Science.gov

Sample records for accelerate polarized protons

  1. Acceleration of polarized proton at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y Y

    1980-01-01

    The unexpected importance of high energy spin effects and the success of the ZGS in correcting many intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances led us to attempt to accelerate polarized protons in the AGS. A collaborative effort is underway by the groups in Argonne, Michigan, Rice, Yale and Brookhaven to improve and modify the AGS to accelerate polarized protons. With the appropriate funding the first polarized proton acceleration at the AGS should be possible by 1983.

  2. POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN AGS AND RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    2007-09-10

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species including polarized proton beams. The acceleration of polarized beams in both the injector and the collider rings is complicated by numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Partial and full Siberian snakes have made it possible to overcome the depolarization and beam polarizations of up to 65% have been reached at 100 GeV in RHIC.

  3. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO 250 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as the first high energy polarized proton collider was designed t o provide polarized proton collisions a t a maximum beam energy of 250 GeV. I t has been providing collisions a t a beam energy of 100 Gel' since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during the acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with careful control of the betatron tunes and the vertical orbit distortions. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV? making it important t o examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were accelerated t o the record energy of 250 GeV in RHIC with a polarization of 46% measured a t top energy in 2006. The polarization measurement as a function of beam energy also shows some polarization loss around 136 GeV, the first strong intrinsic resonance above 100 GeV. This paper presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival t o orbit distortions.

  4. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf; Büscher, Markus; Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  5. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  6. Polarized proton acceleration at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    At the conclusion of polarized proton commissioning in February 1986, protons with an average polarization of 45%, momentum of 21.7 GeV/c, and intensity of 2 x 10/sup 10/ protons per pulse, were extracted to an external polarimeter at the Brookhaven AGS. In order to maintain this polarization, five intrinsic and nearly forty imperfection depolarizing resonances had to be corrected. An apparent interaction between imperfection and intrinsic resonances occurring at very nearly the same energy was observed and the correction of imperfection resonances using ''beat'' magnetic harmonics discovered in the previous AGS commissioning run was further confirmed.

  7. Workshop on acceleration of polarized protons: summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Terwilliger, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    The workshop sessions concentrated on polarized protons in circular accelerators and storage rings. Topics such as polarized electrons were discussed only when the subject was relevant to proton phenomena. Of major interest was the possible applicability of the new idea of spin matching for crossing depolarizing resonances. On the experimental side, some remarkable new data were presented by the SATURNE II Group. They have successfully crossed both intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances by the spin flip method with minimal depolarization-the first group to do so. They also obtained some results which apparently cannot be explained with our present understanding of spin phenomena. The workshop concluded that more experimental measurements are needed to understand the physics and that such studies would be very important for the future acceleration of polarized protons at KEK and the AGS. The workshop included status reports from the four laboratories which have programs of polarized particle acceleration--or approved projects to accelerate polarized protons.

  8. A STUDY OF POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN J-PARC.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO, A.U.; BAI, M.; ROSER, T.

    2006-10-02

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductive partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  9. A Study of Polarized Proton Acceleration in J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A. U.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.; Molodojentsev, A.; Ohmori, C.; Sato, H.; Hatanaka, K.

    2007-06-13

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductve partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  10. Radiation pressure acceleration of protons to 93 MeV with circularly polarized petawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Hyung Taek; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    The radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of charged particles has been a challenging task in laser-driven proton/ion acceleration due to its stringent requirements in laser and target conditions. The realization of radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration requires irradiating ultrathin targets with an ultrahigh contrast and ultraintense laser pulses. We report the generation of 93-MeV proton beams achieved by applying 800-nm 30-fs circularly polarized laser pulses with an intensity of 6.1 × 10 20 W / cm 2 to 15-nm-thick polymer targets. The radiation pressure acceleration was confirmed from the obtained optimal target thickness, quadratic energy scaling, polarization dependence, and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We expect this clear demonstration of RPA to facilitate the realization of laser-driven proton/ion sources delivering energetic and short-pulse particle beams for novel applications.

  11. Enhancement of proton energy by polarization switch in laser acceleration of multi-ion foils

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2013-10-15

    We present a scheme to significantly increase the energy of quasi-monoenergetic protons accelerated by a laser beam without increasing the input power. This improvement is accomplished by first irradiating the foil several wave periods with circular polarization and then switching the laser to linear polarization. The polarization switch increases the electron temperature and thereby moves more electrons ahead of the proton layer, resulting in a space charge electric field pushing the protons forwards. The scaling of the proton energy evolution with respect to the switching time is studied, and an optimal switching time is obtained. The proton energy for the case with optimal switching time can reach about 80 MeV with an input laser power of 70 TW, an improvement of more than 30% compared to the case without polarization switch.

  12. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS IN THE AGS WITH TWO HELICAL PARTIAL SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H.; AHRENS,L.; BAI,M.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The RHIC spin program requires 2 x 10{sup 11} proton/bunch with 70% polarization. As the injector to RHIC, AGS is the bottleneck for preserving polarization: there is no space for a full snake to overcome numerous depolarizing resonances. An ac dipole and a partial snake have been used to preserve beam polarization in the past few years. Two helical snakes have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate all depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the setup and preliminary results.

  13. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS IN THE AGS WITH TWO HELICAL PARTIAL SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, H.; AHRENS, L.A.; BAI, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BROWN, K.; COURANT, E.D.; GARDNER, C.; GLENN, J.W.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MACKAY, W.W.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TSOUPAS, N.; WOOD, J.; YIP, K.; ZELENSKI, A.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-26

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult: the depolarizing resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions and are not feasible in the AGS since straight sections are too short. Recently, two helical partial snakes with double pitch design have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate the intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the accelerator setup and preliminary results.

  14. Polarized Proton Acceleration in the AGS with Two Helical Partial Snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Bravar, A.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Wood, J.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Lin, F.; Okamura, M.

    2007-06-13

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult: the depolarizing resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions and are not feasible in the AGS since straight sections are too short. Recently, two helical partial snakes have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate the intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the accelerator setup and preliminary results.

  15. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M H; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S; Murphy, Chris D; Stockhausen, Luca C; Carroll, David C; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  16. Polarized proton beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.

    2010-10-04

    The polarized beam for RHIC is produced in the optically-pumped polarized H{sup -} ion source and then accelerated in Linac to 200 MeV for strip-injection to Booster and further accelerated 24.3 GeV in AGS for injection in RHIC. In 2009 Run polarized protons was successfully accelerated to 250 GeV beam energy. The beam polarization of about 60% at 100 GeV beam energy and 36-42% at 250 GeV beam energy was measured with the H-jet and p-Carbon CNI polarimeters. The gluon contribution to the proton spin was studied in collisions of longitudinally polarized proton beams at 100 x 100 GeV. At 250 x 250 GeV an intermediate boson W production with the longitudinally polarized beams was studied for the first time.

  17. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  18. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  19. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  20. Generating high-current monoenergetic proton beams by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the phase-stable acceleration regime.

    PubMed

    Yan, X Q; Lin, C; Sheng, Z M; Guo, Z Y; Liu, B C; Lu, Y R; Fang, J X; Chen, J E

    2008-04-01

    A new ion acceleration method, namely, phase-stable acceleration, using circularly-polarized laser pulses is proposed. When the initial target density n(0) and thickness D satisfy a(L) approximately (n(0)/n(c))D/lambda(L) and D>l(s) with a(L), lambda(L), l(s), and n(c) the normalized laser amplitude, the laser wavelength in vacuum, the plasma skin depth, and the critical density of the incident laser pulse, respectively, a quasiequilibrium for the electrons is established by the light pressure and the space charge electrostatic field at the interacting front of the laser pulse. The ions within the skin depth of the laser pulse are synchronously accelerated and bunched by the electrostatic field, and thereby a high-intensity monoenergetic proton beam can be generated. The proton dynamics is investigated analytically and the results are verified by one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:18517963

  1. Configuration Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Svirida, D.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present our design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. We provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  2. CONFIGURATION MANUAL POLARIZED PROTON COLLIDER AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; MACKAY,W.W.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BAI,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.; ET AL.

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the authors present their design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. They provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  3. Polarized proton beams since the ZGS

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, A.D.

    1994-12-31

    The author discusses research involving polarized proton beams since the ZGS`s demise. He begins by reminding the attendee that in 1973 the ZGS accelerated the world`s first high energy polarized proton beam; all in attendance at this meeting can be proud of this accomplishment. A few ZGS polarized proton beam experiments were done in the early 1970`s; then from about 1976 until 1 October 1979, the majority of the ZGS running time was polarized running. A great deal of fundamental physics was done with the polarized beam when the ZGS ran as a dedicated polarized proton beam from about Fall 1977 until it shut down on 1 October 1979. The newly created polarization enthusiats then dispersed; some spread polarized seeds al over the world by polarizing beams elsewhere; some wound up running the High Energy and SSC programs at DOE.

  4. Electron heating in radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration with a circularly polarized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradkar, B. S.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamics of electron heating in the radiation-pressure-driven acceleration through self-induced transparency (SIT) is investigated with the help of particle-in-cell simulations. The SIT is achieved through laser filamentation which is seeded by the transverse density modulations due to the Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability. We observe stronger SIT induced electron heating for the longer duration laser pulses leading to deterioration of accelerated ion beam quality (mainly energy spread). Such heating can be controlled to obtain a quasimonoenergetic beam by cascaded foils targets where a second foil behind the main accelerating foil acts as a laser reflector to suppress the SIT.

  5. RHIC OPERATION WITH LONGITUDINALLY POLARIZED PROTONS.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H.BAI,M.BEEBE-WANG,J.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    Polarized proton beams have been accelerated, stored and collided at 100GeV per beam in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with longitudinal polarization. The essential equipment includes four Siberian snakes, eight spin rotators and fast relative polarimeters in each of the two RHIC rings as well as local polarimeters at the STAR and PHENIX detectors. This paper summarizes the performance of RHIC as a polarized proton collider in the FY03 run with emphasis on polarization issues. Preliminary data from the FY04 run is also shown.

  6. Quasimonoenergetic Proton Bunch Generation by Dual-Peaked Electrostatic-Field Acceleration in Foils Irradiated by an Intense Linearly Polarized Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, H. B.; Chen, Z. L.; Yu, W.; Sheng, Z. M.; Yu, M. Y.; Jin, Z.; Kodama, R.

    2010-08-01

    It is found that stable proton acceleration from a thin foil irradiated by a linearly polarized ultraintense laser can be realized for appropriate foil thickness and laser intensity. A dual-peaked electrostatic field, originating from the oscillating and nonoscillating components of the laser ponderomotive force, is formed around the foil surfaces. This field combines radiation-pressure acceleration and target normal sheath acceleration to produce a single quasimonoenergetic ion bunch. A criterion for this mechanism to be operative is obtained and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. At a laser intensity of ˜5.5×1022W/cm2, quasimonoenergetic GeV proton bunches are obtained with ˜100MeV energy spread, less than 4° spatial divergence, and ˜50% energy conversion efficiency from the laser.

  7. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  8. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  9. Accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1990-10-01

    Polarization hadron experiments at high energies continue to generate surprises. Many questions remain unanswered or unanswerable within the frame work of QCD. These include such basic questions as to why at high energies the polarization analyzing power in pp elastic scattering remains high, why hyperons are produced with high polarizations etc. It is, therefore, interesting to investigate the possibilities of accelerating and storing polarized beams in high energy colliders. On the technical side the recent understanding and confirmation of the actions of partial and multiple Siberian snakes made it possible to contemplate accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams to multi-TeV energies. In this paper, we will examine the equipment, the operation and the procedure required to obtain colliding beams of polarized protons at TeV energies.

  10. Polarized antiproton beam at U-70 accelerator of IHEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurushev, S. B.; Chetvertkov, M. A.; Chetvertkova, V. A.; Garkusha, V. I.; Meschanin, A. P.; Mochalov, V. V.; Nurusheva, M. B.; Rykov, V. L.; Semenov, P. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Zapolsky, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    The polarized proton and antiproton beam channel is currently under development at the U-70 accelerator of IHEP, Protvino, Russia. An availability of the both, polarized protons and antiprotons provides an exciting opportunity for the comparative studies of spin effects induced by polarized protons and antiprotons in a variety of hadronic reactions. While the proton and antiproton beams are formed by essentially the same method, there is the specific in the antiproton beam shaping and properties compared to protons. In this report, we address some technical details of forming the polarized antiproton beam and describe its main properties.

  11. Study of the Polarization Deterioration During Physics Stores in RHIC Polarized Proton Runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Z.; Qin, Q.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2016-02-01

    As the only high energy polarized proton collider in the world, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has achieved a great success in colliding polarized proton beams up to 255GeV per beam energy with over 50% average store polarizations for spin physics studies. With the help of Siberian snakes as well as outstanding beam control during the acceleration, polarization loss during acceleration up to 100 GeV is negligible. However, about 10% polarization loss was observed between acceleration from 100 GeV to 255 GeV. In addition, a mild polarization deterioration during long store for physics data taking was also observed. In this paper, studies in understanding the store depolarizing mechanism is reported, including the analysis of polarization deterioration data based on the past couple of RHIC polarized proton runs.

  12. Gluon polarization in the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Steven D.; Casey, Andrew; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2011-03-15

    We combine heavy-quark renormalization group arguments with our understanding of the nucleon's wave function to deduce a bound on the gluon polarization {Delta}g in the proton. The bound is consistent with the values extracted from spin experiments at COMPASS and RHIC.

  13. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  14. Muon calculations for the polarized proton beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of the muon intensities due to the new polarized proton beam using the program CASIM are reported. Results are reported in terms of tissue absorbed dose per incident proton. (LEW)

  15. Polarized proton collisions at 205 GeV at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Bai, M; Roser, T; Ahrens, L; Alekseev, I G; Alessi, J; Beebe-Wang, J; Blaskiewicz, M; Bravar, A; Brennan, J M; Bruno, D; Bunce, G; Courant, E; Drees, A; Fischer, W; Gardner, C; Gill, R; Glenn, J; Haeberli, W; Huang, H; Jinnouchi, O; Kewisch, J; Luccio, A; Luo, Y; Nakagawa, I; Okada, H; Pilat, F; Mackay, W W; Makdisi, Y; Montag, C; Ptitsyn, V; Satogata, T; Stephenson, E; Svirida, D; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Wise, T; Zelenski, A; Zeno, K; Zhang, S Y

    2006-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has been providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of 2 stronger than those below 100 GeV making it important to examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were first accelerated to the record energy of 205 GeV in RHIC with a significant polarization measured at top energy in 2005. This Letter presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival to orbit distortions. PMID:16712305

  16. Polarized proton beam for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC has provided polarized proton collisions from 31 GeV to 255 GeV in the past decade. To preserve polarization through numerous depolarizing resonances through the whole accelerator chain, harmonic orbit correction, partial snakes, horizontal tune jump system and full snakes have been used. In addition, close attentions have been paid to betatron tune control, orbit control and beam line alignment. The polarization of 60% at 255 GeV has been delivered to experiments with 1.8×1011 bunch intensity. For the eRHIC era, the beam brightness has to be maintained to reach the desired luminosity. Since we only have one hadron ring in the eRHIC era, existing spin rotator and snakes can be converted to six snake configuration for one hadron ring. With properly arranged six snakes, the polarization can be maintained at 70% at 250 GeV. This paper summarizes the effort and plan to reach high polarization with small emittance for eRHIC.

  17. AGS polarized proton operation in run 8.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,H.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.A.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A.U.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.

    2008-06-23

    Dual partial snake scheme has been used for the Brookhaven AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) polarized proton operation for several years. It has provided polarized proton beams with 1.5 x 10{sup 11} intensity and 65% polarization for RHIC spin program. There is still residual polarization loss. Several schemes such as putting horizontal tune into the spin tune gap, and injection-on-the-fly were tested in the AGS to mitigate the loss. This paper presents the experiment results and analysis.

  18. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  19. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  20. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  1. Azimuthal asymmetries in single polarized proton-proton Drell-Yan processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhun; Ma Boqiang; Zhu Jiacai

    2011-10-01

    We study the azimuthal asymmetries in proton-proton Drell-Yan processes with one incident proton being transversely or longitudinally polarized. We consider particularly the asymmetries contributed by the leading-twist chiral-odd quark distributions. We analyze the asymmetries with sin(2{phi}+{phi}{sub S}) and sin(2{phi}-{phi}{sub S}) modulations in transverse single polarized p{sup {up_arrow}p} Drell-Yan and sin2{phi} asymmetries in longitudinal single polarized p{sup {yields}p} Drell-Yan at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, E906 (Fermi Lab), and the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research). We show that the measurements of the asymmetries in those facilities can provide valuable information of the chiral-odd structure of the nucleon both in the valence and sea regions.

  2. Explore the possibility of accelerating polarized He-3 beam in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2012-05-20

    As the world's first high energy polarized proton collider, RHIC has made significant progresses in measuring the proton spin structure in the past decade. In order to have better understanding of the contribution of up quarks and down quarks to the proton spin structure, collisions of high energy polarized neutron beams are required. Polarized He-3 beams offer an effectiveway to provide polarized neutron beams. In this paper, we present studies of accelerating polarized He-3 in RHIC with the current dual snake configuration. Possibilities of adding two more pairs of snakes for accelerating polarized He-3 were explored. Results of six snake configuration in RHIC are also reported in the paper.

  3. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  4. NICA Facility in Polarized Proton and Deuteron Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Filatov, Yu. N.

    2016-02-01

    NICA project at JINR is aimed at the experiments with polarized protons and deuterons at both as fixed target and colliding mode over beam momentum range from 2 to 13.5GeV/c. Polarized beams are injected into collider from the Nuclotron-superconducting synchrotron. Dynamic solenoid “Siberian snakes” are proposed to prevent resonance depolarization of proton beam during acceleration in the Nuclotron up to momentum of 6 GeV/c and further in the collider up to the maximum momentum after storage and stochastic cooling of necessary number of particles in each ring. By means of pair of the Snakes placed in the opposite collider straight sections “spin transparency” mode is provided. Stabilization and control of the polarization is reached due to “weak field” solenoids integrated in the lattice. The proposed scheme of the polarization control is universal and can be used for different ion spices (p, d, t, He3…).

  5. Proton acceleration in neutron star magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.; Katz, J. I.; Diamond, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    To explain the emission of TeV and PeV gamma rays from accreting X-ray binary sources, protons must be accelerated to several times the gamma-ray energy. It is shown here that at certain times, the plasma in the accretion column of the neutron star may form a deep enough pool that the top portion becomes unstable to convective motions in spite of the strong magnetic field. The resulting turbulence produces fluctuations in the strength of the magnetic field that travel up the accretion column, taking energy out to the region of the energetic protons. The protons resonantly absorb this energy and are accelerated to high energies. Including the synchrotron radiation losses of the protons, it is shown that they can be accelerated to energies that are high enough to explain the gamma-ray observations.

  6. A New High-Current Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; DeSanto, L.; Jongen, Y.

    2009-03-10

    A high-current (>20 mA) dc proton accelerator is being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the detection of explosive materials by nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma radiation. The high-voltage dc accelerator (adjustable between 1.4 and 2.8 MeV) will be a single-ended industrial Dynamitron registered system equipped with a compact high-current, microwave-driven proton source. A magnetic mass analyzer inserted between the ion source and the acceleration tube will select the protons and reject heavier ions. A sorption pump near the ion source will minimize the flow of neutral hydrogen gas into the acceleration tube. For BNCT, a lithium target for generating epithermal neutrons is being developed that will be capable of dissipating the high power (>40 kW) of the proton beam. For NRA, special targets will be used to generate gamma rays with suitable energies for exciting nuclides typically present in explosive materials. Proton accelerators with such high-current and high-power capabilities in this energy range have not been developed previously.

  7. A New High-Current Proton Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; DeSanto, L.; Jongen, Y.

    2009-03-01

    A high-current (>20 mA) dc proton accelerator is being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the detection of explosive materials by nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma radiation. The high-voltage dc accelerator (adjustable between 1.4 and 2.8 MeV) will be a single-ended industrial Dynamitron® system equipped with a compact high-current, microwave-driven proton source. A magnetic mass analyzer inserted between the ion source and the acceleration tube will select the protons and reject heavier ions. A sorption pump near the ion source will minimize the flow of neutral hydrogen gas into the acceleration tube. For BNCT, a lithium target for generating epithermal neutrons is being developed that will be capable of dissipating the high power (>40 kW) of the proton beam. For NRA, special targets will be used to generate gamma rays with suitable energies for exciting nuclides typically present in explosive materials. Proton accelerators with such high-current and high-power capabilities in this energy range have not been developed previously.

  8. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  9. PROTON ACCELERATION AT OBLIQUE SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-20

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  10. Proton spin polarizabilities from polarized Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    B. Pasquini; D. Drechsel; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2007-07-01

    Polarized Compton scattering off the proton is studied within the framework of subtracted dispersion relations for photon energies up to 300 MeV. As a guideline for forthcoming experiments, we focus the attention on the role of the proton's spin polarizabilities and investigate the most favorable conditions to extract them with a minimum of model dependence. We conclude that a complete separation of the four spin polarizabilities is possible, at photon energies between threshold and the $\\Delta(1232)$ region, provided one can achieve polarization measurements with an accuracy of a few percent.

  11. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  12. Status of BINP proton tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdakov, A.; Davydenko, V.; Dolgushin, V.; Dranichnikov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Farrell, J. P.; Khilchenko, A.; Kobets, V.; Konstantinov, S.; Krivenko, A.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Tiunov, M.; Savkin, V.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.

    2007-08-01

    The status of a unique 2.0 MeV, 10 mA proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation is presented. The accelerator is intended to be used in facilities generating resonant gamma rays for explosives detection and epithermal neutrons for boron neutron-capture therapy of brain tumors. A magnetically coupled DC voltage multiplier derived from an industrial ELV-type electron accelerator is used as a high voltage source for the accelerator. A dc high current negative ion source has been developed for injection into the tandem. In the tandem accelerator there is set of nested potential electrodes with openings which form a channel for accelerating the negative hydrogen ion beam and subsequently accelerating the proton beam after stripping in the gas target. The electrodes are connected to a high voltage feedthrough insulator to which required potentials are applied from the high voltage power supply by means of a resistor voltage divider. In the paper the first experimental results obtained with the vacuum insulated tandem accelerator are also given.

  13. CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

  14. Rf cavity primer for cyclic proton accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, J. E.

    1988-04-01

    The electrical and mechanical properities of particle accelerator rf cavities are described in a manner which will be useful to physics and engineering graduates entering the accelerator field. The discussion is limited to proton (or antiproton) synchrotron accelerators or storage rings operating roughly in the range of 20 to 200 MHz. The very high gradient, fixed frequency UHF or microwave devices appropriate for electron machines and the somewhat lower frequency and broader bandwidth devices required for heavy ion accelerators are discussed extensively in other papers in this series. While it is common practice to employ field calculation programs such as SUPERFISH, URMEL, or MAFIA as design aids in the development of rf cavities, we attempt here to elucidate various of the design parameters commonly dealt with in proton machines through the use of simple standing wave coaxial resonator expressions. In so doing, we treat only standing wave structures. Although low-impedance, moderately broad pass-band travelling wave accelerating systems are used in the CERN SPS, such systems are more commonly found in linacs, and they have not been used widely in large cyclic accelerators. Two appendices providing useful supporting material regarding relativistic particle dynamics and synchrotron motion in cyclic accelerators are added to supplement the text.

  15. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  16. DESIGN CRITERIA OF A PROTON FFAG ACCELERATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO, A.G.

    2004-10-13

    There are two major issues that are to be confronted in the design of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerator, namely: (1) the stability of motion over the large momentum range needed for the beam acceleration, and (2) the compactness of the trajectories over the same momentum range to limit the dimensions of the magnets. There are a numbers of rules that need to be followed to resolve these issues. In particular, the magnet arrangement in the accelerator lattice and the distribution of the bending and focusing fields are to be set properly in accordance with these rules. In this report they describe four of these rules that ought to be applied for the optimum design of a FFAG accelerator, especially in the case of proton beams.

  17. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  18. Compact accelerator concept for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporaso, G. J.; Sampayan, S.; Chen, Y.-J.; Harris, J.; Hawkins, S.; Holmes, C.; Krogh, M.; Nelson, S.; Nunnally, W.; Paul, A.; Poole, B.; Rhodes, M.; Sanders, D.; Selenes, K.; Sullivan, J.; Wang, L.; Watson, J.

    2007-08-01

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash X-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  19. Stochastic acceleration of solar flare protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The acceleration of solar flare protons is considered by cyclotron damping of intense Alfven wave turbulence in a magnetic trap. The energy diffusion coefficient is computed for a near-isotropic distribution of super-Alfvenic protons and a steady-state solution for the particle spectrum is found for both transit-time and diffusive losses out of the ends of the trap. The acceleration time to a characteristic energy approximately 20 Mev/nucl can be as short as 10 sec. On the basis of phenomenological arguments an omega/2 frequency dependence for the Alfven wave spectrum is inferred. The correlation time of the turbulence lies in the range .0005 less than tau/corr less than .05s.

  20. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  1. RHIC Proton Luminosity and Polarization Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    The RHIC proton beam polarization can be improved by raising the Booster scraping, which also helps to reduce the RHIC transverse emittance, and therefore to improve the luminosity. By doing this, the beam-beam effect would be enhanced. Currently, the RHIC working point is constrained between 2/3 and 7/10, the 2/3 resonance would affect intensity and luminosity lifetime, and the working point close to 7/10 would enhance polarization decay in store. Run 2013 shows that average polarization decay is merely 1.8% in 8 hours, and most fills have the luminosity lifetime better than 14 hours, which is not a problem. Therefore, even without beam-beam correction, there is room to improve for RHIC polarization and luminosity. The key to push the Booster scraping is to raise the Booster input intensity; for that, two approaches can be used. The first is to extend the LINAC tank 9 pulse width, which has been successfully applied in run 2006. The second is to raise the source temperature, which has been successfully applied in run 2006 and run 2012.

  2. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED BEAMS USING MULTIPLE STRONG PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.AHRENS,L.BAI,M.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20-30% partial Siberian snake both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical superconducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction.

  3. Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Protons: The First 10 Minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Chee K.; Reames, Donald V.

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration at a parallel coronal shock is modeled with self-consistent Alfven wave excitation and shock transmission. 18 - 50 keV seed protons at 0.1% of plasma proton density are accelerated in 10 minutes to a power-law intensity spectrum rolling over at 300 MeV by a 2500km s-1 shock traveling outward from 3.5 solar radius, for typical coronal conditions and low ambient wave intensities. Interaction of high-energy protons of large pitch-angles with Alfven waves amplified by low-energy protons of small pitch angles is key to rapid acceleration. Shock acceleration is not significantly retarded by sunward streaming protons interacting with downstream waves. There is no significant second-order Fermi acceleration.

  4. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W. P.; Li, B. W.; Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Yan, X. Q.; Qiao, B.

    2016-01-01

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 1022 W cm-2, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density.

  5. Preservation and control of the proton and deuteron polarizations in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Filatov, Yury; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kondratenko, M. A.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scheme of preserving the proton and deuteron beam polarizations during acceleration and storage in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab. This scheme allows one to provide both the longitudinal and transverse polarization orientations of the proton and deuteron beams at the interaction points of the figure-8 ion collider ring. We discuss questions of matching the polarization direction at all stages of the beam transport including the pre-booster, large booster and ion collider ring.

  6. Near monochromatic 20 Me V proton acceleration using fs laser irradiating Au foils in target normal sheath acceleration regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ceccio, G.; Cannavò, A.; Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Jakubowska, K.; Ducret, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    A 200 mJ laser pulse energy, 39 fs-pulse duration, 10 μm focal spot, p-polarized radiation has been employed to irradiate thin Au foils to produce proton acceleration in the forward direction. Gold foils were employed to produce high density relativistic electrons emission in the forward direction to generate a high electric field driving the ion acceleration. Measurements were performed by changing the focal position in respect of the target surface. Proton acceleration was monitored using fast SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. A high proton energy, up to about 20 Me V, with a narrow energy distribution, was obtained in particular conditions depending on the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions, and a target optimization.

  7. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  8. Requirements of a proton beam accelerator for an accelerator-driven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Zhao, Y.; Tsoupas, N.; An, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    1997-12-31

    When the authors first proposed an accelerator-driven reactor, the concept was opposed by physicists who had earlier used the accelerator for their physics experiments. This opposition arose because they had nuisance experiences in that the accelerator was not reliable, and very often disrupted their work as the accelerator shut down due to electric tripping. This paper discusses the requirements for the proton beam accelerator. It addresses how to solve the tripping problem and how to shape the proton beam.

  9. Recent results of gluon and sea quark polarization measurements in polarized proton-proton collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Star Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is carrying out a comprehensive high-energy spin physics program to understand the internal structure and dynamics of the proton in polarized proton-proton collisions at = 200 GeV and = 500/510 GeV. STAR has the capability, with nearly full azimuthal coverage, to reconstruct leptons, hadrons and jets in the mid-rapidity region (|η| < 1). The results for inclusive jet longitudinal double spin asymmetries taken during the 2009 RHIC run indicate the first non-zero gluon contribution (Δg(x,Q2)/g(x,Q2)) to the proton spin for 0.05 < x < 1 (Bjorken-x: momentum fraction of partons). Recent longitudinal single-spin asymmetry measurements of W+/- bosons at = 500/510 GeV in polarized proton-proton collisions provide a direct probe of the polarized anti-u and anti-d quark distributions (Δū(x, Q2), Δbar d(x, Q2)). These results better constrain the polarized gluon and sea quark distributions of the proton in the RHIC sensitive kinematic region. Future measurements with continuing high energy polarized proton-proton run at RHIC and detector upgrade will explore the gluonic contribution to the proton spin in extended range.

  10. Spot size dependence of laser accelerated protons in thin multi-ion foils

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung-Chang Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2014-06-15

    We present a numerical study of the effect of the laser spot size of a circularly polarized laser beam on the energy of quasi-monoenergetic protons in laser proton acceleration using a thin carbon-hydrogen foil. The used proton acceleration scheme is a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion due to the carbon ions. We observe that the spot size plays a crucial role in determining the net charge of the electron-shielded carbon ion foil and consequently the efficiency of proton acceleration. Using a laser pulse with fixed input energy and pulse length impinging on a carbon-hydrogen foil, a laser beam with smaller spot sizes can generate higher energy but fewer quasi-monoenergetic protons. We studied the scaling of the proton energy with respect to the laser spot size and obtained an optimal spot size for maximum proton energy flux. Using the optimal spot size, we can generate an 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam containing more than 10{sup 8} protons using a laser beam with power 250 TW and energy 10 J and a target of thickness 0.15 wavelength and 49 critical density made of 90% carbon and 10% hydrogen.

  11. Transition of proton energy scaling using an ultrathin target irradiated by linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, I Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yu, Tae Jun; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Nam, Kee Hwan; Nickles, Peter V; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Particle acceleration using ultraintense, ultrashort laser pulses is one of the most attractive topics in relativistic laser-plasma research. We report proton and/or ion acceleration in the intensity range of 5×10(19) to 3.3×10(20) W/cm2 by irradiating linearly polarized, 30-fs laser pulses on 10-to 100-nm-thick polymer targets. The proton energy scaling with respect to the intensity and target thickness is examined, and a maximum proton energy of 45 MeV is obtained when a 10-nm-thick target is irradiated by a laser intensity of 3.3×10(20) W/cm2. The proton acceleration is explained by a hybrid acceleration mechanism including target normal sheath acceleration, radiation pressure acceleration, and Coulomb explosion assisted-free expansion. The transition of proton energy scaling from I(1/2) to I is observed as a consequence of the hybrid acceleration mechanism. The experimental results are supported by two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:24182274

  12. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  13. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Hamilton; Vahe Mamyan

    2004-10-01

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s = 6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t = -4.0 TeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in excellent agreement with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton and in disagreement with a prediction of pQCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism.

  14. Evidence for polarization of gluons in the proton.

    PubMed

    de Florian, Daniel; Sassot, Rodolfo; Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner

    2014-07-01

    We discuss the impact of recent high-statistics Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider data on the determination of the gluon polarization in the proton in the context of a global QCD analysis of polarized parton distributions. We find evidence for a nonvanishing polarization of gluons in the region of momentum fraction and at the scales mostly probed by the data. Although information from low momentum fractions is presently lacking, this finding is suggestive of a significant contribution of gluon spin to the proton spin, thereby limiting the amount of orbital angular momentum required to balance the proton spin budget. PMID:25032920

  15. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Puckett

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon that describe the effect of its internal quark structure on the cross section and spin observables in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Double-polarization experiments have become the preferred technique to measure the proton and neutron electric form factors at high momentum transfers. The recently completed GEp-III experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility used the recoil polarization method to extend the knowledge of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM to Q2 = 8.5 GeV2. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the experiment.

  16. Simultaneous acceleration of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic quasiparallel collisionless shocks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Caprioli, Damiano; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-02-27

    We study diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic, high Mach number, quasiparallel, collisionless shocks by means of self-consistent 1D particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, both species are found to develop power-law distributions with the universal spectral index -4 in momentum space, in agreement with the prediction of DSA. We find that scattering of both protons and electrons is mediated by right-handed circularly polarized waves excited by the current of energetic protons via nonresonant hybrid (Bell) instability. Protons are injected into DSA after a few gyrocycles of shock drift acceleration (SDA), while electrons are first preheated via SDA, then energized via a hybrid acceleration process that involves both SDA and Fermi-like acceleration mediated by Bell waves, before eventual injection into DSA. Using the simulations we can measure the electron-proton ratio in accelerated particles, which is of paramount importance for explaining the cosmic ray fluxes measured on Earth and the multiwavelength emission of astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants, radio supernovae, and galaxy clusters. We find the normalization of the electron power law is ≲10^{-2} of the protons for strong nonrelativistic shocks. PMID:25768768

  17. Simultaneous Acceleration of Protons and Electrons at Nonrelativistic Quasiparallel Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Caprioli, Damiano; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-02-01

    We study diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic, high Mach number, quasiparallel, collisionless shocks by means of self-consistent 1D particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, both species are found to develop power-law distributions with the universal spectral index -4 in momentum space, in agreement with the prediction of DSA. We find that scattering of both protons and electrons is mediated by right-handed circularly polarized waves excited by the current of energetic protons via nonresonant hybrid (Bell) instability. Protons are injected into DSA after a few gyrocycles of shock drift acceleration (SDA), while electrons are first preheated via SDA, then energized via a hybrid acceleration process that involves both SDA and Fermi-like acceleration mediated by Bell waves, before eventual injection into DSA. Using the simulations we can measure the electron-proton ratio in accelerated particles, which is of paramount importance for explaining the cosmic ray fluxes measured on Earth and the multiwavelength emission of astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants, radio supernovae, and galaxy clusters. We find the normalization of the electron power law is ≲1 0-2 of the protons for strong nonrelativistic shocks.

  18. Micro-sphere layered targets efficiency in laser driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Limpouch, J.; Proska, J.; Novotny, F.; Stolcova, L.; Velyhan, A.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Vassura, L.; Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2013-08-28

    Proton acceleration from the interaction of high contrast, 25 fs laser pulses at >10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intensity with plastic foils covered with a single layer of regularly packed micro-spheres has been investigated experimentally. The proton cut-off energy has been measured as a function of the micro-sphere size and laser incidence angle for different substrate thickness, and for both P and S polarization. The presence of micro-spheres with a size comparable to the laser wavelength allows to increase the proton cut-off energy for both polarizations at small angles of incidence (10∘). For large angles of incidence, however, proton energy enhancement with respect to flat targets is absent. Analysis of electron trajectories in particle-in-cell simulations highlights the role of the surface geometry in the heating of electrons.

  19. Laser Acceleration of Monoenergetic Protons Trapped in Moving Double Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Shao, X.

    2008-10-15

    We present analytic theory of monoenergetic protons acceleration by short pulse laser irradiation on a thin foil with specific thickness suggested by Yan et al. in simulations. The laser ponderomotive force pushes the electrons forward, leaving ions behind until the space charge field balances the ponderomotive force at distance {delta}. For the optimal target thickness D = {delta}>c/{omega}{sub p}, the electron sheath piled up at the rear surface of width skin depth moves into vacuum, carrying with it the protons contained in the sheath. These protons are trapped by the self field of the electron sheath and are collectively accelerated as a double layer by the laser ponderomotive force. We present here the analytic expression for the energy of the accelerated protons as a function of time, laser intensity, wavelength, and plasma density. For example, proton energy can reach {approx_equal}200 MeV at a = 5, and pulse length 90 fs.

  20. Centrifugal acceleration of the polar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, J.L.; Ho, C.W.; Scarbro, H.D.

    1994-08-01

    The effect of parallel ion acceleration associated with convection was first applied to energization of test particle polar ions by Cladis. However, this effect is typically neglected in {open_quotes}self-consistent{close_quotes} models of polar plasma outflow, apart from the fluid simulation by Swift. The authors include approximations for this acceleration, which they broadly characterize as centrifugal in nature, in their time-dependent, semikinetic model of polar plasma outflow. The authors find that the steady state O{sup +} bulk velocities and parallel temperatures strongly increase and decrease, respectively, with convection strength. In particular, the bulk velocities increase from near 0 km s{sup {minus}1} at 4000 km altitude to {approximately} 10 km s{sup {minus}1} at 5 R{sub E} geocentric distance for a 50-mV/m ionospheric convection electric field. However, the centrifugal effect on the steady O{sup +} density profiles depends on the exobase ion and electron temperatures: for low-base temperatures (T{sub i} = T{sub e} = 3000 K) the O{sup +} density at high altitudes increases greatly with convection, while for higher base temperatures (T{sub i} = 5000 K, T{sub e} = 9000 K), the high-altitude O{sup +} density decreases somewhat as convection is enhanced. The centrifugal force further has a pronounced effect on the escaping O{sup +} flux, especially for cool exobase conditions; as referenced to the 4000-km altitude, the steady state O{sup +} flux increases from 10{sup 5} ions cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} when the ionospheric convection field E{sub i} = 0 mV/m to {approximately} 10{sup 7} ions cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} when E{sub i} = 100 mV/m. The centrifugal acceleration described is a possible explanation for the large (up to {approximately} 10 km s{sup {minus}1} or more) O{sup +} outflow velocities observed in the midlatitude polar magnetosphere with the Dynamics Explorer 1 and Akebono spacecraft. 37 refs.

  1. Status Of The Dielectric Wall Accelerator For Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen Yujiuan; Watson, James A.; Blackfield, Don T.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.; Stanley, Joel R.; Sullivan, James S.

    2011-06-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA) offers the potential to produce a high gradient linear accelerator for proton therapy and other applications. The current status of the DWA for proton therapy will be reviewed. Recent progress in SiC photoconductive switch development will be presented. There are serious beam transport challenges in the DWA arising from short pulse excitation of the wall. Solutions to these transport difficulties will be discussed.

  2. Studies of Unstable Nuclei with Spin-Polarized Proton Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Wakui, Takashi; Chebotaryov, Sergey; Kawahara, Tomomi; Kawase, Shoichiro; Milman, Evgeniy; Tang, Tsz Leung; Tateishi, Kenichiro; Teranishi, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Roles of spin-dependent interactions in unstable nuclei have been investigated via the direct reaction of radioactive ions with a solid spin-polarized proton target. The target has a unique advantage of a high polarization of 20-30% under low magnetic field of 0.1 T and at a high temperature of 100 K, which allow us to detect recoil protons with good angular resolution. Present status of on-going experimental studies at intermediate energies, such as proton elastic scattering and (p, 2p) knockout reaction, and new physics opportunities expected with low-energy RI beams are overviewed.

  3. On the threshold of proton acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the reconnection theory of a flare and on recent observational and statistical findings, the problem of the initial acceleration of solar cosmic rays (SCR) is discussed. Simple estimates of the electric fields required to start the electron acceleration are obtained and the problem of proton ionization losses for overcoming the Coulomb barrier is considered. We take into account also the possible differences between proton and electron spectra from the very beginning of the acceleration process. Special attention is paid to the distribution functions of solar flare events in various parameters (peak fluxes and/or energy fluences in X-ray and radio wave bursts, in proton and electron emissions, etc.). It is shown that the distribution functions allow the interpretation of some scale and time flare parameters in terms of expected threshold effects. However, these functions are still insuffienet to evaluate the relative share of different emissions in the global energy budget of a flare. In this context, a more promising approach is to derive the direct ratio between the number of accelerated protons, Np, and total flare energy, Wf, within the frame of a certain acceleration model. It is argued that an absolute threshold for proton production (in Hudson's formulation) does not exist. Meanwhile, the flux and threshold energy of accelerated protons overcoming the Coulomb loss maximum, in fact, may depend heavily on the global output of flare energy.

  4. Laser Acceleration of Protons Using Multi-Ion Plasma Gaseous Targets and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xi; Liu, Tung-Chang; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Hill, Wendell; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2014-10-01

    We present an acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO2 laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 μm, the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the foil compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with peak power 70 TW and pulse duration of 150 wave periods. We compared the effects of modifying the thickness and density of the gaseous targets and showed that the compression of the gaseous target affects significantly in the quasi-monoenergetic property of the proton beams. To assess the feasibility of laser-proton cancer therapy with such a proton accelerator, simulations are carried out to model the interaction of protons with water and determine the depth and lateral dose distribution for particle beams produced from PIC simulation. Comparison between the dosage maps of the proton beams produced with different foil densities and thicknesses is also presented. This work was supported by US DoE Grant DE-SC0008391.

  5. Polarization Status of Magnetic Fluctuations at Proton Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Roberto; Telloni, Daniele; D'Amicis, Raffaella; DeMarco, Rossana; Marcucci, Federica

    2016-04-01

    We study the polarization status of magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales looking for possible links between the large-scale and small-scale features of solar wind fluctuations across the frequency break separating fluid and kinetic regimes. The main goal is to correlate the occurrence of proton temperature anisotropy, low proton β∥ values and, magnetic field fluctuations polarization to the particular state of turbulence found within the inertial range. We found clear correlations between each type of polarization, either left or right, and turbulence status. Moreover, for the first time in literature, we show that left-handed and right handed polarized fluctuations occupy different areas of the temperature anisotropy-β∥ plot, as expected for Alfvén Ion Cyclotron and Kinetic Alfvén waves, respectively.

  6. PIC Simulations Of Ion Acceleration By Linearly And Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Limpouch, Jiri; Klimo, Ondrej; Psikal, Jan; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir T.; Kawata, Shigeo; Andreev, Alexander A.

    2008-06-24

    Linearly polarized laser radiation accelerates electrons to very high velocities and these electron form a sheath layer on the rear side of thin targets where preferentially protons are accelerated. When mass-limited targets are used, the lateral transport of the absorbed laser energy is reduced and the accelerating field is enhanced. For targets consisting of two ion species, heavier ions facilitate formation of quasi-monoenergetic bunch of lighter ions. For circularly polarized light, fast electron production is suppressed by the absence of the oscillatory component of the ponderomotive force. Ions are accelerated on the front side by the separation field and very thin foil can be accelerated as one massive quasi-neutral block. As all ion species acquire the same velocity, this acceleration mechanism is preferred for heavier ions.

  7. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the {pi}{degree} production at high p{sub {perpendicular}} and in the {Lambda} ({Sigma}{degree}), {pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{degree} production at large x{sub F}, and {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(pp, {bar p}p) measurements. 18 refs.

  8. Proton acceleration from microdroplet spray by weakly relativistic femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Xiaoyu; Li Yingjun; Li Hanming; Zhang Jie; Zheng Jun; Sheng Zhengming; Xu Miaohua; Zheng Zhiyuan; Liang Tianjiao; Li Yutong; Dong Quanli; Yuan Xiaohui

    2006-09-15

    Angular distribution of protons is measured from ethanol droplet spray irradiated by linearly polarized 150 fs laser pulses at an intensity of 1.1x10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. Fast protons (with energies >16 keV) with an anisotropic distribution can be observed only in or near the polarization plane of the laser fields, while the slow protons (with energies IE16 keV) emit with nearly an isotropic distribution. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations suggest that three groups of protons originate from different acceleration regimes in the laser-droplet interaction. The first group with the highest energies is accelerated backwards by the anisotropic charge-separation field near the front surface (laser-droplet interaction side) due to the resonance absorption; the second group (forward emission) is generated by the target-normal sheath acceleration mechanism; and the third group, with the lowest energies, is accelerated by the hydrodynamic expansion of the droplet plasmas.

  9. Centrifugal acceleration of the polar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Ho, C. W.; Scarbro, H. D.; Wilson, G. R.; Moore, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of parallel ion acceleration associated with convection was first applied to energization of test particle polar ions by Cladis (1986). However, this effect is typically neglected in 'self-consistent' models of polar plasma outflow, apart from the fluid simulation by Swift (1990). Here we include approximations for this acceleration, which we broadly characterize as centrifugal in nature, in our time-dependent, semikinetic model of polar plasma outflow and describe the effects on the bulk parameter profiles and distribution functions of H+ and O+. For meridional convection across the pole the approximate parallel force along a polar magnetic field line may be written as F(sub cent, pole) = 1.5m(E(sub i))/B(sub i))squared (r(squared)/r(sup 3)(sub i)) where m is ion mass, r is geometric distance; and E(sub i), B(sub i) and r(sub i) refer to the electric and magnetic field magnitudes and geocentric distance at the ionosphere, respectively. For purely longitudinal convection along a constant L shell the parallel force is F(cent. long) = F(sub cent, pole)(1 - (r/(r(sub i)L))(sup 3/2)/(1 - 3r/(4 r(sub i)L))(sup 5/2). For high latitudes the difference between these two cases is relatively unimportant below approximately 5 R(sub E). We find that the steady state O+ bulk velocities and parallel temperatures strongly increase and decrease, respectively, with convection strength. In particular, the bulk velocities increase from near 0 km/s at 4000 km altitude to approximately 10 km/s at 5 R(sub E) geocentric distance for 50-mV/m ionospheric convection electric field. However, the centrifugal effect on the steady O+ density profiles depends on the exobase ion and electron temperatures: for low-base temperatures (T(sub i) = T(sub e) = 3000 K) the O+ density at high altitudes increases greatly with convection, while for higher base temperatures (T(sub i) = 5000 K, T(sub e) = 9000 K), the high-altitude O+ density decreases somewhat as convection is enhanced. The

  10. Proton shock acceleration in laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, M.; Davies, J.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Fahlen, J.; Ren, C.; Tsung, F.; Mori, W. B.

    2003-10-01

    The formation of strong, high Mach number (2--3), electrostatic shocks by laser pulses incident on overdense plasma slabs is observed in 1 and 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, for a wide range of intensities, pulse durations, target thicknesses and densities. The shocks propagate undisturbed across the plasma, accelerating the ions (protons). For dimensionless field strength parameter a_0=16 (Iλ^2 ≈ 3 × 10^20 W cm-2 μm^2, where I is intensity and λ wavelength) the highest energy protons are accelerated by the shock. A plateau in the ion spectrum provides a direct signature for shock acceleration.

  11. Present Status of the TAC Proton Accelerator Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Akkus, B.; Bilgin, P. S.; Caliskan, A.; Yilmaz, M.; Sultansoy, S.

    2007-04-23

    Recently, conceptual design of the Turkic Accelerator Center (TAC) proposal was completed. The main goal of this proposal is a charm factory that consist of a linac-ring type electron-positron collider. In addition, synchrotron radiation from the positron ring, free electron laser from the electron linac and a GeV energy proton accelerator are proposed. The Project related with this proposal has been accepted by the Turkish State Planning Committee. It is planned that the Tecnical Design Repotr of the TAC will have been written in the next three years. In this study we consider main parameters of the TAC proton accelerator, secondary beams and their applications.

  12. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Benmokhtar, F.; Glashauser, C.; McCormick, K.; Ransome, R. D.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Camsonne, A.

    2007-05-04

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  13. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J. P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. J. Holt; C. W. de Jager; M. K. Jones; L. J. Kaufman; E. R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K. D. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I. A. Qattan; R. D. Ransome; P. E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E. C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G. M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; and L. Zhu

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  14. Proton Form Factor Measurements Using Polarization Method: Beyond Born Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Pentchev, Lubomir

    2008-10-13

    Significant theoretical and experimental efforts have been made over the past 7 years aiming to explain the discrepancy between the proton form factor ratio data obtained at JLab using the polarization method and the previous Rosenbluth measurements. Preliminary results from the first high precision polarization experiment dedicated to study effects beyond Born approximation will be presented. The ratio of the transferred polarization components and, separately, the longitudinal polarization in ep elastic scattering have been measured at a fixed Q{sup 2} of 2.5 GeV{sup 2} over a wide kinematic range. The two quantities impose constraints on the real part of the ep elastic amplitudes.

  15. Commissioning of polarized-proton and antiproton beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1988-05-04

    The author described the polarized-proton and polarized-antiproton beams up to 200 GeV/c at Fermilab. The beam line, called MP, consists of the 400-m long primary and 350-m long secondary beam line followed by 60-m long experimental hall. We discuss the characteristics of the polarized beams. The Fermilab polarization projects are designated at E-581/704 initiated and carried out by an international collaboration, Argonne (US), Fermilab (US), Kyoto-Kyushu-Hiroshima-KEK (Japan), LAPP (France), Northwestern University (US), Los Alamos Laboratory (US), Rice (US), Saclay (France), Serpukhov (USSR), INFN Trieste (Italy), and University of Texas (US).

  16. Radiative corrections to polarization observables in electron-proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisyuk, Dmitry; Kobushkin, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    We consider radiative corrections to polarization observables in elastic electron-proton scattering, in particular, for the polarization transfer measurements of the proton form factor ratio μGE/GM. The corrections are of two types: two-photon exchange (TPE) and bremsstrahlung (BS); in the present work we pay special attention to the latter. Assuming small missing energy or missing mass cutoff, the correction can be represented in a model-independent form, with both electron and proton radiation taken into account. Numerical calculations show that the contribution of the proton radiation is not negligible. Overall, at high Q2 and energies, the total correction to μGE/GM grows, but is dominated by TPE. At low energies both TPE and BS may be significant; the latter amounts to ˜0.01 for some reasonable cut-off choices.

  17. Hybrid proton acceleration scheme using relativistic intense laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.; Platonov, K. Yu.; Schnuerer, M.; Prasad, R.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-03-15

    Ion acceleration phenomena at relativistic intense laser interaction with thin foil targets are studied to find an efficient laser-target interaction concept at the conditions, where neither the ponderomotive pressure of the laser light nor the hot electron pressure is negligible. Particle in cell simulations and the analytical model are allowing to predict optimum laser-target parameters and suggesting a significant increase of proton energy if a hybrid proton acceleration scheme is used. In the proposed scenario, the laser polarisation is changed during the acceleration process: First with circularly polarised laser light the target is accelerated as a whole by the ponderamotive pressure, and then with linearly polarised laser light the electrons are heated which additionally increases the accelerating field. The calculations are in good agreement with experimental findings.

  18. Pulsars as cosmic ray particle accelerators: Proton orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielheim, K. O.

    1985-01-01

    Proton orbits are calculated in the electromagnetic vacuum field of a magnetic point dipole rotating with its angular velocity omega perpendicular to its dipole moment mu by numerical integration of the Lorentz-Dirac equation. Trajectories are shown and discussed for various initial conditions. A critical surface is shown separating initial positions of protons which finally hit the pulsar in the polar region from those which finally recede to infinity.

  19. Empirical Determination of Solar Proton Access to the Polar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Jason; Rodger, Craig; Green, Janet; Whittaker, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Violent expulsions on the Sun's surface release high energy solar protons that ultimately affect ionization levels and the local chemical composition in the upper atmosphere as well as High Frequency (HF) communication used by aircraft. The geomagnetic field screens the low altitude equatorial region, but these protons can access the atmosphere over the poles. The latitudes over which the solar protons can reach vary with geomagnetic indices such as Kp and Dst. In this study we use observations from Low Earth Orbit to determine the atmospheric access of solar protons and hence the flights paths most likely to be affected. Observations taken by up to six polar orbiting satellites during 15 solar proton events are analyzed. From this we determine 16,850 proton rigidity cutoff estimates across 3 energy channels. Empirical fits are undertaken to estimate the most likely behavior of the cutoff dependence with geomagnetic activity. We provide simple equations by which the geomagnetic latitude (spatial extent) at which the protons impact the atmosphere can be determined from a given Kp or Dst value. The variation found in the cutoff with Kp is similar to that used in existing operational models, although the changing Kp value is found to lead the variation in the cutoffs by ~3 hours .We also suggest a ~1-2° equatorward shift in latitude would provide greater accuracy. This solar proton access can be used as an input into coupled chemistry climate models and give the likely polar regions to be effected by Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) which causes HF radio 'blackout zones'. We find that a Kp predictive model can provide additional warning to the variation in proton cutoffs. Hence a prediction of the cutoff latitudes can be made ~3 hours to as much as 7 hours into the future, meeting suggested minimum planning times required by the aviation industry.

  20. Nonlinear surface plasma wave induced target normal sheath acceleration of protons

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K. Shao, Xi; Liu, T. C.

    2015-02-15

    The mode structure of a large amplitude surface plasma wave (SPW) over a vacuum–plasma interface, including relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities, is deduced. It is shown that the SPW excited by a p-polarized laser on a rippled thin foil target can have larger amplitude than the transmitted laser amplitude and cause stronger target normal sheath acceleration of protons as reported in a recent experiment. Substantial enhancement in proton number also occurs due to the larger surface area covered by the SPW.

  1. Proton linear accelerators: A theoretical and historical introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lapostolle, P.M.

    1989-07-01

    From the beginning, the development of linear accelerators has followed a number of different directions. This report surveys the basic ideas and general principles of such machines, pointing out the problems that have led to the various improvements, with the hope that it may also aid further progress. After a brief historical survey, the principal aspects of accelerator theory are covered in some detail: phase stability, focusing, radio-frequency accelerating structures, the detailed calculation of particle dynamics, and space-charge effects at high intensities. These developments apply essentially to proton and ion accelerators, and only the last chapter deals with a few aspects relative to electrons. 134 refs.

  2. Measurement of Polarization Observables in the Electro-Excitation of the Proton to its First Excited State

    SciTech Connect

    Rikki Roche

    2003-04-03

    This thesis reports results from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Hall A experiment E91-011, which measured double-polarization observables in the pion electroproduction reaction from the proton. Specifically, the experiment measured the recoil proton polarization, polarized response functions, and cross section for the p{rvec e}, e{prime} {rvec p} {pi}{sup o} reaction at a center-of-mass energy centered at W = 1232 MeV--the peak of the {Delta}(1232) resonance--and at a four-momentum transfer squared of Q{sup 2} = 1.0 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. Both the recoil proton polarization and polarized response function results will be presented in this thesis.

  3. Proton Injector for CW-Mode Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Joseph D.; Swenson, Donald; Guy, Frank; Love, Cody; Starling, Joel; Willis, Carl

    2009-03-01

    Numerous applications exist for CW linear accelerators with final energies in the 0.5 to 4.0 MeV proton energy range. Typical proton current at the linac output energy is 20 mA. An important subsystem for the accelerator facility is a reliable dc mode proton injector. We present here design and laboratory results for a dc, 25-keV, 30-mA proton injector. The proton source is a 2.45-GHz microwave hydrogen ion source which operates with an 875-G axial magnetic field. Low emittance, high proton fraction (>85%), beams have been demonstrated from this source. The injector uses a novel dual-solenoid magnet for matching the injector beam into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. Recently, a dc ion-source development program has given up to 30 mA beam current. The dual solenoid is a compact and simple design utilizing tape-wound, edge-cooled coils. The low-energy beam transport design as well as 25-keV beam matching calculations to an RFQ will also be presented.

  4. Plasma wakefield acceleration with a modulated proton bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, A.; Lotov, K. V.

    2011-10-15

    The plasma wakefield amplitudes which could be achieved via the modulation of a long proton bunch are investigated. We find that in the limit of long bunches compared to the plasma wavelength, the strength of the accelerating fields is directly proportional to the number of particles in the drive bunch and inversely proportional to the square of the transverse bunch size. The scaling laws were tested and verified in detailed simulations using parameters of existing proton accelerators, and large electric fields were achieved, reaching 1 GV/m for LHC bunches. Energy gains for test electrons beyond 6 TeV were found in this case.

  5. TAC Proton Accelerator Facility: The Status and Road Map

    SciTech Connect

    Algin, E.; Akkus, B.; Caliskan, A.; Yilmaz, M.; Sahin, L.

    2011-06-28

    Proton Accelerator (PA) Project is at a stage of development, working towards a Technical Design Report under the roof of a larger-scale Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project. The project is supported by the Turkish State Planning Organization. The PA facility will be constructed in a series of stages including a 3 MeV test stand, a 55 MeV linac which can be extended to 100+ MeV, and then a full 1-3 GeV proton synchrotron or superconducting linac. In this article, science applications, overview, and current status of the PA Project will be given.

  6. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  7. A brief history of high power RF proton linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The first mention of linear acceleration was in a paper by G. Ising in 1924 in which he postulated the acceleration of positive ions induced by spark discharges which produced electric fields in gaps between a series of {open_quotes}drift tubes{close_quotes}. Ising apparently was not able to demonstrate his concept, most likely due to the limited state of electronic devices. Ising`s work was followed by a seminal paper by R. Wideroe in 1928 in which he demonstrated the first linear accelerator. Wideroe was able to accelerate sodium or potassium ions to 50 keV of energy using drift tubes connected alternately to high frequency waves and to ground. Nuclear physics during this period was interested in accelerating protons, deuterons, electrons and alpha particles and not heavy ions like sodium or potassium. To accelerate the light ions required much higher frequencies than available at that time. So linear accelerators were not pursued heavily at that time. Research continued during the 1930s but the development of high frequency RF tubes for radar applications in World War 2 opened the potential for RF linear accelerators after the war. The Berkeley laboratory of E. 0. Lawrence under the leadership of Luis Alvarez developed a new linear proton accelerator concept that utilized drift tubes that required a full RF period to pass through as compared to the earlier concepts. This development resulted in the historic Berkeley 32 MeV proton linear accelerator which incorporated the {open_quotes}Alvarez drift tube{close_quotes} as the basic acceleration scheme using surplus 200 MHz radar components.

  8. Fast scaling of energetic protons generated in the interaction of linearly polarized femtosecond petawatt laser pulses with ultrathin targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    Laser-driven proton/ion acceleration is a rapidly developing research field attractive for both fundamental physics and applications such as hadron therapy, radiography, inertial confinement fusion, and nuclear/particle physics. Laser-driven proton/ion beams, compared to those obtained in conventional accelerators, have outstanding features such as low emittance, small source size, ultra-short duration and huge acceleration gradient of ∼1 MeV μm-1. We report proton acceleration from ultrathin polymer targets irradiated with linearly polarized, 30-fs, 1-PW Ti:sapphire laser pulses. A maximum proton energy of 45 MeV with a broad and modulated profile was obtained when a 10-nm-thick target was irradiated at a laser intensity of 3.3 × 1020 W/cm2. The transition from slow (I1/2) to fast scaling (I) of maximum proton energy with respect to laser intensity I was observed and explained by the hybrid acceleration mechanism including target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration in the acceleration stage and Coulomb-explosion-assisted free expansion in the post acceleration stage.

  9. Enhancing proton acceleration by using composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-07-10

    Efficient laser ion acceleration requires high laser intensities, which can only be obtained by tightly focusing laser radiation. In the radiation pressure acceleration regime, where the tightly focused laser driver leads to the appearance of the fundamental limit for the maximum attainable ion energy, this limit corresponds to the laser pulse group velocity as well as to another limit connected with the transverse expansion of the accelerated foil and consequent onset of the foil transparency. These limits can be relaxed by using composite targets, consisting of a thin foil followed by a near critical density slab. Such targets provide guiding of a laser pulse inside a self-generated channel and background electrons, being snowplowed by the pulse, compensate for the transverse expansion. The use of composite targets results in a significant increase in maximum ion energy, compared to a single foil target case.

  10. Coronal shock acceleration and heliospheric transport of solar energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, Kamen Asenov

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) in the Sun's atmosphere produce highly energetic charged particles during violent bursts of activity. Protons, the most numerous and important species of these solar energetic particles (SEP), accelerate and propagate throughout the heliosphere, probing the interplanetary transport conditions. They also present a significant radiation hazard to space operations. Nevertheless, SEP acceleration in the low corona is currently not well constrained and poorly understood. In this dissertation, I examine off-limb extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave dynamics between 1.3 and 2.0 solar radii in the corona, and I show that the EUV signatures are consistent with CME-driven shocks. Therefore, such shocks may form very low in the corona. I also develop a data-driven model for estimating the maximum energy to which protons may be accelerated in coronal shocks. I apply it to an observed shock and show that it may accelerate protons up to tens of MeV during its fast coronal passage, consistent with in-situ observations. To explore further coronal SEP acceleration by CME-driven shocks, I modify a global, 3D numerical model for interplanetary SEP transport for the coronal conditions, and adapt it to incorporate results from a realistic magnetohydrodynamic coronal and CME model. Furthermore, I apply a diffusive shock acceleration model, which explicitly treats proton energization at traveling shocks, to an MHD simulation of a real CME event. I find that the source population becomes strongly accelerated. In addition, I simulate the proton transport between the Sun and Earth, and find that the modeled fluxes are consistent with particle observations near Earth. Results suggest that CME-driven shocks in the corona may be the primary source of SEPs in solar storms. In addition, conditions along coronal shock fronts vary greatly, influencing the amount of acceleration. Finally, I model the global proton transport between Earth and 5 AU during a

  11. Proton Acceleration beyond 100 EeV by an Oblique Shock Wave in the Jet of 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Yasuko S.; Honda, Mitsuru

    2004-09-01

    We estimate the highest energy of a proton diffusively accelerated by a shock in knot A1 of the jet in luminous nearby quasar 3C 273. Referring to the recent polarization measurements using very long baseline interferometry, we consider the shock propagation across magnetic field lines, namely, configuration of the oblique shock. For larger inclination of the field lines, the effects of particle reflection at the shock front are more pronounced, to significantly increase acceleration efficiency. The quasiperpendicular shock turns out to be needed for safely achieving the proton acceleration to the energy above 100 EeV (1020 eV) in a parameter domain reflecting conceivable energy restrictions.

  12. FIDDLING CARBON STRINGS WITH POLARIZED PROTON BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, H.; KURITA, K.

    2006-05-01

    An innovative polarimeter based on proton carbon elastic scattering in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region was first tested in the Brookhaven AGS successfully. CNI Polarimeters were then installed in the AGS and both RHIC rings. The polarimeter consists of ultra-thin carbon targets and silicon strip detectors. The waveform digitizers are used for signal readout, which allows deadtime-less data processing on the fly. Polarimeters are crucial instrumentation for the RHIC spin physics program. This paper summarizes the polarimeter design issues and operation results.

  13. Helical dipole magnets for polarized protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.

    1997-07-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets will be used in the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to maintain polarization of proton beams and to perform localized spin rotations at the two major experimental detector regions. Requirements for the helical dipole system are discussed, and magnet prototype work is reported.

  14. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  15. Accelerating slow excited state proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J; Concepcion, Javier J; Brennaman, M Kyle; Binstead, Robert A; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-01-15

    Visible light excitation of the ligand-bridged assembly [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(II)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)] (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; L is the bridging ligand, 4-phen-tpy) results in emission from the lowest energy, bridge-based metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state (L(-•))Ru(b)(III)-OH(2) with an excited-state lifetime of 13 ± 1 ns. Near-diffusion-controlled quenching of the emission occurs with added HPO(4)(2-) and partial quenching by added acetate anion (OAc(-)) in buffered solutions with pH control. A Stern-Volmer analysis of quenching by OAc(-) gave a quenching rate constant of k(q) = 4.1 × 10(8) M(-1) • s(-1) and an estimated pK(a)* value of ~5 ± 1 for the [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L(•-))Ru(b)(III)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)]* excited state. Following proton loss and rapid excited-state decay to give [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(II)(bpy)(OH)(3+)] in a H(2)PO(4)(-)/HPO(4)(2-) buffer, back proton transfer occurs from H(2)PO(4)(-) to give [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)] with k(PT,2) = 4.4 × 10(8) M(-1) • s(-1). From the intercept of a plot of k(obs) vs. [H(2)PO(4)(-)], k = 2.1 × 10(6) s(-1) for reprotonation by water providing a dramatic illustration of kinetically limiting, slow proton transfer for acids and bases with pK(a) values intermediate between pK(a)(H(3)O(+)) = -1.74 and pK(a)(H(2)O) = 15.7. PMID:23277551

  16. Direct Photon Production and Gluon Polarization Measurements in Proton-Proton Collisions at PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feege, Nils; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Direct photons probe the hard scattering process in proton-proton collisions. The channel that dominates their production in these collisions is ``the inverse QCD Compton effect,'' g + q --> γ + q . Calculating this process requires no photon fragmentation function, which facilitates comparisons between theories and experiments. In polarized p+p collisions, direct photons help determine the proton spin structure. At leading order, the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry ALL is directly proportional to the product of quark and gluon polarizations. The polarized quark distributions are known from polarized lepton-proton scattering experiments. Using them together with ALL measurements allows to access both the magnitude and sign of the polarized gluon distribution. The PHENIX experiment has collected data from polarized p+p collisions at RHIC at center of mass energies of 200 GeV and 500 GeV. This talk presents the status of direct photon cross section measurements and ALL measurements at midrapidity (| η | < 0 . 35) using these data.

  17. Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, AY; Sitnov, MI; Merkin, VG; Artemyev, AV

    2013-01-01

    [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processes operate in a realistic magnetotail geometry. For this purpose we construct an analytical model of the front which is superimposed onto the ambient field of the magnetotail. According to our numerical simulations, both trapping and quasi-trapping can produce rapid acceleration of protons by more than an order of magnitude. In the case of trapping, the acceleration levels depend on the amount of time particles stay in phase with the front which is controlled by the magnetic field curvature ahead of the front and the front width. Quasi-trapping does not cause particle scattering out of the equatorial plane. Energization levels in this case are limited by the number of encounters particles have with the front before they get magnetized behind it. PMID:26167430

  18. Proton acceleration from short pulse lasers interacting with ultrathin foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, George; McGuffey, Christopher; Thomas, Alec; Krushelnick, Karl; Beg, Farhat

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using 50 nm Si3N4 and DLC foils are compared to published experimental data of proton acceleration from ultra-thin foils (<1 μm) irradiated by short pulse lasers (30-50 fs), and some underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration have been addressed. 2D particle-in-cell simulations show that the maximum proton energy scales as I2/3, stronger than Target Normal Sheath Acceleration for thick foils (>1 μm), which is typically between I1/3 and I1/2. Published experimental data were found to depend primarily on the laser energy and scale as E2/3. The different scaling laws for thick (>1 μm) and ultra-thin (<1 μm) foils are explained qualitatively as transitioning from Target Normal Sheath Acceleration to more advanced acceleration schemes such as Radiation-Induced Transparency and Radiation Pressure Acceleration regimes. This work was performed with the support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant FA9550-14-1-0282.

  19. Polarized Structure Functions: Proton/Deuteron Measurements in Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Oscar A. Rondon

    2005-02-01

    The study of the nucleon polarized structure functions has matured beyond the inclusive measurements of the past to the investigation of all eight quark distribution functions in the nucleon. Jefferson Lab's Hall C program of polarized structure functions studies started with a measurement of the proton and deuteron spin structure in the resonances at Q2 {approx} 1.3 [GeV/c]2. This work will be extended for the proton to more than 5 [GeV/c]2 for both DIS and the resonances in the upcoming SANE experiment. SANE will use a novel non-magnetic very large solid angle detector, BETA. Semi-inclusive asymmetries will be measured to determine the flavor composition of the nucleon spin in the recently approved Semi-SANE experiment. The 11 GeV energy upgrade will open new opportunities to study other functions, such as the transversity, Collins and Sievers functions, using vertical polarized targets.

  20. Polarized Structure Functions: Proton/Deuteron Measurements in Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Rondon, Oscar A.

    2005-02-10

    The study of the nucleon polarized structure functions has matured beyond the inclusive measurements of the past to the investigation of all eight quark distribution functions in the nucleon. Jefferson Lab's Hall C program of polarized structure functions studies started with a measurement of the proton and deuteron spin structure in the resonances at Q2 {approx} 1.3 [GeV/c]2. This work will be extended for the proton to more than 5 [GeV/c]2 for both DIS and the resonances in the upcoming SANE experiment. SANE will use a novel non-magnetic very large solid angle detector, BETA. Semi-inclusive asymmetries will be measured to determine the flavor composition of the nucleon spin in the recently approved Semi -- SANE experiment. The 11 GeV energy upgrade will open new opportunities to study other functions, such as the transversity, Collins and Sievers functions, using vertical polarized targets.

  1. Helical Dipole Magnets for Polarized Protons in RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Luccio, A.; Mariam, F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Willen, E.; Katayama, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Okamura, M.; Tominaka, T.; Wu, H.; Ptitsin, V.; Shatunov, Y.

    1997-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be able to support experiments using polarized proton beams. Siberian Snakes are used to maintain polarization in this high energy superconducting collider. To make efficient use of available space while taking advantage of high field superconducting magnets, 4 Tesla helical dipole magnets will be used. These magnets generate a central dipole field in which the field direction rotates through 360^circ about the longitudinal axis over the length of the device. An arrangement of four such magnets can produce the desired change in the spin direction while keeping the proton orbit outside of the ``Snake'' unaltered. Similar magnet arrangements will be used to produce longitudinal polarization at the two major interaction points in RHIC. The basic requirements and layout of these magnets are described, as well as tolerances on field quality and integrated field strengths. First results of tests of prototype helical magnets will be discussed.

  2. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  3. Acceleration of electrons by the wake field of proton bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel idea to accelerate low-intensity bunches of electrons (or positrons) by the wake field of intense proton bunches travelling along the axis of a cylindrical rf structure. Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/m and large ''transformer ratios'', which allow for acceleration of electrons to energies in the TeV range, are calculated. A possible application of the method is an electron-positron linear collider with luminosity of 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/. The relatively low cost and power consumption of the method is emphasized.

  4. First measurements of laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz Dufrenoy, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Gremillet, L.

    2012-09-15

    We present our first results about laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence in solids. In the first part, we describe the optimization of the proton source as a function of the target thickness as well as the laser pulse duration and energy. Due to the ultra high contrast ratio of our laser beam, we succeeded in using targets ranging from the micron scale down to nanometers thickness. The two optimal thicknesses we put in evidence are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Laser pulse duration shows a small influence on proton maximum energy, whereas the latter turns out to vary almost linearly as a function of laser energy. Thanks to this optimisation work, we have been able to acquire images of the proton energy deposition in a solid scintillator.

  5. Application of ILC superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Aseev, V.N.; Gonin, I.V.; Rusnak, B.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2007-10-01

    Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC) will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC) cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on {pi}-mode to provide maximum accelerating gradient. Significant R&D effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its RF system which resulted excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above {approx}1.2 GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC) cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for {beta}{sub G} = 0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H{sup -} from {approx}420 MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new {beta}{sub G} = 0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9{pi}-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  6. The recoil proton polarization in. pi. p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seftor, C.J.

    1988-09-01

    The polarization of the recoil proton for ..pi../sup +/p and ..pi../sup -/p elastic scattering has been measured for various angles at 547 MeV/c and 625 MeV/c by a collaboration involving The George Washington University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and Abilene Christian University. The experiment was performed at the P/sup 3/ East experimental area of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Beam intensities varied from 0.4 to 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup -/'s/sec and from 3.0 to 10.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup +/'s/sec. The beam spot size at the target was 1 cm in the horizontal direction by 2.5 cm in the vertical direction. A liquid-hydrogen target was used in a flask 5.7 cm in diameter and 10 cm high. The scattered pion and recoil proton were detected in coincidence using the Large Acceptance Spectrometer (LAS) to detect and momentum analyze the pions and the JANUS recoil proton polarimeter to detect and measure the polarization of the protons. Results from this experiment are compared with previous measurements of the polarization, with analyzing power data previously taken by this group, and to partial-wave analysis predictions. 12 refs., 53 figs., 18 tabs.

  7. Emittance measurements from the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Gillespie, G. H.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    A new method of calculating beam emittances at the extraction point of a particle accelerator is presented. The technique uses the optimization programs NPSOL and MINOS developed at Stanford University in order to determine the initial values of beam size, divergence and correlation parameters (i.e. beam sigma matrix, σij) that best fit measured beam parameters. These σij elements are then used to compute the Twiss parameters α, β, and the phase space area, ε, of the beam at the extraction point. Beam size measurements in X and Y throughout the transport line were input to the optimizer along with the magnetic elements of bends, quads, and drifts. The σij parameters were optimized at the accelerator's extraction point by finding the best agreement between these measured beam sizes and those predicted by TRANSPORT. This expands upon a previous study in which a "trial and error" technique was used instead of the optimizer software, and which yielded similar results. The Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab™) program used for this paper integrates particle beam optics and other codes into a single intuitive graphically-based computing environment. This new software provides a seamless interface between the NPSOL and MINOS optimizer and TRANSPORT calculations. The results of these emittance searches are presented here for the eight clinical energies between 70 and 250 MeV currently being used at LLUMC.

  8. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  9. Proton Spin Polarizabilities with Polarized Compton Scattering at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudyal, Dilli; A2 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The nucleon polarizabilities are fundamental structure observables, which describe its response to an applied electric or magnetic field. While the electric and magnetic scalar polarizabilities of the nucleon have been measured, little effort has been made to extract the spin dependent polarizabilities. These leading order spin dependent terms of the nucleon polarizabilities, γE1E1 ,γM1M1 ,γM1E2 and γE1M2 describe the spin response of a proton to electric and magnetic dipole and quadrupole interactions. We plan to extract these spin polarizabilities of the proton using real polarised Compton scattering off the proton at the MAMI tagged photon facility in Mainz, Germany. This requires precise measurement of the single and double polarization observables which are sensitive to these polarizabilities. The double polarization observables ∑2 x, ∑2 z are measured via a circulary polarized photon beam and a transversely and a linearly polarized butanol target in the resonance region (E = 250 - 310 MeV). This presentation will be focused on the status and analyis of an experiment completed at MAMI in 2014 and 2015 for the measurement of ∑2 z at different energies and angles. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  10. Laser Proton acceleration from mass limited silicon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, K.; Kraft, S.; Richter, T.; Metzkes, J.; Bussmann, M.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Fuchs, J.; Buffechoux, S.

    2009-11-01

    We present recent studies on laser proton acceleration experiments using mass limited silicon targets. Small micro machined silicon foils with 2 μm thickness and 20x20 μm2 to 100x100μm2 size mounted on very tiny stalks were shot with the 100 TW LULI Laser (long pulse 150 fs) and with the new 150 TW DRACO Laser facility (short pulse 30 fs) of the Research Centre Dresden-Rossendorf. The experiments were carried out using high contrast levels. Proton spectra have been measured with magnetic spectrometers and radio chromic film stacks.

  11. RHIC UPGRADES FOR HEAVY IONS AND POLARIZED PROTONS.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.; ALESSI, J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.; ROSER, T.

    2005-10-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), in operation since 2000, has exceeded its design parameters. The Enhanced Design parameters, expected to be reached in 2009, call for a 4-fold increase over the heavy ion design luminosity, and a 15-fold increase over the proton design luminosity, the latter with an average polarization of 70%. Also in 2009, it is planned to commission a new Electron Beam Ion Source, offering increased reliability and ion species that cannot be supplied currently. The upgrade to RHIC 11, based on electron cooling of the beams, aims to increase the average heavy ion luminosity by an order of magnitude, and the polarized proton luminosity by a factor 2-5. Plans for an electron-ion collider eRHIC is covered in another article in these proceedings.

  12. Laser acceleration of protons using multi-ion plasma gaseous targets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung -Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan -Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; W. T. Hill, III; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih -Hung

    2015-02-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of a novel acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO₂ laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 μm—much greater than that of a Ti: Sapphire laser—the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the target compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. By impinging such a laser beam on a carbon–hydrogen target, the gaseous target is first compressed and accelerated by radiation pressure until the electron layer disrupts, after which the protons are further accelerated by the electron-shielded carbon ion layer. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with a peak power of 70 TW and a pulse duration of 150 wave periods.

  13. Laser acceleration of protons using multi-ion plasma gaseous targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Tung -Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan -Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; W. T. Hill, III; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih -Hung

    2015-02-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of a novel acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO₂ laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 μm—much greater than that of a Ti: Sapphire laser—the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the target compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. By impinging such amore » laser beam on a carbon–hydrogen target, the gaseous target is first compressed and accelerated by radiation pressure until the electron layer disrupts, after which the protons are further accelerated by the electron-shielded carbon ion layer. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with a peak power of 70 TW and a pulse duration of 150 wave periods.« less

  14. RHIC 100 GeV Polarized Proton Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    A big problem in RHIC 100 GeV proton run 2009 was the significantly lower luminosity lifetime than all previous runs. It is shown in this note that the beam intensity decay in run 2009 is caused by the RF voltage ramping in store. It is also shown that the beam decay is not clearly related to the beam momentum spread, therefore, not directly due to the 0.7m. β* Furthermore, the most important factor regarding the low luminosity lifetime is the faster transverse emittance growth in store, which is also much worse than the previous runs, and is also related to the RF ramping. In 100 GeV proton run 2012a, the RF ramping was abandoned, but the β* was increased to 0.85m, with more than 20% loss of luminosity, which is not necessary. It is strongly suggested to use smaller β* in 100 GeV polarized proton run 2015/2016

  15. Polarized anti-protons with the spin splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Rossmanith, Robert

    1988-05-01

    In this paper a method for polarizing protons, antiprotons and ions using the Stern-Gerlach effect will be discussed. A test of this effect, forseen for the low energy antiproton storage ring LEAR at CERN, is described. In this test particles with different spin directions are separated by a combination of a solenoid together with several skew quadrupoles: this device is called a spin splitter.

  16. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    PubMed Central

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  17. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets.

    PubMed

    Stockem Novo, A; Kaluza, M C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  18. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  19. Proton Shock Acceleration in Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Luís O.; Marti, Michael; Davies, Jonathan R.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Ren, Chuang; Tsung, Frank S.; Mori, Warren B.

    2004-01-01

    The formation of strong, high Mach number (2 3), electrostatic shocks by laser pulses incident on overdense plasma slabs is observed in one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, for a wide range of intensities, pulse durations, target thicknesses, and densities. The shocks propagate undisturbed across the plasma, accelerating the ions (protons). For a dimensionless field strength parameter a0=16 (Iλ2≈3×1020 W cm-2 μm2, where I is the intensity and λ the wavelength), and target thicknesses of a few microns, the shock is responsible for the highest energy protons. A plateau in the ion spectrum provides a direct signature for shock acceleration.

  20. Measurement of Polarization Observables in the Electro-Excitation of the Proton to its First Excited State

    SciTech Connect

    Rikki Roche

    2003-08-01

    This thesis reports results from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Hall A experiment E91-011, which measured double-polarization observables in the pion electroproduction reaction from the proton. Specifically, the experiment measured the recoil proton polarization, polarized response functions, and cross section for the p({rvec e}, e{prime} {rvec p}) {pi}{sup o} reaction at a center-of-mass energy centered at W = 1232 MeV--the peak of the Delta(1232) resonance--and at a four-momentum transfer squared of Q{sup 2} = 1.0 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. Both the recoil proton polarization and polarized response function results will be presented in this thesis. Data were collected at Jefferson Lab, located in Newport News, Virginia during the summer of 2000. A 4.53 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off of a cryogenic hydrogen target. The recoil proton polarization was measured in the Focal Plane Polarimeter (FPP), located in one of the two High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS) in Hall A. A maximum likelihood method was used to determine the polarized response functions directly from the measured polarizations and cross sections. A simultaneous fit of the cross sections, the recoil proton polarizations, and angular distributions of the polarized response functions will provide a determination of individual multipole amplitudes. Some of these multipole amplitudes are related to the concept of proton deformation. Both the recoil proton polarizations and polarized response functions were compared to two phenomenological models: MAID and SAID, which have all free parameters fixed, based on fits to previous world data. The measured helicity dependent observables, which are dominated by imaginary parts of Delta(1232)-resonance excitation multipole amplitudes, agree very well with the two models. The measured helicity independent observables, which are dominated by real parts of background multipole amplitudes, do not agree completely with either

  1. The polarized electron source of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.; Alley, R.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Mulhollan, G.; Saez, P.; Tang, H.; Witte, K.

    1994-08-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator has been running with polarized electrons both in the collider (SLC) mode and in the fixed target mode. The accelerators polarized electron source is based on a thin, strained GaAs photocathode, which is held at a negative high voltage and illuminated by a Titanium Sapphire laser. The reliability of the source was better than 95% during the eight-month-long 1993 SLC run. A beam polarization of 63% was measured by the SLD experiment at the SLC interaction point in the 1993 data run. The fixed-target experiment E143 measured a beam polarization of 85% in its 1993--94 run. These polarization measurements, made at high energy, are in good agreement with measurements made at low energy on a calibrated Mott polarimeter. The higher beam polarization in the fixed target experiment is due to a thinner, more highly strained GaAs photocathode than had been used earlier, and to the experiment`s low beam current requirements. The SLC is now running with the high polarization photocathode. Details of the source, and experience with the high polarization strained GaAs photocathodes on the accelerator in the current SLC run, will be presented.

  2. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  3. The effect of stochastic re-acceleration on the energy spectrum of shock-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Vainio, Rami; Kocharov, Leon

    2014-07-20

    The energy spectra of particles in gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events do not always have a power-law form attributed to the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In particular, the observed spectra in major SEP events can take the form of a broken (double) power law. In this paper, we study the effect of a process that can modify the power-law spectral form produced by the diffusive shock acceleration: the stochastic re-acceleration of energetic protons by enhanced Alfvénic turbulence in the downstream region of a shock wave. There are arguments suggesting that this process can be important when the shock propagates in the corona. We consider a coronal magnetic loop traversed by a shock and perform Monte Carlo simulations of interactions of shock-accelerated protons with Alfvén waves in the loop. The wave-particle interactions are treated self-consistently, so the finiteness of the available turbulent energy is taken into account. The initial energy spectrum of particles is taken to be a power law. The simulations reveal that the stochastic re-acceleration leads either to the formation of a spectrum that is described in a wide energy range by a power law (although the resulting power-law index is different from the initial one) or to a broken power-law spectrum. The resulting spectral form is determined by the ratio of the energy density of shock-accelerated protons to the wave energy density in the shock's downstream region.

  4. Proton shock acceleration using a high contrast high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; Kim, Jongjin; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art; Kerr, Shaun; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Ruby, John; William, Jackson; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration is a field of intense research due to the interesting characteristics of this novel particle source including high brightness, high maximum energy, high laminarity, and short duration. Although the ion beam characteristics are promising for many future applications, such as in the medical field or hybrid accelerators, the ion beam generated using TNSA, the acceleration mechanism commonly achieved, still need to be significantly improved. Several new alternative mechanisms have been proposed such as collisionless shock acceleration (CSA) in order to produce a mono-energetic ion beam favorable for those applications. We report the first results of an experiment performed with the TITAN laser system (JLF, LLNL) dedicated to the study of CSA using a high intensity (5x1019W/cm2) high contrast ps laser pulse focused on 55 μm thick CH and CD targets. We show that the proton spectrum generated during the interaction exhibits high-energy mono-energetic features along the laser axis, characteristic of a shock mechanism.

  5. Solar proton impact on polar ozone and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkina, E.; Shumilov, O.; Kyro, E.; Kivi, R.

    The influence of solar proton events of Ground Level Event (GLE) type on ozone layer through the aerosol creation at high latitudes on the base of some experimental data and model simulation is discussed. For analysis we used ozone total content measurements from TOMS and ground based ozonometers installed at high latitudes (Barentsburg, corrected geomagnetic latitude: 74.9; Murmansk, 64.5; Sodankyla, 63.5). Ozonesonde data from Sodankyla observatory have also been used. A possible trigger mechanism of ozone destruction by incident solar protons including ion nucleation mechanism and heterogeneous chemistry is discussed. The model calculations of altitude distribution of CN (condensation nuclei), plausible centres of sulfate aerosol and Polar Startospheric Cloud (PSC) formation, are presented. Analysis of experimental data and model calculations permits us to explain some distinctions observed in ozone total content variations during several GLEs. For example, aerosol content increased significantly during moderate 21-24 May 1990 GLEs, when polar ozone "miniholes" (ozone total content depletions up to 20%)have been observed. Other GLEs (more intensive ones: 2 May 1998, 14 July 2000, 15 April 2001) caused no considerable enhancement in aerosol layer. In other words the value of aerosol increase during GLE depends on the spectrum of incident solar protons. These results demonstrate that only moderate GLEs can increase aerosol content significantly and cause ozone "minihole" creation.

  6. Laser-Produced and Accelerated High Energy Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Ultra-low emittance, multi-MeV proton beams have recently been produced by the interaction of high-intensity short-pulse lasers with thin metallic foils [1]. The acceleration process proceeds in two steps. First the laser ponderomotively accelerates huge, MA currents of ˜MeV electrons which propagate through the foil and form a dense relativistic electron sheath on the non-irradiated rear surface. This sheath produces an electrostatic field >10^12 V/m that ionizes the surface atoms almost instantaneously, forming a ˜1 nm thick ion layer which, together with the electron sheath, resembles a virtual cathode. The ions are accelerated initially normal to the foil surface, followed by a diverging plasma expansion phase driven by the electron plasma pressure. By structuring the rear surface of the foil, we have succeeded to produce modulations in the transverse phase space of the ions, which resemble fiducial ``beamlets'' within the envelope of the expanding plasma. This allows one to image the initial accelerating sheath, and map the plasma expansion of the beam envelope, to fully reconstruct the transverse phase space. We find that for protons of 10 MeV, the normalized transverse rms emittance is less than 0.004 π mm.mrad [1], i.e. 100-fold better than typical RF accelerators and at substantially higher ion currents exceeding 10 kA. Recent results will be reported on stripping the electrons while maintaining the low emittance from experiments at the LULI 100 TW laser, and theoretical estimates of the lowest emittance which can be expected based on ion heating mechanisms during the initial sheath formation and ion acceleration processes, will be presented. [1] T.E. Cowan, J. Fuchs, H. Ruhl et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004).

  7. Beam optics of the 2 MeV proton injection line at the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    Simulations of the beam optics of the LLUMC proton accelerator injection line have been modeled using the computer codes Parmila [Los Alamos Nat'l Lab, Internal Report LA-UR-98-4478, Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group, Los Alamos, NM] and Trace 3D [Distributed by AccelSoft Inc, P.O. Box 2813. Del Mar, CA 92014, United States]. These simulations give reasonable agreement with the known accelerator dispersion, beam energy spread and optimal debuncher setting. The purpose of this paper is to understand the beam losses and show where improvements can be made, if required, in the future. It has previously been found [G. Coutrakon et al., J. Med. Phys. 20 (11) (1994) 1691] that most intensity losses in the synchrotron can be ascribed to the narrow energy acceptance of the synchrotron. While the present intensity of the accelerator is quite adequate for patient treatments, future plans to treat larger fields will make higher intensity more desirable. A simulation has been performed which adds a second debuncher, or energy compactor, which shows a reduction in energy spread by a factor of two yielding a factor of two increase in the available intensity. The present intensity of 2.5 × 1010 protons per pulse with 34% of the injected intensity captured in the ring can possibly be improved to 5 × 1010 protons per pulse by capturing 68% of the injected beam intensity. These results are discussed in this paper.

  8. The BESS-Polar Proton & Helium flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hams, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Mitchell, J.W.; Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K.C.; Kumazawal, T.; Lee, M.H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Moiseev, A.A.; Meyers, Z.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J.F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E.S.; Shikaze, Y.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Suzuki, J.; Takasugi, Y.; Takeuchi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshimura, K.

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) instrument pro-vides precise measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of the light Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) component. The ability to determine the charge sign of incident par-ticles enables the instrument to search for GCR antimatter, which is a major objective of the BESS program. Since 1993, the US-Japan BESS collaboration has conducted 11 successful balloon flights, nine northern-latitude flights of 1-day duration and most recently two long-duration balloon flights (8.5 days in 2004 & 24.5 days in 2007/2008), with the BESS-Polar instrument. The BESS-Polar instrument is the current effort of BESS program specifically designed for long-duration, low-geomagnetic cutoff Antarctic flights with significantly increased transparency for incident CR particle allowing to study anti/proton down to 100 MeV and a faster data acquisition enables processing of all CR events without event selection. The first BESS-Polar flight was launched on Dec 13, 2004 from Williams Field, near McMurdo Station in Antarctica. The instrument recorded data for 8.5 days, limited by the cryogenic life time of the superconducting magnet. During this flight the BESS-Polar instrument recorded 0.9 x 109 CR events. In this paper, we present the absolute proton and helium flux for the first BESS-Polar flight as well as the time variation of the fluxes due to solar activity.

  9. The Quest for Spinning Glue in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Surrow, Bernd

    2007-10-26

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at {radical}(s) = 200-500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A{sub LL}, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV.

  10. First acceleration of a proton beam in a side coupled drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsivalle, C.; Picardi, L.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Marracino, F.; Nenzi, P.; Snels, C.; Surrenti, V.; Vadrucci, M.; Ambrosini, F.

    2015-07-01

    We report the first experiment aimed at the demonstration of low-energy protons acceleration by a high-efficiency S-band RF linear accelerator. The proton beam has been accelerated from 7 to 11.6 MeV by a 1 meter long SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac) module powered with 1.3 MW. The experiment has been done in the framework of the Italian TOP-IMPLART (Oncological Therapy with Protons-Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Linear Accelerator for Radio-Therapy) project devoted to the realization of a proton therapy centre based on a proton linear accelerator for intensity modulated cancer treatments to be installed at IRE-IFO, the largest oncological hospital in Rome. It is the first proton therapy facility employing a full linear accelerator scheme based on high-frequency technology.

  11. Stochastic acceleration of solar protons in the transrelativistic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, J.; Schlickeiser, R.

    1989-10-01

    A model for the stochastic proton acceleration in solar flares with solutions valid for all energies is presented. A comparison with measured proton spectra supplies excellent agreement for shock dominated events and deviations in the nonrelativistic range for spectra of curved shape in contradiction to the conclusions of McGuire and v. Rosenvinge 1984, who used exclusively the non- and ultrarelativistic approximation. The deviations are discussed in detail with regard to a more accurate consideration of the spatial conditions. In the case of a constant escape time we obtain a theoretical spectrum that can be used for calculating the gamma ray radiation with energies greater than 10 MeV, reproducing the data in the transrelativistic region, where the relevant cross sections of the radiation producing processes are maximal.

  12. High power solid state rf amplifier for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2008-01-15

    A 1.5 kW solid state rf amplifier at 352 MHz has been developed and tested at RRCAT. This rf source for cw operation will be used as a part of rf system of 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. A rf power of 1.5 kW has been achieved by combining output power from eight 220 W rf amplifier modules. Amplifier modules, eight-way power combiner and divider, and directional coupler were designed indigenously for this development. High efficiency, ease of fabrication, and low cost are the main features of this design.

  13. Polarization Losses under Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Supported Pt Catalyst in PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh K.; Shao, Yuyan; Kou, Rong; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior for Pt catalysts supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Vulcan XC-72 in proton exchange membrane fuel cells under accelerated stress test was examined by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and polarization technique. Pt catalyst supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes exhibited highly stable electrochemical surface area, oxygen reduction kinetics, and fuel cell performance at a highly oxidizing condition, indicating multiwalled carbon nanotubes show high corrosion resistance and strong interaction with Pt nanoparticles. The Tafel slope, ohmic resistances, and limiting current density determined were used to differentiate kinetic, ohmic, mass-transfer polarization losses from the actual polarization curve. Kinetic contribution to the total overpotential was larger throughout the stress test. However, the fraction of kinetic overpotential decreased and mass-transfer overpotential portion remained quite constant during accelerated stress test, whereas the fraction of ohmic overpotential primarily originating from severe proton transport limitation in the catalyst layer increased under the anodic potential hold.

  14. Technical assessment of the Loma Linda University proton therapy accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    In April 1986, officials of Loma Linda University requested that Fermilab design and construct a 250 MeV proton synchrotron for radiotherapy, to be located at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. In June 1986 the project, having received all necessary approvals, commenced. In order to meet a desirable schedule providing for operation in early 1990, it was decided to erect such parts of the accelerator as were complete at Fermilab and conduct a precommissioning activity prior to the completion of the building at Loma Linda which will house the final radiotherapy facility. It was hoped that approximately one year would be saved by the precommissioning, and that important information would be obtained about the system so that improvements could be made during installation at Loma Linda. This report contains an analysis by Fermilab staff members of the information gained in the precommissioning activity and makes recommendations about steps to be taken to enhance the performance of the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda. In the design of the accelerator, effort was made to employ commercially available components, or to industrialize the products developed so that later versions of the accelerator could be produced industrially. The magnets could only be fabricated at Fermilab if the schedule was to be met, but efforts were made to transfer that technology to industry. Originally, it was planned to use a 1.7 MeV RFQ fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as injector, but LBL would have found it difficult to meet the project schedule. After consideration of other options, for example a 3.4 MeV tandem accelerator, a supplier (AccSys Inc.) qualified itself to provide a 2 MeV RFQ on a schedule well matched to the project schedule. This choice was made, but a separate supplier was selected to develop and provide the 425 MHz power amplifier for the RFQ.

  15. Requirements for the Loma Linda proton therapy accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, George; Ghebremedhin, Abiel

    1999-06-10

    More than eight years have passed since Loma Linda University Medical Center treated its first cancer patient with the world's first hospital based proton therapy accelerator. Using a synchrotron with extracted energies in the range of 70 to 250 MeV, nearly one hundred patients per day have been treated at the facility. Over the past five years, more than 97% of the patients received treatments on the day they were scheduled for irradiation. The activity schedules of accelerator maintenance and operations to maintain this patient load and accelerator reliability are presented in this paper. A typical 24-hour schedule of daily beam activities is presented. The specifications of what was needed in 1990 and what is needed now will also be discussed, as will an accelerator control system upgrade for achieving better intensity and energy control for more advanced dose localization. These new requirements include rapid energy and intensity changes within a patient treatment, fast beam abort systems, uniform beam spill, and energy control to better than 0.1%.

  16. Requirements for the Loma Linda proton therapy accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, George; Ghebremedhin, Abiel

    1999-06-01

    More than eight years have passed since Loma Linda University Medical Center treated its first cancer patient with the world's first hospital based proton therapy accelerator. Using a synchrotron with extracted energies in the range of 70 to 250 MeV, nearly one hundred patients per day have been treated at the facility. Over the past five years, more than 97% of the patients received treatments on the day they were scheduled for irradiation. The activity schedules of accelerator maintenance and operations to maintain this patient load and accelerator reliability are presented in this paper. A typical 24-hour schedule of daily beam activities is presented. The specifications of what was needed in 1990 and what is needed now will also be discussed, as will an accelerator control system upgrade for achieving better intensity and energy control for more advanced dose localization. These new requirements include rapid energy and intensity changes within a patient treatment, fast beam abort systems, uniform beam spill, and energy control to better than 0.1%.

  17. Proton laser accelerator by means of the inverse free electron laser mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Zakowicz, W.

    1984-07-01

    The inverse free electron laser accelerator is considered to be a potential high gradient electron accelerator. In this accelerator electrons oscillating in the magnetic field of a wiggler can gain energy from a strong laser beam propagating collinearly. The same mechanism of acceleration can work for protons and all other heavier particles. One can expect that the proton acceleration will be less effective, as it is more difficult to wiggle a heavier particle. It is indeed so, but this less efficient coupling of the proton and laser beam is partly compensated by the negligible radiative losses. These losses impose restrictions on the electron acceleration above 100 Gev. 6 references, 2 figures.

  18. Spin dependence in polarized proton-proton elastic scattering at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyku, Donika

    The STAR (Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC - Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) experiment is equipped with Roman Pots, insertion devices that allow detectors to be moved close to the beam for the measurement of high energy protons scattered at very small angles. This setup, together with the unique capability of RHIC to collide spin-polarized proton beams, allows STAR to study both the dynamics and the spin-dependence of the proton-proton ( pp) elastic scattering process. Silicon strip detectors, installed inside the Roman Pots, measure tracks of protons scattered diffractively at very small angles. In a dedicated run with special beam optics during the 2009 RHIC run, the collaboration collected about 20 million elastic events with transversely polarized proton beams at the center of mass energy s = 200 GeV and four momentum transfer squared (t) range of 0.003 ≤ |t| ≤ 0.035 (GeV/c) 2, where, due to the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI), a measurable single spin asymmetry arises. While the electromagnetic interaction can be determined in QED, the description of the hadronic interaction at small -t scattering requires the use of nonperturbative techniques in QCD, and, phenomenological models, rather than pQCD, are used to describe the exchange mechanism. High energy diffractive scattering at small-t is dominated by the Pomeron exchange, treated in pQCD as a color singlet combination of two gluons carrying quantum numbers of the vacuum (JPC = 0++). In this dissertation, I report on a high precision measurement of the transverse single spin asymmetry A N at s = 200 GeV in pp elastic scattering at RHIC. The measured AN and its t-dependence are consistent with the absence of a hadronic spin-flip amplitude. The major contribution to the uncertainty in AN comes from the uncertainty in the beam polarization measurement. The presented results provide a precise measurement in the non-perturbative QCD regime, where experimental data are indispensable, and, a significant

  19. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    2016-03-24

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 10(15) electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators ('PeVatrons'), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 10(13) electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators--not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays--has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 10(6)-10(7) years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays. PMID:26982725

  20. Hole-boring radiation pressure proton acceleration at high intensity in near-critical density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinqing; Dover, N. P.; Jin, Xiaolin; Li, Bin; Dangor, A. E.; Najmudin, Z.

    2014-10-01

    We will present high quality proton beams accelerated from hole-boring radiation pressure proton acceleration (HB-RPA) using three-dimension Particle-in-Cell simulation results. Scaling works on proton cut off energy with laser parameters such as laser intensity and laser pulse duration have been studied in detail by two-dimension Particle-in-Cell simulations. Optimal conditions for generating proton beam of narrow energy spread will be discussed.

  1. A performance study of the Loma Linda proton medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J.; Johanning, J.; Maudsley, G.; Slaton, T.; Morton, P. )

    1994-11-01

    More than three years have passed since Loma Linda treated the first cancer patient with the world's first proton accelerator dedicated to radiation therapy. Since that time, over 1000 patients have completed treatments and the facility currently treats more than 45 patients per day. With a typical intensity of 3[times]10[sup 10] protons per pulse and 27 pulses per minute, dose rates of 90--100 cGy/min are easily achieved on a 20-cm diameter field. In most cases, patient treatment times are 2 min, much less than the patient alignment time required before each treatment. Nevertheless, there is considerable medical interest in increasing field sizes up to 40-cm diameter while keeping dose rates high and treatment times low. In this article, beam measurements relevant to intensity studies are presented and possible accelerator modifications for upgrades are proposed. It is shown that nearly all intensity losses can be ascribed to the large momentum spread of the injected beam and occur at or near the injection energy of 2 MeV. The agreement between calculations and measurements appears quite good. In addition, optimum beam characteristics for a new injector are discussed based upon the momentum acceptance and space charge limits of the Loma Linda synchrotron.

  2. A performance study of the Loma Linda proton medical accelerator.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Hubbard, J; Johanning, J; Maudsley, G; Slaton, T; Morton, P

    1994-11-01

    More than three years have passed since Loma Linda treated the first cancer patient with the world's first proton accelerator dedicated to radiation therapy. Since that time, over 1000 patients have completed treatments and the facility currently treats more than 45 patients per day. With a typical intensity of 3 x 10(10) protons per pulse and 27 pulses per minute, dose rates of 90-100 cGy/min are easily achieved on a 20-cm diameter field. In most cases, patient treatment times are 2 min, much less than the patient alignment time required before each treatment. Nevertheless, there is considerable medical interest in increasing field sizes up to 40-cm diameter while keeping dose rates high and treatment times low. In this article, beam measurements relevant to intensity studies are presented and possible accelerator modifications for upgrades are proposed. It is shown that nearly all intensity losses can be ascribed to the large momentum spread of the injected beam and occur at or near the injection energy of 2 MeV. The agreement between calculations and measurements appears quite good. In addition, optimum beam characteristics for a new injector are discussed based upon the momentum acceptance and space charge limits of the Loma Linda synchrotron. PMID:7891629

  3. Laser-accelerated proton conversion efficiency thickness scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, D. S.; Foord, M. E.; Key, M. H.; LePape, S. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Fedosejevs, R.; Friesen, H.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y. Y.

    2009-12-15

    The conversion efficiency from laser energy into proton kinetic energy is measured with the 0.6 ps, 9x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility as a function of target thickness in Au foils. For targets thicker than 20 {mu}m, the conversion efficiency scales approximately as 1/L, where L is the target thickness. This is explained by the domination of hot electron collisional losses over adiabatic cooling. In thinner targets, the two effects become comparable, causing the conversion efficiency to scale weaker than 1/L; the measured conversion efficiency is constant within the scatter in the data for targets between 5 and 15 {mu}m, with a peak conversion efficiency of 4% into protons with energy greater than 3 MeV. Depletion of the hydrocarbon contaminant layer is eliminated as an explanation for this plateau by using targets coated with 200 nm of ErH{sub 3} on the rear surface. The proton acceleration is modeled with the hybrid-particle in cell code LSP, which reproduced the conversion efficiency scaling observed in the data.

  4. High-intensity pulsed source of polarized protons with an atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Esin, S.K.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.E.; Stepanov, A.A.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1985-10-25

    A source of polarized protons with a beam current up to 2.5 mA in the pulse, a degree of polarization 0.78 +- 0.01, a current pulse length of 120 ..mu..s, and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz is described. This is the first source of polarized protons which makes use of the charge exchange of polarized hydrogen atoms with ions of a deuterium plasma.

  5. Measuring the contribution of low Bjorken-x gluons to the proton spin with polarized proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolin, Scott Justin

    The PHENIX experiment is one of two detectors located at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY. Understanding the spin structure of the proton is a central goal at RHIC, the only polarized proton-on-proton collider in existence. The PHENIX spin program has two primary objectives. The first is to improve the constraints on the polarized parton distributions of the anti-u and anti-d quarks within the proton. The second objective is to improve the constraint on the gluon spin contribution to the proton spin, DeltaG. The focus of this thesis is the second objective. PHENIX experiment has been successful at providing the first meaningful constraints on DeltaG, along with STAR, the other detector located at RHIC. These constraints have, in fact, eliminated the extreme scenarios for gluon polarization through measurements of the double spin asymmetry, ALL, between the cross section of like and unlike sign helicity pp interactions. ALL measurements can be performed with a variety of final states at PHENIX. Until 2009, these final states were only measured for pseudo-rapidities of |eta| < 0.35. This range of eta is referred to as mid-rapidity. These mid-rapidity measurements, like the polarized DIS measurements, suffer from a limited kinematic reach. Final states containing a measured particle with pT [special character omitted] 1 GeV/c are considered to have occurred in the hard scattering domain where the pp interaction is well approximated as an interaction of a quark or gluon in one proton and a quark or gluon in the second proton. Each of these interacting particles has a momentum fraction, x, of its parent proton's momentum. The gluon polarization is dependent on the momentum fraction and the net gluon polarization can be written as the integral of the momentum fraction dependent polarization: DeltaG = f(1,0)Delta g(x)dx. The momentum fractions of the two interacting particles give information about the final state

  6. Development of polarized ion source for the JINR accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fimushkin, V. V.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kutuzova, L. V.; Prokofichev, Yu V.; Shutov, B.; Belov, A. S.; Zubets, V. N.; Turbabin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Status of the JINR polarized ion source development is described. The source is under tests at the test-bench of LHEP, JINR. A charge-exchange plasma ionizer has been tested initially without a storage cell in the ionization region. An unpolarized deuterium ion beam with peak current of 160 mA, 23 keV energy, pulse duration of 100 μs and repetition rate of 1 Hz has been extracted from the ionizer. With a free polarized atomic hydrogen beam injected into the ionizer a polarized proton beam with peak current of 1.4 mA has been obtained. The nearest plans for the source development include tests of the ionizer with the storage cell and tuning of the high frequency transition units installed in their operating position with a Breit-Rabi polarimeter.

  7. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HESS Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dewilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemiére, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Lui, R.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seyffert, A. S.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Valerius, K.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Żywucka, N.

    2016-03-01

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 1015 electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators (‘PeVatrons’), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 1013 electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators—not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays—has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 106-107 years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  8. Measuring the contribution of low Bjorken-x gluons to the proton spin with polarized proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolin, Scott Justin

    The PHENIX experiment is one of two detectors located at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY. Understanding the spin structure of the proton is a central goal at RHIC, the only polarized proton-on-proton collider in existence. The PHENIX spin program has two primary objectives. The first is to improve the constraints on the polarized parton distributions of the anti-u and anti-d quarks within the proton. The second objective is to improve the constraint on the gluon spin contribution to the proton spin, DeltaG. The focus of this thesis is the second objective. PHENIX experiment has been successful at providing the first meaningful constraints on DeltaG, along with STAR, the other detector located at RHIC. These constraints have, in fact, eliminated the extreme scenarios for gluon polarization through measurements of the double spin asymmetry, ALL, between the cross section of like and unlike sign helicity pp interactions. ALL measurements can be performed with a variety of final states at PHENIX. Until 2009, these final states were only measured for pseudo-rapidities of |eta| < 0.35. This range of eta is referred to as mid-rapidity. These mid-rapidity measurements, like the polarized DIS measurements, suffer from a limited kinematic reach. Final states containing a measured particle with pT [special character omitted] 1 GeV/c are considered to have occurred in the hard scattering domain where the pp interaction is well approximated as an interaction of a quark or gluon in one proton and a quark or gluon in the second proton. Each of these interacting particles has a momentum fraction, x, of its parent proton's momentum. The gluon polarization is dependent on the momentum fraction and the net gluon polarization can be written as the integral of the momentum fraction dependent polarization: DeltaG = f(1,0)Delta g(x)dx. The momentum fractions of the two interacting particles give information about the final state

  9. Latest Diagnostic Electronics Development for the PROSCAN Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Duperrex, P.A.; Frei, U.; Gamma, G.; Mueller, U.; Rezzonico, L.

    2004-11-10

    New VME-based diagnostic electronics are being developed for PROSCAN, a proton accelerator for medical application presently under construction at PSI. One new development is a VME-based multi-channel logarithmic amplifier for converting current to voltage (LogIV). The LogIV boards are used for measuring current from the multiple wire (harp) profile monitors. The LogIV calibration method, current dependant bandwidth and temperature stability are presented. Another development is a BPM front end, based on the newest digital receiver techniques. Features of this new system are the remote control of the preamplifier stage and the continuous monitoring of each individual signal overall gain. Characteristics of the developed prototype are given.

  10. Spin structure of the proton from polarized inclusive deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Spin Muon Collaboration

    1997-11-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup p} in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of polarized muons off polarized protons, in the kinematic range 0.003{lt}x{lt}0.7 and 1GeV{sup 2}{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}60GeV{sup 2}. A next-to-leading order QCD analysis is used to evolve the measured g{sub 1}{sup p}(x,Q{sup 2}) to a fixed Q{sub 0}{sup 2}. The first moment of g{sub 1}{sup p} at Q{sub 0}{sup 2}=10GeV{sup 2} is {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}=0.136{plus_minus}0.013 (stat) {plus_minus}0.009 (syst) {plus_minus}0.005 (evol). This result is below the prediction of the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule by more than two standard deviations. The singlet axial charge a{sub 0} is found to be 0.28{plus_minus}0.16. In the Adler-Bardeen factorization scheme, {Delta}g{approx_equal}2 is required to bring {Delta}{Sigma} in agreement with the quark-parton model. A combined analysis of all available proton, deuteron, and {sup 3}He data confirms the Bjorken sum rule. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Internal spin structure of the proton from high energy polarized e-p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, V.W.; Baum, G.; Bergstroem, M.R.

    1981-02-01

    A review is given of experimental knowledge of the spin dependent structure functions of the proton, which is based on inclusive high energy scattering of longitudinal polarized electrons by longitudinally polarized protons in both the deep inelastic and resonance regions, and includes preliminary results from our most recent SLAC experiment. Implications for scaling, sum rules, models of proton structure, and the hyperfine structure interval in hydrogen are given. Possible future directions of research are indicated.

  12. RHIC polarized proton-proton operation at 100 GeV in Run 15

    SciTech Connect

    Schoefer, V.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atoian, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K. A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; D Ottavio, T.; Drees, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Gu, X.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Narayan, G.; Nemesure, S.; Pile, P.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, W. B.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; White, S.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2015-05-03

    The first part of RHIC Run 15 consisted of ten weeks of polarized proton on proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV at two interaction points. In this paper we discuss several of the upgrades to the collider complex that allowed for improved performance. The largest effort consisted in commissioning of the electron lenses, one in each ring, which are designed to compensate one of the two beam-beam interactions experienced by the proton bunches. The e-lenses raise the per bunch intensity at which luminosity becomes beam-beam limited. A new lattice was designed to create the phase advances necessary for a beam-beam compensation with the e-lens, which also has an improved off-momentum dynamic aperture relative to previous runs. In order to take advantage of the new, higher intensity limit without suffering intensity driven emittance deterioration, other features were commissioned including a continuous transverse bunch-by-bunch damper in RHIC and a double harmonic RF cature scheme in the Booster. Other high intensity protections include improvements to the abort system and the installation of masks to intercept beam lost due to abort kicker pre-fires.

  13. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yue

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  14. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hyde, C.; Kuhn, S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Sargsian, M.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleusmore » rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.« less

  15. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    SciTech Connect

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hyde, C.; Kuhn, S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Sargsian, M.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.

  16. Mixing, staging, and phasing for a proton-driven wake field accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Simpson, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper expands on a few important details of the Wakeatron concept. This is a device where electrons can be accelerated by the wake field of short intense proton bunches travelling along the axis of an rf structure. Specifically, we have examined the consequences of the longitudinal dynamics of both the electron and the proton bunches. Included were ''mixing'' in the proton bunches (crucial to the overall concept) and phase shifts (electron bunches relative to proton bunches) in the acceleration process. Because of the deterioration of the proton bunches, due to the ''mixing'' process, it is required that the Wakeatron is indeed staged in a number of consecutive sections.

  17. Study of Polarized Sea Quark Distributions in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sq root(s) = 500 GeV with PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Mibe, Tsutomu

    2009-08-04

    The PHENIX spin program studies the flavor structure of the polarized sea quark distributions in polarized proton-proton collisions. Starting from 2009 run, the quark and antiquark polarization, sorted by flavor, will be investigated with the parity-violating single-spin asymmetry of W-boson production at the collision energy of sq root(s) = 500 GeV. High momentum muons from W-boson decay are detected in the PHENIX muon arms. The muon trigger is being upgraded to allow one to select high momentum muons.

  18. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy. PMID:12512712

  19. Measuring the anti-quark contribution to the proton spin using parity violating W production in polarized proton proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian

    Since the 1980s the spin puzzle has been at the heart of many experimental measurements. The initial discovery that only ~30% of the spin of the proton comes from quarks and anti-quarks has been refined and cross checked by several other deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and semi inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments. Through measurements of polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) the individual contributions of the u, d, u, d, quarks have been measured. The flavor separation done in SIDIS experiments requires knowledge of fragmentation functions (FFs). However, due to the higher uncertainty of the anti-quark FFs compared to the quark FFs, the quark polarized PDFs (Deltau(x), Delta d(x)) are significantly better constrained than the anti-quark distributions (Deltau( x), Deltad(x). By accessing the anti-quarks directly through W boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions (ud → W+ → e+/mu+ and du→ W- → e-/mu-), the large FF uncertainties are avoided and a cleaner measurement can be done. The parity violating single spin asymmetry of the W decay leptons can be directly related to the polarized PDFs of the anti-quarks. The W+/- → e+/- measurement has been performed with the PHENIX central arm detectors at √s=510 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and is presented in this thesis. Approximately 40 pb-1 of data from the 2011 and 2012 was analyzed and a large parity violating single spin asymmetry for W+/- has been measured. The combined data for 2011 and 2012 provide a single spin asymmetry for both charges: W+: -0.27 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.01(syst) W -: 0.28 +/- 0.16(stat) +/- 0.02(syst) These results are consistent with the different theoretical predictions at the 1sigma level. The increased statistical precision enabled and required a more careful analysis of the background contamination for the this measurement. A method based on Gaussian Processes for Regression has been employed to determine this background contribution. This

  20. Constraining the polarization of the proton's glue with the eta meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seele, Joseph

    The division of the proton's spin among its quarks and gluons is a fundamental question in modern nuclear physics. The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is measuring asymmetries in polarized proton-proton collisions at s = 200 GeV to garner information about the polarizations of the quarks and gluons. Measurements of the double helicity asymmetry for high pT mid-rapidity eta meson production in proton-proton collisions at s = 200 GeV are presented in this work. In order to obtain information about the polarizations of the quarks and gluons in the proton using the eta meson, the eta meson fragmentation functions must be known. No set existed, therefore a first global fit to the eta meson fragmentation functions was performed. The fit benefits from the inclusion of measurements of the cross section for eta meson production in proton-proton collisions. Therefore, a measurement of the cross section for high pT mid-rapidity eta meson production in proton-proton collisions at s = 200 GeV is performed to aid the fit. With the eta fragmentation functions, the measurement of the double helicity asymmetry is used to constrain the contribution of the spins of the gluons to the spin of the proton. Using a model and the work in this thesis, an estimate of the gluon contribution to the proton's spin is calculated and compared to other evaluations.

  1. On the possibility for precision measurements of differential cross sections for elastic proton-proton scattering at the Protvino accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S. P.; Kozelov, A. V.; Petrov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    Elastic-scattering data were analyzed, and it was concluded on the basis of this analysis that precisionmeasurements of differential cross sections for elastic proton-proton scattering at the accelerator of the Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP, Protvino, Russia) over a broad momentum-transfer range are of importance and topical interest. The layout of the respective experimental facility detecting the scattered particle and recoil proton and possessing a high momentum-transfer resolution was examined along with the equipment constituting this facility. The facility in question is able to record up to a billion events of elastic proton-proton scattering per IHEP accelerator run (20 days). Other lines of physics research with this facility are briefly discussed.

  2. DEAD ZONE IN THE POLAR-CAP ACCELERATOR OF PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Alexander Y.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-01-10

    We study plasma flows above pulsar polar caps using time-dependent simulations of plasma particles in the self-consistent electric field. The flow behavior is controlled by the dimensionless parameter {alpha} = j/c{rho}{sub GJ}, where j is the electric current density and {rho}{sub GJ} is the Goldreich-Julian charge density. The region of the polar cap where 0 < {alpha} < 1 is a {sup d}ead zone{sup -}in this zone, particle acceleration is inefficient and pair creation is not expected even for young, rapidly rotating pulsars. Pulsars with polar caps near the rotation axis are predicted to have a hollow-cone structure of radio emission, as the dead zone occupies the central part of the polar cap. Our results apply to charge-separated flows of electrons (j < 0) or ions (j > 0). In the latter case, we consider the possibility of a mixed flow consisting of different ion species, and observe the development of two-stream instability. The dead zone at the polar cap is essential for the development of an outer gap near the null surface {rho}{sub GJ} = 0.

  3. Polarization of cumulative protons in the reaction. gamma. A. -->. pX at a maximum bremsstrahlung energy 1. 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bratashevskii-breve, A.S.; Zybalov, A.A.; Karasev, S.P.; Konovalov, O.G.; Marekhin, S.V.; Sorokin, P.V.; Storozhenko, Y.O.; Tenishev, A.E.

    1987-06-01

    We present results of measurement of the polarization of cumulative protons in the reactions ..gamma..A..-->..pX for A = /sup 2/D, /sup 6/Li, /sup 12/C, and /sup 63/Cu. The experiment was performed at the Khar'kov Physicotechnical Institute 2-GeV electron linear accelerator LUE-acute-accent-2. For all nuclei except deuterium the polarization is close to zero.

  4. Inclusive proton polarization in. gamma. sup 3,4 He r arrow pX reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zybalov, A.A.; Karasev, S.P.; Konovalov, O.G.; Marekhin, S.V.; Sorokin, P.V.; Storozhenko, Y.O.; Tenishev, A.E. )

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the first measured data on the inclusive proton polarization in the interaction of photons with {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He nuclei. The proton energy (170 MeV) and emission angle (72{degree}) were chosen such that the proton yield from the meson photoproduction reaction on free nucleons should be kinematically forbidden, and the photon energy in the disintegration of the two-nucleon pair in the nucleus should be such that ensures an essential polarization of the proton from the deuteron photodisintegration. The measurements were performed using the Kharkov 2 GeV electron linac facilities. (AIP)

  5. Measurement of Longitudinal Spin Asymmetries for Weak Boson Production in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W± and Z/γ* boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at √s =510 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W± were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  6. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  7. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental results using shock-wave acceleration (SWA) driven by a CO2 laser in a H2 gas-jet plasma have shown the possibility of producing proton beams with energy spreads <10% and with energies of up to 20 MeV using a modest peak laser power of 4 TW. Here we propose the investigation of the scaling of the SWA mechanism to higher laser powers using the 1- μm OMEGA EP Laser System at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The required tailored plasma profile is created by expanding a CH target using the thermal x-ray emission from a UV ablated material. The desired characteristics optimal for SWA are met: (a) peak plasma density is overcritical for the 1- μm main pulse and (b) the plasma profile exponentially decays over a long scale length on the rear side. Results will be shown using a 4 ω probe to experimentally characterize the plasma density profile. Scaling from simulations of the SWA mechanism shows that ion energies in the range of 100 MeV/amu are achievable with a focused a0 of 5 from the OMEGA EP Laser System. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Spectral Features in Laser Driven Proton Acceleration from Cylindrical Solid-density Hydrogen Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Chandra; Gauthier, Maxence; Mishra, Rohini; Kim, Jongjin; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Williams, Jackson; Ruby, John; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art E.; Kerr, Shaun; Tsui, Ying Y.; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Aurand, Bastian; Willi, Oswald; Roedel, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The generation of monoenergetic proton beams by ultrashort high-intensity laser-plasma interactions is of great interest for applications such as stopping power measurements, fast ignition laser confinement fusion, and ion beam therapy. In general, the commonly used mechanism of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) does not provide the required energy spread or maximum proton energy. Here we study alternative acceleration mechanisms, which have been identified in particle in cell (PIC) simulations, to overcome the limitations of TNSA. Using the Titan laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we investigate proton acceleration from wire targets and a cryogenic solid-density hydrogen jet. Due to the cylindrical geometry, TNSA is suppressed allowing other accelerations mechanisms to become observable. Quasi-monoenergetic features in laser-forward direction are observed in the proton spectrum indicating radiation-pressure-driven acceleration mechanisms. Our experimental results are accompanied by supporting PIC simulations.

  9. Recoil-proton polarization in high-energy deuteron photodisintegration with circularly plarized photons.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Arrington, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Qattan, I. A.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Physics; Rutgers Univ.; Univ. Blaise Pascal; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  10. Angular dependence of recoil proton polarization in high-energy \\gamma d \\to p n

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J.P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D.W. Higinbotham; R.J. Holt; C.W. de Jager; M.K. Jones; L.J. Kaufman; E.R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K.D. Paschke; C.F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I.A. Qattan; R.D. Ransome; P.E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E.C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G.M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Zhu

    2007-02-26

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily.. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  11. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a = 30 over 108 protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least107 protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  12. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-21

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a= 30 over 10{sup 8} protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least10{sup 7} protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  13. Twist-3 effect from the longitudinally polarized proton for ALT in hadron production from pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Yuji; Pitonyak, Daniel; Yoshida, Shinsuke

    2016-08-01

    We compute the contribution from the longitudinally polarized proton to the twist-3 double-spin asymmetry ALT in inclusive (light) hadron production from proton-proton collisions, i.e., p↑ p → → h X. We show that using the relevant QCD equation-of-motion relation and Lorentz invariance relation allows one to eliminate the twist-3 quark-gluon correlator (associated with the longitudinally polarized proton) in favor of one-variable twist-3 quark distributions and the (twist-2) transversity parton density. Including this result with the twist-3 pieces associated with the transversely polarized proton and unpolarized final-state hadron (which have already been calculated in the literature), we now have the complete leading-order cross section for this process.

  14. Proton Acceleration to Therapeutic Energies with Ultra-Intense Ultra-Clean and Ultra-Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S. A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalinchenko, G.; Matsuoka, T.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2006-11-27

    The acceleration of protons to therapeutic energies of over 200 MeV by short-pulse, high-intensity lasers requires very high temporal intensity contrast. We describe improvements to the contrast ratio of the laser pulse produced by a multi-terawatt chirped pulsed amplification (CPA) Ti:sapphire laser for the application of proton acceleration. The modified cross-polarized wave generation (XPW) technique has been implemented on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan to reject the low-intensity amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) preceding the main laser pulse. We demonstrate that by using two BaF2 crystals, the XPW technique yields a 10-11 contrast ratio between the main peak and the ASE for a 50 TW laser system which can be maintained up to 500 TW. Such contrast may be sufficient for a preplasma-free interaction of 225 TW laser pulses with sub-micron thick foils at an intensity of {approx}10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations were conducted under the anticipated experimental conditions: 6.75 J, 30 fs laser pulse without a prepulse, focused to a spot size of 1.2 microns (FWHM) on thin foils of varying thickness. The performed PIC simulations show that for a 0.2 {mu}m thick hydrogen foil protons with energy up to 200 MeV can be produced. In the case of the two-layer aluminum-hydrogen foil, the maximum energy of accelerated protons is about 150 MeV, but the flux-energy spectrum of the accelerated protons has a narrow peak at high energies, which may be more advantageous for medical applications.

  15. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Au setup in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-08-25

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Au stores.

  16. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Aluminum setup in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-10-02

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Aluminum stores.

  17. Calculation of polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful.

  18. Role of target material in proton acceleration from thin foils irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Ramakrishna, B.; Mandal, T.; Upadhyay, A.; Ramis, R.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2014-08-01

    We report on the proton acceleration studies from thin metallic foils of varying atomic number (Z) and thicknesses, investigated using a 45 fs, 10 TW Ti:sapphire laser system. An optimum foil thickness was observed for efficient proton acceleration for our laser conditions, dictated by the laser ASE prepulse and hot electron propagation behavior inside the material. The hydrodynamic simulations for ASE prepulse support the experimental observation. The observed maximum proton energy at different thicknesses for a given element is in good agreement with the reported scaling laws. The results with foils of different atomic number Z suggest that a judicious choice of the foil material can enhance the proton acceleration efficiency, resulting into higher proton energy.

  19. Scaling Laws for Proton Acceleration from the Rear Surface of Laser-Irradiated Thin Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; D'Humieres, E.; Lefebvre, E.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Brambrink, E.; Audebert, P.; Kaluza, M.; Schreiber, J.; Malka, V.; Manclossi, M.; Meyroneinc, S.; Mora, P.; Toncian, T.; Pepin, H.

    2006-04-07

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on the topic of laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications. Ultra-bright beams of multi-MeV protons are produced by irradiating thin metallic foils with ultra-intense short laser pulses. These sources open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control, and could stimulate development of compact ion accelerators for many applications, in particular proton therapy of deep-seated tumours. Here we show that scaling laws deduced from fluid models reproduce well the acceleration of proton beams for a large range of laser and target parameters. These scaling laws show that, in our regime, there is an optimum in the laser pulse duration of {approx}200 fs-1 ps, with a needed laser energy level of 30 to 100 J, in order to achieve e.g. 200 MeV energy protons necessary for proton therapy.

  20. Laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Austin Yi, S.; Shvets, Gennady; Pukhov, Alexander

    2013-10-15

    A new method for initiating the modulation instability (MI) of a proton beam in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator using a short laser pulse preceding the beam is presented. A diffracting laser pulse is used to produce a plasma wave that provides a seeding modulation of the proton bunch with the period equal to that of the plasma wave. Using the envelope description of the proton beam, this method of seeding the MI is analytically compared with the earlier suggested seeding technique that involves an abrupt truncation of the proton bunch. The full kinetic simulation of a realistic proton bunch is used to validate the analytic results. It is further used to demonstrate that a plasma density ramp placed in the early stages of the laser-seeded MI leads to its stabilization, resulting in sustained accelerating electric fields (of order several hundred MV/m) over long propagation distances (∼100–1000 m)

  1. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of >100 MeV Protons in Large Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, Edward W.

    2016-05-01

    Recently several studies have presented correlative evidence for a significant-to-dominant role for a flare-resident process in the acceleration of high-energy protons in large solar particle events. In one of these investigations, a high correlation between >100 MeV proton fluence and 35 GHz radio fluence is obtained by omitting large proton events associated with relatively weak flares; these outlying events are attributed to proton acceleration by shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We argue that the strong CMEs and associated shocks observed for proton events on the main sequence of the scatter plot are equally likely to accelerate high-energy protons. In addition, we examine ratios of 0.5 MeV electron to >100 MeV proton intensities in large SEP events, associated with both well-connected and poorly-connected solar eruptions, to show that scaled-up versions of the small flares associated with classical impulsive SEP events are not significant accelerators of >100 MeV protons.

  2. Capture and Transport of Laser Accelerated Protons by Pulsed Magnetic Fields: Advancements Toward Laser-Based Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, Trevor J.

    The interaction of intense laser light (I > 10 18 W/cm2) with a thin target foil leads to the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism (TNSA). TNSA is responsible for the generation of high current, ultra-low emittance proton beams, which may allow for the development of a compact and cost effective proton therapy system for the treatment of cancer. Before this application can be realized, control is needed over the large divergence and the 100% kinetic energy spread that are characteristic of TNSA proton beams. The work presented here demonstrates control over the divergence and energy spread using strong magnetic fields generated by a pulse power solenoid. The solenoidal field results in a parallel proton beam with a kinetic energy spread DeltaE/E = 10%. Assuming that next generation lasers will be able to operate at 10 Hz, the 10% spread in the kinetic energy along with the 23% capture efficiency of the solenoid yield enough protons per laser pulse to, for the first time, consider applications in Radiation Oncology. Current lasers can generate proton beams with kinetic energies up to 67.5 MeV, but for therapy applications, the proton kinetic energy must reach 250 MeV. Since the maximum kinetic energy Emax of the proton scales with laser light intensity as Emax ∝ I0.5, next generation lasers may very well accelerate 250 MeV protons. As the kinetic energy of the protons is increased, the magnetic field strength of the solenoid will need to increase. The scaling of the magnetic field B with the kinetic energy of the protons follows B ∝ E1/2. Therefor, the field strength of the solenoid presented in this work will need to be increased by a factor of 2.4 in order to accommodate 250 MeV protons. This scaling factor seems reasonable, even with present technology. This work not only demonstrates control over beam divergence and energy spread, it also allows for us to now perform feasibility studies to further research what a laser-based proton therapy system

  3. Lambda and Antilambda Polarization in Proton-Proton Interactions from Sqrt. S = 31 TO 62 GEV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Peter

    This thesis presents measurements of Lambda^0, |Lambda ^0, and Sigma^0 production made using experiment R608 at the CERN ISR. The Lambda^0 cross sections have been measured in the range 0.20 < x _{rm F}< 0.96 and for p _{rm t} up to 2.2 GeV/c. The invariant cross section, E*d^3sigma /dp^3, is presented in x _{rm F} bins, plotted against p_{rm t}^2 . The function Aexp(-(bp _{rm t}^2 + cp _{rm t}^4)) was found to be a good fit to the data. The cross section was integrated with respect to p_{rm t} ^2 to obtain the x_{ rm F} dependence. The Lambda ^0 shows a rapid fall-off with x _{rm F} up to x_ {rm F}~ 0.4, and thereafter exhibits a small decline to zero at x_{ rm F}~ 1, as is typical for baryons produced in proton fragmentation processes. The |Lambda^0 cross section was measured in the region 0.2 < x_{rm F}< 0.5. The invariant cross section was found to be well described by the function Aexp(-bp _{rm t}^2). Unlike the Lambda^0, the |Lambda^0 cross section falls rapidly with x_{rm F}. The Sigma^0 cross section was measured in the region 0.5 < p_{rm t}< 1.2 GeV/c and 0.3 < x_{rm F}< 0.7. In this region, the Lambda ^0/Sigma^0 ratio is 0.376 +/- 0.044. The Sigma^0 is thus the dominant contributor to non-direct Lambda^0 production. The Lambda^0 polarization was measured as function of surds for 31 polarization was found to increase with p_{rm t}, and x_{rm F}. At an average p_{rm t} of 1.1 GeV, it was found to depend linearly on x _{rm F}, with approximately -40% at x_{rm F} = 0.8. The |Lambda ^0 polarization was measured, and was found to be 3.8 +/- 1.5%.

  4. THOUGHTS AND ''FACTS'' FROM THE AGS POLARIZED PROTON RUNS DURING THE 1980S.

    SciTech Connect

    AHRENS,L.

    2002-11-06

    This workshop's focus is on considering ways for improving the proton beam polarization that the AGS delivers to the RHIC. This talk attempts to review the first decade of AGS polarization--the 1980's; to briefly describe some aspects of the machine situation, the depolarization avoidance strategies employed and the success achieved in AGS from the perspective of one of those involved.

  5. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-01

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67 GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  6. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-15

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67 GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  7. Simultaneous observation of angularly separated laser-driven proton beams accelerated via two different mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; Bedacht, S.; Bagnoud, V.; Deppert, O.; Geschwind, S.; Jaeger, R.; Ortner, A.; Tebartz, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Roth, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present experimental data showing an angular separation of laser accelerated proton beams. Using flat plastic targets with thicknesses ranging from 200 nm to 1200 nm, a laser intensity of 6 ×1020 W cm-2 incident with an angle of 10°, we observe accelerated protons in target normal direction with cutoff energies around 30 MeV independent from the target thickness. For the best match of laser and target conditions, an additional proton signature is detected along the laser axis with a maximum energy of 65 MeV. These different beams can be attributed to two acceleration mechanisms acting simultaneously, i.e., target normal sheath acceleration and acceleration based on relativistic transparency, e.g., laser breakout afterburner, respectively.

  8. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.; Salmé, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ahmidouch, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Beaufait, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E. J.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Christy, E.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fowler, M.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kohl, M.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lassiter, S.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lovelace, H.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Maxwell, J.; Mbianda, G.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mulholland, J.; Nelyubin, V.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zheng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θcmp=70 ° . The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ±0.059 ±0.048 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ˜3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  9. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  10. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.more » However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.« less

  11. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, C; Cisbani, E; Hamilton, D J; Salmé, G; Wojtsekhowski, B; Ahmidouch, A; Annand, J R M; Baghdasaryan, H; Beaufait, J; Bosted, P; Brash, E J; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Christy, E; Chudakov, E; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Degtyarenko, P; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Fowler, M; Frlez, E; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Horn, T; Huber, G M; de Jager, C W; Jensen, E; Jones, M K; Kelleher, A; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; Kohl, M; Kumbartzki, G; Lassiter, S; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Lovelace, H; Luo, W; Mack, D; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Meziane, M; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Mulholland, J; Nelyubin, V; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Punjabi, V; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Slifer, K; Smith, G; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zheng, X

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θ_{cm}^{p}=70°. The longitudinal transfer K_{LL}, measured to be 0.645±0.059±0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude. PMID:26550716

  12. Nonlinear Accelerator with Transverse Motion Integrable in Normalized Polar Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Kharkov, Y.; Morozov, I.A.; Zolkin, T.V.; /Chicago U.

    2012-05-01

    Several families of nonlinear accelerator lattices with integrable transverse motion were suggested recently. One of the requirements for the existence of two analytic invariants is a special longitudinal coordinate dependence of fields. This paper presents the particle motion analysis when a problem becomes integrable in the normalized polar coordinates. This case is distinguished from the others: it yields an exact analytical solution and has a uniform longitudinal coordinate dependence of the fields (since the corresponding nonlinear potential is invariant under the transformation from the Cartesian to the normalized coordinates). A number of interesting features are revealed: while the frequency of radial oscillations is independent of the amplitude, the spread of angular frequencies in a beam is absolute. A corresponding spread of frequencies of oscillations in the Cartesian coordinates is evaluated via the simulation of transverse Schottky noise.

  13. Three dimensional effects on proton acceleration by intense laser solid target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jin-Lu; Zheng, Jun; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Department of Mathematics, Institute of Natural Sciences, and MOE-LSC, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 ; Liu, Chuan-Sheng

    2013-06-15

    Multi-dimensional effects on ion acceleration by a normally incident linearly polarized intense laser pulse interacting with a thin solid target have been investigated numerically, where the laser has the peak intensity of 1.37×10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, focused spot size of 6 μm, pulse duration of 33 fs, and total pulse energy about 3 J, which are commercially available now. We have checked the effects of simulation geometries by running one, two, and three dimensional (1D, 2D, 3D) particle-in-cell simulations. 3D simulation results show that, in the case of using a relatively thick target (in the opaque regime, i.e., 2 μm) with the so-called target normal sheath field acceleration mechanism, electrons spread almost uniformly along two transverse directions. While in the case of using an ultra-thin target (in the relativistic-induced transparent regime, i.e., 100 nm) with the so-called break-out afterburner mechanism, electrons spread more quickly along the direction orthogonal to the laser polarization direction especially at the early stage. The transverse spreading of electrons strongly decreases the electron density at the rear side of the target. Such an effect causes different estimation of electron temperatures in different simulation geometries. Usually, 1D and 2D simulations overestimate the temperature; and as a result, the maximum proton energy observed in 1D and 2D simulations is, respectively, about 3 and 2 times of that observed in 3D simulation.

  14. Three dimensional effects on proton acceleration by intense laser solid target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-Lu; Chen, Min; Zheng, Jun; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Chuan-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    Multi-dimensional effects on ion acceleration by a normally incident linearly polarized intense laser pulse interacting with a thin solid target have been investigated numerically, where the laser has the peak intensity of 1.37×1020 W/cm2, focused spot size of 6 μm, pulse duration of 33 fs, and total pulse energy about 3 J, which are commercially available now. We have checked the effects of simulation geometries by running one, two, and three dimensional (1D, 2D, 3D) particle-in-cell simulations. 3D simulation results show that, in the case of using a relatively thick target (in the opaque regime, i.e., 2 μm) with the so-called target normal sheath field acceleration mechanism, electrons spread almost uniformly along two transverse directions. While in the case of using an ultra-thin target (in the relativistic-induced transparent regime, i.e., 100 nm) with the so-called break-out afterburner mechanism, electrons spread more quickly along the direction orthogonal to the laser polarization direction especially at the early stage. The transverse spreading of electrons strongly decreases the electron density at the rear side of the target. Such an effect causes different estimation of electron temperatures in different simulation geometries. Usually, 1D and 2D simulations overestimate the temperature; and as a result, the maximum proton energy observed in 1D and 2D simulations is, respectively, about 3 and 2 times of that observed in 3D simulation.

  15. Measurement of proton polarization in the d(gamma-vector,p-vector)n reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen Strauch; JLAB Hall A Collaboration

    2000-12-12

    Recoil proton polarization was measured in deuteron photodisintegration at 90 deg. {sub cm} for photon energies up to 2.5 GeV. The induced polarization p{sub y} is consistent with zero above 1 GeV, consistent with expectations from quark models and in disagreement with meson-baryon calculations. Polarization transfer observables are non-zero, indicating that hadron helicity is not conserved.

  16. RHIC Performance as a 100 GeV Polarized Proton Collider in Run-9

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hahn, H.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Menga, P.M.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Pozdeyev, E.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    During the second half of Run-9, the Relativisitc Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided polarized proton collisions at two interaction points. The spin orientation of both beams at these collision points was controlled by helical spin rotators, and physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. Recent developments and improvements will be presented, as well as luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-9.

  17. Accelerator physics R and D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisch, A. D.

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the NEPTUN-A experiment that will study spin effects in violent proton-proton collisions; the Siberian snake tests at IUCF cooler ring; polarized gas jets; and polarized proton acceleration to 1 TeV at Fermilab.

  18. Polarization Transfer Coefficient Measurements in the Deuteron Breakup Reaction HYDROGEN-1(POLARIZED Deuteron, Polarized Proton)x at 2.1 GEV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Naipor Eric

    The polarization of the protons emerging at 0 ^circ from the inclusive deuteron breakup reaction ^1H(vec d,vec p)X was measured using a deuteron beam with kinetic energy of 2.1 GeV. The momentum of the protons was selected by the magnetic spectrometer SPES4 and the polarization was measured with the polarimeter POMME. This experiment was performed at eight different proton momenta. When those momenta are Lorentz transformed to the deuteron rest frame, they corresponded to values from 0.00 to 0.34 GeV/c. The result of the measurements is expressed in terms of polarization transfer coefficient which is defined as the ratio of the measured proton polarization P_{p} to the deuteron beam vector polarization P _{Z}:kappa_{o} = P_{p}/P_{Z}. The values of kappa_{o} decreased from 0.995 to -0.320 across the proton momentum range of this experiment. The trend of kappa_{o} is in general agreement with the expected behavior arising from the D state in the deuteron wave function. The impulse approximation predicts quite well the general shape of kappa_{o}. Multiple scattering and relativistic effect based on different models of reaction mechanism are discussed.

  19. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE POLARIZATION OF HIGH ENERGY PROTON BEAMS AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; BRAVAR, A. BUNCE, G. GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires knowledge of the beam polarization to better than 5%. Such a goal is made the more difficult by the lack of knowledge of the analyzing power of high energy nuclear physics processes. To overcome this, a polarized hydrogen jet target was constructed and installed at one intersection region in RHIC where it intersects both beams and utilizes the precise knowledge of the jet atomic hydrogen beam polarization to measure the analyzing power in proton-proton elastic scattering in the Nuclear Coulomb Interference (CNI) region at the prescribed RHIC proton beam energy. The reverse reaction is used to assess the absolute beam polarization. Simultaneous measurements taken with fast high statistics polarimeters that measure the p-Carbon elastic scattering process also in the CNI region use the jet results to calibrate the latter.

  20. Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Protons for Chromosome Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    George, Kerry A.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated chromosome exchanges induced in human cells by seven different energies of protons (5–2500 MeV) with LET values ranging from 0.2 to 8 keV/μm. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro and chromosome damage was assessed using three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization chromosome painting in chemically condensed chromosomes collected during the first cell division post irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was calculated from the initial slope of the dose–response curve for chromosome exchanges with respect to low dose and low dose-rate γ-rays (denoted as RBEmax), and relative to acute doses of γ-rays (denoted as RBEγAcute). The linear dose–response term was similar for all energies of protons, suggesting that the decrease in LET with increasing proton energy was balanced by the increase in dose from the production of nuclear secondaries. Secondary particles increase slowly above energies of a few hundred megaelectronvolts. Additional studies of 50 g/cm2 aluminum shielded high-energy proton beams showed minor differences compared to the unshielded protons and lower RBE values found for shielded in comparison to unshielded beams of 2 or 2.5 GeV. All energies of protons produced a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges when compared to acute doses of γ-rays. The implications of these results for space radiation protection and proton therapy are discussed. PMID:26539409

  1. Plasma Density Tapering for Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons and Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, A.; Gordon, D.; Kaganovich, D.; Sprangle, P.; Helle, M.; Hafizi, B.

    2010-11-04

    Extended acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator can be achieved by tailoring the phase velocity of the accelerating plasma wave, either through profiling of the density of the plasma or direct manipulation of the phase velocity. Laser wakefield acceleration has also reached a maturity that proton acceleration by wakefield could be entertained provided we begin with protons that are substantially relativistic, {approx}1 GeV. Several plasma density tapering schemes are discussed. The first scheme is called ''bucket jumping'' where the plasma density is abruptly returned to the original density after a conventional tapering to move the accelerating particles to a neighboring wakefield period (bucket). The second scheme is designed to specifically accelerate low energy protons by generating a nonlinear wakefield in a plasma region with close to critical density. The third scheme creates a periodic variation in the phase velocity by beating two intense laser beams with laser frequency difference equal to the plasma frequency. Discussions and case examples with simulations are presented where substantial acceleration of electrons or protons could be obtained.

  2. Hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration as a basis for producing high-energy proton bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Dover, N. P.; Najmudin, Z.

    2012-11-01

    The production of high-energy protons by the ‘hole-boring’ radiation pressure acceleration (HB-RPA) mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration is examined in the case where the plasma has a density less than a0nc in 2D. Previously this was examined in 1D (Robinson 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 056701) and was motivated by previous predictions of the non-linear criterion for an ultra-intense laser pulse to penetrate a dense plasma. By reducing the density well below a0nc the proton energies achieved increases considerably, thus leading to proton energies >100 MeV at laser intensities close to current capabilities. The results show that good quality proton beams with proton energies >100 MeV can be obtained via HB-RPA using targets with densities in the range 12-20nc and laser intensities in the range 5 × 1021-3 × 1022 W cm-2.

  3. Control of target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons from a guiding cone

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Shao, F. Q.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations that target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons can be well controlled by using a guiding cone. Compared to a conventional planar target, both the collimation and number density of proton beams are substantially improved, giving a high-quality proton beam which maintained for a longer distance without degradation. The effect is attributed to the radial electric field resulting from the charge due to the hot target electrons propagating along the cone surface. This electric field can effectively suppress the spatial spread of the protons after the expansion of the hot electrons.

  4. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  5. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  6. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10−11 achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W∕cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions∕light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 μm (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150–500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100–220 MeV energies. PMID:18561651

  7. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-05-15

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10{sup -11} achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions/light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 {mu}m (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150-500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100-220 MeV energies.

  8. Combined proton acceleration from foil targets by ultraintense short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuan; Yu, Tongpu; Ge, Xulei; Yang, Su; Wei, Wenqing; Yuan, Tao; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Liu, Jingquan; Li, Yutong; Yuan, Xiaohui; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Proton emission from solid foil targets irradiated by relativistically intense femtosecond laser pulses is studied experimentally. Broad plateaus in energy spectra are measured from micron-thick targets when the incident laser pulses have relatively low intensity contrasts. It is proposed that such proton spectra can be attributed to the combined processes of laser-driven collisionless shock acceleration and target normal sheath acceleration. Simple analytic estimation and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed, which support our interpretation. The obtained plateau-shape spectrum may also serve as an effective tool to diagnose the plasma state and verify the ion acceleration mechanisms in laser-solid interactions.

  9. Instrumentation for diagnostics and control of laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P R; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C; Carroll, D C; De Martinis, C; Fiorini, Francesca; Flacco, A; Floquet, V; Fuchs, J; Gallegos, P; Giove, D; Green, J S; Green, S; Jones, B; Kirby, D; McKenna, P; Neely, D; Nuesslin, F; Prasad, R; Reinhardt, S; Roth, M; Schramm, U; Scott, G G; Ter-Avetisyan, S; Tolley, M; Turchetti, G; Wilkens, J J

    2014-05-01

    Suitable instrumentation for laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams is critical for development of integrated, laser-driven ion accelerator systems. Instrumentation aimed at beam diagnostics and control must be applied to the driving laser pulse, the laser-plasma that forms at the target and the emergent proton (ion) bunch in a correlated way to develop these novel accelerators. This report is a brief overview of established diagnostic techniques and new developments based on material presented at the first workshop on 'Instrumentation for Diagnostics and Control of Laser-accelerated Proton (Ion) Beams' in Abingdon, UK. It includes radiochromic film (RCF), image plates (IP), micro-channel plates (MCP), Thomson spectrometers, prompt inline scintillators, time and space-resolved interferometry (TASRI) and nuclear activation schemes. Repetition-rated instrumentation requirements for target metrology are also addressed. PMID:24100298

  10. Post-acceleration of laser driven protons with a compact high field linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Turchetti, Giorgio; Bolton, Paul R.

    2013-05-01

    We present a start-to-end 3D numerical simulation of a hybrid scheme for the acceleration of protons. The scheme is based on a first stage laser acceleration, followed by a transport line with a solenoid or a multiplet of quadrupoles, and then a post-acceleration section in a compact linac. Our simulations show that from a laser accelerated proton bunch with energy selection at ~ 30MeV, it is possible to obtain a high quality monochromatic beam of 60MeV with intensity at the threshold of interest for medical use. In the present day experiments using solid targets, the TNSA mechanism describes accelerated bunches with an exponential energy spectrum up to a cut-off value typically below ~ 60MeV and wide angular distribution. At the cut-off energy, the number of protons to be collimated and post-accelerated in a hybrid scheme are still too low. We investigate laser-plasma acceleration to improve the quality and number of the injected protons at ~ 30MeV in order to assure efficient post-acceleration in the hybrid scheme. The results are obtained with 3D PIC simulations using a code where optical acceleration with over-dense targets, transport and post-acceleration in a linac can all be investigated in an integrated framework. The high intensity experiments at Nara are taken as a reference benchmarks for our virtual laboratory. If experimentally confirmed, a hybrid scheme could be the core of a medium sized infrastructure for medical research, capable of producing protons for therapy and x-rays for diagnosis, which complements the development of all optical systems.

  11. Spin filtering neutrons with a proton target dynamically polarized using photo-excited triplet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, M.; van den Brandt, B.; Eichhorn, T. R.; Hautle, P.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2012-06-01

    In a test of principle a neutron spin filter has been built, which is based on dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using photo-excited triplet states. This DNP method has advantages over classical concepts as the requirements for cryogenic equipment and magnets are much relaxed: the spin filter is operated in a field of 0.3 T at a temperature of about 100 K and has performed reliably over periods of several weeks. The neutron beam was also used to analyze the polarization of the target employed as a spin filter. We obtained an independent measurement of the proton spin polarization of ˜0.13 in good agreement with the value determined with NMR. Moreover, the neutron beam was used to measure the proton spin polarization as a function of position in the naphthalene sample. The polarization was found to be homogeneous, even at low laser power, in contradiction to existing models describing the photo-excitation process.

  12. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-15

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W^{±} and Z/γ^{*} boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at sqrt[s]=510  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W^{±} were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  13. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, Sayed H.; Cossairt, J.Donald; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  14. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.; Blazevic, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.

    2008-05-15

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50 {mu}m Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10 {mu}m) show large source sizes of over 100 {mu}m diameter for 5 MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  15. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Blažević, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernández, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geißel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.; Roth, M.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50μm Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10μm) show large source sizes of over 100μm diameter for 5MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  16. Microstructured snow targets for high energy quasi-monoenergetic proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Baspaly, A.; Pomerantz, I.; Abricht, F.; Branzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Steinke, S.; Andreev, A.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Zigler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Compact size sources of high energy protons (50-200MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications 1-8. One promising approach is the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) scheme 9,10, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser 11. In general, laser intensity exceeding 1018 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Another approach is the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) scheme which is a more efficient acceleration scheme but requires an extremely clean pulse with contrast ratio of above 10-10. Increasing the energy of the accelerated protons using modest energy laser sources is a very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions 12,13 but no significant enhancement of the accelerated proton energy was measured. Here we report on the generation of up to 20MeV by a modest (5TW) laser system interacting with a microstructured snow target deposited on a Sapphire substrate. This scheme relax also the requirement of high contrast ratio between the pulse and the pre-pulse, where the latter produces the highly structured plasma essential for the interaction process. The plasma near the tip of the snow target is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and enhanced charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. PIC simulations of this targets reproduce the experimentally measured energy scaling and predict the generation of 150 MeV protons from laser power of 100TW laser system18.

  17. The Proton Coulomb Form Factor from Polarized Inclusive e-p Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Harris

    2001-08-01

    The proton form factors provide information on the fundamental properties of the proton and provide a test for models based on QCD. In 1998 at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) in Newport News, VA, experiment E93026 measured the inclusive e-p scattering cross section from a polarized ammonia (15NH3) target at a four momentum transfer squared of Q2 = 0.5 (GeV/c)2. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered from the polarized target and the scattered electron was detected. Data has been analyzed to obtain the asymmetry from elastically scattered electrons from hydrogen in 15NH3. The asymmetry, Ap, has been used to determine the proton elastic form factor GEp. The result is consistent with the dipole model and data from previous experiments. However, due to the choice of kinematics, the uncertainty in the measurement is large.

  18. Protonation-induced red-coloured circularly polarized luminescence of [5]carbohelicene fused by benzimidazole.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hayato; Kubota, Takako; Yuasa, Junpei; Araki, Yasuyuki; Sakanoue, Tomo; Takenobu, Taishi; Wada, Takehiko; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Hasobe, Taku

    2016-07-12

    Benzimidazole-fused [5]carbohelicene ([5]HeliBI) was newly synthesized to examine the spectroscopic and chiroptical properties. The reversible protonation and deprotonation processes of [5]HeliBI were successfully investigated using (1)H NMR, absorption and fluorescence spectral measurements. We also confirmed the circularly polarized luminescence of protonated [5]HeliBI (H(+)-[5]HeliBI). This is the first observation of red-coloured CPL of a helicene derivative. PMID:27319321

  19. Proton acceleration in the interaction of high power laser and cryogenic hydrogen targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    High intensity laser driven ion acceleration has attracted great interest due to many prospective applications ranging from inertial confinement fusion, cancer therapy, particle accelerators. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed to model and design experiments at MEC for high power laser interaction with cryogenic hydrogen targets of tunable density and thickness. Preliminary 1D and 2D simulations, using fully relativistic particle-in-cell code PICLS, show a unique regime of proton acceleration, e.g. ~ 300 MeV peak energy protons are observed in the 1D run for interaction of ~1020 W/cm2, 110 fs intense laser with 6nc dense (nc = 1021 cm-3) and 2 micron thin target. The target is relativistically under-dense for the laser and we observe that a strong (multi-terawatt) shock electric field is produced and protons are reflected to high velocities by this field. Further, the shock field and the laser field keep propagating through the hydrogen target and meets up with target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) electric field produced at the target rear edge and vacuum interface and this superposition amplifies the TNSA fields resulting in higher proton energy. In addition, the electrons present at the rear edge of the target continue to gain energy via strong interaction with laser that crosses the target and these accelerated electrons maintains higher electric sheath fields which further provides acceleration to protons. We will also present detailed investigation with 2D PICLS simulations to gain a better insight of such physical processes to characterize multidimensional effects and establish analytical scaling between laser and target conditions for the optimization of proton acceleration.

  20. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  1. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-15

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  2. Neutron densities in 120Sn observed by polarized proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, H.; Takeda, H.; Taki, T.; Yosoi, M.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Uchida, M.; Tsukahara, N.; Noro, T.; Yoshimura, M.; Fujimura, H.; Yoshida, H.; Obayashi, E.; Tamii, A.; Akimune, H.

    2001-06-01

    Cross sections, analyzing powers and spin rotation parameters of proton elastic scattering from 58Ni and 120Sn have been measured at intermediate energies. By elastic scattering off N~=Z nuclei like 58Ni at intermediate energies we can study medium modification of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction inside the nucleus, because proton distributions in target nuclei are constrained by charge distributions measured by electron scattering and neutron distributions can be assumed to be the same as proton's. In order to explain our experimental data of 58Ni at large scattering angles, it was found to be necessary to use experimental densities deduced from charge densities measured by electron scattering and to modify the coupling constants and the masses of exchanged σ and ω mesons in the RIA, assuming linear dependencies of meson properties to nuclear densities. Parameters of the medium effect have been searched to reproduce the data. For N≠Z nuclei, neutron density distribution can be extracted from the elastic scattering, assuming the same medium modifications fixed by the 58Ni data and using proton distributions obtained from charge distributions. We have searched neutron density distributions obtained from charge distributions. We have searched neutron density distribution so as to reproduce 120Sn data at the proton incident energy of 300 MeV. Deduced neutron distribution has an increase at the nuclear center, which is consistent with the 3s1/2 orbit wave function as expected in 120Sn. At energies other than 300 MeV, experimental data of 120Sn have been also well reproduced by the neutron distribution obtained at 300 MeV. .

  3. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  4. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jack

    2003-06-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space. PMID:12959128

  5. Deeply virtual Compton scattering on longitudinally polarized protons and neutrons at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia Niccolai

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on a measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly-6-GeV polarized electron beam, two longitudinally polarized (via DNP) solid targets of protons (NH{sub 3}) and deuterons (ND{sub 3}) and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Here, preliminary results for target-spin asymmetries and double (beam-target) asymmetries for proton DVCS, as well as a very preliminary extraction of beam-spin asymmetry for neutron DVCS, are presented and linked to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  6. Possibilities of polarized protons in Sp anti p S and other high energy hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements for collisions with polarized protons in hadron colliders above 200 GeV are listed and briefly discussed. Particular attention is given to the use of the ''Siberan snake'' to eliminate depolarizing resonances, which occur when the spin precession frequency equals a frequency contained in the spectrum of the field seen by the beam. The Siberian snake is a device which makes the spin precession frequency essentially constant by using spin rotators, which precess the spin by 180/sup 0/ about either the longitudinal or transverse horizontal axis. It is concluded that operation with polarized protons should be possible at all the high energy hadron colliders. (LEW)

  7. Particle selection and beam collimation system for laser-accelerated proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Fourkal, Eugene; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2005-03-01

    In a laser-accelerated proton therapy system, the initial protons have broad energy and angular distributions, which are not suitable for direct therapeutic applications. A compact particle selection and collimation device is needed to deliver small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra. In this work, we characterize a superconducting magnet system that produces a desired magnetic field configuration to spread the protons with different energies and emitting angles for particle selection. Four magnets are set side by side along the beam axis; each is made of NbTi wires which carry a current density of approximately 10(5) A/cm2 at 4.2 K, and produces a magnetic field of approximately 4.4 T in the corresponding region. Collimation is applied to both the entrance and the exit of the particle selection system to generate a desired proton pencil beam. In the middle of the magnet system, where the magnetic field is close to zero, a particle selection collimator allows only the protons with desired energies to pass through for therapy. Simulations of proton transport in the presence of the magnetic field show that the selected protons have successfully refocused on the beam axis after passing through the magnetic field with the optimal magnet system. The energy spread for any given characteristic proton energy has been obtained. It is shown that the energy spread is a function of the magnetic field strength and collimator size and reaches the full width at half maximum of 25 MeV for 230 MeV protons. Dose distributions have also been calculated with the GEANT3 Monte Carlo code to study the dosimetric properties of the laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy applications. PMID:15839352

  8. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  9. Nonlinear laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Yi, S. Austin; Pukhov, Alexander; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-10-01

    A new method for seeding the modulation instability (MI) in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator (PDPWA) using a CO2 laser pulse is presented. The proton beam's envelope equation is used to analytically compare the laser seed with previously suggested seeding methods. Simulations demonstrate that a laser pulse placed ahead of a proton beam with a realistic longitudinal density profile leads to peak accelerating gradients that are comparable to those produced by other seeding methods. The nonlinear BNS damping of the MI is analytically shown to lead to instability saturation. The envelope equation is Fourier expanded into a set of coupled, nonlinear equations that describe the evolution of the beam's Fourier components. Peak beam density and peak accelerating gradient during the beam's evolution are estimated.

  10. Proton acceleration with high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2006-10-01

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications [1,2]. Proton beams accelerated from solid planar targets have exceptional properties that open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control. Experiments conducted at LANL and LULI have shown that high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets can produce proton beams more collimated and more energetic than with planar targets. These micro-cone targets are composed of a curved cone attached to a micro-table. 2D PIC simulations were performed to understand the experiments and separate the effect of the cone from the effect of the micro-table. These new targets could help increase the laser-accelerated protons maximum energy to the 100 MeV range. [1] J. Fuchs et al., Nature Physics 2, 48 (2006). [2] T.Toncian et al., Science Vol. 312, 21 April 2006, p.410-413.

  11. INJECTOR PARTICLE SIMULATION AND BEAM TRANSPORT IN A COMPACT LINEAR PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D T; Chen, Y J; Harris, J; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B

    2007-06-18

    A compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), with field gradient up to 100 MW/m is being developed to accelerate proton bunches for use in cancer therapy treatment. The injector must create a proton pulse up to several hundred picoseconds, which is then shaped and accelerated with energies up to 250 MeV. The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code LSP is used to model several aspects of this design. First, we use LSP to obtain the voltage waveform in the A-K gap that will produce a proton bunch with the requisite charge. We then model pulse compression and shaping in the section between the A-K gap and the DWA. We finally use LSP to model the beam transport through the DWA.

  12. Laser Radiation Pressure Accelerator for Quasi-Monoenergetic Proton Generation and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. S.; Shao, X.; Liu, T. C.; Su, J. J.; He, M. Q.; Eliasson, B.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dudnikova, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Wilks, S.; Chen, C. D.; Sheng, Z. M.

    Laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of ultrathin foils of subwavelength thickness provides an efficient means of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation. With an optimal foil thickness, the ponderomotive force of the intense short-pulse laser beam pushes the electrons to the edge of the foil, while balancing the electric field due to charge separation. The electron and proton layers form a self-organized plasma double layer and are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser, the so-called light sail. However, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can limit the acceleration and broaden the energy of the proton beam. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the formation of finger-like structures due to the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability limits the acceleration and leads to a leakage of radiation through the target by self-induced transparency. We here review the physics of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation by RPA and recent advances in the studies of energy scaling of RPA, and discuss the RPA of multi-ion and gas targets. The scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic protons with RPA has the potential of leading to table-top accelerators as sources for producing monoenergetic 50-250 MeV protons. We also discuss potential medical implications, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment, using quasi-monoenergetic proton beams generated from RPA. Compact monoenergetic ion sources also have applications in many other areas such as high-energy particle physics, space electronics radiation testing, and fast ignition in laser fusion.

  13. A crystal routine for collimation studies in circular proton accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirarchi, D.; Hall, G.; Redaelli, S.; Scandale, W.

    2015-07-01

    A routine has been developed to simulate interactions of protons with bent crystals in a version of SixTrack for collimation studies. This routine is optimized to produce high-statistics tracking simulations for a highly efficient collimation system, like the one of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The routine has recently been reviewed and improved through a comparison with experimental data, benchmarked against other codes and updated by adding better models of low-probability interactions. In this paper, data taken with 400 GeV/c proton beams at the CERN-SPS North Area are used to verify the prediction of the routine, including the results of a more recent analysis.

  14. Laser accelerated protons captured and transported by a pulse power solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, T.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Busold, S.; Bussmann, M.; Deppert, O.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joost, M.; Sobiella, M.; Tauschwitz, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Using a pulse power solenoid, we demonstrate efficient capture of laser accelerated proton beams and the ability to control their large divergence angles and broad energy range. Simulations using measured data for the input parameters give inference into the phase-space and transport efficiencies of the captured proton beams. We conclude with results from a feasibility study of a pulse power compact achromatic gantry concept. Using a scaled target normal sheath acceleration spectrum, we present simulation results of the available spectrum after transport through the gantry.

  15. Controlled transport and focusing of laser-accelerated protons with miniature magnetic devices.

    PubMed

    Schollmeier, M; Becker, S; Geissel, M; Flippo, K A; Blazević, A; Gaillard, S A; Gautier, D C; Grüner, F; Harres, K; Kimmel, M; Nürnberg, F; Rambo, P; Schramm, U; Schreiber, J; Schütrumpf, J; Schwarz, J; Tahir, N A; Atherton, B; Habs, D; Hegelich, B M; Roth, M

    2008-08-01

    This Letter demonstrates the transporting and focusing of laser-accelerated 14 MeV protons by permanent magnet miniature quadrupole lenses providing field gradients of up to 500 T/m. The approach is highly reproducible and predictable, leading to a focal spot of (286 x 173) microm full width at half maximum 50 cm behind the source. It decouples the relativistic laser-proton acceleration from the beam transport, paving the way to optimize both separately. The collimation and the subsequent energy selection obtained are perfectly applicable for upcoming high-energy, high-repetition rate laser systems. PMID:18764401

  16. Resistively enhanced proton acceleration via high-intensity laser interactions with cold foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The acceleration of MeV protons by high-intensity laser interaction with foil targets is studied using a recently developed plasma simulation technique. Based on a hierarchical N-body tree algorithm, this method provides a natural means of treating three-dimensional, collisional transport effects hitherto neglected in conventional explicit particle-in-cell simulations. For targets with finite resistivity, hot electron transport is strongly inhibited, even at temperatures in the MeV range. This leads to suppression of ion acceleration from the rear of the target and an enhancement in energies and numbers of protons originating from the front.

  17. Dynamics of Electric Fields Driving the Laser Acceleration of Multi-MeV Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Romagnani, L.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; Audebert, P.; Ceccherini, F.; Macchi, A.; Cowan, T.; Grismayer, T.; Mora, P.; Pretzler, G.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.; Schiavi, A.

    2005-11-04

    The acceleration of multi-MeV protons from the rear surface of thin solid foils irradiated by an intense ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) and short ({approx}1.5 ps) laser pulse has been investigated using transverse proton probing. The structure of the electric field driving the expansion of the proton beam has been resolved with high spatial and temporal resolution. The main features of the experimental observations, namely, an initial intense sheath field and a late time field peaking at the beam front, are consistent with the results from particle-in-cell and fluid simulations of thin plasma expansion into a vacuum.

  18. RHIC Performance with polarized protons in run-6

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn,V.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bravar, S.; Brown, K.A.; et al.

    2006-10-02

    In this study, an array of vibration measurements at the undisturbed NSLS II site has been performed in order to establish the 'green-field' vibration environment and its spectral characteristics. The interaction of the green-field vibration environment with the NSLS II accelerator structure and the quantification of the storage ring vibration, both in terms of amplitude and spectral content have been assessed through a state-of-the-art wave propagation and scattering analysis. This paper focuses on the wave propagation and scattering aspect as well as on the filtering effects of accelerator structural parameters.

  19. Solar Interacting Protons Versus Interplanetary Protons in the Core Plus Halo Model of Diffusive Shock Acceleration and Stochastic Re-acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharov, L.; Laitinen, T.; Vainio, R.; Afanasiev, A.; Mursula, K.; Ryan, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    With the first observations of solar γ-rays from the decay of pions, the relationship of protons producing ground level enhancements (GLEs) on the Earth to those of similar energies producing the γ-rays on the Sun has been debated. These two populations may be either independent and simply coincident in large flares, or they may be, in fact, the same population stemming from a single accelerating agent and jointly distributed at the Sun and also in space. Assuming the latter, we model a scenario in which particles are accelerated near the Sun in a shock wave with a fraction transported back to the solar surface to radiate, while the remainder is detected at Earth in the form of a GLE. Interplanetary ions versus ions interacting at the Sun are studied for a spherical shock wave propagating in a radial magnetic field through a highly turbulent radial ray (the acceleration core) and surrounding weakly turbulent sector in which the accelerated particles can propagate toward or away from the Sun. The model presented here accounts for both the first-order Fermi acceleration at the shock front and the second-order, stochastic re-acceleration by the turbulence enhanced behind the shock. We find that the re-acceleration is important in generating the γ-radiation and we also find that up to 10% of the particle population can find its way to the Sun as compared to particles escaping to the interplanetary space.

  20. High intensity proton acceleration at the Brookhaven AGS -- An update

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    1997-07-01

    The AGS accelerator complex is into its third year of 60+ {times} 10{sup 12} (teraproton = Tp) per cycle operation. The hardware making up the complex as configured in 1997 is briefly mentioned. The present level of accelerator performance is discussed. This includes beam transfer efficiencies at each step in the acceleration process, i.e. losses; which are a serious issue at this intensity level. Progress made in understanding beam behavior at the Linac-to-Booster (LtB) injection, at the Booster-to-AGS (BtA) transfer as well as across the 450 ms AGS accumulation porch is presented. The state of transition crossing, with the gamma-tr jump is described. Coherent effects including those driven by space charge are important at all of these steps.

  1. A beam intensity monitor for the Loma Linda cancer therapy proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Miller, D. ); Kross, B.J.; Anderson, D.F. ); DeLuca, P. Jr.; Siebers, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A beam intensity monitor was tested in a 230-MeV proton beam at the Loma Linda Proton Therapy Accelerator during its commissioning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The intensity monitor was designed to regulate the beam intensity extracted from the proton synchrotron. The proton beam is tunable between 70 and 250 MeV with an adjustable intensity between 10{sup 10} and 10{sup 11} protons per spill. A beam spill is typically 1 s long with a 2-s repetition period. The intensity monitor must be radiation hard, expose minimum mass to the beam, and measure intensity to 1% in 1-ms time intervals. To this end, a 5-cm-thick xenon gas scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) was tested to measure its response to the proton beam. The gas cell was operated at 1.2 atm of pressure and has 12.7-{mu}m-thick titanium entrance and exit foils. The total mass exposed to the beam is 0.14 g/cm{sup 2} and is dominated by the titanium windows. This mass corresponds to a range attenuation equal to 1.4 mm of water. The energy lost to the xenon gas is about 70 keV per proton. Each passing proton will produce approximately 2000 photons. With a detection efficiency on the order of 0.05% for this UV light, one would anticipate over 10{sup 10} photoelectrons per second. In a 1-ms time bin there will be approximately 10{sup 7} photoelectrons. This yields a resolution limited by systematics. For unregulated 0.4-s proton spills, we observe a response bandwidth in excess of 10{sup 4} Hz. While signal-to-noise and linearity were not easily measured, we estimate as few as 10{sup 3} protons can be observed suggesting a dynamic range in excess of 10{sup 5} is available.

  2. A beam intensity monitor for the Loma Linda cancer therapy proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Miller, D; Kross, B J; Anderson, D F; DeLuca, P; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A beam intensity monitor was tested in a 230-MeV proton beam at the Loma Linda Proton Therapy Accelerator during its commissioning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The intensity monitor was designed to regulate the beam intensity extracted from the proton synchrotron. The proton beam is tunable between 70 and 250 MeV with an adjustable intensity between 10(10) and 10(11) protons per spill. A beam spill is typically 1 s long with a 2-s repetition period. The intensity monitor must be radiation hard, expose minimum mass to the beam, and measure intensity to 1% in 1-ms time intervals. To this end, a 5-cm-thick xenon gas scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) was tested to measure its response to the proton beam. The gas cell was operated at 1.2 atm of pressure and has 12.7-microns-thick titanium entrance and exit foils. The total mass exposed to the beam is 0.14 g/cm2 and is dominated by the titanium windows. This mass corresponds to a range attenuation equal to 1.4 mm of water. The energy lost to the xenon gas is about 70 keV per proton. Each passing proton will produce approximately 2000 photons. With a detection efficiency on the order of 0.05% for this UV light, one would anticipate over 10(10) photoelectrons per second. In a 1-ms time bin there will be approximately 10(7) photoelectrons. This yields a resolution limited by systematics. For unregulated 0.4-s proton spills, we observe a response bandwidth in excess of 10(4) Hz. While signal-to-noise and linearity were not easily measured, we estimate as few as 10(3) protons can be observed suggesting a dynamic range in excess of 10(5) is available. PMID:1656180

  3. LAMBDA Polarization with a Transversely Polarized Proton Target at the COMPASS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Negrini, Teresa

    2009-08-04

    The transverse polarization of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar hyperons is investigated at the COMPASS experiment at CERN. In 2007 a 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and a transversely polarized NH{sub 3} target were employed to study events in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. Preliminary results for the LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar polarizations extracted from this new data set are presented as a function of x{sub Bj} and z. The polarizations of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar are compatible with zero within their error bars and no dependence on x{sub Bj} or z is observed.

  4. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route: An example of technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience in this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A major issue is the transfer of this technology to the commercial sector to provide hospitals with simple, reliable, and relatively inexpensive accelerators for this application. The author has chosen the SBIR route to accomplish this goal. ACCTEK Associates have received grants from the National Cancer Institute for development of the medical accelerator and beam delivery systems. Considerable encouragement and help has been received from Argonne National Laboratory and the Department of Energy. The experiences to date and the pros and cons on this approach to commercializing medical accelerators are described. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  5. RF properties of 1050 MHz, β = 0.49 Elliptical cavity for High Current Proton Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Amitava; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K. C.

    2008-04-01

    BARC is developing technology for the accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS) that will be mainly utilized for the transmutation of nuclear waste and enrichment of U233. Design and development of superconducting medium velocity cavity has been taken up as a part of the accelerator driven subcritical system project. We have studied RF properties of 1050 MHz, β = 0.49 single cell Elliptical cavity for possible use in High Current Proton Accelerator. Cavity shape optimization studies have been done by means of 2D cavity tuning code SUPERFISH and 3D High Frequency Simulation code CST Microwave Studio. The cavity peak electric and magnetic fields, power dissipation Pc, quality factor Q and effective shunt impedante ZT2 were calculated for various cavity dimensions using these codes. Based on these analyses a list of design parameter for the inner cell of the cavity has been suggested for possible use in high current proton accelerator.

  6. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams.

    PubMed

    Raschke, S; Spickermann, S; Toncian, T; Swantusch, M; Boeker, J; Giesen, U; Iliakis, G; Willi, O; Boege, F

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 10(7)-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  7. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  8. Photodynamics of intramolecular proton transfer in polar and nonpolar biflavonoid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, S. L.; Knyukshto, V. N.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Buganov, O. V.; Pyrko, A. N.

    2012-10-01

    Using methods of steady state luminescence and femtosecond spectroscopy, we have studied the mechanism of intramolecular proton transfer in synthesized 3,7-dihydroxy-2,8-di(4-methoxyphenyl)-4H,6H-pyrano[3,2- g]chromen-4,6-dion in polar and nonpolar solutions, films, and polycrystals at 293 and 77 K. In an excited singlet state, intramolecular proton transfer occurs in two stages. At the first stage, a tautomer with one transferred proton (OTP tautomer) is formed from the Franck-Condon state within τ1 = 0.6 ps. At the second stage, the second proton is transferred within τ2 = 3.1 ps and a tautomer with two transferred protons (TTP tautomer) is formed, which fluoresces in toluene at 293 K with a high quantum yield, Φ f = 0.66, and the fluorescence spectrum of which is characterized by a large Stokes shift, 9900 cm-1. At 293 K, polar solvents (dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethanol, etc.) solvate the BFV molecule in the ground state, while, in the excited state, an OTP tautomer is mainly formed. In polar ethanol at 77 K, a dual fluorescence spectrum is observed, which is caused by the fluorescence emission of polysolvates with λ{max/ f } = 460 nm and TTP phototautomers at λ{max/ f }= 610 nm.

  9. Empirical determination of solar proton access to the atmosphere: Impact on polar flight paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Jason J.; Rodger, Craig J.; Green, Janet C.

    2013-07-01

    Violent expulsions on the Sun's surface release high energy solar protons that ultimately affect HF communication used by aircraft. The geomagnetic field screens the low altitude equatorial region, but these protons can access the atmosphere over the poles. The latitudes over which the solar protons can reach vary with geomagnetic indices such as Kp and Dst. In this study we use observations from low Earth orbit to determine the atmospheric access of solar protons and hence the flights paths most likely to be affected. Observations taken by up to six polar orbiting satellites during 15 solar proton events are analyzed. From this we determine 16,850 proton rigidity cutoff estimates across three energy channels. Empirical fits are undertaken to estimate the most likely behavior of the cutoff dependence with geomagnetic activity. The changing Kp value is found to lead the variation in the cutoffs by ~3 h. We provide simple equations by which the geomagnetic latitude at which the protons impact the atmosphere can be determined from a given Kp or Dst value. The variation found in the cutoff with Kp is similar to that used in existing operational models, although we suggest that a ~1-2° equatorward shift in latitude would provide greater accuracy. We find that a Kp predictive model can provide additional warning to the variation in proton cutoffs. Hence, a prediction of the cutoff latitudes can be made ~3 h to as much as 7 h into the future, meeting suggested minimum planning times required by the aviation industry.

  10. Polarization of Pc1/EMIC waves and related proton auroras observed at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Sakaguchi, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Connors, M.

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the polarization of Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations and related proton auroras at subauroral latitudes, using an induction magnetometer and an all-sky camera at Athabasca, Canada (54.7°N, 246.7°E, magnetic latitude (mlat) 61.7°N). Isolated proton auroras often appear in association with Pc1 pulsations, because of proton scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the magnetosphere. We used the proton aurora as a proxy for the location and size of the Pc1 ionospheric source. For 27 Pc1 events with simultaneously observed proton auroras over 4 years from September 7, 2005 to September 6, 2009, we calculated the distances between the Pc1 ionospheric source and the observation site, normalized by the scale size of the source. We tried three different definitions of the scale size of Pc1 ionospheric source to calculate the normalized distances. We found that the rotation angle θ between the Pc1 polarization ellipse and the direction to the proton aurora changes from 90° to 0° as the normalized distance increases. For the definition of the scale sizes that gives most clear θ-transition from 90° to 0°, the transition occurs at the normalized distance ˜2.0-4.0, while it was ˜1.0-2.0 by the model calculation of Fujita and Tamao (1988). The averaged major axes tend to point toward the proton aurora at larger distances. The difference of the transition location may imply that the Pc1 ionospheric sources are larger than the isolated proton auroras, or that the inhomogenuity of the ionospheric conductivity by the proton precipitation affects the transition distances.

  11. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  12. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda (US)

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Bauman, M.; Lesyna, D.; Miller, D.; Nusbaum, J.; Slater, J.; Johanning, J.; Miranda, J. ); DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Siebers, J. ); Ludewigt, B. )

    1991-11-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented (R. R. Wilson, Radiology {bold 47}, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. {bold 9}, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. {bold 10}, 831 (1983)). One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less then {plus minus}5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7{times}10{sup 9} protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5{times}10{sup 10} protons/spills for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation. The distal edge of the spread out Bragg peak was observed at 27.5-cm depth with an incident proton energy of 235 MeV. The dose at the distal edge falls from 90% to 10% of peak value in 7 mm.

  13. Research methods for parameters of accelerated low-energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Dudkin, G. N.; Kyznetsov, S. I.; Nechaev, B. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Philippov, A. V.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Varlachev, V. A.; Zvaygintsev, O. A.

    2015-07-01

    To study the pd-reaction cross-section it is necessary to know the main parameters of the accelerated hydrogen ion beam with a high accuracy. These parameters include: the energy ion dispersion; the content of neutrals; the ratio of atomic and molecular ions of hydrogen in the flux of accelerated particles. This work is aimed at development of techniques and the measurement of the above mentioned parameters of the low-energy proton beam.

  14. First experimental results from 2MeV proton tandem accelerator for neutron productiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A.; Belchenko, Yu.; Burdakov, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Krivenko, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Mekler, K.; Sanin, A.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.; Sulyaev, Yu.; Tiunov, M.

    2008-02-01

    A 2MeV proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation was developed and first experiments are carried out in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). The accelerator is designed for neutron production via reaction Li7(p,n)Be7 for the boron neutron-capture therapy of the brain tumors, and for explosive detection based on 9.1724MeV resonance gamma, which are produced via reaction C13(p,γ)N14, absorption in nitrogen.

  15. An overview of Booster and AGS polarized proton operation during Run 15

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    2015-10-20

    This note is an overview of the Booster and AGS for the 2015 Polarized Proton RHIC run from an operations perspective. There are some notable differences between this and previous runs. In particular, the polarized source intensity was expected to be, and was, higher this year than in previous RHIC runs. The hope was to make use of this higher input intensity by allowing the beam to be scraped down more in the Booster to provide a brighter and smaller beam for the AGS and RHIC. The RHIC intensity requirements were also higher this run than in previous runs, which caused additional challenges because the AGS polarization and emittance are normally intensity dependent.

  16. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  17. Probing non polar interstellar molecules through their protonated form: Detection of protonated cyanogen (NCCNH+)★

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; de Vicente, P.; Marcelino, N.; Roueff, E.; Fuente, A.; Gerin, M.; Guélin, M.; Albo, C.; Barcia, A.; Barbas, L.; Bolaño, R.; Colomer, F.; Diez, M. C.; Gallego, J. D.; Gómez-González, J.; López-Fernández, I.; López-Fernández, J. A.; López-Pérez, J. A.; Malo, I.; Serna, J. M.; Tercero, F.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanogen (NCCN) is the simplest member of the series of dicyanopolyynes. It has been hypothesized that this family of molecules can be important constituents of interstellar and circumstellar media, although the lack of a permanent electric dipole moment prevents its detection through radioastronomical techniques. Here we present the first solid evidence of the presence of cyanogen in interstellar clouds through the detection of its protonated form toward the cold dark clouds TMC-1 and L483. Protonated cyanogen (NCCNH+) has been identified through the J = 5 – 4 and J = 10 – 9 rotational transitions using the 40m radiotelescope of Yebes and the IRAM 30m telescope. We derive beam averaged column densities for NCCNH+ of (8.6 ± 4.4) × 1010 cm−2 in TMC-1 and (3.9 ± 1.8) × 1010 cm−2 in L483, which translate to fairly low fractional abundances relative to H2, in the range (1-10) × 10−12. The chemistry of protonated molecules in dark clouds is discussed, and it is found that, in general terms, the abundance ratio between the protonated and non protonated forms of a molecule increases with increasing proton affinity. Our chemical model predicts an abundance ratio NCCNH+/NCCN of ~ 10−4, which implies that the abundance of cyanogen in dark clouds could be as high as (1-10) × 10−8 relative to H2, i.e., comparable to that of other abundant nitriles such as HCN, HNC, and HC3N. PMID:26543239

  18. Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration with funnel-shaped-hole target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Da Peng; Li, Yu Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration using a funnel-shaped-hole target is demonstrated through particle simulations. When an intense short pulse laser illuminates a thin foil target with a hole at the rear surface, the proton beam divergence is suppressed compared with that obtained in a traditional flat target. In this paper, a funnel-shaped-hole target is proposed to improve the proton beam quality. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, three different shapes of target (funnel-shaped-hole target, cylinder-shaped-hole target and flat target) are simulated and compared. The funnel-shaped hole in the rear surface of the target helps to focus the electron cloud significantly and improve the maximum proton energy and suppress the proton beam divergence. Different thicknesses of the new target are also simulated, and the effects of thickness on the divergence angle and proton spectra are investigated. The optimal size of the new target is obtained and the quality of the proton beam is improved significantly. The funnel-shaped-hole target serves as a new method to improve the proton beam quality in laser-plasma interactions.

  19. Wavelength-tunable polarization converter utilizing the strain induced by proton exchange in lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.-J.; Chung, J.-S.

    2005-02-01

    A new wavelength-tunable polarization converter utilizing the strain induced by proton exchange is demonstrated in x-cut LiNbO3. The light polarization is converted by the strain-optic effect through the phase-matched coupling of two orthogonal polarizations. The stress-applying structure is designed to be composed of several proton-exchanged strip regions for maximization of the stress distribution. The principle of birefringent chain filters is utilized to design the device structure in order to avoid the requirement of large stress, which results in serious cracks on the substrate surface. The overlap integral between the optical field distribution and the stress distribution can be enhanced simply by prolonging the proton-exchange time. Besides, the stress distribution and its strength in the stress-applying structure can be fine tuned without affecting the waveguide characteristics such that the principle of the birefringent chain filters is completely satisfied. Therefore, the polarization-conversion efficiency can be optimized when utilizing this exclusive stress-tuning ability. By the thermal-optic effect, the wavelength of maximum conversion can be tuned at a rate of -0.115 nm/°C with a maximum conversion efficiency of 92.41%. The proposed polarization converter has the advantages of adequate stress distribution and strength, high parameter-tuning feasibility, low propagation loss, easy fabrication, and low fabrication cost.

  20. Measurements of Double-Polarized Compton Scattering Asymmetries and Extraction of the Proton Spin Polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, P. P.; Miskimen, R.; Aguar-Bartolome, P.; Ahrens, J.; Akondi, C. S.; Annand, J. R. M.; Arends, H. J.; Barnes, W.; Beck, R.; Bernstein, A.; Borisov, N.; Braghieri, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Cherepnya, S.; Collicott, C.; Costanza, S.; Denig, A.; Dieterle, M.; Downie, E. J.; Fil'kov, L. V.; Garni, S.; Glazier, D. I.; Gradl, W.; Gurevich, G.; Hall Barrientos, P.; Hamilton, D.; Hornidge, D.; Howdle, D.; Huber, G. M.; Jude, T. C.; Kaeser, A.; Kashevarov, V. L.; Keshelashvili, I.; Kondratiev, R.; Korolija, M.; Krusche, B.; Lazarev, A.; Lisin, V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mancell, J.; Manley, D. M.; Meyer, W.; Middleton, D. G.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nefkens, B. M. K.; Neganov, A.; Nikolaev, A.; Oberle, M.; Ortega Spina, H.; Ostrick, M.; Ott, P.; Otte, P. B.; Oussena, B.; Pedroni, P.; Polonski, A.; Polyansky, V.; Prakhov, S.; Rajabi, A.; Reicherz, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Sarty, A.; Schrauf, S.; Schumann, S.; Sikora, M. H.; Starostin, A.; Steffen, O.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strub, T.; Supek, I.; Thiel, M.; Tiator, L.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M.; Usov, Y.; Watts, D. P.; Witthauer, L.; Werthmüller, D.; Wolfes, M.; A2 Collaboration at MAMI

    2015-03-01

    The spin polarizabilities of the nucleon describe how the spin of the nucleon responds to an incident polarized photon. The most model-independent way to extract the nucleon spin polarizabilities is through polarized Compton scattering. Double-polarized Compton scattering asymmetries on the proton were measured in the Δ (1232 ) region using circularly polarized incident photons and a transversely polarized proton target at the Mainz Microtron. Fits to asymmetry data were performed using a dispersion model calculation and a baryon chiral perturbation theory calculation, and a separation of all four proton spin polarizabilities in the multipole basis was achieved. The analysis based on a dispersion model calculation yields γE 1 E 1=-3.5 ±1.2 , γM 1 M 1=3.16 ±0.85 , γE 1 M 2=-0.7 ±1.2 , and γM 1 E 2=1.99 ±0.29 , in units of 1 0-4 fm4 .

  1. Polarization of Pc1/EMIC waves and related proton auroras observed at Athabasca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Sakaguchi, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Connors, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves excited in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere by the ion cyclotron instability propagate along magnetic field lines to the ionosphere and are observed as Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations (Pc1) with frequencies at 0.2-5Hz on the ground. These Pc1 waves propagate horizontally through the ionospheric duct. Magnetospheric ions are scattered by the resonance with EMIC waves and precipitate to the ionosphere to cause isolated proton auroras at subauroral latitudes. One-to-one correspondence between isolated proton auroras and Pc1 waves was found by Sakaguchi et al. [JGR, 2008]. The mechanism of ionospheric duct propagation of Pc1 has been studied theoretically for the polarization characteristics [Graifinger, JGR, 1972; Fujita and Tamao, JGR, 1988], and observationally for the possible Pc1 source [e.g., Fraser et al., JATP, 1976] and for the spatial distribution of polarization mode [Hayashi et al., Can J. Phys., 1981] using ground magnetometers. However, comparison between the actual position and size of ionospheric Pc1 sources and the polarization characteristics of Pc1 waves has not been done. In order to investigate this relation, we compare the spectral and polarization parameters of Pc1 waves observed by a 64-Hz sampling induction magnetometer and the position and area of isolated proton auroras observed by an all-sky imager at Athabasca (ATH, 54.7N, 246.7E, magnetic latitude: 61.7N), for 13 one-to-one correspondent events of Pc1 waves and isolated proton auroras reported by Sakaguchi et al. [JGR, 2008]. We found that the major axis direction of Pc1 polarization varies depending on the area of the isolated proton aurora and on the distance from ATH to the aurora. In the presentation, we will discuss these results based on a multi-event study using data from three years of 2005-2008 in the context of the model calculation by Fujita and Tamao [1988].

  2. Polarization of Ω- hyperons produced in 800 GeV proton-beryllium collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, K. B.; James, C.; Rameika, R.; Diehl, H. T.; Teige, S.; Thomson, G. B.; Zou, Y.; Ho, P. M.; Longo, M. J.; Nguyen, A.; Duryea, J.; Guglielmo, G.; Heller, K.; Johns, K.; Thorne, K.

    1993-02-01

    The polarization of 103 211 Ω- hyperons produced in 800 GeV proton-beryllium inclusive reactions has been measured. Between 0.3polarization is found to be consistent with zero, with a mean value of -0.01+/-0.01 at =0.5 and =0.95 GeV/c. This behavior is similar to that of Λ¯0, which also does not have any quarks in common with the incident proton, but is different from Ξ¯+, which is significantly polarized in the same kinematic region.

  3. Longitudinal Spin Transfer of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar Hyperons in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sq root(s) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sichtermann, Ernst

    2009-08-04

    The longitudinal spin transfer D{sub LL} of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar hyperons produced with large transverse momenta P{sub T} in polarized proton-proton collisions is sensitive to the helicity distribution functions of strange quarks and anti-quarks, and to polarized fragmentation functions. This contribution reports a measurement of the longitudinal spin transfer D{sub LL} in the inclusive production of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar hyperons at central rapidities in polarized proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy of sq root(s) = 200 GeV. The data were collected with the STAR experiment at RHIC and correspond to a approx =3 pb{sup -1} luminosity and a approx =50% beam polarization.

  4. POLARIZED ION SOURCES FOR HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZELENSKI,A.N.

    2000-10-16

    The recent progress in polarized ion source development is reviewed. In dc operation a 1.0 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current is now available from the Optically-Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS) . In pulsed operation a 10 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current was demonstrated at the TRIUMF pulsed OPPIS test bench and a 3.5 mA peak current was obtained from an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at the INR Moscow test bench. The possibilities for future improvements with both techniques are discussed. A new OPPIS for RHIC spin physics is described. The OPPIS reliably delivered polarized beam for the polarized run at RHIC. The results obtained with a new pulsed ABS injector for the IUCF Cooler Ring are also discussed.

  5. POLARIZED ION SOURCES FOR HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZELENSKI,A.N.

    2000-10-16

    The recent progress in polarized ion source development is reviewed. In dc operation a 1.0 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current is now available from the Optically-Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS). In pulsed operation a 10 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current was demonstrated at the TRIUMF pulsed OPPIS test bench and a 3.5 mA peak current was obtained from an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at the INR Moscow test bench. The possibilities for future improvements with both techniques are discussed. A new OPPIS for RHIC spin physics is described. The OPPIS reliably delivered polarized beam for the polarized run at RHIC. The results obtained with a new pulsed ABS injector for the IUCF Cooler Ring are also discussed.

  6. Isochoric heating of matter by laser-accelerated high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Atzeni, S.; Benuzzi, A.; Brambrink, E.; Esposito, M.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Schreiber, J.; Schiavi, A.; Audebert, P.

    2006-06-01

    We describe an experiment on isochoric heating of matter by intense laser-accelerated protons. The experiment was performed using the LULI 100 TW facility with 15-20 J on target energy and > 1019 W.cm - 2 maximum focused intensity. Focusing the laser on a 10 micron thick Au foil, we accelerated forward a laminar proton beam with a maximum energy of 16 MeV. This proton beam irradiated and heated a secondary target positioned after a variable vacuum gap. The heating was diagnosed by 1D and 2D time-resolved measurements of the optical self-emission of the heated target rear-surface. Detailed results as a function of the Z and the thickness of the secondary target as well as analysis, including a full modelling of the target heating with a 2D hydro-code (DUED) coupled to a proton energy deposition code, were obtained. We have also studied the efficiency of heating as a function of the primary target topology, i.e. either flat, which results in a diverging proton beam, or curved, which has the ability of focusing partly the proton beam.

  7. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, C. Kester, O.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.

    2014-02-15

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 10{sup 10} cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 10{sup 16} protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms)

  8. Electron and proton acceleration efficiency by merger shocks in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.; Eckert, D.; Brüggen, M.; Huber, B.

    2015-08-01

    Radio relics in galaxy clusters are associated with powerful shocks that (re)accelerate relativistic electrons. It is widely believed that the acceleration proceeds via diffusive shock acceleration. In the framework of thermal leakage, the ratio of the energy in relativistic electrons to the energy in relativistic protons should be smaller than Ke/p ˜ 10-2. The relativistic protons interact with the thermal gas to produce γ-rays in hadronic interactions. Combining observations of radio relics with upper limits from γ-ray observatories can constrain the ratio Ke/p. In this work, we selected 10 galaxy clusters that contain double radio relics, and derive new upper limits from the stacking of γ-ray observations by Fermi. We modelled the propagation of shocks using a semi-analytical model, where we assumed a simple geometry for shocks and that cosmic ray protons are trapped in the intracluster medium. Our analysis shows that diffusive shock acceleration has difficulties in matching simultaneously the observed radio emission and the constraints imposed by Fermi, unless the magnetic field in relics is unrealistically large ( ≫ 10 μG). In all investigated cases (also including realistic variations of our basic model and the effect of re-acceleration), the mean emission of the sample is of the order of the stacking limit by Fermi, or larger. These findings put tension on the commonly adopted model for the powering of radio relics, and imply that the relative acceleration efficiency of electrons and protons is at odds with predictions of diffusive shock acceleration, requiring Ke/p ≥ 10 - 10-2.

  9. Letter of Intent for a Drell-Yan Experiment with a Polarized Proton Target

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.; Reimer, P.; Brown, C.; Christian, D.; Diefenthaler, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Chang, W. -C.; Chen, Y. -C.; Sawada, S.; Chang, T. -H.; Huang, J.; Jiang, X.; Leitch, M.; Klein, A.; Liu, K.; Liu, M.; McGaughey, P.; Beise, E.; Nakahara, K.; Aidala, C.; Lorenzon, W.; Raymond, R.; Badman, T.; Long, E.; Slifer, K.; Zielinski, R.; Guo, R. -S.; Goto, Y.; El Fassi, L.; Myers, K.; Ransome, R.; Tadepalli, A.; Tice, B.; Chen, J. -P.; Nakano, K.; Shibata, T. -A.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Keller, D.; Rondon, O.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the proton is a spin-1/2 particle, but how the constituents (quarks and gluons) assemble to this quantized spin is still a mystery. There is a worldwide effort to map out the individual contributions to the proton spin [1,2]. It is established that the quark spins contribute around 30%, while the gluon intrinsic angular momentum is still under active investigation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider [3]. Fully resolving the proton spin puzzle requires information on the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of both quarks and gluons. Recent studies have shown that the so-called transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) can inform us about the OAM of the partons. One of the most important TMDs, and the main focus of this LOI, is the so-called Sivers function [4]. To summarize, we propose to make the first measurement of the Sivers function of sea quarks, which is expected to be non-zero if the sea quarks contribute orbital angular momentum to the proton spin, as expected from the pion cloud model which also partially explains the E866 results. Thus, we will be able to deduce whether or not sea quark orbital motion contributes significantly to the proton spin. Specifically, we will determine the contribution from the anti-up quarks, with Bjorken-x in the range of ~ 0.1 to 0.5. Drell-Yan production off a polarized proton target has never been measured and is complementary to the recently approved (stage-1) experiment E1027 at Fermilab [11], which will measure the Sivers function of the valence quarks using a polarized proton beam on an unpolarized proton target. If the measured sea quark Sivers function is non-zero, we will also determine its sign.

  10. Neutron-proton-converter acceleration mechanism at subphotospheres of relativistic outflows.

    PubMed

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2013-09-27

    We study a type of particle acceleration that operates via neutron-proton conversion in inelastic nuclear collisions. This mechanism can be expected for relativistic shocks at subphotospheres if relativistic outflows contain neutrons. Using a test-particle approximation, we numerically calculate the energy spectrum and the efficiency of accelerated particles, and show that a good energy fraction of the nucleons can be accelerated. This mechanism may be especially relevant if the shock is radiation mediated, and it would enhance the detectability of GeV-TeV neutrinos. PMID:24116765

  11. Beam Transport in a Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Caporaso, G; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2011-03-16

    To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator, the DWA will be operated in the 'virtual' traveling mode with potentially non-uniform and time-dependent axial accelerating field profiles, especially near the DWA entrance and exit, which makes beam transport challenging. We have established a baseline transport case without using any external lenses. Results of simulations using the 3-D, EM PIC code, LSP indicate that the DWA transport performance meets the medical specifications for proton treatment. Sensitivity of the transport performance to Blumlein block failure will be presented.

  12. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Bauman, M; Lesyna, D; Miller, D; Nusbaum, J; Slater, J; Johanning, J; Miranda, J; DeLuca, P M; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented [R. R. Wilson, Radiology 47, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. 9, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. 10, 831 (1983)]. One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less than +/- 5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7 x 10(9) protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5 x 10(10) protons/spill for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1661367

  13. POLARIZED HYDROGEN JET TARGET FOR MEASUREMENT OF RHIC PROTON BEAM POLARIZATION.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; WISE,T.; CHAPMAN,M.; GRAHAM,D.; KPONOU,A.; MAHLER,G.; MENG,W.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.

    2005-01-28

    The performance and unique features of the RHIC polarized jet target and our solutions to the important design constraints imposed on the jet by the RHIC environment are described. The target polarization and thickness were measured to be 0.924 {+-} 2% and 1.3 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 12} atoms/cm{sup 2} respectively.

  14. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Zepf, M.; Yan, X. Q.

    2014-06-15

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  15. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2013-09-30

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup −15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1μm) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  16. Experimental stand for studying the impact of laser-accelerated protons on biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdonov, K. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Ignatova, N. I.; Osmanov, R. R.; Sladkov, A. D.; Soloviev, A. A.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Ginzburg, V. N.; Kuz'min, A. A.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Revet, G.; Sergeev, A. M.; Fuchs, J.; Khazanov, E. A.; Chen, S.; Shaykin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    An original experimental stand is presented, aimed at studying the impact of high-energy protons, produced by the laser-plasma interaction at a petawatt power level, on biological objects. In the course of pilot experiments with the energy of laser-accelerated protons up to 25 MeV, the possibility is demonstrated of transferring doses up to 10 Gy to the object of study in a single shot with the magnetic separation of protons from parasitic X-ray radiation and fast electrons. The technique of irradiating the cell culture HeLa Kyoto and measuring the fraction of survived cells is developed. The ways of optimising the parameters of proton beams and the suitable methods of their separation with respect to energy and transporting to the studied living objects are discussed. The construction of the stand is intended for the improvement of laser technologies for hadron therapy of malignant neoplasms.

  17. External-Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Multiple Proton Beam Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Amos, Richard A.; Zhang Xiaodong; Taddei, Phillip J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Yu, Tse Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia; Perkins, George H.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Zhang, Sean X.; Sun, Tzou Liang; Gillin, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty was evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.

  18. The complete set of spin observables for the (13)C(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(13)N and (15)N(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(15)O reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qun Qun

    1998-12-01

    The 13C(p,n)13N and 15N(p,n)15O reactions have been a puzzle for more than ten years. The ground state transitions are Jπ=1/2- to Jπ=1/2-. These are 'mixed' transitions because they can involve quantum number changes either (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=0,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=0), or (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=1,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=1); these quantum number changes are refered to as 'Fermi' and 'Gamow-Teller' respectively. Because the quantum number changes are the same as for Fermi and Gamow-Teller beta decay. From the systematics of (p,n) and (n,p) reactions on pure Fermi transitions (e.g. 0 + to 0+) and pure Gamow-Teller transitions (e.g. 0+ to 1+), calibrations have been established of cross section per unit B(F) or unit B(GT), where 'B' refers to doubly reduced matrix elements extracted from beta decay. However, cross sections for the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s.) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) reactions are substantially larger than one would then predict from the known B(F)s and B(GT)s for these transitions. To explore this anomaly, spin observables were used to extract separately the Fermi and Gamow-Teller cross sections for these reactions. To acquire the complete sets of polarization- transfer observables, a new neutron polarimeter was designed, built, commissioned and calibrated. This polarimeter, call the '2π polarimeter' because of its complete azimuthal coverage for scattered neutrons, has very good position and timing resolution (354 ps). The complete sets of spin-transfer coefficients Dij for 13C(p,n)13N (at 0o , 5.5o , and 11o ) and 15N(p,n)15O (at 0o ) at 135 MeV were measured. Following the formalism of Ichimura and Kawahigashi, we extracted the spin-longitudinal, and spin-transverse and spin-independent responses D0,/ Dq,/ Dn and Dp from the measured Dijs. The F and GT fractions of the (p,n) cross sections are then extracted as f F=D0 and fGT=Dn+Dp+Dq=1- d0. Values of Dk for both the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) were extracted. From these responses, we

  19. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  20. Recent results from polarization experiments at the LHEP-JINR Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ladygin, V. P.; Azhgirey, L. S.; Gurchin, Yu. V.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Krasnov, V. A.; Khrenov, A. N.; Kiselev, A. S.; Kizka, V. A.; Kurilkin, A. K.; Kurilkin, P. K.; Livanov, A. N.; Ladygina, N. B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Piyadin, S. M.; Reznikov, S. G.; Shikhalev, M. A.; Vasiliev, T. A.; Uesaka, T.; Kawabata, T.; Sakaguchi, S.

    2008-10-13

    The review of recent results from polarization experiments performed at LHEP-JINR Accelerator Complex in a GeV range is given. The current status of the spin program at Nuclotron as well as its further continuation with new high intensity polarized deuterons ion source is discussed.

  1. Obtaining a proton beam with 5-mA current in a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Kasatov, D. A.; Koshkarev, A. M.; Makarov, A. N.; Ostreinov, Yu. M.; Sorokin, I. N.; Taskaev, S. Yu.; Shchudlo, I. M.

    2016-06-01

    Suppression of parasitic electron flows and positive ions formed in the beam tract of a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation allowed a more than threefold increase (from 1.6 to 5 mA) in the current of accelerated 2-MeV protons. Details of the modification are described. Results of experimental investigation of the suppression of secondary charged particles and data on the characteristics of accelerated proton beam with increased current are presented.

  2. Photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U.; Clendenin, James E.; Kirby, Robert E.

    2004-06-01

    A photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electric beam. The accelerator includes a tube having an inner wall, the inner tube wall being coated by a getter material. A portable, or demountable, cathode plug is mounted within said tube, the surface of said cathode having a semiconductor material formed thereon.

  3. Proton acceleration from high-contrast short pulse lasers interacting with sub-micron thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study complemented with published experimental data of proton acceleration from sub-micron (thickness < 1 μm) foils irradiated by ultra-high contrast ( >1010 ) short pulse lasers is presented. The underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration are addressed using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For laser energy ɛ≤4 J (intensity I ≤5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), simulation predictions agree with experimental data, both exhibiting scaling superior to Target Normal Sheath Acceleration's model. Anomalous behavior was observed for ɛ>4 J ( I >5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), for which the measured maximum proton energies were much lower than predicted by scaling and these simulations. This unexpected behavior could not be explained within the frame of the model, and we conjecture that pre-pulses preceding the main pulse by picoseconds may be responsible. If technological issues can be resolved, energetic proton beams could be generated for a wide range of applications such as nuclear physics, radiography, and medical science.

  4. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio; Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo; Bolton, Paul R.

    2014-03-01

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15 M €. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments.

  5. Computational simulations of hydrogen circular migration in protonated acetylene induced by circularly polarized light.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuetao; Li, Wen; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2016-08-28

    The hydrogens in protonated acetylene are very mobile and can easily migrate around the C2 core by moving between classical and non-classical structures of the cation. The lowest energy structure is the T-shaped, non-classical cation with a hydrogen bridging the two carbons. Conversion to the classical H2CCH(+) ion requires only 4 kcal/mol. The effect of circularly polarized light on the migration of hydrogens in oriented C2H3 (+) has been simulated by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Classical trajectory calculations were carried out with the M062X/6-311+G(3df,2pd) level of theory using linearly and circularly polarized 32 cycle 7 μm cosine squared pulses with peak intensity of 5.6 × 10(13) W/cm(2) and 3.15 × 10(13) W/cm(2), respectively. These linearly and circularly polarized pulses transfer similar amounts of energy and total angular momentum to C2H3 (+). The average angular momentum vectors of the three hydrogens show opposite directions of rotation for right and left circularly polarized light, but no directional preference for linearly polarized light. This difference results in an appreciable amount of angular displacement of the three hydrogens relative to the C2 core for circularly polarized light, but only an insignificant amount for linearly polarized light. Over the course of the simulation with circularly polarized light, this corresponds to a propeller-like motion of the three hydrogens around the C2 core of protonated acetylene. PMID:27586924

  6. Simulation on buildup of electron cloud in a proton circular accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai-Wei; Liu, Yu-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beams are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerators. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detailed processes of the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by electron clouds. The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an intense proton accelerator facility now being built, whose accelerator complex includes two main parts: an H-linac and a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The RCS accumulates the 80 MeV proton beam and accelerates it to 1.6 GeV with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. During beam injection with lower energy, the emerging electron cloud may cause serious instability and beam loss on the vacuum pipe. A simulation code has been developed to simulate the build-up, distribution and density of electron cloud in CSNS/RCS. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275221, 11175193)

  7. Reaction {gamma}p {sup {yields}} {eta}' (958) p and polarization of recoil protons

    SciTech Connect

    Tryasuchev, V. A.

    2006-02-15

    On the basis of the isobar model extended by including the t-channel, the cross sections for and single-polarization features of the reaction {gamma}p {sup {yields}} {eta}'p are calculated for incident-photon energies up to 5 GeV, two poorly studied resonances, S{sub 11}(1978) and P{sub 13}(2080), being taken into account in this calculation. In order to reduce the ambiguities in the choice of resonances and their parameters that make it possible to reproduce the experimental differential cross sections, it is proposed to measure the polarization of recoil protons in the reaction being considered.

  8. Constraints on Solar Wind Acceleration Mechanisms from Ulysses Plasma Observations: The First Polar Pass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Aaron; Gazis, Paul R.; Phillips, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The mass flux density and velocity of the solar wind at polar latitudes can provide strong constraints on solar wind acceleration mechanisms. We use plasma observations from the first polar passage of the Ulysses spacecraft to investigate this question. We find that the mass flux density and velocity are too high to reconcile with acceleration of the solar wind by classical thermal conduction alone. Therefore acceleration of the high-speed must involve extended deposition of energy by some other mechanism, either as heat or as a direct effective pressure, due possibly to waves and/or turbulence, or completely non-classical heat transport.

  9. Acceleration of Ultra-Low Emittance Proton and Ion Beams with High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Thomas E.

    2002-11-01

    Intense beams of several MeV protons and ions, generated by the interaction of high-intensity short pulse lasers with thin foils, have been observed by many researchers in recent years.(S.P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000); T.E. Cowan et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. A 455, 130 (2000); R.A. Snavely et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2945 (2000); S.C. Wilks et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 532 (2000); E. Clark et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 670 (2000).) In experiments performed at the 100 TW LULI laser, we have succeeded to control the ion acceleration process to produce ultra high quality proton beams, whose transverse emittance is <0.006 π mm-mrad (rms-normalized), a factor of 100 lower than is typical of conventional RF linear accelerators. Within the envelope of the entire beam, we could focus individual proton beamlets to 100 nm spatial scales. This required control of the laser-plasma interaction, of the transport of MA currents of relativistic electrons through the target substrate, and of the surface topology and source material layering on the target foil rear-surface.(M. Roth et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 061002 (2002).) By varying the source material, we also accelerated light ion beams, such as He-like fluorine, to over 5 MeV/nucleon.(M. Hegelich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 085002 (2002).) From PIC simulations we understand the highest-energy and lowest-divergence proton acceleration as a transient laser-driven virtual cathode effect occurring at the target rear-surface. We have also confirmed the acceleration of ions from the front surface (A. Maksimchuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4108 (2000).), which we find exhibits an intense low-energy component, but only a tenuous high-energy component, in agreement with PIC simulations. This work was performed with corporate support of General Atomics.

  10. Dosimetric advantages of IMPT over IMRT for laser-accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Li, J.; Fourkal, E.; Fan, J.; Xu, X.; Chen, Z.; Jin, L.; Price, R.; Ma, C.-M.

    2008-12-01

    As a clinical application of an exciting scientific breakthrough, a compact and cost-efficient proton therapy unit using high-power laser acceleration is being developed at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The significance of this application depends on whether or not it can yield dosimetric superiority over intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The goal of this study is to show how laser-accelerated proton beams with broad energy spreads can be optimally used for proton therapy including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and achieve dosimetric superiority over IMRT for prostate cancer. Desired energies and spreads with a varying δE/E were selected with the particle selection device and used to generate spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). Proton plans were generated on an in-house Monte Carlo-based inverse-planning system. Fifteen prostate IMRT plans previously used for patient treatment have been included for comparison. Identical dose prescriptions, beam arrangement and consistent dose constrains were used for IMRT and IMPT plans to show the dosimetric differences that were caused only by the different physical characteristics of proton and photon beams. Different optimization constrains and beam arrangements were also used to find optimal IMPT. The results show that conventional proton therapy (CPT) plans without intensity modulation were not superior to IMRT, but IMPT can generate better proton plans if appropriate beam setup and optimization are used. Compared to IMRT, IMPT can reduce the target dose heterogeneity ((D5-D95)/D95) by up to 56%. The volume receiving 65 Gy and higher (V65) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 45% and 88%, respectively, while the volume receiving 40 Gy and higher (V40) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 49% and 68%, respectively. IMPT can also reduce the whole body non-target tissue dose by up to 61% or a factor 2.5. This study has shown that the laser accelerator under development has a

  11. Fundamental studies for the proton polarization technique in neutron protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ichiro; Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Niimura, Nobuo

    2013-11-01

    The isotope effect in conventional neutron protein crystallography (NPC) can be eliminated by the proton polarization technique (ppt). Furthermore, the ppt can improve detection sensitivity of hydrogen (relative neutron scattering length of hydrogen) by approximately eight times in comparison with conventional NPC. Several technical difficulties, however, should be overcome in order to perform the ppt. In this paper, two fundamental studies to realise ppt are presented: preliminary trials using high-pressure flash freezing has shown the advantage of making bulk water amorphous without destroying the single crystal; and X-ray diffraction and liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry analyses of standard proteins after introducing radical molecules into protein crystals have shown that radical molecules could be distributed non-specifically around proteins, which is essential for better proton polarization. PMID:24121348

  12. Fundamental studies for the proton polarization technique in neutron protein crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ichiro; Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Niimura, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    The isotope effect in conventional neutron protein crystallography (NPC) can be eliminated by the proton polarization technique (ppt). Furthermore, the ppt can improve detection sensitivity of hydrogen (relative neutron scattering length of hydrogen) by approximately eight times in comparison with conventional NPC. Several technical difficulties, however, should be overcome in order to perform the ppt. In this paper, two fundamental studies to realise ppt are presented: preliminary trials using high-pressure flash freezing has shown the advantage of making bulk water amorphous without destroying the single crystal; and X-ray diffraction and liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry analyses of standard proteins after introducing radical molecules into protein crystals have shown that radical molecules could be distributed non-specifically around proteins, which is essential for better proton polarization. PMID:24121348

  13. Lower hybrid turbulence at cometary bow wave and acceleration of cometary protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, V. D.; Shevchenko, V. I.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Lebedev, V. B.

    1993-01-01

    The wave measurements at the spacecraft encounters with Comet Halley have shown intense wave activity at the lower hybrid frequency. The excitation of the lower hybrid instability by the pickup cometary ions (protons and water group) in the bow wave region and the quasi-linear diffusion of the ions in these fluctuations are discussed. The quasi-linear diffusion of the pickup protons takes place over a scale length shorter than that of the heavier water group ions. This enhances damping of the waves by protons, and when the pickup proton density is large enough, it can result in the saturation of the instability as this damping balances the heavy ion driven growth. The observed electric field amplitude and the scale length of proton relaxation are in agreement with the theory. For small pickup proton density the instability can saturate due to the wave energy cascade arising from the modulation instability of the large-amplitude lower hybrid waves. This saturation mechanism leads to electron acceleration and suprathermal tail formation.

  14. High Power Proton Accelerator Development at KAERI and its Vacuum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Ho; Park, Mi Young; Kim, Kui Young; Kim, Kye Ryung; Kim, Jun Yeon; Cho, Yong-Sub

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP), approved and launched by the Korean government in July 2002, includes a 100 MeV proton linear accelerator (linac) development and programs for its utilization and application. The main goals in the first phase of the project, spanning from 2002 to 2005, were the design of a 100 MeV proton linac and the development of a 20 MeV linac consisting of a 50 keV proton injector, a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and a 20 MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The 50 keV injector and 3 MeV RFQ have been installed and tested, and the 20 MeV DTL is being assembled, tuned and under a beam test. At the same time, the utilization programs using the proton beam have been planned, and some are now under way. The vacuum system of the 20 MeV proton linac and its related issues, especially in operation with a high duty, are discussed in detail.

  15. Comment on "effect of a polarized hydrogen target on the polarization of a stored proton beam".

    PubMed

    MacKay, W W; Montag, C

    2006-02-01

    Meyer [Phys. Rev. E 50, 1485 (1994)] analyzed the filtering mechanism of polarizing a stored beam by scattering from an internal polarized target. We noticed in Meyer's derivation of Eq. (4) of that paper that he had added a new twist to an old argument [W. Brückner, Physics with Antiprotons at LEAR in the ACOL Era: Proceedings of the Third LEAR Workshop, Tignes, Savoie, France, January 19-26, 1985 (Editions Frontières, Gif-sur-Yvette, France, 1985), p. 245] by allowing some particles that are spin flipped to be kept in the beam. We show that this invalidates the old result and leads to a more complicated expression for the buildup of polarization. PMID:16605487

  16. A LOW GAMMA_T INJECTION LATTICE FOR POLARIZED PROTONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2007-06-25

    Polarized protons are injected into the Relativistic Heavy Jon Collider (RHIC) just above transition energy. When installation of a cold partial Siberian snake in the AGS required lowering the injection energy by {Delta}{gamma} = 0.56, the transition energy in RHIC had to be lowered accordingly to ensure proper longitudinal matching. This paper presents lattice modifications implemented to lower the transition energy by {Delta}{gamma}{sub t} = 0.8.

  17. Dynamic aperture evaluation of the proposed lattices for the RHIC 2009 polarized proton run

    SciTech Connect

    Luo,Y.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-01-02

    In the article we evaluate the dynamic apertures of the proposed lattices for the coming Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 2009 polarized proton (pp) 100 GeV and 250 GeV runs. One goal of this study is to find out the appropriate {beta}* for the coming 2009 pp runs. Another goal is to study the effect of second order chromaticity correction in the RHIC pp runs.

  18. Advanced low-beta cavity development for proton and ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Z. A.; Kelly, M. P.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in designing and processing low-beta superconducting cavities at Argonne National Laboratory are very encouraging for future applications requiring compact proton and ion accelerators. One of the major benefits of these accelerating structures is achieving real-estate accelerating gradients greater than 3 MV/m very efficiently either continuously or for long-duty cycle operation (>1%). The technology has been implemented in low-beta accelerator cryomodules for the Argonne ATLAS heavy-ion linac where the cryomodules are required to have real-estate gradients of more than 3 MV/m. In offline testing low-beta cavities with even higher gradients have already been achieved. This paper will review this work where we have achieved surface fields greater than 166 mT magnetic and 117 MV/m electric in a 72 MHz quarter-wave resonator optimized for β = 0.077 ions.

  19. On the feasibility of increasing the energy of laser-accelerated protons by using low-density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    Optimal regimes of proton acceleration in the interaction of short high-power laser pulses with thin foils and low-density targets are determined by means of 3D numerical simulation. It is demonstrated that the maximum proton energy can be increased by using low-density targets in which ions from the front surface of the target are accelerated most efficiently. It is shown using a particular example that, for the same laser pulse, the energy of protons accelerated from a low-density target can be increased by one-third as compared to a solid-state target.

  20. On the feasibility of increasing the energy of laser-accelerated protons by using low-density targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brantov, A. V. Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-06-15

    Optimal regimes of proton acceleration in the interaction of short high-power laser pulses with thin foils and low-density targets are determined by means of 3D numerical simulation. It is demonstrated that the maximum proton energy can be increased by using low-density targets in which ions from the front surface of the target are accelerated most efficiently. It is shown using a particular example that, for the same laser pulse, the energy of protons accelerated from a low-density target can be increased by one-third as compared to a solid-state target.

  1. Accelerating monoenergetic protons from ultrathin foils by flat-top laser pulses in the directed-Coulomb-explosion regime

    PubMed Central

    Bulanov, S. S.; Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Chvykov, V.; Kalinchenko, G.; Matsuoka, T.; Rousseau, P.; Reed, S.; Yanovsky, V.; Litzenberg, D. W.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the effect of laser beam shaping on proton acceleration in the interaction of a tightly focused pulse with ultrathin double-layer solid targets in the regime of directed Coulomb explosion. In this regime, the heavy ions of the front layer are forced by the laser to expand predominantly in the direction of the pulse propagation, forming a moving longitudinal charge separation electric field, thus increasing the effectiveness of acceleration of second-layer protons. The utilization of beam shaping, namely, the use of flat-top beams, leads to more efficient proton acceleration due to the increase of the longitudinal field. PMID:18850951

  2. Definition and Application of Proton Source Efficiency in Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seltborg, Per; Wallenius, Jan; Tucek, Kamil; Gudowski, Waclaw

    2003-11-15

    In order to study the beam power amplification of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), a new parameter, the proton source efficiency {psi}* is introduced. {psi}* represents the average importance of the external proton source, relative to the average importance of the eigenmode production, and is closely related to the neutron source efficiency [varphi]*, which is frequently used in the ADS field. [varphi]* is commonly used in the physics of subcritical systems driven by any external source (spallation source, (d,d), (d,t), {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fissions, etc.). On the contrary, {psi}* has been defined in this paper exclusively for ADS studies where the system is driven by a spallation source. The main advantage with using {psi}* instead of [varphi]* for ADS is that the way of defining the external source is unique and that it is proportional to the core power divided by the proton beam power, independent of the neutron source distribution.Numerical simulations have been performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX in order to study {psi}* as a function of different design parameters. It was found that, in order to maximize {psi}* and therefore minimize the proton current needs, a target radius as small as possible should be chosen. For target radii smaller than {approx}30 cm, lead-bismuth is a better choice of coolant material than sodium, regarding the proton source efficiency, while for larger target radii the two materials are equally good. The optimal axial proton beam impact was found to be located {approx}20 cm above the core center. Varying the proton energy, {psi}*/E{sub p} was found to have a maximum for proton energies between 1200 and 1400 MeV. Increasing the americium content in the fuel decreases {psi}* considerably, in particular when the target radius is large.

  3. Electron versus proton accelerator driven sub-critical system performance using TRIGA reactors at power

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Burgio, N.; D'Angelo, A.; Santagata, A.; Petrovich, C.; Schikorr, M.; Beller, D.; Felice, L. S.; Imel, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison of the performance of an electron accelerator-driven experiment, under discussion within the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project, being conducted within the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and of the proton-driven experiment TRADE (TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment) originally planned at ENEA-Casaccia in Italy. Both experiments foresee the coupling to sub-critical TRIGA core configurations, and are aimed to investigate the relevant kinetic and dynamic accelerator-driven systems (ADS) core behavior characteristics in the presence of thermal reactivity feedback effects. TRADE was based on the coupling of an upgraded proton cyclotron, producing neutrons via spallation reactions on a tantalum (Ta) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 200 kW. RACE is based on the coupling of an Electron Linac accelerator, producing neutrons via photoneutron reactions on a tungsten-copper (W-Cu) or uranium (U) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 50 kW. The paper is focused on analysis of expected dynamic power response of the RACE core following reactivity and/or source transients. TRADE and RACE target-core power coupling coefficients are compared and discussed. (authors)

  4. First experimental results from 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator for neutron production.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, A; Belchenko, Yu; Burdakov, A; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Khilchenko, A; Konstantinov, S; Krivenko, A; Kuznetsov, A; Mekler, K; Sanin, A; Shirokov, V; Sorokin, I; Sulyaev, Yu; Tiunov, M

    2008-02-01

    A 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation was developed and first experiments are carried out in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). The accelerator is designed for neutron production via reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be for the boron neutron-capture therapy of the brain tumors, and for explosive detection based on 9.1724 MeV resonance gamma, which are produced via reaction (13)C(p,gamma)(14)N, absorption in nitrogen. PMID:18315262

  5. Construction of low current 30 keV proton accelerator for detection efficiency studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Bacci, Americo; Baessler, Stefan; Ross, Aaron; Roane, Nicholas; Whitaker, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    We have constructed a small ion source and proton accelerator at UVA. This accelerator is needed for the characterization of the detection efficiency of a large area, thick, 127-hexagonal segmented Silicon detector for the neutron beta decay ``Nab'' experiment that will be carried out at SNS, Oak Ridge National Laboratory in search of physics beyond the standard model. We will present the design, simulations, operation, and detection of 30 keV H+ and H2+, as well as our efforts to stabilize and correlate both ion currents.

  6. First experimental results from 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, A.; Belchenko, Yu.; Burdakov, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Krivenko, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Mekler, K.; Sanin, A.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.; Sulyaev, Yu.; Tiunov, M.

    2008-02-15

    A 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation was developed and first experiments are carried out in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). The accelerator is designed for neutron production via reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be for the boron neutron-capture therapy of the brain tumors, and for explosive detection based on 9.1724 MeV resonance gamma, which are produced via reaction {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N, absorption in nitrogen.

  7. Protons acceleration in thin CH foils by ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, I. N.

    2015-03-15

    Interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with the intensities 10{sup 21}, 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} with CH plastic foils is studied in the framework of kinetic theory of laser plasma based on the construction of propagators (in classical limit) for electron and ion distribution functions in plasmas. The calculations have been performed for real densities and charges of plasma ions. Protons are accelerated both in the direction of laser pulse (up to 1 GeV) and in the opposite direction (more than 5 GeV). The mechanisms of forward acceleration are different for various intensities.

  8. Shock wave acceleration of protons in inhomogeneous plasma interacting with ultrashort intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lecz, Zs.; Andreev, A.

    2015-04-15

    The acceleration of protons, triggered by solitary waves in expanded solid targets is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The near-critical density plasma is irradiated by ultrashort high power laser pulses, which generate the solitary wave. The transformation of this soliton into a shock wave during propagation in plasma with exponentially decreasing density profile is described analytically, which allows to obtain a scaling law for the proton energy. The high quality proton bunch with small energy spread is produced by reflection from the shock-front. According to the 2D simulations, the mechanism is stable only if the laser pulse duration is shorter than the characteristic development time of the parasitic Weibel instability.

  9. Proton acceleration with high-intensity ultrahigh-contrast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Ceccotti, T; Lévy, A; Popescu, H; Réau, F; D'Oliveira, P; Monot, P; Geindre, J P; Lefebvre, E; Martin, Ph

    2007-11-01

    We report on simultaneous measurements of backward- and forward-accelerated protons spectra when an ultrahigh intensity (approximately 5 x 10(18) W/cm(20), ultrahigh contrast (>10(10)) laser pulse interacts with foils of thickness ranging from 0.08 to 105 microm. Under such conditions, free of preplasma originating from ionization of the laser-irradiated surface, we show that the maximum proton energies are proportional to the p component of the laser electric field only and not to the ponderomotive force and that the characteristics of the proton beams originating from both target sides are almost identical. All these points have been corroborated by extensive 1D and 2D particle-in-cell simulations showing a very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:17995415

  10. Proton Acceleration with High-Intensity Ultrahigh-Contrast Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccotti, T.; Levy, A.; Popescu, H.; Reau, F.; D'Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Lefebvre, E.

    2007-11-02

    We report on simultaneous measurements of backward- and forward-accelerated protons spectra when an ultrahigh intensity ({approx}5x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}), ultrahigh contrast (>10{sup 10}) laser pulse interacts with foils of thickness ranging from 0.08 to 105 {mu}m. Under such conditions, free of preplasma originating from ionization of the laser-irradiated surface, we show that the maximum proton energies are proportional to the p component of the laser electric field only and not to the ponderomotive force and that the characteristics of the proton beams originating from both target sides are almost identical. All these points have been corroborated by extensive 1D and 2D particle-in-cell simulations showing a very good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Calculations of neutron shielding data for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Sheu, R J; Jian, S H

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of neutron sources and their attenuation in concrete were investigated in detail for protons with energies ranging from 10 to 100 MeV striking on target materials of C, N, Al, Fe, Cu and W. A two-step approach was adopted: thick-target double-differential neutron yields were first calculated from the (p, xn) cross sections recommended in the ICRU Report 63; further, transport simulations of those neutrons in concrete were performed by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The purpose of this study is to provide reasonably accurate parameters for shielding design for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators. Source terms and the corresponding attenuation lengths in concrete for several target materials are given as a function of proton energies and neutron emission angles. PMID:16604637

  12. Numerical study of a linear accelerator using laser-generated proton beams as a source

    SciTech Connect

    Antici, P.; Fazi, M.; Migliorati, M.; Palumbo, L.; Lombardi, A.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-12-15

    The injection of laser-generated protons through conventional drift tube linear accelerators (linacs) has been studied numerically. For this, we used the parameters of the proton source produced by ultraintense lasers, i.e., with an intrinsic high beam quality. The numerical particle tracing code PARMELA[L. M. Young and J. H. Billen, LANL Report No. LA-UR-96-1835, 2004] is then used to inject experimentally measured laser-generated protons with energies of 7{+-}0.1 MeV and rms un-normalized emittance of 0.180 mm mrad into one drift tube linac tank that accelerated them to more than 14 MeV. The simulations exhibit un-normalized emittance growths of 8 in x direction and 22.6 in y direction, with final emittances lower than those produced using conventional sources, allowing a potential luminosity gain for the final beam. However, the simulations also exhibit a limitation in the allowed injected proton charge as, over 0.112 mA, space charge effect worsens significantly the beam emittance.

  13. Electron acceleration driven by ultrashort and nonparaxial radially polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Vincent; April, Alexandre; Piché, Michel

    2012-07-01

    Exact closed-form solutions to Maxwell's equations are used to investigate the acceleration of electrons in vacuum driven by ultrashort and nonparaxial radially polarized laser pulses. We show that the threshold power above which significant acceleration takes place is greatly reduced by using a tighter focus. Moreover, electrons accelerated by tightly focused single-cycle laser pulses may reach around 80% of the theoretical energy gain limit, about twice the value previously reported with few-cycle paraxial pulses. Our results demonstrate that the direct acceleration of electrons in vacuum is well within reach of current laser technology. PMID:22743415

  14. Measurement of proton polarization in the d({gamma},p)n reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    A proposal was approved by CEBAF PAC7 to measure angular distributions of the proton polarization for the d({gamma},p)n reaction in the GeV region. This proposed measurement will test the validity of extensions of conventional nuclear-physics theories to the higher energy regime. The results of the experiment will further constrain the evidence from SLAC experiments NE8 and NE17 that asymptotic scaling was observed above a photon energy of 1.3 GeV. Photoproton polarization measurements at lower energy indicate that the magnitude of the polarization increases with energy. This is consistent with the observation that polarizations are large in high-energy processes, e.g. A{sub nn} in pp {yields} pp scattering or A{sub y} in pp {yields} {pi}{sup 0}X. However, the polarizations in hadron-hadron scattering are believed to arise from Landshoff mechanisms. The higher energy photoproton experiment will permit the first measurements of polarization for a reaction, {gamma}d {yields} pn, where there are no Landshoff terms. The experiment would make use of a polarimeter installed in either the High Resolution Spectrometer in Hall A or the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at CEBAF.

  15. How to Produce a Reactor Neutron Spectrum Using a Proton Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K.; Wootan, D.; Gates, R.; Schmitt, B.; Asner, D. M.

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  16. How to produce a reactor neutron spectrum using a proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Wootan, David W.; Gates, Robert O.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Asner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  17. Accelerating fourier volume rendering by polar coordinate data representation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jan-Ray; Lee, Shun-Zhi; Lee, Huai-Che

    2012-12-01

    Volume rendering is an important tool to visualize three-dimensional data in biomedicine by projecting the data to a two-dimensional plane. The projection is done by ray casting and its complexity is proportional to the number of three-dimensional data points. To reduce complexity, Fourier volume rendering (FVR) uses slice projection theorem to facilitate the integration of voxels along the ray casting path. In this paper, we proposed a new method for FVR that stored and processed the frequency domain data in polar coordinate. By exploiting three aspects of data processing which is previously impossible in rectilinear coordinate, our new method is much faster than the previous methods. The first aspect is data regularity. When data are stored in polar coordinate, extracting a slice involves accessing data stored in adjacent memory location. This regularity makes memory access more efficient. The second aspect is to utilize the high data density near the origin in polar coordinate. We can obtain two benefits from this aspect. The first allows us to extract a slice by nearest-neighbor interpolation instead of more complex interpolation but without sacrificing image quality. The second allows us to trade off between image quality and memory storage. The third aspect is to recognize that converting from rectilinear coordinate to polar coordinate is a one-time process. Therefore, we can use a better interpolation kernel with larger support in coordinate conversion. In turn, most of the computation is shifted to the preprocessing stage and interactive rendering can be made very fast. In the experiments, we show that the speed in interactive visualization for our new method is independent of the size of the interpolation kernel, therefore, achieving comparable image quality at a faster rate than previous methods. PMID:22771165

  18. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanzo, J.; Fallavier, M.; Alphonse, G.; Bernard, C.; Battiston-Montagne, P.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Dauvergne, D.; Beuve, M.

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  19. Study of proton acceleration at the target front surface in laser-solid interactions by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Proton acceleration inside solid LiF and CH-LiF targets irradiated by a 450-fs, 20-J, 1053-nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} has been studied via neutron spectroscopy. Neutron spectra produced through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction that occurs between accelerated protons, at the front surface, and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. From measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, total number, and slope temperature of the accelerated protons are investigated. The study indicates that protons originate at the front surface and are accelerated to a maximum energy that is reasonably consistent with the calculated one due to the ponderomotive force.

  20. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-04-15

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity.

  1. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-15

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  2. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-01

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  3. Radiative capture of polarized neutrons by polarized protons at Tn=183 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Pate, S. F.; Bloch, C.; Vigdor, S. E.; Bowyer, S. M.; Bowyer, T. W.; Jacobs, W. W.; Meyer, H. O.; Pierce, E.; Sowinski, J.; Whiddon, C.; Wissink, S. W.; Jolivette, P. L.; Pickar, M. A.

    1995-12-01

    In order to provide a quantitative test of theoretical calculations incorporating meson-exchange currents and intermediate Δ resonances, we measure the normal-component spin correlation coefficient CNN, the differential cross section dσ/dΩ, and the neutron and proton analyzing powers An and Ap, each as a function of angle, for n-->p-->-->dγ at Tn=183 MeV. Our n-->p-->-->dγ results, combined with the previous cross section and photon asymmetry data collected in the past decade, place quite strong constraints on model calculations. Our data are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions by Jaus and Woolcock that incorporate meson-exchange and isobar current effects and relativistic corrections, signifying great recent progress in our understanding of these effects in the nucleon-nucleon system.

  4. Effective generation of the spread-out-Bragg peak from the laser accelerated proton beams using a carbon-proton mixed target.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung Hoon; Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Song, Yongkeun; Jung, Won-Gyun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Pae, Ki-Hong; Park, Sung Yong

    2014-12-01

    Conventional laser accelerated proton beam has broad energy spectra. It is not suitable for clinical use directly, so it is necessary for employing energy selection system. However, in the conventional laser accelerated proton system, the intensity of the proton beams in the low energy regime is higher than that in the high energy regime. Thus, to generate spread-out-Bragg peak (SOBP), stronger weighting value to the higher energy proton beams is needed and weaker weighting value to the lower energy proton beams is needed, which results in the wide range of weighting values. The purpose of this research is to investigate a method for efficient generating of the SOBP with varying magnetic field in the energy selection system using a carbon-proton mixture target. Energy spectrum of the laser accelerated proton beams was acquired using Particle-In-Cell simulations. The Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was implemented for energy selection, particle transportation, and dosimetric property measurement. The energy selection collimator hole size of the energy selection system was changed from 1 to 5 mm in order to investigate the effect of hole size on the dosimetric properties for Bragg peak and SOBP. To generate SOBP, magnetic field in the energy selection system was changed during beam irradiation with each beam weighting factor. In this study, our results suggest that carbon-proton mixture target based laser accelerated proton beams can generate quasi-monoenergetic energy distribution and result in the efficient generation of SOBP. A further research is needed to optimize SOBP according to each range and modulated width using an optimized weighting algorithm. PMID:25154880

  5. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  6. Research program for the 660 MeV proton accelerator driven MOX-plutonium subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Buttseva, G. L.; Dudarev, S. Ju.; Polanski, A.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the research program of the Experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (25% PuO2+75% UO2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff=0.945, energetic gain G=30, and accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW.

  7. Shielding Benchmark Experiments Through Concrete and Iron with High-Energy Proton and Heavy Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Sasaki, M.; Nunomiya, T.; Nakao, N.; Kim, E.; Kurosawa, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Iwase, H.; Uwamino, Y.; Shibata, T.; Ito, S.; Fukumura, A.; Perry, D. R.; Wright, P.

    The deep penetration of neutrons through thick shield has become a very serious problem in the shielding design of high-energy, high-intensity accelerator facility. In the design calculation, the Monte Carlo transport calculation through thick shields has large statistical errors and the basic nuclear data and model used in the existing Monte Carlo codes are not well evaluated because of very few experimental data. It is therefore strongly needed to do the deep penetration experiment as shielding benchmark for investigating the calculation accuracy. Under this circumference, we performed the following two shielding experiments through concrete and iron, one with a 800 MeV proton accelerator of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), England and the other with a high energy heavy iron accelerator of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Here these two shielding benchmark experiments are outlined.

  8. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND THERMAL SIMULATIONS FOR THE SWITCH REGION OF A COMPACT PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Caporaso, G J; Sullivan, J S

    2007-06-15

    A compact proton accelerator for medical applications is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The accelerator architecture is based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) concept. One critical area to consider is the switch region. Electric field simulations and thermal calculations of the switch area were performed to help determine the operating limits of rmed SiC switches. Different geometries were considered for the field simulation including the shape of the thin Indium solder meniscus between the electrodes and SiC. Electric field simulations were also utilized to demonstrate how the field stress could be reduced. Both transient and steady steady-state thermal simulations were analyzed to find the average power capability of the switches.

  9. Quantum electrodynamics vacuum polarization modification of photon acceleration in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bu Zhigang; Ji Peiyong

    2010-07-15

    The modification of photon frequency shifting based on taking into account the nonlinear quantum electrodynamics vacuum properties in plasma is studied. Motion equations of a laser field propagating in a plasma are derived from the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian density. It is found that besides the classical density perturbation of the plasma electrons, the energy density perturbation of the laser field will induce the frequency shifting via the ponderomotive force of the laser field on the vacuum. In addition it is shown that the electron density will be suppressed, which is attributed to a screening effect on the plasma electrons via the quantum vacuum polarization.

  10. A high brightness proton injector for the Tandetron accelerator at Jožef Stefan Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, Primož; Podaru, Nicolae C.; Vavpetič, Primož; Jeromel, Luka; Ogrinc Potocnik, Nina; Ondračka, Simon; Gottdang, Andreas; Mous, Dirk J. M.

    2014-08-01

    Jožef Stefan Institute recently commissioned a high brightness H- ion beam injection system for its existing tandem accelerator facility. Custom developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa, the multicusp ion source has been tuned to deliver at the entrance of the Tandetron™ accelerator H- ion beams with a measured brightness of 17.1 A m-2 rad-2 eV-1 at 170 μA, equivalent to an energy normalized beam emittance of 0.767 π mm mrad MeV1/2. Upgrading the accelerator facility with the new injection system provides two main advantages. First, the high brightness of the new ion source enables the reduction of object slit aperture and the reduction of acceptance angle at the nuclear microprobe, resulting in a reduced beam size at selected beam intensity, which significantly improves the probe resolution for micro-PIXE applications. Secondly, the upgrade strongly enhances the accelerator up-time since H and He beams are produced by independent ion sources, introducing a constant availability of 3He beam for fusion-related research with NRA. The ion beam particle losses and ion beam emittance growth imply that the aforementioned beam brightness is reduced by transport through the ion optical system. To obtain quantitative information on the available brightness at the high-energy side of the accelerator, the proton beam brightness is determined in the nuclear microprobe beamline. Based on the experience obtained during the first months of operation for micro-PIXE applications, further necessary steps are indicated to obtain optimal coupling of the new ion source with the accelerator to increase the normalized high-energy proton beam brightness at the JSI microprobe, currently at 14 A m-2 rad-2 eV-1, with the output current at 18% of its available maximum.

  11. Ion dynamics during the parametric instabilities of a left-hand polarized Alfvén wave in a proton-electron-alpha plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Hao, Yufei; Tao, Xin; Wang, Shui; Li, Xing

    2014-01-01

    The parametric instabilities of an Alfvén wave in a proton-electron plasma system are found to have great influence on proton dynamics, where part of the protons can be accelerated through the Landau resonance with the excited ion acoustic waves, and a beam component along the background magnetic field is formed. In this paper, with a one-dimensional hybrid simulation model, we investigate the evolution of the parametric instabilities of a monochromatic left-hand polarized Alfvén wave in a proton-electron-alpha plasma with a low beta. When the drift velocity between the protons and alpha particles is sufficiently large, the wave numbers of the backward daughter Alfvén waves can be cascaded toward higher values due to the modulational instability during the nonlinear evolution of the parametric instabilities, and the alpha particles are resonantly heated in both the parallel and perpendicular direction by the backward waves. On the other hand, when the drift velocity of alpha particles is small, the alpha particles are heated in the linear growth stage of the parametric instabilities due to the Landau resonance with the excited ion acoustic waves. Therefore, the heating occurs only in the parallel direction, and there is no obvious heating in the perpendicular direction. The relevance of our results to the preferential heating of heavy ions observed in the solar wind within 0.3 AU is also discussed in this paper.

  12. ELECTRON AND PROTON ACCELERATION DURING THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Sun, L. P.; Firoz, Kazi A.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    2013-06-10

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 {+-} 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 {+-} 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released {approx}10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of {approx}1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to {approx}3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  13. Electron and Proton Acceleration during the First Ground Level Enhancement Event of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Firoz, Kazi A.; Sun, L. P.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    2013-06-01

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 ± 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 ± 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released ~10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of ~1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to ~3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  14. Elastic scattering of polarized protons on helium three at 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, A.

    1985-07-01

    A set of spin dependent parameters and cross sections has been measured for polarized p-/sup 3/He elastic scattering over the range of q .7 to 4.2 fm/sup -1/. The experiment was done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) with a polarized proton beam at .8 GeV. The focal plane polarimeter of the HRS was used to determine the spin direction of the scattered proton. Since /sup 3/He is one of the simplest nuclei, polarized p-/sup 3/He scattering provides a very sensitive test of multiple scattering theories. The theoretical analysis was done by using two different wave functions for /sup 3/He as input to the multiple scattering theory. The theoretical calculations and experimental data together will give us useful information about nucleon-nucleon amplitudes and also help us to obtain a better understanding of the scattering process. 68 refs., 55 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Run05 Proton Beam Polarization Measurements by pC-Polarimeter (ver. 1.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa,I.; Alekseev, I.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bravar, A.; Bunce, G.; Dhawan, S.; Eyser, K.O.; Gill, R.; Haeberli, W.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Nass, A.; Okada, H.; Stephenson, E.; Svirida, D.N.; Wise, T.; Wood, J.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-07-01

    The polarization of the proton beams [1, 2] at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)[3] RHIC ring. The H-Jet polarimeter is located at the collision point allowing measurements of absolute normalization is provided by the hydrogen polarimeter, which measures over 1 {approx} 2 another measurement rather than measuring the absolute polarization. both beams. Two identical pC-polarimeters are equipped in the yellow and blue rings, where carbon ribbon target, providing fast feedback to beam operations and experiments. The days to obtain {approx} 5% statistical uncertainty (in Run05). Thus, the operation of the carbon is measured using both an atomic beam source hydrogen gas jet (H-Jet)[4, 5] and proton-carbon polarimeters was focused on better control of relative stability between one measurement to statistical accuracy within 20 to 30 seconds using an ultra-thin (typically 6 {approx} 8 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}) the rings are separated. The pC-polarimeter measures relative polarization to a few percent.

  16. Asymmetries in ozone depressions between the polar stratospheres following a solar proton event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.; Heath, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone depletions in the polar stratosphere during the energetic solar proton event on 4 August 1972 were observed by the backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) experiments on the Nimbus 4 satellite. The observed ozone contents, the ozone depressions and their temporal variations above the 4 mb level exhibited distinct asymmetries between the northern and southern hemispheres. Since the ozone destroying solar particles precipitate rather symmetrically into the two polar atmospheres, due to the geomagnetic dipole field, it is suggested that these asymmetries may be explained in terms of the differences in dynamics between the summer and the winter polar atmospheres. In the summer (northern) hemisphere, the stratospheric and mesospheric ozone depletion and recovery are smooth functions of time due to the preponderance of undistributed orderly flow in this region. On the other hand, the temporal variation of the upper stratospheric ozone in the winter polar atmosphere (southern hemisphere) exhibits large amplitude irregularities. These characteristic differences between the two polar atmospheres are also evident in the vertical distributions of temperatures and winds observed by balloons and rocket soundings.

  17. Observation of Counter Propagating Alfven Waves with Perpendicular Polarizations and the Associated Proton Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Pei, Z. T.; Wang, L.; Tu, C. Y.; Marsch, E.; Yao, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is believed that MHD turbulence cascading is mainly caused by the collisions between Alfven waves, which propagate oppositely and are polarized perpendicularly to each other. Nonlinear interaction will vanish if the counter-propagating Alfven waves have their polarization aligned with each other. However, the Alfven waves satisfying these collision criteria have not yet been found in the solar wind observations. Here we report the existence of Alfven waves with opposite propagation and non-aligned polarization in the solar wind. In one case of anti-sunward magnetic sector, with RTN as the coordinates, the magnetic fluctuations in T-component (BT) are anti-correlated with the velocity fluctuations in T-component (VT), while BR and BN fluctuations are in positive correlation with VR and VN fluctuations, respectively. These features suggest a possible nonlinear interaction between outward propagating Alfven wave with polarization in T-direction and inward propagating Alfven wave with polarization in R&N-directions. Moreover, the associated proton kinetics shows the existence of field-aligned sunward beam rather than anti-sunward beam, which may indicate a parallel Landau heating by sunward kinetic Alfven waves. A statistical study including more cases is also conducted.

  18. Gravitomagnetic acceleration of accretion disk matter to polar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, John; Mathews, Grant

    2016-03-01

    The motion of the masses of an accretion disk around a black hole creates a general relativistic, gravitomagnetic field (GEM) from the moving matter (be it charged or uncharged) of the accretion disk. This GEM field accelerates moving masses (neutral or charged) near the accretion disk vertically upward and away from the disk, and then inward toward the axis of the disk. As the accelerated material nears the axis with approximately vertical angles, a frame dragging effect contributes to the formation of narrow jets emanating from the poles. This GEM effect is numerically evaluated in the first post Newtonian (1PN) approximation from observable quantities like the mass and velocity of the disk. This GEM force is linear in the total mass of the accretion disk matter and quadratic in the velocity of matter near to the disk with approximately the same velocity. Since these masses and velocities can be quite high in astrophysical contexts, the GEM force, which in other contexts is weak, is quite significant. This GEM effect is compared to the ordinary electromagnetic effects applied to this problem in the past.

  19. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Slow extraction of protons beams from circular accelerators is currently widely used for a variety of beam-based experiments. The method has some deficiencies including limited efficiency of extraction, radiation induced due to scattering on the electrostatic septa and limited beam pipe aperture, beam dynamics effects of space charge forces and magnet power supplies ripple. Here we present a novel slow extraction scheme employing a number of non-standard accelerator elements, such as Silicone crystal strips and pulsed stripline dipole correctors, and illustrate practicality of these examples at the 8 GeV proton Recycler Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in simulations. We propose to initiate an R&D program in the Fermilab 8 GeV Recycler to address the key issues of the method: (a) feasibility of very short crystals - from few mm down to 0.2 mm; (b) their efficiency in the channelling and volume reflection regimes; (c) practical aspects of the fast deflectors.

  20. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  1. Study of the proton structure by measurements of polarization transfers in real Compton scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano Fanelli; Cisbani, Evarostp; Hamilton, David; Salme, G.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-03-01

    A preliminary analysis of polarization-transfer data at large scattering angle (70°), obtained in an experiment of real Compton scattering on proton, performed in Hall-C of Jefferson Lab, is presented. It is also discussed the relevance of this kind of experiments for shedding light on the non-perturbative structure of the proton, at low energy, and on the transition from the non-perturbative regime to the perturbative one, that occurs at high energy. Moreover, the possibility to extract Compton form factors and the Generalized Parton Distributions, one of the most promising theoretical tool to determine the total angular momentum contribution of quarks and gluons to nucleon spin, is emphasized.

  2. Elastic scattering polarimeter for a polarized antiproton beam at U-70 accelerator of IHEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, A. A.; Chetvertkov, M. A.; Chetvertkova, V. A.; Garkusha, V. I.; Meschanin, A. P.; Mochalov, V. V.; Nurusheva, M. B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Ridiger, A. V.; Rykov, V. L.; Semenov, P. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Zapolsky, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    The absolute polarimeter based on the elastic p¯p-scattering in the diffraction kinematic regions with the total momentum transfer squared coverage of 0.1 < - t < 0.3 (GeV/c)2 is proposed for the polarized antiproton beam at the U-70 proton synchrotron of IHEP. It is shown that it would take ˜200-400 hours for measuring the beam polarization at the statistical errors of ΔPB/PB ≃10-15%. These time estimates include also the time which is necessary for the measurements of an analyzing power AN, using a polarized target. Besides the measurements of beam polarizations, the proposed polarimeter provides an opportunity for carrying out the experimental studies of the small momentum transfers physics which would be a valuable enrichment of the SPASCHARM experiment capabilities and its physics program.

  3. Vacuum electron acceleration driven by a tightly focused radially polarized Gaussian beam.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lin; Li, Jian-Xing; Zang, Wei-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2011-05-01

    Electron acceleration in vacuum driven by a tightly focused radially polarized Gaussian beam has been studied in detail. Weniger transformation method is used to eliminate the divergence of the radially polarized electromagnetic field derived from the Lax series approach. And, electron dynamics in an intense radially polarized Gaussian beam is analyzed by using the Weniger transformation field. The roles of the initial phase of the electromagnetic field and the injection angle, position and energy of electron in energy gain of electron have been studied in detail. PMID:21643185

  4. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  5. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, D.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Appelt, S.; Bouchard, L. S.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast (˜100 Hz) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  6. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Sefkow, A. B.; Flippo, K. A.

    2014-04-15

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  7. Search by mariner 10 for electrons and protons accelerated in association with venus.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J A; Eraker, J H; Lamport, J E; Walpole, P H

    1974-03-29

    The University of Chicago instrumnents on board the Mariner 10 spacecraft bound for Mercury have measured energy spectra and fluxes of electrons from 0.18 to 30 million electron volts and protons from 0.5 to 68 million electron volts along the plasma wake and in the bow shock regions associated with Venus. Unusually quiet solar conditions and improved instrumentation made it possible to search for much lower fluxes of protons and electrons in similar energy regions as compared to earlier Mariner missions to Venus-that is, lower by a factor of 10(2) for protons and 10(3) for electrons. We found no evidence for electrons or protons either in the form of increases of intensity or energy spectral changes in the vicinity of the planet, nor any evidence of bursts of radiation in or near the observed bow shock where bursts of electrons might have been expected in analogy with the bow shock at the earth. The importance of these null results for determining the necessary and sufficient conditions for particle acceleration is discussed with respect to magnetometer evidence that Venus does not have a magnetosphere. PMID:17791375

  8. Comparative Study of Radiation Dosage Distribution and Medical Implication of Quasi-monoenergetic Proton Generated from Laser Acceleration of Ultra-thin Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batpurev, Temuge; Cao, Jennifer; Xie, Wang; Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Recently the search for mono-energetic protons has gained great interest, particularly in applications such as proton therapy for cancer treatment. The advantage of proton therapy is that unlike photon radiation, proton beams deposit most of the energy at the tumor, sparing surrounding tissue and vital organs. A compact laser-driven proton accelerator is attractive for proton cancer therapy since the electric fields for particle acceleration can reach the order of tens of GV per cm which allows large reduction of the system size. Recent work by Liu et al. [2012] shows that laser acceleration of an ultra-thin multi-ion foil can generate high quality quasi-monoenergetic proton beams. The proton acceleration is due to the combination of radiation pressure and heavy-ion Coulomb repulsion. To assess the feasibility of laser-proton cancer therapy with such a proton accelerator, we simulated the interaction of protons with water and determine the radiation dosage deposition for particle beams produced from the PIC simulation of laser acceleration of multi-ion targets. We used the SRIM code to calculate the depth and lateral dose distribution of protons. We also compared the dosage map produced from protons generated from laser acceleration of single ion and multi-ion targets.

  9. Acceleration of interstellar pickup protons at the heliospheric termination shock: Voyager 1/2 energetic proton fluxes in the inner heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalov, S. V.; Malama, Y. G.; Alexashov, D. B.; Izmodenov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Fluxes of energetic protons in the range from 30 keV up to several MeV measured at the Voyager 1/2 spacecraft downstream of the heliospheric termination shock can be explained by shock-drift acceleration theory, which includes variations of the magnetic field direction in a vicinity of the shock. The variations can be connected with the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field near the solar equatorial plane. Theoretical fluxes of accelerated protons are calculated numerically in the framework of a 3D kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic model of the interaction of the solar wind and local interstellar medium.

  10. Focal spot effects on the generation of proton beams during target normal sheath acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, H.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Yu, L. H.; Chu, Y. X.; Li, Y. Y.; Xu, T. J.; Zhang, H.; Zhai, S. H.; Leng, Y. X.; Liang, X. Y.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Focal spot effects on the generation of proton beams are investigated by a high-intensity high-contrast laser irradiating on solid foil in target normal sheath acceleration experiments. Different spot size, transverse shape, and intensity of the laser are obtained by appropriately using deformable mirrors and parabolic mirrors. Experiments show that the maximum proton energy is mainly determined by the laser intensity if the focal spot size is not seriously changed. Compared with the previous experimental results, the optimum foil thickness d o is scaled by the laser intensity I as d o ~ I 0.33. The corresponding theoretical estimation is carried out as d o ~ I 0.25 for ultra-high intensity laser systems with similar contrast. MULTI and particle-in-cell simulations are used to interpret the experimental results.

  11. Laser acceleration of monoenergetic protons with a near-critical, optically-shaped gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Helle, Michael; Ting, Antonio; Gordon, Daniel; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration is studied using the intense terawatt CO2 laser pulse with a near-critical hydrogen gas target. The gas density profile is tailored by a hydrodynamic shock, which is launched by ablation of solid with a moderate-energy, nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulse in the vicinity of the gas jet. A sharp density gradient is thus created near the edge of the gas column, resulting to ~ 6X local density enhancement up to several times of critical density within 100 micrometers before CO2 laser pulse arrives. With such density profile, we have observed quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with energies >1 MeV and good shot-to-shot reproducibility. In contrast, no protons were observed when the hydrodynamic shock is absent. Results from experiments and simulations will be presented. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Reduction of proton acceleration in high-intensity laser interaction with solid two-layer targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, M. S.; Davies, J. R.; Clark, E. L.; Beg, F. N.; Gopal, A.; Tatarakis, M.; Willingale, L.; Nilson, P.; Dangor, A. E.; Norreys, P. A.; Zepf, M.; Krushelnick, K.

    2006-12-15

    Reduction of proton acceleration in the interaction of a high-intensity, picosecond laser with a 50-{mu}m aluminum target was observed when 0.1-6 {mu}m of plastic was deposited on the back surface (opposite side of the laser). The maximum energy and number of energetic protons observed at the back of the target were greatly reduced in comparison to pure aluminum and plastic targets of the same thickness. This is attributed to the effect of the interface between the layers. Modeling of the electron propagation in the targets using a hybrid code showed strong magnetic-field generation at the interface and rapid surface heating of the aluminum layer, which may account for the results.

  13. Evaluating the dynamic aperture evaluation for the new RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Tepikian, S.

    2011-03-28

    To increase luminosity in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider's (RHIC's) polarized proton 250 GeV operations, we are considering reducing {beta}* to 0.65 m at the interaction points (IPs), and increasing bunch intensity. The new working point near the 2/3 integer will used on the ramp to preserve polarization. In addition, we plan to adjust the betatron-phase advances between IP6 and IP8 to (k+1/2)*{pi} so to lower the dynamic beta-beat from the beam-beam interaction. The effects of all these changes will impact the dynamic aperture, and hence, it must be evaluated carefully. In this article, we present the results of tracking the dynamic aperture with the proposed lattices.

  14. Measurement of the Induced Proton Polarization Pn in the 12C(e, e', p) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, R J; Barkhuff, David; Bertozzi, William; Chen, Jian-ping; Dale, Dan; Dodson, G; Dow, K A; Epstein, Marty; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Finn, Mike; Gilad, Shalev; Jones, Mark K; Joo, Kyungseon; Kelly, James; Kowalski, Stanley; Lourie, Bob; Madey, Richard; Margaziotis, Dimitri; Markowitz, Pete; McIntyre, Justin; Mertz, Christoph; Milbrath, Brian; Mitchell, Joseph; Perdrisat, Charles F; Punjabi, Vina; Rutt, Paul; Sarty, Adam; Tieger, D; Tschalaer, C; Turchinetz, William; Ulmer, Paul E; Van Verst, S P; Vellidis, C; Warren, Glen; Weinstein, Lawrence

    1998-01-19

    The first measurements of the induced proton polarization Pn for the 12C(e,e',p) reaction are reported. The experiment was performed at quasifree kinematics for energy and momentum transfer (w,q) = (294 MeV, 765 MeV/c) and sampled a missing momentum range of 0-250 MeV/c. The induced polarization arises from final-state interactions and for these kinematics is dominated by the real part of the spin-orbit optical potential. The distorted-wave impulse approximation provides good agreement with data for the 1 p3/2 shell. The data for the continuum suggest that both the 1s1/2 shell and underlying l > 1 configurations contribute.

  15. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  16. Guiding and collimation of laser-accelerated proton beams using thin foils followed with a hollow plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; He, X. T.

    2015-09-01

    It is proposed that guided and collimated proton acceleration by intense lasers can be achieved using an advanced target—a thin foil followed by a hollow plasma channel. For the advanced target, the laser-accelerated hot electrons can be confined in the hollow channel at the foil rear side, which leads to the formation of transversely localized, Gaussian-distributed sheath electric field and resultantly guiding of proton acceleration. Further, due to the hot electron flow along the channel wall, a strong focusing transverse electric field is induced, taking the place of the original defocusing one driven by hot electron pressure in the case of a purely thin foil target, which results in collimation of proton beams. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that collimated proton beams with energy about 20 MeV and nearly half-reduced divergence of 26° are produced at laser intensities 1020 W/cm2 by using the advanced target.

  17. Correlation of pulsar radio emission spectrum with peculiarities of particle acceleration in a polar gap

    SciTech Connect

    Kontorovich, V. M. Flanchik, A. B.

    2013-01-15

    The analytical expression for the frequency of radio emission intensity maximum in pulsars with free electron emission from the stellar surface has been found. Peculiarities of the electron acceleration in a polar gap are considered. The correlation between the high-frequency cutoff and low-frequency turnover in the radio emission spectrum of pulsars known from observations has been explained.

  18. FAST/Polar Conjunction Study of Field-Aligned Auroral Acceleration and Corresponding Magnetotail Drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Richard, R. L.; Klezting, C.; Dotan, Y.; Wygant, J.

    2002-01-01

    The discrete aurora results when energized electrons bombard the Earth's atmosphere at high latitudes. This paper examines the physical processes that can cause field-aligned acceleration of plasma particles in the auroral region. A data and theoretical study has been carried out to examine the acceleration mechanisms that operate in the auroral zone and to identity the magnetospheric drivers of these acceleration mechanisms. The observations used in the study were collected by the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST) and Polar satellites when the two satellites were in approximate magnetic conjunction in the auroral region. During these events FAST was in the middle of the auroral zone and Polar was above the auroral zone in the near-Earth plasma sheet. Polar data was used to determine the conditions in the magnetotail at the time field-aligned acceleration was measured by FAST in the auroral zone. For each of the magnetotail drivers identified in the data study, the physics of field-aligned acceleration in the auroral region was examined using existing theoretical efforts and a long-system particle-in-cell simulation to model the magnetically connected region between the two satellites.

  19. Laser-Foil Acceleration of High-Energy Protons in Small-Scale Plasma Gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, J.; Audebert, P.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Grismayer, T.; Mora, P.; D'Humieres, E.; Sentoku, Y.; Antici, P.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.; Pipahl, A.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.

    2007-07-06

    Proton beams laser accelerated from thin foils are studied for various plasma gradients on the foil rear surface. The beam maximum energy and spectral slope reduce with the gradient scale length, in good agreement with numerical simulations. The results also show that the jxB mechanism determines the temperature of the electrons driving the ion expansion. Future ion-driven fast ignition of fusion targets will use multikilojoule petawatt laser pulses, the leading part of which will induce target preheat. Estimates based on the data show that this modifies by less than 10% the ion beam parameters.

  20. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  1. ANALYSIS OF ACCELERATOR BASED NEUTRON SPECTRA FOR BNCT USING PROTON RECOIL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.; LUDEWIG,H.; POWELL,J.R.; RAPARIA,D.; ALESSI,J.G.; LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    1998-11-06

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  2. Laser-foil acceleration of high-energy protons in small-scale plasma gradients.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, J; Cecchetti, C A; Borghesi, M; Grismayer, T; d'Humières, E; Antici, P; Atzeni, S; Mora, P; Pipahl, A; Romagnani, L; Schiavi, A; Sentoku, Y; Toncian, T; Audebert, P; Willi, O

    2007-07-01

    Proton beams laser accelerated from thin foils are studied for various plasma gradients on the foil rear surface. The beam maximum energy and spectral slope reduce with the gradient scale length, in good agreement with numerical simulations. The results also show that the jxB mechanism determines the temperature of the electrons driving the ion expansion. Future ion-driven fast ignition of fusion targets will use multikilojoule petawatt laser pulses, the leading part of which will induce target preheat. Estimates based on the data show that this modifies by less than 10% the ion beam parameters. PMID:17678159

  3. Proposed method for high-speed plasma density measurement in proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Tarkeshian, R.; Reimann, O.; Muggli, P.

    2012-12-21

    Recently a proton-bunch-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the CERN-SPS beam was proposed. Different types of plasma cells are under study, especially laser ionization, plasma discharge, and helicon sources. One of the key parameters is the spatial uniformity of the plasma density profile along the cell that has to be within < 1% of the nominal density (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}). Here a setup based on a photomixing concept is proposed to measure the plasma cut-off frequency and determine the plasma density.

  4. Recent Results on High-Energy Spin Phenomena of Gluons and Sea-Quarks in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at Rhic at Bnl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrow, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is carrying out a spin physics program in high-energy polarized proton collisions at √ {s} = 200 GeV and √ {s} = 500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. One of the main objectives of the spin physics program at RHIC is the precise determination of the polarized gluon distribution function. The STAR detector is well suited for the reconstruction of various final states involving jets, π0, π±, e± and γ, which allows to measure several different processes. Recent results suggest a gluon spin contribution to the proton spin at the same level as the quark spin contribution itself. The production of W bosons in polarized p+p collisions at √ {s} = 500 GeV opens a new era in the study of the spin-flavor structure of the proton. W-(+) bosons are produced in \\bar {u} + d (\\bar {d} + u) collisions and can be detected through their leptonic decays, e- + \\bar {ν }e (e++ν e), where only the respective charged lepton is measured. Results of W-(+) production suggest a large asymmetry between the polarization of anti-u and anti-d quarks.

  5. The safe, economical operation of a slightly subcritical reactor and transmutor with a small proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1994-04-01

    This report describes methods in which an accelerator can be used to increase the safety and neutron economy of a power reactor and transmutor of long-lived radioactive wastes, such as minor actinides and fission products, by providing neutrons for its subcritical operation. Instead of the rather large subcriticality of k=0.9--0.95 which we originally proposed for such a transmutor, we propose to use a slightly subcritical reactor, such as k=0.99, which will avoid many of the technical difficulties that are associated with large subcriticality, such as localized power peaking, radiation damage due to the injection of medium-energy protons, the high current accelerator, and the requirement for a long beam-expansion section. We analyzed the power drop that occurred in Phoenix reactor, and show that the operating this reactor in subcritical condition improves its safety.

  6. The safe and economical operations of a reactor driven by a small proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Takashita, Hirofumi

    1994-06-01

    An accelerator can be used to increase the safety and neutron economy of a power reactor and transmuter of long-lived radioactive wastes, such as minor actinides and fission products, by providing neutrons for its subcritical operation. Instead of the rather large subcriticality of k=0.9-0.95 which we originally proposed for such a transmutor, we propose to use a slightly subcritical reactor, such as k=0.99, which will avoid many of the technical difficulties that are associated with large subcriticality, such as localized power peaking, radiation damage due to the injection of medium-energy protons, the high current accelerator, and the requirement for a long beam-expansion section. We analyzed the radiation damage of the target area, and discuss the necessity of high neutron economy to transmute the long lived fission products using the fast reactor system.

  7. Electron self-injection in the proton-driven-plasma-wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhang-Hu; Wang, You-Nian

    2013-12-15

    The self-injection process of plasma electrons in the proton-driven-plasma-wakefield acceleration scheme is investigated using a two-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell method. Plasma electrons are self-injected into the back of the first acceleration bucket during the initial bubble formation period, where the wake phase velocity is low enough to trap sufficient electrons. Most of the self-injected electrons are initially located within a distance of the skin depth c/ω{sub pe} to the beam axis. A decrease (or increase) in the beam radius (or length) leads to a significant reduction in the total charges of self-injected electron bunch. Compared to the uniform plasma, the energy spread, emittance and total charges of the self-injected bunch are reduced in the plasma channel case, due to a reduced injection of plasma electrons that initially located further away from the beam axis.

  8. LATTICES FOR HIGH-POWER PROTON BEAM ACCELERATION AND SECONDARY BEAM COLLECTION AND COOLING.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, S.; WEI, J.; BROWN, K.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LOWENSTEIN, D.; PEGGS, S.; SIMOS, N.

    2006-06-23

    Rapid cycling synchrotrons are used to accelerate high-intensity proton beams to energies of tens of GeV for secondary beam production. After primary beam collision with a target, the secondary beam can be collected, cooled, accelerated or decelerated by ancillary synchrotrons for various applications. In this paper, we first present a lattice for the main synchrotron. This lattice has: (a) flexible momentum compaction to avoid transition and to facilitate RF gymnastics (b) long straight sections for low-loss injection, extraction, and high-efficiency collimation (c) dispersion-free straights to avoid longitudinal-transverse coupling, and (d) momentum cleaning at locations of large dispersion with missing dipoles. Then, we present a lattice for a cooler ring for the secondary beam. The momentum compaction across half of this ring is near zero, while for the other half it is normal. Thus, bad mixing is minimized while good mixing is maintained for stochastic beam cooling.

  9. Simulations of proton beam characteristics for ELIMED Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psikal, Jan; Limpouch, Jiri; Klimo, Ondrej; Vyskocil, Jiri; Margarone, Daniele; Korn, Georg

    2016-03-01

    ELIMED Beamline should demonstrate the capability of laser-based particle accelerators for medical applications, mainly for proton radiotherapy of tumours which requires a sufficient number of accelerated protons with energy about 60 MeV at least. In this contribution, we study the acceleration of protons by laser pulse with parameters accessible for ELIMED Beamline (intensity ∼ 1022 W/cm2, pulse length ∼ 30 fs). In our two-dimensional particle-incell simulations, we observed higher energies of protons for linear than for circular polarization. Oblique incidence of the laser pulse on target does not seem to be favourable for proton acceleration at such high intensities as the accelerated protons are deflected from target normal axis and their energy and numbers are slightly decreased. The expected numbers of accelerated protons in the energy interval 60 MeV ± 5% are calculated between 109 and 1010 per laser shot with estimated proton beam divergence about 20° (FWHM).

  10. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from hemisphere-cone targets by high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Foord, M E; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; McLean, H; Patel, P K; Beg, F N

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration and focusing of high-energy proton beams from fast-ignition (FI) -related hemisphere-cone assembled targets have been numerically studied by hybrid particle-in-cell simulations and compared with those from planar-foil and open-hemisphere targets. The whole physical process including the laser-plasma interaction has been self-consistently modeled for 15 ps, at which time the protons reach asymptotic motion. It is found that the achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradients in the co-moving hot electrons, which induce a transverse defocusing electric field that bends proton trajectories near the axis. For the advanced hemisphere-cone target, the flow of hot electrons along the cone wall induces a local transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement in proton focusing; however, it leads to a significant loss of longitudinal sheath potential, reducing the total conversion efficiency from laser to protons. PMID:23410447

  11. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  12. High-intensity polarized H-(proton), deuteron and 3He++ion source development at BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski,A.

    2008-06-23

    New techniques for the production of polarized electron, H{sup -} (proton), D (D+) and {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beams are discussed. Feasibility studies of these techniques are in progress at BNL. An Optically Pumped Polarized H{sup -} Ion Source (OPPIS) delivers beam for polarization studies in RHIC. The polarized deuteron beam will be required for the deuteron Electron Dipole Moment (EDM) experiment, and the {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beam is a part of the experimental program for the future eRHIC (Electron Ion) collider.

  13. Numerical studies of electron acceleration behind self-modulating proton beam in plasma with a density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, A.; Lotov, K.; Sosedkin, A.

    2016-09-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1015cm-3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project-the proof-of-principle experiment on proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CERN.

  14. Equation Of State Measurements of Warm Dense Copper Heated By Laser Accelerated Proton Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gilliss; Feldman, Samuel; Kuk, Donghoon; Wagner, Craig; Gaul, Erhard; Donovan, Michael; Martinez, Mikael; Borger, Teddy; Spinks, Michael; Jiang, Sheng; Aymond, Franki; Akli, Kramer; Ditmire, Todd

    2014-10-01

    We report equation of state (EOS) measurements of solid density transition metals heated to temperatures of 1 to 50 eV by laser accelerated pulsed proton beams. Matter at these densities and temperatures, referred to as warm dense matter (WDM), will exhibit long-range coupling, partial ionization and thermal energies comparable to the Fermi energy, making theoretical predictions of state properties very challenging. Mbar pressures likewise make such states difficult to study in the lab. In this work we use a terawatt or petawatt laser to accelerate MeV protons from a source foil, which then heat an adjacent sample foil. We probe the sample foil on a picosecond timescale using streaked optical pyrometery, time resolved interferometry, and XUV imaging. Previously we and various other groups have applied these techniques to the study of aluminum, one of the best-understood metals from the standpoint of high energy density equations of state. Here we present measurements of Cu, Cr, and Ag. Transition metals such as these are of particular interest because of modeling challenges posed by a partially filled d - orbital.

  15. Chromatic energy filter and characterization of laser-accelerated proton beams for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jürgen; Yan, Xueqing; Al-Omari, Husam

    2012-07-01

    The application of laser accelerated protons or ions for particle therapy has to cope with relatively large energy and angular spreads as well as possibly significant random fluctuations. We suggest a method for combined focusing and energy selection, which is an effective alternative to the commonly considered dispersive energy selection by magnetic dipoles. Our method is based on the chromatic effect of a magnetic solenoid (or any other energy dependent focusing device) in combination with an aperture to select a certain energy width defined by the aperture radius. It is applied to an initial 6D phase space distribution of protons following the simulation output from a Radiation Pressure Acceleration model. Analytical formula for the selection aperture and chromatic emittance are confirmed by simulation results using the TRACEWIN code. The energy selection is supported by properly placed scattering targets to remove the imprint of the chromatic effect on the beam and to enable well-controlled and shot-to-shot reproducible energy and transverse density profiles.

  16. Normal-conducting scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, J. M.; Appleby, R. B.; Owen, H.; Tygier, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a new lattice design for a 30-350 MeV scaling fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator for proton therapy and tomography—NORMA (NOrmal-conducting Racetrack Medical Accelerator). The energy range allows the realization of proton computed tomography and utilizes normal conducting magnets in both a conventional circular ring option and a novel racetrack configuration, both designed using advanced optimization algorithms we have developed in pyzgoubi. Both configurations consist of ten focusing-defocusing-focusing triplet cells and operate in the second stability region of Hills equation. The ring configuration has a circumference of 60 m, a peak magnetic field seen by the beam of <1.6 T , a maximum horizontal orbit excursion of 44 cm and a dynamic aperture of 68 mm mrad—determined using a novel dynamic aperture (DA) calculation technique. The racetrack alternative is realized by adding magnet-free drift space in between cells at two opposing points in the ring, to facilitate injection and extraction. Our racetrack design has a total magnet-free straight lengths of 4.9 m, a circumference of 71 m, a peak magnetic field seen by the beam of <1.74 T , a maximum horizontal orbit excursion of 50 cm and a DA of 58 mm mrad. A transverse magnet misalignment model is also presented for the ring and racetrack configurations where the DA remains above 40 mm mrad for randomly misaligned error distributions with a standard deviation up to 100 μ m .

  17. A Compact Linac for Proton Therapy Based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Mackie, T R; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y -; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Reckwerdt, P J; Schmidt, R; Pearson, D; Flynn, R W; Matthews, D; Purdy, J

    2007-10-29

    A novel compact CT-guided intensity modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) system is described. The system is being designed to deliver fast IMPT so that larger target volumes and motion management can be accomplished. The system will be ideal for large and complex target volumes in young patients. The basis of the design is the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The DWA uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The IMPT planning system will optimize delivery characteristics. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. Feasibility tests of an optimization system for selecting the position, energy, intensity and spot size for a collection of spots comprising the treatment are underway. A prototype is being designed and concept designs of the envelope and environmental needs of the unit are beginning. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  18. Development of an H- ion source for Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex upgradea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkoshi, K.; Namekawa, Y.; Ueno, A.; Oguri, H.; Ikegami, K.

    2010-02-01

    A cesium (Cs) free H- ion source driven with a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) filament was adopted as an ion source for the first stage of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). At present, the maximum H- ion current produced by the ion source is 38 mA, using which J-PARC can produce a proton beam power of 0.6 MW by accelerating it with the 181 MeV linac and the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron. In order to satisfy the beam power of 1 MW required for the second stage of the J-PARC in the near future, we have to increase the ion current to more than 60 mA. Therefore, we have started to develop a Cs-seeded ion source by adding an external Cs-seeding system to a J-PARC test ion source that has a structure similar to that of the J-PARC ion source except for the fact that the plasma chamber is slightly larger. As a result, a H- ion current of more than 70 mA was obtained from the ion source using a tungsten filament instead of a LaB6 filament with a low arc discharge power of 15 kW (100 V, 150 A).

  19. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Principles of self-modulated proton driven plasma wake field acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhov, Alexander; Tuckmantel, Tobias; Kumar, N.; Upadhyay, A.; Lotov, K.; Khudik, V.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.; Muggli, P.; Caldwell, A.

    2012-12-01

    When a long proton bunch propagates in plasma, it is subject to the self-modulational instability. The radius of the proton bunch is modulated at the background plasma wavelength. The wake field is then resonantly excited. The amplitude of the wake is growing exponentially up to a saturation level that can reach a significant fraction of the wave breaking limit. The phase velocity of the wake is defined not only by the driver velocity, but also by the own instability dynamics. At the linear stage of the instability, the phase velocity is decreased that allows to inject low energy electrons in the wake. At the saturation phase, the wake phase velocity becomes close to that of the drvier. Side injection of particles at the right position in plasma may help to improve the maximum energy gain and the quality of acceleration. The wake's phase velocity can be controlled by smooth density gradients. The modulations of the proton bunch can be diagnosed by a transverse coherent transition radiation.

  1. Comparison of scintillators for single shot imaging of laser accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan

    2012-03-01

    The application of intense laser pulses incident on specialized targets provides exciting new means for generating energetic beams of protons and ions. Recent work has demonstrated the utility of these beams of particles in a variety of applications, from inertial confinement fusion to radiation therapy. These applications require precise control, and subsequently precise feedback from the beam. Imaging techniques can provide the necessary shot-to-shot characterization to be effective as diagnostics. However, the utility of imaging methods scales with the capability of scintillating materials to emit well characterized and consistent radiation upon irradiance by a charged particle beam. We will discuss three candidates for an ideal diagnostic for MeV range protons and light ions. CsI:Tl^+ and Al2O3:Cr^3+ are two inorganic scintillators which exhibit excellent response to hadrons in this energy range. They are compared with the combination diagnostic micro-channel plate with a P43 phosphor screen, which offers advantages in refresh rate and resolution over direct exposure methods. Ultimately we will determine which candidate performs optimally as part of a robust, inexpensive diagnostic for laser accelerated protons and light ions.

  2. Dielectric response and anhydrous proton conductivity in a chiral framework containing a non-polar molecular rotor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan-Shan; Liu, Shao-Xian; Duan, Hai-Bao

    2015-12-28

    Herein, we report a chiral 3D framework with the formula [Co(HPO3)2][H2DABCO] (DABCO = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). This compound exhibits two distinct dielectric anomalies, one attributed to the transfer of protons between non-polar DABCO and the inorganic framework, and the other to the in-plane oscillatory fluctuation of the DABCO molecule. It also exhibits proton conductivity under high-temperature anhydrous conditions. PMID:26584424

  3. A laser accelerator. [interaction of polarized light beam with electrons in magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, W. B.; Ride, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that a laser can efficiently accelerate charged particles if a magnetic field is introduced to improve the coupling between the particle and the wave. Solving the relativistic equations of motion for an electron in a uniform magnetic field and superposed, circularly polarized electromagnetic wave, it is found that in energy-position phase space an electron traces out a curtate cycloid: it alternately gains and loses energy. If, however, the parameters are chosen so that the electron's oscillations in the two fields are resonant, it will continually accelerate or decelerate depending on its initial position within a wavelength of light. A laboratory accelerator operating under these resonant conditions appears attractive: in a magnetic field of 10,000 gauss, and the fields of a 5 x 10 to the 12th W, 10 micron wavelength laser, an optimally positioned electron would accelerate to 700 MeV in only 10 m.

  4. Recent progress in the development of a polarized proton target for reactions with radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego-Blanco, J. P.; Bingham, C. R.; van den Brandt, B.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gómez del Campo, J.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Schmelzbach, P. A.

    2007-08-01

    Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with stable beams have provided important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms and hold great promise in the context of exotic nuclei. We report on the development of a polarized target based on plastic foils of 20-200 μm thickness to be used with radioactive ion beams. The operation of such a target requires a moderately high magnetic field and very low temperatures. The plastic foil is placed inside a chamber attached to the mixing chamber of a 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. Cooling of the foil is achieved via a superfluid film of 4He that can be supplied through two capillaries. The chamber has two thin, highly uniform silicon nitride windows. An NMR coil is attached to the target to monitor the polarization. Results of a first test to characterize the target system, using the elastic scattering of 38 MeV 12C by protons in inverse kinematics are presented.

  5. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, C. M.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Lancaster, K. L.; Musgrave, I. O.; Spindloe, C.; Winstone, T.; Wyatt, D.; Neely, D.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Deppert, O.; Batani, D.; Davies, J. R.; Hassan, S. M.; Tatarakis, M.; and others

    2014-02-24

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5–30 MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5 μm-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ∼1 ps.

  6. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, K. D.; Huang, T. W.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; Wu, S. Z.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2016-01-01

    Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) case.

  7. Electron acceleration by linearly polarized twisted laser pulse with narrow divergence

    SciTech Connect

    Vaziri, Mohammad Sohaily, Sozha; Golshani, Mojtaba; Bahrampour, Alireza

    2015-03-15

    We numerically investigate the vacuum electron acceleration by a high-intensity linearly polarized twisted laser pulse. It is shown that the inherent spiral structure of a Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulse leads to improvement in trapping and acceleration of an electron to energies of the order of GeV in the off-axis case. Also, it is demonstrated that by employing a proper choice of initial injection parameters, the high-energetic electrons with very small scattering angles can be produced.

  8. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammazzalorso, F.; Bednarz, T.; Jelen, U.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  9. Production polarization and magnetic moment of Ξ¯+ antihyperons produced by 800-GeV/c protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, P. M.; Longo, M. J.; Nguyen, A.; Luk, K. B.; James, C.; Rameika, R.; Duryea, J.; Guglielmo, G.; Heller, K.; Johns, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Teige, S.; Thomson, G. B.; Zou, Y.

    1990-10-01

    The polarization of Ξ¯ + hyperons produced by 800-GeV/c protons in the inclusive reaction p+Be-->Ξ¯ ++X has been measured. The average polarization of the Ξ¯ +, at a mean xF=0.39 and pt=0.76 GeV/c, is -0.097+/-0.012+/-0.009. The magnetic moment of the Ξ¯ + is 0.657+/-0.028+/-0.020 nuclear magneton.

  10. Measurement of analyzing power for proton-carbon elastic scattering in the coulomb-nuclear interference region with a 22-GeV/c polarized proton beam.

    PubMed

    Tojo, J; Alekseev, I; Bai, M; Bassalleck, B; Bunce, G; Deshpande, A; Doskow, J; Eilerts, S; Fields, D E; Goto, Y; Huang, H; Hughes, V; Imai, K; Ishihara, M; Kanavets, V; Kurita, K; Kwiatkowski, K; Lewis, B; Lozowski, W; Makdisi, Y; Meyer, H-O; Morozov, B V; Nakamura, M; Przewoski, B; Rinckel, T; Roser, T; Rusek, A; Saito, N; Smith, B; Svirida, D; Syphers, M; Taketani, A; Thomas, T L; Underwood, D; Wolfe, D; Yamamoto, K; Zhu, L

    2002-07-29

    The analyzing power for proton-carbon elastic scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region of momentum transfer, 9.0x10(-3)<-t<4.1x10(-2) (GeV/c)(2), was measured with a 21.7 GeV/c polarized proton beam at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The ratio of hadronic spin-flip to nonflip amplitude, r(5), was obtained from the analyzing power to be Rer(5)=0.088+/-0.058 and Imr(5)=-0.161+/-0.226. PMID:12144435

  11. Design and test of superconducting RF cavity prototypes for high intensity proton accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junquera, T.; Biarrotte, J. L.; Saugnac, H.; Gassot, H.; Lesrel, J.; Olry, G.; Bousson, S.; Safa, H.; Charrier, J. P.; Devanz, G.

    2002-05-01

    High intensity proton beams, in the multi-MW range (typically 1 GeV and a few mA) are considered today for different applications: neutron sources, nuclear waste transmutation, radioactive ion beams and neutrino factories. All the foreseen projects are based on superconducting RF cavities for the high energy part of the linac accelerator between 100 MeV and 1 GeV. In this paper we present conceptual and experimental work made by the French group in the R&D preliminary phase. The aim of this study was to design an optimized cavity prototype integrating the more recent progress on RF superconductivity in terms of fabrication and preparation techniques. To reach high accelerating gradients while keeping safety margins and good reliability imposes careful cavity geometry optimization and detailed study of some important technological issues. The most relevant results obtained with several cavity prototypes (accelerating gradient, multipactor,…) are presented. Some other important components of the cavity (helium tank and cold tuner) are also discussed.

  12. The non-orthogonal fixed beam arrangement for the second proton therapy facility at the National Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreuder, A. N.; Jones, D. T. L.; Conradie, J. L.; Fourie, D. T.; Botha, A. H.; Müller, A.; Smit, H. A.; O'Ryan, A.; Vernimmen, F. J. A.; Wilson, J.; Stannard, C. E.

    1999-06-01

    The medical user group at the National Accelerator Center (NAC) is currently unable to treat all eligible patients with high energy protons. Developing a second proton treatment room is desirable since the 200 MeV proton beam from the NAC separated sector cyclotron is currently under-utilized during proton therapy sessions. During the patient positioning phase in one treatment room, the beam could be used for therapy in a second room. The second proton therapy treatment room at the NAC will be equipped with two non-orthogonal beam lines, one horizontal and one at 30 degrees to the vertical. The two beams will have a common isocentre. This beam arrangement together with a versatile patient positioning system (commercial robot arm) will provide the radiation oncologist with a diversity of possible beam arrangements and offers a reasonable cost-effective alternative to an isocentric gantry.

  13. The non-orthogonal fixed beam arrangement for the second proton therapy facility at the National Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schreuder, A. N.; Jones, D. T. L.; Conradie, J. L.; Fourie, D. T.; Botha, A. H.; Mueller, A.; Smit, H. A.; O'Ryan, A.; Vernimmen, F. J. A.; Wilson, J.; Stannard, C. E.

    1999-06-10

    The medical user group at the National Accelerator Center (NAC) is currently unable to treat all eligible patients with high energy protons. Developing a second proton treatment room is desirable since the 200 MeV proton beam from the NAC separated sector cyclotron is currently under-utilized during proton therapy sessions. During the patient positioning phase in one treatment room, the beam could be used for therapy in a second room. The second proton therapy treatment room at the NAC will be equipped with two non-orthogonal beam lines, one horizontal and one at 30 degrees to the vertical. The two beams will have a common isocentre. This beam arrangement together with a versatile patient positioning system (commercial robot arm) will provide the radiation oncologist with a diversity of possible beam arrangements and offers a reasonable cost-effective alternative to an isocentric gantry.

  14. THE NEAR-INTEGER WORKING POINT FOR POLARIZED PROTONS IN THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.; BAI, M.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; CALAGA, R.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    To achieve the RHIC polarized proton enhanced luminosity goal of 150.10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -} on average in stores at 250 GeV, the luminosity needs to be increased by a factor of 3 compared to what was achieved in 2006. Since the number of bunches is already at its maximum of 1 1 1, limited by the injection kickers and the experiments' time resolution, the luminosity can only be increased by either increasing the bunch intensity and/or reducing the beam emittance. This leads to a larger beam-beam tuneshift parameter. Operations during 2006 has shown that the beam-beam interaction is already dominating the luminosity lifetime. To overcome this limitation, a near-integer working point is under study. We will present recent results of these studies.

  15. Acceleration of protons in plasma produced from a thin plastic or aluminum target by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Ryc, L.; Torrisi, L.; Szydlowski, A.; Malinowska, A.; Kaczmarczyk, B.; Makowski, J.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration of protons in plasma produced from thin mylar (3.5 μ m) and aluminum (2 μm) targets by a 45-fs laser pulses with the energy of 400 mJ and the intensity of up to 1019 W/cm2 was investigated. Characteristics of forward-accelerated protons were measured by the time-of-flight method. In the measurements, special attention was paid to the dependence of proton beam parameters on the laser focus position (FP) in relation to the target surface which resulted in the intensity change within a factor of ~ 10. It was observed that in the case of using the Mylar target, the dependence of both the maximum (Epmax) and the mean (langleEprangle) proton energy on |Δx| is clearly non-symmetric with regard to the point where FP = 0 (the focal plane on the target surface) and highest proton energies are achieved when the focal plane is situated in front of the target. In particular, for the target with the thickness of 3.5 μ m Epmax reached 2.2 MeV for FP = +50 μm while for FP = 0 and FP = ‑100 μm the maximum proton energies reached only 1.6 MeV and 1.3 MeV, respectively. For the aluminum target of 2 μm thickness Ep changed only within ~ 40% and the highest proton energies reached 2.4 MeV.

  16. Key conditions for stable ion radiation pressure acceleration by circularly polarized laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Gibbon, P.; Borghesi, M.; Schreiber, J.; Geissler, M.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) theoretically may have great potential to revolutionize the study of laserdriven ion accelerators due to its high conversion efficiency and ability to produce high-quality monoenergetic ion beams. However, the instability issue of ion acceleration has been appeared to be a fundamental limitation of the RPA scheme. To solve this issue is very important to the experimental realization and exploitation of this new scheme. In our recent work, we have identified the key condition for efficient and stable ion RPA from thin foils by CP laser pulses, in particular, at currently available moderate laser intensities. That is, the ion beam should remain accompanied with enough co-moving electrons to preserve a local "bunching" electrostatic field during the acceleration. In the realistic LS RPA, the decompression of the co-moving electron layer leads to a change of local electrostatic field from a "bunching" to a "debunching" profile, resulting in premature termination of acceleration. One possible scheme to achieve stable RPA is using a multi-species foil. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that 100 MeV/u monoenergetic C6+ and/or proton beams are produced by irradiation of a contaminated copper foil with CP lasers at intensities 5 × 1020W/cm2, achievable by current day lasers.

  17. Polarization effect of a Gaussian laser pulse on magnetic field influenced electron acceleration in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghotra, Harjit Singh; Kant, Niti

    2016-04-01

    Electron acceleration by a laser pulse in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field in vacuum has been analyzed. The azimuthal magnetic field influences the trajectory of an accelerated electron during the laser electron interaction in vacuum. The electron trajectory in the absence and presence of azimuthal magnetic field with a linearly polarized (LP) and circularly polarized (CP) laser pulses is analyzed. Due to the presence of azimuthal magnetic field, a confined trajectory of accelerated electron is observed in the direction of propagation of laser pulse. Resonance between the electron and the laser field occurs at optimum values of magnetic field, electron gains high energy from the laser and gets accelerated in the direction of propagation of laser pulse. The azimuthal magnetic field keeps the electron motion close to the axis parallel to the direction of propagation due to which the electron gains and retains high energy for longer distances. The electron energy gain is relatively higher with a CP laser pulse than that with LP laser pulse. The high energy gain of about 2   GeV is observed with a CP laser pulse of peak intensity 2.74 ×1020   W /cm2 in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field of 534   kG .

  18. Centrifugal acceleration at high altitudes above the polar cap: A Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudayyeh, H. A.; Barghouthi, I. A.; Slapak, R.; Nilsson, H.

    2015-08-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation was used to study the outflow of O+ and H+ ions along three flight trajectories above the polar cap up to altitudes of about 15 RE. Barghouthi (2008) developed a model on the basis of altitude and velocity-dependent wave-particle interactions and a radial geomagnetic field which includes the effects of ambipolar electric field and gravitational and mirror forces. In the present work we improve this model to include the effect of the centrifugal force, with the use of relevant boundary conditions. In addition, the magnetic field and flight trajectories, namely, the central polar cap (CPC), nightside polar cap (NPC), and cusp, were calculated using the Tsyganenko T96 model. To simulate wave-particle interactions, the perpendicular velocity diffusion coefficients for O+ ions in each region were determined such that the simulation results fit the observations. For H+ ions, a constant perpendicular velocity diffusion coefficient was assumed for all altitudes in all regions as recommended by Nilsson et al. (2013). The effect of centrifugal acceleration was simulated by considering three values for the ionospheric electric field: 0 (no centrifugal acceleration), 50, and 100 mV/m. It was found that the centrifugal acceleration increases the parallel bulk velocity and decreases the parallel and perpendicular temperatures of both ion species at altitudes above about 4 RE. Centrifugal acceleration also increases the temperature anisotropy at high altitudes. At a given altitude, centrifugal acceleration decreases the density of H+ ions while it increases the density of O+ ions. This implies that with higher centrifugal acceleration more O+ ions overcome the potential barrier. It was also found that aside from two exceptions centrifugal acceleration has the same effect on the velocities of both ions. This implies that the centrifugal acceleration is universal for all particles. The parallel bulk velocities at a given value of ionospheric electric field

  19. FAST/Polar Conjunction Study of Field-Aligned Auroral Acceleration and Corresponding Magnetotail Drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Richard, R. L.; Klezting, C.; Dotan, Y.; Wygant, J.

    2003-01-01

    The discrete aurora results when energized electrons bombard the Earth's atmosphere at high latitudes. This paper examines the physical processes that can cause field-aligned acceleration of plasma particles in the auroral region. A data and theoretical study has been carried out to examine the acceleration mechanisms that operate in the auroral zone and to identi@ the magnetospheric drivers of these acceleration mechanisms. The observations used in the study were collected by the Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) and Polar satellites when the two satellites were in approximate magnetic conjunction in the auroral region. During these events FAST was in the middle of the auroral zone and Polar was above the auroral zone in the near-Earth plasma sheet. Polar data were used to determine the conditions in the magnetotail at the time field-aligned acceleration was measured by FAST in the auroral zone. For each of the magnetotail drivers identified in the data study, the physics of field-aligned acceleration in the auroral region was examined using existing theoretical efforts and/or a long-system particle in cell simulation to model the magnetically connected region between the two satellites. Results from the study indicate that there are three main drivers of auroral acceleration: (1) field-aligned currents that lead to quasistatic parallel potential drops (parallel electric fields), (2) earthward flow of high-energy plasma beams from the magnetotail into the auroral zone that lead to quasistatic parallel potential drops, and (3) large-amplitude Alfven waves that propagate into the auroral region from the magnetotail. The events examined thus far confm the previously established invariant latitudinal dependence of the drivers and show a strong dependence on magnetic activity. Alfven waves tend to occur primarily at the poleward edge of the auroral region during more magnetically active times and are correlated with intense electron precipitation. At lower latitudes away

  20. Enhancement of proton acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulse in radiation pressure mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosoughian, H.; Riazi, Z.; Afarideh, H.; Yazdani, E.

    2015-07-01

    The transition from hole-boring to light-sail regime of radiation pressure acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulses is studied using particle-in-cell simulation. The penetration depth of laser into the plasma with ramped density profile increases when a negatively chirped laser pulse is applied. Because of this induced transparency, the laser reflection layer moves deeper into the target and the hole-boring stage would smoothly transit into the light-sail stage. An optimum chirp parameter which satisfies the laser transparency condition, a 0 ≈ π n e l / n c λ , is obtained for each ramp scale length. Moreover, the efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the kinetic energy of particles is maximized at the obtained optimum condition. A relatively narrow proton energy spectrum with peak enhancement by a factor of 2 is achieved using a negatively chirped pulse compared with the un-chirped pulse.

  1. Longitudinal spin transfer to {lambda} and {lambda} hyperons in polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Kauder, K.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    The longitudinal spin transfer, D{sub LL}, from high energy polarized protons to {lambda} and {lambda} hyperons has been measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The measurements cover pseudorapidity, {eta}, in the range |{eta}|<1.2 and transverse momenta, p{sub T}, up to 4 GeV/c. The longitudinal spin transfer is found to be D{sub LL}=-0.03{+-}0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst) for inclusive {lambda} and D{sub LL}=-0.12{+-}0.08(stat){+-}0.03(syst) for inclusive {lambda} hyperons with <{eta}>=0.5 and =3.7 GeV/c. The dependence on {eta} and p{sub T} is presented.

  2. Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Lambda bar Hyperons in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The longitudinal spin transfer, D{sub LL}, from high energy polarized protons to {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} hypersons has been measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. The measurements cover pseudorapidity, {eta}, in the range |{eta}| < 1.2 and transverse momenta, p{sub T}, up to 4 GeV/c. The longitudinal spin transfer is found to be D{sub LL} = -0.03{+-}0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst) for inclusive {Lambda} and D{sub LL} = -0.12{+-}0.08(stat){+-}0.03(syst) for inclusive {bar {Lambda}} hyperons with <{eta}> = 0.5 and = 3.7 GeV/c. The dependence on {eta} and p{sub T} is presented.

  3. Longitudinal spin transfer to {Lambda} and {bar Lambda} hyperons in polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}{ovr s} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Bridgeman, A.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The longitudinal spin transfer, D{sub LL}, from high energy polarized protons to {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} hyperons has been measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The measurements cover pseudorapidity, {eta}, in the range |{eta}| < 1.2 and transverse momenta, p{sub T}, up to 4 GeV/c. The longitudinal spin transfer is found to be D{sub LL} = -0.03 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst) for inclusive {Lambda} and D{sub LL} = -0.12 {+-} 0.08(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) for inclusive {bar {Lambda}} hyperons with {eta} = 0.5 and p{sub T} =3.7 GeV/c. The dependence on {eta} and p{sub T} is presented.

  4. Beyond the CMSSM without an accelerator: proton decay and direct dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Evans, Jason L.; Luo, Feng; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.; Sandick, Pearl

    2016-01-01

    We consider two potential non-accelerator signatures of generalizations of the well-studied constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM). In one generalization, the universality constraints on soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters are applied at some input scale M_{in} below the grand unification (GUT) scale M_{GUT}, a scenario referred to as `sub-GUT'. The other generalization we consider is to retain GUT-scale universality for the squark and slepton masses, but to relax universality for the soft supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the masses of the Higgs doublets. As with other CMSSM-like models, the measured Higgs mass requires supersymmetric particle masses near or beyond the TeV scale. Because of these rather heavy sparticle masses, the embedding of these CMSSM-like models in a minimal SU(5) model of grand unification can yield a proton lifetime consistent with current experimental limits, and may be accessible in existing and future proton decay experiments. Another possible signature of these CMSSM-like models is direct detection of supersymmetric dark matter. The direct dark matter scattering rate is typically below the reach of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment if M_{in} is close to M_{GUT}, but it may lie within its reach if M_{in} ≲ 10^{11} GeV. Likewise, generalizing the CMSSM to allow non-universal supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the Higgs offers extensive possibilities for models within reach of the LZ experiment that have long proton lifetimes.

  5. Clinical aspects and potential clinical applications of laser accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatola, C.; Privitera, G.

    2013-07-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT), as well as the other forms of hadrontherapy, is in use in the treatment of neoplastic diseases, to realize a high selective irradiation with maximum sparing of surrounding organs. The main characteristic of such a particles is to have an increased radiobiological effectiveness compared to conventional photons (about 10% more) and the advantage to deposit the energy in a defined space through the tissues (Bragg peak phenomenon). The goal of ELIMED Project is the realization of a laser accelerated proton beam line to prove its potential use for clinical application in the field of hadrontherapy. To date, there are several potential clinical applications of PBRT, some of which have become the treatment of choice for a specific tumour, for others it is under investigation as a therapeutic alternative to conventional X-ray radiotherapy, to increase the dose to the tumour and reduce the side effects. For almost half of cancers, an increased local tumour control is the mainstay for increased cancer curability.

  6. Acceleration of low-energy protons and alpha particles at interplanetary shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-01-01

    The low-energy protons and alpha particles in the energy range 30 keV/charge to 150 keV/charge associated with three different interplanetary shock waves in the immediate preshock and postshock region are studied using data obtained by the ISEE 3. The spatial distributions in the preshock and postshock medium are presented, and the dependence of the phase space density at different energies on the distance from the shock and on the form of the distribution function of both species immediately at the shock is examined. It is found that in the preshock region the particles are flowing in the solar wind frame of reference away from the shock and in the postshock medium the distribution is more or less isotropic in this frame of reference. The distribution function in the postshock region can be represented by a power law in energy which has the same spectral exponent for both protons and alpha particles. It is concluded that the first-order Fermi acceleration process can consistently explain the data, although the spectra of diffuse bow shock associated particles are different from the spectra of the interplanetary shock-associated particles in the immediate vicinity of the shock. In addition, the mean free path of the low energy ions in the preshock medium is found to be considerably smaller than the mean free path determined by the turbulence of the background interplanetary medium.

  7. Global numerical modeling of energetic proton acceleration in a coronal mass ejection traveling through the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Opher, Merav; Evans, Rebekah M.; Dayeh, Maher A.; Korreck, Kelly E.; Van der Holst, Bart

    2013-11-20

    The acceleration of protons and electrons to high (sometimes GeV/nucleon) energies by solar phenomena is a key component of space weather. These solar energetic particle (SEP) events can damage spacecraft and communications, as well as present radiation hazards to humans. In-depth particle acceleration simulations have been performed for idealized magnetic fields for diffusive acceleration and particle propagation, and at the same time the quality of MHD simulations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has improved significantly. However, to date these two pieces of the same puzzle have remained largely decoupled. Such structures may contain not just a shock but also sizable sheath and pileup compression regions behind it, and may vary considerably with longitude and latitude based on the underlying coronal conditions. In this work, we have coupled results from a detailed global three-dimensional MHD time-dependent CME simulation to a global proton acceleration and transport model, in order to study time-dependent effects of SEP acceleration between 1.8 and 8 solar radii in the 2005 May 13 CME. We find that the source population is accelerated to at least 100 MeV, with distributions enhanced up to six orders of magnitude. Acceleration efficiency varies strongly along field lines probing different regions of the dynamically evolving CME, whose dynamics is influenced by the large-scale coronal magnetic field structure. We observe strong acceleration in sheath regions immediately behind the shock.

  8. Measurement of the beam-recoil polarization in low-energy virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, L.; Janssens, P.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Baumann, D.; Bensafa, I.; Benali, M.; Beričič, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; D'Hose, N.; Defaÿ, X.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Laveissière, G.; Makek, M.; Marroncle, J.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pasquini, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Postavaru, O.; Potokar, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Seimetz, M.; Širca, S.; Tamas, G.; Van de Vyver, R.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Van Overloop, A.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; A1 Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Double-polarization observables in the reaction e ⃗p →e'p ⃗'γ have been measured at Q2=0.33 (GeV/c ) 2 . The experiment was performed at the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration using the 855 MeV polarized electron beam provided by the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) and a recoil proton polarimeter. From the double-polarization observables the structure function PLT ⊥ is extracted for the first time, with the value (-15.4 ±3 .3(stat .)-2.4+1.5(syst.)) GeV-2 , using the low-energy theorem for virtual Compton scattering. This structure function provides a hitherto unmeasured linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton.

  9. Proton beam of 2 MeV 1.6 mA on a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatov, D.; Kuznetsov, A.; Makarov, A.; Shchudlo, I.; Sorokin, I.; Taskaev, S.

    2014-12-01

    A source of epithermal neutrons based on a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant tumors was proposed and constructed. Stationary proton beam with 2 MeV energy, 1.6 mA current, 0.1% energy monochromaticity and 0.5% current stability has just been obtained.

  10. A 100 MeV Multi-Tank Drift Tube Linac for the Linear Proton Accelerator of the Energy Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, Gerardo; Rossi, Carlo

    1997-05-01

    For the acceleration of protons from the exit of the RFQ at about 6 MeV up to 100 MeV, a Multi-Tank Drift Tube Linac (MTDTL) has been proposed with the goal of being technologically simple, compact, efficient and economical. Theoretical design studies and first measurements on a prototype tank are presented.

  11. Acceleration of protons to above 6 MeV using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pomerantz, I.; Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Gordon, D.; Sprangel, P.; Zigler, A.

    2012-07-09

    A scheme is presented for using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets for the generation of fast protons. This novel method may relax the requirements for very high laser intensities, thus reducing the size and cost of laser based ion acceleration system.

  12. Laser-driven proton and deuteron acceleration from a pure solid-density H2/D2 cryogenic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongjin; Gauthier, Maxence; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Goyon, Clement; Williams, Jackson; Kerr, Shaun; Ruby, John; Propp, Adrienne; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Pak, Art; Hazi, Andy; Glenzer, Siegfried; Roedel, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration has become of tremendous interest for the fundamental science and the potential applications in tumor therapy and proton radiography. We have developed a cryogenic liquid hydrogen jet, which can deliver a self-replenishing target of pure solid-density hydrogen or deuterium. This allows for a target compatible with high-repetition-rate experiments and results in a pure hydrogen plasma, facilitating comparison with simulations. A new modification has allowed for the formation of jets with rectangular profiles, facilitating comparison with foil targets. This jet was installed at the Titan laser and driven by laser pulses of 40-60 J of 527 nm laser light in 1 ps. The resulting proton and deuteron spectra were measured in multiple directions with Thomson parabola spectrometers and RCF stacks. The spectral and angular information suggest contribution from both the TNSA and RPA acceleration mechanisms.

  13. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. Methods: The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and

  14. Application of laser-accelerated protons to the demonstration of DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-05-01

    We report the demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human cancer cells. In vitro (living) A549 cells are irradiated with quasimonoenergetic proton bunches of 0.8-2.4 MeV with a single bunch duration of 15 ns. Irradiation with the proton dose of 20 Gy results in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks generated in the cancer cells. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. Unique high-current and short-bunch features make laser-driven proton bunches an excitation source for time-resolved determination of radical yields.

  15. Application of laser-accelerated protons to the demonstration of DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Bolton, P. R.

    2009-05-04

    We report the demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human cancer cells. In vitro (living) A549 cells are irradiated with quasimonoenergetic proton bunches of 0.8-2.4 MeV with a single bunch duration of 15 ns. Irradiation with the proton dose of 20 Gy results in a distinct formation of {gamma}-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks generated in the cancer cells. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. Unique high-current and short-bunch features make laser-driven proton bunches an excitation source for time-resolved determination of radical yields.

  16. Optical control of hard X-ray polarization by electron injection in a laser wakefield accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Michael; Sävert, Alexander; Uschmann, Ingo; Reuter, Maria; Nicolai, Maria; Kämpfer, Tino; Landgraf, Björn; Jäckel, Oliver; Jansen, Oliver; Pukhov, Alexander; Kaluza, Malte Christoph; Spielmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma particle accelerators could provide more compact sources of high-energy radiation than conventional accelerators. Moreover, because they deliver radiation in femtosecond pulses, they could improve the time resolution of X-ray absorption techniques. Here we show that we can measure and control the polarization of ultra-short, broad-band keV photon pulses emitted from a laser-plasma-based betatron source. The electron trajectories and hence the polarization of the emitted X-rays are experimentally controlled by the pulse-front tilt of the driving laser pulses. Particle-in-cell simulations show that an asymmetric plasma wave can be driven by a tilted pulse front and a non-symmetric intensity distribution of the focal spot. Both lead to a notable off-axis electron injection followed by collective electron–betatron oscillations. We expect that our method for an all-optical steering is not only useful for plasma-based X-ray sources but also has significance for future laser-based particle accelerators. PMID:24026068

  17. The progress in the laser-driven proton acceleration experiment JAEA with table-tip Ti:Sappire laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Ogura, K.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Tanimoto, T.; Yogo, A.; Sakaki, H.; Hori, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Kanasaki, M.; Sagisaka, A.; Tampo, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Shimomura, T.; Kondo, K.; Kawanishi, S.; Brenner, C.; Neely, D.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the experimental investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using a table top Ti:Sapphire laser system interacting with the thin-foil targets during the course of medical application of the laser-driven proton beam. The proton beam with maximum energy of upto 14~MeV is generated in 60 TW mode. The number of protons at ~10 MeV is estimated to be over 105 proton/sr/MeV/shot with beam having half divergence angle of 5~degree. If 10 Hz operation is assumed 2 Gy dose is possible to irradiate during 10 min onto a ~1 mm tumor just under the skin. In contrast to the previous condition of our apparatus with which we demonstrated the DNA double-strand breaking by irradiating the laser-driven proton beam onto the human cancer cells in-vitro test, the result reported here has significant meaning in the sense that pre-clinical in-vivo test can be started by irradiating the laser-driven proton beam onto the skin of the mouse, which is unavoidable step before the real radiation therapy.

  18. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q^2 = 8.5 GeV^2

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, A J.R.; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nedev, S; Nuruzzaman,; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvingnon, P; Subedi, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2010-06-01

    Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon’s quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this Letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5  GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which GEp is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the nonperturbative regime.

  19. SU-E-T-528: Robustness Evaluation for Fiducial-Based Accelerated Partial Breast Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L; Rana, S; Zheng, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the robustness of the proton treatment plans in the presence of rotational setup error when patient is aligned with implanted fiducials. Methods: Five Stage I invasive breast cancer patients treated with the APBP protocol (PCG BRE007-12) were studied. The rotational setup errors were simulated by rotating the original CT images around the body center clockwise and counterclockwise 5 degrees (5CW and 5CCW). Manual translational registration was then performed to match the implanted fiducials on the rotated images to the original dataset. Patient contours were copied to the newly created CT set. The original treatment plan was applied to the new CT dataset with the beam isocenter placed at the geometrical center of PTV. The dose distribution was recalculated for dosimetric parameters comparison. Results: CTV and PTV (D95 and V95) coverages were not significantly different between the two simulated plans (5CW and 5CCW) and the original plan. PTV D95 and CTV D95 absolute difference among the three plans were relatively small, with maximum changes of 0.28 CGE and 0.15 CGE, respectively. PTV V95 and CTV V95 absolute differences were 0.79% and 0.48%. The dosage to the thyroid, heart, contralateral breast and lung remained zero for all three plans. The Dmax and Dmean to the volume of ipsilateral breast excluding CTV were compared, with maximum difference values of 1.02 CGE for Dmax and 3.56 CGE for Dmean. Ipsilateral lung Dmean maintained no significant changes through the three plan comparison, with the largest value 0.32 CGE. Ipsilateral lung Dmax was the most sensitive parameter to this simulation study, with a maximum difference at 20.2 CGE. Conclusion: Our study suggests that fiducial-based Accelerated Partial Breast Proton Therapy is robust with respect to +/− 5 degree patient setup rotational errors, as long as the internal fiducial markers are used for patient alignment.

  20. Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-11-22

    We study the direct acceleration of a free electron in infinite vacuum along the axis of a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam. We find that net energy transfer from laser pulse to electron is maximized with the tightest focusing. We show that the net energy gain of an electron initially moving at a relativistic velocity may exceed more than half the theoretical limit of energy transfer, which is not possible with an initially stationary electron in the parameter space studied. We determine and analyze the power scaling of maximum energy gain, extending our study to include a relatively unexplored regime of low powers and revealing that substantial acceleration is already possible without the use of petawatt peak-power laser technology. PMID:21164849

  1. Guiding and collimation of laser-accelerated proton beams using thin foils followed with a hollow plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; He, X. T.

    2015-09-15

    It is proposed that guided and collimated proton acceleration by intense lasers can be achieved using an advanced target—a thin foil followed by a hollow plasma channel. For the advanced target, the laser-accelerated hot electrons can be confined in the hollow channel at the foil rear side, which leads to the formation of transversely localized, Gaussian-distributed sheath electric field and resultantly guiding of proton acceleration. Further, due to the hot electron flow along the channel wall, a strong focusing transverse electric field is induced, taking the place of the original defocusing one driven by hot electron pressure in the case of a purely thin foil target, which results in collimation of proton beams. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that collimated proton beams with energy about 20 MeV and nearly half-reduced divergence of 26° are produced at laser intensities 10{sup 20 }W/cm{sup 2} by using the advanced target.

  2. Nonlaminar multicomponent models for electron flow in positive polarity multigap accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Church, B.W.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-10-01

    Electron flow in multigap positive-polarity inductive accelerators is studied by numerical simulation and modeling. The objective of this work is to determine the operating principles of the electron flow such that an optimally efficient design of such machines can be achieved for intense ion beam generation. Because the electrons emitted in different gaps have different energies and canonical momenta, the theory of single-component magnetic insulation has to be extended in order to describe such multicomponent electron flows. A two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code is used to simulate multicomponent electron flow in multigap accelerators with two, three, and four gaps. Observations from these simulations lead to new one-dimensional, time-independent models for these flows that incorporate the time-averaged effects of diamagnetic electron vortices. Equivalent circuits are constructed for simulated accelerators using voltage{endash}current relations predicted by the models. These circuit models are incorporated into a software package to aid in the design of multigap inductive accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Sensitiveness of axial magnetic field on electron acceleration by a radially polarized laser pulse in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghotra, Harjit Singh; Kant, Niti

    2015-12-01

    We examine the electron acceleration by a radially polarized (RP) laser pulse in vacuum under influence of an intense axial magnetic field. The electron while interaction with a RP laser pulse gets accelerated with high energy gain. The attained energy gain further enhanced up-to the order of GeV with an intense RP laser pulse. We observe a significant enhancement in energy gain in the presence of an intense axial magnetic field in the direction of propagation of laser pulse. The presence of axial magnetic field improves the strength of v → × B → force which supports the retaining of betatron resonance for longer durations. This improves the electron acceleration with an enhanced energy gain up to 5.2 GeV. It is noticed that the axial magnetic field is sensitive to electron acceleration, small change in magnetic field leads to enhance electron energy gain significantly. Our results also show relatively smaller scattering of the electrons in the presence of axial magnetic field.

  4. Direct acceleration of electrons by a circular polarized laser pulse with phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lun-Wu; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Yu, M. Y.

    2013-11-15

    Electron acceleration by transversely echelon phase-modulated (EPM) circularly polarized (CP) intense laser pulse is investigated. Solution of the relativistic electron equations of motion shows that the CP EPM light wave structure can disrupt the harmonic response of a trapped electron not only in the transverse direction but also in the direction of laser propagation. In each laser cycle, there can be a net gain in the electron's transverse momentum, which is promptly converted into the forward direction by the Lorentz force. As a result, the electron can be trapped and accelerated in the favorable phase of the laser for a rather long time. Its momentum gain then accumulates and can eventually reach high levels. It is also found that with the CP EPM laser, the net acceleration of the electron is not sensitive to its initial position and velocity relative to the phase of the laser fields, so that such a laser can also be useful for accelerating thermal electron bunches to high energies.

  5. Temporal relationship between high-energy proton acceleration and magnetic field changes during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Victoria; Yushkov, Boris

    Understanding of the association of the magnetic field evolution in the corona and the temporal evolution of electromagnetic emissions produced by the accelerated particles during a solar flare can provide information about the nature of the energy-release process and its location. Recent high-spatial-resolution observations in HXR, UV and radio emissions allow one to study in detail a structure of two-ribbon flare site. According to these observations, the flare process can be divided into two different intervals with different temporal evolution of morphological structure: loop contraction during impulsive phase and subsequent loop expansion. Оn the other hand, the appearance of high-energy protons (with energy >300 MeV - an energy threshold of the pion production) in the solar atmosphere can be revealed from an emerging pion-decay component of high-energy gamma-ray emission. The present work is based on comparison of measurements of high-energy gamma-rays performed with the SONG detector onboard the CORONAS-F mission and reported observations of magnetic field evolution, such as HXR foot points (FP) separation and flare shear temporal behavior, or motion of UV/radio loops. We reliably identified the pion-decay component of gamma-ray emission in the course of five events attended with suitable spatial observations, namely, 2001 August 25, 2002 August 24, 2003 October 28, 2003 October 29, and 2005 January 20, and determined its onset time. We found that in these events the pion-decay emission occurred when the distance between conjugated foot-points of flare loops ceased to decrease and began to increase, i.e. changed from shrinkage to expansion. This result leads to the conclusion that the most efficient proton acceleration up to >300 MeV coincided in time with the radical reconfiguration of the magnetic field in the flare site. Earlier we found that the pion-decay emission onset in the 2003 October 28 flare was close to the time of maximum change rate of the

  6. Measurement of the polarization and magnetic moment of Ξ¯+ antihyperons produced by 800-GeV/c protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, P. M.; Longo, M. J.; Nguyen, A.; Luk, K. B.; James, C.; Rameika, R.; Duryea, J.; Guglielmo, G.; Heller, K.; Johns, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Teige, S.; Thomson, G. B.; Zou, Y.

    1991-12-01

    The polarization of Ξ¯ + hyperons produced by 800-GeV/c protons in the inclusive reaction p+Be-->Ξ¯ ++X has been measured using a sample of 70 000 Ξ¯ + decays. The average polarization of the Ξ¯ +, at a mean xF=0.39 and pt=0.76 GeV/c, is -0.097+/-0.012+/-0.009, compared to -0.102+/-0.012+/-0.010 for the Ξ-. The large polarization found for the Ξ¯ + is not expected in any model for polarization of inclusively produced hyperons. The magnetic moment of the Ξ¯ + was measured to be 0.657+/-0.028+/-0.020 nuclear magnetons (μN), compared to (-0.674+/-0.021+/-0.020)μN for the Ξ-, in good agreement with CPT invariance.

  7. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  8. BNL alternating gradient synchrotron with four helical magnets to minimize the losses of the polarized proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W. W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2013-04-01

    The principle of using multiple partial helical magnets to preserve the polarization of the proton beam during its acceleration was applied successfully to the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS) which currently operates with two partial helical magnets. In this paper we further explore this idea by using four partial helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS, which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets and their relatively lower field of operation allows for better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection and allows both the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed within the “spin tune gap,” therefore eliminating the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS during the acceleration cycle. Second, it provides a wider spin tune gap. Third, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical. Although the spin tune gap, which is created with four partial helices, can also be created with a single or two partial helices, the high field strength of a single helical magnet which is required to generate such a spin tune gap makes the use of the single helical magnet impractical, and that of the two helical magnets rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare them with those from the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. Although in this paper we specifically discuss the effect of the four partial helices on the AGS, this method which can eliminate simultaneously the vertical and horizontal intrinsic spin resonances is a general method and can be applied to any medium energy synchrotron which operates in similar energy range like the AGS and provides the required space to accommodate the four

  9. Neutron yield and induced radioactivity: a study of 235-MeV proton and 3-GeV electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Cheng; Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude of potential neutron yield and induced radioactivity of two new accelerators in Taiwan: a 235-MeV proton cyclotron for radiation therapy and a 3-GeV electron synchrotron serving as the injector for the Taiwan Photon Source. From a nuclear interaction point of view, neutron production from targets bombarded with high-energy particles is intrinsically related to the resulting target activation. Two multi-particle interaction and transport codes, FLUKA and MCNPX, were used in this study. To ensure prediction quality, much effort was devoted to the associated benchmark calculations. Comparisons of the accelerators' results for three target materials (copper, stainless steel and tissue) are presented. Although the proton-induced neutron yields were higher than those induced by electrons, the maximal neutron production rates of both accelerators were comparable according to their respective beam outputs during typical operation. Activation products in the targets of the two accelerators were unexpectedly similar because the primary reaction channels for proton- and electron-induced activation are (p,pn) and (γ,n), respectively. The resulting residual activities and remnant dose rates as a function of time were examined and discussed. PMID:25628454

  10. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  11. Computational study of transport and energy deposition of intense laser-accelerated proton beams in solid density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.

    2015-11-01

    With intense proton beams accelerated by high power short pulse lasers, solid targets are isochorically heated to become partially-ionized warm or hot dense matter. In this regime, the thermodynamic state of the matter significantly changes, varying the proton stopping power where both bound and free electrons contribute. Additionally, collective beam-matter interaction becomes important to the beam transport. We present self-consistent hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of proton beam transport and energy deposition in solid-density matter, where the individual proton stopping and the collective effects are taken into account simultaneously with updates of stopping power in the varying target conditions and kinetic motions of the beam in the driven fields. Broadening of propagation range and self-focusing of the beam led to unexpected target heating by the intense proton beams, with dependence on the beam profiles and target conditions. The behavior is specifically studied for the case of an experimentally measured proton beam from the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP laser transporting through metal foils. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contracts No. DE-NA0002034 and No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by the U.S. AFOSR under Contract FA9550-14-1-0346.

  12. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications—for example in particle therapy or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics—requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. Generally speaking, the two approaches are equivalent in focusing capability, if parameters are such that the solenoid length approximately equals its diameter. The scaling also shows that this is usually not the case above a few MeV; consequently, a solenoid needs to be pulsed or superconducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remain conventional. It is also important that the transmission of the triplet is found only 25% lower than that of the equivalent solenoid. Both systems are equally suitable for energy selection based on their chromatic effect as is shown using an initial distribution following the RPA simulation model by Yan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 135001 (2009PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.135001].

  13. Numerical simulations of recent proton acceleration experiments with sub-100 TW laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Recent experiments carried out at the Italian National Research Center, National Optics Institute Department in Pisa, are showing interesting results regarding maximum proton energies achievable with sub-100 TW laser systems. While laser systems are being continuously upgraded in laboratories around the world, at the same time a new trend on stabilizing and making ion acceleration results reproducible is growing in importance. Almost all applications require a beam with fixed performance, so that the energy spectrum and the total charge exhibit moderate shot to shot variations. This result is surely far from being achieved, but many paths are being explored in order to reach it. Some of the reasons for this variability come from fluctuations in laser intensity and focusing, due to optics instability. Other variation sources come from small differences in the target structure. The target structure can vary substantially, when it is impacted by the main pulse, due to the prepulse duration and intensity, the shape of the main pulse and the total energy deposited. In order to qualitatively describe the prepulse effect, we will present a two dimensional parametric scan of its relevant parameters. A single case is also analyzed with a full three dimensional simulation, obtaining reasonable agreement between the numerical and the experimental energy spectrum.

  14. Recovery mechanisms in proton exchange membrane fuel cells after accelerated stress tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Guo, Liejin; Liu, Hongtan

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of performance recovery after accelerated stress test (AST) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are systematically studied. Experiments are carried out by incorporating a well-designed performance recovery procedure right after the AST protocol. The experiment results show that the cell performance recovers significantly from the degraded state after the AST procedure. The results from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements further show that the performance recovery can be divided into kinetic and mass transport recoveries. It is further determined that the kinetic recovery, i.e. the recovery of electrochemical active area (ECA), is due to two distinct mechanisms: the reduction of platinum oxide and the re-attachment of detached platinum nanoparticles onto the carbon surface. The mass transport resistance is probably due to reduction of hydrophilic oxide groups on the carbon surface and the microstructure change that alleviates flooding. Performance comparisons show that the recovery procedure is highly effective, indicating the results of AST significantly over-estimate the true degradation in a PEM fuel cell. Therefore, a recovery procedure is highly recommended when an AST protocol is used to evaluate cell degradations to avoid over-estimating true performance degradations in PEMFCs.

  15. Neutralization and transport of high-current proton beams in a two-stage linear induction accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkowski, Cz.; Kerslick, G. S.; Nation, J. A.; Ivers, J.

    1992-03-01

    Experimental results on the propagation and transport efficiency of a 1 MV, 5 kA, 50 ns annular proton beam through a two-stage linear induction accelerator are presented. The beam is generated in a magnetically insulated diode and propagates with high-efficiency along a 0.6 T axial magnetic field to a second accelerating gap located 30 cm downstream. The second accelerating gap increases the beam energy to 1.3 MeV. A full-cusp geometry provides the magnetic insulation in both the diode and the second gap. We report in this paper an 86% (±5%) transport efficiency and an increase of 1.6° in the beam divergence for propagation through the post acceleration gap.

  16. On the acceleration of ions by interplanetary shock waves. 3: High time resolution observations of CIR proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Vanallen, J. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Observations within + or - 3 hours of corotating interaction region (CIR) shock waves of proton intensities, pitch angle distribution and crude differential energy spectra of the range of 0.6 E sub p 3.4 MeV are presented. The principle result is the evidence for the persistent flow of particles away from the shock. The observations are found to be in good agreement with the hypothesis of local interplanetary shock acceleration by the shock drift and compression mechanisms. The same set of observations strongly suggest that transit time damping does not play an important role in the acceleration of protons to 1 MeV in the immediate vicinity of CIR shocks.

  17. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  18. Development of the integrated control system for the microwave ion source of the PEFP 100-MeV proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Gi; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Jang, Ji-Ho; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2012-07-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) 20-MeV proton linear accelerator is currently operating at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ion source of the 100-MeV proton linac needs at least a 100-hour operation time. To meet the goal, we have developed a microwave ion source that uses no filament. For the ion source, a remote control system has been developed by using experimental physics and the industrial control system (EPICS) software framework. The control system consists of a versa module europa (VME) and EPICS-based embedded applications running on a VxWorks real-time operating system. The main purpose of the control system is to control and monitor the operational variables of the components remotely and to protect operators from radiation exposure and the components from critical problems during beam extraction. We successfully performed the operation test of the control system to confirm the degree of safety during the hardware performance.

  19. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  20. Polarization preservation in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    The successful operation of a high energy polarized beam at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) with the concommitant development of depolarizing resonance correction techniques has led to the present project of commissioning such a beam at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). A description of the project was presented at the 1981 National Accelerator Conference. I would like to now present a more detailed description of how we plan to preserve the polarization during acceleration, and to present our game plan for tuning through some 50 resonances and reaching our goal of a 26 GeV polarized proton beam with greater than 60% polarization.

  1. Polarization Preservation and Control in a Figure-8 Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ya. S.; Morozov, V. S.; Lin, F.; Zhang, Y.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Filatov, Yu. N.

    2016-02-01

    We present a complete scheme for managing the polarization of ion beams in Jefferson Lab’s proposed Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC). It provides preservation of the ion polarization during all stages of beam acceleration and polarization control in the collider’s experimental straights. We discuss characteristic features of the spin motion in accelerators with Siberian snakes and in accelerators of figure-8 shape. We propose 3D spin rotators for polarization control in the MEIC ion collider ring. We provide polarization calculations in the collider with the 3D rotator for deuteron and proton beams. The main polarization control features of the figure-8 design are summarized.

  2. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantha, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Satyamurthy, P.

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth{eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  3. Shock ion acceleration by an ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse via relativistic transparency in an exploded target.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Cho, Myung-Hoon; Song, Hyung Seon; Kang, Teyoun; Park, Hyung Ju; Jung, Moon Youn; Hur, Min Sup

    2015-10-01

    We investigated ion acceleration by an electrostatic shock in an exploded target irradiated by an ultrashort, circularly polarized laser pulse by means of one- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We discovered that the laser field penetrating via relativistic transparency (RT) rapidly heated the upstream electron plasma to enable the formation of a high-speed electrostatic shock. Owing to the RT-based rapid heating and the fast compression of the initial density spike by a circularly polarized pulse, a new regime of the shock ion acceleration driven by an ultrashort (20-40 fs), moderately intense (1-1.4 PW) laser pulse is envisaged. This regime enables more efficient shock ion acceleration under a limited total pulse energy than a linearly polarized pulse with crystal laser systems of λ∼1μm. PMID:26565351

  4. Interesting experimental results in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex H- ion-source development (invited).

    PubMed

    Ueno, A; Oguri, H; Ikegami, K; Namekawa, Y; Ohkoshi, K

    2010-02-01

    The following interesting experimental results observed in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) H(-) ion-source developments are reviewed. It was proven that almost all of H(-) ions were produced with surface reactions in cesium (Cs)-free J-PARC H(-) ion-sources. The world's most intense class H(-) ion current of 38 mA in Cs-free ion sources for a high-energy linac was attained by an optimal shape and high temperature of the plasma electrode (PE), usage of a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB(6)) filament, and a newly devised high-power constant-current pulsed-arc power supply indispensable for it. It was also proven that the H(-) ion current could be increased to more than 40 mA by optimizing LaB(6)-filament shape. The surface elemental analysis of the PE after operation with a LaB(6)-filament showed that it was coated by boron (B) 95.5%, lanthanum (La) 2.5%, and oxygen (O) 1.9%. The H(-) ion current decreased by about 20% when a tungsten (W) filament was used instead of a LaB(6)-filament. The H(-) ion current could not be increased by seeding cesium (Cs) if the LaB(6)-filament was used. On the other hand, it was increased to more than 70 mA with much lower arc current of 150 A if Cs was seeded when a W-filament was used. PMID:20192389

  5. Resonant absorption effects induced by polarized laser light irradiating thin foils in the TNSA regime of ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Pfeifer, M.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-04-01

    Thin foils were irradiated by short pulsed lasers at intensities of 1016‑19W/cm2 in order to produce non-equilibrium plasmas and ion acceleration from the target-normal-sheath-acceleration (TNSA) regime. Ion acceleration in forward direction was measured by SiC detectors and ion collectors used in the time-of-flight configuration. Laser irradiations were employed using p-polarized light at different incidence angles with respect to the target surface and at different focal distances from the target surface. Measurements demonstrate that resonant absorption effects, due to the plasma wave excitations, enhance the plasma temperature and the ion acceleration with respect to those performed without to use of p-polarized light. Dependences of the ion flux characteristics on the laser energy, wavelength, focal distance and incidence angle will be reported and discussed.

  6. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  7. Implementation of the Polarized HD target at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali; David Tedeschi

    2007-01-30

    The original goal of this proposal was to study frozen spin polarized targets (HD target and other technologies) and produce a conceptual design report for the implementation of such a target in the HALL B detector of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). During the first two years of the proposal, we came to the conclusion that the best suited target for JLab was a frozen spin target and helped with the design of such a target. We have not only achieved our original goal but have exceeded it by being involved in the actual building and testing of parts the target. The main reason for this success has been the hiring of a senior research associate, Dr. Oleksandr Dzyubak, who had more than 10 years of experience in the field of frozen spin polarized targets. The current grant has allowed the USC nuclear physics group to strengthen its role in the JLab collaboration and make important contribution to both the detector development and the scientific program.

  8. Decay-Accelerating Factor Binding Determines the Entry Route of Echovirus 11 in Polarized Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Sobo, Komla; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Brown, T. David K.; Stuart, Amanda D.; McKee, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between echovirus 11 strain 207 (EV11-207) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) at the apical surface of polarized Caco-2 cells results in rapid transport of the virus to tight junctions and in its subsequent uptake. A virus mutant (EV11-207R) which differs at 6 amino acids and whose affinity for DAF is apparently significantly lower remains at the apical surface, from where its uptake occurs. Binding of EV11-207 to DAF and its transport to tight junctions result in a loss of function of the junctions. In contrast, the mutant virus EV11-207R is not transferred to tight junctions, nor does it impair the integrity of these junctions. Cholesterol depletion from the apical membrane leads to DAF aggregation and, presumably, internalization and inhibits infection by EV11-207. However, infection by EV11-207R is significantly less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than infection by EV11-207, confirming the DAF requirement for EV11-207, but not EV11-207R, to infect cells. These data strongly indicate that in the case of infection of polarized epithelial cells by echovirus 11, DAF binding appears be a key determinant in the choice of entry pathway, at least in cell culture. PMID:21917947

  9. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Arun

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  10. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  11. A study of the structural activation caused by proton beam loss in the {open_quotes}accelerator production of tritium{close_quotes} LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Daemen, L.L.; Beard, C.A.; Eaton, S.L.; Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory makes use of a high power linear proton accelerator to produce neutrons via spallation reactions m a heavy metal target. The fast spallation neutrons are moderated by a heavy water blanket, and used to produce tritium by means of the reaction: {sup 3}He(n,p)T, APT 1993. Various accelerator designs are currently under consideration. At the time when this study was performed, the project called for a 1 GeV proton linear accelerator with a beam current of 200 mA, i.e., a proton beam power of 200 MW. Given the high power at which the APT accelerator is expected to operate, as well as the heavy maintenance that is likely to be required to keep it operating, it is essential to consider health physics issues at an early stage of the design.

  12. Measurement of spin parameters in inclusive. Lambda. and K sub S production using a polarized proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tonse, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    A polarized proton beam incident on a Beryllium target was used for inclusive {Lambda}(1116 meV) production at beam momenta of 13.3 GeV and 18.5 GeV. The beam polarization was transverse to the beam direction with magnitude 0.63(0.40) at 13.3(18.5) GeV. The trigger condition favored forward produced {Lambda}'s with moderately high p{sub T}(p{sub T} {approximately} 1GeV). The {Lambda} polarization was measured and found to be in agreement with results from earlier experiments which used unpolarized proton beams. Analyzing power (A) and depolarization (D{sub NN}) of the {Lambda}'s were both measured and compared with a hyperon polarization model in which the polarization arises from a Thomas precession effect. There is good agreement with its predictions: A = 0 and D{sub NN} = 0. In particular, our measurement of D{sub NN} = {minus}0.009 {plus minus} 0.015 supports the idea that the valence quarks carry all of the hadron spin, since this assumption is implicit in the model's use of SU(6) wave functions to form final state hadrons from beam fragments and sea quarks. The analyzing power of K{sub s} was also measured at 13.3(18.5)GeV and found to be {minus}0.094 {plus minus} 0.012 ({minus}0.076 {plus minus} 0.015). We use the same model to predict A of K{sub s}, taking into account K{sub s} production from various sources (K{degree}, K{degree} and K*) and find good agreement with the data. Finally a small sample of {Lambda} was isolated form the 18.5 GeV sample and was found to have A = 0.03 {plus minus} 0.1, consistent with the model's prediction of zero.

  13. Polarization Observables for K{sup +}{Lambda} and K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0} Photoproduction form Polarized Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Walford, Natalie K.; Klein, Franz J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The search for undiscovered excited states of the nucleon continues to be a focus of experiments at Jefferson Lab. Recent LQCD calculations have confirmed long-standing quark-model predictions of many more states than have so far been identified. A large effort for the N* program has been launched using the CLAS detector to provide the database that will allow nearly model-independent partial wave analyses to be carried out in the search for such states. Polarization observables play a crucial role in this effort, as they are essential in disentangling overlapping resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. In 2010, double-polarization data were taken at JLab using circularly polarized photons incident on a transversely polarized frozen-spin butanol target. Our current analysis yields preliminary data of the T and F asymmetries of the K{sup +}{Lambda} and K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0} final states, which are compared to predictions of recent multipole analyses. This work is the first of its kind and will significantly broaden the world database for these reactions.

  14. Generation and focusing of short pulse high intensity laser accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foord, Mark E.

    2011-10-01

    Much progress has recently been reported in generating MeV energy protons from intense laser-matter interactions, having potential applications in areas such as radiography, oncology, and ion-proton beam fast ignition. Experiments were conducted on the sub-ps LANL Trident laser, where we systematically investigated proton focusing and conversion efficiency from curved surface targets in both open and closed cone-shaped target geometries. We clearly show that the focusing is strongly affected by the electric fields in the beam, bending the trajectories near the axis. We also find that in the cone geometry, a sheath electric field effectively ``channels'' the proton beam through the cone tip, substantially improving the beam focusing properties. The far-field energy and angular distribution of the proton beam were measured using a mesh that images the beam onto a RCF detector. For the cone-shaped targets using a 300 μm-radius curved surface foil, a 60 μm diameter proton spot was determined. Proton generation and focusing were modeled using 2-D hybrid PIC simulations, which compared well with RCF data. The proton conversion efficiency varied strongly with the target geometry. Simulations indicate this is due to that charge flow on the structure and the coupling to the hot electrons and electric fields in the plasma. Work performed under US DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344

  15. Dynamics of the correlation between polar cap radio absorption and solar energetic proton fluxes in the interplanetary medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Knudsen, D. J.; Donovan, E. F.; Spanswick, E.

    2014-03-01

    During solar energetic particle (SEP) events, large fluxes of energetic particles spreading throughout the interplanetary medium (IPM) have access to the upper polar atmosphere where they play important roles in physical and chemical processes. We examine the dynamics of the relation between solar energetic proton (SEP) fluxes detected outside the magnetosphere by SOHO, at geosynchronous orbit by GOES 8, and in low earth orbit by NOAA 15 (POES) satellites on one hand, and ionospheric absorption measured by a NORSTAR riometer in the polar cap on the other. We attempt to isolate SEP-related signals by rejecting periods influenced by electron precipitation and solar radio bursts. Under these conditions we find R2of up to 0.9 between the logarithms of SEP flux and absorption for all satellites, but with the additional restriction to periods beginning 10 h after event onsets and within tens of hours following times of maximum flux. We find that the flux-absorption correlation is poor during the first few hours of an event, which we attribute to the fact that SEP angular distributions are often highly peaked along the interplanetary magnetic field during the early stages of an event. Such highly anisotropic distributions map to small regions inside the polar caps, making it unlikely that the corresponding absorption signal will be detected by a single riometer. These observations suggest that riometers in combination with a suitable numerical tool can be used as a diagnostic of properties of energetic proton populations in the interplanetary medium.

  16. ACCELERATING WAVES IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES AS SEEN BY EIS AND SUMER

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G. R.; Banerjee, D.; Teriaca, L.; Solanki, S.; Imada, S.

    2010-07-20

    We present EIS/Hinode and SUMER/SOHO observations of propagating disturbances detected in coronal lines in inter-plume and plume regions of a polar coronal hole. The observation was carried out on 2007 November 13 as part of the JOP196/HOP045 program. The SUMER spectroscopic observation gives information about fluctuations in radiance and on both resolved (Doppler shift) and unresolved (Doppler width) line-of-sight velocities, whereas EIS 40'' wide slot images detect fluctuations only in radiance but maximize the probability of overlapping field of view between the two instruments. From distance-time radiance maps, we detect the presence of propagating waves in a polar inter-plume region with a period of 15-20 minutes and a propagation speed increasing from 130 {+-} 14 km s{sup -1} just above the limb to 330 {+-} 140 km s{sup -1} around 160'' above the limb. These waves can be traced to originate from a bright region of the on-disk part of the coronal hole where the propagation speed is in the range of 25 {+-} 1.3 to 38 {+-} 4.5 km s{sup -1}, with the same periodicity. These on-disk bright regions can be visualized as the base of the coronal funnels. The adjacent plume region also shows the presence of propagating disturbances with the same range of periodicity but with propagation speeds in the range of 135 {+-} 18 to 165 {+-} 43 km s{sup -1} only. A comparison between the distance-time radiance map of the two regions indicates that the waves within the plumes are not observable (may be getting dissipated) far off-limb, whereas this is not the case in the inter-plume region. A correlation analysis was also performed to find out the time delay between the oscillations at several heights in the off-limb region, finding results consistent with those from the analysis of the distance-time maps. To our knowledge, this result provides first spectroscopic evidence of the acceleration of propagating disturbances in the polar region close to the Sun (within 1.2 R/R{sub sun

  17. Focusing of short-pulse high-intensity laser-accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartal, Teresa; Foord, Mark E.; Bellei, Claudio; Key, Michael H.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Patel, Pravesh K.; Jarrott, Leonard C.; Higginson, Drew P.; Roth, Markus; Otten, Anke; Kraus, Dominik; Stephens, Richard B.; McLean, Harry S.; Giraldez, Emilio M.; Wei, Mingsheng S.; Gautier, Donald C.; Beg, Farhat N.

    2012-02-01

    Recent progress in generating high-energy (>50MeV) protons from intense laser-matter interactions (1018-1021Wcm-2 refs , , , , , , ) has opened up new areas of research, with applications in radiography, oncology, astrophysics, medical imaging, high-energy-density physics, and ion-proton beam fast ignition. With the discovery of proton focusing with curved surfaces, rapid advances in these areas will be driven by improved focusing technologies. Here we report on the first investigation of the generation and focusing of a proton beam using a cone-shaped target. We clearly show that the focusing is strongly affected by the electric fields in the beam in both open and enclosed (cone) geometries, bending the trajectories near the axis. Also in the cone geometry, a sheath electric field effectively `channels' the proton beam through the cone tip, substantially improving the beam focusing properties. These results agree well with particle simulations and provide the physics basis for many future applications.

  18. Filamentation control and collimation of laser accelerated MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, B.; Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Mandal, T.; Upadhyay, A.; Weng, S. M.; Murakami, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that the proton beam filamentation in dense plasma can be controlled in multi-layered (Al-CH-Al) sandwich targets. We observe up to three-fold reduction in the MeV proton beam divergence (~12°) from these targets as a result of decrease in filamentary structures in the proton beam profile. Strong self-generated resistive magnetic fields in targets with a high-Z transport layer are mainly responsible for this observed effect. Enhancement in the proton flux and energy is also observed from these targets. Supported by a matching 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and theoretical considerations, we suggest that these targets can be very effectively implemented to collimate proton beams useful for ion oncology applications or advanced fast igniter approach of inertial confinement fusion (ICF).

  19. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima

    2016-08-01

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  20. The affect of erbium hydride on the conversion efficience to accelerated protons from ultra-shsort pulse laser irradiated foils

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, Dustin Theodore

    2008-01-01

    This thesis work explores, experimentally, the potential gains in the conversion efficiency from ultra-intense laser light to proton beams using erbium hydride coatings. For years, it has been known that contaminants at the rear surface of an ultra-intense laser irradiated thin foil will be accelerated to multi-MeV. Inertial Confinement Fusion fast ignition using proton beams as the igniter source requires of about 1016 protons with an average energy of about 3MeV. This is far more than the 1012 protons available in the contaminant layer. Target designs must include some form of a hydrogen rich coating that can be made thick enough to support the beam requirements of fast ignition. Work with computer simulations of thin foils suggest the atomic mass of the non-hydrogen atoms in the surface layer has a strong affect on the conversion efficiency to protons. For example, the 167amu erbium atoms will take less energy away from the proton beam than a coating using carbon with a mass of 12amu. A pure hydrogen coating would be ideal, but technologically is not feasible at this time. In the experiments performed for my thesis, ErH3 coatings on 5 μm gold foils are compared with typical contaminants which are approximately equivalent to CH1.7. It will be shown that there was a factor of 1.25 ± 0.19 improvement in the conversion efficiency for protons above 3MeV using erbium hydride using the Callisto laser. Callisto is a 10J per pulse, 800nm wavelength laser with a pulse duration of 200fs and can be focused to a peak intensity of about 5 x 1019W/cm2. The total number of protons from either target type was on the order of 1010. Furthermore, the same experiment was performed on the Titan laser, which has a 500fs pulse duration, 150J of energy and can be focused to about 3 x 1020 W/cm2. In this experiment 1012 protons were seen from both erbium hydride and

  1. The effect of erbium hydride on the conversion efficiency to accelerated protons from ultra-short pulse laser irradiated foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, Dustin Theodore

    This thesis work explores, experimentally, the potential gains in the conversion efficiency from ultra-intense laser light to proton beams using erbium hydride coatings. For years, it has been known that contaminants at the rear surface of an ultra-intense laser irradiated thin foil will be accelerated to multi-MeV. Inertial Confinement Fusion fast ignition using proton beams as the igniter source requires of about 10 16 protons with an average energy of about 3MeV. This is far more than the 1012 protons available in the contaminant layer. Target designs must include some form of a hydrogen rich coating that can be made thick enough to support the beam requirements of fast ignition. Work with computer simulations of thin foils suggest the atomic mass of the non-hydrogen atoms in the surface layer has a strong affect on the conversion efficiency to protons. For example, the 167amu erbium atoms will take less energy away from the proton beam than a coating using carbon with a mass of 12amu. A pure hydrogen coating would be ideal, but technologically is not feasible at this time. In the experiments performed for my thesis, ErH 3 coatings on 5mum gold foils are compared with typical contaminants which are approximately equivalent to CH 1.7. It will be shown that there was a factor of 1.25 +/- 0.19 improvement in the conversion efficiency for protons above 3MeV using erbium hydride using the Callisto laser. Callisto is a 10J per pulse, 800nm wavelength laser with a pulse duration of 200fs and can be focused to a peak intensity of about 5 x 1019W/cm2. The total number of protons from either target type was on the order of 1010. Furthermore, the same experiment was performed on the Titan laser, which has a 500fs pulse duration, 150J of energy and can be focused to about 3 x 1020W/cm 2. In this experiment 1012 protons were seen from both erbium hydride and contaminants on 14mum gold foils. Significant improvements were also observed but possibly because of the depletion of

  2. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators. PMID:25811254

  3. Personal History of Nucleon Polarization Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chamberlain, O.

    1984-09-01

    The history of nucleon scattering experiments is reviewed, starting with the observation of large proton polarizations in scattering from light elements such as carbon, and ending with the acceleration of polarized proton beams in high-energy synchrotrons. Special mention is made about significant contributions made by C.L. Oxley, L. Wolfenstein, R.D. Tripp, T. Ypsilantis, A. Abragam, M. Borghini, T. Niinikoski, Froissart, Stora, A.D. Krisch, and L.G. Ratner.

  4. Large-amplitude, circularly polarized, compressive, obliquely propagating electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves throughout the Earth's magnetosheath: low plasma β conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Remya, B.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Falkowski, B. J.; Echer, E.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2014-09-20

    During 1999 August 18, both Cassini and WIND were in the Earth's magnetosheath and detected transverse electromagnetic waves instead of the more typical mirror-mode emissions. The Cassini wave amplitudes were as large as ∼14 nT (peak to peak) in a ∼55 nT ambient magnetic field B {sub 0}. A new method of analysis is applied to study these waves. The general wave characteristics found were as follows. They were left-hand polarized and had frequencies in the spacecraft frame (f {sub scf}) below the proton cyclotron frequency (f{sub p} ). Waves that were either right-hand polarized or had f {sub scf} > f{sub p} are shown to be consistent with Doppler-shifted left-hand waves with frequencies in the plasma frame f{sub pf} < f{sub p} . Thus, almost all waves studied are consistent with their being electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves. Most of the waves (∼55%) were found to be propagating along B {sub 0} (θ{sub kB{sub 0}}<30{sup ∘}), as expected from theory. However, a significant fraction of the waves were found to be propagating oblique to B {sub 0}. These waves were also circularly polarized. This feature and the compressive ([B {sub max} – B {sub min}]/B {sub max}, where B {sub max} and B {sub min} are the maximum and minimum field magnitudes) nature (ranging from 0.27 to 1.0) of the waves are noted but not well understood at this time. The proton cyclotron waves were shown to be quasi-coherent, theoretically allowing for rapid pitch-angle transport of resonant protons. Because Cassini traversed the entire subsolar magnetosheath and WIND was in the dusk-side flank of the magnetosheath, it is surmised that the entire region was filled with these waves. In agreement with past theory, it was the exceptionally low plasma β (0.35) that led to the dominance of the proton cyclotron wave generation during this interval. A high-speed solar wind stream ((V{sub sw} ) = 598 km s{sup –1}) was the source of this low-β plasma.

  5. Fighting the Residual Polarization Loss in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2009-08-04

    A dual partial snake scheme has been used for AGS polarized proton operation for several years. It has provided polarized proton beams with 1.5x10{sup 11} protons per bunch and 65% polarization for the RHIC spin program. There is still residual polarization loss due to both snake resonances and horizontal resonances as shown in the data. Several schemes were tested or proposed in the AGS to mitigate the loss, such as putting horizontal tune into the spin tune gap, injection into a accelerating bucket, and tune jump across the horizontal resonances. This paper presents the experiment and simulation results and analyses.

  6. Generation of high-quality mega-electron volt proton beams with intense-laser-driven nanotube accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Tanaka, M.

    2013-04-22

    An ion acceleration scheme using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is proposed, in which embedded fragments of low-Z materials are irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser to eject substantial numbers of electrons. Due to the resultant characteristic electrostatic field, the nanotube and embedded materials play the roles of the barrel and bullets of a gun, respectively, to produce highly collimated and quasimonoenergetic ion beams. Three-dimensional particle simulations, that take all the two-body Coulomb interactions into account, demonstrate generation of quasimonoenergetic MeV-order proton beams using nanometer-size CNT under a super-intense electrostatic field {approx}10{sup 14} V m{sup -1}.

  7. Measurement of DNA Double-Strand Break Yield in Human Cancer Cells by High-Current, Short-Duration Bunches of Laser-Accelerated Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, Akifumi; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Maeda, Takuya; Sakaki, Hironao; Hori, Toshihiko; Ogura, Koichi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kondo, Kiminori; Bolton, Paul R.; Kawanishi, Shunichi

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the radiobiological effects of high dose rates that are attributed to high current, short bunch beam generation with laser-dreven ion acceleration, we have developed an experimental setup that uses laser-accelerated protons. In-vitro human lung cancer cells: A549 pulmonary adenocarcinoma are irradiated with a laser-accelerated proton bunches with a duration of 2×10-8 s and flux of ˜1015 cm-2 s-1, amounting to single bunch absorbed dose at the 1 Gy level. The double-strand break (DSB) yield in cell DNA is analyzed for the laser-accelerated proton beam at an average LET of 41 keV/µm.

  8. Resonance Structure with Polarization Experiments at MAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, Hans-Juergen

    2011-10-21

    The Mainz Microtron MAMI is an ideal facility to study the hadron structure with the electromagnetic probe. With the new accelerator stage, the Harmonic Double-Sided Microtron (HDSM), which is in operation since 2007, high-intensity polarized electron and photon beams with energies up to 1.6 GeV are delivered to the experiments. Polarized proton, deuteron, {sup 3}He targets, and recoil proton polarimeters are available to allow a broad range of polarization observables for low-mass nucleon resonances to be measured. In this talk, an overview over selected recent double polarization experiments at MAMI is given.

  9. Commissioning the polarized beam in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.; Brown, H.; Chiang, I.H.; Courant, E.; Gardner, C.; Lazarus, D.; Lee, Y.Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Sidhu, S.; Skelly, J.

    1985-01-01

    After the successful operation of a high energy polarized proton beam at the Argonne Laboratory Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) was terminated, plans were made to commission such a beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). On February 23, 1984, 2 ..mu..A of polarized H/sup -/ was accelerated through the Linac to 200 MeV with a polarization of about 65%. 1 ..mu..A was injected into the AGS and acceleration attempts began. Several relatively short runs were then made during the next three months. Dedicated commissioning began in early June, and on June 26 the AGS polarized beam reached 13.8 GeV/c to exceed the previous ZGS peak momentum of 12.75 GeV/c. Commissioning continued to the point where 10/sup 10/ polarized protons were accelerated to 16.5 GeV/c with 40% polarization. Then, two experiments had a short polarized proton run. We plan to continue commissioning efforts in the fall of this year to reach higher energy, higher intensity, and higher polarization levels. We present a brief description of the facility and of the methods used for preserving the polarization of the accelerating beam.

  10. Proton and Ion Beams Generated with Picosecond CO{sub 2} Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Stolyarov, Daniil; Shkolnikov, Peter; Chen Min; Pukhov, Alexander; McKenna, Paul; Carroll, David; Neely, David; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Willingale, Louise; Stolyarova, Elena; Flynn, George

    2009-01-22

    1-TW, 6-ps, circularly polarized CO{sub 2} laser pulses focused onto thin Al foils are used to drive ion acceleration. The spectra of ions and protons generated in the direction normal to the rear surface, detected with a compact magnet spectrometer with CR39, reveals a broad proton high-energy peak at {approx}1 MeV. This observation conforms to the theoretical predictions that circularly polarized laser pulses are less efficient than linearly polarized pulses in driving ion acceleration via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Instead, there is evidence that the circularly polarized laser may provide direct ponderomotive acceleration of ions and protons. We report also the first application of the BNL proton source in nano-science. Irradiation of graphite and graphene films produced local defects and membranes for variety of applications.

  11. Activation caused by proton beam losses in Accelerator Production of Tritium LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Eaton, S.L.; Daemen, L.L.; Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-03-01

    A variety of accelerator designs are being considered for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at Alamos National Laboratory. Because activation of the structural components of the accelerator is considered a major radiation protection issue, we have developed a computational methodology to estimate quantitatively radionuclide inventories and gamma dose rates resulting from accelerator operation. The work presented here illustrates the use of our computational methodology by focusing on the 20 and 100 MeV sections of the Bridge-Coupled Drift Tube LINAC (BCDTL), and the 100 and 1000 MeV sections of the Coupled Cavity LINAC (CCL).

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization study of inhibitor binding to the M2(18-60) proton transporter from influenza A.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Barnes, Alexander B; Corzilius, Björn; Chou, James J; Miller, Eric A; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-04-23

    We demonstrate the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to elucidate ligand binding to a membrane protein using dipolar recoupling magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In particular, we detect drug binding in the proton transporter M2(18-60) from influenza A using recoupling experiments at room temperature and with cryogenic DNP. The results indicate that the pore binding site of rimantadine is correlated with previously reported widespread chemical shift changes, suggesting functional binding in the pore. Futhermore, the (15)N-labeled ammonium of rimantadine was observed near A30 (13)Cβ and G34 (13)Cα, suggesting a possible hydrogen bond to A30 carbonyl. Cryogenic DNP was required to observe the weaker external binding site(s) in a ZF-TEDOR spectrum. This approach is generally applicable, particularly for weakly bound ligands, in which case the application of MAS NMR dipolar recoupling requires the low temperatures to quench dynamic exchange processes. For the fully protonated samples investigated, we observed DNP signal enhancements of ~10 at 400 MHz using only 4-6 mM of the polarizing agent TOTAPOL. At 600 MHz and with DNP, we measured a distance between the drug and the protein to a precision of 0.2 Å. PMID:23480101

  13. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Study of Inhibitor Binding to the M218–60 Proton Transporter from Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Loren B.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Corzilius, Björn; Chou, James J.; Miller, Eric A.; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to elucidate ligand binding to a membrane protein using dipolar recoupling magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In particular, we detect drug binding in the proton transporter M218–60 from influenza A using recoupling experiments at room temperature and with cryogenic DNP. The results indicate that the pore binding site of rimantadine is correlated with previously reported widespread chemical shift changes, suggesting functional binding in the pore. Futhermore, the 15N labeled ammonium of rimantadine was observed near A30 13Cβ and G34 13Cα suggesting a possible hydrogen bond to A30 Carbonyl. Cryogenic DNP was required to observe the weaker external binding site(s) in a ZF-TEDOR spectrum. This approach is generally applicable, particularly for weakly bound ligands, in which case the application of MAS NMR dipolar recoupling requires the low temperatures to quench dynamic exchange processes. For the fully protonated samples investigated, we observed DNP signal enhancements of ~10 at 400 MHz using only 4–6 mM of the polarizing agent TOTAPOL. At 600 MHz and with DNP, we measured a distance between the drug and the protein to a precision of 0.2 Å. PMID:23480101

  14. Polarization transmission at RHIC, numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Meot F.; Bai, M.; Liu, C.; Minty, M.; Ranjbar, V.

    2012-05-20

    Typical tracking simulations regarding the transmission of the polarization in the proton-proton collider RHIC are discussed. They participate in general studies aimed at understanding and improving polarization performances during polarized proton-proton runs.

  15. Collinear Photon Exchange in the Beam Normal Polarization Asymmetry of Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; N.P. Merenkov

    2004-07-01

    The parity-conserving single-spin beam asymmetry of elastic electron-proton scattering is induced by an absorptive part of the two-photon exchange amplitude. We demonstrate that this asymmetry has logarithmic and double-logarithmic enhancement due to contributions of hard collinear quasi-real photons. An optical theorem is used to evaluate the asymmetry in terms of the total photoproduction cross section on the proton, predicting its magnitude at 20-30 parts per million for high electron beam energies and small scattering angles. At fixed 4-momentum transfers, the asymmetry is rising logarithmically with increasing electron beam energy, following the high-energy diffractive behavior of total photoproduction cross section on the proton.

  16. Monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil by circularly polarized laser pulse in RPA regime without thermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2012-12-21

    A kinetic model of the monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil irradiated by the circularly polarized laser pulse is developed. The target moves without thermal heating with constant acceleration which is provided by chirping the frequency of the laser pulse and correspondingly increasing its intensity. In the accelerated reference frame, bulk plasma in the target is neutral and its parameters are stationary: cold ions are immobile while nonrelativistic electrons bounce back and forth inside the potential well formed by ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. It is shown that a positive charge left behind of the moving target in the ion tail and a negative charge in front of the target in the electron sheath form a capacitor whose constant electric field accelerates the ions of the target. The charge separation is maintained by the radiation pressure pushing electrons forward. The scalings of the target thickness and electromagnetic radiation with the electron temperature are found.

  17. Polarization of the light from the 3P(1)-2S(1) transition in proton beam excited helium. Ph.D. Thesis; [target gas pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhous, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the light from the 3 1p-2 1s transition in proton beam excited Helium have shown both a proton beam energy and Helium target gas pressure dependence. Results for the linear polarization fraction range from +2.6% at 100 keV proton energy to -5.5% at 450 keV. The zero crossover occurs at approximately 225 keV. This is in good agreement with other experimental work in the field, but in poor agreement with theoretical predictions. Measurements at He target gas pressures as low as .01 mtorr show that the linear polarization fraction is still pressure dependent at .01 mtorr.

  18. Investigation of polarized-proton target materials by differential calorimetry: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.; Hill, J.J.

    1980-10-15

    A simple differential calorimeter was designed and operated for an investigation of the thermodynamic properties of polarized target materials. The calibration and use of the calorimeter are discussed, after a brief exposition of our motivation for this work. The results of a preliminary study of target materials is presented with emphasis on the relevance of the glass state to dynamic polarization in chemically-doped targets.

  19. Transforming in-situ observations of CME-driven shock accelerated protons into the shock's reference frame.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, I. M.; Simnett, G. M.

    2005-07-01

    We examine the solar energetic particle event following solar activity from 14, 15 April 2001 which includes a "bump-on-the-tail" in the proton energy spectra at 0.99 AU from the Sun. We find this population was generated by a CME-driven shock which arrived at 0.99 AU around midnight 18 April. As such this population represents an excellent opportunity to study in isolation, the effects of proton acceleration by the shock. The peak energy of the bump-on-the-tail evolves to progressively lower energies as the shock approaches the observing spacecraft at the inner Lagrange point. Focusing on the evolution of this peak energy we demonstrate a technique which transforms these in-situ spectral observations into a frame of reference co-moving with the shock whilst making allowance for the effects of pitch angle scattering and focusing. The results of this transform suggest the bump-on-the-tail population was not driven by the 15 April activity but was generated or at least modulated by a CME-driven shock which left the Sun on 14 April. The existence of a bump-on-the-tail population is predicted by models in Rice et al. (2003) and Li et al. (2003) which we compare with observations and the results of our analysis in the context of both the 14 April and 15 April CMEs. We find an origin of the bump-on-the-tail at the 14 April CME-driven shock provides better agreement with these modelled predictions although some discrepancy exists as to the shock's ability to accelerate 100 MeV protons. Keywords. Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (Energetic particles; Flares and mass ejections) Space plasma physics (Transport processes)

  20. Detailed analysis of the cell-inactivation mechanism by accelerated protons and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2006-03-01

    A detailed study of the biological effects of diverse quality radiations, addressing their biophysical interpretation, is presented. Published survival data for V79 cells irradiated by monoenergetic protons, helium-3, carbon and oxygen ions and for CHO cells irradiated by carbon ions have been analysed using the probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation. Three different classes of DNA damage formed by traversing particles have been distinguished, namely severe single-track lesions which might lead to cell inactivation directly, less severe lesions where cell inactivation is caused by their combinations and lesions of negligible severity that can be repaired easily. Probabilities of single ions forming these lesions have been assessed in dependence on their linear energy transfer (LET) values. Damage induction probabilities increase with atomic number and LET. While combined lesions play a crucial role at lower LET values, single-track damage dominates in high-LET regions. The yields of single-track lethal lesions for protons have been compared with Monte Carlo estimates of complex DNA lesions, indicating that lethal events correlate well with complex DNA double-strand breaks. The decrease in the single-track damage probability for protons of LET above approximately 30 keV µm-1, suggested by limited experimental evidence, is discussed, together with the consequent differences in the mechanisms of biological effects between protons and heavier ions. Applications of the results in hadrontherapy treatment planning are outlined.