendering on HDR image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerman, Emin; Valenzise, Giuseppe; De Simone, Francesca; Banterle, Francesco; Dufaux, Frederic

    2015-09-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) displays use local backlight modulation to produce both high brightness levels and large contrast ratios. Thus, the display rendering algorithm and its parameters may greatly affect HDR visual experience. In this paper, we analyze the impact of display rendering on perceived quality for a specific display (SIM2 HDR47) and for a popular application scenario, i.e., HDR image compression. To this end, we assess whether significant differences exist between subjective quality of compressed images, when these are displayed using either the built-in rendering of the display, or a rendering algorithm developed by ourselves. As a second contribution of this paper, we investigate whether the possibility to estimate the true pixel-wise luminance emitted by the display, offered by our rendering approach, can improve the performance of HDR objective quality metrics that require true pixel-wise luminance as input.

  18. Local and Global Illumination in the Volume Rendering Integral

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N; Chen, M

    2005-10-21

    This article is intended as an update of the major survey by Max [1] on optical models for direct volume rendering. It provides a brief overview of the subject scope covered by [1], and brings recent developments, such as new shadow algorithms and refraction rendering, into the perspective. In particular, we examine three fundamentals aspects of direct volume rendering, namely the volume rendering integral, local illumination models and global illumination models, in a wavelength-independent manner. We review the developments on spectral volume rendering, in which visible light are considered as a form of electromagnetic radiation, optical models are implemented in conjunction with representations of spectral power distribution. This survey can provide a basis for, and encourage, new efforts for developing and using complex illumination models to achieve better realism and perception through optical correctness.

  19. A fast high accuracy volume renderer for unstructured data.

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Edward S.; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we describe an unstructured mesh volume renderer. Our renderer is interactive and accurately integrates light intensity an order of magnitude faster than previous methods. We employ a projective technique that takes advantage of the expanded programmability of the latest 3D graphics hardware. We also analyze an optical model commonly used for scientific volume rendering and derive a new method to compute it that is very accurate but computationally feasible in real time. We demonstrate a system that can accurately produce a volume rendering of an unstructured mesh with a first-order approximation to any classification method. Furthermore, our system is capable of rendering over 300 thousand tetrahedra per second yet is independent of the classification scheme used.

  20. Order-of-magnitude faster isosurface rendering in software on a PC than using dedicated general-purpose rendering hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevera, George J.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to compare the speed of isosurface rendering in software with that using dedicated hardware. Input data consists of 10 different objects form various parts of the body and various modalities with a variety of surface sizes and shapes. The software rendering technique consists of a particular method of voxel-based surface rendering, called shell rendering. The hardware method is OpenGL-based and uses the surfaces constructed from our implementation of the 'Marching Cubes' algorithm. The hardware environment consists of a variety of platforms including a Sun Ultra I with a Creator3D graphics card and a Silicon Graphics Reality Engine II, both with polygon rendering hardware, and a 300Mhz Pentium PC. The results indicate that the software method was 18 to 31 times faster than any hardware rendering methods. This work demonstrates that a software implementation of a particular rendering algorithm can outperform dedicated hardware. We conclude that for medical surface visualization, expensive dedicated hardware engines are not required. More importantly, available software algorithms on a 300Mhz Pentium PC outperform the speed of rendering via hardware engines by a factor of 18 to 31.

  1. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  2. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  3. 40 CFR 305.27 - Accelerated order, order to dismiss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accelerated order, order to dismiss... Prehearing Procedures § 305.27 Accelerated order, order to dismiss. (a) General. The Presiding Officer, upon motion of any party or sua sponte, may at any time render an accelerated order in favor of the...

  4. Particle nonuniformity effects on particle cloud flames in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.; Tangirala, V.; Seshadri, K.; Facca, L. T.; Ogrin, J.; Ross, H.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of particle cloud combustion at reduced gravity reveal the substantial roles that particle cloud nonuniformities may play in particle cloud combustion. Macroscopically uniform, quiescent particle cloud systems (at very low gravitational levels and above) sustain processes which can render them nonuniform on both macroscopic and microscopic scales. It is found that a given macroscopically uniform, quiescent particle cloud flame system can display a range of microscopically nonuniform features which lead to a range of combustion features. Microscopically nonuniform particle cloud distributions are difficult experimentally to detect and characterize. A uniformly distributed lycopodium cloud of particle-enriched microscopic nonuniformities in reduced gravity displays a range of burning velocities for any given overall stoichiometry. The range of observed and calculated burning velocities corresponds to the range of particle enriched concentrations within a characteristic microscopic nonuniformity. Sedimentation effects (even in reduced gravity) are also examined.

  5. Experiencing "Macbeth": From Text Rendering to Multicultural Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisin, Gail

    1993-01-01

    Shows how one teacher used innovative methods in teaching William Shakespeare's "Macbeth." Outlines student assignments including text renderings, rewriting a scene from the play, and creating a multicultural scrapbook for the play. (HB)

  6. 38. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden REAR ELEVATION OF W. C. PRATT'S COUNTRY SEAT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  7. 34. Photocopy of watercolor perspective rendering by N. G. Starkwether ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Photocopy of watercolor perspective rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden VIEW OF CAMDEN FROM THE SOUTHWEST - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  8. 37. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden SIDE ELEVATION OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR W. C. PRATT, ESQr - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  9. 7. Photocopy of circa 1890 architectural rendering of the terminal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of circa 1890 architectural rendering of the terminal station, courtesy of Philadelphia City Archives, City Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Terminal Station, 1115-1141 Market Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. 3. Photocopy of architectural rendering, ca. 1902, from Moses King, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of architectural rendering, ca. 1902, from Moses King, Philadelphia and Notable Philadelphians, (1902), page 24 D. - Drexel Institute, Thirty-second & Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. 8. TANKWATER VAT IN RENDERING AREA ON SOUTH SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. TANKWATER VAT IN RENDERING AREA ON SOUTH SIDE OF LEVEL 3; LOOKING WEST - Rath Packing Company, Grease Interceptor Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  12. 24. FET 574343 PHOTOCOPY OF ARTIST'S RENDERING OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. FET 57-4343 PHOTOCOPY OF ARTIST'S RENDERING OF HANGAR, WITH CUTAWAY SHOWING SOME INTERIOR FEATURES. PRODUCED IN 1957. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar No. 629, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Rendering by C. Howard Crane ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Rendering by C. Howard Crane Office, 1919. Courtesy Detroit Historical Society. Photocopy by Jack E. Boucher, 1973 PERSPECTIVE VIEW FROM SOUTH - Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI

  14. Fast stereoscopic images with ray-traced volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Adelson, S.J.; Hansen, C.D.

    1994-05-01

    One of the drawbacks of standard volume rendering techniques is that is it often difficult to comprehend the three-dimensional structure of the volume from a single frame; this is especially true in cases where there is no solid surface. Generally, several frames must be generated and viewed sequentially, using motion parallax to relay depth. Another option is to generate a single spectroscopic pair, resulting in clear and unambiguous depth information in both static and moving images. Methods have been developed which take advantage of the coherence between the two halves of a stereo pair for polygon rendering and ray-tracing, generating the second half of the pair in significantly less time than that required to completely render a single image. This paper reports the results of implementing these techniques with parallel ray-traced volume rendering. In tests with different data types, the time savings is in the range of 70--80%.

  15. 11. Architect's rendering of the Arcade Building by Furness, Evans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Architect's rendering of the Arcade Building by Furness, Evans and Co., from Moses King's Philadelphia and Notable Philadelphians, published 1902 for the City's 220th birthday - Arcade Building, Fifteenth & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Perspective rendering of the competition design for the New Masonic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective rendering of the competition design for the New Masonic Temple, Philadelphia by architects Fraser, Furness, and Hewitt, 1867 - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. 1. Photocopy of architect's rendering of approved design, which was ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of architect's rendering of approved design, which was altered in execution Furness, Evans & Co. 1893 General view - Pennsylvania Railroad Station, Broad Street Station, Broad & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. 12. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings in the possession of Potter, Lawson and Pawlowsky, TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN - Manchester's Department Store Building, 2 East Mifflin Street, Madison, Dane County, WI

  19. 9. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings in the possession of Potter, Lawson and Pawlowsky, ELEVATIONS AND TWO SECTIONS - Manchester's Department Store Building, 2 East Mifflin Street, Madison, Dane County, WI

  20. 11. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings in the possession of Potter, Lawson and Pawlowsky, WISCONSIN AVENUE ELEVATION - Manchester's Department Store Building, 2 East Mifflin Street, Madison, Dane County, WI

  1. 10. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings in the possession of Potter, Lawson and Pawlowsky, MIFFLIN STREET ELEVATION - Manchester's Department Store Building, 2 East Mifflin Street, Madison, Dane County, WI

  2. Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M; Kirby, R.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

    2005-05-27

    Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a luminosity limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing SLAC and international R&D program to study potential remedies.

  3. Modeling and rendering realistic textures from unconstrained tool-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Culbertson, Heather; Unwin, Juliette; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Texture gives real objects an important perceptual dimension that is largely missing from virtual haptic interactions due to limitations of standard modeling and rendering approaches. This paper presents a set of methods for creating a haptic texture model from tool-surface interaction data recorded by a human in a natural and unconstrained manner. The recorded high-frequency tool acceleration signal, which varies as a function of normal force and scanning speed, is segmented and modeled as a piecewise autoregressive (AR) model. Each AR model is labeled with the source segment's median force and speed values and stored in a Delaunay triangulation to create a model set for a given texture. We use these texture model sets to render synthetic vibration signals in real time as a user interacts with our TexturePad system, which includes a Wacom tablet and a stylus augmented with a Haptuator. We ran a human-subject study with two sets of ten participants to evaluate the realism of our virtual textures and the strengths and weaknesses of this approach. The results indicated that our virtual textures accurately capture and recreate the roughness of real textures, but other modeling and rendering approaches are required to completely match surface hardness and slipperiness. PMID:25248220

  4. Fast Time-Varying Volume Rendering Using Time-Space Partition (TSP) Tree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Chiang, Ling-Jen; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1999-01-01

    We present a new, algorithm for rapid rendering of time-varying volumes. A new hierarchical data structure that is capable of capturing both the temporal and the spatial coherence is proposed. Conventional hierarchical data structures such as octrees are effective in characterizing the homogeneity of the field values existing in the spatial domain. However, when treating time merely as another dimension for a time-varying field, difficulties frequently arise due to the discrepancy between the field's spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition, treating spatial and temporal dimensions equally often prevents the possibility of detecting the coherence that is unique in the temporal domain. Using the proposed data structure, our algorithm can meet the following goals. First, both spatial and temporal coherence are identified and exploited for accelerating the rendering process. Second, our algorithm allows the user to supply the desired error tolerances at run time for the purpose of image-quality/rendering-speed trade-off. Third, the amount of data that are required to be loaded into main memory is reduced, and thus the I/O overhead is minimized. This low I/O overhead makes our algorithm suitable for out-of-core applications.

  5. Diffusion and multiple anisotropic scattering for global illumination in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N L; Schussman, G; Miyazaki, R; Iwasaki, K; Nishita, T

    2003-10-14

    The diffusion method is a good approximation inside the dense core of a cloud, but not at the more tenuous boundary regions. Also, it breaks down in regions where the density of scattering droplets is zero. We have enhanced it by using hardware cell projection volume rendering at cloud border voxels to account for the straight line light transport across these empty regions. We have also used this hardware volume rendering at key voxels in the low-density boundary regions to account for the multiple anisotropic scattering of the environment.

  6. Java multi-histogram volume rendering framework for medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senseney, Justin; Bokinsky, Alexandra; Cheng, Ruida; McCreedy, Evan; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2013-03-01

    This work extends the multi-histogram volume rendering framework proposed by Kniss et al. [1] to provide rendering results based on the impression of overlaid triangles on a graph of image intensity versus gradient magnitude. The developed method of volume rendering allows for greater emphasis to boundary visualization while avoiding issues common in medical image acquisition. For example, partial voluming effects in computed tomography and intensity inhomogeneity of similar tissue types in magnetic resonance imaging introduce pixel values that will not reflect differing tissue types when a standard transfer function is applied to an intensity histogram. This new framework uses developing technology to improve upon the Kniss multi-histogram framework by using Java, the GPU, and MIPAV, an open-source medical image processing application, to allow multi-histogram techniques to be widely disseminated. The OpenGL view aligned texture rendering approach suffered from performance setbacks, inaccessibility, and usability problems. Rendering results can now be interactively compared with other rendering frameworks, surfaces can now be extracted for use in other programs, and file formats that are widely used in the field of biomedical imaging can be visualized using this multi-histogram approach. OpenCL and GLSL are used to produce this new multi-histogram approach, leveraging texture memory on the graphics processing unit of desktops to provide a new interactive method for visualizing biomedical images. Performance results for this method are generated and qualitative rendering results are compared. The resulting framework provides the opportunity for further applications in medical imaging, both in volume rendering and in generic image processing.

  7. Sorting and hardware assisted rendering for volume visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.; Becker, B.; Max, N.

    1994-03-01

    We present some techniques for volume rendering unstructured data. Interpolation between vertex colors and opacities is performed using hardware assisted texture mapping, and color is integrated for use with a volume rendering system. We also present an O(n{sup 2}) method for sorting n arbitrarily shaped convex polyhedra prior to visualization. It generalizes the Newell, Newell and Sancha sort for polygons to 3-D volume elements.

  8. Real-time volume rendering of MRCP: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Neri, E; Boraschi, P; Caramella, D; Braccini, G; Gigoni, R; Cosottini, M; Lodovigi, S; Bartolozzi, C

    2000-02-01

    MR-cholangiopancreatography (Signa Contour 0.5T; GE/Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) data sets of 156 patients, obtained with a 2D T2-weighted FSE sequence, in the coronal plane, were volume rendered (Advantage Windows 3.1; GEMS) independently by two radiologists, that were asked to define the range of signal intensities in which the signal of the pancreaticobiliary system was included and to rank the quality of native images and volume renderings. Patients had biliary stones (n = 47), inflammatory ampullary stenoses (n = 18), pancreatic tumors (n = 12), surgical bilio-enteric anastomoses (n = 19), ampullary carcinomas (n = 2), pancreatic duct stone (n = 1), cholangiocarcinoma (n = 3) and normal pancreaticobiliary tree (n = 54). Good quality volume renderings of the bile ducts were obtained for at least a maximum diameter of 1.5 mm. The quality rank agreement between volume rendering and native images was excellent (k = 0.94). The correlation between the observers for the setting the signal intensity range was excellent and statistically significant (P < 0.001). The correlation between the observers for the time of volume rendering was not statistically significant. Biliary stones could be displayed in 32/47 (68%) cases. The pancreatic duct stones was displayed as well. Inflammatory ampullary stenoses were detected in all cases (100%). In case of pancreatic tumors, cholangiocarcinomas and ampullary carcinomas volume rendering allowed to identify the site of stenosis. In surgical bilio-enteric anastomoses volume rendering was helpful to display the residual biliary tract, the site of anastomosis and the enteric tract. Volume rendering could be a reliable and efficient tool for the study of the anatomy and pathological changes of the pancreaticobiliary tract. PMID:10697224

  9. 30. Photocopy of photograph of architectural rendering by office of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph of architectural rendering by office of Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., dated 1929; photograph in Clarence H. Johnston Papers, Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota; photographer unknown; location of rendering unknown; delineator unknown; THREE-QUARTER VIEW SHOWING WEST SIDE AND SOUTH FRONT; LOOKING NORTHEAST - Northwest Airways Hangar & Administration Building, 590 Bayfield Street, St. Paul Downtown Airport (Holman), Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  10. Parallel Rendering of Large Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbutt, Alexander E.

    2005-01-01

    Interactive visualization of large time-varying 3D volume datasets has been and still is a great challenge to the modem computational world. It stretches the limits of the memory capacity, the disk space, the network bandwidth and the CPU speed of a conventional computer. In this SURF project, we propose to develop a parallel volume rendering program on SGI's Prism, a cluster computer equipped with state-of-the-art graphic hardware. The proposed program combines both parallel computing and hardware rendering in order to achieve an interactive rendering rate. We use 3D texture mapping and a hardware shader to implement 3D volume rendering on each workstation. We use SGI's VisServer to enable remote rendering using Prism's graphic hardware. And last, we will integrate this new program with ParVox, a parallel distributed visualization system developed at JPL. At the end of the project, we Will demonstrate remote interactive visualization using this new hardware volume renderer on JPL's Prism System using a time-varying dataset from selected JPL applications.

  11. High-fidelity real-time maritime scene rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, Hawjye; Taczak, Thomas M.; Cox, Kevin; Gover, Robert; Maraviglia, Carlos; Cahill, Colin

    2011-06-01

    The ability to simulate authentic engagements using real-world hardware is an increasingly important tool. For rendering maritime environments, scene generators must be capable of rendering radiometrically accurate scenes with correct temporal and spatial characteristics. When the simulation is used as input to real-world hardware or human observers, the scene generator must operate in real-time. This paper introduces a novel, real-time scene generation capability for rendering radiometrically accurate scenes of backgrounds and targets in maritime environments. The new model is an optimized and parallelized version of the US Navy CRUISE_Missiles rendering engine. It was designed to accept environmental descriptions and engagement geometry data from external sources, render a scene, transform the radiometric scene using the electro-optical response functions of a sensor under test, and output the resulting signal to real-world hardware. This paper reviews components of the scene rendering algorithm, and details the modifications required to run this code in real-time. A description of the simulation architecture and interfaces to external hardware and models is presented. Performance assessments of the frame rate and radiometric accuracy of the new code are summarized. This work was completed in FY10 under Office of Secretary of Defense (OSD) Central Test and Evaluation Investment Program (CTEIP) funding and will undergo a validation process in FY11.

  12. Desorption of biocides from renders modified with acrylate and silicone.

    PubMed

    Styszko, Katarzyna; Bollmann, Ulla E; Wangler, Timothy P; Bester, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Biocides are used in the building industry to prevent algal, bacterial and fungal growth on polymericrenders and thus to protect buildings. However, these biocides are leached into the environment. To better understand this leaching, the sorption/desorption of biocides in polymeric renders was assessed. In this study the desorption constants of cybutryn, carbendazim, iodocarb, isoproturon, diuron, dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone and tebuconazole towards acrylate and silicone based renders were assessed at different pH values. At pH 9.5 (porewater) the constants for an acrylate based render varied between 8 (isoproturon) and 9634 (iodocarb) and 3750 (dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone), respectively. The values changed drastically with pH value. The results for the silicone based renders were in a similar range and usually the compounds with high sorption constants for one polymer also had high values for the other polymer. Comparison of the octanol water partitioning constants (Kow) with the render/water partitioning constants (Kd) revealed similarities, but no strong correlation. Adding higher amounts of polymer to the render material changed the equilibria for dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone, tebuconazole, cybutryn, carbendazim but not for isoproturon and diuron. PMID:24059976

  13. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  14. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  15. CLOUD CONDENSATION NUCLEI MEASUREMENTS WITHIN CLOUDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of the spectra of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within and near the boundaries of clouds are presented. Some of the in-cloud measurements excluded the nuclei within cloud droplets (interstitial CCN) while others included all nuclei inside the cloud (total CCN). The...

  16. CLOUD CHEMISTRY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.

    2001-03-01

    Clouds present substantial concentrations of liquid-phase water, which can potentially serve as a medium for dissolution and reaction of atmospheric gases. The important precursors of acid deposition, SO{sub 2} and nitrogen oxides NO and NO{sub 2} are only sparingly soluble in clouds without further oxidation to sulfuric and nitric acids. In the case of SO{sub 2} aqueous-phase reaction with hydrogen peroxide, and to lesser extent ozone, are identified as important processes leading to this oxidation, and methods have been described by which to evaluate the rates of these reactions. The limited solubility of the nitrogen oxides precludes significant aqueous-phase reaction of these species, but gas-phase reactions in clouds can be important especially at night.

  17. Neptune's clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipating over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot (GDS). The surprisingly rapid changes which occur separating each panel shows that in this region Neptune's weather is perhaps as dynamic and variable as that of the Earth. However, the scale is immense by our standards -- the Earth and the GDS are of similar size -- and in Neptune's frigid atmosphere, where temperatures are as low as 55 degrees Kelvin (-360 F), the cirrus clouds are composed of frozen methane rather than Earth's crystals of water ice. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications

  18. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  19. Geometric Effects on Electron Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L

    2007-07-06

    The development of an electron cloud in the vacuum chambers of high intensity positron and proton storage rings may limit the machine performances by inducing beam instabilities, beam emittance increase, beam loss, vacuum pressure increases and increased heat load on the vacuum chamber wall. The electron multipacting is a kind of geometric resonance phenomenon and thus is sensitive to the geometric parameters such as the aperture of the beam pipe, beam shape and beam bunch fill pattern, etc. This paper discusses the geometric effects on the electron cloud build-up in a beam chamber and examples are given for different beams and accelerators.

  20. Architecture for high performance stereoscopic game rendering on Android

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Julien; Sanderson, Hugh; Shetty, Sampath

    2014-03-01

    Stereoscopic gaming is a popular source of content for consumer 3D display systems. There has been a significant shift in the gaming industry towards casual games for mobile devices running on the Android™ Operating System and driven by ARM™ and other low power processors. Such systems are now being integrated directly into the next generation of 3D TVs potentially removing the requirement for an external games console. Although native stereo support has been integrated into some high profile titles on established platforms like Windows PC and PS3 there is a lack of GPU independent 3D support for the emerging Android platform. We describe a framework for enabling stereoscopic 3D gaming on Android for applications on mobile devices, set top boxes and TVs. A core component of the architecture is a 3D game driver, which is integrated into the Android OpenGL™ ES graphics stack to convert existing 2D graphics applications into stereoscopic 3D in real-time. The architecture includes a method of analyzing 2D games and using rule based Artificial Intelligence (AI) to position separate objects in 3D space. We describe an innovative stereo 3D rendering technique to separate the views in the depth domain and render directly into the display buffer. The advantages of the stereo renderer are demonstrated by characterizing the performance in comparison to more traditional render techniques, including depth based image rendering, both in terms of frame rates and impact on battery consumption.

  1. Fast volume rendering algorithm in a virtual endoscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang H.; Kim, Jin K.; Ra, Jong Beom

    2002-05-01

    Recently, 3D virtual endoscopy has been used as an alternative noninvasive procedure for visualization of a hollow organ. In this paper, we propose a fast volume rendering scheme based on perspective ray casting for virtual endoscopy. As a pre-processing step, the algorithm divides a volume into hierarchical blocks and classifies them into opaque or transparent blocks. Then, the rendering procedure is as follows. In the first step, we perform ray casting only for sub-sampled pixels on the image plane, and determine their pixel values and depth information. In the second step, by reducing the sub-sampling factor by half, we repeat ray casting for newly added pixels, and their pixel values and depth information are determined. Here, the previously obtained depth information is utilized to reduce the processing time. This step is performed recursively until the full-size rendering image is acquired. Experiments conducted on a PC shows that the proposed algorithm can reduce the rendering time by 70-80% for the bronchus and colon endoscopy, compared with the brute-force ray casting scheme. Thereby, interactive rendering becomes more realizable in a PC environment without any specific hardware.

  2. Adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm for point-based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaoping; Liu, Xiaoping P.

    2015-03-01

    Surgical simulation is a major application in computer graphics and virtual reality, and most of the existing work indicates that interactive real-time cutting simulation of soft tissue is a fundamental but challenging research problem in virtual surgery simulation systems. More specifically, it is difficult to achieve a fast enough graphic update rate (at least 30 Hz) on commodity PC hardware by utilizing traditional triangle-based rendering algorithms. In recent years, point-based rendering (PBR) has been shown to offer the potential to outperform the traditional triangle-based rendering in speed when it is applied to highly complex soft tissue cutting models. Nevertheless, the PBR algorithms are still limited in visual quality due to inherent contrast distortion. We propose an adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm as a postprocessing module for PBR, providing high visual rendering quality as well as acceptable rendering efficiency. Our approach is based on a perceptible image quality technique with automatic parameter selection, resulting in a visual quality comparable to existing conventional PBR algorithms. Experimental results show that our adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm produces encouraging results both visually and numerically compared to representative algorithms, and experiments conducted on the latest hardware demonstrate that the proposed PBR framework with the postprocessing module is superior to the conventional PBR algorithm and that the proposed contrast enhancement algorithm can be utilized in (or compatible with) various variants of the conventional PBR algorithm.

  3. Our World: Cool Clouds

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn how clouds are formed and watch an experiment to make a cloud using liquid nitrogen. Find out how scientists classify clouds according to their altitude and how clouds reflect and absorb ligh...

  4. Parallel volume rendering on the IBM Blue Gene/P.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterka, T.; Yu, H.; Ross, R.; Ma, K.-L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of California at Davis

    2008-01-01

    Parallel ray casting volume rendering is implemented and tested on an IBM Blue Gene distributed memory parallel architecture. Data are presented from experiments under a number of different conditions, including dataset size, number of processors, low and high quality rendering, offline storage of results, and streaming of images for remote display. Performance is divided into three main sections of the algorithm: disk I/O, rendering, and compositing. The dynamic balance between these tasks varies with the number of processors and other conditions. Lessons learned from the work include understanding the balance between parallel I/O, computation, and communication within the context of visualization on supercomputers, recommendations for tuning and optimization, and opportunities for scaling further in the future. Extrapolating these results to very large data and image sizes suggests that a distributed memory HPC architecture such as the Blue Gene is a viable platform for some types of visualization at very large scales.

  5. [A hybrid volume rendering method using general hardware].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Tian, Lianfang; Chen, Ping; Mao, Zongyuan

    2008-06-01

    In order to improve the effect and efficiency of the reconstructed image after hybrid volume rendering of different kinds of volume data from medical sequential slices or polygonal models, we propose a hybrid volume rendering method based on Shear-Warp with economical hardware. First, the hybrid volume data are pre-processed by Z-Buffer method and RLE (Run-Length Encoded) data structure. Then, during the process of compositing intermediate image, a resampling method based on the dual-interpolation and the intermediate slice interpolation methods is used to improve the efficiency and the effect. Finally, the reconstructed image is rendered by the texture-mapping technology of OpenGL. Experiments demonstrate the good performance of the proposed method. PMID:18693424

  6. Distributed GPU Volume Rendering of ASKAP Spectral Data Cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. H.; Fluke, C. J.; Barnes, D. G.

    2011-07-01

    The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) will be producing 2.2 terabyte HI spectral-line cubes for each 8 hours of observation by 2013. Global views of spectral data cubes are vital for the detection of instrumentation errors, the identification of data artifacts and noise characteristics, and the discovery of strange phenomena, unexpected relations, or unknown patterns. We have previously presented the first framework that can render ASKAP-sized cubes at interactive frame rates. The framework provides the user with a real-time interactive volume rendering by combining shared and distributed memory architectures, distributed CPUs and graphics processing units (GPUs), using the ray-casting algorithm. In this paper we present two main extensions of this framework which are: using a multi-panel display system to provide a high resolution rendering output, and the ability to integrate automated data analysis tools into the visualization output and to interact with its output in place.

  7. Volume rendering using parallel algebraic logic (PAL) hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongzheng; Shi, Hongchi; Coffield, Patrick C.

    1997-09-01

    In this paper, we present the implementation of a volume graphics rendering algorithm using shift-restoration operations on parallel algebraic logic (PAL) image processor. The algorithm is a parallel ray casting algorithm. In order to eliminate shading artifacts caused by inaccurate estimation of surface normal vectors, we use gray level volume instead of binary volume, and apply a low pass filter to smooth the volume object surfaces. By transforming the volume to an intermediate coordinate system to which there is a simple mapping from the object coordinate system, we solve the data redistribution problem caused by nonregular data access patterns in volume rendering. It has been proved very effective in reducing the data communication cost of the rendering algorithm on the PAL hardware.

  8. Incremental volume reconstruction and rendering for 3-D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohbuchi, Ryutarou; Chen, David; Fuchs, Henry

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, we present approaches toward an interactive visualization of a real time input, applied to 3-D visualizations of 2-D ultrasound echography data. The first, 3 degrees-of- freedom (DOF) incremental system visualizes a 3-D volume acquired as a stream of 2-D slices with location and orientation with 3 DOF. As each slice arrives, the system reconstructs a regular 3-D volume and renders it. Rendering is done by an incremental image-order ray- casting algorithm which stores and reuses the results of expensive resampling along the rays for speed. The second is our first experiment toward real-time 6 DOF acquisition and visualization. Two-dimensional slices with 6 DOF are reconstructed off-line, and visualized at an interactive rate using a parallel volume rendering code running on the graphics multicomputer Pixel-Planes 5.

  9. Algorithms for Haptic Rendering of 3D Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basdogan, Cagatay; Ho, Chih-Hao; Srinavasan, Mandayam

    2003-01-01

    Algorithms have been developed to provide haptic rendering of three-dimensional (3D) objects in virtual (that is, computationally simulated) environments. The goal of haptic rendering is to generate tactual displays of the shapes, hardnesses, surface textures, and frictional properties of 3D objects in real time. Haptic rendering is a major element of the emerging field of computer haptics, which invites comparison with computer graphics. We have already seen various applications of computer haptics in the areas of medicine (surgical simulation, telemedicine, haptic user interfaces for blind people, and rehabilitation of patients with neurological disorders), entertainment (3D painting, character animation, morphing, and sculpting), mechanical design (path planning and assembly sequencing), and scientific visualization (geophysical data analysis and molecular manipulation).

  10. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...     View Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired ... Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and every 9 days views the entire globe ...

  11. Cloud Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02171 Cloud Front

    These clouds formed in the south polar region. The faintness of the cloud system likely indicates that these are mainly ice clouds, with relatively little dust content.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.7N, Longitude 212.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Thin Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... of this montage is a natural-color view of the Caribbean Sea east of the Yucatan Peninsula as seen by MISR's most steeply ... - Thin, feathery clouds of ice crystals over the Caribbean Sea. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  13. High quality GPU rendering with displaced pixel shading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Choi, Jae

    2006-03-01

    Direct volume rendering via consumer PC hardware has become an efficient tool for volume visualization. In particular, the volumetric ray casting, the most frequently used volume rendering technique, can be implemented by the shading language integrated with graphical processing units (GPU). However, to produce high-quality images offered by GPU-based volume rendering, a higher sampling rate is usually required. In this paper, we present an algorithm to generate high quality images with a small number of slices by utilizing displaced pixel shading technique. Instead of sampling points along a ray with the regular interval, the actual surface location is calculated by the linear interpolation between the outer and inner points, and this location is used as the displaced pixel for the iso-surface illumination. Multi-pass and early Z-culling techniques are applied to improve the rendering speed. The first pass simply locates and stores the exact surface depth of each ray using a few pixel instructions; then, the second pass uses instructions to shade the surface at the previous position. A new 3D edge detector from our previous research is integrated to provide more realistic rendering results compared with the widely used gradient normal estimator. To implement our algorithm, we have made a program named DirectView based on DirectX 9.0c and Microsoft High Level Shading Language (HLSL) for volume rendering. We tested two data sets and discovered that our algorithm can generate smoother and more accurate shading images with a small number of intermediate slices.

  14. Rendering the "Not-So-Simple" Pendulum Experimentally Accessible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, David P.

    1996-01-01

    Presents three methods for obtaining experimental data related to acceleration of a simple pendulum. Two of the methods involve angular position measurements and the subsequent calculation of the acceleration while the third method involves a direct measurement of the acceleration. Compares these results with theoretical calculations and…

  15. 10. Historic photo of rendering of rocket engine test facility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic photo of rendering of rocket engine test facility complex, April 28, 1964. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-69472. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. 11. Historic photo of cutaway rendering of rocket engine test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic photo of cutaway rendering of rocket engine test facility complex, June 11, 1965. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-74433. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  17. 36. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden ELEVATIONS OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR WILLIAM C. PRATT - CAMDEN PLACE - DRIVE FRONT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  18. 35. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden ELEVATIONS OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR WILLIAM C. PRATT - CAMDEN PLACE - RIVER FRONT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  19. An experiment on the color rendering of different light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Simonetta; Bonanomi, Cristian; Rizzi, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    The color rendering index (CRI) of a light source attempts to measure how much the color appearance of objects is preserved when they are illuminated by the given light source. This problem is of great importance for various industrial and scientific fields, such as lighting architecture, design, ergonomics, etc. Usually a light source is specified through the Correlated Color Temperature or CCT. However two (or more) light sources with the same CCT but different spectral power distribution can exist. Therefore color samples viewed under two light sources with equal CCTs can appear different. Hence, the need for a method to assess the quality of a given illuminant in relation to color. Recently CRI has had a renewed interest because of the new LED-based lighting systems. They usually have a color rendering index rather low, but good preservation of color appearance and a pleasant visual appearance (visual appeal). Various attempts to develop a new color rendering index have been done so far, but still research is working for a better one. This article describes an experiment performed by human observers concerning the appearance preservation of color under some light sources, comparing it with a range of available color rendering indices.

  20. Photographic copy of photograph of the Architect's rendering of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph of the Architect's rendering of the proposed Auditorium Building (1904-05) (original photograph in possession of Brunner and Brunner, Architect and Engineers, Inc., St. Joseph, Missouri) VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER - Old City Auditorium, 404-424 North Fourth Street, Saint Joseph, Buchanan County, MO

  1. 69. PHOTOCOPY OF RENDERING OF PROPOSED OPEN VALLEY TREATMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. PHOTOCOPY OF RENDERING OF PROPOSED OPEN VALLEY TREATMENT OF P STREET BEND, FROM U.S. CONGRESS. HOUSE. REPORT OF THE ROCK CREEK AND POTOMAC PARKWAY COMMISSION, 1916. HOUSE DOC. No. 1114, 64th CONG. 1st SESS. - Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. Perspective rendering of the Masonic Temple by James H. Windrim ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective rendering of the Masonic Temple by James H. Windrim showing the abandoned intermediate design of the Broad Street facade with architectural details and allegorical figures selected to represent symbolic Masonry, 1868 - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. 14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built at west end 1892-94. Designed by George W. Hewitt and his brother, William D. Hewitt of Philadelphia. - Hospital of Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Front Street & Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  5. ODOR CONTROL BY SCRUBBING IN THE RENDERING INDUSTRY. (ADDENDUM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study extending an earlier project during which an investigation of the performance of packed-bed scrubbers for high-intensity rendering plant odors (5000 to 180,000 odor units) showed that, although in some cases the removal was as high as 99%, the ...

  6. Color-rendering indices in global illumination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler-Moroder, David; Dür, Arne

    2009-10-01

    Human perception of material colors depends heavily on the nature of the light sources that are used for illumination. One and the same object can cause highly different color impressions when lit by a vapor lamp or by daylight, respectively. On the basis of state-of-the-art colorimetric methods, we present a modern approach for the calculation of color-rendering indices (CRI), which were defined by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) to characterize color reproduction properties of illuminants. We update the standard CIE method in three main points: first, we use the CIELAB color space; second, we apply a linearized Bradford transformation for chromatic adaptation; and finally, we evaluate color differences using the CIEDE2000 total color difference formula. Moreover, within a real-world scene, light incident on a measurement surface is composed of a direct and an indirect part. Neumann and Schanda [Proc. CGIV'06 Conf., Leeds, UK, pp. 283-286 (2006)] have shown for the cube model that diffuse interreflections can influence the CRI of a light source. We analyze how color-rendering indices vary in a real-world scene with mixed direct and indirect illumination and recommend the usage of a spectral rendering engine instead of an RGB-based renderer for reasons of accuracy of CRI calculations.

  7. Matching rendered and real world images by digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitjà, Carles; Bover, Toni; Bigas, Miquel; Escofet, Jaume

    2010-05-01

    Recent advances in computer-generated images (CGI) have been used in commercial and industrial photography providing a broad scope in product advertising. Mixing real world images with those rendered from virtual space software shows a more or less visible mismatching between corresponding image quality performance. Rendered images are produced by software which quality performance is only limited by the resolution output. Real world images are taken with cameras with some amount of image degradation factors as lens residual aberrations, diffraction, sensor low pass anti aliasing filters, color pattern demosaicing, etc. The effect of all those image quality degradation factors can be characterized by the system Point Spread Function (PSF). Because the image is the convolution of the object by the system PSF, its characterization shows the amount of image degradation added to any taken picture. This work explores the use of image processing to degrade the rendered images following the parameters indicated by the real system PSF, attempting to match both virtual and real world image qualities. The system MTF is determined by the slanted edge method both in laboratory conditions and in the real picture environment in order to compare the influence of the working conditions on the device performance; an approximation to the system PSF is derived from the two measurements. The rendered images are filtered through a Gaussian filter obtained from the taking system PSF. Results with and without filtering are shown and compared measuring the contrast achieved in different final image regions.

  8. Computer-aided detection of colonic polyps using volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei; Qiu, Feng; Marino, Joseph; Kaufman, Arie

    2007-03-01

    This work utilizes a novel pipeline for the computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps, assisting radiologists in locating polyps when using a virtual colonoscopy system. Our CAD pipeline automatically detects polyps while reducing the number of false positives (FPs). It integrates volume rendering and conformal colon flattening with texture and shape analysis. The colon is first digitally cleansed, segmented, and extracted from the CT dataset of the abdomen. The colon surface is then mapped to a 2D rectangle using conformal mapping. Using this colon flattening method, the CAD problem is converted from 3D into 2D. The flattened image is rendered using a direct volume rendering of the 3D colon dataset with a translucent transfer function. Suspicious polyps are detected by applying a clustering method on the 2D volume rendered image. The FPs are reduced by analyzing shape and texture features of the suspicious areas detected by the clustering step. Compared with shape-based methods, ours is much faster and much more efficient as it avoids computing curvature and other shape parameters for the whole colon wall. We tested our method with 178 datasets and found it to be 100% sensitive to adenomatous polyps with a low rate of FPs. The CAD results are seamlessly integrated into a virtual colonoscopy system, providing the radiologists with visual cues and likelihood indicators of areas likely to contain polyps, and allowing them to quickly inspect the suspicious areas and further exploit the flattened colon view for easy navigation and bookmark placement.

  9. 103. Photocopy of architect's rendering from Renwick's office, signed lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. Photocopy of architect's rendering from Renwick's office, signed lower right 'H. C. Moore Draughtsman May 1848' & signed lower left 'Louis R. Townsend pinxt. June 1848' NORTH FRONT, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 17 CFR 256.457 - Services rendered to associate companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... companies. 256.457 Section 256.457 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR MUTUAL SERVICE COMPANIES AND SUBSIDIARY SERVICE COMPANIES, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935 Income and Expense Accounts § 256.457 Services rendered to...

  11. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  12. Linear Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03667 Linear Clouds

    These clouds are located near the edge of the south polar region. The cloud tops are the puffy white features in the bottom half of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1N, Longitude 52.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 1 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 258.8 East (101.2 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration

  14. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  15. Data and image fusion for geometrical cloud characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, L.R.; Buch, K.A.; Sun, Chen-Hui; Diegert, C.

    1997-04-01

    Clouds have a strong influence on the Earth`s climate and therefore on climate change. An important step in improving the accuracy of models that predict global climate change, general circulation models, is improving the parameterization of clouds and cloud-radiation interactions. Improvements in the next generation models will likely include the effect of cloud geometry on the cloud-radiation parameterizations. We have developed and report here methods for characterizing the geometrical features and three-dimensional properties of clouds that could be of significant value in developing these new parameterizations. We developed and report here a means of generating and imaging synthetic clouds which we used to test our characterization algorithms; a method for using Taylor`s hypotheses to infer spatial averages from temporal averages of cloud properties; a computer method for automatically classifying cloud types in an image; and a method for producing numerical three-dimensional renderings of cloud fields based on the fusion of ground-based and satellite images together with meteorological data.

  16. A model-free method for annotating on vascular structure in volume rendered images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Li, Yanfang; Shi, Weili; Miao, Yu; He, Fei; Yan, Fei; Yang, Huamin; Zhang, Huimao; Mori, Kensaku; Jiang, Zhengang

    2015-03-01

    The precise annotation of vessel is desired in computer-assisted systems to help surgeons identify each vessel branch. A method has been reported that annotates vessels on volume rendered images by rendering their names on them using a two-pass rendering process. In the reported method, however, cylinder surface models of the vessels should be generated for writing vessels names. In fact, vessels are not actual cylinders, so the surfaces of the vessels cannot be simulated by such models accurately. This paper presents a model-free method for annotating vessels on volume rendered images by rendering their names on them using the two-pass rendering process: surface rendering and volume rendering. In the surface rendering process, docking points of vessel names are estimated by using such properties as centerlines, running directions, and vessel regions which are obtained in preprocess. Then the vessel names are pasted on the vessel surfaces at the docking points. In the volume rendering process, volume image is rendered using a fast volume rendering algorithm with depth buffer of image rendered in the surface rendering process. Finally, those rendered images are blended into an image as a result. In order to confirm the proposed method, a visualizing system for the automated annotation of abdominal arteries is performed. The experimental results show that vessel names can be drawn on the corresponding vessel in the volume rendered images correctly. The proposed method has enormous potential to be adopted to annotate other organs which cannot be modeled using regular geometrical surface.

  17. Chromium: A Stress-Processing Framework for Interactive Rendering on Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, G,; Houston, M.; Ng, Y.-R.; Frank, R.; Ahern, S.; Kirchner, P.D.; Klosowski, J.T.

    2002-01-11

    We describe Chromium, a system for manipulating streams of graphics API commands on clusters of workstations. Chromium's stream filters can be arranged to create sort-first and sort-last parallel graphics architectures that, in many cases, support the same applications while using only commodity graphics accelerators. In addition, these stream filters can be extended programmatically, allowing the user to customize the stream transformations performed by nodes in a cluster. Because our stream processing mechanism is completely general, any cluster-parallel rendering algorithm can be either implemented on top of or embedded in Chromium. In this paper, we give examples of real-world applications that use Chromium to achieve good scalability on clusters of workstations, and describe other potential uses of this stream processing technology. By completely abstracting the underlying graphics architecture, network topology, and API command processing semantics, we allow a variety of applications to run in different environments.

  18. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  19. Instrument measures cloud cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight solar sensing cells comprise inexpensive monitoring instrument. Four cells always track Sun while other four face sky and clouds. On overcast day, cloud-irradiance sensors generate as much short-circuit current as Sun sensor cells. As clouds disappear, output of cloud sensors decreases. Ratio of two sensor type outputs determines fractional cloud cover.

  20. Accretion phase of star formation in clouds with different metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Nakamura, Teppei

    2015-04-01

    The main accretion phase of star formation is investigated in clouds with different metallicities in the range 0 ≤ Z ≤ Z⊙, resolving the protostellar radius. Starting from a near-equilibrium prestellar cloud, we calculate the cloud evolution up to ˜100 yr after the first protostar forms. Star formation differs considerably between clouds with lower (Z ≤ 10-4 Z⊙) and higher (Z > 10-4 Z⊙) metallicities. Fragmentation frequently occurs and many protostars appear without a stable circumstellar disc in lower-metallicity clouds. In these clouds, although protostars mutually interact and some are ejected from the cloud centre, many remain as a small stellar cluster. In contrast, higher-metallicity clouds produce a single protostar surrounded by a nearly stable rotation-supported disc. In these clouds, although fragmentation occasionally occurs in the disc, the fragments migrate inwards and finally fall on to the central protostar. The difference in cloud evolution is due to different thermal evolutions and mass accretion rates. The thermal evolution of the cloud determines the emergence and lifetime of the first core. The first core develops prior to the formation of a protostar in higher-metallicity clouds, whereas no (obvious) first core appears in lower-metallicity clouds. The first core evolves into a circumstellar disc with a spiral pattern, which effectively transfers the angular momentum outwards and suppresses frequent fragmentation. In lower-metallicity clouds, the higher mass accretion rate increases the disc surface density within a very short time, rendering the disc unstable to self-gravity and inducing vigorous fragmentation.

  1. Stability of narrow emission line clouds in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, W.G.; Veilleux, S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the lateral flow and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities on clouds in the narrow-line region of active galaxies are considered using cloud densities and velocities based on observations. A simplified model for the lateral flow instability governed only by overpressures is discussed. The associated radiative acceleration is considered, and parameters describing the narrow-line region and the central nonstellar continuum are presented. It is shown that many otherwise acceptable narrow-line clouds are unstable to lateral flows, particularly if their column depths are small. It is argued that the most likely narrow-line clouds have column densities of about 10 to the 23rd/sq cm and that these clouds are accelerated by winds in the intercloud medium. Arguments are made against models in which narrow-line clouds move inward. 22 references.

  2. Volcanic explosion clouds - Density, temperature, and particle content estimates from cloud motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Self, S.

    1980-01-01

    Photographic records of 10 vulcanian eruption clouds produced during the 1978 eruption of Fuego Volcano in Guatemala have been analyzed to determine cloud velocity and acceleration at successive stages of expansion. Cloud motion is controlled by air drag (dominant during early, high-speed motion) and buoyancy (dominant during late motion when the cloud is convecting slowly). Cloud densities in the range 0.6 to 1.2 times that of the surrounding atmosphere were obtained by fitting equations of motion for two common cloud shapes (spheres and vertical cylinders) to the observed motions. Analysis of the heat budget of a cloud permits an estimate of cloud temperature and particle weight fraction to be made from the density. Model results suggest that clouds generally reached temperatures within 10 K of that of the surrounding air within 10 seconds of formation and that dense particle weight fractions were less than 2% by this time. The maximum sizes of dense particles supported by motion in the convecting clouds range from 140 to 1700 microns.

  3. A Study to Investigate Cloud Feedback Processes and Evaluate GCM Cloud Variations Using Statistical Cloud Property Composites From ARM Data

    SciTech Connect

    George Tselioudis

    2009-08-11

    cloud layering information into the context of large-scale dynamical regimes, such information can be used to study interactions among cloud vertical distributions and dynamical and microphysical processes and to evaluate the ability of models to simulate those interactions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has established several Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) that provide continuous, long-term observations of clouds and radiation. ARM, with its overall goal of improving the treatment of radiation and clouds in climate models has provided unique observing systems for accelerating progress on the representation of cloud processes. In this project, six and a half years (January 1998 to June 2004) of cloud observations collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Oklahoma ACRF were used to produce a cloud-type climatology. The climatology provides cloud amounts for seven different cloud types as well as information on the detailed structure of multi-layer cloud occurrences. Furthermore, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output was used to define the dynamic regimes present during the observations of the cloud conditions by the vertically pointing radars at the SGP ACRF. The cloud-type climatology and the ECMWF SGP data set were then analyzed to examine and map dynamical conditions that favor the creation of single-layer versus multi-layer cloud structures as well as dynamical conditions that favor the occurrence of drizzle in continental stratus clouds. In addition, output from the ECMWF weather model forecasts was analyzed with the objective to compare model and radar derived cloud type statistics, in order to identify the major model deficiencies in cloud vertical distribution and map their seasonal variations. The project included two primary goals. The first was to create a cloud type climatology over the Southern Great Planes site that will show how cloud vertical distribution

  4. Generalized pipeline for preview and rendering of synthetic holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappu, Ravikanth; Sparrell, Carlton J.; Underkoffler, John S.; Kropp, Adam B.; Chen, Benjie; Plesniak, Wendy J.

    1997-04-01

    We describe a general pipeline for the computation and display of either fully-computed holograms or holographic stereograms using the same 3D database. A rendering previewer on a Silicon Graphics Onyx allows a user to specify viewing geometry, database transformations, and scene lighting. The previewer then generates one of two descriptions of the object--a series of perspective views or a polygonal model--which is then used by a fringe rendering engine to compute fringes specific to hologram type. The images are viewed on the second generation MIT Holographic Video System. This allows a viewer to compare holographic stereograms with fully-computed holograms originating from the same database and comes closer to the goal of a single pipeline being able to display the same data in different formats.

  5. Color Rendering Plasmonic Aluminum Substrates with Angular Symmetry Breaking.

    PubMed

    Duempelmann, Luc; Casari, Daniele; Luu-Dinh, Angélique; Gallinet, Benjamin; Novotny, Lukas

    2015-12-22

    We fabricate and characterize large-area plasmonic substrates that feature asymmetric periodic nanostructures made of aluminum. Strong coupling between localized and propagating plasmon resonances leads to characteristic Fano line shapes with tunable spectral positions and widths. Distinctive colors spanning the entire visible spectrum are generated by tuning the system parameters, such as the period and the length of the aluminum structures. Moreover, the asymmetry of the aluminum structures gives rise to a strong symmetry broken color rendering effect, for which colors are observed only from one side of the surface normal. Using a combination of immersed laser interference lithography and nanoimprint lithography, our color rendering structures can be fabricated on areas many inches in size. We foresee applications in anticounterfeiting, photovoltaics, sensing, displays, and optical security. PMID:26498131

  6. Rapid exploration of curvilinear grids using direct volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangelder, Allen; Wilhelms, Jane

    1993-01-01

    Fast techniques for direct volume rendering over curvilinear grids of hexahedral cells are developed. This type of 3D grid is common in computational fluid dynamics and finite element analysis. Four new projection methods are presented and compared with each other and with previous methods for tetrahedral grids and rectilinear grids. All four methods use polygon-rendering hardware for speed. A simplified algorithm for visibility ordering, which is based on a combination of breadth-first and depth-first searches, is described. A new multi-pass blending method is described that reduces visual artifacts that are introduced by linear interpolation in hardware where exponential interpolation is needed. Multi-pass blending is of equal interest to hardware-oriented projection methods used on rectilinear grids. Visualization tools that permit rapid data banding and cycling through transfer functions, as well as region restrictions, are described.

  7. The shock response of a rendered porcine fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilgeroth, J. M.; Hazell, P. J.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.

    2010-11-01

    Characterization of the shock response of biological materials is required in order to develop an understanding of how such materials behave under high strain-rate loading. In this work, a predominately linear Us-up Hugoniot relationship for a rendered porcine fat has been established using the plate-impact technique. This has been shown to take the form Us=1.58+2.47up (ρ0=0.945 g/cc) and comparison has been made between the dynamic behavior of the adipose material and both 20 wt % ballistic gelatin and water. The adipose material has been shown to behave in likeness with simple polymers such as polyethylene and to strengthen under shock loading, unlike ballistic gelatin, which has been shown to behave hydrodynamically. An experimental design incorporating direct insertion of lateral stress gauges within the rendered fat has given insight into both the behavior of lateral gauges and the lateral stress response of the material under dynamic loading.

  8. Realistic fetus skin color processing for ultrasound volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Tae; Kim, Kyuhong; Park, Sung-Chan; Kang, Jooyoung; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes realistic fetus skin color processing using a 2D color map and a tone mapping function (TMF) for ultrasound volume rendering. The contributions of this paper are a 2D color map generated through a gamut model of skin color and a TMF that depends on the lighting position. First, the gamut model of fetus skin color is calculated by color distribution of baby images. The 2D color map is created using a gamut model for tone mapping of ray casting. For the translucent effect, a 2D color map in which lightness is inverted is generated. Second, to enhance the contrast of rendered images, the luminance, color, and tone curve TMF parameters are changed using 2D Gaussian function that depends on the lighting position. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves better realistic skin color reproduction than the conventional method.

  9. Martian Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 28 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during early spring near the North Pole. The linear 'ripples' are transparent water-ice clouds. This linear form is typical for polar clouds. The black regions on the margins of this image are areas of saturation caused by the build up of scattered light from the bright polar material during the long image exposure.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.1, Longitude 147.9 East (212.1 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS

  10. Rendering plant emissions in a residential setting: An economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, J.M.; MacDonald, H.F.

    1992-12-01

    The contingent value method is employed to estimate economic damages to households resulting from rendering plant emissions in a small town. Household WTA and WTP are estimated individually and in aggregate. The influence of Household characteristics is examined with regression models. The perception of health risk is an important determinant of household valuation while income appears insignificant. Results indicate that a potential Pareto-improvement is possible with the incorporation of current abatement technology.

  11. Perspective volume rendering on Parallel Algebraic Logic (PAL) computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongzheng; Shi, Hongchi

    1998-09-01

    We propose a perspective volume graphics rendering algorithm on SIMD mesh-connected computers and implement the algorithm on the Parallel Algebraic Logic computer. The algorithm is a parallel ray casting algorithm. It decomposes the 3D perspective projection into two transformations that can be implemented in the SIMD fashion to solve the data redistribution problem caused by non-regular data access patterns in the perspective projection.

  12. Volume Visual Attention Maps (VVAM) in ray-casting rendering.

    PubMed

    Beristain, Andoni; Congote, John; Ruiz, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extension visual attention maps for volume data visualization, where eye fixation points become rays in the 3D space, and the visual attention map becomes a volume. This Volume Visual Attention Map (VVAM) is used to interactively enhance a ray-casting based direct volume rendering (DVR) visualization. The practical application of this idea into the biomedical image visualization field is explored for interactive visualization. PMID:22356956

  13. Informatics in radiology: Render: an online searchable radiology study repository.

    PubMed

    Dang, Pragya A; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Schultz, Thomas J; Graham, Steven A; Dreyer, Keith J

    2009-01-01

    Radiology departments are a rich source of information in the form of digital radiology reports and images obtained in patients with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. A free text radiology report and image search application known as Render was created to allow users to find pertinent cases for a variety of purposes. Render is a radiology report and image repository that pools researchable information derived from multiple systems in near real time with use of (a) Health Level 7 links for radiology information system data, (b) periodic file transfers from the picture archiving and communication system, and (c) the results of natural language processing (NLP) analysis. Users can perform more structured and detailed searches with this application by combining different imaging and patient characteristics such as examination number; patient age, gender, and medical record number; and imaging modality. Use of NLP analysis allows a more effective search for reports with positive findings, resulting in the retrieval of more cases and terms having greater relevance. From the retrieved results, users can save images, bookmark examinations, and navigate to an external search engine such as Google. Render has applications in the fields of radiology education, research, and clinical decision support. PMID:19564253

  14. Efficient Encoding and Rendering of Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Smith, Diann; Shih, Ming-Yun; Shen, Han-Wei

    1998-01-01

    Visualization of time-varying volumetric data sets, which may be obtained from numerical simulations or sensing instruments, provides scientists insights into the detailed dynamics of the phenomenon under study. This paper describes a coherent solution based on quantization, coupled with octree and difference encoding for visualizing time-varying volumetric data. Quantization is used to attain voxel-level compression and may have a significant influence on the performance of the subsequent encoding and visualization steps. Octree encoding is used for spatial domain compression, and difference encoding for temporal domain compression. In essence, neighboring voxels may be fused into macro voxels if they have similar values, and subtrees at consecutive time steps may be merged if they are identical. The software rendering process is tailored according to the tree structures and the volume visualization process. With the tree representation, selective rendering may be performed very efficiently. Additionally, the I/O costs are reduced. With these combined savings, a higher level of user interactivity is achieved. We have studied a variety of time-varying volume datasets, performed encoding based on data statistics, and optimized the rendering calculations wherever possible. Preliminary tests on workstations have shown in many cases tremendous reduction by as high as 90% in both storage space and inter-frame delay.

  15. Crater Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06085 Crater Clouds

    The crater on the right side of this image is affecting the local wind regime. Note the bright line of clouds streaming off the north rim of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -78.8N, Longitude 320.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Cloud Infrastructure & Applications - CloudIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulistio, Anthony; Reich, Christoph; Doelitzscher, Frank

    The idea behind Cloud Computing is to deliver Infrastructure-as-a-Services and Software-as-a-Service over the Internet on an easy pay-per-use business model. To harness the potentials of Cloud Computing for e-Learning and research purposes, and to small- and medium-sized enterprises, the Hochschule Furtwangen University establishes a new project, called Cloud Infrastructure & Applications (CloudIA). The CloudIA project is a market-oriented cloud infrastructure that leverages different virtualization technologies, by supporting Service-Level Agreements for various service offerings. This paper describes the CloudIA project in details and mentions our early experiences in building a private cloud using an existing infrastructure.

  17. Cloud4Psi: cloud computing for 3D protein structure similarity searching

    PubMed Central

    Mrozek, Dariusz; Małysiak-Mrozek, Bożena; Kłapciński, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Popular methods for 3D protein structure similarity searching, especially those that generate high-quality alignments such as Combinatorial Extension (CE) and Flexible structure Alignment by Chaining Aligned fragment pairs allowing Twists (FATCAT) are still time consuming. As a consequence, performing similarity searching against large repositories of structural data requires increased computational resources that are not always available. Cloud computing provides huge amounts of computational power that can be provisioned on a pay-as-you-go basis. We have developed the cloud-based system that allows scaling of the similarity searching process vertically and horizontally. Cloud4Psi (Cloud for Protein Similarity) was tested in the Microsoft Azure cloud environment and provided good, almost linearly proportional acceleration when scaled out onto many computational units. Availability and implementation: Cloud4Psi is available as Software as a Service for testing purposes at: http://cloud4psi.cloudapp.net/. For source code and software availability, please visit the Cloud4Psi project home page at http://zti.polsl.pl/dmrozek/science/cloud4psi.htm. Contact: dariusz.mrozek@polsl.pl PMID:24930141

  18. Migrating EO/IR sensors to cloud-based infrastructure as service architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglie, Stephen T.; Webster, Steven; May, Christopher M.

    2014-06-01

    The Night Vision Image Generator (NVIG), a product of US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD, is a visualization tool used widely throughout Army simulation environments to provide fully attributed synthesized, full motion video using physics-based sensor and environmental effects. The NVIG relies heavily on contemporary hardware-based acceleration and GPU processing techniques, which push the envelope of both enterprise and commodity-level hypervisor support for providing virtual machines with direct access to hardware resources. The NVIG has successfully been integrated into fully virtual environments where system architectures leverage cloudbased technologies to various extents in order to streamline infrastructure and service management. This paper details the challenges presented to engineers seeking to migrate GPU-bound processes, such as the NVIG, to virtual machines and, ultimately, Cloud-Based IAS architectures. In addition, it presents the path that led to success for the NVIG. A brief overview of Cloud-Based infrastructure management tool sets is provided, and several virtual desktop solutions are outlined. A discrimination is made between general purpose virtual desktop technologies compared to technologies that expose GPU-specific capabilities, including direct rendering and hard ware-based video encoding. Candidate hypervisor/virtual machine configurations that nominally satisfy the virtualized hardware-level GPU requirements of the NVIG are presented , and each is subsequently reviewed in light of its implications on higher-level Cloud management techniques. Implementation details are included from the hardware level, through the operating system, to the 3D graphics APls required by the NVIG and similar GPU-bound tools.

  19. Irregular Morphing for Real-Time Rendering of Large Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalem, Sid'Ali; Kourgli, Assia

    2016-06-01

    The following paper proposes an alternative approach to the real-time adaptive triangulation problem. A new region-based multi-resolution approach for terrain rendering is described which improves on-the-fly the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile after selecting appropriate Level-Of-Detail by an adaptive sampling. This proposed approach organizes the heightmap into a QuadTree of tiles that are processed independently. This technique combines the benefits of both Triangular Irregular Network approach and region-based multi-resolution approach by improving the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile. Our technique morphs the initial regular grid of the tile to deformed grid in order to minimize approximation error. The proposed technique strives to combine large tile size and real-time processing while guaranteeing an upper bound on the screen space error. Thus, this approach adapts terrain rendering process to local surface characteristics and enables on-the-fly handling of large amount of terrain data. Morphing is based-on the multi-resolution wavelet analysis. The use of the D2WT multi-resolution analysis of the terrain height-map speeds up processing and permits to satisfy an interactive terrain rendering. Tests and experiments demonstrate that Haar B-Spline wavelet, well known for its properties of localization and its compact support, is suitable for fast and accurate redistribution. Such technique could be exploited in client-server architecture for supporting interactive high-quality remote visualization of very large terrain.

  20. An example of quantum imaging: rendering an object undetectable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose and analyse a Gedankenexperiment involving three non-linear crystals and two objects inserted in the idler beams. We show that, besides the behaviour that can be extrapolated from previous experiments involving two crystals and one object, we are able to predict a new effect: under certain circumstances, one of the objects can be rendered undetectable to any single detection rate on the signal photons with discarded idler photons. This effect could find applications in future developments of quantum imaging techniques.

  1. Enterobacteriaceae as indicators of good manufacturing practices in rendering plants.

    PubMed

    van Schothorst, M; Oosterom, J

    1984-01-01

    Finished products and samples from the environment of the production line in rendering plants were checked for Enterobacteriaceae and salmonellae. Improvements in hygiene and measures taken to limit multiplication of microorganisms in the dry area of the production lines resulted in reduction of both numbers of Enterobacteriaceae in environmental samples and frequency of their occurrence in finished products. Simultaneously, there was an equivalent reduction of salmonellae positives in environmental samples and finished products. Consequently, the determination of Enterobacteriaceae can be used as an effective tool to assess the improvements in good manufacturing practices. PMID:6721473

  2. The Cube Analysis and Rendering Tool for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolowsky, E.; Kern, J.; Federl, P.; Jacobs, J.; Loveland, S.; Taylor, J.; Sivakoff, G.; Taylor, R.

    2015-09-01

    We present the design principles and current status of the Cube Analysis and Rendering Tool for Astronomy (CARTA). The CARTA project is designing a cube visualization tool for the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimeter array. CARTA will join the domain-specific software already developed for millimetre-wave interferometry with sever-side visualization solution. This connection will enable archive-hosted exploration of three-dimensional data cubes. CARTA will also provide an indistinguishable desktop client. While such a goal is ambitious for a short project, the team is focusing on a well-developed framework which can readily accommodate community code development through plugins.

  3. Interactive View-Dependent Rendering of Large Isosurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gregorski, B; Duchaineau, M; Lindstrom, P; Pascucci, V; Joy, K I

    2002-11-19

    We present an algorithm for interactively extracting and rendering isosurfaces of large volume datasets in a view-dependent fashion. A recursive tetrahedral mesh refinement scheme, based on longest edge bisection, is used to hierarchically decompose the data into a multiresolution structure. This data structure allows fast extraction of arbitrary isosurfaces to within user specified view-dependent error bounds. A data layout scheme based on hierarchical space filling curves provides access to the data in a cache coherent manner that follows the data access pattern indicated by the mesh refinement.

  4. Beam induced electron cloud resonances in dipole magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  5. Accelerated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Accelerated Reader, a system of computerized testing and record-keeping that supplements the regular classroom reading program. Accelerated Reader's primary goal is to increase literature-based reading practice. The program offers a computer-aided reading comprehension and management program intended to motivate…

  6. Molecular clouds in Orion and Monoceros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, M.; Montani, J.; Thaddeus, P.

    1980-01-01

    A 1.2-m millimeter-wave telescope has been used to survey CO in the constellations of Orion and Monoceros. Many new molecular clouds have been found. The distribution of molecular material shows two striking characteristics: (1) Most of the molecular clouds in this region appear to be connected by continuous extensions and filaments. To judge from continuity in radial velocity, most of these connections appear to be real, and are not merely the result of projection along the line of sight; (2) There are at least two slender filamentary features longer than 10 deg in angular extent. These filaments may connect the molecular clouds lying well out of the Galactic plane to clouds lying in the plane. Their shape and orientation suggest that magnetic fields may play a role in their evolution. The observed velocity gradients may be explained by accelerated gas flow along the filament.

  7. Spatial 3D infrastructure: display-independent software framework, high-speed rendering electronics, and several new displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Won-Suk; Napoli, Joshua; Cossairt, Oliver S.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Purtell, Thomas J., II; Schooler, James F.; Banker, Yigal; Favalora, Gregg E.

    2005-03-01

    We present a software and hardware foundation to enable the rapid adoption of 3-D displays. Different 3-D displays - such as multiplanar, multiview, and electroholographic displays - naturally require different rendering methods. The adoption of these displays in the marketplace will be accelerated by a common software framework. The authors designed the SpatialGL API, a new rendering framework that unifies these display methods under one interface. SpatialGL enables complementary visualization assets to coexist through a uniform infrastructure. Also, SpatialGL supports legacy interfaces such as the OpenGL API. The authors" first implementation of SpatialGL uses multiview and multislice rendering algorithms to exploit the performance of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) to enable real-time visualization of 3-D graphics from medical imaging, oil & gas exploration, and homeland security. At the time of writing, SpatialGL runs on COTS workstations (both Windows and Linux) and on Actuality"s high-performance embedded computational engine that couples an NVIDIA GeForce 6800 Ultra GPU, an AMD Athlon 64 processor, and a proprietary, high-speed, programmable volumetric frame buffer that interfaces to a 1024 x 768 x 3 digital projector. Progress is illustrated using an off-the-shelf multiview display, Actuality"s multiplanar Perspecta Spatial 3D System, and an experimental multiview display. The experimental display is a quasi-holographic view-sequential system that generates aerial imagery measuring 30 mm x 25 mm x 25 mm, providing 198 horizontal views.

  8. The rendering context for stereoscopic 3D web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qinshui; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Ronggang

    2014-03-01

    3D technologies on the Web has been studied for many years, but they are basically monoscopic 3D. With the stereoscopic technology gradually maturing, we are researching to integrate the binocular 3D technology into the Web, creating a stereoscopic 3D browser that will provide users with a brand new experience of human-computer interaction. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to apply stereoscopy technologies to the CSS3 3D Transforms. Under our model, each element can create or participate in a stereoscopic 3D rendering context, in which 3D Transforms such as scaling, translation and rotation, can be applied and be perceived in a truly 3D space. We first discuss the underlying principles of stereoscopy. After that we discuss how these principles can be applied to the Web. A stereoscopic 3D browser with backward compatibility is also created for demonstration purposes. We take advantage of the open-source WebKit project, integrating the 3D display ability into the rendering engine of the web browser. For each 3D web page, our 3D browser will create two slightly different images, each representing the left-eye view and right-eye view, both to be combined on the 3D display to generate the illusion of depth. And as the result turns out, elements can be manipulated in a truly 3D space.

  9. Rendering energy-conservative scenes in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Eric M.; Garbo, Dennis L.; Crow, Dennis R.; Coker, Charles F.

    1997-07-01

    Real-time infrared (IR) scene generation from HardWare-in- the-Loop (HWIL) testing of IR seeker systems is a complex problem due to the required frame rates and image fidelity. High frame rates are required for current generation seeker systems to perform designation, discrimination, identification, tracking, and aimpoint selection tasks. Computational requirements for IR signature phenomenology and sensor effects have been difficult to perform in real- time to support HWIL testing. Commercial scene generation hardware is rapidly improving and is becoming a viable solution for HWIL testing activities being conducted at the Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulator facility at Eglin AFB, Florida. This paper presents computational techniques performed to overcome IR scene rendering errors incurred with commercially available hardware and software for real-time scene generation in support of HWIL testing. These techniques provide an acceptable solution to real-time IR scene generation that strikes a balance between physical accuracy and image framing rates. The results of these techniques are investigated as they pertain to rendering accuracy and speed for target objects which begin as a point source during acquisition and develop into an extended source representation during aimpoint selection.

  10. Non-photorealistic rendering for minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Jens; Schäfer, Henry; Brost, Alexander; Stamminger, Marc; Pfister, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are a common disease of the aorta which are treated minimally invasive in about 33 % of the cases. Treatment is done by placing a stent graft in the aorta to prevent the aneurysm from growing. Guidance during the procedure is facilitated by fluoroscopic imaging. Unfortunately, due to low soft tissue contrast in X-ray images, the aorta itself is not visible without the application of contrast agent. To overcome this issue, advanced techniques allow to segment the aorta from pre-operative data, such as CT or MRI. Overlay images are then subsequently rendered from a mesh representation of the segmentation and fused to the live fluoroscopic images with the aim of improving the visibility of the aorta during the procedure. The current overlay images typically use forward projections of the mesh representation. This fusion technique shows deficiencies in both the 3-D information of the overlay and the visibility of the fluoroscopic image underneath. We present a novel approach to improve the visualization of the overlay images using non-photorealistic rendering techniques. Our method preserves the visibility of the devices in the fluoroscopic images while, at the same time, providing 3-D information of the fused volume. The evaluation by clinical experts shows that our method is preferred over current state-of-the-art overlay techniques. We compared three visualization techniques to the standard visualization. Our silhouette approach was chosen by clinical experts with 67 %, clearly showing the superiority of our new approach.

  11. Emphatic, interactive volume rendering to support variance in user expertise.

    PubMed

    Stredney, Don; Ebert, David S; Svakhine, Nikolai; Bryan, Jason; Sessanna, Dennis; Wiet, Gregory J

    2005-01-01

    Various levels of representation, from abstract to schematic to realistic, have been exploited for millennia to facilitate the transfer of information from one individual to another. Learning complex information, such as that found in biomedicine, proves specifically problematic to many, and requires incremental, step-wise depictions of the information to clarify structural, functional, and procedural relationships.Emerging volume-rendering technique, such as non-photorealistic representation, coupled with advances in computational speeds, especially new graphical processing units, provide unique capabilities to explore the use of various levels of representation in interactive sessions. We have developed a system that produces images that simulate pictorial representations for both scientific and biomedical visualization. The system combines traditional and novel volume illustration techniques. We present examples from our efforts to distill representational techniques for both creative exploration and emphatic presentation for clarity. More specifically, we present our efforts to adapt these techniques for interactive simulation sessions being developed in a concurrent project for resident training in temporal bone dissection simulation. The goal of this effort is to evaluate the use of emphatic rendering to guide the user in an interactive session and to facilitate the learning of complex biomedical information, including structural, functional, and procedural information. PMID:15718791

  12. Fast polyhedral cell sorting for interactive rendering of unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Combra, J; Klosowski, J T; Max, N; Silva, C T; Williams, P L

    1998-10-30

    Direct volume rendering based on projective methods works by projecting, in visibility order, the polyhedral cells of a mesh onto the image plane, and incrementally compositing the cell's color and opacity into the final image. Crucial to this method is the computation of a visibility ordering of the cells. If the mesh is ''well-behaved'' (acyclic and convex), then the MPVO method of Williams provides a very fast sorting algorithm; however, this method only computes an approximate ordering in general datasets, resulting in visual artifacts when rendered. A recent method of Silva et al. removed the assumption that the mesh is convex, by means of a sweep algorithm used in conjunction with the MPVO method; their algorithm is substantially faster than previous exact methods for general meshes. In this paper we propose a new technique, which we call BSP-XMPVO, which is based on a fast and simple way of using binary space partitions on the boundary elements of the mesh to augment the ordering produced by MPVO. Our results are shown to be orders of magnitude better than previous exact methods of sorting cells.

  13. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs. PMID:26146475

  14. Physically Based Rendering in the Nightshade NG Visualization Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Karrie; Larey-Williams, Trystan; Spearman, Rob; Bogard, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This poster describes our work on creating a physically based rendering model in Nightshade NG planetarium simulation and visualization software (project website: NightshadeSoftware.org). We discuss techniques used for rendering realistic scenes in the universe and dealing with astronomical distances in real time on consumer hardware. We also discuss some of the challenges of rewriting the software from scratch, a project which began in 2011.Nightshade NG can be a powerful tool for sharing data and visualizations. The desktop version of the software is free for anyone to download, use, and modify; it runs on Windows and Linux (and eventually Mac). If you are looking to disseminate your data or models, please stop by to discuss how we can work together.Nightshade software is used in literally hundreds of digital planetarium systems worldwide. Countless teachers and astronomy education groups run the software on flat screens. This wide use makes Nightshade an effective tool for dissemination to educators and the public.Nightshade NG is an especially powerful visualization tool when projected on a dome. We invite everyone to enter our inflatable dome in the exhibit hall to see this software in a 3D environment.

  15. Dynamic rendering of the heterogeneous cell response to anticancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Falcetta, Francesca; Lupi, Monica; Colombo, Valentina; Ubezio, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The antiproliferative response to anticancer treatment is the result of concurrent responses in all cell cycle phases, extending over several cell generations, whose complexity is not captured by current methods. In the proposed experimental/computational approach, the contemporary use of time-lapse live cell microscopy and flow cytometric data supported the computer rendering of the proliferative process through the cell cycle and subsequent generations during/after treatment. The effects of treatments were modelled with modules describing the functional activity of the main pathways causing arrest, repair and cell death in each phase. A framework modelling environment was created, enabling us to apply different types of modules in each phase and test models at the complexity level justified by the available data. We challenged the method with time-course measures taken in parallel with flow cytometry and time-lapse live cell microscopy in X-ray-treated human ovarian cancer cells, spanning a wide range of doses. The most suitable model of the treatment, including the dose-response of each effect, was progressively built, combining modules with a rational strategy and fitting simultaneously all data of different doses and platforms. The final model gave for the first time the complete rendering in silico of the cycling process following X-ray exposure, providing separate and quantitative measures of the dose-dependence of G1, S and G2M checkpoint activities in subsequent generations, reconciling known effects of ionizing radiations and new insights in a unique scenario. PMID:24146610

  16. Inverse rendering of Lambertian surfaces using subspace methods.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Q; Do, Minh N

    2014-12-01

    We propose a vector space approach for inverse rendering of a Lambertian convex object with distant light sources. In this problem, the texture of the object and arbitrary lightings are both to be recovered from multiple images of the object and its 3D model. Our work is motivated by the observation that all possible images of a Lambertian object lie around a low-dimensional linear subspace spanned by the first few spherical harmonics. The inverse rendering can therefore be formulated as a matrix factorization, in which the basis of the subspace is encoded in a spherical harmonic matrix S associated with the object’s geometry. A necessary and sufficient condition on S for unique factorization is derived with an introduction to a new notion of matrix rank called nonseparable full rank. A singular value decomposition-based algorithm for exact factorization in the noiseless case is introduced. In the presence of noise, two algorithms, namely, alternating and optimization based are proposed to deal with two different types of noise. A random sample consensus-based algorithm is introduced to reduce the size of the optimization problem, which is equal to the number of pixels in each image. Implementations of the proposed algorithms are done on a real data set. PMID:25373083

  17. Molecular clouds in Orion and Monoceros

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    About one-eighth of a well-sampled 850 deg/sup 2/ region of Orion and Monoceros, extending from the Taurus dark cloud complex to the CMa OB 1 association, shows emission at the frequency of the J = 1 ..-->.. 0 transition of CO coming from either local clouds (d < 1 kpc) lying as much as 25/sup 8/ from the galactic plane or from more distant objects located within a few degrees of the plane and well outside the solar circle. Local giant molecular clouds associated with Orion A and B have enhanced temperatures and densities near their western edges possibly due to compression of molecular gas by a high pressure region created by the cumulative effects of approx.10 supernovae that occurred in the Orion OB association. Another giant molecular cloud found to be associated with Mon R2 may be related to the Orion clouds. Two filamentary clouds (one possible 200 pc long but only 3-10 pc wide) were found that may represent a new class of object; magnetic fields probably play a role in confining these filaments. An expanding ring of clouds concentric with the H II region S 264 and its ionizing 08 star lambda Ori was also investigated, and a possible evolutionary sequence for the ring is given in detail: the clouds probably constitute fragments of the original cloud from which lambda Ori formed, the gas pressure of the H II region and the rocket effect having disrupted the cloud and accelerated the fragments to their present velocities.

  18. 9. Copy of early 20th century rendering of bird's eye ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Copy of early 20th century rendering of bird's eye view of plant looking north. Rendering owned by the Weatherhead Company. - Cleveland-Chandler Motors Corporation, 300 East 131st Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  19. 3. Copy of early 20th century lithograph, aerial rendering, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Copy of early 20th century lithograph, aerial rendering, looking south. Rendering owned by Baker Materials Handling Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio. - Rauch & Lang Carriage Company, West Twenty-fifth Street & Monroe Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. The Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marochnik, Leonid S.; Mukhin, Lev M.; Sagdeev, Roald Z.

    1991-01-01

    Views of the large-scale structure of the solar system, consisting of the Sun, the nine planets and their satellites, changed when Oort demonstrated that a gigantic cloud of comets (the Oort cloud) is located on the periphery of the solar system. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the Oort cloud's mass; (2) Hill's cloud mass; (3) angular momentum distribution in the solar system; and (4) the cometary cloud around other stars.

  1. Study and application on accelerated algorithm of ray-casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoping; Wu, Jian; Cui, Zhiming; Ma, Jianlin

    2007-12-01

    Medical image 3D reconstruct is an important application filed for volume rendering, for it special using, it required fast interactive speed and high image quality. The ray casting algorithm (RCA) is a widely used basic volume rendering algorithm. It can get high quality image but the rendering speed is very slowly for powerful computing capacity. Due to these shortcomings and deficiencies, the accelerated ray casting algorithm is presented in this paper to improve its rendering speed and apply it to medical image 3D reconstruct. Firstly, accelerate algorithms for ray casting are fully studied and compared. Secondly, improved tri-linear interpolation technology has been selected and extended to continuous ray casting in order to reduce matrix computation by matrix transformation characteristics of re-sampling points. Then ray interval casting technology is used to reduce the number of rays. Utilizing volume data sets cropping technology that improving boundary box technique avoids the sampling in empty voxel. Finally, the synthesized accelerate algorithm has been proposed. The result shown that compare with standard ray casting algorithm, the accelerate algorithm not only improve the rendering speed but also produce the required quality images.

  2. Mathematical models for volume rendering and neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.

    1994-09-01

    This paper reviews several different models for light interaction with volume densities of absorbing, glowing, reflecting, or scattering material. They include absorption only, glow only, glow and absorption combined, single scattering of external illumination, and multiple scattering. The models are derived from differential equations, and illustrated on a data set representing a cloud. They are related to corresponding models in neutron transport. The multiple scattering model uses an efficient method to propagate the radiation which does not suffer from the ray effect.

  3. A diagnostic statistical cloud scheme for data assimilation purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, A. M.; Janiskova, M.

    2003-04-01

    The task of assimilating cloud and rainfall information is steadily increasing in importance with a new generation of observing platforms. The inherent non-linearity of many cloud related processes exacerbates the archetypical assimilation dilemma. Overly simplistic schemes may not represent the physical cloud processes adequately for assimilation purposes. At the other extreme, many current cloud schemes used in forecast or climate models are simply too complex for the tangent linear and adjoint codes to be constructed. Even if the latter is achievable, the full schemes in forecast models often contain discrete switches and non linear processes to maximize forecast performance, but render the linear approximation invalid for perturbations of the magnitude of typical analysis increments. This may cause convergence problems over typical assimilation windows (currently 12 hours) in 4D variational assimilation (4DVAR). The existing ECMWF cloud scheme used in the assimilating model is deficient since there is no connection between diagnosed cloud cover, water/ice and precipitation generation. We thus present a new non-linear diagnostic cloud scheme for which the tangent linear and adjoint codes have been constructed. The scheme is based on prognostic humidity and temperature variables and a diagnostic assumption concerning subgrid variability is used to derive cloud water, ice and cover characteristics. Results using the new scheme are shown.

  4. A Fast Ray-Tracing Using Bounding Spheres and Frustum Rays for Dynamic Scene Rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Kaeriyama, Yoshiyuki; Komatsu, Kazuhiko; Egawa, Ryusuke; Ohba, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki

    Ray tracing is one of the most popular techniques for generating photo-realistic images. Extensive research and development work has made interactive static scene rendering realistic. This paper deals with interactive dynamic scene rendering in which not only the eye point but also the objects in the scene change their 3D locations every frame. In order to realize interactive dynamic scene rendering, RTRPS (Ray Tracing based on Ray Plane and Bounding Sphere), which utilizes the coherency in rays, objects, and grouped-rays, is introduced. RTRPS uses bounding spheres as the spatial data structure which utilizes the coherency in objects. By using bounding spheres, RTRPS can ignore the rotation of moving objects within a sphere, and shorten the update time between frames. RTRPS utilizes the coherency in rays by merging rays into a ray-plane, assuming that the secondary rays and shadow rays are shot through an aligned grid. Since a pair of ray-planes shares an original ray, the intersection for the ray can be completed using the coherency in the ray-planes. Because of the three kinds of coherency, RTRPS can significantly reduce the number of intersection tests for ray tracing. Further acceleration techniques for ray-plane-sphere and ray-triangle intersection are also presented. A parallel projection technique converts a 3D vector inner product operation into a 2D operation and reduces the number of floating point operations. Techniques based on frustum culling and binary-tree structured ray-planes optimize the order of intersection tests between ray-planes and a sphere, resulting in 50% to 90% reduction of intersection tests. Two ray-triangle intersection techniques are also introduced, which are effective when a large number of rays are packed into a ray-plane. Our performance evaluations indicate that RTRPS gives 13 to 392 times speed up in comparison with a ray tracing algorithm without organized rays and spheres. We found out that RTRPS also provides competitive

  5. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  6. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  7. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  8. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  9. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  10. 9 CFR 319.703 - Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. 319.703 Section 319.703 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... § 319.703 Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. “Rendered Animal Fat,” or any mixture of...

  11. 9 CFR 319.703 - Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. 319.703 Section 319.703 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... § 319.703 Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. “Rendered Animal Fat,” or any mixture of...

  12. 9 CFR 319.703 - Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. 319.703 Section 319.703 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... § 319.703 Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. “Rendered Animal Fat,” or any mixture of...

  13. Clouds Dominate the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Using the exquisite sensitivity of the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, W. Va., has produced the best cross-section ever of the Milky Way Galaxy's diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. This image confirms the presence of discrete hydrogen clouds in the halo, and could help astronomers understand the origin and evolution of the rarefied atmosphere that surrounds our Galaxy. Lockman presented his findings at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, WA. Hydrogen Clouds Graphic Artist's Rendering of the Milky Way (background) with insert showing GBT image of cross-section of neutral atomic Hydrogen Credit: Kirk Woellert/National Science Foundation Patricia Smiley, NRAO. "The first observations with the Green Bank Telescope suggested that the hydrogen in the lower halo, the transition zone between the Milky Way and intergalactic space, is very clumpy," said Lockman. "The latest data confirm these results and show that instead of trailing away smoothly from the Galactic plane, a significant fraction of the hydrogen gas in the halo is concentrated in discrete clouds. There are even some filaments." Beyond the star-filled disk of the Milky Way, there exists an extensive yet diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. For years, astronomers have speculated about the origin and structure of this gas. "Even the existence of neutral hydrogen in the halo has been somewhat of a puzzle," Lockman remarked. "Unlike the Earth's atmosphere, which is hot enough to hold itself up against the force of gravity, the hydrogen in the halo is too cool to support itself against the gravitational pull of the Milky Way." Lockman points out that some additional factor has to be involved to get neutral hydrogen to such large distances from the Galactic plane. "This force could be cosmic rays, a supersonic wind, the blast waves from supernovae, or something we have not thought of

  14. Observation of Magnetic Resonances in Electron Clouds in a Positron Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wang, L.F.; /SLAC

    2011-08-24

    The first experimental observation of magnetic resonances in electron clouds is reported. The resonance was observed as a modulation in cloud intensity for uncoated as well as TiN-coated aluminum surfaces in the positron storage ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. Electron clouds frequently arise in accelerators of positively charged particles, and severely impact the machines performance. The TiN coating was found to be an effective remedy, reducing the cloud intensity by three orders of magnitude.

  15. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  16. Excellent color rendering indexes of multi-package white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Hye; Yang, Su Ji; Sung, Yeon-Goog; Do, Y R

    2012-08-27

    This study introduces multi-package white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) system with the ability to realize high luminous efficacy and an excellent color rendering index (CRI, R a) using the R B,M A B,M G B,M C B (R B,M A B,M G B,M denoted as a long-pass dichroic filter (LPDF)-capped, monochromatic red, amber and green phosphor converted-LED (pc-LED) pumped by a blue LED chip, and C B denoted as a cyan and blue mixed pc-LED pumped by a blue LED) system. The luminous efficacy and color rendering index (CRI) of multi-package white LED systems are compared while changing the concentration of the cyan phosphor used in the paste of a cyan-blue LED package and the driving current of individual LEDs in multi-package white LEDs at correlated color temperatures (CCTs) ranging from 6,500 K (cold white) to 2,700 K (warm white) using a set of eight CCTs as specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard number C78.377-2008. A R B,M A B,M G B,M C B white LED system provides high luminous efficacy (≥ 96 lm/W) and a color rendering index (≥ 91) encompassing the complete CCT range. We also compare the optical properties of the R B,M A B,M G B,M C B system with those of the R B,M A B,M G B,M B and RAGB (red, amber, green, and blue semiconductor-type narrow-spectrum-band LEDs) systems. It can be expected that the cyan color added to a blue LED in multi-package white LEDs based on LPDF-capped, phosphor-converted monochromatic LEDs will meet the needs of the high-quality, highly efficient, full-color white LED lighting market in the near future. PMID:23037079

  17. Cloud CCN feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Cloud microphysics affects cloud albedo precipitation efficiency and the extent of cloud feedback in response to global warming. Compared to other cloud parameters, microphysics is unique in its large range of variability and the fact that much of the variability is anthropogenic. Probably the most important determinant of cloud microphysics is the spectra of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) which display considerable variability and have a large anthropogenic component. When analyzed in combination three field observation projects display the interrelationship between CCN and cloud microphysics. CCN were measured with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) instantaneous CCN spectrometer. Cloud microphysical measurements were obtained with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Lockheed Electra. Since CCN and cloud microphysics each affect the other a positive feedback mechanism can result.

  18. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  19. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  20. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  1. Feature-driven data exploration for volumetric rendering.

    PubMed

    Woo, Insoo; Maciejewski, Ross; Gaither, Kelly P; Ebert, David S

    2012-10-01

    We have developed an intuitive method to semiautomatically explore volumetric data in a focus-region-guided or value-driven way using a user-defined ray through the 3D volume and contour lines in the region of interest. After selecting a point of interest from a 2D perspective, which defines a ray through the 3D volume, our method provides analytical tools to assist in narrowing the region of interest to a desired set of features. Feature layers are identified in a 1D scalar value profile with the ray and are used to define default rendering parameters, such as color and opacity mappings, and locate the center of the region of interest. Contour lines are generated based on the feature layer level sets within interactively selected slices of the focus region. Finally, we utilize feature-preserving filters and demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to noisy data. PMID:22291153

  2. Predictive rendering of composite materials: a multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T.; Callet, P.; da Graça, F.; Paljic, A.; Porral, P.; Hoarau, R.

    2015-03-01

    Predictive rendering of material appearance means going deep into the understanding of the physical interaction between light and matter and how these interactions are perceived by the human brain. In this paper we describe our approach to predict the appearance of composite materials by relying on the multi-scale nature of the involved phenomena. Using recent works on physical modeling of complex materials, we show how to predict the aspect of a composite material based on its composition and its morphology. Specifically, we focus on the materials whose morphological structures are defined at several embedded scales. We rely on the assumption that when the inclusions in a composite material are smaller than the considered wavelength, the optical constants of the corresponding effective media can be computed by a homogenization process (or analytically for special cases) to be used into the Fresnel formulas.

  3. Hierarchical image-based rendering using texture mapping hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N

    1999-01-15

    Multi-layered depth images containing color and normal information for subobjects in a hierarchical scene model are precomputed with standard z-buffer hardware for six orthogonal views. These are adaptively selected according to the proximity of the viewpoint, and combined using hardware texture mapping to create ''reprojected'' output images for new viewpoints. (If a subobject is too close to the viewpoint, the polygons in the original model are rendered.) Specific z-ranges are selected from the textures with the hardware alpha test to give accurate 3D reprojection. The OpenGL color matrix is used to transform the precomputed normals into their orientations in the final view, for hardware shading.

  4. An artist's rendering of the planned RLV Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be located at the tow-way adjacent to the SLF, the complex will include a multi-purpose RLV hangar and adjacent facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle, the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator, the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34, and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000.

  5. Artist rendering of dust grains colliding at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Clues to the formation of planets and planetary rings -- like Saturn's dazzling ring system -- may be found by studying how dust grains interact as they collide at low speeds. To study the question of low-speed dust collisions, NASA sponsored the COLLisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) at the University of Colorado. It was designed to spring-launch marble-size projectiles into trays of powder similar to space or lunar dust. COLLIDE-1 (1998) discovered that collisions below a certain energy threshold eject no material. COLLIDE-2 was designed to identify where the threshold is. In COLLIDE-2, scientists nudged small projectiles into dust beds and recorded how the dust splashed outward (video frame at top; artist's rendering at bottom). The slowest impactor ejected no material and stuck in the target. The faster impactors produced ejecta; some rebounded while others stuck in the target.

  6. Latency in Distributed Acquisition and Rendering for Telepresence Systems.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Stephan; Willert, Malte; Staadt, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Telepresence systems use 3D techniques to create a more natural human-centered communication over long distances. This work concentrates on the analysis of latency in telepresence systems where acquisition and rendering are distributed. Keeping latency low is important to immerse users in the virtual environment. To better understand latency problems and to identify the source of such latency, we focus on the decomposition of system latency into sub-latencies. We contribute a model of latency and show how it can be used to estimate latencies in a complex telepresence dataflow network. To compare the estimates with real latencies in our prototype, we modify two common latency measurement methods. This presented methodology enables the developer to optimize the design, find implementation issues and gain deeper knowledge about specific sources of latency. PMID:26529463

  7. Depth remapping using seam carving for depth image based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Ikuko; Iwauchi, Kenichi

    2015-03-01

    Depth remapping is a technique to control depth range of stereo images. Conventional remapping which uses a transform function in the whole image has a stable characteristic, however it sometimes reduces the 3D appearance too much. To cope with this problem, a depth remapping method which preserves the details of depth structure is proposed. We apply seam carving, which is an effective technique for image retargeting, to depth remapping. An extended depth map is defined as a space-depth volume, and a seam surface which is a 2D monotonic and connected manifold is introduced. The depth range is reduced by removing depth values on the seam surface from the space-depth volume. Finally a stereo image pair is synthesized from the corrected depth map and an input color image by depth image based rendering.

  8. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  9. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

  10. Volumetric Rendering of Geophysical Data on Adaptive Wavelet Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezolainen, A.; Erlebacher, G.; Vasilyev, O.; Yuen, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical modeling of geological phenomena frequently involves processes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In the last several years, transport phenomena governed by the Navier-Stokes equations have been simulated in wavelet space using second generation wavelets [1], and most recently on fully adaptive meshes. Our objective is to visualize this time-dependent data using volume rendering while capitalizing on the available sparse data representation. We present a technique for volumetric ray casting of multi-scale datasets in wavelet space. Rather of working with the wavelets at the finest possible resolution, we perform a partial inverse wavelet transform as a preprocessing step to obtain scaling functions on a uniform grid at a user-prescribed resolution. As a result, a function in physical space is represented by a superposition of scaling functions on a coarse regular grid and wavelets on an adaptive mesh. An efficient and accurate ray casting algorithm is based just on these scaling functions. Additional detail is added during the ray tracing by taking an appropriate number of wavelets into account based on support overlap with the interpolation point, wavelet amplitude, and other characteristics, such as opacity accumulation (front to back ordering) and deviation from frontal viewing direction. Strategies for hardware implementation will be presented if available, inspired by the work in [2]. We will pressent error measures as a function of the number of scaling and wavelet functions used for interpolation. Data from mantle convection will be used to illustrate the method. [1] Vasilyev, O.V. and Bowman, C., Second Generation Wavelet Collocation Method for the Solution of Partial Differential Equations. J. Comp. Phys., 165, pp. 660-693, 2000. [2] Guthe, S., Wand, M., Gonser, J., and Straßer, W. Interactive rendering of large volume data sets. In Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization '02 (Boston, Massachusetts, October 27 - November

  11. Discrete Modal Decomposition for surface appearance modelling and rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitard, Gilles; Le Goïc, Gaëtan; Favrelière, Hugues; Samper, Serge; Desage, Simon-Frédéric; Pillet, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Controlling surface appearance has become essential in the supplier/customer relationship. In this context, many industries have implemented new methods to improve the sensory inspection, particularly in terms of variability. A trend is to develop both hardware and methods for moving towards the automation of appearance inspection and analysis. If devices inspired from dimensional control solutions generally allow to identify defects far apart the expected quality of products, it do not allow to quantify finely appearance anomalies, and decide on their acceptance. To address this issue, new methods devoted to appearance modelling and rendering have been implemented, such as the Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) technique. By varying the illumination positions, the RTI technique aims at enriching the classical information conveyed by images. Thus each pixel is described by a set of values rather than one value classically; each value corresponding to a specific illumination position. This set of values could be interpolated or approximated by a continuous model (function), associated to the reflectance of the pixel, generally based on a second order polynomial (namely, Polynomial Texture Mapping Technique). This paper presents a new approach to evaluate this information from RTI acquisitions. A modal projection based on dynamics (Discrete Modal Decomposition) is used to estimate surface reflectance on each measurement point. After presenting the acquisition device, an application on an industrial surface is proposed in order to validate the approach, and compare it to the more classical polynomial transformation. Results show that the proposed projection basis not only provides closer assessment of surface reflectance (modelling) but also yields to a more realistic rendering.

  12. Technologies Render Views of Earth for Virtual Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    On a December night in 1995, 159 passengers and crewmembers died when American Airlines Flight 965 flew into the side of a mountain while in route to Cali, Colombia. A key factor in the tragedy: The pilots had lost situational awareness in the dark, unfamiliar terrain. They had no idea the plane was approaching a mountain until the ground proximity warning system sounded an alarm only seconds before impact. The accident was of the kind most common at the time CFIT, or controlled flight into terrain says Trey Arthur, research aerospace engineer in the Crew Systems and Aviation Operations Branch at NASA s Langley Research Center. In situations such as bad weather, fog, or nighttime flights, pilots would rely on airspeed, altitude, and other readings to get an accurate sense of location. Miscalculations and rapidly changing conditions could contribute to a fully functioning, in-control airplane flying into the ground. To improve aviation safety by enhancing pilots situational awareness even in poor visibility, NASA began exploring the possibilities of synthetic vision creating a graphical display of the outside terrain on a screen inside the cockpit. How do you display a mountain in the cockpit? You have to have a graphics-powered computer, a terrain database you can render, and an accurate navigation solution, says Arthur. In the mid-1990s, developing GPS technology offered a means for determining an aircraft s position in space with high accuracy, Arthur explains. As the necessary technologies to enable synthetic vision emerged, NASA turned to an industry partner to develop the terrain graphical engine and database for creating the virtual rendering of the outside environment.

  13. Hardware-Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-08-04

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32-bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. The hardware accelerated solutions are accurate enough to enable scientists to explore the experimental design space with greater efficiency than the methods currently in use. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedral meshes that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester.

  14. Study of Electron Cloud for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, J.D. Dolph, G.A. Krafft, T. Satogata, B.C. Yunn

    2011-09-01

    The Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab has been envisioned as a future high energy particle accelerator beyond the 12 GeV upgrade of the existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Synchrotron radiation from the closely spaced proton bunches in MEIC can generate photoelectrons inside the vacuum chamber and cause secondary emission due to multipacting in the presence of beam's electric field. This phenomenon can lead to fast build up of electron density, known as electron cloud effect - resulting into beam instability coupled to multi-bunches in addition to a single bunch. For MEIC, the estimated threshold value of the electron-cloud density is approximately 5 x 10{sup 12} m{sup -3}. In this paper, we would like to report the self-consistent simulation studies of electron cloud formation for MEIC. The code has been benchmarked against the published data of electron cloud effects observed in LHC. Our first simulations predict increase of electron clouds with the increase of repetition rate. The detailed simulations are under progress and will be reported.

  15. Fundamental difference of subpicosecond laser interaction compared to longer pulses for ultrahigh acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Foeldes, I. B.; Lalousis, P.; Moustaizis, S.; Hora, H.

    2012-07-09

    Interaction of picosecond laser pulses above terawatt power with high density plasmas shows a nearly 100% conversion of the laser energy into directed acceleration of the electron cloud by nonlinear (ponderomotive) forces giving the ion cloud accelerations several orders of magnitude higher than comparable nanosecond interaction based on thermal pressure processes.

  16. A Parallel Pipelined Renderer for the Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiueh, Tzi-Cker; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a strategy for efficiently rendering time-varying volume data sets on a distributed-memory parallel computer. Time-varying volume data take large storage space and visualizing them requires reading large files continuously or periodically throughout the course of the visualization process. Instead of using all the processors to collectively render one volume at a time, a pipelined rendering process is formed by partitioning processors into groups to render multiple volumes concurrently. In this way, the overall rendering time may be greatly reduced because the pipelined rendering tasks are overlapped with the I/O required to load each volume into a group of processors; moreover, parallelization overhead may be reduced as a result of partitioning the processors. We modify an existing parallel volume renderer to exploit various levels of rendering parallelism and to study how the partitioning of processors may lead to optimal rendering performance. Two factors which are important to the overall execution time are re-source utilization efficiency and pipeline startup latency. The optimal partitioning configuration is the one that balances these two factors. Tests on Intel Paragon computers show that in general optimal partitionings do exist for a given rendering task and result in 40-50% saving in overall rendering time.

  17. The turbulent destruction of clouds - III. Three-dimensional adiabatic shock-cloud simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, J. M.; Parkin, E. R.

    2016-04-01

    We present 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a dense, spherical cloud. We compare how the nature of the interaction changes with the Mach number of the shock, M, and the density contrast of the cloud, χ. We examine the differences with 2D axisymmetric calculations, perform detailed resolution tests, and compare `inviscid' results to those obtained with the inclusion of a k-ɛ subgrid turbulence model. Resolutions of 32-64 cells per cloud radius are the minimum necessary to capture the dominant dynamical processes in 3D simulations, while the 3D inviscid and k-ɛ simulations typically show very good agreement. Clouds accelerate and mix up to five times faster when they are poorly resolved. The interaction proceeds very similarly in 2D and 3D - although non-azimuthal modes lead to different behaviour, there is very little effect on key global quantities such as the lifetime of the cloud and its acceleration. In particular, we do not find significant differences in the hollowing or `voiding' of the cloud between 2D and 3D simulations with M = 10 and χ = 10, which contradicts previous work in the literature.

  18. Cloud Processed CCN Affect Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.; Tabor, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the bimodality/monomodality of CCN spectra (Hudson et al. 2015) exert opposite effects on cloud microphysics in two aircraft field projects. The figure shows two examples, droplet concentration, Nc, and drizzle liquid water content, Ld, against classification of CCN spectral modality. Low ratings go to balanced separated bimodal spectra, high ratings go to single mode spectra, strictly monomodal 8. Intermediate ratings go merged modes, e.g., one mode a shoulder of another. Bimodality is caused by mass or hygroscopicity increases that go only to CCN that made activated cloud droplets. In the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) small cumuli with lower Nc, greater droplet mean diameters, MD, effective radii, re, spectral widths, σ, cloud liquid water contents, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal (lower modal ratings) below cloud CCN spectra whereas clouds with higher Nc, smaller MD, re, σ, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN (higher modal ratings). In polluted stratus clouds of the MArine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) clouds that had greater Nc, and smaller MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal CCN spectra whereas clouds with lower Nc, and greater MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN. These relationships are opposite because the dominant ICE-T cloud processing was coalescence whereas chemical transformations (e.g., SO2 to SO4) were dominant in MASE. Coalescence reduces Nc and thus also CCN concentrations (NCCN) when droplets evaporate. In subsequent clouds the reduced competition increases MD and σ, which further enhance coalescence and drizzle. Chemical transformations do not change Nc but added sulfate enhances droplet and CCN solubility. Thus, lower critical supersaturation (S) CCN can produce more cloud droplets in subsequent cloud cycles, especially for the low W and effective S of stratus. The increased competition reduces MD, re, and σ, which inhibit coalescence and thus reduce drizzle

  19. Searching for SNPs with cloud computing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    As DNA sequencing outpaces improvements in computer speed, there is a critical need to accelerate tasks like alignment and SNP calling. Crossbow is a cloud-computing software tool that combines the aligner Bowtie and the SNP caller SOAPsnp. Executing in parallel using Hadoop, Crossbow analyzes data comprising 38-fold coverage of the human genome in three hours using a 320-CPU cluster rented from a cloud computing service for about $85. Crossbow is available from http://bowtie-bio.sourceforge.net/crossbow/. PMID:19930550

  20. Searching for SNPs with cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Langmead, Ben; Schatz, Michael C; Lin, Jimmy; Pop, Mihai; Salzberg, Steven L

    2009-01-01

    As DNA sequencing outpaces improvements in computer speed, there is a critical need to accelerate tasks like alignment and SNP calling. Crossbow is a cloud-computing software tool that combines the aligner Bowtie and the SNP caller SOAPsnp. Executing in parallel using Hadoop, Crossbow analyzes data comprising 38-fold coverage of the human genome in three hours using a 320-CPU cluster rented from a cloud computing service for about $85. Crossbow is available from http://bowtie-bio.sourceforge.net/crossbow/. PMID:19930550

  1. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future. PMID:23599560

  2. Noctilucent Cloud Sightings

    NASA Video Gallery

    Polar Mesospheric Clouds form during each polar region's summer months in the coldest place in the atmosphere, 50 miles above Earth's surface. Noctilucent Clouds were first observed in 1885 by an a...

  3. Closed Small Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Closed Small Cell Clouds in the South Pacific     ... the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). Closed cell clouds are formed under conditions of widespread sinking of the air above. ...

  4. Rendering Future Vegetation Change across Large Regions of the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant'Anna Dias, Felipe; Gu, Yuting; Agarwalla, Yashika; Cheng, Yiwei; Patil, Sopan; Stieglitz, Marc; Turk, Greg

    2015-04-01

    We use two Machine Learning techniques, Decision Trees (DT) and Neural Networks (NN), to provide classified images and photorealistic renderings of future vegetation cover at three large regions in the US. The training data used to generate current vegetation cover include Landsat surface reflectance images, USGS Land Cover maps, 50 years of mean annual temperature and precipitation for the period 1950 - 2000, elevation, aspect and slope data. Present vegetation cover was generated on a 100m grid. Future vegetation cover for the period 2061- 2080 was predicted using the 1 km resolution bias corrected data from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Global Climate Model E simulation. The three test regions encompass a wide range of climatic gradients, topographic variation, and vegetation cover. The central Oregon site covers 19,182 square km and includes the Ochoco and Malheur National Forest. Vegetation cover is 50% evergreen forest and 50% shrubs and scrubland. The northwest Washington site covers 14,182 square km. Vegetation cover is 60% evergreen forest, 14% scrubs, 7% grassland, and 7% barren land. The remainder of the area includes deciduous forest, perennial snow cover, and wetlands. The third site, the Jemez mountain region of north central New Mexico, covers 5,500 square km. Vegetation cover is 47% evergreen forest, 31% shrubs, 13% grasses, and 3% deciduous forest. The remainder of the area includes developed and cultivated areas and wetlands. Using the above mentioned data sets we first trained our DT and NN models to reproduce current vegetation. The land cover classified images were compared directly to the USGS land cover data. The photorealistic generated vegetation images were compared directly to the remotely sensed surface reflectance maps. For all three sites, similarity between generated and observed vegetation cover was quite remarkable. The three trained models were then used to explore what the equilibrium vegetation would look like for

  5. Cloud optical thickness feedbacks in the CO2 climate problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.; Remer, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    A radiative-convective equilibrium model is developed and applied to study cloud optical thickness feedbacks in the CO2 climate problem. The basic hypothesis is that in the warmer and moister CO2-rich atmosphere, cloud liquid water content will generally be larger too. For clouds other than thin cirrus the result is to increase the albedo more than to increase the greenhouse effect. Thus, the sign of the feedback is negative: cloud optical properties act as a thermostat and alter in such a way as to reduce the surface and tropospheric warming caused by the addition of CO2. This negative feedback can be substantial. When observational estimates of the temperature dependence of cloud liquid water content are employed in the model, the surface temperature change caused by doubling CO2 is reduced by about one half. This result is obtained for global and annual average conditions, no change in cloud amount or altitude, and constant relative humidity. These idealizations, together with other simplifications typical of one-dimensional radiative-convective climate models, render the result tentative. Further study of cloud optical property feedbacks is warranted, however, because the climate is apparently so sensitive to them.

  6. Cyclosporin A renders target cells resistant to immune cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Hudnall, S D

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of cytolytically susceptible human target cells with therapeutic concentrations of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A renders these cells highly resistant to T cell-mediated, natural killer (NK) cell-mediated, and complement-mediated cytolysis. The resistance is dose dependent, time dependent and reversible. The resistance is accompanied by target cell growth inhibition as measured by thymidine uptake. Surprisingly, target cell growth inhibition induced by serum depletion is associated with cell-mediated cytolytic resistance. These data suggest that cyclosporin A (CsA) may block some target cell biochemical pathway(s) important in the suicidal cytolytic process which is (are) linked to some G0/G1 cell cycle events. In addition, these results suggest that the increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferative disease in human organ transplant recipients may be contributed to by CsA-induced resistance of EBV-transformed B lymphocytes to immune cytolysis. In the post-transplant setting, CsA probably blocks T cell-dependent responses to EBV-transformed B lymphocytes (Bird, A.G., McLachlan, S.M. and Britton, S., Nature 1981, 289: 300) yet leaving the NK cell and antibody-dependent responses intact (Shao-Hsien, C. et al. Transplantation 1983. 35: 127). However, given the direct effect of CsA upon EBV-transformed B lymphocytes, these cells would be rendered resistant to nearly all forms of cytolytic immune control (cytotoxic T lymphocyte, natural killer, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement). Unregulated EBV-transformed B lymphocytes may then proliferate in the CsA-treated host thus leading to a polyclonal B cell hyperplasia. Our data would suggest that this early pre-malignant process is likely to be reversible following CsA dose reduction. Indeed, EBV-dependent polyclonal B cell hyperplasia is seen in early post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (Hanto, D.W., et al., Transplantation 1989, 47: 458

  7. Dissipative rendering and neural network control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar R.

    1995-01-01

    Model-based control system designs are limited by the accuracy of the models of the plant, plant uncertainty, and exogenous signals. Although better models can be obtained with system identification, the models and control designs still have limitations. One approach to reduce the dependency on particular models is to design a set of compensators that will guarantee robust stability to a set of plants. Optimization over the compensator parameters can then be used to get the desired performance. Conservativeness of this approach can be reduced by integrating fundamental properties of the plant models. This is the approach of dissipative control design. Dissipative control designs are based on several variations of the Passivity Theorem, which have been proven for nonlinear/linear and continuous-time/discrete-time systems. These theorems depend not on a specific model of a plant, but on its general dissipative properties. Dissipative control design has found wide applicability in flexible space structures and robotic systems that can be configured to be dissipative. Currently, there is ongoing research to improve the performance of dissipative control designs. For aircraft systems that are not dissipative active control may be used to make them dissipative and then a dissipative control design technique can be used. It is also possible that rendering a system dissipative and dissipative control design may be combined into one step. Furthermore, the transformation of a non-dissipative system to dissipative can be done robustly. One sequential design procedure for finite dimensional linear time-invariant systems has been developed. For nonlinear plants that cannot be controlled adequately with a single linear controller, model-based techniques have additional problems. Nonlinear system identification is still a research topic. Lacking analytical models for model-based design, artificial neural network algorithms have recently received considerable attention. Using

  8. Electron cloud wakefields in bunch trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, F. B.; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    Electron cloud is a concern for many modern and future accelerator facilities. There are a number of undesired effects attributed to the presence of electron clouds. Among them are coherent instabilities, emittance growth, cryogenic heat load, synchronous phase shift and pressure rise. In long bunch trains one can observe the emittance growth getting faster along the bunch train. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud is a two-stream interaction. The prameters of the electron cloud wakefields depend on the beam intensity, beam centroid perturbations, and on the electron density and perturbations. If the electron cloud forgets the bunch centroid perturbation very fast, the buildup itself, via growing density, becomes a way of coupling between the bunches. In the present paper we address how the bunch perturbation shape affects the multi-bunch wakefields under the conditions similar to the CERN LHC and SPS. We study the interplay between the single-bunch and multi-bunch electron cloud wakefields. The effect of the dipole magnetic field on the multi-bunch wakefields is studied.

  9. Cloud Scaling Properties and Cloud Parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Morcrette, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    Cloud liquid and cloud traction variability is studied as a function of horizontal scale in the ECMWF forecast model during several 10-day runs at the highest available model resolution, recently refined from approximately 60 km (T213) down to approximately 20 km (T639). At higher resolutions, model plane-parallel albedo biases are reduced, so that models may be tuned to have larger, more realistic, cloud liquid water amounts, However, the distribution of cloud liquid assumed -within- each gridbox, for radiative and thermodynamic computations, depends on ad hoc assumptions that are not necessarily consistent with observed scaling properties, or with scaling properties produced by the model at larger scales. To study the larger-scale cloud properties, ten locations on the Earth are chosen to coincide with locations having considerable surface data available for validation, and representing a variety of climatic regimes, scaling exponents are determined from a range or scales down to model resolution, and are re-computed every three hours, separately for low, medium and high clouds, as well as column-integrated cloudiness. Cloud variability fluctuates in time, due to diurnal, synoptic and other' processes, but scaling exponents are found to be relatively stable. various approaches are considered for applying computed cloud scaling to subgrid cloud distributions used for radiation, beyond simple random or maximal overlap now in common use. Considerably more work is needed to compare model cloud scaling with observations. This will be aided by increased availability of high-resolution surface, aircraft and satellite data, and by the increasing resolution of global models,

  10. The heliospheric sector boundary as a distented magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Intriligator, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic cloud was detected both near Earth and by Pioneer 11 located 43 deg east of Earth at 4.8 AU. The magnetic field within the cloud rotated smoothly from toward to away polarity, marking sector boundary passage. Interpreted as a flux rope, the cloud had a vertical axis, implying that its cylindrical cross-section in the ecliptic plane was distended along the sector boundary by at least 43, forming an extensive occlusion in the heliospheric current sheet. At 1 AU the cloud had plasma signatures typical of a fast coronal mass ejection with low temperature and a leading shock. In contrast, at 4.8 AU, only the cloud signature remained. Its radial dimension was the same at both locations, consistent with little expansion beyond 1 AU. Energetic particle data at 4.8 AU show high fluxes preceding the cloud but not extending forward to the corotating shock that marked entry into the interaction region containing the cloud. The streaming direction was antisunward, consistent with possible acceleration in a low-beta region of field line draping around the cloud's western (upstream) end. The fluxes dropped upon entry into the cloud and became essentially isotropic one third of the way through it. On the basis of sector boundary characteristics published in the past, we suggest that distended clouds may be common heliospheric current sheet occlusions.

  11. Cloud Computing Explained

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Rosalyn

    2010-01-01

    While many talk about the cloud, few actually understand it. Three organizations' definitions come to the forefront when defining the cloud: Gartner, Forrester, and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST). Although both Gartner and Forrester provide definitions of cloud computing, the NIST definition is concise and uses…

  12. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  13. Architecture of web services in the enhancement of real-time 3D video virtualization in cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, Adedayo; Wang, Qi; Alcaraz-Calero, Jose M.; Grecos, Christos

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to improving the application of 3D video rendering and streaming by jointly exploring and optimizing both cloud-based virtualization and web-based delivery. The proposed web service architecture firstly establishes a software virtualization layer based on QEMU (Quick Emulator), an open-source virtualization software that has been able to virtualize system components except for 3D rendering, which is still in its infancy. The architecture then explores the cloud environment to boost the speed of the rendering at the QEMU software virtualization layer. The capabilities and inherent limitations of Virgil 3D, which is one of the most advanced 3D virtual Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) available, are analyzed through benchmarking experiments and integrated into the architecture to further speed up the rendering. Experimental results are reported and analyzed to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed approach.

  14. WikiPrints: rendering enterprise Wiki content for printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkner, Kathrin

    2010-02-01

    Wikis have become a tool of choice for collaborative, informative communication. In contrast to the immense Wikipedia, that serves as a reference web site and typically covers only one topic per web page, enterprise wikis are often used as project management tools and contain several closely related pages authored by members of one project. In that scenario it is useful to print closely related content for review or teaching purposes. In this paper we propose a novel technique for rendering enterprise wiki content for printing called WikiPrints, that creates a linearized version of wiki content formatted as a mixture between web layout and conventional document layout suitable for printing. Compared to existing print options for wiki content, Wikiprints automatically selects content from different wiki pages given user preferences and usage scenarios. Meta data such as content authors or time of content editing are considered. A preview of the linearized content is shown to the user and an interface for making manual formatting changes provided.

  15. Rendering log aesthetic curves via Runge-Kutta method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobithaasan, R. U.; Meng, T. Y.; Piah, A. R. M.; Miura, K. T.

    2014-07-01

    Log Aesthetic Curves (LAC) are visually pleasing curves which has been developed using monotonic curvature profile. Hence, it can be easily implemented in product design environment, e.g, Rhino 3D CAD systems. LAC is generally represented in an integral form of its turning angle. Traditionally, Gaussian-Kronrod method has been used to render this curve which consumes less than one second for a given interval. Recently, Incomplete Gamma Function was proposed to represent LAC analytically which decreases the computation time up to 13 times. However, only certain value of shape parameters (denoted as α) which dictates the types of curves generated for LAC, can be used to compute LAC. In this paper, the classical Runge-Kutta (RK4) method is proposed to evaluate LAC numerically to reduce the LAC computation time for arbitrary, α. The preliminary result looks promising where the evaluation time is decreased tremendously. This paper also demonstrates the accuracy control of LAC by reducing the stepsize of RK4. The computation time and the accuracy for various α, are also illustrated in the last section of this paper.

  16. General RNA binding proteins render translation cap dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Svitkin, Y V; Ovchinnikov, L P; Dreyfuss, G; Sonenberg, N

    1996-01-01

    Translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate is relatively independent of the presence of the mRNA m7G cap structure and the cap binding protein, eIF-4E. In addition, initiation occurs frequently at spurious internal sites. Here we show that a critical parameter which contributes to cap-dependent translation is the amount of general RNA binding proteins in the extract. Addition of several general RNA binding proteins, such as hnRNP A1, La autoantigen, pyrimidine tract binding protein (hnRNP I/PTB) and the major core protein of cytoplasmic mRNP (p50), rendered translation in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate cap dependent. These proteins drastically inhibited the translation of an uncapped mRNA, but had no effect on translation of a capped mRNA. Based on these and other results, we suggest that one function of general mRNA binding proteins in the cytoplasm is to promote ribosome binding by a 5' end, cap-mediated mechanism, and prevent spurious initiations at aberrant translation start sites. Images PMID:9003790

  17. Perception of Perspective Distortions in Image-Based Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Vangorp, Peter; Richardt, Christian; Cooper, Emily A.; Chaurasia, Gaurav; Banks, Martin S.; Drettakis, George

    2013-01-01

    Image-based rendering (IBR) creates realistic images by enriching simple geometries with photographs, e.g., mapping the photograph of a building façade onto a plane. However, as soon as the viewer moves away from the correct viewpoint, the image in the retina becomes distorted, sometimes leading to gross misperceptions of the original geometry. Two hypotheses from vision science state how viewers perceive such image distortions, one claiming that they can compensate for them (and therefore perceive scene geometry reasonably correctly), and one claiming that they cannot compensate (and therefore can perceive rather significant distortions). We modified the latter hypothesis so that it extends to street-level IBR. We then conducted a rigorous experiment that measured the magnitude of perceptual distortions that occur with IBR for façade viewing. We also conducted a rating experiment that assessed the acceptability of the distortions. The results of the two experiments were consistent with one another. They showed that viewers’ percepts are indeed distorted, but not as severely as predicted by the modified vision science hypothesis. From our experimental results, we develop a predictive model of distortion for street-level IBR, which we use to provide guidelines for acceptability of virtual views and for capture camera density. We perform a confirmatory study to validate our predictions, and illustrate their use with an application that guides users in IBR navigation to stay in regions where virtual views yield acceptable perceptual distortions. PMID:24273376

  18. Grayscale performance enhancement for time-multiplexing light field rendering.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen; Zhong, Qing; Peng, Yifan; Xu, Liang; Wang, Rui; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2015-12-14

    One of the common approaches to compensate for the grayscale performance limitation in time-multiplexing light field displays is to employ a halftone technique. We propose an ordered-dithering halftone algorithm based on a 3-dimension super-mask to increase the gray levels of the time-multiplexing light field display. Our method makes full use of the overlapping perceived pixels which are caused by the time-multiplexing design, such that effectively trading-off the spatial resolution and color performance. A real-time rendering time-multiplexing display prototype is built to validate the proposed halftone algorithm. We conducted a user study to evaluate the quality of display scenes dithered by different super-mask configuration, which showed the consistency with the parameters we pre-calculated. The 3D ordered-dithering algorithm is able to present better visual perception than the conventional halftone algorithms with respect to grayscale representation, and flexible to be applied in different time-multiplexing light field display systems. PMID:26699051

  19. VITRAIL: Acquisition, Modeling, and Rendering of Stained Glass.

    PubMed

    Thanikachalam, Niranjan; Baboulaz, Loic; Prandoni, Paolo; Trumpler, Stefan; Wolf, Sophie; Vetterli, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Stained glass windows are designed to reveal their powerful artistry under diverse and time-varying lighting conditions; virtual relighting of stained glass, therefore, represents an exceptional tool for the appreciation of this age old art form. However, as opposed to most other artifacts, stained glass windows are extremely difficult if not impossible to analyze using controlled illumination because of their size and position. In this paper, we present novel methods built upon image based priors to perform virtual relighting of stained glass artwork by acquiring the actual light transport properties of a given artifact. In a preprocessing step, we build a material-dependent dictionary for light transport by studying the scattering properties of glass samples in a laboratory setup. We can now use the dictionary to recover a light transport matrix in two ways: under controlled illuminations the dictionary constitutes a sparsifying basis for a compressive sensing acquisition, while in the case of uncontrolled illuminations the dictionary is used to perform sparse regularization. The proposed basis preserves volume impurities and we show that the retrieved light transport matrix is heterogeneous, as in the case of real world objects. We present the rendering results of several stained glass artifacts, including the Rose Window of the Cathedral of Lausanne, digitized using the presented methods. PMID:27416590

  20. Changing the color of textiles with realistic visual rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Mathieu; Henckens, Lambert; Barbier, Justine; Leboulleux, Lucie; Page, Marine; Roujas, Lucie; Cazier, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Fast and easy preview of a fabric without having to produce samples would be very profitable for textile designers, but remains a technological challenge. As a first step towards this objective, we study the possibility of making images of a real sample, and changing virtually the colors of its yarns while preserving the shine and shadow texture. We consider two types of fabrics: Jacquard weave fabrics made of polyester warp and weft yarns of different colors, and satin ribbons made of polyester and metallic yarns. For the Jacquard fabric, we make a color picture with a scanner on a sample in which the yarns have contrasted colors, threshold this image in order to distinguish the pixels corresponding to each yarn, and accordingly modify their hue and chroma values. This method is simple to operate but do not enable to simulate the angle-dependent shine. A second method, tested on the satin ribbon made of black polyester and achromatic metallic yarns, is based on polarized imaging. We analyze the polarization state of the reflected light which is different for dielectric and metallic materials illuminated by polarized light. We then add a fixed color value to the pixels representing the polyester yarns and modify the hue and chroma of the pixels representing the metallic yarns. This was performed for many incident angles of light, in order to render the twinkling effect displayed by these ribbons. We could verify through a few samples that the simulated previews reproduce real pictures with visually acceptable accuracy.

  1. Distributed volume rendering of global models of seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, N.; van Keken, P.; Renambot, L.; Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Johnson, A.; Leigh, J.

    2004-12-01

    Modeling the dynamics and structure of the Earth's interior now routinely involves massively distributed computational techniques, which makes it feasible to study time-dependent processes in the 3D Earth. Accurate, high-resolution models require the use of distributed simulations that run on, at least, moderately large PC clusters and produce large amounts of data on the order of terabytes distributed across the cluster. Visualizing such large data sets efficiently necessitates the use of the same type and magnitude of resources employed by the simulation. Generic, distributed volumetric rendering methods that produce high-quality monoscopic and stereoscopic visualizations currently exist, but rely on a different distributed data layout than is produced during simulation. This presents a challenge during the visualization process because an expensive data gather and redistribution stage is required before the distributed volume visualization algorithm can operate. We will compare different general purpose techniques and tools for visualizing volumetric data sets that are widely used in the field of scientific visualization, and propose a new approach that eliminates the data gather and redistribution stage by working directly on the data as distributed by, e.g., a seismic wave propagation simulation.

  2. The Evolution of Gas Clouds Falling in the Magnetized Galactic Halo: High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs) Originated in the Galactic Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Shelton, Robin L.; Raley, Elizabeth A.

    2009-07-01

    In the Galactic fountain scenario, supernovae and/or stellar winds propel material into the Galactic halo. As the material cools, it condenses into clouds. By using FLASH three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we model and study the dynamical evolution of these gas clouds after they form and begin to fall toward the Galactic plane. In our simulations, we assume that the gas clouds form at a height of z = 5 kpc above the Galactic midplane, then begin to fall from rest. We investigate how the cloud's evolution, dynamics, and interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by the initial mass of the cloud. We find that clouds with sufficiently large initial densities (n >= 0.1 H atoms cm-3) accelerate sufficiently and maintain sufficiently large column densities as to be observed and identified as high-velocity clouds (HVCs) even if the ISM is weakly magnetized (1.3 μG). However, the ISM can provide noticeable resistance to the motion of a low-density cloud (n <= 0.01 H atoms cm-3) thus making it more probable that a low-density cloud will attain the speed of an intermediate-velocity cloud rather than the speed of an HVC. We also investigate the effects of various possible magnetic field configurations. As expected, the ISM's resistance is greatest when the magnetic field is strong and perpendicular to the motion of the cloud. The trajectory of the cloud is guided by the magnetic field lines in cases where the magnetic field is oriented diagonal to the Galactic plane. The model cloud simulations show that the interactions between the cloud and the ISM can be understood via analogy to the shock tube problem which involves shock and rarefaction waves. We also discuss accelerated ambient gas, streamers of material ablated from the clouds, and the cloud's evolution from a sphere-shaped to a disk- or cigar-shaped object.

  3. Solar disturbances and correlated geospace responses: Relativistic magnetospheric electron acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    1997-01-01

    The role of high-speed solar wind streams in driving relativistic electron acceleration within the earth's magnetosphere is discussed based on International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Observatory and related spacecraft observations. A 'recirculation' mechanism for electron acceleration and redistribution was invoked. Recently, an increase in the number of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and related 'magnetic clouds' was seen at 1 AU. As these CME/cloud systems interact with the earth's magnetosphere, they are able to produce rapid enhancements in the magnetospheric electron population. The relativistic electron signatures observed by the POLAR, SAMPEX, and other spacecraft during recent magnetic cloud events, especially January 1997 and May 1997, were compared and contrasted. In these cases, there were large solar wind and IMF changes during the cloud passages and very rapid energetic electron acceleration was observed. The relative geoeffectiveness of these events is examined and 'space weather' predicatability is assessed.

  4. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  5. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  6. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  7. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  8. Corona Discharge in Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin'kevich, A. A.; Dovgalyuk, Yu. A.

    2014-04-01

    We present a review of the results of theoretical studies and laboratory modeling of corona discharge initiation in clouds. The influence of corona discharges on the evolution of the cloud microstructure and electrification is analyzed. It is shown that corona discharges are initiated when large-size hydrometeors approach each other, whereas in some cases, corona discharges from crystals, ice pellets, and hailstones can appear. The corona discharges lead to significant air ionization, charging of cloud particles, and separation of charges in clouds and initiate streamers and lightnings. The influence of corona discharges on changes in the phase composition of clouds is analyzed.

  9. Cloud microstructure studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blau, H. H., Jr.; Fowler, M. G.; Chang, D. T.; Ryan, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Over two thousand individual cloud droplet size distributions were measured with an optical cloud particle spectrometer flown on the NASA Convair 990 aircraft. Representative droplet spectra and liquid water content, L (gm/cu m) were obtained for oceanic stratiform and cumuliform clouds. For non-precipitating clouds, values of L range from 0.1 gm/cu m to 0.5 gm/cu m; with precipitation, L is often greater than 1 gm/cu m. Measurements were also made in a newly formed contrail and in cirrus clouds.

  10. Points based reconstruction and rendering of 3D shapes from large volume dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingchang; Tian, Jie; He, Huiguang; Li, Guangming

    2003-05-01

    In the field of medical imaging, researchers often need visualize lots of 3D datasets to get the informaiton contained in these datasets. But the huge data genreated by modern medical imaging device challenge the real time processing and rendering algorithms at all the time. Spurring by the great achievement of Points Based Rendering (PBR) in the fields of computer graphics to render very large meshes, we propose a new algorithm to use the points as basic primitive of surface reconstruction and rendering to interactively reconstruct and render very large volume dataset. By utilizing the special characteristics of medical image datasets, we obtain a fast and efficient points-based reconstruction and rendering algorithm in common PC. The experimental results show taht this algorithm is feasible and efficient.

  11. Methane Clouds on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.

    Following the Voyager encounter with Titan in 1981 Saturn's largest moon was hypothesized sport a liquid cycle similar that on Earth with clouds rain and seas. On Titan methane is the condensible playing the role that water plays on Earth. Although the presence of seas is difficult to establish from ground methane clouds have been detected on Titan. Ground-based observations reveal that Titan's clouds differ remarkedly from their terrestrial counterparts. Titan's clouds are sparse reside primarily at particular altitude and concentrate presently in the south pole. That Titan's clouds are exotic is not surprising. Titan receives ~100 times less sunlight than Earth to drive weather. In addition Titan's radiative time constant is 180 years large compared to the 3 month terrestrial value. With little power and sluggish conditions it is not clear how clouds form on Titan. This talk will compare Titan to Earth to explore the nature of clouds under Titan's foreign conditions.

  12. Clouds Over Crater Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Clouds above the rim of 'Endurance Crater' in this image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity can remind the viewer that Mars, our celestial neighbor, is subject to weather. On Earth, clouds like these would be referred to as 'cirrus' or the aptly nicknamed 'mares' tails.' These clouds occur in a region of strong vertical shear. The cloud particles (ice in this martian case) fall out, and get dragged along away from the location where they originally condensed, forming characteristic streamers. Opportunity took this picture with its navigation camera during the rover's 269th martian day (Oct. 26, 2004).

    The mission's atmospheric science team is studying cloud observations to deduce seasonal and time-of-day behavior of the clouds. This helps them gain a better understanding of processes that control cloud formation.

  13. Clouds-Aerosols-Precipitation Satellite Analysis Tool (CAPSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensky, I. M.; Rosenfeld, D.

    2008-11-01

    A methodology for representing much of the physical information content of the METEOSAT Second Generation (MSG) geostationary satellite using red-green-blue (RGB) composites of the computed physical values of the picture elements is presented. The physical values are the solar reflectance in the solar channels and brightness temperature in the thermal channels. The main RGB compositions are (1) "Day Natural Colors", presenting vegetation in green, bare surface in brown, sea surface in black, water clouds as white, ice as magenta; (2) "Day Microphysical", presenting cloud microstructure using the solar reflectance component of the 3.9 μm, visible and thermal IR channels; (3) "Night Microphysical", also presenting clouds microstructure using the brightness temperature differences between 10.8 and 3.9 μm; (4) "Day and Night", using only thermal channels for presenting surface and cloud properties, desert dust and volcanic emissions; (5) "Air Mass", presenting mid and upper tropospheric features using thermal water vapor and ozone channels. The scientific basis for these rendering schemes is provided, with examples for the applications. The expanding use of these rendering schemes requires their proper documentation and setting as standards, which is the main objective of this publication.

  14. Clouds-Aerosols-Precipitation Satellite Analysis Tool (CAPSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensky, I. M.; Rosenfeld, D.

    2008-03-01

    A methodology for representing much of the physical information content of the METEOSAT Second Generation (MSG) geostationary satellite using red-green-blue (RGB) composites of the computed physical values of the picture elements is presented. The physical values are the solar reflectance in the solar channels and brightness temperature in the thermal channels. The main RGB compositions are (1) "Day Natural Colors", presenting vegetation in green, bare surface in brown, sea surface in black, water clouds as white, ice as magenta; (2) "Day Microphysical", presenting cloud microstructure using the solar reflectance component of the 3.9 μm, visible and thermal IR channels; (3) "Night Microphysical", also presenting clouds microstructure using the brightness temperature differences between 10.8 and 3.9 μm; (4) "Day and Night", using only thermal channels for presenting surface and cloud properties, desert dust and volcanic emissions; (5) "Air Mass", presenting mid and upper tropospheric features using thermal water vapor and ozone channels. The scientific basis for these rendering schemes is provided, with examples for the applications. The expanding use of these rendering schemes requires their proper documentation and setting as standards, which is the main objective of this publication.

  15. Digital tomosynthesis rendering of joint margins for arthritis assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duryea, Jeffrey W.; Neumann, Gesa; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Dobbins, James T., III

    2004-05-01

    PURPOSE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the hand is a significant healthcare problem. Techniques to accurately quantity the structural changes from RA are crucial for the development and prescription of therapies. Analysis of radiographic joint space width (JSW) is widely used and has demonstrated promise. However, radiography presents a 2D view of the joint. In this study we performed tomosynthesis reconstructions of proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints to measure the 3D joint structure. METHODS: We performed a reader study using simulated radiographs of 12 MCP and 12 PIP joints from skeletal specimens imaged with micro-CT. The tomosynthesis technique provided images of reconstructed planes with 0.75 mm spacing, which were presented to 2 readers with a computer tool. The readers were instructed to delineate the joint surfaces on tomosynthetic slices where they could visualize the margins. We performed a quantitative analysis of 5 slices surrounding the central portion of each joint. Reader-determined JSW was compared to a gold standard. As a figure of merit we calculated the average root-mean square deviation (RMSD). RESULTS: RMSD was 0.22 mm for both joints. For the individual joints, RMSD was 0.18 mm (MCP), and 0.26 mm (PIP). The reduced performance for the smaller PIP joints suggests that a slice spacing less than 0.75 mm may be more appropriate. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated the capability of limited 3D rendering of joint surfaces using digital tomosynthesis. This technique promises to provide an improved method to visualize the structural changes of RA.

  16. New light field camera based on physical based rendering tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ming-Han; Chang, Shan-Ching; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Even though light field technology was first invented more than 50 years ago, it did not gain popularity due to the limitation imposed by the computation technology. With the rapid advancement of computer technology over the last decade, the limitation has been uplifted and the light field technology quickly returns to the spotlight of the research stage. In this paper, PBRT (Physical Based Rendering Tracing) was introduced to overcome the limitation of using traditional optical simulation approach to study the light field camera technology. More specifically, traditional optical simulation approach can only present light energy distribution but typically lack the capability to present the pictures in realistic scenes. By using PBRT, which was developed to create virtual scenes, 4D light field information was obtained to conduct initial data analysis and calculation. This PBRT approach was also used to explore the light field data calculation potential in creating realistic photos. Furthermore, we integrated the optical experimental measurement results with PBRT in order to place the real measurement results into the virtually created scenes. In other words, our approach provided us with a way to establish a link of virtual scene with the real measurement results. Several images developed based on the above-mentioned approaches were analyzed and discussed to verify the pros and cons of the newly developed PBRT based light field camera technology. It will be shown that this newly developed light field camera approach can circumvent the loss of spatial resolution associated with adopting a micro-lens array in front of the image sensors. Detailed operational constraint, performance metrics, computation resources needed, etc. associated with this newly developed light field camera technique were presented in detail.

  17. Wire bonded 3D coils render air core microtransformers competitive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazenzadeh, A.; Spengler, N.; Lausecker, R.; Rezvani, A.; Mayer, M.; Korvink, J. G.; Wallrabe, U.

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel wafer-level fabrication method for 3D solenoidal microtransformers using an automatic wire bonder for chip-scale, very high frequency regime applications. Using standard microelectromechanical systems fabrication processes for the manufacturing of supporting structures, together with ultra-fast wire bonding for the fabrication of solenoids, enables the flexible and repeatable fabrication, at high throughput, of high performance air core microtransformers. The primary and secondary solenoids are wound one on top of the other in the lateral direction, using a 25 µm thick insulated wire. Besides commonly available gold wire, we also introduce insulated copper wire to our coil winding process. The influence of copper on the transformer properties is explored and compared to gold. A simulation model based on the solenoids’ wire bonding trajectories has been defined using the FastHenry software to accurately predict and optimize the transformer's inductive properties. The transformer chips are encapsulated in polydimethylsiloxane in order to protect the coils from environmental influences and mechanical damage. Meanwhile, the effect of the increase in the internal capacitance of the chips as a result of the encapsulation is analyzed. A fabricated transformer with 20 windings in both the primary and the secondary coils, and a footprint of 1 mm2, yields an inductance of 490 nH, a maximum efficiency of 68%, and a coupling factor of 94%. The repeatability of the coil winding process was investigated by comparing the data of 25 identically processed devices. Finally, the microtransformers are benchmarked to underline the potential of the technology in rendering air core transformers competitive.

  18. Real-time volume rendering of digital medical images on an iOS device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noon, Christian; Holub, Joseph; Winer, Eliot

    2013-03-01

    Performing high quality 3D visualizations on mobile devices, while tantalizingly close in many areas, is still a quite difficult task. This is especially true for 3D volume rendering of digital medical images. Allowing this would empower medical personnel a powerful tool to diagnose and treat patients and train the next generation of physicians. This research focuses on performing real time volume rendering of digital medical images on iOS devices using custom developed GPU shaders for orthogonal texture slicing. An interactive volume renderer was designed and developed with several new features including dynamic modification of render resolutions, an incremental render loop, a shader-based clipping algorithm to support OpenGL ES 2.0, and an internal backface culling algorithm for properly sorting rendered geometry with alpha blending. The application was developed using several application programming interfaces (APIs) such as OpenSceneGraph (OSG) as the primary graphics renderer coupled with iOS Cocoa Touch for user interaction, and DCMTK for DICOM I/O. The developed application rendered volume datasets over 450 slices up to 50-60 frames per second, depending on the specific model of the iOS device. All rendering is done locally on the device so no Internet connection is required.

  19. The Launching of Cold Clouds by Galaxy Outflows. I. Hydrodynamic Interactions with Radiative Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannapieco, Evan; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the nature of the multiphase material found in outflowing galaxies, we study the evolution of cold clouds embedded in flows of hot and fast material. Using a suite of adaptive mesh refinement simulations that include radiative cooling, we investigate both cloud mass loss and cloud acceleration under the full range of conditions observed in galaxy outflows. The simulations are designed to track the cloud center of mass, enabling us to study the cloud evolution at long disruption times. For supersonic flows, a Mach cone forms around the cloud, which damps the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability but also establishes a streamwise pressure gradient that stretches the cloud apart. If time is expressed in units of the cloud crushing time, both the cloud lifetime and the cloud acceleration rate are independent of cloud radius, and we find simple scalings for these quantities as a function of the Mach number of the external medium. A resolution study suggests that our simulations accurately describe the evolution of cold clouds in the absence of thermal conduction and magnetic fields, physical processes whose roles will be studied in forthcoming papers.

  20. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  1. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  2. Silicon photonics cloud (SiCloud)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jiang, Yunshan; Lynch, Michael; Miyatake, Taira; Carmona, Christopher; Chan, Andrew C.; Muniam, Kuhan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-02-01

    We present SiCloud (Silicon Photonics Cloud), the first free, instructional web-based research and education tool for silicon photonics. SiCloud's vision is to provide a host of instructional and research web-based tools. Such interactive learning tools enhance traditional teaching methods by extending access to a very large audience, resulting in very high impact. Interactive tools engage the brain in a way different from merely reading, and so enhance and reinforce the learning experience. Understanding silicon photonics is challenging as the topic involves a wide range of disciplines, including material science, semiconductor physics, electronics and waveguide optics. This web-based calculator is an interactive analysis tool for optical properties of silicon and related material (SiO2, Si3N4, Al2O3, etc.). It is designed to be a one stop resource for students, researchers and design engineers. The first and most basic aspect of Silicon Photonics is the Material Parameters, which provides the foundation for the Device, Sub-System and System levels. SiCloud includes the common dielectrics and semiconductors for waveguide core, cladding, and photodetection, as well as metals for electrical contacts. SiCloud is a work in progress and its capability is being expanded. SiCloud is being developed at UCLA with funding from the National Science Foundation's Center for Integrated Access Networks (CIAN) Engineering Research Center.

  3. A Virtual Reality System for PTCD Simulation Using Direct Visuo-Haptic Rendering of Partially Segmented Image Data.

    PubMed

    Fortmeier, Dirk; Mastmeyer, Andre; Schröder, Julian; Handels, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a new visuo-haptic virtual reality (VR) training and planning system for percutaneous transhepatic cholangio-drainage (PTCD) based on partially segmented virtual patient models. We only use partially segmented image data instead of a full segmentation and circumvent the necessity of surface or volume mesh models. Haptic interaction with the virtual patient during virtual palpation, ultrasound probing and needle insertion is provided. Furthermore, the VR simulator includes X-ray and ultrasound simulation for image-guided training. The visualization techniques are GPU-accelerated by implementation in Cuda and include real-time volume deformations computed on the grid of the image data. Computation on the image grid enables straightforward integration of the deformed image data into the visualization components. To provide shorter rendering times, the performance of the volume deformation algorithm is improved by a multigrid approach. To evaluate the VR training system, a user evaluation has been performed and deformation algorithms are analyzed in terms of convergence speed with respect to a fully converged solution. The user evaluation shows positive results with increased user confidence after a training session. It is shown that using partially segmented patient data and direct volume rendering is suitable for the simulation of needle insertion procedures such as PTCD. PMID:25532197

  4. Interpretation of MODIS Cloud Images by CloudSat/CALIPSO Cloud Vertical Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Fetzer, E. J.; Wong, S.; Yue, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds observed by passive remote-sensing imager (Aqua-MODIS) are collocated to cloud vertical profiles observed by active profiling sensors (CloudSat radar and CALIPSO lidar) at the pixel-scale. By comparing different layers of cloud types classified in the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR product from CloudSat+CALIPSO to those cloud properties observed by MODIS, we evaluate the occurrence frequencies of cloud types and cloud-overlap in CloudSat+CALIPSO for each MODIS cloud regime defined by cloud optical depth (τ) and cloud-top pressure (P) histograms. We find that about 70% of MODIS clear sky agrees with the clear category in CloudSat+CALIPSO; whereas the remainder is either single layer (~25%) cirrus (Ci), low-level cumulus (Cu), stratocumulus (Sc), or multi-layer (<5%) clouds in CloudSat+CALIPSO. Under MODIS cloudy conditions, 60%, 28%, and 8% of the occurrences show single-, double-, and triple-layer clouds, respectively in CloudSat+CALIPSO. When MODIS identifies single-layer clouds, 50-60% of the MODIS low-level clouds are categorized as stratus (Sc) in CloudSat+CALIPSO. Over the tropics, ~70% of MODIS high and optically thin clouds (considered as cirrus in the histogram) is also identified as Ci in CloudSat+CALIPSO, and ~40% of MODIS high and optically thick clouds (considered as convective in the histogram) agrees with CloudSat+CALIPSO deep convections (DC). Over mid-latitudes these numbers drop to 45% and 10%, respectively. The best agreement occurs in tropical single-layer cloud regimes, where 90% of MODIS high-thin clouds are identified as Ci by CloudSat+CALIPSO and 60% of MODIS high-thick clouds are identified as DC. Worst agreement is found for multi-layer clouds, where cirrus on top of low- and mid-level clouds in MODIS are frequently categorized as high-thick clouds by passive imaging - among these only 5-12% are DC in CloudSat+CALIPSO. It is encouraging that both MODIS low-level clouds (regardless of optical thickness) and high-level thin clouds are consistently

  5. What is a Cloud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. N.; Wu, W.

    2013-12-01

    There are multiple factors that cause disagreements between differing methods using differing instruments to infer cloud amounts. But along with these issues is a fundamental concern that has permeated all comparisons and supersedes such questions as what are the uncertainty estimates of a given retrieval. To wit: what is a cloud? How can uncertainty of a cloud amount measurement be determined when there is no absolute 'truth' on what defines a cloud, as opposed to cloud-free? Recent research comparing a decade of surface- and satellite-based retrievals of cloud amount for the ARM Southern Great Plains site shows significant disagreements. While Total Sky Imager 100-degree FOV, Shortwave (SW) Radiative Flux Analysis, GOES satellite and PATMOS-x satellite amounts agree relatively well, ISCCP satellite and ARSCL time-series cloud amounts are significantly greater, 15% (ISCCP) and 8% (ARSCL) larger in average diurnal variations. In both cases, it appears that optically thin high ice is counted as 'cloud' in ARSCL and ISCCP that is not categorized as cloud by all the others. Additionally, cloud amounts from three methods (ISCCP, ARSCL, and GOES) show an overall increase of 8%-10% in the annually averaged cloud fractions from 1998 to 2009, while those from the other three (TSI, SWFA, PATMOS-x) show little trend for this period. So one wonders: are cloud amounts increasing or not over this period? The SW Flux Analysis used sky imager retrievals as 'truth' in development of the methodology (Long et al, 2006a), where sky imagery itself used human observations as the model (Long et al., 2006b). Min et al. (2008) then used SW Flux Analysis retrievals as 'truth' to develop an MFRSR-based spectral SW retrieval method. Dupont et al. (2008) show that the SW-based retrievals allow up to a visible optical depth of 0.15 (95% of occurrences) under the 'clear-sky' category which primarily consists of sub-visual cirrus, which by ancestry applies to spectral SW, sky imager and human

  6. Stratus Cloud Supersaturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S.; Hudson, J. G.; Jha, V.

    2009-12-01

    Extensive aircraft measurements of cloud microphysics and complete CCN spectra from 15 flights in central California stratus clouds are presented. Cloud droplet and CCN concentrations varied over an order of magnitude in this July-August, 2008 POST project. Correlation coefficients (R) between CCN and average total cloud droplet concentrations within parcels with specific minimal liquid water contents (LWC) are shown in the table. For most LWC thresholds R is greatest for CCN concentrations at rather high supersaturations (S); i.e., 1%. The highest R for the 0.1 gm-3 are for the 300’ altitude CCN measurements but the number of cases is very small. The 0.5 g-3 R values are higher at lower S but the number of cases is also very small. The high cloud S implied by most R values goes against conventional wisdom that low stratus cloud updraft velocities limit cloud S to < 0.3%. On the other hand average droplet concentrations for most LWC thresholds match best the CCN concentrations at 0.2-0.3% S, which is more in keeping with conventional wisdom. However, these average droplet concentrations were probably reduced from adiabatic values by entrainment, which would suggest higher initial cloud S. Yum and Hudson (2002, Tellus) did report S > 1% in some maritime clouds. Further research is ongoing with this data set to substantiate stratus cloud S values. If stratus cloud S is determined to be higher than previous estimates this would imply that a much larger subset of particles (even smaller sizes) influence cloud microphysics and this would have important climate implications. As has recently been reported for small cumulus clouds (Hudson et al. 2009 JGR and Hudson and Noble 2009 GRL) negative R values were found for CCN with larger cloud droplets and drizzle drop concentrations. Correlation coefficients (R) between average droplet and CCN concentrations. 1st row (1 min)is for CCN measurements in ascents or descents closest to cloud base. 2nd row is for CCN averaged in

  7. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  8. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tricht, K.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Noël, B.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Turner, D. D.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (+/-5.2) W m-2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  9. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tricht, Kristof; Lhermitte, Stef; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Turner, David D.; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m‑2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  10. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    PubMed Central

    Van Tricht, K.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Noël, B.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Turner, D. D.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m−2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise. PMID:26756470

  11. Energy Aware Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgerie, Anne-Cécile; de Assunção, Marcos Dias; Lefèvre, Laurent

    Cloud infrastructures are increasingly becoming essential components for providing Internet services. By benefiting from economies of scale, Clouds can efficiently manage and offer a virtually unlimited number of resources and can minimize the costs incurred by organizations when providing Internet services. However, as Cloud providers often rely on large data centres to sustain their business and offer the resources that users need, the energy consumed by Cloud infrastructures has become a key environmental and economical concern. This chapter presents an overview of techniques that can improve the energy efficiency of Cloud infrastructures. We propose a framework termed as Green Open Cloud, which uses energy efficient solutions for virtualized environments; the framework is validated on a reference scenario.

  12. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  13. Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    In this movie, put together from false-color images taken by the New Horizons Ralph instrument as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2007, show ammonia clouds (appearing as bright blue areas) as they form and disperse over five successive Jupiter 'days.' Scientists noted how the larger cloud travels along with a small, local deep hole.

  14. 1. Photocopy of early 20th century rendering showing aerial veiw, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of early 20th century rendering showing aerial veiw, looking south. Rendering owned by the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum, 10825 East Blvd., Cleveland, Ohio. - Peerless Motor Car Company, East Ninety-third Street & Quincy Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. Spectral optimization of phosphor-conversion light-emitting diodes for ultimate color rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Ivanauskas, F.; Vaitkevičius, H.; Shur, M. S.

    2008-08-01

    We apply an optimization scheme based on rendering of all colors of the enhanced Munsell palette to phosphor-conversion (PC) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This approach yields combinations of peak wavelengths and bandwidths for white PC LEDs with partial and complete conversion that enable lighting with better quality than that obtained using designs based on the standard color-rendering assessment procedure.

  16. 9 CFR 315.1 - Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carcasses and parts passed for cooking... PARTS PASSED FOR COOKING § 315.1 Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow. Carcasses and parts passed for cooking may be rendered into lard in accordance with § 319.702 of...

  17. 9 CFR 315.1 - Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carcasses and parts passed for cooking... PARTS PASSED FOR COOKING § 315.1 Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow. Carcasses and parts passed for cooking may be rendered into lard in accordance with § 319.702 of...

  18. 9 CFR 315.1 - Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carcasses and parts passed for cooking... PARTS PASSED FOR COOKING § 315.1 Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow. Carcasses and parts passed for cooking may be rendered into lard in accordance with § 319.702 of...

  19. 9 CFR 315.1 - Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carcasses and parts passed for cooking... PARTS PASSED FOR COOKING § 315.1 Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow. Carcasses and parts passed for cooking may be rendered into lard in accordance with § 319.702 of...

  20. 17 CFR 260.7a-32 - Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing. 260.7a-32 Section 260.7a-32 Commodity and Securities... OF 1939 Incorporation by Reference § 260.7a-32 Incorporation by reference rendering...

  1. 17 CFR 260.7a-32 - Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing. 260.7a-32 Section 260.7a-32 Commodity and Securities... OF 1939 Incorporation by Reference § 260.7a-32 Incorporation by reference rendering...

  2. 22 CFR 102.10 - Rendering assistance at the scene of the accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rendering assistance at the scene of the accident. 102.10 Section 102.10 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER FUNCTIONS CIVIL AVIATION United States Aircraft Accidents Abroad § 102.10 Rendering assistance at the scene of the...

  3. 17 CFR 260.7a-32 - Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing. 260.7a-32 Section 260.7a-32 Commodity and Securities... OF 1939 Incorporation by Reference § 260.7a-32 Incorporation by reference rendering...

  4. 17 CFR 260.7a-32 - Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing. 260.7a-32 Section 260.7a-32 Commodity and Securities... OF 1939 Incorporation by Reference § 260.7a-32 Incorporation by reference rendering...

  5. 17 CFR 260.7a-32 - Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Incorporation by reference rendering document incomplete, unclear, or confusing. 260.7a-32 Section 260.7a-32 Commodity and Securities... OF 1939 Incorporation by Reference § 260.7a-32 Incorporation by reference rendering...

  6. 22 CFR 102.10 - Rendering assistance at the scene of the accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rendering assistance at the scene of the accident. 102.10 Section 102.10 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER FUNCTIONS CIVIL AVIATION United States Aircraft Accidents Abroad § 102.10 Rendering assistance at the scene of the...

  7. 22 CFR 102.10 - Rendering assistance at the scene of the accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rendering assistance at the scene of the accident. 102.10 Section 102.10 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER FUNCTIONS CIVIL AVIATION United States Aircraft Accidents Abroad § 102.10 Rendering assistance at the scene of the...

  8. 22 CFR 102.10 - Rendering assistance at the scene of the accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rendering assistance at the scene of the accident. 102.10 Section 102.10 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER FUNCTIONS CIVIL AVIATION United States Aircraft Accidents Abroad § 102.10 Rendering assistance at the scene of the...

  9. 29 CFR 784.151 - Operations performed after product is rendered nonperishable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operations performed after product is rendered... Operations performed after product is rendered nonperishable. As indicated in § 784.138, after the character of the aquatic products as taken from nature has been altered by the performance of the...

  10. Improved ray-casting volume rendering used for brain MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengguang; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Ximei; Lin, Xueyan

    2006-09-01

    This paper discusses the principle and implementation method of Ray-casting volume rendering algorithm. In order to enhance the image quality and speed of alternate operation, we improve the grads formula in Ray-casting volume rendering algorithm and compound method of the sampling points.

  11. PERFORMANCE OF THE INTERACTIVE PROCEDURES FOR DAYTIME DETECTION OF DENSE CLOUDS IN THE MTI PIPELINE

    SciTech Connect

    C. ROHDE; K. HIRSCH; A. DAVIS

    2001-03-01

    Pixel-scale cloud detection relies on the simple fact that dense-enough clouds are generally brighter, whiter, and colder than the underlying surface. These plain-language statements are readily translated into threshold operations in the multispectral subspaces, thus providing a reasonable premise for searching data cubes for cloud signatures. To supplement this spectral input (VIS, NIR, and TIR channels), we remark that cloud tops are generally above most of the water vapor in the atmosphere column. An extra threshold in the MTI water vapor product can therefore be applied. This helps considerably in cases where one of the default cloud signatures becomes ambiguous. The resulting cloud mask is however still sensitive to the thresholds in brightness, whiteness, temperature, and column water content, especially since we also want to ag low-level clouds that are not-so-dense. Clouds are also generally spatially large compared to pixel size. This implies that simple spatial morphological filters can be use to remove false positives and for expansion of the cloud mask. A false positive is indeed preferable to a miss in the view of MTI's mission in support of nuclear non-proliferation; non-local cloud radiative effects can otherwise bias retrievals in adjacent cloud-free areas. Therefore we use a data analyst to ensure built-in quality control for MTI cloud masks. When looking for low-level clouds, the analyst interacts with a GUI containing histograms, a customized RGB rendering of the input data, and an RGB diagnostic cloud mask for quick evaluation of all threshold values. We use MTI data to document the performance and analyst-sensitivity to this procedure.

  12. Performance of the interactive procedures for daytime detection of dense clouds in the MTI pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Charles A.; Hirsch, Karen L.; Davis, Anthony B.

    2001-08-01

    Pixel-scale cloud detection relies on the simple fact that dense-enough clouds are generally brighter, whiter, and colder than the underlying surface. These plain-language statements are readily translated into threshold operations in the multispectral subspaces, thus providing a reasonable premise for searching data cubes for cloud signatures. To supplement this spectral input (VIS, NIR, and TIR channels), we remark that cloud tops are generally above most of the water vapor in the atmosphere column. An extra threshold in the MTI water vapor product can therefore be applied. This helps considerably in cases where one of the default cloud signatures becomes ambiguous. The resulting cloud mask is however still highly sensitive to the thresholds in brightness, whiteness, temperature, and column water content, especially since we also want to flag low-level clouds that are not-so-dense. Clouds are also generally spatially large. This implies that simple spatial morphological filters can be of use to remove false positives and for expansion of the cloud mask. A false positive is indeed preferable to a miss in the view of MTI's mission in support of nuclear non-proliferation; non-local cloud radiative effects can otherwise bias retrievals in adjacent cloud-free areas. Therefore we use a data analyst to ensure built in quality control for MTI cloud masks. When looking for low-level clouds, the analyst interacts with a GUI containing histograms, a customized RGB rendering of the input data, and an RGB diagnostic cloud mask for quick evaluation of all threshold values. We use MTI data to document the performance and analyst-sensitivity to this procedure.

  13. Method and system for rendering and interacting with an adaptable computing environment

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil; Bouchard, Ann Marie

    2012-06-12

    An adaptable computing environment is implemented with software entities termed "s-machines", which self-assemble into hierarchical data structures capable of rendering and interacting with the computing environment. A hierarchical data structure includes a first hierarchical s-machine bound to a second hierarchical s-machine. The first hierarchical s-machine is associated with a first layer of a rendering region on a display screen and the second hierarchical s-machine is associated with a second layer of the rendering region overlaying at least a portion of the first layer. A screen element s-machine is linked to the first hierarchical s-machine. The screen element s-machine manages data associated with a screen element rendered to the display screen within the rendering region at the first layer.

  14. Accelerating the Original Profile Kernel

    PubMed Central

    Hamp, Tobias; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    One of the most accurate multi-class protein classification systems continues to be the profile-based SVM kernel introduced by the Leslie group. Unfortunately, its CPU requirements render it too slow for practical applications of large-scale classification tasks. Here, we introduce several software improvements that enable significant acceleration. Using various non-redundant data sets, we demonstrate that our new implementation reaches a maximal speed-up as high as 14-fold for calculating the same kernel matrix. Some predictions are over 200 times faster and render the kernel as possibly the top contender in a low ratio of speed/performance. Additionally, we explain how to parallelize various computations and provide an integrative program that reduces creating a production-quality classifier to a single program call. The new implementation is available as a Debian package under a free academic license and does not depend on commercial software. For non-Debian based distributions, the source package ships with a traditional Makefile-based installer. Download and installation instructions can be found at https://rostlab.org/owiki/index.php/Fast_Profile_Kernel. Bugs and other issues may be reported at https://rostlab.org/bugzilla3/enter_bug.cgi?product=fastprofkernel. PMID:23825697

  15. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, K-L; Schussman, G.; Wilson, B.; Ko, K.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.

    2002-11-16

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of commodity graphics cards to achieve perceptually effective visualization of the very dense and complex electromagnetic fields produced from the modeling of reflection and transmission properties of open structures in an accelerator design. Because of the collaborative nature of the overall accelerator modeling project, the visualization technology developed is for both desktop and remote visualization settings. We have tested the techniques using both time varying particle data sets containing up to one billion particle s per time step and electromagnetic field data sets with millions of mesh elements.

  16. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Benedetto, E.; Rumolo, G.; Schulte, D.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, Frank; Franchetti, G.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Sonnad, K.G.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Pivi, M.T.F.; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; /SLAC

    2008-01-24

    Incoherent electron effects could seriously limit the beam lifetime in proton or ion storage rings, such as LHC, SPS, or RHIC, or blow up the vertical emittance of positron beams, e.g., at the B factories or in linear-collider damping rings. Different approaches to modeling these effects each have their own merits and drawbacks. We describe several simulation codes which simplify the descriptions of the beam-electron interaction and of the accelerator structure in various different ways, and present results for a toy model of the SPS. In addition, we present evidence that for positron beams the interplay of incoherent electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead to a significant increase in vertical equilibrium emittance. The magnitude of a few incoherent e{sup +}e{sup -} scattering processes is also estimated. Options for future code development are reviewed.

  17. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Benedetto, E.; Fischer, W.; Franchetti, G.; Ohmi, K.; Schulte, D.; Sonnad, K.; Tomas, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; Rumolo, G.; Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.

    2007-06-18

    Incoherent electron effects could seriously limit the beam lifetime in proton or ion storage rings, such as LHC, SPS, or RHIC, or blow up the vertical emittance of positron beams, e.g., at the B factories or in linear-collider damping rings. Different approaches to modeling these effects each have their own merits and drawbacks. We describe several simulation codes which simplify the descriptions of the beam-electron interaction and of the accelerator structure in various different ways, and present results for a toy model of the SPS. In addition, we present evidence that for positron beams the interplay of incoherent electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead to a significant increase in vertical equilibrium emittance. The magnitude of a few incoherent e+e- scattering processes is also estimated. Options for future code development are reviewed.

  18. Lost in Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Shetye, Sandeep D.; Chilukuri, Sri; Sturken, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing can reduce cost significantly because businesses can share computing resources. In recent years Small and Medium Businesses (SMB) have used Cloud effectively for cost saving and for sharing IT expenses. With the success of SMBs, many perceive that the larger enterprises ought to move into Cloud environment as well. Government agency s stove-piped environments are being considered as candidates for potential use of Cloud either as an enterprise entity or pockets of small communities. Cloud Computing is the delivery of computing as a service rather than as a product, whereby shared resources, software, and information are provided to computers and other devices as a utility over a network. Underneath the offered services, there exists a modern infrastructure cost of which is often spread across its services or its investors. As NASA is considered as an Enterprise class organization, like other enterprises, a shift has been occurring in perceiving its IT services as candidates for Cloud services. This paper discusses market trends in cloud computing from an enterprise angle and then addresses the topic of Cloud Computing for NASA in two possible forms. First, in the form of a public Cloud to support it as an enterprise, as well as to share it with the commercial and public at large. Second, as a private Cloud wherein the infrastructure is operated solely for NASA, whether managed internally or by a third-party and hosted internally or externally. The paper addresses the strengths and weaknesses of both paradigms of public and private Clouds, in both internally and externally operated settings. The content of the paper is from a NASA perspective but is applicable to any large enterprise with thousands of employees and contractors.

  19. Cloud Resolving Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with cloud-resolving models (CRMs). CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (with sizes ranging from about 2-200 km). CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. This paper provides a brief discussion and review of the main characteristics of CRMs as well as some of their major applications. These include the use of CRMs to improve our understanding of: (1) convective organization, (2) cloud temperature and water vapor budgets, and convective momentum transport, (3) diurnal variation of precipitation processes, (4) radiative-convective quasi-equilibrium states, (5) cloud-chemistry interaction, (6) aerosol-precipitation interaction, and (7) improving moist processes in large-scale models. In addition, current and future developments and applications of CRMs will be presented.

  20. On Cloud Nine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrea, Bridget; Weil, Marty

    2011-01-01

    Across the U.S., innovative collaboration practices are happening in the cloud: Sixth-graders participate in literary salons. Fourth-graders mentor kindergarteners. And teachers use virtual Post-it notes to advise students as they create their own television shows. In other words, cloud computing is no longer just used to manage administrative…

  1. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  2. Smoke Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2009-01-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere alter the radiative balance of the Earth by reflecting or absorbing solar radiation. Spaceborne measurements of clouds and aerosols advected over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean indicate that the greater the cloud cover below the aerosols, the more likely the aerosols are to heat the planet.

  3. Cloud shadow speed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, V.; Bosch, J. L.; Roberts, S. W.; Kleissl, J.

    2014-06-01

    Changing cloud cover is a major source of solar radiation variability and poses challenges for the integration of solar energy. A compact and economical system is presented that measures cloud shadow motion vectors to estimate power plant ramp rates and provide short-term solar irradiance forecasts. The cloud shadow speed sensor (CSS) is constructed using an array of luminance sensors and a high-speed data acquisition system to resolve the progression of cloud passages across the sensor footprint. An embedded microcontroller acquires the sensor data and uses a cross-correlation algorithm to determine cloud shadow motion vectors. The CSS was validated against an artificial shading test apparatus, an alternative method of cloud motion detection from ground-measured irradiance (linear cloud edge, LCE), and a UC San Diego sky imager (USI). The CSS detected artificial shadow directions and speeds to within 15° and 6% accuracy, respectively. The CSS detected (real) cloud shadow directions and speeds with average weighted root-mean-square difference of 22° and 1.9 m s-1 when compared to USI and 33° and 1.5 m s-1 when compared to LCE results.

  4. Cloud speed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, V.; Bosch, J. L.; Roberts, S. W.; Kleissl, J.

    2013-10-01

    Changing cloud cover is a major source of solar radiation variability and poses challenges for the integration of solar energy. A compact and economical system that measures cloud motion vectors to estimate power plant ramp rates and provide short term solar irradiance forecasts is presented. The Cloud Speed Sensor (CSS) is constructed using an array of luminance sensors and high-speed data acquisition to resolve the progression of cloud passages across the sensor footprint. An embedded microcontroller acquires the sensor data and uses a cross-correlation algorithm to determine cloud motion vectors. The CSS was validated against an artificial shading test apparatus, an alternative method of cloud motion detection from ground measured irradiance (Linear Cloud Edge, LCE), and a UC San Diego Sky Imager (USI). The CSS detected artificial shadow directions and speeds to within 15 and 6% accuracy, respectively. The CSS detected (real) cloud directions and speeds without average bias and with average weighted root mean square difference of 22° and 1.9 m s-1 when compared to USI and 33° and 1.5 m s-1 when compared to LCE results.

  5. Kernel structures for Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spafford, Eugene H.; Mckendry, Martin S.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the internal structure of the Clouds kernel was presented. An indication of how these structures will interact in the prototype Clouds implementation is given. Many specific details have yet to be determined and await experimentation with an actual working system.

  6. Learning in the Clouds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Engaged learning--the type that happens outside textbooks and beyond the four walls of the classroom--moves beyond right and wrong answers to grappling with the uncertainties and contradictions of a complex world. iPhones back up to the "cloud." GoogleDocs is all about "cloud computing." Facebook is as ubiquitous as the sky.…

  7. Clouds over Open Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heavy concentration of these cirrocumulus and nimbostratus clouds over open ocean - location unknown, indicate that a heavy downpouring of rain is occuring on the Earth's surface below. Towering anvils, seen rising high above the base cloud cover and casting long shadows, also indicate high winds and possible tornado activity.

  8. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  9. Attention's Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Robert M G; McClenahan, Laura J; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2016-06-01

    How do people get attention to operate at peak efficiency in high-pressure situations? We tested the hypothesis that the general mechanism that allows this is the maintenance of multiple target representations in working and long-term memory. We recorded subjects' event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing the working memory and long-term memory representations used to control attention while performing visual search. We found that subjects used both types of memories to control attention when they performed the visual search task with a large reward at stake, or when they were cued to respond as fast as possible. However, under normal circumstances, one type of target memory was sufficient for slower task performance. The use of multiple types of memory representations appears to provide converging top-down control of attention, allowing people to step on the attentional accelerator in a variety of high-pressure situations. PMID:27056975

  10. Io's sodium cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, B. A.; Garneau, G. W.; Lavoie, S. K.

    1984-11-01

    The first two-dimensional images of the source region of Io's neutral sodium cloud have been acquired by ground-based observation. Observed asymmetries in its spatial brightness distribution provide new evidence that the cloud is supplied by sodium that is ejected nonisotropically from Io or its atmosphere. Complementary, high-time-resolution, calibrated image sequences that give the first comprehensive picture of the variations of the fainter regions of the cloud extending more than 100,000 kilometers from Io were also obtained. These data demonstrate that the cloud exhibits a persistent systematic behavior coupled with Io's orbital position, a distinct 'east-west orbital asymmetry', a variety of spatial morphologies, and true temporal changes. The geometric stability of the sodium source is also indicated. Isolation of the cloud's temporal changes constitutes an important milestone toward its utilization as a long-term probe of Io and the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  11. SMILES ice cloud products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MilláN, L.; Read, W.; Kasai, Y.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N.; Mendrok, J.; Sagawa, H.; Sano, T.; Shiotani, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2013-06-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor and clouds play an important role in Earth's climate, but knowledge of them, in particular diurnal variation in deep convective clouds, is limited. An essential variable to understand them is cloud ice water content. The Japanese Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS) samples the atmosphere at different local times allowing the study of diurnal variability of atmospheric parameters. We describe a new ice cloud data set consisting of partial Ice Water Path and Ice Water Content. Preliminary comparisons with EOS-MLS, CloudSat-CPR and CALIOP-CALIPSO are presented. Then, the diurnal variation over land and over open ocean for partial ice water path is reported. Over land, a pronounced diurnal variation peaking strongly in the afternoon/early evening was found. Over the open ocean, little temporal dependence was encountered. This data set is publicly available for download in HDF5 format.

  12. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  13. Polarization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloub, Philippe; Herman, Maurice; Parol, Frederic

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports the main results concerning polarization by clouds derived from POLDER (polarization and directionality of earth's reflectances) airborne version. These results tend to confirm the high information content in the polarization (phase, altimetry). The preliminary results of EUCREX'94 (European Cloud Radiation Experiment) evidenced the drastically different polarized signatures for ice crystals and water droplets. Here we report systematic and statistically significative observations over the whole EUCREX data set. The results show that the cirrus exhibit their own signature. Preliminary observations performed during CLEOPATRA'91 (Cloud Experiment Ober Pfaffenhofen And Transport) and EUCREX'94 campaigns have shown the feasibility of cloud altimetry using spectral information (443 nm and 865 nm) of the polarized light over liquid water droplets clouds. Altimetry technique has been generalized on ASTEX-SOFIA'92 and EUCREX'94 data sets. All these results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  14. Cloud model bat algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongquan; Xie, Jian; Li, Liangliang; Ma, Mingzhi

    2014-01-01

    Bat algorithm (BA) is a novel stochastic global optimization algorithm. Cloud model is an effective tool in transforming between qualitative concepts and their quantitative representation. Based on the bat echolocation mechanism and excellent characteristics of cloud model on uncertainty knowledge representation, a new cloud model bat algorithm (CBA) is proposed. This paper focuses on remodeling echolocation model based on living and preying characteristics of bats, utilizing the transformation theory of cloud model to depict the qualitative concept: "bats approach their prey." Furthermore, Lévy flight mode and population information communication mechanism of bats are introduced to balance the advantage between exploration and exploitation. The simulation results show that the cloud model bat algorithm has good performance on functions optimization. PMID:24967425

  15. Prebiotic chemistry in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Marshall, John; Shen, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The chemical evolution hypothesis of Woese (1979), according to which prebiotic reactions occurred rapidly in droplets in giant atmospheric reflux columns was criticized by Scherer (1985). This paper proposes a mechanism for prebiotic chemistry in clouds that answers Scherer's concerns and supports Woese's hypothesis. According to this mechanism, rapid prebiotic chemical evolution was facilitated on the primordial earth by cycles of condensation and evaporation of cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and nonvolatile monomers. For example, amino acids supplied by, or synthesized during entry of meteorites, comets, and interplanetary dust, would have been scavenged by cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and would be polymerized within cloud systems during cycles of condensation, freezing, melting, and evaporation of cloud drops.

  16. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  17. Elasticity-based three dimensional ultrasound real-time volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Matinfar, Mohammad; Ahmad, Omar; Rivaz, Hassan; Choti, Michael; Taylor, Russell H.

    2009-02-01

    Volumetric ultrasound imaging has not gained wide recognition, despite the availability of real-time 3D ultrasound scanners and the anticipated potential of 3D ultrasound imaging in diagnostic and interventional radiology. Their use, however, has been hindered by the lack of real-time visualization methods that are capable of producing high quality 3D rendering of the target/surface of interest. Volume rendering is a known visualization method, which can display clear surfaces out of the acquired volumetric data, and has an increasing number of applications utilizing CT and MRI data. The key element of any volume rendering pipeline is the ability to classify the target/surface of interest by setting an appropriate opacity function. Practical and successful real-time 3D ultrasound volume rendering can be achieved in Obstetrics and Angio applications where setting these opacity functions can be done rapidly, and reliably. Unfortunately, 3D ultrasound volume rendering of soft tissues is a challenging task due to the presence of significant amount of noise and speckle. Recently, several research groups have shown the feasibility of producing 3D elasticity volume from two consecutive 3D ultrasound scans. This report describes a novel volume rendering pipeline utilizing elasticity information. The basic idea is to compute B-mode voxel opacity from the rapidly calculated strain values, which can also be mixed with conventional gradient based opacity function. We have implemented the volume renderer using GPU unit, which gives an update rate of 40 volume/sec.

  18. COMPANION ANIMALS SYMPOSIUM: Rendered ingredients significantly influence sustainability, quality, and safety of pet food.

    PubMed

    Meeker, D L; Meisinger, J L

    2015-03-01

    The rendering industry collects and safely processes approximately 25 million t of animal byproducts each year in the United States. Rendering plants process a variety of raw materials from food animal production, principally offal from slaughterhouses, but include whole animals that die on farms or in transit and other materials such as bone, feathers, and blood. By recycling these byproducts into various protein, fat, and mineral products, including meat and bone meal, hydrolyzed feather meal, blood meal, and various types of animal fats and greases, the sustainability of food animal production is greatly enhanced. The rendering industry is conscious of its role in the prevention of disease and microbiological control and providing safe feed ingredients for livestock, poultry, aquaculture, and pets. The processing of otherwise low-value OM from the livestock production and meat processing industries through rendering drastically reduces the amount of waste. If not rendered, biological materials would be deposited in landfills, burned, buried, or inappropriately dumped with large amounts of carbon dioxide, ammonia, and other compounds polluting air and water. The majority of rendered protein products are used as animal feed. Rendered products are especially valuable to the livestock and pet food industries because of their high protein content, digestible AA levels (especially lysine), mineral availability (especially calcium and phosphorous), and relatively low cost in relation to their nutrient value. The use of these reclaimed and recycled materials in pet food is a much more sustainable model than using human food for pets. PMID:26020862

  19. General Color Rendering Index of Wall-stabilized Arc of Water-cooled Vortex Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takaya; Yanagi, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    The arc lighting to obtain the environment to evacuate, save the life, keep the safety and be comfortable are focus on. The lack of radiation intensity and color rendering is problem because of inappropriate energy balance. Some researchers have researched the high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp which is one of the arc lamp with metal vapor, and the line spectrum emitted from the metal vapor is used for improvement of color rendering spectrum. The broad spectrum emitted from continuous spectrum is needed for improvement of color rendering spectrum. It is necessary to perform the calculation using the wall-stabilized arc to equalize the contribution to the temperature distribution which the convection gives it to bell-shaped form in the gas flow-stabilized arc for the axial distance. This research elucidates the development of the argon wall-stabilized arc in order to control the spectrum for improvement of color rendering spectrum with controlling the current and radius. The color rendering is measured by the general color rendering index. As a result, the general color rendering index increases with increasing the current and radius of the wall-stabilized arc in the case of simulation. However, it doesn't change so much in the case of experiment. Therefore, the radius, i.e. the arc temperature distribution, is more important factor.

  20. Summary of SLAC's SEY Measurement On Flat Accelerator Wall Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen /SLAC

    2007-06-08

    The electron cloud effect (ECE) causes beam instabilities in accelerator structures with intense positively charged bunched beams. Reduction of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the beam pipe inner wall is effective in controlling cloud formation. We summarize SEY results obtained from flat TiN, TiZrV and Al surfaces carried out in a laboratory environment. SEY was measured after thermal conditioning, as well as after low energy, less than 300 eV, particle exposure.

  1. Community Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinos, Alexandros; Briscoe, Gerard

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, it is a challenge we must pursue.

  2. Clouds in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacmeister, Julio; Rienecker, Michele; Suarez, Max; Norris, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The GEOS-5 atmospheric model is being developed as a weather-and-climate capable model. It must perform well in assimilation mode as well as in weather and climate simulations and forecasts and in coupled chemistry-climate simulations. In developing GEOS-5, attention has focused on the representation of moist processes. The moist physics package uses a single phase prognostic condensate and a prognostic cloud fraction. Two separate cloud types are distinguished by their source: "anvil" cloud originates in detraining convection, and large-scale cloud originates in a PDF-based condensation calculation. Ice and liquid phases for each cloud type are considered. Once created, condensate and fraction from the anvil and statistical cloud types experience the same loss processes: evaporation of condensate and fraction, auto-conversion of liquid or mixed phase condensate, sedimentation of frozen condensate, and accretion of condensate by falling precipitation. The convective parameterization scheme is the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert, or RAS, scheme. Satellite data are used to evaluate the performance of the moist physics packages and help in their tuning. In addition, analysis of and comparisons to cloud-resolving models such as the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model are used to help improve the PDFs used in the moist physics. The presentation will show some of our evaluations including precipitation diagnostics.

  3. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  4. Diagnosing AIRS Sampling with CloudSat Cloud Classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric; Yue, Qing; Guillaume, Alexandre; Kahn, Brian

    2011-01-01

    AIRS yield and sampling vary with cloud state. Careful utilization of collocated multiple satellite sensors is necessary. Profile differences between AIRS and ECMWF model analyses indicate that AIRS has high sampling and excellent accuracy for certain meteorological conditions. Cloud-dependent sampling biases may have large impact on AIRS L2 and L3 data in climate research. MBL clouds / lower tropospheric stability relationship is one example. AIRS and CloudSat reveal a reasonable climatology in the MBL cloud regime despite limited sampling in stratocumulus. Thermodynamic parameters such as EIS derived from AIRS data map these cloud conditions successfully. We are working on characterizing AIRS scenes with mixed cloud types.

  5. Modeling the Acceleration Process of Dust in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. D.; Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.

    2015-12-01

    In previous studies we have identified structures created by nano-dust in the solar wind, and we have observed the expected draping and diverting signatures of such structures using well-spaced multi-spacecraft observations. In this study, we reproduce such an interaction event with our multi-fluid MHD model, modeling the dust particles as a fluid. When the number density of dust particles is comparable to the solar wind ions, a significant draping in the IMF is created, with amplitude larger than the ambient fluctuations. We note that such a density is well above several nano dust particles per Debye sphere and a dusty fluid is appropriate for modeling the dust-solar wind interaction. We assume a spherical cloud of dust travelling with 90% solar wind speed. In addition to reproducing the IMF response to the nano-dust at the end-stage of dust acceleration, we model the entire process of such acceleration in the gravity field of the inner heliosphere. It takes hours for the smallest dust with 3000 amu per proton charge to reach the solar wind speed. We find the dust cloud stretched along the solar wind flow. Such stretching enhances the draping of IMF, compared to the spherical cloud we used in an earlier stage of this study. This model will be further used to examine magnetic perturbations at an earlier stage of dust cloud acceleration, and then determine the size, density, and total mass of dust cloud, as well as its creation and acceleration.

  6. Impact of cement renders on airborne ozone and carbon dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C.; Juenger, Maria C. G.; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    The uptake of pollutants by building surfaces can potentially improve both indoor and outdoor air quality. Cement renders provide a unique opportunity for passive pollutant removal because they can cover large surface areas. This study investigated the passive removal of carbon dioxide and ozone by cement renders having varied binder compositions and curing durations. The results from this study demonstrated shorter curing durations resulted in greater pollutant uptake. However, the use of the supplementary cementitious material, metakaolin, in the cement render increased the carbon dioxide ingress while decreasing the ozone uptake. Therefore, the adaptation of the render composition for the best effective application may result in valuable indoor air quality or carbon savings consequences.

  7. Multi-Grained Level of Detail for Rendering Complex Meshes Using a Hierarchical Seamless Texture Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Niski, K; Purnomo, B; Cohen, J

    2006-11-06

    Previous algorithms for view-dependent level of detail provide local mesh refinements either at the finest granularity or at a fixed, coarse granularity. The former provides triangle-level adaptation, often at the expense of heavy CPU usage and low triangle rendering throughput; the latter improves CPU usage and rendering throughput by operating on groups of triangles. We present a new multiresolution hierarchy and associated algorithms that provide adaptive granularity. This multi-grained hierarchy allows independent control of the number of hierarchy nodes processed on the CPU and the number of triangles to be rendered on the GPU. We employ a seamless texture atlas style of geometry image as a GPU-friendly data organization, enabling efficient rendering and GPU-based stitching of patch borders. We demonstrate our approach on both large triangle meshes and terrains with up to billions of vertices.

  8. 1. PHOTOCOPY OF RENDERING OF PSFS BUILDING BY D.E. SUTTON. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PHOTOCOPY OF RENDERING OF PSFS BUILDING BY D.E. SUTTON. Date possibly 1929 or 1930, when construction started. - Philadelphia Saving Fund Society, Twelfth & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 7. Architect's rendering,LaSalle,Washington,Clark and Randolph Streets, Courtesy of Jerome R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Architect's rendering,LaSalle,Washington,Clark and Randolph Streets, Courtesy of Jerome R. Butler,FAIA,Commissioner of Public Works,chicago - Chicago City Hall, 121 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  10. A Generic Approach for Multi-Device User Interface Rendering with UIML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luyten, Kris; Thys, Kristof; Vermeulen, Jo; Coninx, Karin

    We present a rendering engine for displaying graphical user interfaces on multiple devices. The renderer interprets a standardized XML-based user interface description language: the User Interface Markup Language (UIML). A generic architecture for the renderer is defined so that deployment of the engine on different devices implies only little effort. We show that our rendering engine can be used on iDTV set-top boxes, mobile phones, PDAs and desktop PCs, and smoothly integrates with both local and remote application logic. As a test bed for the UIML specification we also explore support for extensions to UIML that enable the user interface designer to maximize accessibility and target multiple devices and different types of users at once

  11. Hybrid Rendering Architecture for Realtime and Photorealistic Simulation of Robot-Assisted Surgery.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastijan; Bihlmaier, Andreas; Irgenfried, Stephan; Wörn, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for combining realtime and non-realtime (photorealistic) rendering with open source software. Realtime rendering provides sufficient realism and is a good choice for most simulation and regression testing purposes in robot-assisted surgery. However, for proper end-to-end testing of the system, some computer vision algorithms require high fidelity images that capture more minute details of the real scene. One of the central practical obstacles to combining both worlds in a uniform way is creating models that are suitable for both kinds of rendering paradigms. We build a modeling pipeline using open source tools that builds on established, open standards for data exchange. The result is demonstrated through a unified model of the medical OpenHELP phantom used in the Gazebo robotics simulator, which can at the same time be rendered with more visual fidelity in the Cycles raytracer. PMID:27046586

  12. Multiresolution Techniques for Interactive Texture-Based Rendering of Arbitrarily Oriented Cutting Planes

    SciTech Connect

    LaMar, E; Duchaineau, M A; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-10-03

    We present a multiresolution technique for interactive texture based rendering of arbitrarily oriented cutting planes for very large data sets. This method uses an adaptive scheme that renders the data along a cutting plane at different resolutions: higher resolution near the point-of-interest and lower resolution away from the point-of-interest. The algorithm is based on the segmentation of texture space into an octree, where the leaves of the tree define the original data and the internal nodes define lower-resolution versions. Rendering is done adaptively by selecting high-resolution cells close to a center of attention and low-resolution cells away from it. We limit the artifacts introduced by this method by blending between different levels of resolution to produce a smooth image. This technique can be used to produce viewpoint-dependent renderings.

  13. Simulation of a Feedback System for the Attenuation of e-Cloud Driven Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Fox, J.; Rivetta, C.; de Maria, R.; Rumolo, G.

    2009-05-04

    Electron clouds impose limitations on current accelerators that may be more severe for future machines, unless adequate measures of mitigation are taken. Recently, it has been proposed to use feedback systems operating at high frequency (in the GHz range) to damp single-bunch transverse coherent oscillations that may otherwise be amplified during the interaction of the beam with ambient electron clouds. We have used the simulation package WARP-POSINST and the code Headtail to study the growth rate and frequency patterns in space-time of the electron cloud driven beam breakup instability in the CERN SPS accelerator with, or without, an idealized feedback model for damping the instability.

  14. Color rendering ability and luminous efficacy enhancements in white light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Roya; Schubert, Martin; Chhajed, Sameer; Cho, Jaehee; Kim, Jong Kyu; Schubert, E. Fred

    2009-08-01

    There exists a fundamental trade-off relation between color rendering index (CRI) and luminous efficacy; in other words, improvements in one are generally detrimental to the other. We analyze and demonstrate through simulation that phosphor-converted white LEDs with dual-blue emitting active regions, as opposed to single-blue emitting active regions, significantly enhance color rendering ability while maximizing the output luminous flux. The improvements are achieved over a broad range of correlated color temperatures.

  15. Cloud computing basics for librarians.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    "Cloud computing" is the name for the recent trend of moving software and computing resources to an online, shared-service model. This article briefly defines cloud computing, discusses different models, explores the advantages and disadvantages, and describes some of the ways cloud computing can be used in libraries. Examples of cloud services are included at the end of the article. PMID:22289098

  16. High-quality slab-based intermixing method for fusion rendering of multiple medical objects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joon; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Juneseuk; Kim, Kyoung Won; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    The visualization of multiple 3D objects has been increasingly required for recent applications in medical fields. Due to the heterogeneity in data representation or data configuration, it is difficult to efficiently render multiple medical objects in high quality. In this paper, we present a novel intermixing scheme for fusion rendering of multiple medical objects while preserving the real-time performance. First, we present an in-slab visibility interpolation method for the representation of subdivided slabs. Second, we introduce virtual zSlab, which extends an infinitely thin boundary (such as polygonal objects) into a slab with a finite thickness. Finally, based on virtual zSlab and in-slab visibility interpolation, we propose a slab-based visibility intermixing method with the newly proposed rendering pipeline. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method delivers more effective multiple-object renderings in terms of rendering quality, compared to conventional approaches. And proposed intermixing scheme provides high-quality intermixing results for the visualization of intersecting and overlapping surfaces by resolving aliasing and z-fighting problems. Moreover, two case studies are presented that apply the proposed method to the real clinical applications. These case studies manifest that the proposed method has the outstanding advantages of the rendering independency and reusability. PMID:26403436

  17. Real-time volume rendering of 4D image using 3D texture mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinwoo; Kim, June-Sic; Kim, Jae Seok; Kim, In Young; Kim, Sun Il

    2001-05-01

    Four dimensional image is 3D volume data that varies with time. It is used to express deforming or moving object in virtual surgery of 4D ultrasound. It is difficult to render 4D image by conventional ray-casting or shear-warp factorization methods because of their time-consuming rendering time or pre-processing stage whenever the volume data are changed. Even 3D texture mapping is used, repeated volume loading is also time-consuming in 4D image rendering. In this study, we propose a method to reduce data loading time using coherence between currently loaded volume and previously loaded volume in order to achieve real time rendering based on 3D texture mapping. Volume data are divided into small bricks and each brick being loaded is tested for similarity to one which was already loaded in memory. If the brick passed the test, it is defined as 3D texture by OpenGL functions. Later, the texture slices of the brick are mapped into polygons and blended by OpenGL blending functions. All bricks undergo this test. Continuously deforming fifty volumes are rendered in interactive time with SGI ONYX. Real-time volume rendering based on 3D texture mapping is currently available on PC.

  18. A learning-based approach for automated quality assessment of computer-rendered images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Agam, Gady

    2012-01-01

    Computer generated images are common in numerous computer graphics applications such as games, modeling, and simulation. There is normally a tradeoff between the time allocated to the generation of each image frame and and the quality of the image, where better quality images require more processing time. Specifically, in the rendering of 3D objects, the surfaces of objects may be manipulated by subdividing them into smaller triangular patches and/or smoothing them so as to produce better looking renderings. Since unnecessary subdivision results in increased rendering time and unnecessary smoothing results in reduced details, there is a need to automatically determine the amount of necessary processing for producing good quality rendered images. In this paper we propose a novel supervised learning based methodology for automatically predicting the quality of rendered images of 3D objects. To perform the prediction we train on a data set which is labeled by human observers for quality. We are then able to predict the quality of renderings (not used in the training) with an average prediction error of roughly 20%. The proposed approach is compared to known techniques and is shown to produce better results.

  19. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  20. CloudSat Anomaly Recovery and Operational Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkowski, Mona; Vane, Deborah; Livermore, Thomas; Rokey, Mark; Barthuli, Marda; Gravseth, Ian J.; Pieper, Brian; Rodzinak, Aaron; Silva, Steve; Woznick, Paul; Nayak, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In April 2011, NASA's pioneering cloud profiling radar satellite, CloudSat, experienced a battery anomaly that placed it into emergency mode and rendered it operations incapable. All initial attempts to recover the spacecraft failed as the resultant power limitations could not support even the lowest power mode. Originally part of a six-satellite constellation known as the "A-Train", CloudSat was unable to stay within its assigned control box, posing a threat to other A-Train satellites. CloudSat needed to exit the constellation, but with the tenuous power profile, conducting maneuvers was very risky. The team was able to execute a complex sequence of operations which recovered control, conducted an orbit lower maneuver, and returned the satellite to safe mode, within one 65 minute sunlit period. During the course of the anomaly recovery, the team developed several bold, innovative operational strategies. Details of the investigation into the root-cause and the multiple approaches to revive CloudSat are examined. Satellite communication and commanding during the anomaly are presented. A radical new system of "Daylight Only Operations" (DO-OP) was developed, which cycles the payload and subsystem components off in tune with earth eclipse entry and exit in order to maintain positive power and thermal profiles. The scientific methodology and operational results behind the graduated testing and ramp-up to DO-OP are analyzed. In November 2011, the CloudSat team successfully restored the vehicle to consistent operational collection of cloud radar data during sunlit portions of the orbit. Lessons learned throughout the six-month return-to-operations recovery effort are discussed and offered for application to other R&D satellites, in the context of on-orbit anomaly resolution efforts.

  1. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Mark; Alexander, James; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; /more authors..

    2012-07-06

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  2. Cloud Distribution Statistics from LITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) mission has demonstrated the utility of spaceborne lidar in observing multilayer clouds and has provided a dataset showing the distribution of tropospheric clouds and aerosols. These unambiguous observations of the vertical distribution of clouds will allow improved verification of current cloud climatologies and GCM cloud parameterizations. Although there is now great interest in cloud profiling radar, operating in the mm-wave region, for the spacebased observation of cloud heights the results of the LITE mission have shown that satellite lidars can also make significant contributions in this area.

  3. Entrainment, Drizzle, and Cloud Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, J. P.; Stevens, D. E.; Toon, O. B.

    2004-01-01

    Increased aerosol and hence droplet concentrations in polluted clouds are expected to inhibit precipitation and thereby increase cloud water, leading to more reflective clouds that partially offset global warming. Yet polluted clouds are not generally observed to hold more water. Much of the uncertainty regarding the indirect aerosol effect stems from inadequate understanding of such changes in cloud water. Detailed simulations show that the relative humidity of air overlying stratocumulus is a leading factor determining whether cloud water increases or decreases when precipitation is suppressed. When the overlying air is dry, cloud water can decrease as droplet concentrations increase.

  4. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-04-01

    The authors report observations, for the first time, of the 20 - 10A+ and E, 2-1 - 1-1 E, and 10 - 00A+ lines of methanol (CH3OH) in three dark cold clouds, TMC 1, L 134N, and B 335. The CH3OH emission is extended in these clouds and shows a complex velocity structure. Clear indications of non LTE excitation are observed in TMC 1. Estimated column densities are a few×1013cm-2. Although less abundant than formaldehyde (H2CO), methanol is almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), in these clouds. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134N, to an upper limit of 4×1012cm-2 (3σ). Implications for dark cloud excitation and chemistry are discussed.

  5. Fingerprinting the Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, M. V.; Caballero, J.; Lee, A. M.; Matrai, P. A.; Leck, C.; Madan, A.; Collins, H.

    2012-12-01

    Marine microgels play an important role in regulating ocean-basin-scale biogeochemical dynamics. We have found them in surface waters, in airborne aerosol, fog, and cloud water in the high Arctic (north of 80oN). Microgels dominated the available cloud condensation nuclei number population during the summer season. These microgels have unique physicochemical characteristics and originate from the ice algae and/or phytoplankton in the surface water. We have sequenced the genomic material found in the microgels from the sea surface and cloud waters with next-generation sequencing technology. The sequence analysis and annotation, show a high abundance of proteins of microbial and diatom origin, including a high number of proteins from different taxonomical origin associated with antifreeze functions. Our results have implications not only for cloud droplet activation but also for ice nucleation.

  6. My NASA Data Clouds

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson has two activities that help students develop a basic understanding of the relationship between cloud type and the form of precipitation and the relationship between the amount of water...

  7. Noctilucent Clouds in Motion

    NASA Video Gallery

    Swedish photographer Peter Rosén took this close-up, time-lapse movieof Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs) over Stockholm, Sweden on the evening ofJuly 16, 2012. "What looked like a serene view from a di...

  8. GEOS-5 Modeled Clouds

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows clouds from a simulation using the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Verison 5 (GEOS-5). The global atmospheric simulation covers a period from Feb 3, 2010 through Feb ...

  9. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  10. Closed Large Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Closed Large Cell Clouds in the South Pacific     ... unperturbed by cyclonic or frontal activity. When the cell centers are cloudy and the main sinking motion is concentrated at cell ...

  11. Cloud Inhomogeneity from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Two full months (July 2003 and January 2004) of MODIS Atmosphere Level-3 data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are analyzed in order to characterize the horizontal variability of cloud optical thickness and water path at global scales. Various options to derive cloud variability parameters are discussed. The climatology of cloud inhomogeneity is built by first calculating daily parameter values at spatial scales of l degree x 1 degree, and then at zonal and global scales, followed by averaging over monthly time scales. Geographical, diurnal, and seasonal changes of inhomogeneity parameters are examined separately for the two cloud phases, and separately over land and ocean. We find that cloud inhomogeneity is weaker in summer than in winter, weaker over land than ocean for liquid clouds, weaker for local morning than local afternoon, about the same for liquid and ice clouds on a global scale, but with wider probability distribution functions (PDFs) and larger latitudinal variations for ice, and relatively insensitive to whether water path or optical thickness products are used. Typical mean values at hemispheric and global scales of the inhomogeneity parameter nu (roughly the mean over the standard deviation of water path or optical thickness), range from approximately 2.5 to 3, while for the inhomogeneity parameter chi (the ratio of the logarithmic to linear mean) from approximately 0.7 to 0.8. Values of chi for zonal averages can occasionally fall below 0.6 and for individual gridpoints below 0.5. Our results demonstrate that MODIS is capable of revealing significant fluctuations in cloud horizontal inhomogenity and stress the need to model their global radiative effect in future studies.

  12. Mesospheric cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Formation of mesospheric clouds as a result of deposition of large amounts of H2O by the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) of the solar power satellite system is discussed. The conditions which must be met in order to form and maintain clouds near the mesopause are described. The frequency and magnitude of H2O injections from the HLLV rocket exhaust are considered.

  13. Marine Cloud Brightening

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, H.; Connolly, P.; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Robert

    2012-09-07

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could - subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein - have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seedparticle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  14. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harkay, K. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2003-03-20

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in amore » positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.« less

  15. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Harkay, K. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2003-03-20

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  16. Interstellar Cloud Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, J. C.; Monaghan, J. J.; Pongracic, H.; Schwarz, M. P.

    1985-07-01

    We describe the results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of isothermal interstellar clouds in the absence of magnetic fields. A wide variety of high and low Mach number, head-on and off-centre collisions of clouds with mass ratios 1, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.1 have been studied. The results show that a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the gravitational instability of a substantial fraction of the matter is that the initial clouds should be either marginally stable or unstable according to the usual Jeans criterion. The collisions, in general, do not result in one or more clouds. Instead we find, in most cases, that the matter disperses in an irregular way. The calculations therefore suggest that if the initial state of the interstellar medium is one of cool dense clouds in a hotter more tenuous background, collisions will rapidly mix the medium rather than produce a steady-state spectrum of cool clouds.

  17. FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, J. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; King, M. D.; Randall, D. A.; Minnis, P.; Issac, G. A.; Pinto, J. O.; Uttal, T.; Bucholtz, A.; Cripe, D. G.; Gerber, H.; Fairall, C. W.; Garrett, T. J.; Hudson, J.; Intrieri, J. M.; Jakob, C.; Jensen, T.; Lawson, P.; Marcotte, D.; Nguyen, L.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Clouds Experiment that was conducted in the Arctic during April through July, 1998. The principal goal of the field experiment was to gather the data needed to examine the impact of arctic clouds on the radiation exchange between the surface, atmosphere, and space, and to study how the surface influences the evolution of boundary layer clouds. The observations will be used to evaluate and improve climate model parameterizations of cloud and radiation processes, satellite remote sensing of cloud and surface characteristics, and understanding of cloud-radiation feedbacks in the Arctic. The experiment utilized four research aircraft that flew over surface-based observational sites in the Arctic Ocean and Barrow, Alaska. In this paper we describe the programmatic and science objectives of the project, the experimental design (including research platforms and instrumentation), conditions that were encountered during the field experiment, and some highlights of preliminary observations, modelling, and satellite remote sensing studies.

  18. A cloud physics radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyle, H. L.; Curran, R. J.; Barnes, W. L.; Escoe, D.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the design features and capabilities of a seven-channel cloud physics radiometer (CPR) for remote sensing of cloud properties. The CPR channel characteristics and functions are tabulated and diagrammed. Each of the first three channels utilizes a photo-multipler detector, with the high-voltage power supply integrated with the tube into a single unit. In operation a heater is used to keep the optics temperature at or above 273 K and this temperature is constantly monitored. The last four channel detectors and filters are all cooled to the temperature of liquid nitrogen. The inclined scanning mirror rotates at a rate of 3.48 rps. Registration pulses are triggered and recorded as the mirror enters and leaves the + or -45 deg earth observation region. The ice-cloud, water cloud, snow discriminator detector has worked quite well in general. Interesting radiometer data have been obtained and their analysis is under way. The combination of the CPR and the Cloud Lidar System will make possible sophisticated remote sensing cloud studies.

  19. Molecules in interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Hjalmarson, A.; Rydbeck, O. E. H.

    The physical conditions and chemical compositions of the gas in interstellar clouds are reviewed in light of the importance of interstellar clouds for star formation and the origin of life. The Orion A region is discussed as an example of a giant molecular cloud where massive stars are being formed, and it is pointed out that conditions in the core of the cloud, with a kinetic temperature of about 75 K and a density of 100,000-1,000,000 molecules/cu cm, may support gas phase ion-molecule chemistry. The Taurus Molecular Clouds are then considered as examples of cold, dark, relatively dense interstellar clouds which may be the birthplaces of solar-type stars and which have been found to contain the heaviest interstellar molecules yet discovered. The molecular species identified in each of these regions are tabulated, including such building blocks of biological monomers as H2O, NH3, H2CO, CO, H2S, CH3CN and H2, and more complex species such as HCOOCH3 and CH3CH2CN.

  20. FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  1. a Cache Design Method for Spatial Information Visualization in 3d Real-Time Rendering Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, X.; Xiong, H.; Zheng, X.

    2012-07-01

    A well-designed cache system has positive impacts on the 3D real-time rendering engine. As the amount of visualization data getting larger, the effects become more obvious. They are the base of the 3D real-time rendering engine to smoothly browsing through the data, which is out of the core memory, or from the internet. In this article, a new kind of caches which are based on multi threads and large file are introduced. The memory cache consists of three parts, the rendering cache, the pre-rendering cache and the elimination cache. The rendering cache stores the data that is rendering in the engine; the data that is dispatched according to the position of the view point in the horizontal and vertical directions is stored in the pre-rendering cache; the data that is eliminated from the previous cache is stored in the eliminate cache and is going to write to the disk cache. Multi large files are used in the disk cache. When a disk cache file size reaches the limit length(128M is the top in the experiment), no item will be eliminated from the file, but a new large cache file will be created. If the large file number is greater than the maximum number that is pre-set, the earliest file will be deleted from the disk. In this way, only one file is opened for writing and reading, and the rest are read-only so the disk cache can be used in a high asynchronous way. The size of the large file is limited in order to map to the core memory to save loading time. Multi-thread is used to update the cache data. The threads are used to load data to the rendering cache as soon as possible for rendering, to load data to the pre-rendering cache for rendering next few frames, and to load data to the elimination cache which is not necessary for the moment. In our experiment, two threads are designed. The first thread is to organize the memory cache according to the view point, and created two threads: the adding list and the deleting list, the adding list index the data that should be

  2. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  3. Gamma Rays, Cosmic Rays, and Extinct Radioactivity in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Jin, Liping

    1995-10-01

    We investigate causal connection between two astonishingly big numbers: the very large 26Al concentration (5 × 10-5 of 27Al) in the early solar system and the very large nuclear excitation rate in Orion clouds. We present three separate pictures attributing 26Al within the early solar system and other molecular cloud cores to special cosmic-ray irradiation of those cloud cores. These pictures reinterpret the large 26Al/27Al ratio found in the early solar accretion disk, and seem not to be relevant to the present interstellar 1.5 Msun of 26Al. These three pictures of cosmic-ray irradiation of molecular clouds accounting for their high 26Al content are: 1. High flux of low-energy cosmic ray 0, Na, Mg, and Si nuclei stopping in the clouds with partial conversion to 26Al by nuclear interactions while they stop (Clayton 1994); 2. Stopping of low-energy galactic cosmic rays, which are known (at 100 MeV nucleon-1) to carry the very large activity 26Al/27Al = 0.1 and which we argue to be absorbed by cloud cores; 3. Stopping of newly synthesized particles accelerated from local ejecta of supernovae and W-R star winds, which carry activities as great as 26Al/27Al = 0.01 from those events. In these pictures the cosmic rays may be very different in origin than the galactic cosmic rays. At low energy they are injected into clouds and stopped in the cloud cores. We normalize our expectations for massive clouds to the inelastic nuclear excitation rates of 12C*(4.43 MeV) and 16O*(6.13 MeV) gamma rays emerging from the clouds in Orion (Bloemen et al. 1994). Picture 1 is plagued by very large power requirements if the accelerated particles are predominantly hydrogen. Nonetheless, we show that several other extinct radioactivity concentrations that accompanied 26Al in the early solar system would be coproduced by ordinary cosmic-ray composition. Our most promising construction of picture 1 appears to be anomalous acceleration of 16O ions (as known from the solar wind) to several Me

  4. Marine cloud brightening

    PubMed Central

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could—subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein—have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud–albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action

  5. Stratocumulus cloud evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Rogers, D.P.; Norris, P.M.; Johnson, D.W.; Martin, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structure and evolution of the extra-tropical marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) depends largely on the variability of stratus and stratocumulus clouds. The typical boundary-layer is capped by a temperature inversion that limits exchange with the free atmosphere. Cloud-top is usually coincident with the base of the inversion. Stratus clouds are generally associated with a well-mixed MABL, whereas daytime observations of stratocumulus-topped boundary-layers indicate that the cloud and subcloud layers are often decoupled due to shortwave radiative heating of the cloud layer. In this case the surface-based mixed layer is separated from the base of the stratocumulus (Sc) by a layer that is stable to dry turbulent mixing. This is sometimes referred to as the transition layer. Often cumulus clouds (Cu) develop in the transition layer. The cumulus tops may remain below the Sc base or they may penetrate into the Sc layer and occasionally through the capping temperature inversion. While this cloud structure is characteristic of the daytime MABL, it may persist at night also. The Cu play an important role in connecting the mixed layer to the Sc layer. If the Cu are active they transport water vapor from the sea surface that maintains the Sc against the dissipating effects of shortwave heating. The Cu, however, are very sensitive to small changes in the heat and moisture in the boundary-layer and are transient features. Here the authors discuss the effect of these small Cu on the turbulent structure of the MABL.

  6. Time-dependent injection of Oort Cloud comets into earth-crossing orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Ip, W.H.

    1987-07-01

    The present consideration of close stellar encounter-induced modulations of the influx rate of Oort Cloud comets notes that comet showers sufficiently intense for emergence in cratering statistics are produced at 80-Myr intervals, on the assumption of an Oort Cloud heavy comet core. Numerical simulations of the time evolution of comet showers or bursts indicate that a long tail of residual shower comets follows the major event with an intensity of about 0.01 of the peak rate after 20-30 Myr, thereby suggesting that residual comet showers are primarily clustered in certain areas of the sky, rendering them observable at virtually any time. 33 references.

  7. Direct Visuo-Haptic 4D Volume Rendering Using Respiratory Motion Models.

    PubMed

    Fortmeier, Dirk; Wilms, Matthias; Mastmeyer, Andre; Handels, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    This article presents methods for direct visuo-haptic 4D volume rendering of virtual patient models under respiratory motion. Breathing models are computed based on patient-specific 4D CT image data sequences. Virtual patient models are visualized in real-time by ray casting based rendering of a reference CT image warped by a time-variant displacement field, which is computed using the motion models at run-time. Furthermore, haptic interaction with the animated virtual patient models is provided by using the displacements computed at high rendering rates to translate the position of the haptic device into the space of the reference CT image. This concept is applied to virtual palpation and the haptic simulation of insertion of a virtual bendable needle. To this aim, different motion models that are applicable in real-time are presented and the methods are integrated into a needle puncture training simulation framework, which can be used for simulated biopsy or vessel puncture in the liver. To confirm real-time applicability, a performance analysis of the resulting framework is given. It is shown that the presented methods achieve mean update rates around 2,000 Hz for haptic simulation and interactive frame rates for volume rendering and thus are well suited for visuo-haptic rendering of virtual patients under respiratory motion. PMID:26087498

  8. Warping error analysis and reduction for depth-image-based rendering in 3DTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Luat; Zinger, Sveta; de With, Peter H. N.

    2011-03-01

    Interactive free-viewpoint selection applied to a 3D multi-view video signal is an attractive feature of the rapidly developing 3DTV media. In recent years, significant research has been done on free-viewpoint rendering algorithms which mostly have similar building blocks. In our previous work, we have analyzed the principal building blocks of most recent rendering algorithms and their contribution to the overall rendering quality. We have discovered that the first step, Warping determines the basic quality level of the complete rendering chain. In this paper, we have analyzed the warping step in more detail since it leads to ways for improvement. We have observed that the accuracy of warping is mainly determined by two factors which are sampling and rounding errors when performing pixel-based warping and quantization errors of depth maps. For each error factor, we have proposed a technique that can reduce the errors and thus increase the warping quality. Pixel-based warping errors are reduced by employing supersampling at the reference and virtual images and we decrease depth map errors by creating depth maps with more quantization levels. The new techniques are evaluated with two series of experiments using real-life and synthetic data. From these experiments, we have observed that reducing warping errors may increases the overall rendering quality and that the impact of errors due to pixel-based warping is much larger than that of errors due to depth quantization.

  9. Volume rendering segmented data using 3D textures: a practical approach for intra-operative visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Navneeth; Mullick, Rakesh; Vaidya, Vivek

    2006-03-01

    Volume rendering has high utility in visualization of segmented datasets. However, volume rendering of the segmented labels along with the original data causes undesirable intermixing/bleeding artifacts arising from interpolation at the sharp boundaries. This issue is further amplified in 3D textures based volume rendering due to the inaccessibility of the interpolation stage. We present an approach which helps minimize intermixing artifacts while maintaining the high performance of 3D texture based volume rendering - both of which are critical for intra-operative visualization. Our approach uses a 2D transfer function based classification scheme where label distinction is achieved through an encoding that generates unique gradient values for labels. This helps ensure that labelled voxels always map to distinct regions in the 2D transfer function, irrespective of interpolation. In contrast to previously reported algorithms, our algorithm does not require multiple passes for rendering and supports greater than 4 masks. It also allows for real-time modification of the colors/opacities of the segmented structures along with the original data. Additionally, these capabilities are available with minimal texture memory requirements amongst comparable algorithms. Results are presented on clinical and phantom data.

  10. Cloud Photogrammetry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaksek, K.; Gerst, A.; von der Lieth, J.; Ganci, G.; Hort, M.

    2015-04-01

    The most commonly used method for satellite cloud top height (CTH) compares brightness temperature of the cloud with the atmospheric temperature profile. Because of the uncertainties of this method, we propose a photogrammetric approach. As clouds can move with high velocities, even instruments with multiple cameras are not appropriate for accurate CTH estimation. Here we present two solutions. The first is based on the parallax between data retrieved from geostationary (SEVIRI, HRV band; 1000 m spatial resolution) and polar orbiting satellites (MODIS, band 1; 250 m spatial resolution). The procedure works well if the data from both satellites are retrieved nearly simultaneously. However, MODIS does not retrieve the data at exactly the same time as SEVIRI. To compensate for advection in the atmosphere we use two sequential SEVIRI images (one before and one after the MODIS retrieval) and interpolate the cloud position from SEVIRI data to the time of MODIS retrieval. CTH is then estimated by intersection of corresponding lines-of-view from MODIS and interpolated SEVIRI data. The second method is based on NASA program Crew Earth observations from the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has a lower orbit than most operational satellites, resulting in a shorter minimal time between two images, which is needed to produce a suitable parallax. In addition, images made by the ISS crew are taken by a full frame sensor and not a push broom scanner that most operational satellites use. Such data make it possible to observe also short time evolution of clouds.

  11. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  12. Counting the clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Cloud processes are very important for the global circulation of the atmosphere. It is now possible, though very expensive, to simulate the global circulation of the atmosphere using a model with resolution fine enough to explicitly represent the larger individual clouds. An impressive preliminary calculation of this type has already been performed by Japanese scientists, using the Earth Simulator. Within the next few years, such global cloud-resolving models (GCRMs) will be applied to weather prediction, and later they will be used in climatechange simulations. The tremendous advantage of GCRMs, relative to conventional lowerresolution global models, is that GCRMs can avoid many of the questionable "parameterizations" used to represent cloud effects in lower-resolution global models. Although cloud microphysics, turbulence, and radiation must still be parameterized in GCRMs, the high resolution of a GCRM simplifies these problems considerably, relative to conventional models. The United States currently has no project to develop a GCRM, although we have both the computer power and the expertise to do it. A research program aimed at development and applications of GCRMs is outlined.

  13. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  14. Cloud top entrainment instability and cloud top distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout; Spinhirne, James D.

    1990-01-01

    Classical cloud-top entrainment instability condition formulation is discussed. A saturation point diagram is used to investigate the details of mixing in cases where the cloud-top entrainment instability criterion is satisfied.

  15. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  16. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  17. Local intelligent electronic device (IED) rendering templates over limited bandwidth communication link to manage remote IED

    DOEpatents

    Bradetich, Ryan; Dearien, Jason A; Grussling, Barry Jakob; Remaley, Gavin

    2013-11-05

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for remote device management. According to various embodiments, a local intelligent electronic device (IED) may be in communication with a remote IED via a limited bandwidth communication link, such as a serial link. The limited bandwidth communication link may not support traditional remote management interfaces. According to one embodiment, a local IED may present an operator with a management interface for a remote IED by rendering locally stored templates. The local IED may render the locally stored templates using sparse data obtained from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, the management interface may be a web client interface and/or an HTML interface. The bandwidth required to present a remote management interface may be significantly reduced by rendering locally stored templates rather than requesting an entire management interface from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, an IED may comprise an encryption transceiver.

  18. Leaching of biocides from polymer renders under wet/dry cycles--Rates and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Styszko, Katarzyna; Bollmann, Ulla E; Bester, Kai

    2015-11-01

    In this study it was tested, which mechanism for the transport of biocides in polymeric renders is more relevant: (1) evaporative transports (meaning there is a flow of water through the material due to evaporation on the surface), which transports also the biocides to the surface, (2) transport through the polymer and (3) transport through water filled pores. It turned out that under the experimental conditions evaporative transport was not relevant, while transport through soaked (constantly wetted) renders was considerably faster than by other means. Additionally it turned out that also the equilibria were influenced by the water content. Differences in equilibria can be up to factor 10 between constantly wetted (soaked) and un-wetted materials. The two tested materials (one silicone and one acrylate render) had significantly different leaching behavior concerning equilibria and dynamics of mass flows, but for both the pre-wetted materials leached most. PMID:26210026

  19. Physics Based Modeling and Rendering of Vegetation in the Thermal Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. A.; Ballard, J. R., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    We outline a procedure for rendering physically-based thermal infrared images of simple vegetation scenes. Our approach incorporates the biophysical processes that affect the temperature distribution of the elements within a scene. Computer graphics plays a key role in two respects. First, in computing the distribution of scene shaded and sunlit facets and, second, in the final image rendering once the temperatures of all the elements in the scene have been computed. We illustrate our approach for a simple corn scene where the three-dimensional geometry is constructed based on measured morphological attributes of the row crop. Statistical methods are used to construct a representation of the scene in agreement with the measured characteristics. Our results are quite good. The rendered images exhibit realistic behavior in directional properties as a function of view and sun angle. The root-mean-square error in measured versus predicted brightness temperatures for the scene was 2.1 deg C.

  20. Research on transformation and optimization of large scale 3D modeling for real time rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hu; Yang, Yongchao; Zhao, Gang; He, Bin; Shen, Guosheng

    2011-12-01

    During the simulation process of real-time three-dimensional scene, the popular modeling software and the real-time rendering platform are not compatible. The common solution is to create three-dimensional scene model by using modeling software and then transform the format supported by rendering platform. This paper takes digital campus scene simulation as an example, analyzes and solves the problems of surface loss; texture distortion and loss; model flicker and so on during the transformation from 3Ds Max to MultiGen Creator. Besides, it proposes the optimization strategy of model which is transformed. The operation results show that this strategy is a good solution to all kinds of problems existing in transformation and it can speed up the rendering speed of the model.