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Sample records for accelerated 56fe particles

  1. Induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation: comparison to the induction by exposure to accelerated 56Fe particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts by exposure to (137)Cs gamma radiation was investigated by measuring the frequency and characteristics of unstable clones isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure. Clones surviving irradiation and control clones were analyzed for 17 characteristics including chromosomal aberrations, growth defects, alterations in response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the thymidine kinase and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase loci. Putative unstable clones were defined as those that exhibited a significant alteration in one or more characteristics compared to the controls. The frequency and characteristics of the unstable clones were compared in clones exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays or (56)Fe particles. The majority of the unstable clones isolated after exposure to either gamma rays or (56)Fe particles exhibited chromosomal instability. Alterations in growth characteristics, radiation response and mutant frequencies occurred much less often than cytogenetic alterations in these unstable clones. The frequency and complexity of the unstable clones were greater after exposure to (56)Fe particles than to gamma rays. Unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to gamma rays exhibited increases in the incidence of dicentric chromosomes but not of chromatid breaks, whereas unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited increases in both chromatid and chromosome aberrations.

  2. Induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation: comparison to the induction by exposure to accelerated 56Fe particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts by exposure to (137)Cs gamma radiation was investigated by measuring the frequency and characteristics of unstable clones isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure. Clones surviving irradiation and control clones were analyzed for 17 characteristics including chromosomal aberrations, growth defects, alterations in response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the thymidine kinase and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase loci. Putative unstable clones were defined as those that exhibited a significant alteration in one or more characteristics compared to the controls. The frequency and characteristics of the unstable clones were compared in clones exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays or (56)Fe particles. The majority of the unstable clones isolated after exposure to either gamma rays or (56)Fe particles exhibited chromosomal instability. Alterations in growth characteristics, radiation response and mutant frequencies occurred much less often than cytogenetic alterations in these unstable clones. The frequency and complexity of the unstable clones were greater after exposure to (56)Fe particles than to gamma rays. Unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to gamma rays exhibited increases in the incidence of dicentric chromosomes but not of chromatid breaks, whereas unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited increases in both chromatid and chromosome aberrations.

  3. Accelerated hematopoietic toxicity by high energy (56)Fe radiation.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Trani, Daniela; Doiron, Kathryn; Rotolo, Jimmy A; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Kolesnick, Richard; Cole, Michael F; Fornace, Albert J

    2012-03-01

    There is little information on the relative toxicity of highly charged (Z) high-energy (HZE) radiation in animal models compared to γ or X-rays, and the general assumption based on in vitro studies has been that acute toxicity is substantially greater. C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with (56)Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon), and acute (within 30 d) toxicity compared to that of γ rays or protons (1 GeV). To assess relative hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity, the effects of (56)Fe ions were compared to γ rays using complete blood count (CBC), bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (GM-CFU), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis in bone marrow, and intestinal crypt survival. Although onset was more rapid, (56)Fe ions were only slightly more toxic than γ rays or protons with lethal dose (LD)(50/30) (a radiation dose at which 50% lethality occurs at 30-day) values of 5.8, 7.25, and 6.8 Gy, respectively, with relative biologic effectiveness for (56)Fe ions of 1.25 and 1.06 for protons. (56)Fe radiation caused accelerated and more severe hematopoietic toxicity. Early mortality correlated with more profound leukopenia and subsequent sepsis. Results indicate that there is selective enhanced toxicity to bone marrow progenitor cells, which are typically resistant to γ rays, and bone marrow stem cells, because intestinal crypt cells did not show increased HZE toxicity.

  4. Divergent Modification of Low-Dose 56Fe-Particle and Proton Radiation on Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shtifman, Alexander; Pezone, Matthew J.; Sasi, Sharath P.; Agarwal, Akhil; Gee, Hannah; Song, Jin; Perepletchikov, Aleksandr; Yan, Xinhua; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A.

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown whether loss of skeletal muscle mass and function experienced by astronauts during space flight could be augmented by ionizing radiation (IR), such as low-dose high-charge and energy (HZE) particles or low-dose high-energy proton radiation. In the current study adult mice were irradiated whole-body with either a single dose of 15 cGy of 1 GeV/n 56Fe-particle or with a 90 cGy proton of 1 GeV/n proton particles. Both ionizing radiation types caused alterations in the skeletal muscle cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis. 56Fe-particle irradiation also caused a reduction of depolarization-evoked Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The increase in the [Ca2+]i was detected as early as 24 h after 56Fe-particle irradiation, while effects of proton irradiation were only evident at 72 h. In both instances [Ca2+]i returned to baseline at day 7 after irradiation. All 56Fe-particle irradiated samples revealed a significant number of centrally localized nuclei, a histologic manifestation of regenerating muscle, 7 days after irradiation. Neither unirradiated control or proton-irradiated samples exhibited such a phenotype. Protein analysis revealed significant increase in the phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and rpS6k on day 7 in 56Fe-particle irradiated skeletal muscle, but not proton or unirradiated skeletal muscle, suggesting activation of pro-survival signaling. Our findings suggest that a single low-dose 56Fe-particle or proton exposure is sufficient to affect Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle. However, only 56Fe-particle irradiation led to the appearance of central nuclei and activation of pro-survival pathways, suggesting an ongoing muscle damage/recovery process. PMID:24131063

  5. Dietary modulation of the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Carey, A. N.

    On exploratory missions to other planets, astronauts will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays composed of protons and heavy particles, such as 56Fe. Long-term exposure to these particles can cause cancer. However, there are significant uncertainties in the risk estimates for the probability of developing heavy particle-induced cancer, and in the amount of shielding needed to provide an adequate level of radiation protection. The results of this preliminary study, using a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays, show reduced tumorigenesis in rats maintained on diets containing blueberry or strawberry extract prior to exposure to 56Fe particles. Because the study was not initially designed to evaluate tumorigenesis following exposure to 56Fe particles, additional research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of strawberry and blueberry supplementation. However, the preliminary results presented in this study suggest that diets containing antioxidant phytochemicals can provide additional radiation protection on interplanetary voyages.

  6. Antimutagenicity of WR-1065 in L5178Y cells exposed to accelerated (56)Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Evans, T. E.; Horng, M. F.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of the aminothiol WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] to protect L5178Y (LY) cells against the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of exposure to accelerated (56)Fe ions (1.08 GeV/nucleon) was determined. It was found that while WR-1065 reduced the mutagenicity in both cell lines when it was present during the irradiation, the addition of WR-1065 after the exposure had no effect on the mutagenicity of the radiation in either cell line. No marked protection against the cytotoxic effects of exposure to (56)Fe ions was provided by WR-1065 when added either during or after irradiation in either cell line. We reported previously that WR-1065 protected the LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cell lines against both the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of X radiation when present during exposure, but that its protection when administered after exposure was limited to the mutagenic effects in the radiation-hypersensitive cell line, LY-S1. The results indicate that the mechanisms involved differ in the protection against cytotoxic compared to mutagenic effects and in the protection against damage caused by accelerated (56)Fe ions compared to X radiation.

  7. Brain signaling and behavioral responses induced by exposure to (56)Fe-particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denisova, N. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that exposure to 56Fe-particle irradiation (1.5 Gy, 1 GeV) produced aging-like accelerations in neuronal and behavioral deficits. Astronauts on long-term space flights will be exposed to similar heavy-particle radiations that might have similar deleterious effects on neuronal signaling and cognitive behavior. Therefore, the present study evaluated whether radiation-induced spatial learning and memory behavioral deficits are associated with region-specific brain signaling deficits by measuring signaling molecules previously found to be essential for behavior [pre-synaptic vesicle proteins, synaptobrevin and synaptophysin, and protein kinases, calcium-dependent PRKCs (also known as PKCs) and PRKA (PRKA RIIbeta)]. The results demonstrated a significant radiation-induced increase in reference memory errors. The increases in reference memory errors were significantly negatively correlated with striatal synaptobrevin and frontal cortical synaptophysin expression. Both synaptophysin and synaptobrevin are synaptic vesicle proteins that are important in cognition. Striatal PRKA, a memory signaling molecule, was also significantly negatively correlated with reference memory errors. Overall, our findings suggest that radiation-induced pre-synaptic facilitation may contribute to some previously reported radiation-induced decrease in striatal dopamine release and for the disruption of the central dopaminergic system integrity and dopamine-mediated behavior.

  8. Brain signaling and behavioral responses induced by exposure to (56)Fe-particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denisova, N. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that exposure to 56Fe-particle irradiation (1.5 Gy, 1 GeV) produced aging-like accelerations in neuronal and behavioral deficits. Astronauts on long-term space flights will be exposed to similar heavy-particle radiations that might have similar deleterious effects on neuronal signaling and cognitive behavior. Therefore, the present study evaluated whether radiation-induced spatial learning and memory behavioral deficits are associated with region-specific brain signaling deficits by measuring signaling molecules previously found to be essential for behavior [pre-synaptic vesicle proteins, synaptobrevin and synaptophysin, and protein kinases, calcium-dependent PRKCs (also known as PKCs) and PRKA (PRKA RIIbeta)]. The results demonstrated a significant radiation-induced increase in reference memory errors. The increases in reference memory errors were significantly negatively correlated with striatal synaptobrevin and frontal cortical synaptophysin expression. Both synaptophysin and synaptobrevin are synaptic vesicle proteins that are important in cognition. Striatal PRKA, a memory signaling molecule, was also significantly negatively correlated with reference memory errors. Overall, our findings suggest that radiation-induced pre-synaptic facilitation may contribute to some previously reported radiation-induced decrease in striatal dopamine release and for the disruption of the central dopaminergic system integrity and dopamine-mediated behavior.

  9. Cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with accelerated 56Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, M.; Piao, C.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We examined cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with high-energy 56Fe ions. Cells were irradiated with graded doses of 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon) accelerated with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The survival curves for cells plated 1 h after irradiation (immediate plating) showed little or no shoulder. However, the survival curves for cells plated 24 h after irradiation (delayed plating) had a small initial shoulder. The RBE for 56Fe ions compared to 137Cs gamma rays was 1.99 for immediate plating and 2.73 for delayed plating at the D10. The repair ratio (delayed plating/immediate plating) was 1.67 for 137Cs gamma rays and 1.22 for 56Fe ions. The dose-response curves for initially measured and residual chromatid fragments detected by the Calyculin A-mediated premature chromosome condensation technique showed a linear response. The results indicated that the induction frequency for initially measured fragments was the same for 137Cs gamma rays and 56Fe ions. On the other hand, approximately 85% of the fragments induced by 137Cs gamma rays had rejoined after 24 h of postirradiation incubation; the corresponding amount for 56Fe ions was 37%. Furthermore, the frequency of chromatid exchanges induced by gamma rays measured 24 h after irradiation was higher than that induced by 56Fe ions. No difference in the amount of chromatid damage induced by the two types of radiations was detected when assayed 1 h after irradiation. The results suggest that high-energy 56Fe ions induce a higher frequency of complex, unrepairable damage at both the cellular and chromosomal levels than 137Cs gamma rays in the target cells for radiation-induced lung cancers.

  10. Cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with accelerated 56Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, M.; Piao, C.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We examined cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with high-energy 56Fe ions. Cells were irradiated with graded doses of 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon) accelerated with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The survival curves for cells plated 1 h after irradiation (immediate plating) showed little or no shoulder. However, the survival curves for cells plated 24 h after irradiation (delayed plating) had a small initial shoulder. The RBE for 56Fe ions compared to 137Cs gamma rays was 1.99 for immediate plating and 2.73 for delayed plating at the D10. The repair ratio (delayed plating/immediate plating) was 1.67 for 137Cs gamma rays and 1.22 for 56Fe ions. The dose-response curves for initially measured and residual chromatid fragments detected by the Calyculin A-mediated premature chromosome condensation technique showed a linear response. The results indicated that the induction frequency for initially measured fragments was the same for 137Cs gamma rays and 56Fe ions. On the other hand, approximately 85% of the fragments induced by 137Cs gamma rays had rejoined after 24 h of postirradiation incubation; the corresponding amount for 56Fe ions was 37%. Furthermore, the frequency of chromatid exchanges induced by gamma rays measured 24 h after irradiation was higher than that induced by 56Fe ions. No difference in the amount of chromatid damage induced by the two types of radiations was detected when assayed 1 h after irradiation. The results suggest that high-energy 56Fe ions induce a higher frequency of complex, unrepairable damage at both the cellular and chromosomal levels than 137Cs gamma rays in the target cells for radiation-induced lung cancers.

  11. Interaction Between Age and Exposure to 56Fe Particles on Behavior and Neurochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Carey, A. N.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    Previous research has shown that exposure to HZE particles and protons which will be encountered on long-term space missions can adversely affect the ability of rats to perform a variety of behavioral tasks This outcome has implications for an astronaut s ability to successfully complete requirements associated with these missions It has also been found that irradiation can lead to increases in oxidative stress similar to that seen in the aging brain Given that astronauts are often middle-aged or older it is important to determine if their age puts them at higher risk for the potentially hazardous effects of exposure to HZE particles Therefore we exposed young and old rats to either 1 or 2Gy of 56 Fe irradiation and evaluated performance in a spatial learning and memory task in addition to examining levels of dopamine DA release from superfused striatal slices Results indicated that exposure to 56 Fe particles can produce alterations in behavior and signaling and that these alterations may be more apparent in older organisms which suggests that the aging brain may be more susceptible to the deleterious effects of irradiation on performance Therefore age may be a factor for consideration in planning long-term missions into space Supported by NASA Grants NAG9-1190 and NAG9-1529

  12. Interaction between age and exposure to 56Fe particles on behavior and neurochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Amanda N.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Rabin, Bernard M.; Joseph, James A.

    Previous research has shown that exposure to HZE particles, which will be encountered on long-term space missions, can adversely affect the ability of rats to perform a variety of behavioral tasks. This outcome has implications for an astronaut’s ability to successfully complete requirements associated with these missions. It has also been found that irradiation can lead to increases in oxidative stress, similar to that seen in the aging brain. Given that astronauts are often middle-aged or older it is important to determine if their age puts them at higher risk for the potentially hazardous effects of exposure to HZE particles. Therefore, we exposed young and old rats to either 1 or 2 Gy of 56Fe irradiation and evaluated performance in a spatial learning and memory task, in addition to examining levels of dopamine (DA) release from superfused striatal slices. Results indicated that exposure to 56Fe particles can produce alterations in behavior and neuronal signaling and that these alterations may be more apparent in older organisms, a finding which suggests that the aging brain may be more susceptible to the deleterious effects of irradiation on performance. Therefore, age may be a factor for consideration in planning long-term missions into space.

  13. Cognitive differences between male and female rats following exposure to 56Fe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Bernard; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Luskin, Katharine; Long, Lauren; Joseph, James

    On exploratory class missions astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation (HZE particles) that are not experienced in low earth orbit. While it is likely that the crew will consist of both male and female astronauts, there has been little research on the effects of exposure to HZE particles on cognitive performance in female subjects. While previous research has shown that exposure to HZE particles disrupts cognitive performance in male rats it remains to be established whether or not similar effects will occur with female subjects because estrogen may act as a neuroprotectant. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were obtained from Taconic Farms. Thirty mm segments of silastic tubing containing either 180 pg l7-estradiol/mL in sesame oil or vehicle alone were implanted subcutaneously in the neck. Three days following surgery the rats were exposed to 56Fe particles (1000 MeV/n, 0-200 cGy) at the NSRL. Following irradiation the rats were shipped to UMBC for behavioral testing. The results indicated that the pattern of decrements in cognitive performance differed between male and female rats. In addition, for female rats, there were differences in performance as a function of the presence or absence of estradiol. In the vehicle implanted subjects exposure to 56Fe particles did not affect operant responding on an ascending fixed-ratio schedule; whereas irradiation did disrupt responding in OVX animals given estradiol. These results suggest that estrogen may not be protective following exposure to HZE particles. This research was supported by Grant NNX08AM66G from NASA.

  14. Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Neuroinflammation after Cranial Irradiation with 56Fe Particles

    PubMed Central

    Rola, Radoslaw; Fishman, Kelly; Baure, Jennifer; Rosi, Susanna; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Obenaus, Andre; Nelson, Gregory A.; Fike, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to heavy-ion radiation is considered a potential health risk in long-term space travel. In the central nervous system (CNS), loss of critical cellular components may lead to performance decrements that could ultimately compromise mission goals and long-term quality of life. Hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairments occur after exposure to ionizing radiation, and while the pathogenesis of this effect is not yet clear, it may involve the production of newly born neurons (neurogenesis) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We irradiated mice with 0.5–4 Gy of 56Fe ions and 2 months later quantified neurogenesis and numbers of activated microglia as a measure of neuroinflammation in the dentate gyrus. Results showed that there were few changes after 0.5 Gy, but that there was a dose-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis and a dose-related increase in numbers of newly born activated microglia from 0.5–4.0 Gy. While those findings were similar to what was reported after X irradiation, there were also some differences, particularly in the response of newly born glia. Overall, this study showed that hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to relatively low doses of 56Fe particles, and that those effects were associated with neuroinflammation. Whether these changes will result in functional impairments or if/how they can be managed are topics for further investigation. PMID:18494546

  15. Hippocampal neurogenesis and neuroinflammation after cranial irradiation with (56)Fe particles.

    PubMed

    Rola, Radoslaw; Fishman, Kelly; Baure, Jennifer; Rosi, Susanna; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Obenaus, Andre; Nelson, Gregory A; Fike, John R

    2008-06-01

    Exposure to heavy-ion radiation is considered a potential health risk in long-term space travel. In the central nervous system (CNS), loss of critical cellular components may lead to performance decrements that could ultimately compromise mission goals and long-term quality of life. Hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairments occur after exposure to ionizing radiation, and while the pathogenesis of this effect is not yet clear, it may involve the production of newly born neurons (neurogenesis) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We irradiated mice with 0.5-4 Gy of (56)Fe ions and 2 months later quantified neurogenesis and numbers of activated microglia as a measure of neuroinflammation in the dentate gyrus. Results showed that there were few changes after 0.5 Gy, but that there was a dose-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis and a dose-related increase in numbers of newly born activated microglia from 0.5-4.0 Gy. While those findings were similar to what was reported after X irradiation, there were also some differences, particularly in the response of newly born glia. Overall, this study showed that hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to relatively low doses of (56)Fe particles, and that those effects were associated with neuroinflammation. Whether these changes will result in functional impairments or if/how they can be managed are topics for further investigation.

  16. Changes in gene expression in the rat hippocampus following exposure to 56 fe particles and protection by berry diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles), such as 56Fe, enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts behavior, including spatial learning and memory. In the present study, we examined whether gene expression in the hippocampus, an area of the b...

  17. Effects of exposure to 56Fe particles or protons on fixed-ratio operant responding in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Buhler, Lynn L.; Joseph, James A.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Jenkins, Daniel G.

    2002-01-01

    On long-duration trips outside of the magnetosphere, astronauts will be exposed to protons and to heavy particles which can affect their performance of required tasks. It is essential to determine the range of behaviors that might be affected by exposure to these types of radiation in order to understand the nature of behavioral deficits and to develop effective countermeasures. The present experiment examined the ability of rats to make an operant response following exposure to protons (250 MeV, 4 Gy) or 56Fe particles (1 GeV/n, 1 or 2 Gy). Following irradiation, rats were trained to press a lever in order to obtain food reinforcement. They were then placed on an ascending fixed-ratio schedule from FR-1 (each lever press rewarded with a food pellet) through FR-35 (35 lever presses required for 1 food pellet). Rats exposed to 4 Gy of protons or 1 Gy of 56Fe particles responded similarly to controls, increasing their rate of responding as the ratio increased. However, rats exposed to 2 Gy of 56Fe particles failed to increase their rate of responding at ratios greater than FR-20, indicating that rats exposed to 2 Gy of 56Fe particles cannot respond appropriately to increasing work requirements.

  18. Effects of exposure to 56Fe particles or protons on fixed-ratio operant responding in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Buhler, Lynn L.; Joseph, James A.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Jenkins, Daniel G.

    2002-01-01

    On long-duration trips outside of the magnetosphere, astronauts will be exposed to protons and to heavy particles which can affect their performance of required tasks. It is essential to determine the range of behaviors that might be affected by exposure to these types of radiation in order to understand the nature of behavioral deficits and to develop effective countermeasures. The present experiment examined the ability of rats to make an operant response following exposure to protons (250 MeV, 4 Gy) or 56Fe particles (1 GeV/n, 1 or 2 Gy). Following irradiation, rats were trained to press a lever in order to obtain food reinforcement. They were then placed on an ascending fixed-ratio schedule from FR-1 (each lever press rewarded with a food pellet) through FR-35 (35 lever presses required for 1 food pellet). Rats exposed to 4 Gy of protons or 1 Gy of 56Fe particles responded similarly to controls, increasing their rate of responding as the ratio increased. However, rats exposed to 2 Gy of 56Fe particles failed to increase their rate of responding at ratios greater than FR-20, indicating that rats exposed to 2 Gy of 56Fe particles cannot respond appropriately to increasing work requirements.

  19. Neurochemical differences in learning and memory paradigms among rats supplemented with anthocyanin-rich blueberry diets and exposed to acute doses of 56Fe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulose, Shibu M.; Rabin, Bernard M.; Bielinski, Donna F.; Kelly, Megan E.; Miller, Marshall G.; Thanthaeng, Nopporn; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The protective effects of anthocyanin-rich blueberries (BB) on brain health are well documented and are particularly important under conditions of high oxidative stress, which can lead to ;accelerated aging.; One such scenario is exposure to space radiation, consisting of high-energy and -charge particles (HZE), which are known to cause cognitive dysfunction and deleterious neurochemical alterations. We recently tested the behavioral and neurochemical effects of acute exposure to HZE particles such as 56Fe, within 24-48 h after exposure, and found that radiation primarily affects memory and not learning. Importantly, we observed that specific brain regions failed to upregulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in response to this insult. To further examine these endogenous response mechanisms, we have supplemented young rats with diets rich in BB, which are known to contain high amounts of antioxidant-phytochemicals, prior to irradiation. Exposure to 56Fe caused significant neurochemical changes in hippocampus and frontal cortex, the two critical regions of the brain involved in cognitive function. BB supplementation significantly attenuated protein carbonylation, which was significantly increased by exposure to 56Fe in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Moreover, BB supplementation significantly reduced radiation-induced elevations in NADPH-oxidoreductase-2 (NOX2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and upregulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Overall results indicate that 56Fe particles may induce their toxic effects on hippocampus and frontal cortex by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overload, which can cause alterations in the neuronal environment, eventually leading to hippocampal neuronal death and subsequent impairment of cognitive function. Blueberry supplementation provides an effective preventative measure to reduce the ROS load on the CNS in an event of acute HZE exposure.

  20. Neurochemical differences in learning and memory paradigms among rats supplemented with anthocyanin-rich blueberry diets and exposed to acute doses of (56)Fe particles.

    PubMed

    Poulose, Shibu M; Rabin, Bernard M; Bielinski, Donna F; Kelly, Megan E; Miller, Marshall G; Thanthaeng, Nopporn; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The protective effects of anthocyanin-rich blueberries (BB) on brain health are well documented and are particularly important under conditions of high oxidative stress, which can lead to "accelerated aging." One such scenario is exposure to space radiation, consisting of high-energy and -charge particles (HZE), which are known to cause cognitive dysfunction and deleterious neurochemical alterations. We recently tested the behavioral and neurochemical effects of acute exposure to HZE particles such as (56)Fe, within 24-48h after exposure, and found that radiation primarily affects memory and not learning. Importantly, we observed that specific brain regions failed to upregulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in response to this insult. To further examine these endogenous response mechanisms, we have supplemented young rats with diets rich in BB, which are known to contain high amounts of antioxidant-phytochemicals, prior to irradiation. Exposure to (56)Fe caused significant neurochemical changes in hippocampus and frontal cortex, the two critical regions of the brain involved in cognitive function. BB supplementation significantly attenuated protein carbonylation, which was significantly increased by exposure to (56)Fe in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Moreover, BB supplementation significantly reduced radiation-induced elevations in NADPH-oxidoreductase-2 (NOX2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and upregulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Overall results indicate that (56)Fe particles may induce their toxic effects on hippocampus and frontal cortex by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overload, which can cause alterations in the neuronal environment, eventually leading to hippocampal neuronal death and subsequent impairment of cognitive function. Blueberry supplementation provides an effective preventative measure to reduce the ROS load on the CNS in an event of acute HZE exposure.

  1. Changes in Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Following Exposure to 56Fe Particles and Protection by Berry Diets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Lau, Francis; Carey, Amanda; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Rabin, Bernard; Joseph, James

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles), such as 56 Fe, enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts the functioning of the dopaminergic system and behaviors mediated by this system in a manner similar to that seen in aged animals. Behaviors affected by radiation include deficits in motor performance, spatial learning and memory behavior, amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion learning, conditioned place preference, and operant conditioning. Berry fruit diets are high in antioxidant and antiinflammatory activity, and prevent the occurrence of the neurochemical and behavioral changes that occur in aging and by exposure to 56 Fe particles. In the present study, we examined whether gene expression in the hippocampus, an area of the brain important in memory, is affected by exposure to 56 Fe particles 36 hours post-irradiation. We also evaluated whether the blueberry (BB) and strawberry (SB) diets could ameliorate irradiation-induced deficits in gene expression by maintaining rats on these diets or a control diet for 8 weeks prior to being exposed to radiation. Therefore, to measure gene expression, 4 rats/group were euthanized 36 hours post whole-body irradiation with 1.5 Gy or 2.5 Gy of 1 GeV/n high-energy 56 Fe particles. Alterations in gene expression profile induced by radiation were analyzed by pathway-focused microarrays on the inflammatory cytokines and genes involved in NF-κB signal transduction pathways. For the diet studies, 3 rats/group were irradiated with 2.5 Gy of 56 Fe following 8 weeks supplementation with either the 2% BB or the 2% SB diet. We found that genes that directly or indirectly interact in the regulation of growth and differentiation of neurons were changed following irradiation. Genes that regulate apoptosis were up-regulated whereas genes that modulate cellular proliferation were down-regulated, possibly to eliminate damaged cells and to stop cell proliferation to prevent

  2. Effects of exposure to 56Fe particles on the acquisition of a conditioned place preference in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Joseph, J. A.; Denissova, N.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to low doses of 56Fe particles produces changes in neural function and behavior. The present experiments were designed to examine the effects of irradiation on the acquisition of a dopamine-mediated conditioned place preference (CPP). In the CPP procedure, rats are given an injection of the dopamine agonist amphetamine in one distinctive compartment and a saline injection in a different compartment of a three-compartment apparatus. Control rats develop a preference for the amphetamine-paired compartment. In contrast, rats exposed to 1 Gy of 56Fe particles fail to develop a similar preference. The results of the experiment indicate that exposure to low doses of heavy particles can disrupt the neural mechanisms that mediate the reinforcement of behavior.

  3. 56Fe accelerates development of atherosclerosis in apoE -/-mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Yu, Tao; Parks, Brian; Yu, Shaohua; Srivastava, Roshni; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Khaled, Saman; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz

    Exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. For example, for women with early breast cancer, the benefit of radiotherapy can be nearly offset by the increased risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Head and neck cancer patients who undergo radiation treatment are at significantly elevated risk of stroke, even in a relatively young patient population that would not normally be at risk for atheroscle-rosis. Similarly, atomic bomb survivors had an increased incidence of mortality from coronary artery disease and stroke. Even radiation technologists working before 1950 (when occupational exposure was higher) had increased mortality due to circulatory diseases. Although much is known about the cardiovascular consequences these exposures to X-raus and gamma radiation, the response to the type of radiation likely to be encountered in prolonged space flight has not been determined. A key component of this cosmic radiation is 56Fe, which is particularly damaging to tissues. Using collimated beams, we selectively irradiated aortic arches and carotids (only) of the well-established apoE -/-atherosclerosis mouse model to test directly whether 56Fe exposure is a cardiovascular risk factor. Mice were sacrificed at 13 weeks post-irradiation and dissected, and aortas were divided into areas that had been targeted by the ion beam and those that were not. The area that was covered by plaques was then quantified. Plaque area at 13 weeks post-irradiation was significantly greater in targeted areas of mice that had received 5 Gy of 56Fe as compared to age-and sex-matched un-irradiated controls. In the carotid arteries and aortic roots, significantly greater atherosclerosis was apparent for a 2Gy exposure as well (the lowest dose tested). This demonstrates that even a single exposure to heavy ion radiation is capable of triggering events that culminate in cardiovascular disease, even long after the exposure has

  4. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning.

  5. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2003-01-01

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0 Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2003-01-01

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0 Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exposure to 56Fe irradiation accelerates normal brain aging and produces deficits in spatial learning and memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Casadesus, Gemma; Carey, Amanda N.; Rabin, Bernard M.; Joseph, James A.

    Previous studies have shown that radiation exposure, particularly to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles) such as 56Fe, produces deficits in spatial learning and memory. These adverse behavioral effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. It is possible that these shared effects may be produced by the same mechanism. For example, an increased release of reactive oxygen species, and the subsequent oxidative stress and inflammatory damage caused to the central nervous system, is likely responsible for the deficits seen in aging and following irradiation. Therefore, dietary antioxidants, such as those found in fruits and vegetables, could be used as countermeasures to prevent the behavioral changes seen in these conditions. Both aged and irradiated rats display cognitive impairment in tests of spatial learning and memory such as the Morris water maze and the radial arm maze. These rats have decrements in the ability to build spatial representations of the environment, and they utilize non-spatial strategies to solve tasks. Furthermore, they show a lack of spatial preference, due to a decline in the ability to process or retain place (position of a goal with reference to a “map” provided by the configuration of numerous cues in the environment) information. These declines in spatial memory occur in measures dependent on both reference and working memory, and in the flexibility to reset mental images. These results show that irradiation with 56Fe high-energy particles produces age-like decrements in cognitive behavior that may impair the ability of astronauts, particularly middle-aged ones, to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere.

  8. Age/Radiation Parallels in the Effects of 56Fe Particle Irradiation and Protection by Berry Diets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, James; Bielinski, Donna; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Rabin, Bernard; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    Exposing young rats to particles of high-energy and charge (HZE particles) enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts the functioning of the dopaminergic system and behaviors mediated by this system in a manner similar to that seen in aged animals Previous research has shown that diets supplemented with 2% blueberry or strawberry extracts have the ability to retard and even reverse age-related deficits in behavior and signal transduction in rats, perhaps due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. A subsequent study has shown that whole-body irradiation with 1.5 Gy of 1 GeV/n high-energy 56 Fe particles impaired performance in the Morris water maze and measures of dopamine release one month following radiation; these deficits were protected by the antioxidant diets. The strawberry diet offered better protection against spatial deficits in the maze because strawberry-fed animals were better able to retain place information, while the blueberry-supplemented animals showed enhanced learning that was dependent on striatal functioning. Additional experiments in cell models to examine possible mechanisms involved in these beneficial effects have shown that, in addition to the well known free radical scavenging effects of berries, it appears that berry fruit can directly reduce stress signaling and enhance protective signals, suggesting the involvement of multiple mechanisms in the beneficial effects observed. Enhancements of "protective" signals (e.g., extracellular signal regulated kinase, ERK) include those that are involved in neuronal communication, neurogenesis, and learning and memory. Reductions in stress signaling include inhibiting nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cytokines, among others, induced by oxidative and inflammatory stressors. We have found these changes in both BV2 mouse microglial and hippocampal cells. We believe that the possible addition of colorful fruits such as berry fruits to the diet can possibly

  9. Exposure to 56Fe Particles Produces Deficits in Spatial Learning and Memory in the Radial Arm Water Maze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Miller, Marshall; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Rabin, Bernard; Joseph, James

    Previous research has shown that radiation exposure, particularly to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles) which will be encountered on long-term space missions, can adversely affect the ability of rats to perform a variety of behavioral tasks. This outcome has implications for an astronaut's ability to successfully complete requirements associated with these missions. Both aged and irradiated rats display cognitive impairment in tests of spatial learning and memory such as the Morris water maze and the radial arm maze. Therefore, in the present study, we used a combination of these two tests, the 8 arm radial water maze (RAWM), to measure spatial learning in rats which were irradiated at the NSRL with 0, 150cGy, or 200cGy of 56Fe radiation. Following irradiation the rats were shipped to the HNRCA and tested in the RAWM (2-3 months later) for 5 days, 3 trials/day. In this version of the RAWM, there were 4 hidden platforms that the rat needed to locate to successfully solve a trial. Once the rat located a platform, it was allowed to remain there for 15 sec before the platform sank, at which point the rat tried to locate the remaining ones. Reference (entering an arm that never contained the platform) and working (re-entering an arm in which the platform had already been found) memory errors were tabulated. Results showed that the irradiated rats had more reference and working memory errors while learning the maze, particularly on Day 3 of testing. Additionally, they utilized non-spatial strategies to solve the RAWM task whereas the control animals used spatial strategies. These results show that irradiation with 56Fe high-energy particles produces age-like decrements in cognitive behavior that may impair the ability of astronauts to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere. Supported by USDA Intramural and N.A.S.A. Grant NNX08AM66G

  10. Diverse delayed effects in human lymphoblastoid cells surviving exposure to high-LET (56)Fe particles or low-LET (137)Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Ricanati, M.; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain information on the origin of radiation-induced genomic instability, we characterized a total of 166 clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles or (137)Cs gamma radiation, isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure, along with their respective control clones. Cytogenetic aberrations, growth alterations, responses to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and thymidine kinase loci were determined. A greater percentage of clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited instability (defined as clones showing one or more outlying characteristics) than in the case of those that survived gamma irradiation. The phenotypes of the unstable clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles were also qualitatively different from those of the clones that survived gamma irradiation. A greater percentage (20%) of the unstable clones that survived gamma irradiation than those that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles (4%) showed an altered response to the second irradiation, while an increase in the percentage of clones that had an outlying frequency of ouabain-resistant and thymidine kinase mutants was more evident in the clones exposed to (56)Fe particles than in those exposed to gamma rays. Growth alterations and increases in dicentric chromosomes were found only in clones with more than one alteration. These results underscore the complex nature of genomic instability and the likelihood that radiation-induced genomic instability arises from different original events.

  11. Diverse delayed effects in human lymphoblastoid cells surviving exposure to high-LET (56)Fe particles or low-LET (137)Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Ricanati, M.; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain information on the origin of radiation-induced genomic instability, we characterized a total of 166 clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles or (137)Cs gamma radiation, isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure, along with their respective control clones. Cytogenetic aberrations, growth alterations, responses to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and thymidine kinase loci were determined. A greater percentage of clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited instability (defined as clones showing one or more outlying characteristics) than in the case of those that survived gamma irradiation. The phenotypes of the unstable clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles were also qualitatively different from those of the clones that survived gamma irradiation. A greater percentage (20%) of the unstable clones that survived gamma irradiation than those that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles (4%) showed an altered response to the second irradiation, while an increase in the percentage of clones that had an outlying frequency of ouabain-resistant and thymidine kinase mutants was more evident in the clones exposed to (56)Fe particles than in those exposed to gamma rays. Growth alterations and increases in dicentric chromosomes were found only in clones with more than one alteration. These results underscore the complex nature of genomic instability and the likelihood that radiation-induced genomic instability arises from different original events.

  12. Elevated plus-maze performance of Fischer-344 rats as a function of age and of exposure to 56Fe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty L.; Carey, Amanda N.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Joseph, James A.; Foster, Brian C.

    The aging process is characterized by a series of changes in neurochemical functioning and in motor and cognitive performance. In addition to changes in cognitive/behavioral performance, aged rats also show an increase in baseline anxiety measured using the elevated plus-maze. Exposure to 56Fe particles, a component of cosmic rays, produces neurochemical and behavioral changes in young animals which are characteristic of aged organisms. The present study was designed to determine the relationships between aging and exposure to 56Fe particles on anxiety. Fischer-344 (F-344), which were 2, 7, 12, and 16 months of age at the time of irradiation, were exposed to 56Fe particles (50 200 cGy). Concordant with previous results, the oldest rats spent less time exploring the open arms of the maze. Exposure to 56Fe particles also produced decreased exploration of the open arms of the plus-maze. The dose needed to produce increased levels of anxiety was a function of age at the time of irradiation. The dose of 56Fe particles needed to produce a decrease in open arm exploration was significantly lower in the rats that were irradiated at 7 and 12 months of age than in the rats irradiated at 2 months of age. These results suggest the possibility that exposing middle-aged astronauts to cosmic rays during exploratory class missions outside the magnetosphere, and the resultant effects on exploration-induced anxiety, may affect their ability to successfully complete mission requirements.

  13. Neuronal stress following exposure to 56Fe particles and the effects of antioxidant-rich diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles), a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays, enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts the functioning of neuronal communication in critical regions of the brain, similar to those seen in aging....

  14. Protective effects of blueberry and strawberry diets on neuronal stress following exposure to 56Fe particles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles), which are abundant outside the magnetic field of the earth, have been shown to disrupt the functioning of neuronal communication in critical regions of the brain. Previous studies have shown that irradiation produces enhanced indices of oxidative ...

  15. Neuronal stress following exposure to 56Fe particles and the effects of antioxidant-rich diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles), a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays, enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts the functioning of neuronal communication in critical regions of the brain. These changes in neuronal funct...

  16. Acute effects of exposure to 56Fe and 16O particles on learning and memory

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although it has been shown that exposure to HZE particles disrupts cognitive performance when tested 2-4 weeks after irradiation, it has not been determined whether exposure to HZE particles can exert acute effects on cognitive performance; i.e., effects within 4-48 hrs after exposure. The present ...

  17. [Effect of accelerated heavy ions of carbon 12C, neon 20Ne and iron 56Fe on the chromosomal apparatus of human blood lymphocytes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Repina, L A

    2011-01-01

    Cytogenetic assay of the chromosomal apparatus of human blood lymphocytes was carried out after in vitro irradiation by heavy charged particles with high LET values. Blood plasm samples enriched with lymphocytes were irradiated by accelerated ions of carbon 12C (290 MeV/nucleon and LET = 70 keV/microm), neon 20Ne (400 MeV/nucleon and LET = 70 keV/microm), and iron 56Fe (500 MeV/nucleon and LET = 200 keV/microm) in the dose range from 0.25 to 1 Gy. Rate of chromosome aberrations showed a linear dependence on doses from the densely ionizing radiations with high LET values. Frequency of dicentrics and centric rings in human lymphocytes irradiated by 12C with the energy of 290 MeV/nucleon was maximal at 1 Gy (p < 0.05) relative to the other heavy particles. It was found that relative biological effectiveness of heavy nuclei is several times higher than of 60Co gamma-radiation throughout the range of doses in this investigation.

  18. 56Fe Particle Exposure Results in a Long-Lasting Increase in a Cellular Index of Genomic Instability and Transiently Suppresses Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z.; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-01-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24h), intermediate (7d), and/or long time points (2–3mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support

  19. 56Fe particle exposure results in a long-lasting increase in a cellular index of genomic instability and transiently suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z.; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal R.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-07-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24 h), intermediate (7 d), and/or long time points (2-3 mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support

  20. Acute and fractionated exposure to high-LET (56)Fe HZE-particle radiation both result in similar long-term deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Phillip D; Shih, Hung-Ying; Leblanc, Junie A; Cole, Mara G; Amaral, Wellington Z; Mukherjee, Shibani; Zhang, Shichuan; Lucero, Melanie J; Decarolis, Nathan A; Chen, Benjamin P C; Eisch, Amelia J

    2013-12-01

    Astronauts on multi-year interplanetary missions will be exposed to a low, chronic dose of high-energy, high-charge particles. Studies in rodents show acute, nonfractionated exposure to these particles causes brain changes such as fewer adult-generated hippocampal neurons and stem cells that may be detrimental to cognition and mood regulation and thus compromise mission success. However, the influence of a low, chronic dose of these particles on neurogenesis and stem cells is unknown. To examine the influence of galactic cosmic radiation on neurogenesis, adult-generated stem and progenitor cells in Nestin-CreER(T2)/R26R-YFP transgenic mice were inducibly labeled to allow fate tracking. Mice were then sham exposed or given one acute 100 cGy (56)Fe-particle exposure or five fractionated 20 cGy (56)Fe-particle exposures. Adult-generated hippocampal neurons and stem cells were quantified 24 h or 3 months later. Both acute and fractionated exposure decreased the amount of proliferating cells and immature neurons relative to sham exposure. Unexpectedly, neither acute nor fractionated exposure decreased the number of adult neural stem cells relative to sham expsoure. Our findings show that single and fractionated exposures of (56)Fe-particle irradiation are similarly detrimental to adult-generated neurons. Implications for future missions and ground-based studies in space radiation are discussed.

  1. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  2. Exposure to Mission Relevant Doses of 1 GeV/Nucleon 56Fe Particles Leads to Impairment of Attentional Set-Shifting Performance in Socially Mature Rats

    PubMed Central

    Britten, Richard A.; Davis, Leslie K.; Jewell, Jessica S.; Miller, Vania D.; Hadley, Melissa M.; Sanford, Larry D.; Machida, Mayumi; Lonart, György

    2014-01-01

    Previous ground-based experiments have shown that cranial irradiation with mission relevant (20 cGy) doses of 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe particles leads to a significant impairment in Attentional Set Shifting (ATSET) performance, a measure of executive function, in juvenile Wistar rats. However, the use of head only radiation exposure and the biological age of the rats used in that study may not be pertinent to determine the likelihood that ATSET will be impaired in Astronauts on deep space flights. In this study we have determined the impact that whole-body exposure to 10, 15 and 20 cGy of 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe particles had on the ability (at three months post exposure) of socially mature (retired breeder) Wistar rats to conduct the attentional set-shifting paradigm. The current study has established that whole-body exposures to 15 and 20 (but not 10) cGy of 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe particles results in the impairment of ATSET in both juvenile and socially mature rats. However, the exact nature of the impaired ATSET performance varied depending upon the age of the rats, whether whole-body versus cranial irradiation was used and the dose of 1 GeV/u 56Fe received. Exposure of juvenile rats to 20 cGy of 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe particles led to a decreased ability to perform intra-dimensional shifting (IDS) irrespective of whether the rats received head only or whole-body exposures. Juvenile rats that received whole-body exposure also had a reduced ability to habituate to the assay and to complete intra-dimensional shifting reversal (IDR), whereas juvenile rats that received head only exposure had a reduced ability to complete compound discrimination reversal (CDR). Socially mature rats that received whole-body exposures to 10 cGy of 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe particles exhibited no obvious decline in set-shifting performance; however those exposed to 15 and 20 cGy had a reduced ability to perform simple discrimination (SD) and compound discrimination (CD). Exposure to 20 cGy of 1 GeV/nucleon 56

  3. Impaired Spatial Memory Performance in Adult Wistar Rats Exposed to Low (5-20 cGy) Doses of 1 GeV/n (56)Fe Particles.

    PubMed

    Britten, Richard A; Jewell, Jessica S; Miller, Vania D; Davis, Leslie K; Hadley, Melissa M; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    Prolonged deep space missions to planets and asteroids will expose astronauts to galactic cosmic radiation, comprised of low-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiations, high-energy protons and high-Z and energy (HZE) particles, such as (56)Fe nuclei. In prior studies with rodents exposed to HZE particle radiation at doses likely to be encountered during deep space missions (<20 cGy) investigators reported impaired hippocampal-dependent neurocognitive performance and further observed substantial variation among the irradiated animals in neurocognitive impairment, ranging from no observable effects to severe impairment. These findings point to the importance of incorporating quantitative measures of interindividual variations into next generation risk assessment models of radiation risks on neurocognition. In this study, 269 male proven breeder Wistar rats were exposed to 1 GeV/n (56)Fe at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 cGy, and tested for spatial memory performance on the Barnes maze at three months after exposure. The radiation response data were compared using changes in mean cohort performance and by the proportion of poor responders using the performance benchmark of two standard deviations below the mean value among the sham-irradiated cohort. Acute exposures to mission-relevant doses of 1 GeV/n (56)Fe reduced the mean spatial memory performance at three months after exposure (P < 0.002) and increased the proportions of poor performers, 2- to 3-fold. However, a substantial fraction of animals in all exposure cohorts showed no detectable change in performance, compared to the distribution of sham-irradiated animals. Our findings suggest that individualized metrics of susceptibility or resistance to radiation-induce changes in neurocognitive performance will be advantageous to the development of probabilistic risk assessment models for HZE-induced neurocognitive impairment.

  4. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  5. Accelerated heavy ions and the lens. IV. Biomicroscopic and cytopathological analyses of the lenses of mice irradiated with 600 MeV/amu sup 56 Fe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Worgul, B.V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E. )

    1989-11-01

    The lenses of mice exposed to 600 MeV/amu iron ions were evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and cytopathological analyses. The doses ranged from 0.05 to 1.6 Gy, and the lenses were assessed at several intervals postirradiation. Cataract, the development of which is dependent on both time and dose, is significantly more advanced in all of the exposed mice when compared to the unirradiated controls. The great difference between the severity of the cataracts caused by 0.05 Gy (the lowest dose used) and those that developed spontaneously in the control animals is an indication that 0.05 Gy may far exceed the threshold dose for the production of cataracts by accelerated iron ions. Cytopathologically, a similar dose dependence was observed for a number of end points including micronucleation, interphase death, and meridional row disorganization. In addition the exposure to the 56Fe ions produced a long-term effect on the mitotic population and a pronounced focal loss of epithelial cytoarchitecture. The microscopic changes support the view that the mechanism of heavy-ion-induced cataractogenesis is the same as that for cataracts caused by low-LET radiation.

  6. Thermodynamical Properties of 56Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Tavukcu, E; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garrett, P E; Guttormsen, M; Mitchell, G E; Rekstad, J; Schiller, A; Siem, S; Voinov, A; Younes, W

    2002-08-30

    Average nuclear level densities close to the nuclear binding energy in {sup 56}Fe and {sup 57}Fe are extracted from primary {gamma}-ray spectra. Thermal properties of {sup 56}Fe are studied within the statistical canonical ensemble. The experimental heat capacity is compared with the theoretical heat capacity calculated within the shell model Monte Carlo approach.

  7. Effects of 17Beta-estradiol on cognitive performance of ovariectomized female rats exposed to 56Fe particles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    On exploratory class missions to other planets astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation (HZE particles) that are not experienced in low earth orbit. While it is likely that the crew will consist of both male and female astronauts, there has been little research on the effects of ...

  8. Precision Cross Sections Measurement of 56Fe(n,n γ) at 14.1 MeV using Associated Particle Neutron Elemental Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Koltick, David

    2017-01-01

    Integral production cross sections for 846.8 keV and 1238.3 keV prompt gamma rays from 14.1 MeV neutrons interactions on 56Fe and are reported, using Associated Particle Neutron Elemental Imaging technique. The experimental technique involves: (1) The development of a VME standard high speed DAQ system and a MATLAB parallel cluster for offline signal analysis with full control of data flow; (2) The advantage of the <1.5 ns coincidence timing resolution between the neutron production and the gamma ray detection to reject noise; (3) A large 30% solid angle gamma ray coverage by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors. The neutron flux is measured through detecting the associated alpha-particle from the D-T fusion reaction in the neutron generator. Present cross section measurements using other techniques with limited timing resolution and solid angle coverage are in agreement at neutron energies lower than 6 MeV. At higher neutron energies reported results can disagree by more than 20%. This more accurate technique presented can distinguish between the differences in the reported results based on pulse-mode neutron source and neutron time-of-flight techniques, at higher neutron energies.

  9. Low (20 cGy) doses of 1 GeV/u (56)Fe--particle radiation lead to a persistent reduction in the spatial learning ability of rats.

    PubMed

    Britten, Richard A; Davis, Leslie K; Johnson, Angela M; Keeney, Sonia; Siegel, Andrew; Sanford, Larry D; Singletary, Sylvia J; Lonart, György

    2012-02-01

    Exposure to galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is considered to be a potential health risk in long-term space travel, and it represents a significant risk to the central nervous system (CNS). The most harmful component of GCR is the HZE [high-mass, highly charged (Z), high-energy] particles, e.g. (56)Fe. In previous ground-based experiments, exposure to high doses of HZE-particle radiation induced pronounced deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in rodents. Recent data suggest that glutamatergic transmission in hippocampal synaptosomes is impaired after low (60 cGy) doses of 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles, which could lead to impairment of hippocampus-dependent spatial memory. To assess the effects of mission-relevant (20-60 cGy) doses of 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles on hippocampus-dependent spatial memory, male Wistar rats either received sham treatment or were irradiated and tested 3 months later in the Barnes maze test. Compared to the controls, rats that received 20, 40 and 60 cGy 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles showed significant impairments in their ability to locate the escape box in the Barnes maze, which was manifested by progressively increasing escape latency times over the 3 days of testing. However, this increase was not due to a lack of motivation of the rats to escape, because the total number of head pokes (and especially incorrect head pokes) remained constant over the test period. Given that rats exposed to X rays did not exhibit spatial memory impairments until >10 Gy was delivered, the RBE for 1 GeV/u (56)Fe-particle-induced hippocampal spatial memory impairment is ∼50. These data demonstrate that mission-relevant doses of 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles can result in severe deficits in hippocampus-dependent neurocognitive tasks, and the extreme sensitivity of these processes to 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles must arise due to the perturbation of multiple processes in addition to killing neuronal cells.

  10. Reductions of {sup 56}Fe heavy-particle irradiation-induced deficits in striatal muscarinic receptor sensitivity by selective cross-activation/inhibition of second-messenger systems

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, J.A.; Villalobos-Molina, R.; Rabin, B.M.; Dalton, T.K.; Harris, A.; Kandasamy, S.

    1994-07-01

    Recent experiments have revealed radiation-induced losses of sensitivity of rodent neostriatal muscarinic receptors to stimulation by cholinergic agonists that appears as reduction in oxotremorine enhancement of K{sup +}-evoked dopamine release. These losses were postulated to be the result of radiation-induced alterations early in phosphoinositide-mediated signal transduction. Additional findings indicated that if the ligand-receptor-G protein interface was bypassed no radiation deficits were seen. In the present study, radiation-induced deficits in K{sup +}-evoked dopamine release were examined in perifused striatal tissue obtained from rats exposed to 0,0.1 or 1.0 Gy of {sup 56}Fe particles. Results showed that these deficits could be reduced by co-applying combinations of various pharmacological agents that were known to have differential effects on various second messengers such as 1,4,5-inositoltrisphosphate (IP{sub 3}). Combinations included oxotremorine-carbachol, and either oxotremorine or carbachol with arginine vasopressin or arachidonic acid. These results are discussed in terms of putative radiation-induced changes in receptor-containing membranes which alter receptor-G protein coupling/uncoupling. 49 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  12. Piezoelectric particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Kemp, Mark A.; Jongewaard, Erik N.; Haase, Andrew A.; Franzi, Matthew

    2017-08-29

    A particle accelerator is provided that includes a piezoelectric accelerator element, where the piezoelectric accelerator element includes a hollow cylindrical shape, and an input transducer, where the input transducer is disposed to provide an input signal to the piezoelectric accelerator element, where the input signal induces a mechanical excitation of the piezoelectric accelerator element, where the mechanical excitation is capable of generating a piezoelectric electric field proximal to an axis of the cylindrical shape, where the piezoelectric accelerator is configured to accelerate a charged particle longitudinally along the axis of the cylindrical shape according to the piezoelectric electric field.

  13. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  14. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  15. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  16. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  17. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  18. Neurochemical differences in learning and memory paradigms among rats supplemented with anthocyanin-rich blueberry diets and exposed to acute doses of 56Fe particles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The protective effects of anthocyanin-rich blueberries (BB) on brain health are well documented and are particularly important under conditions of high oxidative stress, which can lead to “accelerated aging.” One such scenario is exposure to space radiation, consisting of high-energy and -charge par...

  19. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  20. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  1. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  2. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  3. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  4. The response of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter to 56-Fe particles from 200-1000 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Gersey, Bradford B.; Borak, Thomas B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.; Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Murakami, T.; Iwata, Y.

    2001-09-04

    The radiation environment aboard the space shuttle and the International Space Station includes high-Z and high-energy (HZE) particles that are part of the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) spectrum. Iron-56 is considered to be one of the most biologically important parts of the GCR spectrum. Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used as active dosimeters on manned space flights. These TEPC's are further used to determine average quality factor for each space mission. A TEPC simulating a 1 micron diameter sphere of tissue was exposed as part of a particle spectrometer to iron-56 at energies from 200-1000 MeV/nucleon. The response of TEPC in terms of frequency-averaged lineal energy, dose-averaged lineal energy, as well as energy deposited at different impact parameters through detector was determined for six different incident energies of iron-56 in this energy range. Calculations determined that charged particle equilibrium was achieved for each of the six experiments. Energy depositions at different impact parameters were calculated using a radial dose distribution model and the results compared to experimental data.

  5. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  6. Performance in hippocampus- and PFC-dependent cognitive domains are not concomitantly impaired in rats exposed to 20 cGy of 1 GeV/n 56Fe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, Richard A.; Miller, Vania D.; Hadley, Melissa M.; Jewell, Jessica S.; Macadat, Evangeline

    2016-08-01

    NASA is currently conducting ground based experiments to determine whether the radiation environment that astronauts will encounter on deep space missions will have an impact on their long-term health and their ability to complete the various tasks during the mission. Emerging data suggest that exposure of rodents to mission-relevant HZE radiation doses does result in the impairment of various neurocognitive processes. An essential part of mission planning is a probabilistic risk assessment process that takes into account the likely incidence and severity of a problem. To date few studies have reported the impact of space radiation in a format that is amenable to PRA, and those that have only reported data for a single cognitive process. This study has established the ability of individual male Wistar rats to conduct a hippocampus-dependent (spatial memory) task and a cortex-dependent (attentional set shifting task) 90 days after exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n 56Fe particles. Radiation-induced impairment of performance in one cognitive domain was not consistently associated with impaired performance in the other domain. Thus sole reliance upon a single measure of cognitive performance may substantially under-estimate the risk of cognitive impairment, and ultimately it may be necessary to establish the likelihood that mission-relevant HZE doses will impair performance in the three or four cognitive domains that NASA considers to be most critical for mission success, and build a PRA using the composite data from such studies.

  7. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  8. Particle Accelerator Focus Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, José; Rocha, Jorge; Redondo, Luís; Cruz, João

    2017-08-01

    The Laboratório de Aceleradores e Tecnologias de Radiação (LATR) at the Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, of Instituto Superior Técnico (IST) has a horizontal electrostatic particle accelerator based on the Van de Graaff machine which is used for research in the area of material characterization. This machine produces alfa (He+) and proton (H+) beams of some μA currents up to 2 MeV/q energies. Beam focusing is obtained using a cylindrical lens of the Einzel type, assembled near the high voltage terminal. This paper describes the developed system that automatically focuses the ion beam, using a personal computer running the LabVIEW software, a multifunction input/output board and signal conditioning circuits. The focusing procedure consists of a scanning method to find the lens bias voltage which maximizes the beam current measured on a beam stopper target, which is used as feedback for the scanning cycle. This system, as part of a wider start up and shut down automation system built for this particle accelerator, brings great advantages to the operation of the accelerator by turning it faster and easier to operate, requiring less human presence, and adding the possibility of total remote control in safe conditions.

  9. Cognitive deficits induced by 56Fe radiation exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Casadesus, G.; Cantuti-Castelvetri, I.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Exposing rats to particles of high energy and charge (e.g., 56Fe) disrupts neuronal systems and the behaviors mediated by them; these adverse behavioral and neuronal effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. Because cognition declines with age, and our previous study showed that radiation disrupted Morris water maze spatial learning and memory performance, the present study used an 8-arm radial maze (RAM) to further test the cognitive behavioral consequences of radiation exposure. Control rats or rats exposed to whole-body irradiation with 1.0 Gy of 1 GeV/n high-energy 56Fe particles (delivered at the alternating gradient synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory) were tested nine months following exposure. Radiation adversely affected RAM performance, and the changes seen parallel those of aging. Irradiated animals entered baited arms during the first 4 choices significantly less than did controls, produced their first error sooner, and also tended to make more errors as measured by re-entries into non-baited arms. These results show that irradiation with high-energy particles produces age-like decrements in cognitive behavior that may impair the ability of astronauts to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  10. Cognitive deficits induced by 56Fe radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Casadesus, G.; Cantuti-Castelvetri, I.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    Exposing rats to particles of high energy and charge (e.g., 56Fe) disrupts neuronal systems and the behaviors mediated by them; these adverse behavioral and neuronal effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. Because cognition declines with age, and our previous study showed that radiation disrupted Morris water maze spatial learning and memory performance, the present study used an 8-arm radial maze (RAM) to further test the cognitive behavioral consequences of radiation exposure. Control rats or rats exposed to whole-body irradiation with 1.0 Gy of 1 GeV/n high-energy 56Fe particles (delivered at the alternating gradient synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory) were tested nine months following exposure. Radiation adversely affected RAM performance, and the changes seen parallel those of aging. Irradiated animals entered baited arms during the first 4 choices significantly less than did controls, produced their first error sooner, and also tended to make more errors as measured by re-entries into non-baited arms. These results show that irradiation with high-energy particles produces age-like decrements in cognitive behavior that may impair the ability of astronauts to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere.

  11. Cognitive deficits induced by 56Fe radiation exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Casadesus, G.; Cantuti-Castelvetri, I.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Exposing rats to particles of high energy and charge (e.g., 56Fe) disrupts neuronal systems and the behaviors mediated by them; these adverse behavioral and neuronal effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. Because cognition declines with age, and our previous study showed that radiation disrupted Morris water maze spatial learning and memory performance, the present study used an 8-arm radial maze (RAM) to further test the cognitive behavioral consequences of radiation exposure. Control rats or rats exposed to whole-body irradiation with 1.0 Gy of 1 GeV/n high-energy 56Fe particles (delivered at the alternating gradient synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory) were tested nine months following exposure. Radiation adversely affected RAM performance, and the changes seen parallel those of aging. Irradiated animals entered baited arms during the first 4 choices significantly less than did controls, produced their first error sooner, and also tended to make more errors as measured by re-entries into non-baited arms. These results show that irradiation with high-energy particles produces age-like decrements in cognitive behavior that may impair the ability of astronauts to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  12. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  13. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  14. Particle acceleration in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Cygnus X-3 massive binary system is one of the powerful sources of radio and X-ray emission consisting of an accreting compact object, probably a black hole, with a Wolf-Rayet star companion. Based on the detections of ultra high energy gamma-rays by Kiel and Havera Park, Cygnus X-3 has been proposed to be one of the most powerful sources of charged cosmic ray particles in the Galaxy. The results of long-term observations of the Cyg X-3 binary at energies 800 GeV-85 TeV detected by SHALON in 1995 are presented with images, integral spectra and spectral energy distribution. The identification of source with Cygnus X-3 detected by SHALON was secured by the detection of its 4.8 hour orbital period in TeV gamma-rays. During the whole observation period of Cyg X-3 with SHALON significant flux increases were detected at energies above 0.8 TeV. These TeV flux increases are correlated with flaring activity at a lower energy range of X-ray and/or at observations of Fermi LAT as well as with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The variability of very high-energy gamma-radiation and correlation of radiation activity in the wide energy range can provide essential information on particle mechanism production up to very high energies. Whereas, modulation of very high energy emission connected to the orbital motion of the binary system, provides an understanding of the emission processes, nature and location of particle acceleration.

  15. Dusty-Plasma Particle Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A dusty-plasma apparatus is being investigated as means of accelerating nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. Applications for the dusty-plasma particle accelerators fall into two classes: Simulation of a variety of rapidly moving dust particles and micrometeoroids in outer-space environments that include micrometeoroid streams, comet tails, planetary rings, and nebulae and Deposition or implantation of nanoparticles on substrates for diverse industrial purposes that could include hardening, increasing thermal insulation, altering optical properties, and/or increasing permittivities of substrate materials. Relative to prior apparatuses used for similar applications, dusty-plasma particle accelerators offer such potential advantages as smaller size, lower cost, less complexity, and increased particle flux densities. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator exploits the fact that an isolated particle immersed in plasma acquires a net electric charge that depends on the relative mobilities of electrons and ions. Typically, a particle that is immersed in a low-temperature, partially ionized gas, wherein the average kinetic energy of electrons exceeds that of ions, causes the particle to become negatively charged. The particle can then be accelerated by applying an appropriate electric field. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator (see figure) includes a plasma source such as a radio-frequency induction discharge apparatus containing (1) a shallow cup with a biasable electrode to hold the particles to be accelerated and (2) a holder for the substrate on which the particles are to impinge. Depending on the specific design, a pair of electrostatic-acceleration grids between the substrate and discharge plasma can be used to both collimate and further accelerate particles exiting the particle holder. Once exposed to the discharge plasma, the particles in the cup quickly acquire a negative charge. Application of a negative voltage pulse to the biasable electrode results in the

  16. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  17. sup 56 Fe and sup 60 Ni resonance parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Perey, C.M.; Perey, F.G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Larson, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution neutron transmission and differential elastic-scattering measurements were made for a {sup 56}Fe-enriched iron target at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). A natural iron target was used for transmission measurements below 160 keV. The data were analyzed from 5 to 850 keV. Parameters were obtained for 33 {ell} = 0 and 242 {ell} > 0 resonances. New {sup 6}Li-glass transmission data were acquired for two {sup 60}Ni-enriched sample thicknesses. The neutron width for the 2.253-keV resonance was determined to be 59.3 {plus minus} 0.6 meV and the radiation width 553 {plus minus} 50 meV. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Neutron scattering cross section measurements for 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Harrison, T. D.; Howard, T. J.; Jackson, D. T.; Lenzen, P. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Pecha, R. L.; Rice, B. G.; Thompson, B. K.; Yates, S. W.

    2017-06-01

    Elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for neutron scattering from 56Fe have been measured for several incident energies from 1.30 to 7.96 MeV at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Scattered neutrons were detected using a C6D6 liquid scintillation detector using pulse-shape discrimination and time-of-flight techniques. The deduced cross sections have been compared with previously reported data, predictions from evaluation databases ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF, and theoretical calculations performed using different optical model potentials using the talys and empire nuclear reaction codes. The coupled-channel calculations based on the vibrational and soft-rotor models are found to describe the experimental (n ,n0 ) and (n ,n1 ) cross sections well.

  19. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Bottura, Luca; Gourlay, Stephen A.; Yamamoto, Akira; ...

    2015-11-10

    In this study, we summarize the evolution and contributions of superconducting magnets to particle accelerators as chronicled over the last 50 years of Particle Accelerator Conferences (PAC, NA-PAC and IPAC). We begin with an historical overview based primarily on PAC Proceedings augmented with references to key milestones in the development of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. We then provide some illustrative examples of applications that have occurred over the past 50 years, focusing on those that have either been realized in practice or provided technical development for other projects, with discussion of possible future applications.

  20. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottura, Luca; Gourlay, Stephen A.; Yamamoto, Akira; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we summarize the evolution and contributions of superconducting magnets to particle accelerators as chronicled over the last 50 years of Particle Accelerator Conferences (PAC, NA-PAC and IPAC). We begin with an historical overview based primarily on PAC Proceedings augmented with references to key milestones in the development of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. We then provide some illustrative examples of applications that have occurred over the past 50 years, focusing on those that have either been realized in practice or provided technical development for other projects, with discussion of possible future applications.

  1. Particle Acceleration in Cosmic Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Gaisser, T.K. )

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings includes papers presented at the Bartol ResearchInstitute, on topics concerning particle acceleration in stellar, space andgalactic environments. Two of the papers from this proceedings have beenabstracted for the database. (AIP)

  2. Collisionless Shocks and Particle Acceleration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, M.

    2016-12-01

    Collisionless shocks emerged in the 50s and 60s of the last century as an important branch of plasma physics and have remained ever since. New applications pose new challenges to our understanding of collisionless shock mechanisms. Particle acceleration in astrophysical settings, primarily studied concerning the putative origin of cosmic rays (CR) in supernova remnant (SNR) shocks, stands out with the collisionless shock mechanism being the key. Among recent laboratory applications, a laser-based tabletop proton accelerator is an affordable compact alternative to big synchrotron accelerators. The much-anticipated proof of cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in supernova remnants is hindered by our limited understanding of collisionless shock mechanisms. Over the last decade, dramatically improved observations were puzzling the theorists with unexpected discoveries. The difference between the helium/carbon and proton CR rigidity (momentum to charge ratio) spectra, seemingly inconsistent with the acceleration and propagation theories, and the perplexing positron excess in the 10-300 GeV range are just two recent examples. The latter is now also actively discussed in the particle physics and CR communities as a possible signature of decay or annihilation of hypothetical dark matter particles. By considering an initial (injection) phase of a diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, including particle reflection off the shock front - where an elemental similarity of particle dynamics does not apply - I will discuss recent suggestions of how to address the new data from the collisionless shock perspective. The backreaction of accelerated particles on the shock structure, its environment, and visibility across the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to gamma rays is another key aspect of collisionless shock that will be discussed.

  3. Studies of 54,56Fe Neutron Scattering Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.; French, A. J.; Henderson, S. L.; Howard, T. J.; Pecha, R. L.; Santonil, Z. C.; Crider, B. P.; Liu, S.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-05-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering differential cross sections and γ-ray production cross sections have been measured on 54,56Fe at several incident energies in the fast neutron region between 1.5 and 4.7 MeV. All measurements were completed at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (UKAL) using a 7-MV Model CN Van de Graaff accelerator, along with the neutron production and neutron and γ-ray detection systems located there. The facilities at UKAL allow the investigation of both elastic and inelastic scattering with nearly mono-energetic incident neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques were used to detect the scattered neutrons for the differential cross section measurements. The measured cross sections are important for fission reactor applications and also for testing global model calculations such as those found at ENDF, since describing both the elastic and inelastic scattering is important for determining the direct and compound components of the scattering mechanism. The γ-ray production cross sections are used to determine cross sections to unresolved levels in the neutron scattering experiments. Results from our measurements and comparisons to model calculations are presented.

  4. Optically powered charged particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesner, Larry D.

    1991-09-01

    A charged particle control apparatus provides very high voltage particle beams. One or more photocell arrays provide bias voltages for beam accelerating stages. The arrays are made from a number of microfabricated photocells connected in series to produce a voltage output that is the sum of the voltages from the individual cells. Arrays of each stage are connected in series to produce a cumulative stage voltage that is applied to an accelerating electrode made part of the stage. Optical power illuminates the stages to generate desired voltage biases to the accelerating electrodes. A light source is used to excite the photocathode when this emission source is used. Electrons from the emission source are accelerated electrodes and are emitted from the chamber which is typically conjoined with other apparatus. By utilizing photocell arrays to generate beam current and accelerating biases, as well as a photocathode for providing a source of electrons, the apparatus of the invention is completely optically isolated thereby requiring no direct electrical connections to the apparatus even though multiple accelerating stages are used to facilitate the achievement of very high voltage particle beams.

  5. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  6. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  7. Local factors modify the dose dependence of 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Yu, Tao; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz; Yu, Shaohua

    2012-07-01

    Radiation exposure from a number of terrestrial sources is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence establishing whether high-LET radiation has similar effects has been lacking. We recently demonstrated that 600 MeV/n 56Fe induces atherosclerosis as well. Ten-week old male apolipoprotein-E deficient mice, a well-characterized atherosclerosis animal model, were exposed to 0 (control) 2, or 5Gy 56Fe targeted to the chest and neck. In these mice, 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis was similar in character to that induced by X-rays in the same mouse model and to that resulting from therapeutic radiation in cancer patients. Atherosclerosis was exacerbated by 56Fe only in targeted areas, however, suggesting a direct effect of the radiation on the arteries themselves. This is in contrast to some other risk factors, such as high cholesterol or tobacco use, which have systemic effects. The radiation dose required to accelerate development of atherosclerotic plaques, however, differed depending on the vessel that was irradiated and even the location within the vessel. For example, atherosclerosis in the aortic arch was accelerated only by the highest dose (5 Gy), while the carotid arteries and the aortic root showed effects at 2 Gy (a dose four- to eight-fold lower than the dose of X-rays that produces similar effects in this model). Since shear stress is disrupted in the area of the aortic root, it is likely that at least part of the site-specificity is due to additive or synergistic effects of radiation and local hydrodynamics. Other factors, such as local oxidative stress or gene expression may also have been involved. Since the pro-atherogenic effects of 56Fe depend on additional local factors, this suggests that radiation exposure, when unavoidable, might be mitigated by modification of factors unrelated to the radiation itself.

  8. Naked singularities as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2010-11-15

    We investigate here the particle acceleration by naked singularities to arbitrarily high center of mass energies. Recently it has been suggested that black holes could be used as particle accelerators to probe the Planck scale physics. We show that the naked singularities serve the same purpose and probably would do better than their black hole counterparts. We focus on the scenario of a self-similar gravitational collapse starting from a regular initial data, leading to the formation of a globally naked singularity. It is seen that when particles moving along timelike geodesics interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center of mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to Planck scale physics.

  9. A Fundamental Theorem on Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-05-01

    A fundamental theorem on particle acceleration is derived from the reciprocity principle of electromagnetism and a rigorous proof of the theorem is presented. The theorem establishes a relation between acceleration and radiation, which is particularly useful for insightful understanding of and practical calculation about the first order acceleration in which energy gain of the accelerated particle is linearly proportional to the accelerating field.

  10. Semiclassical geons at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.

    2014-02-01

    We point out that in certain four-dimensional extensions of general relativity constructed within the Palatini formalism stable self-gravitating objects with a discrete mass and charge spectrum may exist. The incorporation of nonlinearities in the electromagnetic field may effectively reduce their mass spectrum by many orders of magnitude. As a consequence, these objects could be within (or near) the reach of current particle accelerators. We provide an exactly solvable model to support this idea.

  11. Superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1992-02-01

    RF Superconductivity has become an important technology for particle accelerators for high energy physics, nuclear physics, and free electron lasers. More than 100 MVolts of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities have been installed in accelerators for heavy ions and operated at gradients of 2-3 MV/m in excess of 105 hours. More than 500 MVolts are installed in electron accelerators and operated at gradients of 4-6 MV/m in excess of 104 hours. Encouraged by this success, another 500 meters of SRF cavities are in the production line. New applications for High Energy Physics are forthcoming for high current e+e- colliders in the B-quark energy range (B-factory). For the next linear collider in the TeV energy range, there are many compelling attractions to use SRF, if the gradients can be improved substantially and the costs lowered. Substantial progress has been made in understanding performance limitations and in inventing cures through better cavity geometries, materials, and processes. Techniques are now in hand to reach 15-20 MV/m accelerating. In light of this progress, the potential of high gradient SRF for a TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) will be explored.

  12. New 56Fe Evaluation for the CIELO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobre, G. P. A.; Herman, M.; Brown, D.; Capote, R.; Trkov, A.; Leal, L.; Plompen, A.; Danon, Y.; Qian, Jing; Ge, Zhigang; Liu, Tingjin; Lu, Hnalin; Ruan, Xichao

    2016-03-01

    The Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO) aims to provide revised and updated evaluations for 239Pu, 238,235U, 56Fe, 16O, and 1H through international collaboration. This work, which is part of the CIELO project, presents the initial results for the evaluation of the 56Fe isotope, with neutron-incident energy ranging from 0 to 20 MeV. The 56Fe(n,p) cross sections were fitted to reproduce the ones from IRDFF dosimetry file. Our preliminary file provides good cross-section agreements for the main angle-integrated reactions, as well as a reasonable overall agreement for angular distributions and double-di_erential spectra, when compared to previous evaluations.

  13. Early changes in vascular reactivity in response to 56Fe irradiation in ApoE-/- mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. Roger; Yu, Tao; Gupta, Kiran; Babitz, Stephen K.; Black, Leland L.; Kabarowski, Janusz H.; Kucik, Dennis F.

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have established that radiation from a number of terrestrial sources increases the risk of atherosclerosis. The accelerated heavy ions in the galacto-cosmic radiation (GCR) that astronauts will encounter on in space, however, interact very differently with tissues than most types of terrestrial radiation, so the health consequences of exposure on deep-space missions are not clear. We demonstrated earlier that 56Fe, an important component of cosmic radiation, accelerates atherosclerotic plaque development. In the present study, we examined an earlier, pro-atherogenic event that might be predictive of later atherosclerotic disease. Decreased endothelium-dependent vasodilation is a prominent manifestation of vascular dysfunction that is thought to predispose humans to the development of structural vascular changes that precede the development of atherosclerotic plaques. To test the effect of heavy-ion radiation on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, we used the same ApoE-/- mouse model in which we previously demonstrated the pro-atherogenic effect of 56Fe on plaque development. Ten week old male ApoE mice (an age at which there is little atherosclerotic plaque in the descending aorta) were exposed to 2.6 Gy 56Fe. The mice were then fed a normal diet and housed under standard conditions. At 4-5 weeks post-irradiation, aortic rings were isolated and endothelial-dependent relaxation was measured. Relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly impaired in irradiated mice compared to age-matched, un-irradiated mice. This decrease in vascular reactivity following 56Fe irradiation occurred eight weeks prior to the development of statistically significant exacerbation of aortic plaque formation and may contribute to the formation of later atherosclerotic lesions.

  14. Longitudinal and Transverse Inelastic Electron Scattering from 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, R.; Cafolla, A.; Day, D.; McCarthy, J. S.; Whitney, R. R.; Wise, J. E.

    1980-04-01

    Inelastic-electron-scattering cross sections for 56Fe have been measured in the continuum region. The longitudinal and transverse inelastic response functions have been determined for vector momentum transfers, q, from 210-410 MeV/c and for energy losses 0<ω<=220 MeV.

  15. Particle acceleration in MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2017-05-01

    MHD Turbulence describes dynamics of astrophysical plasmas on large scale. It is characterized by energy transfer between different scales and the exchange of energy with nonthermal population - typically cosmic rays. Recent progress in theory regarding almost all basic regimes of turbulence - from the dynamo to the decaying case and the asymptotic scaling laws, allowed us to proceed with more observationally motivated questions. One of them is why almost all strongly magnetized environments are indeed observable, e.g. why such environments are infused with high-energy particles, their distributions stretching to energies orders of magnitude higher than thermal. It turns out that there are generic mechanisms of acceleration in turbulence, both second and first order in v/c, the latter was somehow unnoticed. These generic mechanisms may explain the ubiquity of non-thermal tails in various magnetized astrophysical environments, e.g. solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, gamma-ray bursts, etc.

  16. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    The space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) instruments consist of an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, a neutral gas (N2) release device, particle and field diagnostic instruments, and a low light level television system. These instruments are used to accomplish multiple experiments: to study beam particle interactions and other plasma processes; as probes to investigate magnetospheric processes; and as perturbation devices to study energy coupling mechanisms in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere.

  17. Acceleration technologies for charged particles: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Particle accelerators have many important uses in scientific experiments, in industry and in medicine. This paper reviews the variety of technologies which are used to accelerate charged particles to high energies. It aims to show how the capabilities and limitations of these technologies are related to underlying physical principles. The paper emphasises the way in which different technologies are used together to convey energy from the electrical supply to the accelerated particles.

  18. Particle acceleration by slow magnetosonic wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos-Cruz, A.

    1997-06-01

    An important alternative for particle acceleration in a turbulent plasma is through magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes. However, particle acceleration by slow magnetosonic mode has been systematically disregarded for some nonquantitative considerations. Slow magnetosonic waves interchange energy with the medium through two basic processes: resonant (Landau and gyroresonant) and nonresonant (as viscosity and thermal conduction). The energized particles lose energy mainly through Coulombian collisions with the plasma particles. In this work, a quantitative study of the time scales involved in several energetic transfer wave{endash}particle processes is done. Comparison of all these time scales allows one to determine the possibilities that particle acceleration by slow magnetosonic wave mode may occur within the solar corona. It is shown that physical conditions can hardly exist within the solar corona, where thermal particles can be energized and form an acceleration spectrum after crossing the collisional barrier. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Introduction to Particle Acceleration in the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Horwitz, J. L.; Perez, J.; Quenby, J.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated charged particles have been used on Earth since 1930 to explore the very essence of matter, for industrial applications, and for medical treatments. Throughout the universe nature employs a dizzying array of acceleration processes to produce particles spanning twenty orders of magnitude in energy range, while shaping our cosmic environment. Here, we introduce and review the basic physical processes causing particle acceleration, in astrophysical plasmas from geospace to the outer reaches of the cosmos. These processes are chiefly divided into four categories: adiabatic and other forms of non-stochastic acceleration, magnetic energy storage and stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, and plasma wave and turbulent acceleration. The purpose of this introduction is to set the stage and context for the individual papers comprising this monograph.

  20. Introduction to Particle Acceleration in the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Horwitz, J. L.; Perez, J.; Quenby, J.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated charged particles have been used on Earth since 1930 to explore the very essence of matter, for industrial applications, and for medical treatments. Throughout the universe nature employs a dizzying array of acceleration processes to produce particles spanning twenty orders of magnitude in energy range, while shaping our cosmic environment. Here, we introduce and review the basic physical processes causing particle acceleration, in astrophysical plasmas from geospace to the outer reaches of the cosmos. These processes are chiefly divided into four categories: adiabatic and other forms of non-stochastic acceleration, magnetic energy storage and stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, and plasma wave and turbulent acceleration. The purpose of this introduction is to set the stage and context for the individual papers comprising this monograph.

  1. Particle Accelerators Test Cosmological Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the symbiotic relationship of cosmology and elementary-particle physics. Presents a brief overview of particle physics. Explains how cosmological considerations set limits on the number of types of elementary particles. (RT)

  2. Particle Accelerators Test Cosmological Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the symbiotic relationship of cosmology and elementary-particle physics. Presents a brief overview of particle physics. Explains how cosmological considerations set limits on the number of types of elementary particles. (RT)

  3. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to 56Fe irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Samy S.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Boerma, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a “priming” dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a “challenge” dose of 56Fe in a mouse model. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of 56Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of 56Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Results Exposure to 56Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before 56Fe prevented all of the responses to 56Fe. Conclusions This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions. PMID:26948008

  4. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to 56Fe irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Samy S.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a ;priming; dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a ;challenge; dose of 56Fe in a mouse model. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of 56Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of 56Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Results: Exposure to 56Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before 56Fe prevented all of the responses to 56Fe. Conclusions: This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions.

  5. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to (56)Fe irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Samy S; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a "priming" dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a "challenge" dose of (56)Fe in a mouse model. Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of (56)Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of (56)Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Exposure to (56)Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before (56)Fe prevented all of the responses to (56)Fe. This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Particle acceleration at collisionless shocks: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Li Gang; Webb, G.M.; Le Roux, J.A.; Florinski, V.; Ao, X.; Rice, W.K.M.

    2005-08-01

    An overview of shock acceleration is presented, focusing primarily on interplanetary shocks and the termination shock as examples. An extended discussion of recent advances in modeling real solar energetic particle (SEP) and energetic storm particle (ESP) events is presented. When the energy of accelerated particles becomes very large, their back reaction on the flow can result in a shock that is significantly mediated, and as an example, we consider some results for the termination shock.

  7. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  8. Beneficial effects of fruit extracts on neuronal function and behavior following 56Fe irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Carey, A. N.; Jenkins, D.; Rabin, B. M.

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge HZE particles enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts the functioning of the dopaminergic system and behaviors mediated by this system in a manner similar to that seen in aged animals Previous research has shown that diets supplemented with 2 blueberry or strawberry extracts have the ability to retard and even reverse age-related deficits in behavior and signal transduction in rats perhaps due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties This study evaluated the efficacy of these diets on irradiation-induced deficits in these parameters by maintaining rats on these diets or a control diet for 8 weeks prior to being exposed to whole-body irradiation with 1 5 Gy of 1 GeV n high-energy 56 Fe particles Irradiation impaired performance in the Morris water maze and measures of dopamine release one month following radiation these deficits were protected by the antioxidant diets The strawberry diet offered better protection against spatial deficits in the maze because strawberry-fed animals were better able to retain place information a hippocampally-mediated behavior compared to controls The blueberry diet on the other hand seemed to improve reversal learning a behavior more dependent on intact striatal function These data suggest that 56 Fe particle irradiation causes deficits in behavior and signaling in rats which were ameliorated by an antioxidant diet and that the polyphenols in these fruits might be acting in different brain regions

  9. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating.

  10. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S.; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating.

  11. Cross sections of the 56Fe(n ,α ) 53Cr and 54Fe(n ,α ) 51Cr reactions in the MeV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhimin; Fan, Xiao; Zhang, Luyu; Bai, Huaiyong; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Sedysheva, M. V.; Krupa, L.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Cross sections of the 56Fe(n ,α ) 53Cr and 54Fe(n ,α )51Cr reactions were measured at En=5.5 and 6.5 MeV and En=4.0 ,4.5 ,5.5 ,and 6.5 MeV , respectively, using a double-section gridded ionization chamber as the α -particle detector. Natural iron and enriched 56Fe and 54Fe foil samples were prepared. A deuterium gas target was used to produce monoenergetic neutrons through the 2H(d ,n )3He reaction. Two rounds of experiments were performed at the 4.5-MV Van de Graaff Accelerator of Peking University. The foreground and background were measured in separate runs. The neutron flux was monitored by a B F3 long counter, and the cross sections of the 238U(n ,f ) reaction were used as the standard. Present results are compared with those of the talys-1.6 code calculations, existing measurements, and evaluations.

  12. Nonlinear Particle Acceleration and Thermal Particles in GRB Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Donald C.; Ellison, Donald C.; Barkov, Maxim V.; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2017-02-01

    The standard model for GRB afterglow emission treats the accelerated electron population as a simple power law, N(E)\\propto {E}-p for p≳ 2. However, in standard Fermi shock acceleration, a substantial fraction of the swept-up particles do not enter the acceleration process at all. Additionally, if acceleration is efficient, then the nonlinear back-reaction of accelerated particles on the shock structure modifies the shape of the nonthermal tail of the particle spectra. Both of these modifications to the standard synchrotron afterglow impact the luminosity, spectra, and temporal variation of the afterglow. To examine the effects of including thermal particles and nonlinear particle acceleration on afterglow emission, we follow a hydrodynamical model for an afterglow jet and simulate acceleration at numerous points during the evolution. When thermal particles are included, we find that the electron population is at no time well fitted by a single power law, though the highest-energy electrons are; if the acceleration is efficient, then the power-law region is even smaller. Our model predicts hard–soft–hard spectral evolution at X-ray energies, as well as an uncoupled X-ray and optical light curve. Additionally, we show that including emission from thermal particles has drastic effects (increases by factors of 100 and 30, respectively) on the observed flux at optical and GeV energies. This enhancement of GeV emission makes afterglow detections by future γ-ray observatories, such as CTA, very likely.

  13. Gamow-Teller strength in 54Fe and 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurier, E.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Poves, A.; Zuker, A. P.

    1995-10-01

    Through a sequence of large scale 0ħω shell model calculations, Gamow-Teller strengths (S+ and S-) in 54Fe and 56Fe are obtained. They reproduce the experimental values by quenching the στ operator through the standard factor of 0.77. Comparisons are made with recent shell model Monte Carlo calculations. Results are shown to depend critically on the interaction. It is argued that the experimental data contain enough strength in the region above the resonance to make them consistent with the 3(N-Z) sum rule.

  14. Visions for the future of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The ambitions of accelerator based science, technology and applications far exceed the present accelerator possibilities. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results and visions for the future in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development. The conference concerns building of the research infrastructure, including advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution. The main subject is however the vision for the future of particle accelerators and next generation light sources.

  15. Space experiments with particle accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The SEPAC instruments consist of an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, a neutral gas (N2) release device, particle and field diagnostic instruments, and a low light level television system. These instruments are used to accomplish multiple experiments: to study beam-particle interactions and other plasma processes; as probes to investigate magnetospheric processes; and as perturbation devices to study energy coupling mechanisms in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere.

  16. Diagnosing particle acceleration in relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.; Liang, Edison P.; Summerlin, Errol J.; Fu, Wen; Smith, Ian A.; Roustazadeh, Parisa

    2015-03-01

    The high-energy emission from blazars and other relativistic jet sources indicates that electrons are accelerated to ultra-relativistic (GeV - TeV) energies in these systems. This paper summarizes recent results from numerical studies of two fundamentally different particle acceleration mechanisms potentially at work in relativistic jets: Magnetic-field generation and relativistic particle acceleration in relativistic shear layers, which are likely to be present in relativistic jets, is studied via Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. Diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic shocks is investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting magnetic-field configurations and thermal + non-thermal particle distributions are then used to predict multi-wavelength radiative (synchrotron + Compton) signatures of both acceleration scenarios. In particular, we address how anisotropic shear-layer acceleration may be able to circumvent the well-known Lorentz-factor crisis, and how the self-consistent evaluation of thermal + non-thermal particle populations in diffusive shock acceleration simulations provides tests of the bulk Comptonization model for the Big Blue Bump observed in the SEDs of several blazars.

  17. Particle acceleration by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    A review is given of the analysis of new observations of energetic particles and energetic secondary emissions obtained over the solar maxium (approx. 1980) by the Solar Maximum mission, Hinotori, the international Sun-Earth Explorer, Helios, Explorer satellites, and Voyager spacecraft. Solar energetic particle events observed in space, He(3)- rich events, solar gamma rays and neutrons, and solar neutrinos are discussed.

  18. Particle Acceleration and Emission in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Hardee, P. E.; Richardson, G. A.; Preece, R. D.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Shock wave acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  19. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration in Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Zhang, Haocheng; Daughton, William; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a leading mechanism for dissipating magnetic energy and accelerating nonthermal particles in Poynting-flux-dominated flows. In this study, we investigate nonthermal particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a magnetically dominated plasma using fully kinetic simulations. We have studied the magnetically dominated regime by varying σe = 103-105 and mass ratios. The results demonstrate that reconnection quickly establishes power-law energy distributions for both electrons and ions within several (2-3) light-crossing times. For the cases with periodic boundary conditions, the power-law index is 1 < p < 2 for both electrons and ions. We study particle acceleration in magnetic reconnection via large-scale 3D kinetic simulations to examine several effects that may be important, including pre-existing fluctuations, kink and secondary tearing instabilities, and open boundary conditions. The results show that particle acceleration in reconnection layers is surprisingly robust despite the development of 3D turbulence and instabilities. The main acceleration mechanism is a Fermi-like acceleration through the drift motions of charged particles. We discuss the implication of this study in the context of Poynting-flux dominated jets and pulsar winds, especially the applications for explaining nonthermal high-energy emissions.

  20. Applications of particle accelerators in medicine.

    PubMed

    Silari, Marco

    2011-07-01

    There are nearly 20,000 particle accelerators in operation worldwide, about half of them employed for biomedical uses. This paper focuses on some recent advances in the two main medical domains where accelerators find their use, radionuclide production and radiation therapy. The paper first discusses the use of high-energy electron and proton accelerators for the potential, future production of (99)Mo, which is presently provided by fission reactors. Next, it reviews the rationale for the use of protons and carbon ions in cancer therapy, discussing the requirements imposed on accelerator technology and looking at some recent developments.

  1. Solar Energetic Particles: Acceleration and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, Takashi

    Research of solar energetic particles (SEPs) is important in understanding particle acceleration, transport and interactions taking place in the universe. The importance of space weather to modern human life is also increasing. In this lecture, I introduce a selected subset of SEP observations together with observation techniques and future plans. The aim is to connect these SEP observations with associated particle acceleration mechanisms and the subsequent transport and interaction processes. Because the observational properties are determined by different processes, a wide range of observations is necessary in order to fully understand the phenomena taking place. I will also give an overview of the role of the SEP studies in general astrophysics.

  2. [Proton therapy and particle accelerators].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Since the high energy accelerator plan was changed from a 40 GeV direct machine to a 12GeV cascade one, a 500 MeV rapid cycling booster synchrotron was installed between the injector linac and the 12 GeV main ring at KEK, National Lab. for High Energy Physics. The booster beams were used not only for injection to the main ring but also for medical use. Their energy was reduced to 250 MeV by a graphite block for clinical trial of cancer therapy. In 1970's, pi(-) or heavy ions were supposed to be promising. Although advantage of protons with Bragg Peak was pointed out earlier, they seemed effective only for eye melanoma at that time. In early 1980's, it was shown that they were effective for deep-seated tumor by Tsukuba University with KEK beams. The first dedicated facility was built at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Its synchrotron was made by Fermi National Accelerator Lab. Since a non-resonant accelerating rf cavity was installed, operation of the synchrotron became much easier. Later, innovation of the cyclotron was achieved. Its weight was reduced from 1,000 ton to 200 ton. Some of the cyclotrons are equipped with superconducting coils.

  3. Longitudinal electron scattering form factors for 54,56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, A. D.; Kadhim, D. R.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, inelastic longitudinal electron scattering form factors for C2 transition have been studied in 54Fe and 56Fe with the aid of shell model calculations. The GX1 effective interaction for the fp-shell is used with the nucleon-nucleon realistic interaction Michigan three-range Yukawa and Modified surface delta interaction as a two-body interactions. The core polarization effects is taken into account through the first-order perturbation theory with the effective charge, which is taken to the proton and the neutron. The effective charge along with the core effects up to 6 ℏw enhanced the calculation very well and improving good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Solar particle acceleration and propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1987-04-01

    Most of the papers of the 1983 - 1986 period dealt with the analyses of new observations of energetic particles and energetic secondary emissions obtained over the solar maximum (≡1980) by the SMM, Hinotori, ISEE, IMP, Helios and Voyager spacecraft. This review paper is divided into the following sections: (1) large solar energetic particle events observed in space; (2) solar gamma-rays and neutrons; (3) 3He-rich events; (4) low energy 1 - 102keV electrons; (5) interplanetary and coronal propagation; (6) theoretical work; and (7) summary.

  5. A New Paradigm for Flare Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission and its spectra in solar flares is not well understood. Here, we propose a first-principle-based model of particle acceleration that produces energy spectra that closely resemble those derived from hard X-ray observations. Our mechanism uses contracting magnetic islands formed during fast reconnection in solar flares to accelerate electrons, as first proposed by Drake et al. (2006) for kinetic-scale plasmoids. We apply these ideas to MHD-scale islands formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model based on the particles’ adiabatic invariants is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting field lines in our ultrahigh-resolution, 2.5D, MHD numerical simulation of a solar eruption (flare + coronal mass ejection). Then, we analytically model electrons visiting multiple contracting islands to account for the observed high-energy flare emission. Our acceleration mechanism inherently produces sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each macroscopic island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare current sheet is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions. This work was supported in part by the NASA LWS and H-SR programs..

  6. Observation of particle acceleration in laboratory magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kawazura, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Nogami, T.; Sato, N.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Mushiake, T.

    2015-11-15

    The self-organization of magnetospheric plasma is brought about by inward diffusion of magnetized particles. Not only creating a density gradient toward the center of a dipole magnetic field, the inward diffusion also accelerates particles and provides a planetary radiation belt with high energy particles. Here, we report the first experimental observation of a “laboratory radiation belt” created in the ring trap 1 device. By spectroscopic measurement, we found an appreciable anisotropy in the ion temperature, proving the betatron acceleration mechanism which heats particles in the perpendicular direction with respect to the magnetic field when particles move inward. The energy balance model, including the heating mechanism, explains the observed ion temperature profile.

  7. Anisotropic Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Markus; Liang, Edison P.; Fu, Wen

    2017-08-01

    We present results of Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic shear layers as relevant to the relativistic jets of acive galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. We study the self-generation of electro-magnetic fields and particle acceleration for various different plasma compositions (electron-ion vs. electron-positron pair vs. hybrid). Special emphasis is placed on the angular distribution of accelerated particles. We find that electron-ion shear layers lead to highly anisotropic particle distributions in the frame of the fast-moving inner spine. The beaming pattern of the highest-energy particles is much narrower than the characteristic beaming angle of 1/Gamma resulting from relativistic aberration of a co-moving isotropic distribution. This may pose a possible solution to the Lorentz-Factor crisis in blazars and explain very hard X-ray / soft gamma-ray spectra of some gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Scalar fields and particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    The phenomenon discovered in 2009 by Bañados, Silk and West where particle collisions can achieve arbitrary high center-of-mass (c.m.) energies close to the event horizon of an extreme Kerr black hole, has generated a lot of interest. Although rotation seemed to be an essential requirement, it was later shown that arbitrary high energies can also be achieved for collisions between radially moving particles near the horizon of the electrically charged extreme Reissner-Nordström black hole. Recently Patil and Joshi claimed that instead of spinning up the black hole one can also crank up the c.m. energy of particle collisions by "charging up" a static black hole with a massless scalar field. In this regard they showed that infinite energies can be attained in the vicinity of the naked singularity of the Janis-Newman-Wincour (JNW) spacetime, which contains a massless scalar field that also becomes infinite at the position of the curvature singularity. In this study we show that Patil and Joshi's claim does not apply for other static black hole systems endowed with a massless scalar field. In particular we consider the well-known Bekenstein black hole and the recently discovered Martínez-Troncoso-Zanelli black hole, and show that the expression of the c.m. energy for particle collisions near the event horizons of these black holes is no different than the corresponding case with vanishing scalar field represented by the Schwarzschild solution. Moreover by studying the motion of scalar test charges that interact with the background scalar field in these black hole spacetimes we show that the resulting c.m. energies are even smaller than in the case of free particles. This shows that the infinite energies obtained by Patil and Joshi may not be due to the fact that the black hole contains a massless scalar field, but may be instead related to the geometry of the naked singularity in the JNW spacetime. An analogous case of infinite c.m. energy in the vicinity of a naked

  9. Particles Acceleration in Converged Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Observations show that there is a proton spectral ``break" with E_{break} at 1-10MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. However, the understanding of this energy spectral ``break" from the diffusive shock acceleration theory still remains uncertain. Although previous numerical methods can hardly predict this ``break" from current theoretical models due to high computational expense, the present paper focuses on simulating this energy spectrum in converged two shocks by Monte Carlo numerical method. Considering the Dec 13 2006 CME-driven shock interaction with an Earth bow shock, we examine whether the energy spectral ``break" could occur on an interaction between two shocks. As result, we indeed obtain the maximum proton energy up to 10MeV, and we further find a proton spectral ``break" appears distinctly at the energy ˜5MeV.

  10. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  11. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  12. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in

  13. Particle Acceleration With a Wiggling Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.

    1997-05-01

    A novel method of high rate far-field laser acceleration of electron beams is proposed. It is based on a resonance interaction of straightforward charged particle beam passing through wiggling propagation of electromagnetic wave. Electromagnetic beam guiding can be provided in vacuum by periodically curved waveguide or in overdense plasma channels under stimulated hose instability. Main parameters of acceleration process are estimated. The method proposed provides low energy ( 10MeV) electrons capture, absence of conventional undulator, absence of synchrotron radiation losses and enhanced acceleration rate compared with Inversed Free Electron Laser (IFEL).

  14. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOEpatents

    Shepard, K.W.; Delayen, J.R.

    1995-06-06

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium. 5 figs.

  15. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOEpatents

    Shepard, Kenneth W.; Delayen, Jean R.

    1995-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium.

  16. Particle Acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1997-01-01

    The high efficiency of energy generation inferred from radio observations of quasars and X-ray observations of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is apparently achieved only by the gravitational conversion of the rest mass energy of accreting matter onto supermassive black holes. Evidence for the acceleration of particles to high energies by a central engine is also inferred from observations of apparent superluminal motion in flat spectrum, core-dominated radio sources. This phenomenon is widely attributed to the ejection of relativistic bulk plasma from the nuclei of active galaxies, and accounts for the existence of large scale radio jets and lobes at large distances from the central regions of radio galaxies. Reports of radio jets and superluminal motion from galactic black hole candidate X-ray sources indicate that similar processes are operating in these sources. Observations of luminous, rapidly variable high-energy radiation from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory show directly that particles are accelerated to high energies in a compact environment. The mechanisms which transform the gravitational potential energy of the infalling matter into nonthermal particle energy in galactic black hole candidates and AGNs are not conclusively identified, although several have been proposed. These include direct acceleration by static electric fields (resulting from, for example, magnetic reconnection), shock acceleration, and energy extraction from the rotational energy of Kerr black holes. The dominant acceleration mechanism(s) operating in the black hole environment can only be determined, of course, by a comparison of model predictions with observations. The purpose of the work proposed for this grant was to investigate stochastic particle acceleration through resonant interactions with plasma waves that populate the magnetosphere surrounding an accreting black hole. Stochastic acceleration has been successfully applied to the

  17. High-resolution study of {sup 56}Fe{yields}{sup 56}Mn Gamow-Teller transition by the combined analysis of {sup 56}Fe({sup 3}He, t){sup 56}Co and 56Fe(P, p'){sup 56}Fe reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashimaa, M.; Shimbara, Y.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Matsubara, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Sakemic, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Botha, N. T.; Neveling, R.; Ganioglu, E.; Susoy, G.

    2010-08-12

    The Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in the {beta}{sup +}(electron capture) direction from the ground state of {sup 56}Fe to the excited states of {sup 56}Mn play an important role in the core collapse of presupernova. Assuming that isospin analogous transitions in isobars have corresponding strengths, we deduced these GT strengths by combining the results of the {sup 56}Fe(p, p'){sup 56}Fe experiment performed at 200 MeV and 0 deg. and the {sup 56}Fe({sup 3}He, t){sup 56}Co experiment in the {beta}{beta} direction at 140 MeV/u and 0 deg. The ground state of {sup 56}Fe has the isospin value of T = 2, while the GT states in {sup 56}Mn have T = 3. In order to identify the analogous T = 2{yields}3, GT transitions in the {sup 56}Fe(p, p'){sup 56}Fe and the {sup 56}Fe({sup 3}He, t){sup 56}Co measurements, we used the fact that the isospin Clebsch-Gordan (CG) coefficients for these T = 2{yields}3 transitions are different in these measurements. Then the GT transition strengths B(GT) in the {beta}{sup +} direction can be deduced from the B(GT) values of the corresponding transitions well determined in the {sup 56}Fe({sup 3}He, t){sup 56}Co measurement assuming the isospin symmetry and correcting the difference of CG coefficients.

  18. Laser and Particle Guiding Micro-Elements for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Gaume, R.; Wisdom, J.; Spencer, J.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    Laser driven particle accelerators require sub-micron control of the laser field as well as precise electron-beam guiding so fabrication techniques that allow integrating both elements into an accelerator-on-chip format become critical for the success of such next generation machines. Micromachining technology for silicon has been shown to be one such feasible technology in PAC2003[1] but with a variety of complications on the laser side. However, fabrication of transparent ceramics has become an interesting technology that could be applied for laser-particle accelerators in several ways. We discuss the advantages such as the range of materials available and ways to implement them followed by some different test examples we been considered. One important goal is an integrated system that avoids having to inject either laser or particle pulses into these structures.

  19. Origin and acceleration of suprathermal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir I.; Dayeh, Maher A.; Ebert, Robert W.

    2016-03-01

    Observations over the last decade have shown that suprathermal ions with energies above that of the core or bulk solar wind protons (i.e., ~1-2 keV/nucleon) are an important constituent of the overall seed population that is accelerated in solar and interplanetary events. Despite the recent recognition of their importance, the origin of these populations and the method of their acceleration remains poorly understood. This is partly due to the fact that these particles exist in the so-called tail regions of the corresponding solar wind distributions where high temporal and sensitivity measurements are sparse. Moreover, observations comprising long-term averages (between hours to more than a day) show conflicting results. For instance, below ~40 keV/nucleon the ion differential intensities in the solar wind frame appear to exhibit a near-constant power-law spectral slope of ~1.5, perhaps indicating a universal acceleration mechanism. In contrast, at energies greater than ~40 keV/nucleon, the ion composition changes with solar activity, and the energy spectra are significantly steeper, perhaps indicating that the suprathermal pool of material also comprises lower-energy particle populations accelerated in corotating interaction regions, interplanetary shocks, and solar energetic particle events. This paper discusses key observations of suprathermal ions and electrons in terms of state-of-the-art theories and models that have been put forward to account for their origin and acceleration.

  20. Origin and acceleration of suprathermal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Mihir I.; Dayeh, Maher A.; Ebert, Robert W.

    2016-03-25

    Observations over the last decade have shown that suprathermal ions with energies above that of the core or bulk solar wind protons (i.e., ~1-2 keV/nucleon) are an important constituent of the overall seed population that is accelerated in solar and interplanetary events. Despite the recent recognition of their importance, the origin of these populations and the method of their acceleration remains poorly understood. This is partly due to the fact that these particles exist in the so-called tail regions of the corresponding solar wind distributions where high temporal and sensitivity measurements are sparse. Moreover, observations comprising long-term averages (between hours to more than a day) show conflicting results. For instance, below ~40 keV/nucleon the ion differential intensities in the solar wind frame appear to exhibit a near-constant power-law spectral slope of ~1.5, perhaps indicating a universal acceleration mechanism. In contrast, at energies greater than ~40 keV/nucleon, the ion composition changes with solar activity, and the energy spectra are significantly steeper, perhaps indicating that the suprathermal pool of material also comprises lower-energy particle populations accelerated in corotating interaction regions, interplanetary shocks, and solar energetic particle events. This paper discusses key observations of suprathermal ions and electrons in terms of state-of-the-art theories and models that have been put forward to account for their origin and acceleration.

  1. The charged particle accelerators subsystems modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Presented web-based resource for information support the engineering, science and education in Electrophysics, containing web-based tools for simulation subsystems charged particle accelerators. Formulated the development motivation of Web-Environment for Virtual Electrophysical Laboratories. Analyzes the trends of designs the dynamic web-environments for supporting of scientific research and E-learning, within the framework of Open Education concept.

  2. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema

    Andy Sessler

    2016-07-12

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  3. EIDOSCOPE: particle acceleration at plasma boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaivads, A.; Andersson, G.; Bale, S. D.; Cully, C. M.; De Keyser, J.; Fujimoto, M.; Grahn, S.; Haaland, S.; Ji, H.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Lazarian, A.; Lavraud, B.; Mann, I. R.; Nakamura, R.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Narita, Y.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Schekochihin, A.; Schwartz, S. J.; Shinohara, I.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the mission concept of how ESA can make a major contribution to the Japanese Canadian multi-spacecraft mission SCOPE by adding one cost-effective spacecraft EIDO (Electron and Ion Dynamics Observatory), which has a comprehensive and optimized plasma payload to address the physics of particle acceleration. The combined mission EIDOSCOPE will distinguish amongst and quantify the governing processes of particle acceleration at several important plasma boundaries and their associated boundary layers: collisionless shocks, plasma jet fronts, thin current sheets and turbulent boundary layers. Particle acceleration and associated cross-scale coupling is one of the key outstanding topics to be addressed in the Plasma Universe. The very important science questions that only the combined EIDOSCOPE mission will be able to tackle are: 1) Quantitatively, what are the processes and efficiencies with which both electrons and ions are selectively injected and subsequently accelerated by collisionless shocks? 2) How does small-scale electron and ion acceleration at jet fronts due to kinetic processes couple simultaneously to large scale acceleration due to fluid (MHD) mechanisms? 3) How does multi-scale coupling govern acceleration mechanisms at electron, ion and fluid scales in thin current sheets? 4) How do particle acceleration processes inside turbulent boundary layers depend on turbulence properties at ion/electron scales? EIDO particle instruments are capable of resolving full 3D particle distribution functions in both thermal and suprathermal regimes and at high enough temporal resolution to resolve the relevant scales even in very dynamic plasma processes. The EIDO spin axis is designed to be sun-pointing, allowing EIDO to carry out the most sensitive electric field measurements ever accomplished in the outer magnetosphere. Combined with a nearby SCOPE Far Daughter satellite, EIDO will form a second pair (in addition to SCOPE Mother-Near Daughter) of closely

  4. Evidence for particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.; Baker, Daniel N.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent the episodic dissipation of energy stored in the geomagnetic tail that was previously extracted from the solar wind. This energy release produces activity throughout the entire magnetosphere-ionosphere system, and it results in a wide variety of phenomena such as auroral intensifications and the generation of new current systems. All of these phenomena involve the acceleration of particles, sometimes up to several MeV. We present a brief overview of substorm phenomenology. We then review some of the evidence for particle acceleration in Earth's magnetosphere during substorms. Such in-situ observations in this most accessible of all cosmic plasma domains may hold important clues to understanding acceleration processes in more distant astrophysical systems.

  5. Evidence for particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.; Baker, Daniel N.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent the episodic dissipation of energy stored in the geomagnetic tail that was previously extracted from the solar wind. This energy release produces activity throughout the entire magnetosphere-ionosphere system, and it results in a wide variety of phenomena such as auroral intensifications and the generation of new current systems. All of these phenomena involve the acceleration of particles, sometimes up to several MeV. We present a brief overview of substorm phenomenology. We then review some of the evidence for particle acceleration in Earth's magnetosphere during substorms. Such in-situ observations in this most accessible of all cosmic plasma domains may hold important clues to understanding acceleration processes in more distant astrophysical systems.

  6. Particle-acceleration by turbulent magnetohydrodynamic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Ambrosiano, J. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Test particles in a two dimensional, turbulent MHD simulation are found to undergo significant acceleration. The magnetic field configuration is a periodic sheet pinch which undergoes reconnection. The test particles are trapped in the reconnection region for times of order an Alfven transit time in the large electric fields that characterize the turbulent reconnection process at the relatively large magnetic Reynolds number used in the simulation. The maximum speed attained by these particles is consistent with an analytic estimate which depends on the reconnection electric field, the Alfven speed, and the ratio of Larmor period to the Alfven transit time.

  7. Effects of whole body (56)Fe radiation on contextual freezing and Arc-positive cells in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Allen, Antiño R; Rosi, Susanna; Sharma, Sourabh; Dayger, Catherine; Davis, Matthew J; Fike, John R

    2013-06-01

    The space radiation environment contains high-energy charged particles such as (56)Fe, which could pose a significant hazard to hippocampal function in astronauts during and after the mission(s). The mechanisms underlying impairments in cognition are not clear but might involve alterations in the percentage of neurons in the dentate gyrus expressing the plasticity-related immediate early gene Arc. Previously, we showed effects of cranial (56)Fe irradiation on hippocampus-dependent contextual freezing and on the percentage of Arc-positive cells in the enclosed, but not free, blade. Because it is unclear whether whole body (56)Fe irradiation causes similar effects on these markers of hippocampal function, in the present study we quantified the effects of whole body (56)Fe irradiation (600MeV, 0.5 or 1Gy) on hippocampus-dependent and hippocampus-independent cognitive performance and determined whether these effects were associated with changes in Arc expression in the enclosed and free blades of the dentate gyrus. Whole body (56)Fe irradiation impacted contextual but not cued fear freezing and the percentage of Arc-positive cells in the enclosed and free blades. In mice tested for contextual freezing, there was a correlation between Arc-positive cells in the enclosed and free blades. In addition, in mice irradiated with 0.5Gy, contextual freezing in the absence of aversive stimuli correlated with the percentage of Arc-positive cells in the enclosed blade. In mice tested for cued freezing, there was no correlation between Arc-positive cells in the enclosed and free blades. In contrast, cued freezing in the presence or absence of aversive stimuli correlated with Arc-positive cells in the free blade. In addition, in mice irradiated with 1Gy cued freezing in the absence of aversive stimuli correlated with the percentage of Arc-positive neurons in the free blade. These data indicate that while whole body (56)Fe radiation affects contextual freezing and Arc-positive cells

  8. Level density and mechanism of deuteron-induced reactions on 54,58,56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Byun, Y.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Akhtar, S.; Dhakal, S.; Parker, C. E.

    2015-07-01

    Deuteron elastic cross sections, as well as neutron, proton, and α -particle emission spectra, from d + 54,58,56Fe reactions have been measured with deuteron beam energies of 5, 7, and 9 MeV. Optical model parameters have been tested against our experimental data. The fraction of total reaction cross section responsible for the formation of compound nuclei has been deduced from the angular distributions. The degree of discrepancy between calculated and experimental compound cross sections was found to increase with increasing neutron number. The nuclear level densities of the residual nuclei 57Co, 55Co, 57Fe, 55Fe, 52Mn, 54Mn have been deduced from the compound double differential cross sections. The Gilbert-Cameron model with Iljinov parameter systematics [A. S. Iljinov and M. V. Mebel, Nucl. Phys. A 543, 517 (1992)], 10.1016/0375-9474(92)90278-R was found to have a good agreement with our results.

  9. Characteristics of genomic instability in clones of TK6 human lymphoblasts surviving exposure to 56Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, Mireya; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Genomic instability in the human lymphoblast cell line TK6 was studied in clones surviving 36 generations after exposure to accelerated 56Fe ions. Clones were assayed for 20 characteristics, including chromosome aberrations, plating efficiency, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequency at two loci. The primary effect of the 56Fe-ion exposure on the surviving clones was a significant increase in the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations compared to the very low spontaneous frequency, along with an increase in the phenotypic complexity of the unstable clones. The radiation-induced increase in the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations was much greater than that observed previously in clones of the related cell line, WTK1, which in comparison to the TK6 cell line expresses an increased radiation resistance, a mutant TP53 protein, and an increased frequency of spontaneous unstable chromosome aberrations. The characteristics of the unstable clones of the two cell lines also differed. Most of the TK6 clones surviving exposure to 56Fe ions showed unstable cytogenetic abnormalities, while the phenotype of the WTK1 clones was more diverse. The results underscore the importance of genotype in the characteristics of instability after radiation exposure.

  10. Characteristics of genomic instability in clones of TK6 human lymphoblasts surviving exposure to 56Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, Mireya; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Genomic instability in the human lymphoblast cell line TK6 was studied in clones surviving 36 generations after exposure to accelerated 56Fe ions. Clones were assayed for 20 characteristics, including chromosome aberrations, plating efficiency, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequency at two loci. The primary effect of the 56Fe-ion exposure on the surviving clones was a significant increase in the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations compared to the very low spontaneous frequency, along with an increase in the phenotypic complexity of the unstable clones. The radiation-induced increase in the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations was much greater than that observed previously in clones of the related cell line, WTK1, which in comparison to the TK6 cell line expresses an increased radiation resistance, a mutant TP53 protein, and an increased frequency of spontaneous unstable chromosome aberrations. The characteristics of the unstable clones of the two cell lines also differed. Most of the TK6 clones surviving exposure to 56Fe ions showed unstable cytogenetic abnormalities, while the phenotype of the WTK1 clones was more diverse. The results underscore the importance of genotype in the characteristics of instability after radiation exposure.

  11. Particle acceleration in axisymmetric pulsar current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Philippov, Alexander; Parfrey, Kyle; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-03-01

    The equatorial current sheet in pulsar magnetospheres is often regarded as an ideal site for particle acceleration via relativistic reconnection. Using 2D spherical particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate particle acceleration in the axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere as a function of the injected plasma multiplicity and magnetization. We observe a clear transition from a highly charge-separated magnetosphere for low plasma injection with little current and spin-down power, to a nearly force-free solution for high plasma multiplicity characterized by a prominent equatorial current sheet and high spin-down power. We find significant magnetic dissipation in the current sheet, up to 30 per cent within 5 light-cylinder radii in the high-multiplicity regime. The simulations unambiguously demonstrate that the dissipated Poynting flux is efficiently channelled to the particles in the sheet, close to the Y-point within about 1-2 light-cylinder radii from the star. The mean particle energy in the sheet is given by the upstream plasma magnetization at the light cylinder. The study of particle orbits shows that all energetic particles originate from the boundary layer between the open and the closed field lines. Energetic positrons always stream outwards, while high-energy electrons precipitate back towards the star through the sheet and along the separatrices, which may result in auroral-like emission. Our results suggest that the current sheet and the separatrices may be the main source of high-energy radiation in young pulsars.

  12. Double layers acting as particles accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sanduloviciu, M.; Lozneanu, E.

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that self-consistent stable and unstable double layers generated in plasma after a self-organisation process are able to accelerate charged particles. The implication of cosmic double layers (Dls) in the acceleration of electrical charged particles long been advocated by Alfven and his Stockholm school is today disputed by argument that static electric fields associated with Dls are conservative and consequently the line integral of the electric field outside the DL balances the line integral inside it. Related with this dispute we will evidence some, so far not considered, facts which are in our opinion arguments that aurora Dls are able to energize particles. For justifying this assertion we start from recent experimental results concerning the phenomenology of self-consistent Dls whose generation involve beside ionisations the neutrals excitations which are at tile origin of the light phenomena as those observed in auroras.

  13. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  14. Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2001-12-11

    At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

  15. Transient particle acceleration associated with solar flares.

    PubMed

    Chupp, E L

    1990-10-12

    Understanding how individual charged particles can be accelerated to extreme energies (10(20) electron volts), remains a foremost problem in astrophysics. Within our solar system, the active sun is capable of producing, on a short time scale, ions with energies higher than 25 gigaelectron volts. Satellite and ground-based observation over the past 30 years have greatly increased our knowledge of the properties of transient bursts of energetic particles emitted from the sun in association with solar flares, but a real understanding of the solar flare particle acceleration process requires greatly refined experimental data. On the practical side, it is also imperative that this problem be solved if man is to venture, for long periods of time, beyond the protective umbrella of Earth's magnetic field, which excludes much of the biologically damaging solar energetic particles. It is only through an understanding of the basic acceleration problem that we can expect to be able to predict the occurrence of a solar flare with lethal solar radiations. For our knowledge of these effects to advance, a new space mission dedicated to studying the high-energy aspects of solar flares at high spatial and energy resolution will be required.

  16. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    High energy physics, perhaps more than any other branch of science, is driven by technology. It is not the development of theory, or consideration of what measurements to make, which are the driving elements in our science. Rather it is the development of new technology which is the pacing item. Thus it is the development of new techniques, new computers, and new materials which allows one to develop new detectors and new particle-handling devices. It is the latter, the accelerators, which are at the heart of the science. Without particle accelerators there would be, essentially, no high energy physics. In fact. the advances in high energy physics can be directly tied to the advances in particle accelerators. Looking terribly briefly, and restricting one's self to recent history, the Bevatron made possible the discovery of the anti-proton and many of the resonances, on the AGS was found the {mu}-neutrino, the J-particle and time reversal non-invariance, on Spear was found the {psi}-particle, and, within the last year the Z{sub 0} and W{sup {+-}} were seen on the CERN SPS p-{bar p} collider. Of course one could, and should, go on in much more detail with this survey, but I think there is no need. It is clear that as better acceleration techniques were developed more and more powerful machines were built which, as a result, allowed high energy physics to advance. What are these techniques? They are very sophisticated and ever-developing. The science is very extensive and many individuals devote their whole lives to accelerator physics. As high energy experimental physicists your professional lives will be dominated by the performance of 'the machine'; i.e. the accelerator. Primarily you will be frustrated by the fact that it doesn't perform better. Why not? In these lectures, six in all, you should receive some appreciation of accelerator physics. We cannot, nor do we attempt, to make you into accelerator physicists, but we do hope to give you some insight into the

  17. Naked singularities as particle accelerators. II

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-03-15

    We generalize here our earlier results on particle acceleration by naked singularities. We showed recently [M. Patil and P. S. Joshi, Phys. Rev. D 82, 104049 (2010).] that the naked singularities that form due to the gravitational collapse of massive stars provide a suitable environment where particles could get accelerated and collide at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. However, we focused there only on the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse models, which were also assumed to be self-similar. In this paper, we broaden and generalize the result to all gravitational collapse models leading to the formation of a naked singularity as the final state of collapse, evolving from a regular initial data, without making any prior restrictive assumptions about the spacetime symmetries such as above. We show that, when the particles interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center-of-mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to the Planck scale physics. We also consider the issue of various possible physical mechanisms of generation of such very high-energy particles from the vicinity of naked singularity. We then construct a model of gravitational collapse to a timelike naked singularity to demonstrate the working of these ideas, where the pressure is allowed to be negative, but the energy conditions are respected. We show that a finite amount of mass-energy density has to be necessarily radiated away from the vicinity of the naked singularity as the collapse evolves. Therefore, the nature of naked singularities, both at the classical and quantum level, could play an important role in the process of particle acceleration, explaining the occurrence of highly energetic outgoing particles in the vicinity of the Cauchy horizon that participate in extreme high-energy collisions.

  18. Magnetic Reconnection: A Powerful Cosmic Particle Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fan

    2015-11-01

    Astrophysical magnetic reconnection sites have long been expected to be sources of high-energy particles. Recent observations of high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula and hard X-ray emission from solar flares have motivated us to better understand magnetic reconnection and its associated particle acceleration in plasma conditions where the magnetic energy is dominant. We will present fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of anti-parallel magnetic reconnection in the highly magnetized regime (the magnetization parameter sigma >> 1 or plasma beta << 1). The magnetic energy is converted efficiently into kinetic energy of nonthermal relativistic particles in a power-law spectrum. For a sufficiently large system and strong magnetic field, the power-law index approaches ``-1''. The dominant acceleration mechanism is a first-order Fermi process accomplished through the curvature drift motion of particles in magnetic flux tubes along the electric field induced by fast plasma flows. We will show simulations in three dimensions and with open boundary conditions. We will present an analytical model for the formation of power-law distribution and show the nonthermal distribution may be a common feature of magnetically dominated reconnection. Collaborators: Hui Li, William Daughton, Yi-Hsin Liu, Xiaocan Li

  19. Particle Acceleration in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, M.; Naito, Tsuguya; Ohno, Hiroshi; Shibata, Shinpei

    2003-07-01

    Clusters of galaxies have non-thermal high energy particles as well as the thermal intracluster medium in the intracluster space. One bit of direct evidence is the existence of non-thermal synchrotron radio halos and relics. However, it is still unclear how they are accelerated. Here, we consider two kinds of acceleration processes which likely work in the intracluster space and intro duce models based on them. One is shock acceleration associated with cluster mergers. We calculate evolution of non-thermal electrons during cluster merger based on N-b o dy + SPH simulations. Radio emission is localized near the shocks. This is qualitatively similar to radio relics. The other is resonant scattering of random Alfv´n waves. e We calculate steady state electron distribution functions when Alfv´n wave power e spectra are power-law. We successfully repro duce the Coma cluster radio halo spectrum.

  20. Acceleration and Propagation of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Dalla, Silvia

    2017-07-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) are an important component of Space Weather, including radiation hazard to humans and electronic equipment, and the ionisation of the Earth's atmosphere. We review the key observations of SEPs, our current understanding of their acceleration and transport, and discuss how this knowledge is incorporated within Space Weather forecasting tools. Mechanisms for acceleration during solar flares and at shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are discussed, as well as the timing relationships between signatures of solar eruptive events and the detection of SEPs in interplanetary space. Evidence on how the parameters of SEP events are related to those of the parent solar activity is reviewed and transport effects influencing SEP propagation to near-Earth locations are examined. Finally, the approaches to forecasting Space Weather SEP effects are discussed. We conclude that both flare and CME shock acceleration contribute to Space Weather relevant SEP populations and need to be considered within forecasting tools.

  1. Proceedings of: 2005 Particle Acceleration Confence

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    The 21st Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC05, took place at the Knoxville Convention Center (KCC) from Monday through Friday, May 16-20, 2005. Sponsored by the American Physical Society (APS), the Institute of Electrics and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) with its subdivision of Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society (NPSS), the conference was hosted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The conference was chaired by Norbert Holtkamp, and the Local Organizing Committee was made up of staff from the ORNL SNS Project under the chairmanship of Stuart Henderson. The conference welcomed over 1400 delegates from the United States, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, South America and from as far away as Australia. Almost 1400 papers where processed during the conference and will be published on the Joint Accelerator Conferences Website (JACoW) page.

  2. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Kawashima, N.; Marshall, J. A.; Moses, S. L.; Neubert, T.; Mende, S. B.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), which flew on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 mission, used new techniques to study natural phenomena in the Earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere by introducing energetic perturbations into the system from a high power electron beam with known characteristics. Properties of auroras were studied by directing the electron beam into the upper atmosphere while making measurements of optical emissions. Studies were also performed of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon.

  3. Interdisciplinary glossary — particle accelerators and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, V. V.; Dyubkov, V. S.; Nikitaev, V. G.; Ulin, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    A general concept of a new interdisciplinary glossary, which includes particle accelerator terminology used in medicine, as well as relevant medical concepts, is presented. Its structure and usage rules are described. An example, illustrating the quickly searching technique of relevant information in this Glossary, is considered. A website address, where one can get an access to the Glossary, is specified. Glossary can be refined and supplemented.

  4. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Kawashima, N.; Marshall, J. A.; Moses, S. L.; Neubert, T.; Mende, S. B.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), which flew on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 mission, used new techniques to study natural phenomena in the Earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere by introducing energetic perturbations into the system from a high power electron beam with known characteristics. Properties of auroras were studied by directing the electron beam into the upper atmosphere while making measurements of optical emissions. Studies were also performed of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon.

  5. Superdense Coding with Uniformly Accelerated Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, Mehrnoosh; Mohammadzadeh, Hosein; Mehri-Dehnavi, Hossein; Rahimi, Robabeh

    2017-03-01

    We study superdense coding with uniformly accelerated particle in single mode approximation and beyond single mode approximation. We use four different functions, the capacity of superdense coding, negativity, discord and the probability of success for evaluating the final results. In single mode approximation, all the four functions behave as expected, however in beyond single mode approximation, except the probability of success, the other three functions represent peculiar behaviors at least for special ranges where the beyond single mode approximation is strong.

  6. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the

  7. Measurements of Materials Shielding Properties with 1 GeV/nuc56Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Cary; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Miller, Jack

    2006-05-15

    The design of future spacecraft such as the Crew ExplorationVehicle must take into account the radiation shielding properties of boththe structural components as well as dedicated shielding materials. Sincemodest depths of shielding stop the vast majority of Solar EnergeticParticles (SEP), the greater challenge is posed by the need to shieldcrew from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), which include highly-chargedand highly-energetic particles. Here, we report on results from testsperformed with beams of 1 GeV/nuc 56Fe at the Brookhaven NationalLaboratory. A wide variety of targets, both elemental and composite, wereplaced in the particle beams, and the spectra of particles emerging fromthe targets were measured using a stack of silicon detectors. Results arepresented primarily in terms of dose reduction per g cm-2 of targetmaterial, and support the conclusions of an earlier calculation by Wilsonet al. showing that performance improves as the shield's mass numberdecreases, with hydrogen being by far the most effective. The data alsoshow that, as depth increases, the incremental benefit of addingshielding decreases, particularlyfor aluminum and other elements withhigher atomic mass numbers.

  8. Induction of genomic instability after an acute whole-body exposure of mice to 56Fe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn; Supanpaiboon, Wisa; Whorton, Elbert

    Different types of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are present in space and have large mass and energy (HZE particles). Among these, stripped 56 Fe ions are of major concern. Although HZE particles are approximately 1% of GCR, their contribution to health risk could be significant because of (1) their high linear energy transfer (LET) resulting in a larger amount of energy being deposited in the hit cells, and (2) the lack of information on the effectiveness of these particles in cancer induction. To better protect astronauts in space environments, it is essential that we improve our understanding of the 56 Fe-ion-induced damage associated with the increased risk of late occurring diseases (such as cancer). It has been well established that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the major malignancies associated with exposure to ionizing radiation in both human beings and in mice. It is therefore one of the most important cancers related to space flights. For these reasons, it is important to investigate 56 Fe ion-induced damage in in vivo systems, especially in those cells that are known to be at risk for health problems associated with radiation, such as hematopoietic cells, the known target cell for radiation-induced leukemia. Since in vivo studies of humans are not possible, animal studies are critically important. It has been widely suggested that elevation of delayed chromosomal damage (normally known as genomic instability) is associated with cancer risk. We therefore determined dose-response relationships for the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) in mouse blood erythrocytes as a measure of both initial radiation damage and the induction of genomic instability. The frequencies of MN were measured in mature normochromatic-erythrocytes (MN-NCEs) and immature polychromatic-erythrocytes (MN-PCEs). These measurements were made as a function of radiation dose, radiation quality, time after irradiation and the genetic background of exposed mice. Blood samples were

  9. Channeled particle acceleration by plasma waves in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Noble, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A solid state accelerator concept utilizing particle acceleration along crystal channels by longitudinal electron plasma waves in a metal is presented. Acceleration gradients of order 100 GV/cm are theoretically possible. Particle dechanneling due to electron multiple scattering can be eliminated with a sufficiently high acceleration gradient. Plasma wave dissipation and generation in metals are also discussed.

  10. Particle Accelerators | RadTown USA | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-08-07

    article accelerators are special machines that speed up charged particles and smash them into atoms, breaking the atoms into even smaller pieces. Scientists use particle accelerators to study the smallest building blocks of our world. Accelerators can produce ionizing radiation in the form of x-rays, neutrons and charged particle beams as well as radioisotopes for use in research and technology.

  11. Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    2011-07-01

    John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

  12. Particle acceleration by combined diffusive shock acceleration and downstream multiple magnetic island acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Li, Gang; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-09-01

    As a consequence of the evolutionary conditions [28; 29], shock waves can generate high levels of downstream vortical turbulence. Simulations [32-34] and observations [30; 31] support the idea that downstream magnetic islands (also called plasmoids or flux ropes) result from the interaction of shocks with upstream turbulence. Zank et al. [18] speculated that a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream reconnection-related effects associated with the dynamical evolution of a “sea of magnetic islands” would result in the energization of charged particles. Here, we utilize the transport theory [18; 19] for charged particles propagating diffusively in a turbulent region filled with contracting and reconnecting plasmoids and small-scale current sheets to investigate a combined DSA and downstream multiple magnetic island charged particle acceleration mechanism. We consider separately the effects of the anti-reconnection electric field that is a consequence of magnetic island merging [17], and magnetic island contraction [14]. For the merging plasmoid reconnection- induced electric field only, we find i) that the particle spectrum is a power law in particle speed, flatter than that derived from conventional DSA theory, and ii) that the solution is constant downstream of the shock. For downstream plasmoid contraction only, we find that i) the accelerated particle spectrum is a power law in particle speed, flatter than that derived from conventional DSA theory; ii) for a given energy, the particle intensity peaks downstream of the shock, and the peak location occurs further downstream of the shock with increasing particle energy, and iii) the particle intensity amplification for a particular particle energy, f(x, c/c0)/f(0, c/c0), is not 1, as predicted by DSA theory, but increases with increasing particle energy. These predictions can be tested against observations of electrons and ions accelerated at interplanetary shocks and the heliospheric

  13. Space experiments with particle accelerators. [Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. It is also intended to make an initial performance test for an overall program of Spacelab/SEPAC experiments. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma dynamic arcjet, and associated diagnostic equipment. The accelerators are installed on the pallet, with monitoring and diagnostic observations being made by the gas plume release, beam-monitor TV, and particle-wave measuring instruments also mounted on the pallet. Command and display systems are installed in the module. Three major classes of investigations to be performed are vehicle charge neutralization, beam plasma physics, and beam atmosphere interactions. The first two are mainly onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effect of phenomena in the vicinity of Spacelab. The last one is concerned with atmospheric modification and is supported by other Spacelab 1 investigations as well as by ground-based, remote sensing observations.

  14. Space experiments with particle accelerators. [Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. It is also intended to make an initial performance test for an overall program of Spacelab/SEPAC experiments. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma dynamic arcjet, and associated diagnostic equipment. The accelerators are installed on the pallet, with monitoring and diagnostic observations being made by the gas plume release, beam-monitor TV, and particle-wave measuring instruments also mounted on the pallet. Command and display systems are installed in the module. Three major classes of investigations to be performed are vehicle charge neutralization, beam plasma physics, and beam atmosphere interactions. The first two are mainly onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effect of phenomena in the vicinity of Spacelab. The last one is concerned with atmospheric modification and is supported by other Spacelab 1 investigations as well as by ground-based, remote sensing observations.

  15. Radiation from Shock-Accelerated Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration, generation of magnetic fields , and associated radiation. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. The shock structure depends on the composition of the jet and ambient plasma (electron-positron or electron-ions). Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the reverse , jet shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The detailed properties of the radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jet shocks, and supernova remnants

  16. Effect of behavioral testing on spine density of basal dendrites in the CA1 region of the hippocampus modulated by (56)Fe irradiation.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Allen, Antiño R; Weber, Sydney; Chakraborti, Ayanabha; Sharma, Sourabh; Fike, John R

    2016-04-01

    A unique feature of the space radiation environment is the presence of high-energy charged particles, including (56)Fe ions, which can present a significant hazard to space flight crews during and following a mission. (56)Fe irradiation-induced cognitive changes often involve alterations in hippocampal function. These alterations might involve changes in spine morphology and density. In addition to irradiation, performing a cognitive task can also affect spine morphology. Therefore, it is often hard to determine whether changes in spine morphology and density are due to an environmental challenge or group differences in performance on cognitive tests. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the ability of exploratory behavior to increase specific measures of hippocampal spine morphology and density is affected by (56)Fe irradiation. In sham-irradiated mice, exploratory behavior increased basal spine density in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and the enclosed blade of the dentate gyrus. These effects were not seen in irradiated mice. In addition, following exploratory behavior, there was a trend toward a decrease in the percent stubby spines on apical dendrites in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in (56)Fe-irradiated, but not sham-irradiated, mice. Other hippocampal regions and spine measures affected by (56)Fe irradiation showed comparable radiation effects in behaviorally naïve and cognitively tested mice. Thus, the ability of exploratory behavior to alter spine density and morphology in specific hippocampal regions is affected by (56)Fe irradiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ion source studies for particle beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bieg, K.W.; Burns, E.J.T.; Olsen, J.N.; Dorrell, L.R.

    1985-05-01

    High power particle beam accelerators are being developed for use in inertial confinement fusion applications. These pulsed power accelerators require sources of low atomic number ions (e.g., protons, deuterons, carbon, or lithium). The sources must be of high purity for efficient accelerator operation and proper target coupling, must have a rapid ''turn-on,'' and must be compatible with ion diode configurations under development. A particular type of source presently being investigated is the flashover ion source which generates ions by means of the vacuum flashover of an insulating anode material when the high voltage pulse arrives at the diode. We have developed an applied-magnetic-field, extraction ion diode for the 0.03 TW Nereus accelerator specifically to investigate these sources. Extracted ion species are measured by means of a Thomson-parabola ion analyzer, dB/dt current monitors, and Faraday cups. Experiments have been performed to investigate the surface flashover mechanism and the effects of various dielectric source materials, anode preparation methods (including rf glow discharge cleaning), and vacuum conditions on ion species and diode operation.

  18. Evidence for the dipole nature of the low-energy γ enhancement in 56Fe.

    PubMed

    Larsen, A C; Blasi, N; Bracco, A; Camera, F; Eriksen, T K; Görgen, A; Guttormsen, M; Hagen, T W; Leoni, S; Million, B; Nyhus, H T; Renstrøm, T; Rose, S J; Ruud, I E; Siem, S; Tornyi, T; Tveten, G M; Voinov, A V; Wiedeking, M

    2013-12-13

    The γ-ray strength function of 56Fe has been measured from proton-γ coincidences for excitation energies up to ≈11  MeV. The low-energy enhancement in the γ-ray strength function, which was first discovered in the (3He,αγ)56Fe reaction, is confirmed with the (p,p'γ)56Fe experiment reported here. Angular distributions of the γ rays give for the first time evidence that the enhancement is dominated by dipole transitions.

  19. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Tatsuzo

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) mission, is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the earth's ionosphere, atmosphere, and magnetosphere. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator (EBA), plasma contactor, and associated instruments the purpose of which is to perform diagnostic, monitoring, and general data taking functions. Four major classes of investigations are to be performed by SEPAC. They are: beam plasma physics, beam-atmosphere interactions, the use of modulated electron beams as transmitting antennas, and the use of electron beams for remote sensing of electric and magnetic fields. The first class consists mainly of onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effects of phenomena in the vicinity of the shuttle. The last three are concerned with remote effects and are supported by other ATLAS 1 investigations as well as by ground-based observations.

  20. A method of accelerating solid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, M.S.; Kasimov, V.Z.; Khomenko, Y.P.; Kostochko, Y.P.

    1986-03-01

    The acceleration of solid particles by a high-velocity jet of detonation products (DP) of a tubular charge enclosed in a cylindrical shell is investigated. Its scheme consists of detonation of the charge, which is initiated by the impact of a piston from which a particle is de tached at the necessary moment. An analysis of the results showed that the structure of the flow of the DP quantitatively conincides with the case of flow of DP during detonation of a tubular charge. The presence of a massive external shell and piston is equivalent to an in crease in the thickness of a tubular charge. The jet of DP forming has the same velocity on the axis of symmetry of the charge and the same degree of inhomogeneity over the cross section of the charge channel.

  1. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38acceleration of charged-particles, mainly protons and {alpha}-particles, that in turn can by interaction with the stellar material modify the surface content.The present contribution explores to what extent the spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  2. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  3. Evolution of δ 56Fe in serpentinites during subduction: example in the Western Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debret, B.; Williams, H. M.; Millet, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    During subduction, prograde metamorphism leads to the disappearance of Fe3+-rich phases in serpentinites (mostly magnetite and lizardite). This redox reaction is accompanied with a decrease of Fe3+/FeTot ratio in serpentinites and a release of fluid mobile elements (e.g. B, S) but little is known about the iron mobility in fluids during subduction. We investigate this problem with an isotopic study of Fe in serpentinites from Western Alps ophiolites. These samples record different metamorphic conditions modelling a subduction gradient that allow deciphering the impact of prograde metamorphism on the Fe isotopic composition of serpentinites during subduction. At mid-oceanic ridges, ultramafic rocks are serpentinized by interaction with seawater derived fluids. This process leads to the replacement and oxidation of ferromagnesian minerals (olivine and orthopyroxene) to Fe3+-rich lizardite and magnetite (Liz-serpentinite). Mantle peridotites commonly display δ56Fe between -0.1 and +0.1 ‰ while Liz-serpentinites display a δ56Fe ranging from -0.09 to +0.04 (± 0.03)‰, which could potentially reflect interactions with low-δ56Fe hydrothermal fluids. During subduction, from greenschist to blueschist facies, the transition lizardite to antigorite leads to a progressive disappearance of magnetite and a reduction of Fe in serpentine. This redox reaction is accompanied with an increase of δ56Fe from +0.03 to +0.13‰. At eclogite facies, fully recrystallized Atg-serpentinites display a δ56Fe ranging from +0.14 to +0.20‰ while partly dehydrated serpentinites composed of antigorite, secondary olivine and chlorite display a lower δ56Fe ranging from -0.03 to +0.03‰. Our results show that, during the first 70 km of subduction, the transition lizardite to antigorite conduct to the formation of a serpentinite with a high δ56Fe value that can be accompanied with the loss of a low δ56Fe fluid. The increase of δ56Fe in serpentinites is correlated with a decrease of Fe3

  4. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.

    1994-01-01

    The scientific emphasis of this contract has been on the physics of beam ionosphere interactions, in particular, what are the plasma wave levels stimulated by the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) electron beam as it is ejected from the Electron Beam Accelerator (EBA) and passes into and through the ionosphere. There were two different phenomena expected. The first was generation of plasma waves by the interaction of the DC component of the beam with the plasma of the ionosphere, by wave particle interactions. The second was the generation of waves at the pulsing frequency of the beam (AC component). This is referred to as using the beam as a virtual antenna, because the beam of electrons is a coherent electrical current confined to move along the earth's magnetic field. As in a physical antenna, a conductor at a radio or TV station, the beam virtual antenna radiates electromagnetic waves at the frequency of the current variations. These two phenomena were investigated during the period of this contract.

  5. Future Particle Accelerator Developments for Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels

    During the last decade particle beam cancer therapy has seen a rapid increase in interest, and several new centers have been built, are currently under construction, or are in an advanced stage of planning. Typical treatment centers today consist of an accelerator capable of producing proton or ion beams in an energy range of interest for medical treatment, i.e. providing a penetration depth in water of about 30 cm, a beam delivery system to transport the produced beam to the patient treatment rooms, and several patient stations, allowing for an optimal usage of the continuously produced beam. This makes these centers rather large and consequently expensive. Only major hospital centers situated in an area where they can draw on a population of several million can afford such an installation. In order to spread the use of particle beam cancer therapy to a broader population base it will be necessary to scale down the facility size and cost. This can in principle be done by reducing the number of treatment rooms to one, eliminating the need of an elaborate beam delivery system, and thereby reducing the building size and cost. Such a change should be going in parallel with a reduction of the accelerator itself, and a number of approaches to this are currently being pursued. If successful, such developments could eventually lead to a compact system where all components would fit into a single shielded room, not much different in size from a typical radiation vault for radiotherapy with X-rays.

  6. Neutron scattering studies of 54,56Fe with monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B. M.; Henderson, S. L.; Sidwell, L. C.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Garza, E.; Steves, J.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Prados-Estevez, F. M.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-10-01

    Neutron scattering data for Fe are important for the development of next generation fission reactors, since Fe is an important structural material in all proposed reactor designs, as well as in existing reactors. How neutrons interact with Fe has an important impact on fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of fission reactors. While differential scattering cross sections have been previously measured at several incident neutron energies in the fast neutron region, questions remain regarding the uncertainties for existing cross sections and for neutron inelastic scattering. Elastic and inelastic differential scattering cross sections have been measured on 54,56Fe at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory in the fast neutron energy region between 1.7 and 4 MeV. Results from our measurements and comparisons to model calculations will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the Department of Energy under grant NEUP: NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and by the Cowan Physics Fund at the Univ. of Dallas.

  7. Production and applications of neutrons using particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chichester, David L.

    2009-11-01

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development and of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields of study. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and how neutrons interact in matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed too. Today the diversity of applications for industrial accelerator-based neutron sources is high and so to is the actual number of instruments in daily use is high, and they serve important roles in the fields where they're used. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the early development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of some current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends in the industrial uses of neutron producing particle accelerators.

  8. Charged particle acceleration in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S.V.; Naumova, N.M.; Dudnikova, G.I.; Vshivkov, V.A.; Pegoraro, F.; Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-11-01

    The high-gradient electron acceleration schemes that have been demonstrated using LWFA appear promising for the development of plasma-based laser accelerators into practical devices. However, a question still exists: how to avoid the wake field deterioration and the loss of the phase synchronism between the plasma wave and the electrons that prevent them from being accelerated up to the theoretical limit. In order to obtain the highest possible values of the wake electric field one must use as intense laser pulses as possible i.e., pulses with dimensionless amplitudes a {much_gt} 1. Pulses that have a dimensionless amplitude larger than one tend to be subject to a host of instabilities, such as relativistic self-focusing, self modulation and stimulated Raman scattering, that affect their propagation in the plasma. Such processes could be beneficial, in so far as they increase the pulse energy density, enhance the wake field generation, and provide the mechanism for transporting the laser radiation over several Rayleigh lengths without diffraction spreading. However, it is still far from certain that these processes can be exploited in a controlled form and can lead to regular, stationary wake fields. It is known that, in order to create good quality wake fields, it would be preferable to use laser pulses with steep fronts of order {lambda}{sub p}. The present paper aims at analyzing the influence of the laser pulse shape and of the plasma nonuniformity on the charged particle acceleration. This study is based on the results obtained with one dimensional PIC simulations.

  9. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  10. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  11. The acceleration and propagation of solar flare energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Ramaty, R.; Zweibel, E. G.; Holzer, T. E. (Editor); Mihalas, D. (Editor); Sturrock, P. A. (Editor); Ulrich, R. K. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Observations and theories of particle acceleration in solar flares are reviewed. The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are gamma rays, X-rays and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere and energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth's atmosphere. The implication of these observations are discussed. Stochastic and shock acceleration as well as acceleration in direct electric fields are considered. Interplanetary particle propagation is discussed and an overview of the highlights of both current and promising future research is presented.

  12. Effects of Proton and Combined Proton and (56)Fe Radiation on the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Allen, Antiño R; Sharma, Sourabh; Allen, Barrett; Rosi, Susanna; Olsen, Reid H J; Davis, Matthew J; Eiwaz, Massarra; Fike, John R; Nelson, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    The space radiation environment contains protons and (56)Fe, which could pose a significant hazard to space flight crews during and after missions. The space environment involves complex radiation exposures, thus, the effects of a dose of protons might be modulated by a dose of heavy-ion radiation. The brain, and particularly the hippocampus, may be susceptible to space radiation-induced changes. In this study, we first determined the dose-response effect of proton radiation (150 MeV) on hippocampus-dependent cognition 1 and 3 months after exposure. Based on those results, we subsequently exposed mice to protons alone (150 MeV, 0.1 Gy), (56)Fe alone (600 MeV/n, 0.5 Gy) or combined proton and (56)Fe radiations (protons first) with the two exposures separated by 24 h. At one month postirradiation, all animal groups showed novel object recognition. However, at three months postirradiation, mice exposed to either protons or combined proton and (56)Fe radiations showed impaired novel object recognition, which was not observed in mice irradiated with (56)Fe alone. The mechanisms in these impairments might involve inflammation. In mice irradiated with protons alone or (56)Fe alone three months earlier, there was a negative correlation between a measure of novel object recognition and the number of newly born activated microglia in the dentate gyrus. Next, cytokine and chemokine levels were assessed in the hippocampus. At one month after exposure the levels of IL-12 were higher in mice exposed to combined radiations compared with sham-irradiated mice, while the levels of IFN-γ were lower in mice exposed to (56)Fe radiation alone or combined radiations. In addition, IL-4 levels were lower in (56)Fe-irradiated mice compared with proton-irradiated mice and TNF-α levels were lower in proton-irradiated mice than in mice receiving combined radiations. At three months after exposure, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) and eotaxin levels were lower in mice receiving combined

  13. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Nagatomo, M.; Ninomiya, K.; Sasaki, S.; Ushirokawa, A.; Kudo, I.; Ejiri, M.; Roberts, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Plans for SEPAC, an instrument array to be used on Spacelab 1 to study vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma interaction in space, beam-atmospheric interaction exciting artificial aurora and airglow, and the electromagnetic-field configuration of the magnetosphere, are presented. The hardware, consisting of electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma arcjet, neutral-gas plume generator, power supply, diagnostic package (photometer, plasma probes, particle analyzers, and plasma-wave package), TV monitor, and control and data-management unit, is described. The individual SEPAC experiments, the typical operational sequence, and the general outline of the SEPAC follow-on mission are discussed. Some of the experiments are to be joint ventures with AEPI (INS 003) and will be monitored by low-light-level TV.

  14. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Nagatomo, M.; Ninomiya, K.; Sasaki, S.; Ushirokawa, A.; Kudo, I.; Ejiri, M.; Roberts, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Plans for SEPAC, an instrument array to be used on Spacelab 1 to study vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma interaction in space, beam-atmospheric interaction exciting artificial aurora and airglow, and the electromagnetic-field configuration of the magnetosphere, are presented. The hardware, consisting of electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma arcjet, neutral-gas plume generator, power supply, diagnostic package (photometer, plasma probes, particle analyzers, and plasma-wave package), TV monitor, and control and data-management unit, is described. The individual SEPAC experiments, the typical operational sequence, and the general outline of the SEPAC follow-on mission are discussed. Some of the experiments are to be joint ventures with AEPI (INS 003) and will be monitored by low-light-level TV.

  15. A Magnetorestrictive Tuning System for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu-Ying Tai; Jordan Cormier; William Espinola; Zhixiu Han; Chad Joshi; Anil Mavanur; Livia Racz; Kenneth Shepard; Edward Daly; Kirk Davis

    2005-05-16

    Energen, Inc. has designed, built, and demonstrated several fast and slow tuners based on its magnetostrictive actuators and stepper motor. These tuners are designed for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities, which are important structures in particle accelerators that support a wide spectrum of disciplines, including nuclear and high-energy physics and free electron lasers (FEL). In the past two years, Energen's work has focused on magnetostrictive fast tuners for microphonics and Lorentz detuning compensation on elliptical-cell and spoke-loaded cavities. These tuners were custom designed to meet specific requirements, which included a few to 100 micron stroke range, hundreds to kilohertz operation frequency, and cryogenic temperature operation in vacuum or liquid helium. These tuners have been tested in house and at different laboratories, such as DESY, Argonne National Lab, and Jefferson Lab. Some recent results are presented in this paper.

  16. Particle Acceleration in SN1006 Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant is for the analysis of FUSE observations of particle acceleration in supernova remnant SN1006 shock waves. We have performed quick look analysis of the data, but because the source is faint and because the O VI emission lines on SN1006 are extremely broad, extreme care is needed for background subtraction and profile fitting. Moreover, the bulk of the analysis in will consist of model calculations. The Ly beta and O VI lines are clearly detected at the position in the NW filament of SN1006, but not in the NE position where non-thermal X-rays are strong. The lack of O VI emission in the NE places an upper limit on the pre-shock density there.

  17. US particle accelerators at age 50

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.R.

    1981-11-01

    Fifty years ago, a dramatic race was under way to see who would be first to accelerate protons to an energy high enough to disintegrate the atomic nucleus. This contest, coincidental with the birth of the American Institute of Physics, could be considered as the beginning of what was to become a Golden age of high-energy physics. The race might also be taken to mark the end of an Age of Innocence of nulcear physicists. Heretofore during an era to which all physicists look back with nostalgia, much of the fundamental knowledge about the nucleus had been by obtained the use of rather primitive experimental devices, followed by sophisticated analysis. Rutherford's famous ..cap alpha..-particle scattering experiment is a case-in-point: a little string and sealing wax and not much else. Not much, that is, except great leaps of reason and imagination. In the future, in addition to make-do skills, physicists were going to have to master arcane techniques, such as those of mechanical and electrical engineers. Indeed they would have to invent a whole new technology of accelerator building in order to explore the inside of the nucleus and to identify and study its constituent parts.

  18. US Particle Accelerators at Age 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the development of accelerators over the past 50 years. Topics include: types of accelerators, including cyclotrons; sociology of accelerators (motivation, financing, construction, and use); impact of war; national laboratories; funding; applications; future projects; foreign projects; and international collaborations. (JN)

  19. US Particle Accelerators at Age 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the development of accelerators over the past 50 years. Topics include: types of accelerators, including cyclotrons; sociology of accelerators (motivation, financing, construction, and use); impact of war; national laboratories; funding; applications; future projects; foreign projects; and international collaborations. (JN)

  20. Optical Phase Locking of Modelocked Lasers for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Sinha, S.; Wisdom, J.; Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-17

    Particle accelerators require precise phase control of the electric field through the entire accelerator structure. Thus a future laser driven particle accelerator will require optical synchronism between the high-peak power laser sources that power the accelerator. The precise laser architecture for a laser driven particle accelerator is not determined yet, however it is clear that the ability to phase-lock independent modelocked oscillators will be of crucial importance. We report the present status on our work to demonstrate long term phaselocking between two modelocked lasers to within one degree of optical phase and describe the optical synchronization techniques that we employ.

  1. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  2. Current Fragmentation and Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Vlahos, L.; Baumann, G.; Drake, J. F.; Nordlund, Å.

    2012-11-01

    Particle acceleration in solar flares remains an outstanding problem in plasma physics and space science. While the observed particle energies and timescales can perhaps be understood in terms of acceleration at a simple current sheet or turbulence site, the vast number of accelerated particles, and the fraction of flare energy in them, defies any simple explanation. The nature of energy storage and dissipation in the global coronal magnetic field is essential for understanding flare acceleration. Scenarios where the coronal field is stressed by complex photospheric motions lead to the formation of multiple current sheets, rather than the single monolithic current sheet proposed by some. The currents sheets in turn can fragment into multiple, smaller dissipation sites. MHD, kinetic and cellular automata models are used to demonstrate this feature. Particle acceleration in this environment thus involves interaction with many distributed accelerators. A series of examples demonstrate how acceleration works in such an environment. As required, acceleration is fast, and relativistic energies are readily attained. It is also shown that accelerated particles do indeed interact with multiple acceleration sites. Test particle models also demonstrate that a large number of particles can be accelerated, with a significant fraction of the flare energy associated with them. However, in the absence of feedback, and with limited numerical resolution, these results need to be viewed with caution. Particle in cell models can incorporate feedback and in one scenario suggest that acceleration can be limited by the energetic particles reaching the condition for firehose marginal stability. Contemporary issues such as footpoint particle acceleration are also discussed. It is also noted that the idea of a "standard flare model" is ill-conceived when the entire distribution of flare energies is considered.

  3. Effects of 28Si Ions, 56Fe Ions, and Protons on the Induction of Murine Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Michael M.; Ray, F. Andrew; Genik, Paula C.; Yu, Yongjia; McCarthy, Maureen; Fallgren, Christina M.; Ullrich, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of cancer risks posed to space-flight crews by exposure to high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) ions are subject to considerable uncertainty because epidemiological data do not exist for human populations exposed to similar radiation qualities. We assessed the carcinogenic effects of 300 MeV/n 28Si or 600 MeV/n 56Fe ions in a mouse model for radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia and hepatocellular carcinoma. C3H/HeNCrl mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, or 1 Gy of 300 MeV/n 28Si ions, 600 MeV/n 56Fe ions or 1 or 2 Gy of protons simulating the 1972 solar particle event (1972SPE) at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Additional mice were irradiated with 137Cs gamma rays at doses of 1, 2, or 3 Gy. All groups were followed until they were moribund or reached 800 days of age. We found that 28Si or 56Fe ions do not appear to be substantially more effective than gamma rays for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia. However, 28Si or 56Fe ion irradiated mice had a much higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma than gamma ray irradiated or proton irradiated mice. These data demonstrate a clear difference in the effects of these HZE ions on the induction of leukemia compared to solid tumors, suggesting potentially different mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Also seen in this study was an increase in metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma in the 28Si and 56Fe ion irradiated mice compared with those exposed to gamma rays or 1972SPE protons, a finding with important implications for setting radiation exposure limits for space-flight crew members. PMID:25126721

  4. Computer modeling of test particle acceleration at oblique shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of the basic techniques and illustrative results of charged particle-modeling numerical codes suitable for particle acceleration at oblique, fast-mode collisionless shocks emphasizes the treatment of ions as test particles, calculating particle dynamics through numerical integration along exact phase-space orbits. Attention is given to the acceleration of particles at planar, infinitessimally thin shocks, as well as to plasma simulations in which low-energy ions are injected and accelerated at quasi-perpendicular shocks with internal structure.

  5. MHD turbulence, reconnection, and test-particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Perry C.; Matthaeus, William H.

    1992-01-01

    We examine homogeneous MHD turbulence and turbulent magnetic reconnection as possible mechanisms for accelerating cosmic ray particles. Test particle calculations are performed using fields from MHD simulations, and initially Maxwellian particle distributions are shown to evolve into power-law distributions. Simple estimates for both the maximum energy attainable and the mean energies of the accelerated particles are fairly successful and are consistent with timescales for flares and cosmic rays.

  6. CUSP Energetic Particles: Confinement, Acceleration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    The cusp energetic particle (CEP) event is a new magnetospheric phenomenon. The events were detected in the dayside cusp for hours, in which the measured helium ions had energies up to 8 MeV. All of these events were associated with a dramatic decrease and large fluctuations in the local magnetic field strength. During January 1999 - December 1999 covered by this report, I have studied the CEP events by analyzing the POLAR, GEOTAIL, and WIND particle and magnetic field data measured during the geomagnetic quiet periods in 1996 and one geomagnetic storm period in 1998. The simultaneous observations indicated that the ion fluxes in the CEP events were higher than that in both the upstream and the downstream from the bow shock. The pitch angle distribution of the helium ions in the CEP events was found to peak around 90 deg. It was found that the mirror parameter, defined as the ratio of the square root of the integration of the parallel turbulent power spectral component over the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges to the mean field in the cusp, is correlated with the intensity of the cusp MeV helium flux, which is a measure of the influence of mirroring interactions and an indication of local effect. It was also found that the turbulent power of the local magnetic field in the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges is correlated with the intensity of the cusp energetic helium ions. Such ULF ranges correspond to periods of about 0.33-500 seconds that cover the gyroperiods, the bounce periods, and the drift periods of the tens keV to MeV charged particles when they are temporarily confined in the high-altitude dayside cusp. These observations represent a discovery that the high-altitude dayside cusp is a new acceleration and dynamic trapping region of the magnetosphere. The cusp geometry is connected via gradient and curvature drift of these energized ions to the equatorial plasma sheet as close as the geostationary orbit at local midnight. It implies that the dayside cusp is

  7. CUSP Energetic Particles: Confinement, Acceleration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    The cusp energetic particle (CEP) event is a new magnetospheric phenomenon. The events were detected in the dayside cusp for hours, in which the measured helium ions had energies up to 8 MeV. All of these events were associated with a dramatic decrease and large fluctuations in the local magnetic field strength. During January 1999 - December 1999 covered by this report, I have studied the CEP events by analyzing the POLAR, GEOTAIL, and WIND particle and magnetic field data measured during the geomagnetic quiet periods in 1996 and one geomagnetic storm period in 1998. The simultaneous observations indicated that the ion fluxes in the CEP events were higher than that in both the upstream and the downstream from the bow shock. The pitch angle distribution of the helium ions in the CEP events was found to peak around 90 deg. It was found that the mirror parameter, defined as the ratio of the square root of the integration of the parallel turbulent power spectral component over the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges to the mean field in the cusp, is correlated with the intensity of the cusp MeV helium flux, which is a measure of the influence of mirroring interactions and an indication of local effect. It was also found that the turbulent power of the local magnetic field in the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges is correlated with the intensity of the cusp energetic helium ions. Such ULF ranges correspond to periods of about 0.33-500 seconds that cover the gyroperiods, the bounce periods, and the drift periods of the tens keV to MeV charged particles when they are temporarily confined in the high-altitude dayside cusp. These observations represent a discovery that the high-altitude dayside cusp is a new acceleration and dynamic trapping region of the magnetosphere. The cusp geometry is connected via gradient and curvature drift of these energized ions to the equatorial plasma sheet as close as the geostationary orbit at local midnight. It implies that the dayside cusp is

  8. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore » uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  9. Acceleration of superparamagnetic particles with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, R.; Lenk, F.; Bley, T.; Boschke, E.

    2017-04-01

    High magnetic capture efficiency in the context of Biomagnetic Separation (BMS) using superparamagnetic particles (SMPs) requires efficient mixing and high relative velocities between cellular and other targets and SMPs. For this purpose, batch processes or microfluidic systems are commonly used. Here, we analyze the characteristics of an in-house developed batch process experimental setup, the Electromagnetic Sample Mixer (ESM) described earlier. This device uses three electromagnets to increase the relative velocity between SMPs and targets. We carry out simulations of the magnetic field in the ESM and in a simpler paradigmatic setup, and thus were able to calculate the force field acting on the SMPs and to simulate their relative velocities and fluid dynamics due to SMP movement. In this way we were able to show that alternate charging of the magnets induces a double circular stream of SMPs in the ESM, resulting in high relative velocities of SMPs to the targets. Consequently, due to the conservation of momentum, the fluid experiences an acceleration induced by the SMPs. We validated our simulations by microscopic observation of the SMPs in the magnetic field, using a homemade apparatus designed to accommodate a long working-distance lens. By comparing the results of modeling this paradigmatic setup with the experimental observations, we determined that the velocities of the SMPs corresponded to the results of our simulations.

  10. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  11. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly.

  12. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  13. Neutron cross section covariances in the resonance region: 52Cr, 56Fe, 58Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Oblozinsky, P.; Cho, Y.-S.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.

    2010-08-03

    We evaluated covariances for neutron capture and elastic scattering cross sections on major structural materials, {sup 52}Cr, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Ni, in the resonance region which extends beyond 800 keV for each of them. Use was made of the recently developed covariance formalism based on kernel approximation along with data in the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. The data of most interest for AFCI applications, elastic scattering cross section uncertainties at energies above about few hundred keV, are on the level of about 12% for {sup 52}Cr, 7-8% for {sup 56}Fe and 5-6% for {sup 58}Ni.

  14. PARTICLE ACCELERATION DURING MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN A COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2013-08-20

    Particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk was investigated by using a particle-in-cell simulation. We discuss the important role that magnetic reconnection plays not only on the saturation of MRI but also on the relativistic particle generation. The plasma pressure anisotropy of p > p{sub ||} induced by the action of MRI dynamo leads to rapid growth in magnetic reconnection, resulting in the fast generation of nonthermal particles with a hard power-law spectrum. This efficient particle acceleration mechanism involved in a collisionless accretion disk may be a possible model to explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes.

  15. Cavitation inception on microparticles: a self-propelled particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2004-04-30

    Corrugated, hydrophilic particles with diameters between 30 and 150 microm are found to cause cavitation inception at their surfaces when they are exposed to a short, intensive tensile stress wave. The growing cavity accelerates the particle into translatory motion until the tensile stress decreases, and subsequently the particle separates from the cavity. The cavity growth and particle detachment are modeled by considering the momentum of the particle and the displaced liquid. The analysis suggests that all particles which cause cavitation are accelerated into translatory motion, and separate from the cavities they themselves nucleate. Thus, in the research of cavitation nuclei the link is established between developed cavitation bubbles and their origin.

  16. Explosive reconnection and particle acceleration in relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Komissarov, Sergey; Porth, Oliver; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    We develop a model of particle acceleration in explosive reconnection events in relativistic magnetically-dominated plasmas. We identify two stages of particle acceleration: (i) fast explosive prompt X-point collapse and (ii) ensuing island merger. The fastest acceleration occurs during the initial catastrophic X-point collapse, with the reconnection electric field of the order of the magnetic field. During the X-point collapse particles are accelerated by charge-starved electric fields, which can reach (and even exceed) values of the local magnetic field. The explosive stage of reconnection produces non-thermal power-law tails with slopes that depend on the average magnetization sigma. The model has all the ingredients needed for Crab flares: natural formation of highly magnetized regions, explosive dynamics on light travel time, development of high electric fields on macroscopic scales and acceleration of particles to energies well exceeding the average magnetic energy per particle.

  17. Test particle acceleration in turbulent reconnecting magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosiano, John; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Plante, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    The effect of turbulence on particle acceleration in a MHD field was investigated by computing test particle trajectories in turbulent MHD reconnecting fields, including reconnection simulations at different magnetic Reynolds numbers. The dynamics of individual particles were investigated making it possible to examine the acceleration mechanism in great detail. It was found that turbulence influences the acceleration in two ways. It enhances the reconnection electric field while producing a stochastic electric field that gives rise to momentum diffusion; and it produces magnetic 'bubbles' and other irregularities that can temporarily trap test particles in the strong reconnection electric field for times comparable to the magnetofluid characteristic time.

  18. Test particle acceleration in turbulent reconnecting magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosiano, John; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Plante, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    The effect of turbulence on particle acceleration in a MHD field was investigated by computing test particle trajectories in turbulent MHD reconnecting fields, including reconnection simulations at different magnetic Reynolds numbers. The dynamics of individual particles were investigated making it possible to examine the acceleration mechanism in great detail. It was found that turbulence influences the acceleration in two ways. It enhances the reconnection electric field while producing a stochastic electric field that gives rise to momentum diffusion; and it produces magnetic 'bubbles' and other irregularities that can temporarily trap test particles in the strong reconnection electric field for times comparable to the magnetofluid characteristic time.

  19. Nuclear processes and accelerated particles in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear processes and particle acceleration in solar flares are discussed and the theory of gamma-ray and neutron production is reviewed. Gamma-ray, neutron, and charged-particle observations of solar flares are compared with predictions, and the implications of these comparisons for particle energy spectra, total numbers, anisotropies, electron-to-proton ratios, and acceleration mechanisms are considered. Elemental and isotopic abundances of the ambient gas derived from gamma-ray observations have also been compared to abundances obtained from observations of escaping accelerated particles and other sources.

  20. Modeling inertial particle acceleration statistics in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyalasomayajula, S.; Warhaft, Z.; Collins, L. R.

    2008-09-01

    Our objective is to explain recent Lagrangian acceleration measurements of inertial particles in decaying, nearly isotropic turbulence [Ayyalasomayajula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 144507 (2006)]. These experiments showed that as particle inertial effects increased, the variance in the particle acceleration fluctuations was reduced, and the tails of the normalized particle acceleration probability density function (PDF) became systematically attenuated. We model this phenomenon using a base flow that consists of a two-dimensional array of evenly spaced vortices with signs and intensities that vary randomly in time. We simulate a large sample of inertial particles moving through the fluid without disturbing the flow (one-way coupling). Consistent with Bec et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 550, 349 (2006)], we find that our model exhibits preferential concentration or clustering of particles in regions located away from the vortex centers. That is, inertial particles selectively sample the flow field, oversampling regions with high strains and undersampling regions with high vorticities. At low Stokes numbers, this biased "sampling" of the flow is responsible for the reduction in the acceleration variance and partially explains the attenuation of the tails of the acceleration PDF. However, contrary to previous findings, we show that the tails of the PDF are also diminished by "filtering" induced by the attenuated response of the inertial particles to temporal variations in the fluid acceleration: Inertial particles do not respond to fluctuations with frequencies much higher than the inverse of the particle stopping time. We show that larger fluid acceleration events have higher frequencies and hence experience greater filtering by particle inertia. We contrast the vortex model with previous Lagrangian acceleration models by Sawford [Phys. Fluids A 3, 1577 (1991)] and Reynolds [Phys. Fluids 15, L1 (2003)] and show that although these models capture some aspects of the inertial

  1. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR AND METHOD OF CONTROLLING THE TEMPERATURE THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1960-10-11

    A method and means for controlling the temperature of a particle accelerator and more particularly to the maintenance of a constant and uniform temperature throughout a particle accelerator is offered. The novel feature of the invention resides in the provision of two individual heating applications to the accelerator structure. The first heating application provided is substantially a duplication of the accelerator heat created from energization, this first application being employed only when the accelerator is de-energized thereby maintaining the accelerator temperature constant with regard to time whether the accelerator is energized or not. The second heating application provided is designed to add to either the first application or energization heat in a manner to create the same uniform temperature throughout all portions of the accelerator.

  2. Earth's Most Powerful Natural Particle Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Thunderstorms launch antimatter, gamma rays, and highly energetic electrons and neutrons to the edge of space. This witches' brew of radiation is generated at the edge of the stratopause, by the strong electric fields associated with lightning discharges. In less than a quarter millisecond, an explosive feedback process takes an initial seed population of electrons, perhaps produced by cosmic rays from dying stars, and amplifies them a billion billion-fold in the rarefied air over high altitude thunderheads. The electrons generate gamma radiation as they travel through the stratosphere and lower mesosphere, momentarily brighter and of harder spectrum than cosmic gamma ray bursts. These electrons ultimately are absorbed by the atmosphere, but the gamma rays continue on, into the upper reaches of the atmosphere, where they in turn generate a new population of electrons, positrons, and energetic neutrons. These secondary electrons and positrons move along the magnetic field, and can reach near-earth space, streaming through the inner radiation belts, and possibly contributing to the trapped populations there. First postulated by Wilson in 1925, and serendipitously discovered by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory in 1994 [Fishman et al.], these events, known as "Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes" (TGFs), represent the most intense episodes of particle acceleration on or near the Earth, resulting in electrons with energies up to 100 MeV. Recent observations by the RHESSI [Smith et al., 2004], Fermi [Briggs et al., 2010], and AGILE [Tavani et al., 2011] satellites, and theoretical and computational modeling, have suggested that the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) mechanism [Gurevich, 1992], and important modifications, such as the relativistic feedback discharge (RFD) model [Dwyer 2012] can best explain the observations at present. In these models, strong thunderstorm electric fields drive seed electrons, generated from cosmic ray interactions, into a runaway

  3. Comparing particle acceleration rates of different astrophysical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Antonella; Zimbardo, Gaetano; Perri, Silvia; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Energetic particles, with energies much larger than thermal energies, are observed in most astrophysical environments, but a full understanding of the acceleration processes is still missing. Here, we make a comparison of the observed acceleration rates at various astrophysical environments like solar flares, Crab nebula flares, Earth's magnetotail energetic particles, supernova remnants and heliospheric shocks. We try to cross the borders between different astrophysical fields by looking for common acceleration mechanisms: in particular we consider acceleration at the reconnection outflow jet and shock Fermi acceleration in the cases of either diffusive or superdiffusive particle transport. We make order-of-magnitude estimates of the acceleration rates in solar flares, Crab nebula flares, Earth's magnetotail, supernova remnants (SNRs) and heliospheric shocks, and compare the observations with predictions from acceleration models related to magnetic reconnection and Fermi acceleration at shocks. In details, we consider the results of numerical simulations of particle acceleration in the presence of moving magnetized plasmas, i.e., reconnection jets or transient random perturbations which model fluctuations observed in the Earth's magnetotail. Such measurements may help MMS mission as well as other future missions currently under study, e.g., THOR. We find that magnetic reconnection can explain the fastest acceleration rates observed both in solar flares and Crab flares, while shock acceleration is generally slower and requires magnetic field amplification in the SNR environment and anomalous transport at heliospheric shocks.

  4. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  5. Particle Acceleration in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Z.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Harding, A.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar magnetospheres represent unipolar inductor-type electrical circuits at which an EM potential across the polar cap (due to the rotation of their magnetic field) drives currents that run in and out of the polar cap and close at infinity. An estimate ofthe magnitude of this current can be obtained by dividing the potential induced across the polar cap V approx = B(sub O) R(sub O)(Omega R(sub O)/c)(exp 2) by the impedance of free space Z approx eq 4 pi/c; the resulting polar cap current density is close to $n {GJ} c$ where $n_{GJ}$ is the Goldreich-Julian (GJ) charge density. This argument suggests that even at current densities close to the GJ one, pulsar magnetospheres have a significant component of electric field $E_{parallel}$, parallel to the magnetic field, a condition necessary for particle acceleration and the production of radiation. We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents, charge densities, spin down rates and potential drops along the magnetic field lines of pulsar magnetospheres which do not obey the ideal MHD condition $E cdot B = 0$. By relating the current density along the poloidal field lines to the parallel electric field via a kind of Ohm's law $J = sigma E_{parallel}$ we study the structure of these magnetospheres as a function of the conductivity $sigma$. We find that for $sigma gg OmegaS the solution tends to the (ideal) Force-Free one and to the Vacuum one for $sigma 11 OmegaS. Finally, we present dissipative magnetospheric solutions with spatially variable $sigma$ that supports various microphysical properties and are compatible with the observations.

  6. Application of particle accelerators in research.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Since the beginning of the past century, accelerators have started to play a fundamental role as powerful tools to discover the world around us, how the universe has evolved since the big bang and to develop fundamental instruments for everyday life. Although more than 15 000 accelerators are operating around the world only a very few of them are dedicated to fundamental research. An overview of the present high energy physics (HEP) accelerator status and prospectives is presented.

  7. Charged Particle Acceleration by Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2007-07-11

    Several physical processes of laser electron acceleration in plasmas are revisited. A laser beam can drive plasma waves which in turn can accelerate resonant electrons. If these plasma waves can reach amplitude limited only by wave breaking alone, then the corresponding accelerating gradient in the plasma wave is of the order of electron rest mass energy per plasma skin depth, typically about GEV per centimeter. This is several orders of magnitudes higher than the conventional RF field gradient, giving rise to the possibility of compact accelerators needed for high energy physics research as well as medical and other applications. The chirped short pulse laser, with intensity exceeding the threshold for relativistic self focusing, can generate ion bubble in its wake by expelling electrons. The electrons at the bubble boundary, surge toward the stagnation point and pile up there. As the pile acquires a critical size, these electrons are injected into the bubble and accelerated by the combined fields of ion space charge and the plasma wave to Gev in energy. Most remarkably these electrons are bunched in phase space while being accelerated to high energy, resulting in near mono-energetic electron beam of high beam quality, with narrow energy spread. We review also other processes related to laser electron acceleration, such as acceleration in plasma wave assisted by ponderomotive force and betatron acceleration.

  8. A practical guide to modern high energy particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to convey an understanding of how particle accelerators work and why they look the way they do. The approach taken is physically intuitive rather than mathematically rigorous. The emphasis is on the description of proton circular accelerators and colliders. Linear accelerators are mentioned only in passing as sources of protons for higher energy rings. Electron accelerators/storage rings and antiproton sources are discussed only by way of brief descriptions of the features which distinguish them from proton accelerators. The basics of how generic accelerators work are discussed, focusing on descriptions of what sets the overall scale, single particle dynamics and stability, and descriptions of the phase space of the particle beam, the information thus presented is then used to go through the exercise of designing a Superconducting Super Collider. (LEW)

  9. Particle accelerations and current structures of Weibel and Filamentation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, C. M.; Huynh, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Particle accelerations of the Wibel instability (WI) and the Filamentation instability(FI) are studied by using PIC simuations, comparing them side-by-side. Although two instabilities are almost identical in the linear growth phase, significant differences are found in the nonlinear phase in their particle accelerations and current structures. The FI shows enhanced electron acceleration, whereas particle acceleration is almost absent in the WI. The different particle accelerations between the FI and the WI seem to be associated with their different current structures; a hollow electron current structure for the FI and a center filled current structure for that of the WI. Different electron distributions seem to bring in different current filament structures, eventually leading to different magnetic characteristics.

  10. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT LOW CORONAL COMPRESSION REGIONS AND SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Lee, M. A.; Gorby, M; Lugaz, N.; Spence, H. E.; Desai, M.; Török, T.; Downs, C.; Linker, J.; Lionello, R.; Mikić, Z.; Riley, P.; Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.; Kozarev, K.

    2015-09-10

    We present a study on particle acceleration in the low corona associated with the expansion and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Because CME expansion regions low in the corona are effective accelerators over a finite spatial region, we show that there is a rigidity regime where particles effectively diffuse away and escape from the acceleration sites using analytic solutions to the Parker transport equation. This leads to the formation of broken power-law distributions. Based on our analytic solutions, we find a natural ordering of the break energy and second power-law slope (above the break energy) as a function of the scattering characteristics. These relations provide testable predictions for the particle acceleration from low in the corona. Our initial analysis of solar energetic particle observations suggests a range of shock compression ratios and rigidity dependencies that give rise to the solar energetic particle (SEP) events studied. The wide range of characteristics inferred suggests competing mechanisms at work in SEP acceleration. Thus, CME expansion and acceleration in the low corona may naturally give rise to rapid particle acceleration and broken power-law distributions in large SEP events.

  11. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 - 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  12. Suprathermal Charged Particle Acceleration by Small-scale Flux Ropes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of super-Alvenic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that particle drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes. Preliminary results will be discussed to illustrate how particle acceleration might be affected when both diffusive shock and small-scale flux acceleration occur simultaneously at interplanetary shocks.

  13. Trans-Relativistic Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter A.; Subramanian, P.

    2014-01-01

    Trans-relativistic particle acceleration due to Fermi interactions between charged particles and MHD waves helps to power the observed high-energy emission in AGN transients and solar flares. The trans-relativistic acceleration process is challenging to treat analytically due to the complicated momentum dependence of the momentum diffusion coefficient. For this reason, most existing analytical treatments of particle acceleration assume that the injected seed particles are already relativistic, and therefore they are not suited to study trans-relativistic acceleration. The lack of an analytical model has forced workers to rely on numerical simulations to obtain particle spectra describing the trans-relativistic case. In this work we present the first analytical solution to the global, trans-relativistic problem describing the acceleration of seed particles due to hard-sphere collisions with MHD waves. The new results include the exact solution for the steady-state Green's function resulting from the continual injection of monoenergetic seed particles with an arbitrary energy. We also introduce an approximate treatment of the trans-relativistic acceleration process based on a hybrid form for the momentum diffusion coefficient, given by the sum of the two asymptotic forms. We refer to this process as "quasi hard-sphere scattering." The main advantage of the hybrid approximation is that it allows the extension of the physical model to include (i) the effects of synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses and (ii) time dependence. The new analytical results can be used to model the trans-relativistic acceleration of particles in AGN and solar environments, and can also be used to compute the spectra of the associated synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission. Applications of both types are discussed. We highlight (i) relativistic ion acceleration in black hole accretion coronae, and (ii) the production of gyrosynchrotron microwave emission due to relativistic electron

  14. Charged-particle acceleration in braking plasma jets.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we describe the mechanism of the charged particle acceleration in space plasma systems. We consider the interaction of nonrelativistic particles with a sub-Alfvenic plasma jet originated from the magnetic reconnection. The sharp front with increased magnetic field amplitude forms in the jet leading edge. Propagation of the jet in the inhomogeneous background plasma results in front braking. We show that particles can interact with this front in a resonance manner. Synchronization of particle reflections from the front and the front braking provides the stable trapping of particles in the vicinity of the front. This trapping supports the effective particle acceleration along the front. The mechanism of acceleration is potentially important due to the prevalence of the magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas.

  15. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  16. Particles Acceleration at Solar Wind Termination Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksenofontov, Leonid T.; Berezhko, E. G.

    2003-07-01

    A selfconsistent time dependent model is developed to study anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) acceleration at the heliospheric termination shock in the upwind direction and the shock modification under the influence of pickup protons and ACRs. Preliminary results demonstrate that ACR spectrum, termination shock structure and its position are very sensitive to the efficiency of ACR injection/acceleration. Relatively high injection rate of pickup protons is required in order to repro duce ACR proton spectrum consistent with the experiment.

  17. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SUPERLUMINAL STRONG WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Teraki, Yuto; Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2015-06-01

    We calculate the electron acceleration in random superluminal strong waves (SLSWs) and radiation from them using numerical methods in the context of the termination shocks of pulsar wind nebulae. We pursue the orbit of electrons by solving the equation of motion in the analytically expressed electromagnetic turbulences. These consist of a primary SLS and isotropically distributed secondary electromagnetic waves. Under the dominance of the secondary waves, all electrons gain nearly equal energy. On the other hand, when the primary wave is dominant, selective acceleration occurs. The phase of the primary wave for electrons moving nearly along the wavevector changes very slowly compared with the oscillation of the wave, which is “phase-locked,” and such electrons are continuously accelerated. This acceleration by SLSWs may play a crucial role in pre-shock acceleration. In general, the radiation from the phase-locked population is different from the synchro-Compton radiation. However, when the amplitude of the secondary waves is not extremely weaker than that of the primary wave, the typical frequency can be estimated from synchro-Compton theory using the secondary waves. The primary wave does not contribute to the radiation because the SLSW accelerates electrons almost linearly. This radiation can be observed as a radio knot at the upstream of the termination shocks of the pulsar wind nebulae without counterparts in higher frequency ranges.

  18. Analysis of powerful local acceleration of solar wind particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, I. A.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2017-07-01

    Collisionless plasma of the solar wind is considered. A number of physical processes in this plasma lead to the formation of magnetic islands that are potential traps for charged particles. The merging and contractions of magnetic islands cause a powerful acceleration of these particles to energies over 1 MeV. This work continues the study in recent years on modeling of the acceleration of charged particles of the solar wind. Our analytical solution of the transport equations allowed us to find the exact number of particles with energies exceeding given level.

  19. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Sessler, Andy

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe.

  20. High energy particle acceleration in solar flares Observational evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1983-07-01

    The recent gamma ray and neutron observations made by the SMM Gamma Ray Spectrometer are reviewed. The implication these observations hold for understanding particle acceleration in solar flares are discussed. The data require that both electrons and ions must be accelerated together to relativistic energies and interact with matter in a time scale of seconds.

  1. Stable charged-particle acceleration and focusing in a laser accelerator using spatial harmonics.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, B; Valloni, A; Putterman, S; Rosenzweig, J B

    2012-10-19

    Regarding the laser-driven acceleration of charged particles in photonic systems, a central unmet challenge is the achievement of simultaneous transverse and longitudinal stability at nonultrarelativistic energies. At such energies, Earnshaw's theorem [S. Earnshaw, Trans. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 7, 97 (1842)] indicates that a synchronous accelerating wave gives a defocusing effect. We present a scheme in which particles are accelerated by interaction with a resonant spatial harmonic and are focused by strong ponderomotive interaction with nonresonant spatial harmonics. We show that this scheme exhibits net transverse focusing and longitudinal stability, and we discuss its use in a compact laser accelerator.

  2. STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE PROBLEM OF BACKGROUND PLASMA OVERHEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C. M.

    2012-11-10

    The origin of hard X-ray (HXR) excess emission from clusters of galaxies is still an enigma, whose nature is debated. One of the possible mechanisms to produce this emission is the bremsstrahlung model. However, previous analytical and numerical calculations showed that in this case the intracluster plasma had to be overheated very fast because suprathermal electrons emitting the HXR excess lose their energy mainly by Coulomb losses, i.e., they heat the background plasma. It was concluded also from these investigations that it is problematic to produce emitting electrons from a background plasma by stochastic (Fermi) acceleration because the energy supplied by external sources in the form of Fermi acceleration is quickly absorbed by the background plasma. In other words, the Fermi acceleration is ineffective for particle acceleration. We revisited this problem and found that at some parameter of acceleration the rate of plasma heating is rather low and the acceleration tails of nonthermal particles can be generated and exist for a long time while the plasma temperature is almost constant. We showed also that for some regime of acceleration the plasma cools down instead of being heated up, even though external sources (in the form of external acceleration) supply energy to the system. The reason is that the acceleration withdraws effectively high-energy particles from the thermal pool (analog of Maxwell demon).

  3. Stochastic particle acceleration in flaring stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Schlickeiser, R.

    1985-01-01

    The acceleration of electrons by the Fermi-Parker mechanisms in a quasistationary turbulent plasma of dimension l, mean magnetic field strength B, and mean number density n are considered. The electrons suffer radiative and ionization losses and have a scattering mean free path that increases linearly with their momentum. Analytic solutions for the steady-state electron energy spectra are presented. The spectra are characterized by an exponential cutoff above a given momentum determined by the synchrontron or the confinement time, depending on the physical characteristics of the accelerating region.

  4. Particle Acceleration and Associated Emission from Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishkawa, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    Five talks consist of a research program consisting of numerical simulations and theoretical development designed to provide an understanding of the emission from accelerated particles in relativistic shocks. The goal of this lecture is to discuss the particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and radiation along with the microphysics of the shock process in a self-consistent manner. The discussion involves the collisionless shocks that produce emission from gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows, and producing emission from supernova remnants and AGN relativistic jets. Recent particle-in-cell simulation studies have shown that the Weibel (mixed mode two-stream filamentation) instability is responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration and magnetic field generation in relativistic collisionless shocks. 3-D RPIC code parallelized with MPI has been used to investigate the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields. In this lecture we will present brief tutorials of RPIC simulations and RMHD simulations, a brief summary of recent RPIC simulations, mechanisms of particle acceleration in relativistic shocks, and calculation of synchrotron radiation by tracing particles. We will discuss on emission from the collisionless shocks, which will be calculated during the simulation by tracing particle acceleration self-consistently in the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated in the shocks. In particular, we will discuss the differences between standard synchrotron radiation and the jitter radiation that arises in turbulent magnetic fields.

  5. The Los Alamos Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop and beginning of the advanced accelerator concepts field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first Advanced Acceleration of Particles-AAC-Workshop (actually named Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop) was held at Los Alamos in January 1982. The workshop lasted a week and divided all the acceleration techniques into four categories: near field, far field, media, and vacuum. Basic theorems of particle acceleration were postulated (later proven) and specific experiments based on the four categories were formulated. This landmark workshop led to the formation of the advanced accelerator R&D program in the HEP office of the DOE that supports advanced accelerator research to this day. Two major new user facilities at Argonne and Brookhaven and several more directed experimental efforts were built to explore the advanced particle acceleration schemes. It is not an exaggeration to say that the intellectual breadth and excitement provided by the many groups who entered this new field provided the needed vitality to then recently formed APS Division of Beams and the new online journal Physical Review Special Topics-Accelerators and Beams. On this 30th anniversary of the AAC Workshops, it is worthwhile to look back at the legacy of the first Workshop at Los Alamos and the fine groundwork it laid for the field of advanced accelerator concepts that continues to flourish to this day.

  6. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems, as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.

  7. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  8. Validation of Geant4 physics models for 56Fe ion beam in various media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalota, Summit; Kumar, Ashavani

    2012-11-01

    The depth-dose distribution of a 56Fe ion beam has been studied in water, polyethylene, nextel, kevlar and aluminum media. The dose reduction versus areal depth is also calculated for 56Fe ions in carbon, polyethylene and aluminum using the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4. This study presents the validation of physics models available in Geant4 by comparing the simulated results with the experimental data available in the literature. Simulations are performed using binary cascade (BIC), abrasion-ablation (AA) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) models; integrated into Geant4. Deviations from experimental results may be due to the selection of simple geometry. This paper also addresses the differences in the simulated results from various models.

  9. Consistent Data Assimilation of Structural Isotopes: 23Na and 56Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2010-09-01

    A new approach is proposed, the consistent data assimilation, that allows to link the integral data experiment results to basic nuclear parameters employed by evaluators to generate ENDF/B point energy files in order to improve them. Practical examples are provided for the structural materials 23Na and 56Fe. The sodium neutron propagation experiments, EURACOS and JANUS-8, are used to improve via modifications of 23Na nuclear parameters (like scattering radius, resonance parameters, Optical model parameters, Statistical Hauser-Feshbach model parameters, and Preequilibrium Exciton model parameters) the agreement of calculation versus experiments for a series of measured reaction rate detectors slopes. For the 56Fe case the EURACOS and ZPR3 assembly 54 are used. Results have shown inconsistencies in the set of nuclear parameters used so that further investigation is needed. Future work involves comparison of results against a more traditional multigroup adjustments, and extension to other isotope of interest in the reactor community.

  10. Analysis of 238Pu and 56Fe Evaluated Data for Use in MYRRHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez, C. J.; Cabellos, O.; Martínez, J. S.; Stankovskiy, A.; Van den Eynde, G.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Heyse, J.

    2014-04-01

    A sensitivity analysis on the multiplication factor, keff, to the cross section data has been carried out for the MYRRHA critical configuration in order to show the most relevant reactions. With these results, a further analysis on the 238Pu and 56Fe cross sections has been performed, comparing the evaluations provided in the JEFF-3.1.2 and ENDF/B-VII.1 libraries for these nuclides. Then, the effect in MYRRHA of the differences between evaluations are analysed, presenting the source of the differences. With these results, recommendations for the 56Fe and 238Pu evaluations are suggested. These calculations have been performed with SCALE6.1 and MCNPX-2.7e.

  11. Particle acceleration in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    DOE PAGES

    Totorica, S. R.; Abel, T.; Fiuza, F.

    2017-04-03

    Particle acceleration induced by magnetic reconnection is thought to be a promising candidate for producing the nonthermal emissions associated with explosive phenomena such as solar flares, pulsar wind nebulae, and jets from active galactic nuclei. Laboratory experiments can play an important role in the study of the detailed microphysics of magnetic reconnection and the dominant particle acceleration mechanisms. We have used two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to study particle acceleration in high Lundquist number reconnection regimes associated with laser-driven plasma experiments. For current experimental conditions, we show that nonthermal electrons can be accelerated to energies more than an order ofmore » magnitude larger than the initial thermal energy. The nonthermal electrons gain their energy mainly from the reconnection electric field near the X points, and particle injection into the reconnection layer and escape from the finite system establish a distribution of energies that resembles a power-law spectrum. Energetic electrons can also become trapped inside the plasmoids that form in the current layer and gain additional energy from the electric field arising from the motion of the plasmoid. We compare simulations for finite and infinite periodic systems to demonstrate the importance of particle escape on the shape of the spectrum. Based on our findings, we provide an analytical estimate of the maximum electron energy and threshold condition for observing suprathermal electron acceleration in terms of experimentally tunable parameters. We also discuss experimental signatures, including the angular distribution of the accelerated particles, and construct synthetic detector spectra. Finally, these results open the way for novel experimental studies of particle acceleration induced by reconnection.« less

  12. Particle acceleration in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totorica, S. R.; Abel, T.; Fiuza, F.

    2017-04-01

    Particle acceleration induced by magnetic reconnection is thought to be a promising candidate for producing the nonthermal emissions associated with explosive phenomena such as solar flares, pulsar wind nebulae, and jets from active galactic nuclei. Laboratory experiments can play an important role in the study of the detailed microphysics of magnetic reconnection and the dominant particle acceleration mechanisms. We have used two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to study particle acceleration in high Lundquist number reconnection regimes associated with laser-driven plasma experiments. For current experimental conditions, we show that nonthermal electrons can be accelerated to energies more than an order of magnitude larger than the initial thermal energy. The nonthermal electrons gain their energy mainly from the reconnection electric field near the X points, and particle injection into the reconnection layer and escape from the finite system establish a distribution of energies that resembles a power-law spectrum. Energetic electrons can also become trapped inside the plasmoids that form in the current layer and gain additional energy from the electric field arising from the motion of the plasmoid. We compare simulations for finite and infinite periodic systems to demonstrate the importance of particle escape on the shape of the spectrum. Based on our findings, we provide an analytical estimate of the maximum electron energy and threshold condition for observing suprathermal electron acceleration in terms of experimentally tunable parameters. We also discuss experimental signatures, including the angular distribution of the accelerated particles, and construct synthetic detector spectra. These results open the way for novel experimental studies of particle acceleration induced by reconnection.

  13. Transverse response functions in deep inelastic electron scattering for 40Ca, 48Ca, and 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziani, Z. E.; Barreau, P.; Bernheim, M.; Morgenstern, J.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Altemus, R.; McCarthy, J.; Orphanos, L. J.; Whitney, R. R.; Capitani, G. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.

    1985-03-01

    Deep-inelastic inclusive electron-scattering cross sections from 40Ca, 48Ca, and 56Fe have been measured at 60°, 90°, and 140° and at energy transfers including the Δ(3,3) region. The transverse response function in the momentum interval 300 MeV/c<||q-->||<600 MeV/c was extracted by the Rosenbluth prescription. Different theoretical approaches to the quasielastic region are compared to the data. A mass-number scaling is observed.

  14. Particle Acceleration and Heating by Turbulent Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis; Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (i.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Jets Due to Weibel Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  16. Particle acceleration from reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Borovsky, J.E.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D.; Hesse, M.; Schindler, K.

    1997-08-01

    Acceleration of charged particles in the near geomagnetic tail, associated with a dynamic magnetic reconnection process, was investigated by a combined effort of data analysis, using Los Alamos data from geosynchronous orbit, MHD modeling of the dynamic evolution of the magnetotail, and test particle tracing in the electric and magnetic fields obtained from the MHD simulation.

  17. Solid-particle jet formation under shock-wave acceleration.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, V; Saurel, R; Jourdan, G; Houas, L

    2013-12-01

    When solid particles are impulsively dispersed by a shock wave, they develop a spatial distribution which takes the form of particle jets whose selection mechanism is still unidentified. The aim of the present experimental work is to study particle dispersal with fingering effects in an original quasi-two-dimensional experiment facility in order to accurately extract information. Shock and blast waves are generated in the carrier gas at the center of a granular medium ring initially confined inside a Hele-Shaw cell and impulsively accelerated. With the present experimental setup, the particle jet formation is clearly observed. From fast flow visualizations, we notice, in all instances, that the jets are initially generated inside the particle ring and thereafter expelled outward. This point has not been observed in three-dimensional experiments. We highlight that the number of jets is unsteady and decreases with time. For a fixed configuration, considering the very early times following the initial acceleration, the jet size selection is independent of the particle diameter. Moreover, the influence of the initial overpressure and the material density on the particle jet formation have been studied. It is shown that the wave number of particle jets increases with the overpressure and with the decrease of the material density. The normalized number of jets as a function of the initial ring acceleration shows a power law valid for all studied configurations involving various initial pressure ratios, particle sizes, and particle materials.

  18. Accelerators for heavy-charged-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, George B

    2007-08-01

    This paper focuses on current and future designs of medical hadron accelerators for treating cancers and other diseases. Presently, five vendors and several national laboratories have produced heavy-particle medical accelerators for accelerating nuclei from hydrogen (protons) up through carbon and oxygen. Particle energies are varied to control the beam penetration depth in the patient. As of the end of 2006, four hospitals and one clinic in the United States offer proton treatments; there are five more such facilities in Japan. In most cases, these facilities use accelerators designed explicitly for cancer treatments. The accelerator types are a combination of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, and linear accelerators; some carry advanced features such as respiration gating, intensity modulation, and rapid energy changes, which contribute to better dose conformity on the tumor when using heavy charged particles. Recent interest in carbon nuclei for cancer treatment has led some vendors to offer carbon-ion and proton capability in their accelerator systems, so that either ion can be used. These features are now being incorporated for medical accelerators in new facilities.

  19. Turbulence Evolution and Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chee, Ng K.

    2007-01-01

    We model the effects of self-excitation/damping and shock transmission of Alfven waves on solar-energetic-particle (SEP) acceleration at a coronal-mass-ejection (CME) driven parallel shock. SEP-excited outward upstream waves speedily bootstrap acceleration. Shock transmission further raises the SEP-excited wave intensities at high wavenumbers but lowers them at low wavenumbers through wavenumber shift. Downstream, SEP excitation of inward waves and damping of outward waves tend to slow acceleration. Nevertheless, > 2000 km/s parallel shocks at approx. 3.5 solar radii can accelerate SEPs to 100 MeV in < 5 minutes.

  20. Double layer -- a particle accelerator in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong

    2015-07-16

    Slides present the material under the following topics: Introduction (What is a double layer (DL)? Why is it important? Key unsolved problems); Theory -- time-independent solutions of 1D Vlasov--Poisson system; Particle-in-cell simulations (Current-driven DLs); and Electron acceleration by DL (Betatron acceleration). Key problems include the generation mechanism, stability, and electron acceleration. In summary, recent observations by Van Allen Probes show large number of DLs in the outer radiation belt, associated with enhanced flux of relativistic electrons. Simulations show that ion acoustic double layers can be generated by field-aligned currents. Thermal electrons can gain energy via betatron acceleration in a dipole magnetic field.

  1. Charged spinning black holes as accelerators of spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Peng; Gu, Bao-Min; Wei, Shao-Wen; Yang, Jie; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that some black holes can act as accelerators for particles without spin. Recently, some works have considered the collision of two spinning particles in the background of Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes and it has been shown that the center-of-mass energy of the test particles is related to the spin. In this paper we extend the results to some more general cases. We consider Kerr-Newman black holes as accelerators for spinning particles. We derive the center-of-mass energy of the spinning particles and use numerical method to investigate how the center-of-mass energy is affected by the properties of the black holes and spinning particles.

  2. Particle Acceleration Due to Coronal Non-null Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threlfall, James; Neukirch, Thomas; Parnell, Clare Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Various topological features, for example magnetic null points and separators, have been inferred as likely sites of magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in the solar atmosphere. In fact, magnetic reconnection is not constrained to solely take place at or near such topological features and may also take place in the absence of such features. Studies of particle acceleration using non-topological reconnection experiments embedded in the solar atmosphere are uncommon. We aim to investigate and characterise particle behaviour in a model of magnetic reconnection which causes an arcade of solar coronal magnetic field to twist and form an erupting flux rope, crucially in the absence of any common topological features where reconnection is often thought to occur. We use a numerical scheme that evolves the gyro-averaged orbit equations of single electrons and protons in time and space, and simulate the gyromotion of particles in a fully analytical global field model. We observe and discuss how the magnetic and electric fields of the model and the initial conditions of each orbit may lead to acceleration of protons and electrons up to 2 MeV in energy (depending on model parameters). We describe the morphology of time-dependent acceleration and impact sites for each particle species and compare our findings to those recovered by topologically based studies of three-dimensional (3D) reconnection and particle acceleration. We also broadly compare aspects of our findings to general observational features typically seen during two-ribbon flare events.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy K.

    1989-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for the simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks. The code is implemented in Turbo Pascal on a PC. It is modularized and structured in such a way that modification and maintenance are relatively painless. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at shocks follow the trajectories of individual particles as they scatter repeatedly across the shock front, gaining energy with each crossing. The particles are assumed to scatter from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence on both sides of the shock. A scattering law is used which is related to the assumed form of the turbulence, and the particle and shock parameters. High energy cosmic ray spectra derived from Monte Carlo simulations have observed power law behavior just as the spectra derived from analytic calculations based on a diffusion equation. This high energy behavior is not sensitive to the scattering law used. In contrast with Monte Carlo calculations diffusive calculations rely on the initial injection of supra-thermal particles into the shock environment. Monte Carlo simulations are the only known way to describe the extraction of particles directly from the thermal pool. This was the triumph of the Monte Carlo approach. The question of acceleration efficiency is an important one in the shock acceleration game. The efficiency of shock waves efficient to account for the observed flux of high energy galactic cosmic rays was examined. The efficiency of the acceleration process depends on the thermal particle pick-up and hence the low energy scattering in detail. One of the goals is the self-consistent derivation of the accelerated particle spectra and the MHD turbulence spectra. Presumably the upstream turbulence, which scatters the particles so they can be accelerated, is excited by the streaming accelerated particles and the needed downstream turbulence is convected from the upstream region. The present code is to be modified to include a better

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy K.

    1989-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for the simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks. The code is implemented in Turbo Pascal on a PC. It is modularized and structured in such a way that modification and maintenance are relatively painless. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at shocks follow the trajectories of individual particles as they scatter repeatedly across the shock front, gaining energy with each crossing. The particles are assumed to scatter from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence on both sides of the shock. A scattering law is used which is related to the assumed form of the turbulence, and the particle and shock parameters. High energy cosmic ray spectra derived from Monte Carlo simulations have observed power law behavior just as the spectra derived from analytic calculations based on a diffusion equation. This high energy behavior is not sensitive to the scattering law used. In contrast with Monte Carlo calculations diffusive calculations rely on the initial injection of supra-thermal particles into the shock environment. Monte Carlo simulations are the only known way to describe the extraction of particles directly from the thermal pool. This was the triumph of the Monte Carlo approach. The question of acceleration efficiency is an important one in the shock acceleration game. The efficiency of shock waves efficient to account for the observed flux of high energy galactic cosmic rays was examined. The efficiency of the acceleration process depends on the thermal particle pick-up and hence the low energy scattering in detail. One of the goals is the self-consistent derivation of the accelerated particle spectra and the MHD turbulence spectra. Presumably the upstream turbulence, which scatters the particles so they can be accelerated, is excited by the streaming accelerated particles and the needed downstream turbulence is convected from the upstream region. The present code is to be modified to include a better

  5. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, K-L; Schussman, G.; Wilson, B.; Ko, K.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.

    2002-11-16

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of commodity graphics cards to achieve perceptually effective visualization of the very dense and complex electromagnetic fields produced from the modeling of reflection and transmission properties of open structures in an accelerator design. Because of the collaborative nature of the overall accelerator modeling project, the visualization technology developed is for both desktop and remote visualization settings. We have tested the techniques using both time varying particle data sets containing up to one billion particle s per time step and electromagnetic field data sets with millions of mesh elements.

  6. On the acceleration of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Fermi scattering and transit time damping are two possible mechanisms for accelerating low energy protons (approximately 1 Mev) in co-rotating particle streams. Solutions to the equations which govern particle behavior in such streams are presented. It was found that acceleration by Fermi scattering requires a scattering mean-free path more than an order of magnitude smaller than the nominal value for low energy particles of 0.1 AU. Transit time damping of only the observed low level of magnitude fluctuations in the interplanetary magnetic field appears to yield the required acceleration rate. Measurements of the direction of the anisotropy in the particle streams could help in deciding which mechanism is operative. In the case of Fermi scattering the anisotropy must be in the heliocentric radial direction, whereas for transit time damping a significant azimuthal anisotropy could be present.

  7. Magnetospheric plasma - Sources, wave-particle interactions and acceleration mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speiser, T. W.

    1971-01-01

    Some of the basic problems associated with magnetospheric physics are reviewed. The sources of magnetospheric plasma, with auroral particles included as a subset, are discussed. The possible ways in which the solar wind plasma can gain access to the magnetosphere are outlined. Some important consequences of wave-particle interactions are examined. Finally, the basic mechanisms which energize or accelerate particles by reconnection and convection are explained.

  8. Particle accelerators inside spinning black holes.

    PubMed

    Lake, Kayll

    2010-05-28

    On the basis of the Kerr metric as a model for a spinning black hole accreting test particles from rest at infinity, I show that the center-of-mass energy for a pair of colliding particles is generically divergent at the inner horizon. This shows not only that classical black holes are internally unstable, but also that Planck-scale physics is a characteristic feature within black holes at scales much larger that the Planck length. The novel feature of the divergence discussed here is that the phenomenon is present only for black holes with rotation, and in this sense it is distinct from the well-known Cauchy horizon instability.

  9. Prospects for Fermi Particle Acceleration at Coronal Magnetic Reconnection Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provornikova, E.; Laming, J. M.; Lukin, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of first order Fermi acceleration of particles interacting with the converging magnetized flows at a reconnection site was introduced recently in an attempt to predict the energy distribution of particles resulting from violent reconnection in galactic microquasars. More careful consideration of this mechanism showed that the spectral index of accelerated particles is related to the total plasma compression within a reconnection region, similar to that in the formulation for diffusive shock acceleration. In the solar context, reconnection regions producing strong compression could be the source of suprathermal "seed particles". A hard spectrum of such suprathermal particles is believed to be necessary to initiate the particle acceleration process at low Mach number coronal mass ejection shocks close to the Sun where the gradual solar energetic particle events originate. As a first step to investigate the efficiency of Fermi acceleration, we explore the degree of plasma compression that can be achieved at reconnection sites in the solar corona. This work presents a set of 2D two-temperature resistive MHD simulations of the dynamics of several magnetic configurations within a range of lower corona plasma parameters. Energy transport processes in the MHD model include anisotropic thermal conduction for electrons and ions and radiative cooling. Magnetic configurations considered are a Harris current sheet, a force-free current sheet, a flux rope sitting above an arcade of magnetic loops, and two merging flux ropes. We demonstrate that only for some magnetic topologies, corresponding in particular to 3D magnetic nulls, the compression ratio, sufficient for first order Fermi acceleration in the reconnection region, can be achieved. These represent the potential sites in the solar corona where a hard seed particle energetic spectrum could be produced.

  10. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box. We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E(sub max)) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  11. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, G. Jerry; Hartmann, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernova remnants, and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration' is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different spectral properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations of relativistic jets and try to make a connection with observations.

  12. Particle Acceleration at the Sun and in the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    Energetic particles are accelerated in rich profusion at sites throughout the heliosphere. They come from solar flares in the low corona, from shock waves driven outward by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), from planetary magnetospheres and bow shocks. They come from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) produced by high-speed streams in the solar wind, and from the heliospheric termination shock at the outer edge of the heliospheric cavity. We sample all these populations near Earth, but can distinguish them readily by their element and isotope abundances, ionization states, energy spectra, angular distributions and time behavior. Remote spacecraft have probed the spatial distributions of the particles and examined new sources in situ. Most acceleration sources can be "seen" only by direct observation of the particles; few photons are produced at these sites. Wave-particle interactions are an essential feature in acceleration sources and, for shock acceleration, new evidence of energetic-proton-generated waves has come from abundance variations and from local cross-field scattering. Element abundances often tell us the physics the source plasma itself, prior to acceleration. By comparing different populations, we learn more about the sources, and about the physics of acceleration and transport, than we can possibly learn from one source alone.

  13. Particle acceleration in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totorica, Samuel; Abel, Tom; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    Particle acceleration induced by magnetic reconnection is a promising candidate for producing the nonthermal emissions associated with explosive astrophysical phenomena. We have used two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to explore the possibility of studying particle acceleration from reconnection in laser-driven plasma experiments. For current experimental conditions, we show that nonthermal electrons can be accelerated to energies up to two orders of magnitude larger than the initial thermal energy. The nonthermal electrons gain energy primarily by the reconnection electric field near the X-points, and particle injection into the reconnection layer and escape from the finite system establishes a distribution of energies resembling a power-law spectrum. Energetic electrons can also become trapped inside the plasmoids that form in the current layer and gain additional energy from the electric field arising from the motion of the plasmoid. Based on our findings, we provide an analytical estimate of the maximum electron energy and threshold condition for suprathermal electron acceleration in terms of experimentally tunable parameters. Finally, we investigate future experiments with a more energetic laser drive and larger system size. We discuss the influence of plasmoids on the particle acceleration, and the use of proton radiography to probe plasmoids. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  14. Spinning black holes as particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Ted; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2010-01-15

    It has recently been pointed out that particles falling freely from rest at infinity outside a Kerr black hole can in principle collide with an arbitrarily high center of mass energy in the limiting case of maximal black hole spin. Here we aim to elucidate the mechanism for this fascinating result, and to point out its practical limitations, which imply that ultraenergetic collisions cannot occur near black holes in nature.

  15. Space experiments with particle accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, J. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Kawashima, N.; Marshall, J. A.; Moses, S. L.; Neubert, T.; Mende, S. B.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1994-09-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelarators (SEPAC), which flew on the ATLAS 1 mission, used new techniques to study natural phenomena in the Earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere by introducing energetic perturbations into the system from a high power electron beam with known characteristics. Properties of auroras were studied by directing the electron beam into the upper atmosphere while making measurements of optical emissions. Studies were also performed of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon.

  16. Investigation of the production of promethium-147 via particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artun, Ozan

    2017-08-01

    In the present paper, we mainly aim to extend nuclear data of production of radionuclide promethium-147 used in nuclear battery technology due to its weak experimental measurement and theoretical calculation. Therefore, the cross-section for charged particle induced reactions on Nd target is calculated, and moreover, the reaction processes are simulated by particle accelerator with the energy range {{E}}_{{particle}} = 50 \\to 5 MeV and in the particle beam current of 20 mA to figure out yield, activity of reaction and integral yield. For a proper understanding of investigation, the obtained results are also discussed to determine the most suitable reaction and target material for the production of radionuclide promethium-147 via particle accelerator on the basis of process.

  17. Particle acceleration and reconnection in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Decker, R. B.

    2016-03-25

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized quasi-2D small-scale magnetic island reconnection processes. An advection-diffusion transport equation for a nearly isotropic particle distribution describes particle transport and energization in a region of interacting magnetic islands [1; 2]. The dominant charged particle energization processes are 1) the electric field induced by quasi-2D magnetic island merging, and 2) magnetic island contraction. The acceleration of charged particles in a “sea of magnetic islands” in a super-Alfvénic flow, and the energization of particles by combined diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream magnetic island reconnection processes are discussed.

  18. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune

    2010-11-15

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  19. Finite-Time Shock Acceleration of Energetic Storm Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channok, Chanruangrit; Ruffolo, David; Desai, Mihir I.; Mason, Glenn M.

    2005-11-01

    Energetic storm particles (ESPs) of various ion species have been shown to arise from suprathermal seed ions accelerated by traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks. The observed spectral rollovers at ~0.1-10 MeV nucleon-1 can be attributed to the finite time available for shock acceleration. Using the locally measured shock strength parameters as inputs, the finite-time shock acceleration model can successfully fit the energy spectra of carbon, oxygen, and iron ions measured by the Ultra Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ULEIS) on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) during three ESP events. The inferred scattering mean free path in the acceleration region ranges from a typical IP value for the weakest ESP event down to 3.0×10-3 AU for the strongest event. This is consistent with the idea that proton-amplified waves result from the very intense particle fluxes in major events.

  20. Charged particle acceleration by induction electric field in Neptune magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    The precession of the Neptune magnetic dipole leads to strong dynamics of the magnetosphere and results in continuous transformation from the “Earth-like” configuration to the “pole-on” one and vice versa. In the present work we use simple model of the Neptune magnetotail to investigate the influence of magnetotail topology transformation on particle acceleration and transport through the tail. Energy spectra are obtained for protons penetrating from the solar wind and heavier ions N+ from the Neptune ionosphere. We have found that protons and heavier ions are accelerated up to ∼330 keV and ∼150 keV, respectively. More particles are accelerated and leave the tail during transformations from the “pole-on” configuration to the “Earth-like” one than during inverse transformations. We have shown that the dusk-dawn convection field is responsible for particle leaving through the dawn flank. We briefly compare our results with Voyager-2 observations.

  1. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    DOE PAGES

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution inmore » magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.« less

  2. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-04

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. FIRST-ORDER PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN MAGNETICALLY DRIVEN FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-10

    We demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution in magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.

  4. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution in magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.

  5. LONGITUDINAL REFERENCE PARTICLE MOTION IN NEARLY ISOCHRONOUS FFAG RECIRCULATING ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.

    2001-07-01

    A Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) arc can be used to reduce the cost of a recirculating accelerator. Path length variation with energy in such an arc can limit its usefulness, however, due to phase offset at the linac. This paper examines the dynamics of the reference particle in an FFAG recirculating accelerator, and describes the limitations on the design because of path length variation with energy.

  6. Medical physics--particle accelerators--the beginning.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2014-01-01

    This chapter outlines the early development of particle accelerators with the redesign from linear accelerator to cyclotron by Ernest Lawrence with a view to reducing the size of the machines as the power increased. There are minibiographies of Ernest Lawrence and his brother John. The concept of artificial radiation is outlined and the early attempts at patient treatment are mentioned. The reasons for trying and abandoning neutron therapy are discussed, and the early use of protons is described.

  7. Energetic particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions: Ulysses results

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M.I.; Marsden, R.G.; Sanderson, T.R.; Gosling, J.T.

    1997-07-01

    We present here statistical properties of energetic ions (tilde 1 MeV) accelerated by corotating interaction regions observed at the Ulysses spacecraft. We have correlated the tilde 1 MeV proton intensity measured near the trailing edges of the interaction regions with their compression ratio. We interpret our results in terms of the plasma conditions experienced at Ulysses and identify a likely source of the low energy seed particles accelerated at the interaction regions.

  8. Explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe by particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ibotombi N.; Devi, Bembem Y.

    2016-04-01

    A spatially flat FRW Universe in the context of particle creation has been discussed by assuming a variable deceleration parameter which is a function of scale factor. A dust model in which creation of particles giving a negative creation pressure has been studied. Treating the Universe as an open adiabatic system, it is supposed that matter creation takes place out of gravitational energy. In this model, the Universe shows an accelerating phase of its expansion. Total number of particles increases while number of particle density decreases. Some physical implications of this model are investigated.

  9. Particle Acceleration by Cme-driven Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Peak particle intensities are a strong function of CME speed, although the intensities, spectra, and angular distributions of particles escaping the shock are highly modified by scattering on Alfven waves produced by the streaming particles themselves. Element abundances vary in complex ways because ions with different values of Q/A resonate with different parts of the wave spectrum, which varies with space and time. Just recently, we have begun to model these systematic variations theoretically and to explore other consequences of proton-generated waves.

  10. A Plasma Drag Hypervelocity Particle Accelerator (HYPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Steve R.; Rose, M. Frank

    1998-01-01

    Current debris models are able to predict the growth of the space debris problem and suggest that spacecraft must employ armor or bumper shields for some orbital altitudes now and that the problem will become worse as a function of time. The practical upper limit to the velocity distribution is on the order of 40 km/s and is associated with the natural environment. The velocity distribution of the man-made component peaks at 9-10 km/s with maximum velocity in the 14-16 km/s range. Experience in space has verified that the "high probability of impact" particles are in the microgram to milligram range. These particles can have very significant effects on coatings, insulators, and thin metallic layers. The surface of thick materials becomes pitted and the local debris component is enhanced by ejecta from the impact events. In this paper, the HYPER facility is described which produces a reasonable simulation of the man-made space debris spectrum in a controlled environment. The facility capability is discussed in terms of drive geometry, energetics, velocity distribution, diagnostics, and projectile/debris loading. The facility has been used to study impact phenomena on Space Station Freedom's solar array structure, the calibration of space debris collectors, other solar array materials, potential structural materials for use in space, electrical breakdown in the space environment, and as a means of clarifying or duplicating the impact phenomena on surfaces which have been exposed in space.

  11. Charged dilation black holes as particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-03-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the center-of-mass (CM) frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole (BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the CM energy (Ecm) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the Ecm at the horizon with the ISCO (Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal Reissner-Nordstrøm (RN) BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes Ecm|r+ >Ecm|rmb >Ecm|rISCO i.e. Ecm|r+=M :Ecm | rmb =(3 +√{ 5 }/2) M :Ecm| rISCO = 4 M = ∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is Ecm| r+ = 2 M :Ecm| rmb = 4 M :Ecm| rISCO = 6 M =√{ 5 } :√{ 2 } :√{ 13 }/3 . Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being Ecm| r+ = 2 M :Ecm| rmb = 2 M :Ecm| rISCO = 2 M = ∞ : ∞ : ∞ .

  12. A Plasma Drag Hypervelocity Particle Accelerator (HYPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Steve R.; Rose, M. Frank

    1998-01-01

    Current debris models are able to predict the growth of the space debris problem and suggest that spacecraft must employ armor or bumper shields for some orbital altitudes now and that the problem will become worse as a function of time. The practical upper limit to the velocity distribution is on the order of 40 km/s and is associated with the natural environment. The velocity distribution of the man-made component peaks at 9-10 km/s with maximum velocity in the 14-16 km/s range. Experience in space has verified that the "high probability of impact" particles are in the microgram to milligram range. These particles can have very significant effects on coatings, insulators, and thin metallic layers. The surface of thick materials becomes pitted and the local debris component is enhanced by ejecta from the impact events. In this paper, the HYPER facility is described which produces a reasonable simulation of the man-made space debris spectrum in a controlled environment. The facility capability is discussed in terms of drive geometry, energetics, velocity distribution, diagnostics, and projectile/debris loading. The facility has been used to study impact phenomena on Space Station Freedom's solar array structure, the calibration of space debris collectors, other solar array materials, potential structural materials for use in space, electrical breakdown in the space environment, and as a means of clarifying or duplicating the impact phenomena on surfaces which have been exposed in space.

  13. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration with laser-driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The acceleration of non-thermal particles in plasmas is critical for our understanding of explosive astrophysical phenomena, from solar flares to gamma ray bursts. Particle acceleration is thought to be mediated by collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection. The microphysics underlying these processes and their ability to efficiently convert flow and magnetic energy into non-thermal particles, however, is not yet fully understood. By performing for the first time ab initio 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of both magnetized and unmagnetized laser-driven plasmas, it is now possible to identify the optimal parameters for the study of particle acceleration in the laboratory relevant to astrophysical scenarios. It is predicted for the Omega and NIF laser conditions that significant non-thermal acceleration can occur during magnetic reconnection of laser-driven magnetized plasmas. Electrons are accelerated by the electric field near the X-points and trapped in contracting magnetic islands. This leads to a power-law tail extending to nearly a hundred times the thermal energy of the plasma and that contains a large fraction of the magnetic energy. The study of unmagnetized interpenetrating plasmas also reveals the possibility of forming collisionless shocks mediated by the Weibel instability on NIF. Under such conditions, both electrons and ions can be energized by scattering out of the Weibel-mediated turbulence. This also leads to power-law spectra that can be detected experimentally. The resulting experimental requirements to probe the microphysics of plasma particle acceleration will be discussed, paving the way for the first experiments of these important processes in the laboratory. As a result of these simulations and theoretical analysis, there are new experiments being planned on the Omega, NIF, and LCLS laser facilities to test these theoretical predictions. This work was supported by the SLAC LDRD program and DOE Office of Science, Fusion

  14. Understanding the Acceleration of Energetic Particles at the Termination Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2006-05-01

    Voyager 1 observations of energetic particles during the crossing of the Termination Shock of the solar wind present a number of puzzles, and challenges to existing acceleration theories. For example, downstream from the shock the low-energy phase space density spectra are power laws exhibiting a remarkably constant spectral index, which is difficult to understand in terms of standard diffusive shock acceleration. Upstream from the shock there are beams of highly anisotropic energetic particles, with varying spectral shapes. Again, diffusive shock acceleration has difficultly in dealing with such large anisotropies. Here we show that the observed, constant spectral index of -5 can be accounted for by a simple theory in which the pressure in the accelerated particles behaves according to the Rankine-Hugoniot relationship of an ideal gas at the shock. We also demonstrate that the observed varying spectral shapes of the upstream beams result from velocity dispersion of a downstream spectrum with index of -5 propagating along magnetic flux tubes connecting the termination shock to Voyager 1. We show that even though the beams dominate the upstream foreshock region, they do not have an appreciable effect on the shock acceleration process. The implications of our theory for the acceleration of the Anomalous Cosmic Rays in the heliosheath are also discussed.

  15. Design Conception of a Solution Ion Source Based Particle Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashis, Das

    2004-05-01

    Particle accelerators till date have been based on several ion source principles such as thermal ionization, stripping etc. Such methods of ion source enabling is very limited by high temperature of ionization required in cases of very heavy ions generation. Heavy ions speeding in accelerator may lead to experiments with such ions in both accelerators and colliders, that is believed capable of opening new regimes of particle accelerator studies that is very heavy very heavy collision. Literature indicate that many yet-unknown mysteries of atomic and subnuclear Physics, creation and fate of Universe, new element synthesis all lie in this regime of investigation. In this paper, I outline a simpler and less energetic manner of creating, particularly, speeding very heavy ions using a solution ion stripping source such as with liquid ammonia which has ability to dissolve many heavy metals in form of ammonia-metal ion clusters, that can be led to a specially designed accelerator chamber as detailed in the paper. It is surprising indeed why such easy road to ions source generation was not conceived by particle accelerator Physicists earlier.

  16. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission in Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-IchiI.; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G.

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (m) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient parallel magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. New simulations with an ambient perpendicular magnetic field show the strong interaction between the relativistic jet and the magnetic fields. The magnetic fields are piled up by the jet and the jet electrons are bent, which creates currents and displacement currents. At the nonlinear stage, the magnetic fields are reversed by the current and the reconnection may take place. Due to these dynamics the jet and ambient electron are strongly accelerated in both parallel and perpendicular directions.

  17. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation in Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Richardson, G.; Sol, H.; Preece, R.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient parallel magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. New simulations with an ambient perpendicular magnetic field show the strong interaction between the relativistic jet and the magnetic fields. The magnetic fields are piled up by the jet and the jet electrons are bent, which creates currents and displacement currents. At the nonlinear stage, the magnetic fields are reversed by the current and the reconnection may take place. Due to these dynamics the jet and ambient electron are strongly accelerated in both parallel and perpendicular directions.

  18. Particle acceleration in rotating and shearing jets from AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, F. M.; Mannheim, K.

    2002-12-01

    We model the acceleration of energetic particles due to shear and centrifugal effects in rotating astrophysical jets. The appropriate equation describing the diffusive transport of energetic particles in a collisionless, rotating background flow is derived and analytical steady state solutions are discussed. In particular, by considering velocity profiles from rigid, over flat to Keplerian rotation, the effects of centrifugal and shear acceleration of particles scattered by magnetic inhomogeneities are distinguished. In the case where shear acceleration dominates, it is confirmed that power law particle momentum solutions f(p) ~ p-(3+alpha ) exist, if the mean scattering time tauc ~ palpha is an increasing function of momentum. We show that for a more complex interplay between shear and centrifugal acceleration, the recovered power law momentum spectra might be significantly steeper but flatten with increasing azimuthal velocity due to the increasing centrifugal effects. The possible relevance of shear and centrifugal acceleration for the observed extended emission in AGN is demonstrated for the case of the jet in the quasar 3C273.

  19. Particle bursts from thunderclouds: Natural particle accelerators above our heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Hovhannisyan, Armen

    2011-03-01

    Strong electrical fields inside thunderclouds give rise to fluxes of high-energy electrons and, consequently, gamma rays and neutrons. Gamma rays and electrons are currently detected by the facilities of low orbiting satellites and by networks of surface particle detectors. During intensive particle fluxes, coinciding with thunderstorms, series of particle bursts were detected by the particle detectors of Aragats Space Environmental Center at an altitude of 3250 m. We classify the thunderstorm ground enhancements in 2 categories, one lasting microseconds, and the other lasting tens of minutes. Both types of events can occur at the same time, coinciding with a large negative electric field between the cloud and the ground and negative intracloud lightning. Statistical analysis of the short thunderstorm ground enhancement bursts sample suggests the duration is less than 50μs and spatial extension is larger than 1000m2. We discuss the origin of thunderstorm ground enhancements and its connection to the terrestrial gamma flashes detected by orbiting gamma-ray observatories.

  20. Particle bursts from thunderclouds: Natural particle accelerators above our heads

    SciTech Connect

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Hovhannisyan, Armen

    2011-03-15

    Strong electrical fields inside thunderclouds give rise to fluxes of high-energy electrons and, consequently, gamma rays and neutrons. Gamma rays and electrons are currently detected by the facilities of low orbiting satellites and by networks of surface particle detectors. During intensive particle fluxes, coinciding with thunderstorms, series of particle bursts were detected by the particle detectors of Aragats Space Environmental Center at an altitude of 3250 m. We classify the thunderstorm ground enhancements in 2 categories, one lasting microseconds, and the other lasting tens of minutes. Both types of events can occur at the same time, coinciding with a large negative electric field between the cloud and the ground and negative intracloud lightning. Statistical analysis of the short thunderstorm ground enhancement bursts sample suggests the duration is less than 50 {mu}s and spatial extension is larger than 1000 m{sup 2}. We discuss the origin of thunderstorm ground enhancements and its connection to the terrestrial gamma flashes detected by orbiting gamma-ray observatories.

  1. Applications of laser-accelerated particle beams for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Fourkal, E.; Li, J. S.; Veltchev, I.; Luo, W.; Fan, J. J.; Lin, T.; Tafo, A.

    2011-05-01

    Proton beams are more advantageous than high-energy photons and electrons for radiation therapy because of their finite penetrating range and the Bragg peak near the end of their range, which have been utilized to achieve better dose conformity to the treatment target allowing for dose escalation and/or hypofractionation to increase local tumor control, reduce normal tissue complications and/or treatment time/cost. Proton therapy employing conventional particle acceleration techniques is expensive because of the large accelerators and treatment gantries that require excessive space and shielding. Compact proton acceleration systems are being sought to improve the cost-effectiveness for proton therapy. This paper reviews the physics principles of laser-proton acceleration and the development of prototype laserproton therapy systems as a solution for widespread applications of advanced proton therapy. The system design, the major components and the special delivery techniques for energy and intensity modulation are discussed in detail for laser-accelerated proton therapy.

  2. New mechanism of acceleration of particles by stellar black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanov, Zaza

    In this paper, we study the efficiency of particle acceleration in the magnetospheres of stellar mass black holes. For this purpose, we consider the linearized set of the Euler equation, continuity equation and Poisson equation, respectively. After introducing the varying relativistic centrifugal force, we show that the charge separation undergoes the parametric instability, leading to generation of centrifugally-excited Langmuir waves. It is shown that these waves, via the Langmuir collapse damp by means of the Landau damping, as a result, energy transfers to particles accelerating them to energies of the order of 1016 eV.

  3. Magnetic control of particle injection in plasma based accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Martins, S F; Pathak, V B; Fonseca, R A; Mori, W B; Silva, L O

    2011-06-03

    The use of an external transverse magnetic field to trigger and to control electron self-injection in laser- and particle-beam driven wakefield accelerators is examined analytically and through full-scale particle-in-cell simulations. A magnetic field can relax the injection threshold and can be used to control main output beam features such as charge, energy, and transverse dynamics in the ion channel associated with the plasma blowout. It is shown that this mechanism could be studied using state-of-the-art magnetic fields in next generation plasma accelerator experiments.

  4. Directionality of Flare-Accelerated Alpha Particles at the Sun

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Directionality of Flare-Accelerated α Particles at the Sun Gerald H. Share, Ronald J. Murphy E.O. Hulburt Center for Space Research, Naval Research...2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Directionality of Flare-Accelerated a Particles at the Sun 5a...one which is isotropic in the hemisphere towards the solar surface and has no component away from the Sun ) exhibits a broad struc- – 4 – ture from

  5. Accelerating dissipative particle dynamics with multiple GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sibo; Xu, Junbo; Wen, Hao

    2013-11-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation is implemented on multiple GPUs by using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) in this paper. Data communication between each GPU is executed based on the POSIX thread. Compared with the single-GPU implementation, this implementation can provide faster computation speed and more storage space to perform simulations on a significant larger system. In benchmark, the performance of GPUs is compared with that of Material Studio running on a single CPU core. We can achieve more than 90x speedup by using three C2050 GPUs to perform simulations on an 80∗80∗80 system. This implementation is applied to the study on the dispersancy of lubricant succinimide dispersants. A series of simulations are performed on lubricant-soot-dispersant systems to study the impact factors including concentration and interaction with lubricant on the dispersancy, and the simulation results are agreed with the study in our present work.

  6. Charged Dilation Black Holes as Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-07-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the Center-of-mass frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole(BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the center-of-mass energy (E_{cm}) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the E_{cm} at the horizon with the ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal RN BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}}> E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}} i.e. E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}= ({3+√{5}}/{2})M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=4M} =∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=4M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=6M} = √{5} : √{2} : {√{13}}/{3}. Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=2M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=2M}=∞ : ∞ : ∞.

  7. Precision Measurement of 56Fe(n,n γ) Cross Sections Using 14.1 MeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Koltick, David

    2016-03-01

    Integral production cross sections for 846.8 keV and 1238.3 keV prompt gamma rays from 14.1 MeV neutrons interactions on 56Fe are reported. The experimental technique takes advantage of the 1.5 nanosecond coincidence timing resolution between the neutron production time and the gamma ray detection time to reject noise, together with the large 30% solid angle gamma ray coverage. The scattering angle coverage with respect to the neutron beam direction extends from 60 degrees to 120 degrees. The neutron flux is measured using the detected associated alpha-particle from the D-T fusion reaction produced using an associated particle neutron generator. Present cross section measurements using other techniques with limited timing resolution and solid angle coverage are in agreement at neutron energies lower than 6 MeV. At higher neutron energies reported results can disagree by more than 20%. The more accurate technique used in these measurements can distinguish between the differences in the present reported results at higher neutron energies. The author would like to thank TechSource, Inc. and Advanced Physics Technologies, LLC. for their support in this work.

  8. Quantitative and Qualitative Differences in Neurocognitive Impairment Induced by 1 GeV 56Fe Ions and X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, R.; Mitchell, S.; Parris, B.; Johnson, A.; Singletary-Britten, S.; Lonart, G.; Drake, R.

    2008-10-01

    During the planned mission to Mars, Astronauts will be exposed to heavy charged particles (Hze). Our group has been determining the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of Hze (1 GeV 56Fe, LET = 150 kev/um) with respect to neurocognitive impairment, specifically spatial memory, short-term working memory and attentional set shifting. Our current data suggest that Hze have RBE values of about 7 for hippocampal-dependent spatial memory tasks (Barnes Maze) and possibly even higher for certain attentional processes. We have also used MALDI-TOF serum profiling analysis to identify several proteins that are biomarkers of both the level and LET of the radiation exposure, and biomarkers of cognitive performance. Our data suggest that Hze particles have a distinctly different impact upon neurocognitive function in rats than do X-rays. From a mission perspective, attentional set shifting is the neurocognitive function most likely to be impacted by the predicted Hze exposure; unfortunately Set shifting underlies our ability to execute complex plans. The proteins identified could be used to monitor the Astronauts for radiation exposure and any associated loss of neurocognitive function, and some may actually give an insight into the complex processes that lead to radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

  9. Thermal neutron capture cross section for 56Fe(n ,γ )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Belgya, T.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.; Szentmikloṡi, L.; Tomandl, I.

    2017-01-01

    The 56Fe(n ,γ ) thermal neutron capture cross section and the 57Fe level scheme populated by this reaction have been investigated in this work. Singles γ -ray spectra were measured with an isotopically enriched 56Fe target using the guided cold neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor, and γ γ -coincidence data were measured with a natural Fe target at the LWR-15 research reactor in Řež, Czech Republic. A detailed level scheme consisting of 448 γ rays populating/depopulating 97 levels and the capture state in 57Fe has been constructed, and ≈99 % of the total transition intensity has been placed. The transition probability of the 352-keV γ ray was determined to be Pγ(352 ) =11.90 ±0.07 per 100 neutron captures. The 57Fe level scheme is substantially revised from earlier work and ≈33 previously assigned levels could not be confirmed while a comparable number of new levels were added. The 57Feγ -ray cross sections were internally calibrated with respect to 1H and 32Sγ -ray cross section standards using iron(III) acetylacetonate (C15H21FeO6) and iron pyrite (FeS2) targets. The thermal neutron cross section for production of the 352-keV γ -ray cross section was determined to be σγ(352 ) =0.2849 ±0.015 b. The total 56Fe(n ,γ ) thermal radiative neutron cross section is derived from the 352-keV γ -ray cross section and transition probability as σ0=2.394 ±0.019 b. A least-squares fit of the γ rays to the level scheme gives the 57Fe neutron separation energy Sn=7646.183 ±0.018 keV.

  10. Induction and processing of oxidative clustered DNA lesions in 56Fe-ion-irradiated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doug; Kalogerinis, Peter; Tabrizi, Isla; Dingfelder, Michael; Stewart, Robert D; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2007-07-01

    Space and cosmic radiation is characterized by energetic heavy ions of high linear energy transfer (LET). Although both low- and high-LET radiations can create oxidative clustered DNA lesions and double-strand breaks (DSBs), the local complexity of oxidative clustered DNA lesions tends to increase with increasing LET. We irradiated 28SC human monocytes with doses from 0-10 Gy of (56)Fe ions (1.046 GeV/ nucleon, LET = 148 keV/microm) and determined the induction and processing of prompt DSBs and oxidative clustered DNA lesions using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Number Average Length Analysis (NALA). The (56)Fe ions produced decreased yields of DSBs (10.9 DSB Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)) and clusters (1 DSB: approximately 0.8 Fpg clusters: approximately 0.7 Endo III clusters: approximately 0.5 Endo IV clusters) compared to previous results with (137)Cs gamma rays. The difference in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the measured and predicted DSB yields may be due to the formation of spatially correlated DSBs (regionally multiply damaged sites) which result in small DNA fragments that are difficult to detect with the PFGE assay. The processing data suggest enhanced difficulty compared with gamma rays in the processing of DSBs but not clusters. At the same time, apoptosis is increased compared to that seen with gamma rays. The enhanced levels of apoptosis observed after exposure to (56)Fe ions may be due to the elimination of cells carrying high levels of persistent DNA clusters that are removed only by cell death and/or "splitting" during DNA replication.

  11. Kinematically Accelerated Repulsions Due to Relative Motion between Mass Particles in an Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, David

    2016-03-01

    An accelerated expansion of the universe, due only to relative particle motion, is described here in the form of a particular model that illustrates its physical cause. A simplified three particle universe is considered here by defining coordinate positions for effective mass-points because their size is extremely small compared to the distances between them. The three particles initially form a static isosceles triangular configuration. The third particle at the triangle's apex could only then determine its position relative to the triangle by measuring the apex angle subtended by the base particles. If the two base particles then exert for an instant a force between only themselves, they will move away from each other while the third particle could physically maintain its position relative to the universe only by referring to these other two existing particles. It would then be required that the apex particle would accelerate outwards and away from the base particles in order to regain the smaller size of the original apex angle and subsequently generate a Hubble expansion for the particles.

  12. Particle acceleration at shocks - A Monte Carlo method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, J. G.; Schneider, P.

    1987-01-01

    A Monte Carlo method is presented for the problem of acceleration of test particles at relativistic shocks. The particles are assumed to diffuse in pitch angle as a result of scattering off magnetic irregularities frozen into the fluid. Several tests are performed using the analytic results available for both relativistic and nonrelativistic shock speeds. The acceleration at relativistic shocks under the influence of radiation losses is investigated, including the effects of a momentum dependence in the diffusion coefficient. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the technique in those situations in which the diffusion approximation cannot be employed, such as when relativistic bulk motion is considered, when particles are permitted to escape at the boundaries, and when the effects of the finite length of the particle mean free path are important.

  13. Supernova neutrino induced inclusive reactions on {sup 56}Fe in terrestrial detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, M. Sajjad; Ahmad, Shakeb; Singh, S.K.

    2005-04-01

    The calculations for the neutrino absorption cross sections for supernova neutrinos in {sup 56}Fe have been done in the local density approximation (LDA) taking into account Pauli blocking and Fermi motion effects. The renormalization of weak transition strengths in the nuclear medium and the effect of Coulomb distortion of the final lepton are taken into account. The numerical results for the cross sections averaged over the Michel spectrum of neutrinos and various supernova neutrino spectra are presented and compared with other theoretical results.

  14. Mixed-symmetry 2 sup + state of sup 56 Fe in realistic shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, H. ); Otsuka, T. ); Sebe, T. )

    1991-08-26

    The mixed-symmetry 2{sup +} state of {sup 56}Fe is investigated by a large-scale shell-model calculation. We can reproduce the experimental energy levels by the Kuo-Brown interaction, as well as the {ital E}2 and {ital M}1 transition probabilities. The ({ital e},{ital e}{prime}) form factors are also reproduced by including the core-polarization effect. By inspecting the shell-model wave functions thus tested, it is found that the 2{sub 2}{sup +} and 2{sub 4}{sup +} states share a large fraction of the mixed-symmetry component.

  15. Particle acceleration in ultra-relativistic oblique shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, A.; Quenby, J. J.

    2003-08-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations of diffusive shock acceleration at highly relativistic oblique shock waves. High upstream flow Lorentz gamma factors ( Γ) are used, which are relevant to models of ultra-relativistic particle shock acceleration in active galactic nuclei (AGN) central engines and relativistic jets and gamma ray burst (GRB) fireballs. We investigate numerically the acceleration properties in the relativistic and ultra-relativistic flow regime ( Γ˜10-10 3), such as angular distribution, acceleration time constant, particle energy gain versus number of crossings and spectral shapes. We perform calculations for sub-luminal and super-luminal shocks. For the first case, the dependence on whether or not the scattering is pitch angle diffusion or large angle scattering is studied. The large angle model exhibits a distinctive structure in the basic power-law spectrum which is not nearly so obvious for small angle scattering. However, both models yield significant 'speed-up' or faster acceleration rates when compared with the conventional, non-relativistic expression for the time constant, or alternatively with the time scale rg/ c where rg is Larmor radius. The Γ2 energization for the first crossing cycle and the significantly large energy gain for subsequent crossings as well as the high 'speed-up' factors found, are important in supporting the Vietri and Waxman work on GRB ultra-high energy cosmic ray, neutrino and gamma-ray output. Secondly, for super-luminal shocks, we calculate the energy gain for a number of different inclinations and the spectral shapes of the accelerated particles are given. In this investigation we consider only large angle scattering, partly because of computational time limitations and partly because this model provides the most favourable situation for acceleration. We use high gamma flows with Lorentz factors in the range 10-40, which are relevant to AGN accretion disks and jet ultra-relativistic shock configurations. We

  16. When is quasi-linear theory exact. [particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, F. C.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    We use the cumulant expansion technique of Kubo (1962, 1963) to derive an integrodifferential equation for the average one-particle distribution function for particles being accelerated by electric and magnetic fluctuations of a general nature. For a very restricted class of fluctuations, the equation for this function degenerates exactly to a differential equation of Fokker-Planck type. Quasi-linear theory, including the adiabatic assumption, is an exact theory only for this limited class of fluctuations.

  17. Simulations of collisionless shocks - Some implications for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, D.

    1992-08-01

    The role of self-consistent plasma simulations is discussed with reference to collisionless shock structure and the extraction of thermal particles to supra-thermal energies. Examples are given from quasi-perpendicular and parallel shock geometries. The cyclic reformation behavior of the quasi-parallel shock, as revealed by simulations, is detailed, and some implications given. Finally, some recent advances are described in the techniques of simulation of strong particle acceleration.

  18. Optical Diagnostics for Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, Patric

    2009-05-01

    One of the challenges for plasma-based particle accelerators is to measure the spatio-temporal characteristics of the accelerated particle bunch. ``Optical'' diagnostics are particularly interesting and useful because of the large number of techniques that exits to determine the properties of photon pulses. The accelerated bunch can produce photons pulses that carry information about its characteristics for example through synchrotron radiation in a magnet, Cherenkov radiation in a gas, and transition radiation (TR) at the boundary between two media with different dielectric constants. Depending on the wavelength of the emission when compared to the particle bunch length, the radiation can be incoherent or coherent. Incoherent TR in the optical range (or OTR) is useful to measure the transverse spatial characteristics of the beam, such as charge distribution and size. Coherent TR (or CTR) carries information about the bunch length that can in principle be retrieved by standard auto-correlation or interferometric techniques, as well as by spectral measurements. A measurement of the total CTR energy emitted by bunches with constant charge can also be used as a shot-to-shot measurement for the relative bunch length as the CTR energy is proportional to the square of the bunch population and inversely proportional to its length (for a fixed distribution). Spectral interferometry can also yield the spacing between bunches in the case where multiple bunches are trapped in subsequent buckets of the plasma wave. Cherenkov radiation can be used as an energy threshold diagnostic for low energy particles. Cherenkov, synchrotron and transition radiation can be used in a dispersive section of the beam line to measure the bunch energy spectrum. The application of these diagnostics to plasma-based particle accelerators, with emphasis on the beam-driven, plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be discussed.

  19. Particle Acceleration via Reconnection Processes in the Supersonic Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Dosch, A.; Khabarova, O.

    2014-12-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We derive a gyrophase-averaged transport equation for particles experiencing pitch-angle scattering and energization in a super-Alfvénic flowing plasma experiencing multiple small-scale reconnection events. A simpler advection-diffusion transport equation for a nearly isotropic particle distribution is derived. The dominant charged particle energization processes are (1) the electric field induced by quasi-2D magnetic island merging and (2) magnetic island contraction. The magnetic island topology ensures that charged particles are trapped in regions where they experience repeated interactions with the induced electric field or contracting magnetic islands. Steady-state solutions of the isotropic transport equation with only the induced electric field and a fixed source yield a power-law spectrum for the accelerated particles with index α = -(3 + MA )/2, where MA is the Alfvén Mach number. Considering only magnetic island contraction yields power-law-like solutions with index -3(1 + τ c /(8τdiff)), where τ c /τdiff is the ratio of timescales between magnetic island contraction and charged particle diffusion. The general solution is a power-law-like solution with an index that depends on the Alfvén Mach number and the timescale ratio τdiff/τ c . Observed power-law distributions of energetic particles observed in the quiet supersonic solar wind at 1 AU may be a consequence of particle acceleration associated with dissipative small-scale reconnection processes in a turbulent plasma, including the widely reported c -5 (c particle speed) spectra observed by Fisk & Gloeckler and Mewaldt et

  20. Direct extraction of the isovector deformation parameter β(1)2 from the (p, n) reaction of 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orihara, H.; Murakami, T.; Nishihara, S.; Nakagawa, T.; Maeda, K.; Miura, K.; Ohnuma, H.

    1981-11-01

    The reaction 56Fe(p, n) 56Co leading to the analog of the ground state and the first excited 2 + state of 56Fe has been studied at Ep=20, 28, 32 and35MeV. The direct process dominates at higher energies, thus the direct extraction of the isovector deformation parameter β(1)2 is feasible. It is found that β(1)2 is about three times larger than β(0)2, the isoscalar deformation parameter.

  1. Fine structure of auroral particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    A mass-analyzing capped hemispherical electrostatic analyzer was developed for the purpose of resolving the mass, energy, and pitch angle distributions of auroral ions. The instrument, the B-field Hemispherical Electrostatic Energy and Pitch Angle Spectrometer (BEEPS), is an extension of the HEEPS instrument, which uses a hemispherical analyzer and microchannel plates to measure the angular and energy distribution of ions. BEEPS uses a toroidal magnetic field constructed from rare-earth permanent magnets to separate ion measurements into two groups, protons and heavier ions. BEEPS was flown in February, 1991, from Poker Flat, Alaska, on the TOPAZ3 sounding rocket. This sounding rocket mission carried a full array of particle and field instrumentation to an altitude of over 1000 km. Electron data from the flight are presented and discussed in detail, and are shown in light of both ion and wave data taken during the same flight. Correspondences between the various data sets are presented. Particular note is made of the observation that ion heating seems to correspond with a field-aligned plateau in the electron distribution function below the peak electron energy. The growth rate of the n = -1 anomalous Doppler resonance of medium energy electrons with lower hybrid waves is discussed, and proposed as a mechanism for converting energy from the auroral electrons, the driver of the auroral activity, to the ion heating events.

  2. Particle Acceleration in SN1006 Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Raymond, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The FUSE data have been reduced, and a paper on the results is in progress. The main results have been presented in a poster at the January 2004 AAS meeting and an ApJ paper in press. The primary result is that the widths of the 0 VI lines in the NW filament are a bit less than the width expected if the oxygen kinetic temperature is 16 times the proton temperature (mass proportional heating). This is at variance with measurements of shocks in the heliosphere, where preferential heating of oxygen and other heavy species is observed. The paper discusses the theoretical implications for collisionless shock wave physics. A secondary result is that no O VI emission was observed from the NE filament. While the very different particle distribution in that region can partially account for the weakness of the O VI lines, the simplest interpretation is that the pre-shock density in the NE is less than 0.22 times the density in the NW.

  3. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities are responsible not only for the onset and mediation of collisionless shocks but also for the associated acceleration of particles. We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and, more generally, relativistic acceleration behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. Our initial results of a jet-ambient interaction with anti-parallelmagnetic fields show pile-up of magnetic fields at the colliding shock, which may lead to reconnection and associated particle acceleration. We will investigate the radiation in a transient stage as a possible generation mechanism of precursors of prompt emission. In our simulations we calculate the radiation from electrons in the shock region. The detailed properties of this radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  4. Particle acceleration in cosmic plasmas – paradigm change?

    SciTech Connect

    Lytikov, Maxim; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    The presentation begins by considering the requirements on the acceleration mechanism. It is found that at least some particles in high-energy sources are accelerated by magnetic reconnection (and not by shocks). The two paradigms can be distinguished by the hardness of the spectra. Shocks typically produce spectra with p > 2 (relativistic shocks have p ~ 2.2); non-linear shocks & drift acceleration may give p < 2, e.g. p=1.5; B-field dissipation can give p = 1. Then collapse of stressed magnetic X-point in force-free plasma and collapse of a system of magnetic islands are taken up, including Island merger: forced reconnection. Spectra as functions of sigma are shown, and gamma ~ 109 is addressed. It is concluded that reconnection in magnetically-dominated plasma can proceed explosively, is an efficient means of particle acceleration, and is an important (perhaps dominant for some phenomena) mechanism of particle acceleration in high energy sources.

  5. Particle Diffusion and Localized Acceleration in Inhomogeneous AGN Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuhui; Pohl, Martin; Boettcher, Markus

    2014-08-01

    We present an inhomogeneous AGN jet model built on our time-dependent multi-zone radiation code that permits studying how particle acceleration and spatial diffusion complicate the energy-dependent jet inhomogeneity.In the code, a Fokker-Planck equation is used to describe the electrons accelerated through a second-order Fermi process. A Monte Carlo method is used for the radiative transfer, so that light travel time effects are taken into account.To account for inhomogeneity, we use a 2D axi-symmetric cylindrical geometry for both relativistic electrons and magnetic field. We found that small isolated acceleration regions in a much larger emission volume are sufficient to generate high energy particles needed for the X-ray and gamma-ray emission. Diffusive escape from these regions provides a natural explanation for the spectral form of the jet emission. Characteristic spectral hardening can be identified at high energies if diffusive escape is relatively inefficient.Various possible geometries and locations of the acceleration region are evaluated to further assess the structure of the relativistic jets and the energy dissipation processes in them. If the acceleration region is not located at the center of the emission region, the electron spectrum is an atypical broken power-law. The change in the power-law index, which is a result of both particle cooling and escape, is less than 1, the traditionally assumed value.

  6. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic and Ultra-Relativistic Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, A.

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations using diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic and ultra-relativistic shock waves. High upstream flow gamma factors are used, Γ=(1-uup2/c2)-0.5, which are relevant to models of ultra-relativistic particle shock acceleration in the central engines and relativistic jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and in Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) fireballs. Numerical investigations are carried out on acceleration properties in the relativistic and ultra-relativistic flow regime (Γ ˜ 10-1000) concerning angular distributions, acceleration time scales, particle energy gain versus number of crossings and spectral shapes. We perform calculations for both parallel and oblique sub-luminal and super-luminal shocks. For parallel and oblique sub-luminal shocks, the spectra depend on whether or not the scattering is represented by pitch angle diffusion or by large angle scattering. The large angle case exhibits a distinctive structure in the basic power-law spectrum not nearly so obvious for small angle scattering. However, both cases yield a significant 'speed-up' of acceleration rate when compared with the conventional, non-relativistic expression, tacc=[c/(uup-udown)] (λup/uup+λdown/udown). An energization by a factor Γ2 for the first crossing cycle and a large energy gains for subsequent crossings as well as the high 'speed-up' factors found, are important in supporting past works, especially the models developed by Vietri and Waxman on ultra-high energy cosmic ray, neutrino and gamma-ray production in GRB. For oblique super-luminal shocks, we calculate the energy gain and spectral shape for a number of different inclinations. For this case the acceleration of particles is 'pictured' by a shock drift mechanism. We use high gamma flows with Lorentz factors in the range 10-40 which are relevant to ultra-relativistic shocks in AGN accretion disks and jets. In all investigations we closely follow the particle's trajectory along the magnetic field

  7. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Jets due to Weibel Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Hardee, P. E.; Richardson, G. A.; Preece, R. D.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter radiation (Medvedev 2000) from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  8. Finite difference time domain modelling of particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgens, T.G.; Harfoush, F.A.

    1989-03-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) modelling has been successfully applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic scattering and interaction problems for many years. Here the method is extended to incorporate the modelling of wake fields in particle accelerators. Algorithmic comparisons are made to existing wake field codes, such as MAFIA T3. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Investigations of turbulent motions and particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakimiec, J.; Fludra, A.; Lemen, J. R.; Dennis, B. R.; Sylwester, J.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations of X-raya spectra of solar flares show that intense random (turbulent) motions are present in hot flare plasma. Here it is argued that the turbulent motions are of great importance for flare development. They can efficiently enhance flare energy release and accelerate particles to high energies.

  10. Analytic Method to Estimate Particle Acceleration in Flux Ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. (2006) proposed a kinetic mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by reconnection. In this model, particles that gyrate around magnetic field lines transit from island to island, increasing their energy by Fermi acceleration in those islands that are contracting. Based on these ideas, we present an analytic model to estimate the energy gain of particles orbiting around field lines inside a flux rope (2.5D magnetic island). We calculate the change in the velocity of the particles as the flux rope evolves in time. The method assumes a simple profile for the magnetic field of the evolving island; it can be applied to any case where flux ropes are formed. In our case, the flux-rope evolution is obtained from our recent high-resolution, compressible 2.5D MHD simulations of breakout eruptive flares. The simulations allow us to resolve in detail the generation and evolution of large-scale flux ropes as a result of sporadic and patchy reconnection in the flare current sheet. Our results show that the initial energy of particles can be increased by 2-5 times in a typical contracting island, before the island reconnects with the underlying arcade. Therefore, particles need to transit only from 3-7 islands to increase their energies by two orders of magnitude. These macroscopic regions, filled with a large number of particles, may explain the large observed rates of energetic electron production in flares. We conclude that this mechanism is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in flares, but further research is needed to extend our results to 3D flare conditions.

  11. Stochastic particle acceleration by plasma waves in AGN jets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Colgate, S.A.; Miller, J.A.

    1997-11-01

    The free energy stored in the stressed magnetic fields in AGN jets could be dissipated via generating turbulent plasma waves. The authors review several key wave-particle resonant interactions and point out the importance of a broad wave spectrum. Under several idealized assumptions, they show that the transit-time damping process can accelerate electrons to TeV energies in an AGN jet environment, and present a preliminary calculation on the evolution of plasma wave, electron, and photon distributions. The authors especially emphasize several open questions on particle acceleration by waves, and argue that a plausible scenario is to energize electrons out of the thermal background via transit-time damping and further accelerate them by the parallel propagating right-handed waves.

  12. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes as powerful particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tavani, M; Marisaldi, M; Labanti, C; Fuschino, F; Argan, A; Trois, A; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Pittori, C; Palma, F; Trifoglio, M; Gianotti, F; Bulgarelli, A; Vittorini, V; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; Contessi, T; Costa, E; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Galli, M; Giuliani, A; Giusti, M; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Pucella, G; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Scalise, E; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Zanello, D

    2011-01-07

    Strong electric discharges associated with thunderstorms can produce terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), i.e., intense bursts of x rays and γ rays lasting a few milliseconds or less. We present in this Letter new TGF timing and spectral data based on the observations of the Italian Space Agency AGILE satellite. We determine that the TGF emission above 10 MeV has a significant power-law spectral component reaching energies up to 100 MeV. These results challenge TGF theoretical models based on runaway electron acceleration. The TGF discharge electric field accelerates particles over the large distances for which maximal voltages of hundreds of megavolts can be established. The combination of huge potentials and large electric fields in TGFs can efficiently accelerate particles in large numbers, and we reconsider here the photon spectrum and the neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the atmosphere.

  13. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes as Powerful Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tavani, M.; Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Di Cocco, G.; Morelli, E.; Rossi, E.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Trois, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.

    2011-01-07

    Strong electric discharges associated with thunderstorms can produce terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), i.e., intense bursts of x rays and {gamma} rays lasting a few milliseconds or less. We present in this Letter new TGF timing and spectral data based on the observations of the Italian Space Agency AGILE satellite. We determine that the TGF emission above 10 MeV has a significant power-law spectral component reaching energies up to 100 MeV. These results challenge TGF theoretical models based on runaway electron acceleration. The TGF discharge electric field accelerates particles over the large distances for which maximal voltages of hundreds of mega volts can be established. The combination of huge potentials and large electric fields in TGFs can efficiently accelerate particles in large numbers, and we reconsider here the photon spectrum and the neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the atmosphere.

  14. Particle Acceleration and Nonthermal Emission in Relativistic Astrophysical Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    The common observational feature of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and AGN jets is a broad nonthermal spectrum of synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation. It is usually assumed that the emitting electrons are accelerated to a power-law distribution at relativistic shocks, via the so-called Fermi mechanism. Despite decades of research, the Fermi acceleration process is still not understood from first principles. An assessment of the micro-physics of particle acceleration in relativistic shocks is of paramount importance to unveil the properties of astrophysical nonthermal sources, and it is the subject of this dissertation. In the first part of this thesis, I explore by means of fully-kinetic first-principle particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations the properties of relativistic shocks that propagate in electron-positron and electron-proton plasmas carrying uniform magnetic fields. I find that nonthermal particle acceleration only occurs if the upstream magnetization is weak (sigma<0.001), or if the pre-shock field is nearly aligned with the shock direction of propagation (quasi-parallel shocks). Relativistic shocks in PWNe, GRBs and AGN jets are usually thought to be appreciably magnetized (sigma>0.01) and quasi-perpendicular, yet they need to be efficient particle accelerators, in order to explain the prominent nonthermal signatures of these sources. Motivated by this discrepancy, I then relax the assumption of uniform pre-shock fields, and investigate the acceleration efficiency of perpendicular shocks that propagate in high-sigma flows with alternating magnetic fields. This is the geometry expected at the termination shock of pulsar winds, but it could also be relevant for Poynting-dominated jets in GRBs and AGNs. I show by means of PIC simulations that compression of the flow at the shock will force annihilation of nearby field lines, a process known as shock-driven reconnection. Magnetic reconnection can efficiently transfer the energy of

  15. Implementation and performance of FPGA-accelerated particle flow filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampidis, Dimitrios; Jilkov, Vesselin P.; Wu, Jiande

    2015-09-01

    The particle flow filters, proposed by Daum & Hwang, provide a powerful means for density-based nonlinear filtering but their computation is intense and may be prohibitive for real-time applications. This paper proposes a design for superfast implementation of the exact particle flow filter using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as a parallel environment to speedup computation. Simulation results from a nonlinear filtering example are presented to demonstrate that using FPGA can dramatically accelerate particle flow filters through parallelization at the expense of a tolerable loss in accuracy as compared to nonparallel implementation.

  16. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, Evgeny V.; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build-up and decay in relativistic collisionless shocks, are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high-energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build-up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current particle-in-cell simulations show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a very short length-scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplification of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the shock-generated magnetic field at large distances from the shock front. The dissipation of this magnetic field results in a continuous particle acceleration within the downstream region. A unique feature of the model is the existence of an `attractor', towards which any shock will evolve. The model is applicable to any relativistic shock, but its distinctive features show up only for sufficiently large compactness. We demonstrate that prompt and afterglow gamma-ray bursts' shocks satisfy the relevant conditions, and we compare their observations with the predictions of the model.

  17. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.

    2009-03-10

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  18. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the next generation of accelerator scientists and engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.; /MIT

    2008-09-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator / beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, crossdisciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  19. Particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions in the heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of both solar wind protons and interplanetary pickup ions (PUIs) around the corotating interaction region (CIR). The one-dimensional system is applied in order to focus on processes in the direction of CIR propagation. The CIR is bounded by forward and reverse shocks, which are responsible for particle acceleration. The effective acceleration of solar wind protons takes place when the reverse shock (fast wind side) favors a quasi-parallel regime. The diffusive process accounts for this acceleration, and particles can gain energy in a suprathermal range (on the order of 10 keV). In contrast, the PUI acceleration around the shock differs from the conventional model in which the motional electric field along the shock surface accelerates particles. Owing to their large gyroradius, PUIs can gyrate between the upstream and downstream, several proton inertial lengths away from the shock. This 'cross-shock' gyration results in a net velocity increase in the field-aligned component, indicating that the magnetic mirror force is responsible for acceleration. The PUIs that remain in the vicinity of the shock for a long duration (tens of gyroperiods) gain much energy and are reflected back toward the upstream. These reflected energetic PUIs move back and forth along the magnetic field between a pair of CIRs that are magnetically connected. The PUIs are repeatedly accelerated in each reflection, leading to a maximum energy gain close to 100 keV. This mechanism can be evaluated in terms of 'preacceleration' for the generation of anomalous cosmic rays.

  20. Space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC): Description of instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Baker, B. B.; Burch, J. L.; Gibson, W. C.; Black, R. K.; Tomlinson, W. M.; Bounds, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    SEPAC (Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators) flew on Spacelab 1 (SL 1) in November and December 1983. SEPAC is a joint U.S.-Japan investigation of the interaction of electron, plasma, and neutral beams with the ionosphere, atmosphere and magnetosphere. It is scheduled to fly again on Atlas 1 in August 1990. On SL 1, SEPAC used an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, and neutral gas source as active elements and an array of diagnostics to investigate the interactions. For Atlas 1, the plasma accelerator will be replaced by a plasma contactor and charge collection devices to improve vehicle charging meutralization. This paper describes the SEPAC instrumentation in detail for the SL 1 and Atlas 1 flights and includes a bibliography of SEPAC papers.

  1. Accurate and efficient spin integration for particle accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Abell, Dan T.; Meiser, Dominic; Ranjbar, Vahid H.; ...

    2015-02-01

    Accurate spin tracking is a valuable tool for understanding spin dynamics in particle accelerators and can help improve the performance of an accelerator. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of the integrators in the spin tracking code GPUSPINTRACK. We have implemented orbital integrators based on drift-kick, bend-kick, and matrix-kick splits. On top of the orbital integrators, we have implemented various integrators for the spin motion. These integrators use quaternions and Romberg quadratures to accelerate both the computation and the convergence of spin rotations.We evaluate their performance and accuracy in quantitative detail for individual elements as well as formore » the entire RHIC lattice. We exploit the inherently data-parallel nature of spin tracking to accelerate our algorithms on graphics processing units.« less

  2. Extreme particle acceleration in the microquasar Cygnus X-3.

    PubMed

    Tavani, M; Bulgarelli, A; Piano, G; Sabatini, S; Striani, E; Evangelista, Y; Trois, A; Pooley, G; Trushkin, S; Nizhelskij, N A; McCollough, M; Koljonen, K I I; Pucella, G; Giuliani, A; Chen, A W; Costa, E; Vittorini, V; Trifoglio, M; Gianotti, F; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Cocco, V; Contessi, T; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Mattaini, E; Marisaldi, M; Mastropietro, M; Mauri, A; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Scalise, E; Soffitta, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Santolamazza, P; Antonelli, A; Salotti, L

    2009-12-03

    Super-massive black holes in active galaxies can accelerate particles to relativistic energies, producing jets with associated gamma-ray emission. Galactic 'microquasars', which are binary systems consisting of a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole accreting gas from a companion star, also produce relativistic jets, generally together with radio flares. Apart from an isolated event detected in Cygnus X-1, there has hitherto been no systematic evidence for the acceleration of particles to gigaelectronvolt or higher energies in a microquasar, with the consequence that we are as yet unsure about the mechanism of jet energization. Here we report four gamma-ray flares with energies above 100 MeV from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 (an exceptional X-ray binary that sporadically produces radio jets). There is a clear pattern of temporal correlations between the gamma-ray flares and transitional spectral states of the radio-frequency and X-ray emission. Particle acceleration occurred a few days before radio-jet ejections for two of the four flares, meaning that the process of jet formation implies the production of very energetic particles. In Cygnus X-3, particle energies during the flares can be thousands of times higher than during quiescent states.

  3. Extreme particle acceleration in the microquasar CygnusX-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Piano, G.; Sabatini, S.; Striani, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Trois, A.; Pooley, G.; Trushkin, S.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; McCollough, M.; Koljonen, K. I. I.; Pucella, G.; Giuliani, A.; Chen, A. W.; Costa, E.; Vittorini, V.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cocco, V.; Contessi, T.; D'Ammando, F.; Del Monte, E.; de Paris, G.; Di Cocco, G.; di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Ferrari, A.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Longo, F.; Mattaini, E.; Marisaldi, M.; Mastropietro, M.; Mauri, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Morelli, E.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perotti, F.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Prest, M.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Rossi, E.; Rubini, A.; Scalise, E.; Soffitta, P.; Vallazza, E.; Vercellone, S.; Zambra, A.; Zanello, D.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Giommi, P.; Colafrancesco, S.; Santolamazza, P.; Antonelli, A.; Salotti, L.

    2009-12-01

    Super-massive black holes in active galaxies can accelerate particles to relativistic energies, producing jets with associated γ-ray emission. Galactic ‘microquasars’, which are binary systems consisting of a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole accreting gas from a companion star, also produce relativistic jets, generally together with radio flares. Apart from an isolated event detected in CygnusX-1, there has hitherto been no systematic evidence for the acceleration of particles to gigaelectronvolt or higher energies in a microquasar, with the consequence that we are as yet unsure about the mechanism of jet energization. Here we report four γ-ray flares with energies above 100MeV from the microquasar CygnusX-3 (an exceptional X-ray binary that sporadically produces radio jets). There is a clear pattern of temporal correlations between the γ-ray flares and transitional spectral states of the radio-frequency and X-ray emission. Particle acceleration occurred a few days before radio-jet ejections for two of the four flares, meaning that the process of jet formation implies the production of very energetic particles. In CygnusX-3, particle energies during the flares can be thousands of times higher than during quiescent states.

  4. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks Via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Zank, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models (Protheroe and Stanev, 1998; Moraal and Axford, 1983; Ball and Kirk, 1992; Drury et al., 1999) in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box (Melrose and Pope, 1993; Zank et al., 2000). We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (Emax) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks (Zank et al., 2000, 2006; Dosch and Shalchi, 2010) and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  5. Radiation leukemogenesis in mice: loss of PU.1 on chromosome 2 in CBA and C57BL/6 mice after irradiation with 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions, X rays or gamma rays. Part I. Experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuanlin; Brown, Natalie; Finnon, Rosemary; Warner, Christy L; Liu, Xianan; Genik, Paula C; Callan, Matthew A; Ray, F Andrew; Borak, Thomas B; Badie, Christophe; Bouffler, Simon D; Ullrich, Robert L; Bedford, Joel S; Weil, Michael M

    2009-04-01

    Since deletion of the PU.1 gene on chromosome 2 is a crucial acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initiating step in the mouse model, we quantified PU.1 deleted cells in the bone marrow of gamma-, X- and 56Fe-ion-irradiated mice at various times postirradiation. Although 56Fe ions were initially some two to three times more effective than X or gamma rays in inducing PU.1 deletions, by 1 month postirradiation, the proportions of cells with PU.1 deletions were similar for the HZE particles and the sparsely ionizing radiations. These results indicate that while 56Fe ions are more effective in inducing PU.1 deletions, they are also more effective in causing collateral damage that removes hit cells from the bone marrow. After X, gamma or 56Fe-ion irradiation, AML-resistant C57BL/6 mice have fewer cells with PU.1 deletions than CBA mice, and those cells do not persist in the bone marrow of the C57B6/6 mice. Our findings suggest that quantification of PU.1 deleted bone marrow cells 1 month postirradiation can be used as surrogate for the incidence of radiation-induced AML measured in large-scale mouse studies. If so, PU.1 loss could be used to systematically assess the potential leukemogenic effects of other ions and energies in the space radiation environment.

  6. Strongly Accelerated Margination of Active Particles in Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Gekle, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic nanoparticles and other stiff objects injected into a blood vessel filled with red blood cells are known to marginate toward the vessel walls. By means of hydrodynamic lattice-Boltzmann simulations, we show that active particles can strongly accelerate their margination by moving against the flow direction: particles located initially in the channel center migrate much faster to their final position near the wall than in the nonactive case. We explain our findings by an enhanced rate of collisions between the stiff particles and the deformable red blood cells. Our results imply that a significantly faster margination can be achieved either technically by the application of an external magnetic field (if the particles are magnetic) or biologically by self-propulsion (if the particles are, e.g., swimming bacteria). PMID:26789773

  7. Magnetic moment conservation and particles acceleration in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalena, S.; Greco, A.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    The present work concerns the study of particle magnetic moment conservation in the presence of turbulent magnetic fields. As we know from the particle orbit theory, for slow temporal and spatial magnetic field variations(i.e. if their characteristic length and time are greater than the particle orbit diameter and the time spent by a particle to execute one orbit, respectively), the magnetic moment, defined as μ = (v^2⊥ /B) (averaged over the particle gyroperiod) is an adiabatic invariant and remains constant during particle motion. But in presence of a well developed magnetic turbulence μ can undergo rapid variations and might not be constant anymore. Of course, this fact could influence particle acceleration and could have a considerable implications in many astrophysical problems, such as coronal heating. In order to reproduce and extend some of the results obtained by Karimabadi et al. 1992, we study the interaction between ions and a single or a couple of electromagnetic waves. We varied both the wave frequency and the cosine of pitch angle at which particles are injected, in order to observe in this very simple case which is the limit for magnetic moment conservation. We also will reconsider the results of Dmitruk and Matthaeus (2006) regarding particle acceleration in turbulence, taking into account statistics of the magnetic moment (see also Lehe et al., 2010). Later we will add more waves to obtain a complete turbulent spectrum. The final aim of this research work is the understanding the behavior of particles magnetic moment during magnetic reconnection phenomena. H. Karimabadi, D. Krauss-Varban and T. Teresawa, JGR, 97, 13853, 1992. P. Dmitruk and W. H. Matthaeus, JGR, 11, A12110, 2006. R. Lehe, I. J. Parrish and E. Quataert, Astrophys. J. 707, 404, 2009.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at oblique shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Ellison, Donald C.; Jones, Frank C.

    1994-01-01

    The Fermi shock acceleration mechanism may be responsible for the production of high-energy cosmic rays in a wide variety of environments. Modeling of this phenomenon has largely focused on plane-parallel shocks, and one of the most promising techniques for its study is the Monte Carlo simulation of particle transport in shocked fluid flows. One of the principal problems in shock acceleration theory is the mechanism and efficiency of injection of particles from the thermal gas into the accelerated population. The Monte Carlo technique is ideally suited to addressing the injection problem directly, and previous applications of it to the quasi-parallel Earth bow shock led to very successful modeling of proton and heavy ion spectra, as well as other observed quantities. Recently this technique has been extended to oblique shock geometries, in which the upstream magnetic field makes a significant angle Theta(sub B1) to the shock normal. Spectral resutls from test particle Monte Carlo simulations of cosmic-ray acceleration at oblique, nonrelativistic shocks are presented. The results show that low Mach number shocks have injection efficiencies that are relatively insensitive to (though not independent of) the shock obliquity, but that there is a dramatic drop in efficiency for shocks of Mach number 30 or more as the obliquity increases above 15 deg. Cosmic-ray distributions just upstream of the shock reveal prominent bumps at energies below the thermal peak; these disappear far upstream but might be observable features close to astrophysical shocks.

  9. Observational Evidence of Particle Acceleration Associated with Plasmoid Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Asai, Ayumi; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-09-01

    We report a strong association between the particle acceleration and plasma motions found in the 2010 August 18 solar flare. The plasma motions are tracked in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft Ahead, and the signature of particle acceleration was investigated by using Nobeyama Radioheliograph data. In our previous paper, we reported that in EUV images many plasma blobs appeared in the current sheet above the flare arcade. They were ejected bidirectionally along the current sheet, and the blobs that were ejected sunward collided with the flare arcade. Some of them collided or merged with each other before they were ejected from the current sheet. We discovered impulsive radio bursts associated with such plasma motions (ejection, coalescence, and collision with the post flare loops). The radio bursts are considered to be the gyrosynchrotron radiation by nonthermal high energy electrons. In addition, the stereoscopic observation by AIA and EUVI suggests that plasma blobs had a three-dimensionally elongated structure. We consider that the plasma blobs were three-dimensional plasmoids (i.e., flux ropes) moving in a current sheet. We believe that our observation provides clear evidence of particle acceleration associated with the plasmoid motions. We discuss possible acceleration mechanisms on the basis of our results.

  10. Plasma jet acceleration of dust particles to hypervelocities

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.

    2008-10-15

    A convenient method to accelerate simultaneously hundreds of micron-size dust particles to a few km/s over a distance of about 1 m is based on plasma drag. Plasma jets which can deliver sufficient momentum to the dust particles need to have speeds of at least several tens of km/s, densities of the order of 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} or higher, and low temperature {approx}1 eV, in order to prevent dust destruction. An experimental demonstration of dust particles acceleration to hypervelocities by plasma produced in a coaxial gun is presented here. The plasma flow speed is deduced from photodiode signals while the plasma density is measured by streaked spectroscopy. As a result of the interaction with the plasma jet, the dust grains are also heated to high temperatures and emit visible light. A hypervelocity dust shower is imaged in situ with a high speed video camera at some distance from the coaxial gun, where light emission from the plasma flow is less intense. The bright traces of the flying microparticles are used to infer their speed and acceleration by employing the time-of-flight technique. A simple model for plasma drag which accounts for ion collection on the grain surface gives predictions for dust accelerations which are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  11. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Turbulence Generated by Magnetorotational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Toma, Kenji; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We investigate stochastic particle acceleration in accretion flows. It is believed that magnetorotational instability (MRI) generates turbulence inside accretion flows and that cosmic rays (CRs) are accelerated by the turbulence. We calculate equations of motion for CRs in the turbulent fields generated by MRI with the shearing box approximation and without back reaction to the field. Our results show that the CRs randomly gain or lose their energy through interaction with the turbulent fields. The CRs diffuse in the configuration space anisotropically: the diffusion coefficient in the direction of the unperturbed flow is about 20 times higher than the Bohm coefficient, while those in the other directions are only a few times higher than the Bohm. The momentum distribution is isotropic and its evolution can be described by the diffusion equation in momentum space where the diffusion coefficient is a power-law function of the CR momentum. We show that the shear acceleration works efficiently for energetic particles. We also cautiously note that in the shearing box approximation, particles that cross the simulation box many times along the radial direction undergo unphysical runaway acceleration by the Lorentz transformation, which needs to be taken into account with special care.

  12. Differential Effects of X-Rays and High-Energy {sup 56}Fe Ions on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kurpinski, Kyle; Jang, Deok-Jin; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Rydberg, Bjorn; Chu, Julia; So, Joanna; Wyrobek, Andy; Li Song; Wang Daojing

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Stem cells hold great potential for regenerative medicine, but they have also been implicated in cancer and aging. How different kinds of ionizing radiation affect stem cell biology remains unexplored. This study was designed to compare the biological effects of X-rays and of high-linear energy transfer (LET) {sup 56}Fe ions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Methods and Materials: A multi-functional comparison was carried out to investigate the differential effects of X-rays and {sup 56}Fe ions on hMSC. The end points included modulation of key markers such as p53, cell cycle progression, osteogenic differentiation, and pathway and networks through transcriptomic profiling and bioinformatics analysis. Results: X-rays and {sup 56}Fe ions differentially inhibited the cell cycle progression of hMSC in a p53-dependent manner without impairing their in vitro osteogenic differentiation process. Pathway and network analyses revealed that cytoskeleton and receptor signaling were uniquely enriched for low-dose (0.1 Gy) X-rays. In contrast, DNA/RNA metabolism and cell cycle regulation were enriched for high-dose (1 Gy) X-rays and {sup 56}Fe ions, with more significant effects from {sup 56}Fe ions. Specifically, DNA replication, DNA strand elongation, and DNA binding/transferase activity were perturbed more severely by 1 Gy {sup 56}Fe ions than by 1 Gy X-rays, consistent with the significant G2/M arrest for the former while not for the latter. Conclusions: {sup 56}Fe ions exert more significant effects on hMSC than X-rays. Since hMSC are the progenitors of osteoblasts in vivo, this study provides new mechanistic understandings of the relative health risks associated with low- and high-dose X-rays and high-LET space radiation.

  13. Differential effects of x-rays and high-energy 56Fe ions on human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kurpinski, Kyle; Jang, Deok-Jin; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Rydberg, Bjorn; Chu, Julia; So, Joanna; Wyrobek, Andy; Li, Song; Wang, Daojing

    2009-03-01

    Stem cells hold great potential for regenerative medicine, but they have also been implicated in cancer and aging. How different kinds of ionizing radiation affect stem cell biology remains unexplored. This study was designed to compare the biological effects of X-rays and of high-linear energy transfer (LET) (56)Fe ions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). A multi-functional comparison was carried out to investigate the differential effects of X-rays and (56)Fe ions on hMSC. The end points included modulation of key markers such as p53, cell cycle progression, osteogenic differentiation, and pathway and networks through transcriptomic profiling and bioinformatics analysis. X-rays and (56)Fe ions differentially inhibited the cell cycle progression of hMSC in a p53-dependent manner without impairing their in vitro osteogenic differentiation process. Pathway and network analyses revealed that cytoskeleton and receptor signaling were uniquely enriched for low-dose (0.1 Gy) X-rays. In contrast, DNA/RNA metabolism and cell cycle regulation were enriched for high-dose (1 Gy) X-rays and (56)Fe ions, with more significant effects from (56)Fe ions. Specifically, DNA replication, DNA strand elongation, and DNA binding/transferase activity were perturbed more severely by 1 Gy (56)Fe ions than by 1 Gy X-rays, consistent with the significant G2/M arrest for the former while not for the latter. (56)Fe ions exert more significant effects on hMSC than X-rays. Since hMSC are the progenitors of osteoblasts in vivo, this study provides new mechanistic understandings of the relative health risks associated with low- and high-dose X-rays and high-LET space radiation.

  14. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  15. An Expert System For Tuning Particle-Beam Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lager, Darrel L.; Brand, Hal R.; Maurer, William J.; Searfus, Robert M.; Hernandez, Jose E.

    1989-03-01

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script.

  16. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  17. Solar accelerated particles - Comparisons of abundances and energy spectra from particle and gamma-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Miller, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations of the April 27, 1981 flare have been used to derive elemental abundances of both the ambient gas and the accelerated particle which interact with this gas to produce gamma rays. The results show that the abundances of the accelerated particles which produce the gamma rays are much more consistent with first-class particle abundances than with large proton-flare abundances. Observed bremsstrahlung spectral from 16 flares are compared with calculated bremsstrahlung spectra. It is concluded that the electrons observed in interplanetary space and the electrons responsible for gamma-ray production cannot be drawn from the same accelerated particle population without the former being affected by reacceleration or energy-dependent escape.

  18. String black holes as particle accelerators to arbitrarily high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2014-07-01

    We show that an extremal Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole may act as a particle accelerator with arbitrarily high energy when two uncharged particles falling freely from rest to infinity on the near horizon. We show that the center of mass energy of collision is independent of the extreme fine tuning of the angular momentum of the colliding particles. We further show that the center of mass energy of collisions of particles at the ISCO ( r ISCO ) or at the photon orbit ( r ph ) or at the marginally bound circular orbit ( r mb ) i.e. at r≡ r ISCO = r ph = r mb =2 M could be arbitrarily large for the aforementioned space-time, which is quite different from the Schwarzschild and the Reissner-Nordstrøm space-time. For non-extremal GMGHS space-time the CM energy is finite and depends upon the asymptotic value of the dilation field ( ϕ 0).

  19. Sites of Relativistic Particle Acceleration in Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. C.; Rudnick, L.

    1996-01-01

    We have determined the synchrotron spectral indices of 304 compact radio knots in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. A comparison of these data with the dynamical and brightness properties of these knots tabulated by Anderson & Rudnick indicates that spectral index shows a significant correlation with projected radius from the center of the remnant. Spectrally flat knots reside in a shell coincident with the bright radio ring, while steeper knots occupy a shell coincident with the diffuse radio plateau surrounding the ring. To a lesser extent, we find spectral index to be correlated also with the radio brightness of the knot, in the sense that brighter knots tend to have steeper spectra. No significant correlation is found between spectral index and knot deceleration or rate of brightness change. As the synchrotron spectral index traces the distribution of energy among relativistic particle populations, we use these results to study the nature of particle acceleration mechanisms active in Cas A. Given the dual- shell nature of the spectral index distribution in Cas A and the lack of strong correlation between spectral index and dynamical properties of the knots, we conclude that radio-bright compact features are not sites of currently active particle acceleration in Cas A. This conclusion is in agreement with models of supersonic gaseous bullets constructed by Jones, Kang, & Tregillis. In these models, the marked synchrotron brightening which accompanies bullet deceleration is due primarily to preexisting relativistic particles radiating in rapidly amplifying shear-layer magnetic fields, rather than a large infusion of new relativistic particles accelerated in situ. Spectral variations between compact features in Cas A are more likely to reflect modulations in the background particle energy spectra within the remnant, perhaps instilled by temperature variations in the underlying thermal material. This interpretation requires that the diffuse synchrotron emission

  20. Pre-equilibrium emission in neutron induced reactions on54,56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Ivaşcu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1988-06-01

    The experimentally well known ( n, p), ( n, α) and ( n, 2 n) reaction excitation functions, from threshold to 20 MeV incident energy, and neutron and proton emission spectra at 14.8 MeV from54,56Fe targets are calculated in the frame of the Geometry-Dependent Hybrid pre-equilibrium emission model, including angular momentum and parity conservation, and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Use of a consistent statistical model parameter set enables the validation of the pre-equilibrium emission model. Moreover, an enhanced pre-equilibrium emission from higher spin composite system states, associated with higher incoming orbital momenta, has been evidenced. Higher orbital momenta involved also in the emergent channels of the process are suggested by calculations of the residual nuclei level populations.

  1. 56Fe capture cross section experiments at the RPI LINAC Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Brian; Blain, Ezekiel; Thompson, Nicholas; Weltz, Adam; Youmans, Amanda; Danon, Yaron; Barry, Devin; Block, Robert; Daskalakis, Adam; Epping, Brian; Leinweber, Gregory; Rapp, Michael

    2017-09-01

    A new array of C6D6 detectors installed at the RPI LINAC Center has enabled the capability to measure neutron capture cross sections above the 847 keV inelastic scattering threshold of 56Fe through the use of digital post-processing filters and pulse-integral discriminators, without sacrificing the statistical quality of data at lower incident neutron energies where such filtering is unnecessary. The C6D6 detectors were used to perform time-of-flight capture cross section measurements on a sample 99.87% enriched iron-56. The total-energy method, combined with the pulse height weighting technique, were then applied to the raw data to determine the energy-dependent capture yield. Above the inelastic threshold, the data were analyzed with a pulse-integral filter to reveal the capture signal, extending the the full data set to 2 MeV.

  2. Quasielastic electron scattering from /sup 56/Fe at 180/sup 0/

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, A.; Ryan, P.J.; Ogino, H.; Parker, B.; Peterson, G.A.; Singhal, R.P.

    1984-07-01

    Transverse inelastic electron scattering cross sections for /sup 56/Fe have been measured at 180/sup 0/ in the quasielastic region for 12 incident electron energies. From these data transverse response functions have been extracted at constant three-momentum transfers of 250, 290, 330, 370, 410, 450, 490, and 530 MeV/c. The results in the quasielastic region have been compared with two relativistic Fermi gas models: one employing a momentum-transfer-dependent effective mass M(, the other employing the free-nucleon mass. The region beyond the quasielastic peak has been compared with model calculations incorporating meson-exchange currents and nucleon-nucleon correlations. Transverse response function y scaling is also discussed.

  3. Dissipation Mechanisms and Particle Acceleration at the Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Burch, J. L.; Fuselier, S. A.; Genestreti, K. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Ergun, R.; Russell, C.; Wei, H.; Phan, T.; Giles, B. L.; Chen, L. J.; Mauk, B.

    2016-12-01

    Collisionless shocks are a major producer of suprathermal and energetic particles throughout space and astrophysical plasma environments. Theoretical studies combined with in-situ observations during the space age have significantly advanced our understanding of how such shocks are formed, the manner in which they evolve and dissipate their energy, and the physical mechanisms by which they heat the local plasma and accelerate the energetic particles. Launched in March 2015, NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission has four spacecraft separated between 10-40 km and equipped with identical state-of-the-art instruments that acquire magnetic and electric field, plasma wave, and particle data at unprecedented temporal resolution to study the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere. Serendipitously, during Phase 1a, the MMS mission also encountered and crossed the Earth's bow shock more than 300 times. In this paper, we combine and analyze the highest available time resolution MMS burst data during 140 bow shock crossings from October 2015 through December 31, 2015 to shed new light on key open questions regarding the formation, evolution, dissipation, and particle injection and energization at collisionless shocks. In particular, we compare and contrast the differences in shock dissipation and particle acceleration mechanisms at quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks.

  4. Radial equilibrium of relativistic particle bunches in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotov, K. V.

    2017-02-01

    Drive particle beams in linear or weakly nonlinear regimes of the plasma wakefield accelerator quickly reach a radial equilibrium with the wakefield, which is described in detail for the first time. The equilibrium beam state and self-consistent wakefields are obtained by combining analytical relationships, numerical integration, and first-principles simulations. In the equilibrium state, the beam density is strongly peaked near the axis, the beam radius is constant along most of the beam, and longitudinal variation of the focusing strength is balanced by varying beam emittance. The transverse momentum distribution of beam particles depends on the observation radius and is neither separable nor Gaussian.

  5. Connecting inflation with late cosmic acceleration by particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-04-01

    A continuous process of creation of particles is investigated as a possible connection between the inflationary stage with late cosmic acceleration. In this model, the inflationary era occurs due to a continuous and fast process of creation of relativistic particles, and the recent accelerating phase is driven by the nonrelativistic matter creation from the gravitational field acting on the quantum vacuum, which finally results in an effective equation of state (EoS) less than - 1. Thus, explaining recent results in favor of a phantom dynamics without the need of any modifications in the gravity theory has been proposed. Finally, we confront the model with recent observational data of type Ia Supernova, history of the Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

  6. The appreciation of stochastic motion in particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Symon, Keith; Sessler, Andrew

    2003-08-03

    A description is given of the analytic and numerical work, performed from July 1955 through August 1956, so as to develop, and then study, the process of making intense proton beams, suitable for colliding beams. It is shown how this investigation led, in a most natural way, to the realization that stochasticity can arise in a simple Hamiltonian system. Furthermore, the criterion for the onset of stochasticity was understood, and carefully studied, in two different situations. The first situation was the proposed (and subsequently used) ''stacking process'' for developing an intense beam, where stochasticity occurs as additional particles are added to the intense circulating beam. The second situation occurs when one seeks to develop ''stochastic accelerators'' in which particles are accelerated (continuously) by a collection of radio frequency systems. It was in the last connection that the well-known criterion for stochasticity, resonance overlap, was obtained.

  7. Linear particle accelerator with seal structure between electrodes and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Broadhurst, John H.

    1989-01-01

    An electrostatic linear accelerator includes an electrode stack comprised of primary electrodes formed or Kovar and supported by annular glass insulators having the same thermal expansion rate as the electrodes. Each glass insulator is provided with a pair of fused-in Kovar ring inserts which are bonded to the electrodes. Each electrode is designed to define a concavo-convex particle trap so that secondary charged particles generated within the accelerated beam area cannot reach the inner surface of an insulator. Each insulator has a generated inner surface profile which is so configured that the electrical field at this surface contains no significant tangential component. A spark gap trigger assembly is provided, which energizes spark gaps protecting the electrodes affected by over voltage to prevent excessive energy dissipation in the electrode stack.

  8. Relativistic particle acceleration by obliquely propagating electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalón, Elena; Burke, William J.

    1987-12-01

    The relativistic equations of motion are analyzed for charged particles in a magnetized plasma and externally imposed electromagnetic fields (ω, k), which have wave vectors k that are at arbitrary angles. The particle energy is obtained from a set of nonlinear differential equations, as a function of time, initial conditions, and cyclotron harmonic numbers. For a given cyclotron resonance, the energy oscillates in time within the limits of a potential well; stochastic acceleration occurs if the widths of different Hamiltonian potentials overlap. The net energy gain for a given harmonic increase with the angle of propagation, and decreases as the magnitude of the wave magnetic field increases. Potential applications of these results to the acceleration of ionsopheric electrons are presented.

  9. Recent advances in UHV techniques for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Rao

    1995-01-01

    The ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) requirements for storage rings and accelerators, and the development of the science and technology of UHV for particle accelerators and magnetic fusion devices have been recently reviewed by N.B. Mistry and H.F. Dylla respectively. In this paper, the latest developments in the advancement of UHV techniques for the vacuum integrity of Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and for successfully dealing with the synchrotron radiation related beam line vacuum problem encountered in the design of the SSC are reviewed: the review includes developments in extreme sensitivity He leak detection technique based on the dynamic adsorption and desorption of He, operation of ionization gauges at Lhe temperatures, metal sponges for the effective cryopumping of H{sup 2} and He to pressures better than 10{sup -14} torr, and low cost and high He sensitivity RGA's. The details of a new extreme sensitivity He leak detector system are also discussed here.

  10. Particle Accelerators for Radiotherapy:. Present Status and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciszewski, Wieslaw; Scharf, Waldemar

    2004-07-01

    The paper describes the development of the application of particle accelerators in the treatment of cancer diseases over the past fifty years. Special emphasis is put on the routine application of conventional electron accelerators delivering electron and photon beams. This is the largest group of devices for radiotherapy (over 7500 machines operating worldwide). The number of patients reaches 5 million per year. The medical electron linacs have recently undergone considerable modifications of construction, in particular the systems of radiation field shaping. Contemporary accelerators for radiotherapy are equipped with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) which, in conjunction with IMRT (Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy) technique and special system of therapy planning, assure considerably higher precision, effectiveness and quality of treatment.

  11. Particle acceleration via reconnection processes in the supersonic solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G. P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Dosch, A.; Khabarova, O.

    2014-12-10

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We derive a gyrophase-averaged transport equation for particles experiencing pitch-angle scattering and energization in a super-Alfvénic flowing plasma experiencing multiple small-scale reconnection events. A simpler advection-diffusion transport equation for a nearly isotropic particle distribution is derived. The dominant charged particle energization processes are (1) the electric field induced by quasi-2D magnetic island merging and (2) magnetic island contraction. The magnetic island topology ensures that charged particles are trapped in regions where they experience repeated interactions with the induced electric field or contracting magnetic islands. Steady-state solutions of the isotropic transport equation with only the induced electric field and a fixed source yield a power-law spectrum for the accelerated particles with index α = –(3 + M{sub A} )/2, where M{sub A} is the Alfvén Mach number. Considering only magnetic island contraction yields power-law-like solutions with index –3(1 + τ {sub c}/(8τ{sub diff})), where τ {sub c}/τ{sub diff} is the ratio of timescales between magnetic island contraction and charged particle diffusion. The general solution is a power-law-like solution with an index that depends on the Alfvén Mach number and the timescale ratio τ{sub diff}/τ {sub c}. Observed power-law distributions of energetic particles observed in the quiet supersonic solar wind at 1 AU may be a consequence of particle acceleration associated with dissipative small-scale reconnection processes in a turbulent plasma, including the widely reported c {sup –5} (c particle

  12. Kerr black holes as particle accelerators to arbitrarily high energy.

    PubMed

    Bañados, Máximo; Silk, Joseph; West, Stephen M

    2009-09-11

    We show that intermediate mass black holes conjectured to be the early precursors of supermassive black holes and surrounded by relic cold dark matter density spikes can act as particle accelerators with collisions, in principle, at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies in the case of Kerr black holes. While the ejecta from such interactions will be highly redshifted, we may anticipate the possibility of a unique probe of Planck-scale physics.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael R.

    2006-11-16

    Project Title: Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications PI: Michael R. Brown, Swarthmore College The purpose of the project was to provide theoretical and modeling support to the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Accordingly, the theoretical effort was tightly integrated into the SSX experimental effort. During the grant period, Michael Brown and his experimental collaborators at Swarthmore, with assistance from W. Matthaeus as appropriate, made substantial progress in understanding the physics SSX plasmas.

  14. Wave and particle dynamics of the beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, P. )

    1989-10-15

    We present two-dimensional wave-envelope studies of the interaction between a plasma beat-wave and the laser pumps which drive it. A new method of focusing is demonstrated which requires the plasma wave to be driven slightly below its resonant frequency. Test particles are employed to investigate possible means of extending the accelerator stage length. {copyright} 1989 American Institute of Physics

  15. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Zhang, B.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma instabilities are responsible not only for the onset and mediation of collisionless shocks but also for the associated acceleration of particles. We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and, more generally, relativistic acceleration behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. We are currently investigating the specific case of a jet colliding with an anti-parallel magnetized ambient medium. The properties of the radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants.

  16. Microscopic Processes On Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Sol, H.; Niemiec, J.; Pohl, M.; Nordlund, A.; Fredriksen, J.; Lyubarsky, Y.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  17. Microscopic Processes On Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Sol, H.; Niemiec, J.; Pohl, M.; Nordlund, A.; Fredriksen, J.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  18. Charged-Particle Acceleration and Energy Loss Measurements on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Ram, A. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Soures, J. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Roberts, S.; Sorce, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Phillips, T. W.

    2000-10-01

    Measurements have been made of charged fusion products produced in D ^3He-filled targets irradiated on OMEGA. Comparing the energy shifts of four particle types has probed two distinct physical processes: electrostatic acceleration in the low-density corona and energy loss in the high-density target. When the burn occurred during the laser pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by acceleration effects. Using a simple mode, the time history of the target's electrostatic potential was found and shown to decay to zero soon after laser irradiation was complete. When the burn occurred after the pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by energy losses in the target, allowing charged-particle stopping-power predictions to be tested. The results provide the first verification of the general form of stopping power theories over a wide velocity range. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of ICF under Coop. Agreem. No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  19. Accelerated simulation of stochastic particle removal processes in particle-resolved aerosol models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, J.H.; Michelotti, M.D.; Riemer, N.; Heath, M.T.; West, M.

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods have proven useful for simulating multi-dimensional systems such as composition-resolved aerosol size distributions. While particle-resolved methods have substantial benefits for highly detailed simulations, these techniques suffer from high computational cost, motivating efforts to improve their algorithmic efficiency. Here we formulate an algorithm for accelerating particle removal processes by aggregating particles of similar size into bins. We present the Binned Algorithm for particle removal processes and analyze its performance with application to the atmospherically relevant process of aerosol dry deposition. We show that the Binned Algorithm can dramatically improve the efficiency of particle removals, particularly for low removal rates, and that computational cost is reduced without introducing additional error. In simulations of aerosol particle removal by dry deposition in atmospherically relevant conditions, we demonstrate about 50-times increase in algorithm efficiency.

  20. On the relationship between collisionless shock structure and energetic particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental research on bow shock structure and theoretical studies of quasi-parallel shock structure and shock acceleration of energetic particles were reviewed, to point out the relationship between structure and particle acceleration. The phenomenological distinction between quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks that has emerged from bow shock research; present efforts to extend this work to interplanetary shocks; theories of particle acceleration by shocks; and particle acceleration to shock structures using multiple fluid models were discussed.

  1. Accelerating particle-in-cell simulations using multilevel Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been an important tool in understanding plasmas since the dawn of the digital computer. Much more recently, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method has accelerated particle-based simulations of a variety of systems described by stochastic differential equations (SDEs), from financial portfolios to porous media flow. The fundamental idea of MLMC is to perform correlated particle simulations using a hierarchy of different time steps, and to use these correlations for variance reduction on the fine-step result. This framework is directly applicable to the Langevin formulation of Coulomb collisions, as demonstrated in previous work, but in order to apply to PIC simulations of realistic scenarios, MLMC must be generalized to incorporate self-consistent evolution of the electromagnetic fields. We present such a generalization, with rigorous results concerning its accuracy and efficiency. We present examples of the method in the collisionless, electrostatic context, and discuss applications and extensions for the future.

  2. Acceleration of particles in shocked magnetic neutral sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, D.J.; Perez-Peraza, J.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the long-duration 10-100-GeV particle events observed following solar flares is investigated theoretically. Particle acceleration by a passing MHD shock striking a magnetic neutral sheet like that of a helmet streamer is simulated over a 5-min interval using the two-dimensional MHD code of Steinolfson and Mullan (1980), defining the diffusion region by the gas pressure or by the magnetic Reynolds number. The results of zeroth-order and particle-trajectory approximations are presented in graphs and diagrams and shown to be viable explanations of the observed phenomena. Time delays of 10 min to 2 h and source durations of 10 min to 1 d are estimated. 8 references.

  3. Acceleration of particles in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Pu-Jian; Li, Ran; Jia, Lin-Yu; Ren, Ji-Rong

    2017-06-01

    It has recently been pointed out that, under certain conditions, the energy of particles accelerated by black holes in the center-of-mass frame can become arbitrarily high. In this paper, we study the collision of two particles in the case of four-dimensional charged nonrotating, extremal charged rotating and near-extremal charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes as well as the naked singularity case in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. We find that the center-of-mass energy for a pair of colliding particles is unlimited at the horizon of charged nonrotating Kaluza-Klein black holes, extremal charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes and in the naked singularity case. Supported by NSFC (11575202, 11205048), Foundation for Young Key Teacher of Henan Normal University and Cuiying Programme of Lanzhou University (225000-582404) and Fundamental Research Fund for Physics and Mathematic of Lanzhou University (LZULL200911)

  4. Shock drift acceleration. [of charged particles in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Thomas P.; Pesses, Mark E.; Decker, Robert B.

    1985-01-01

    This is a review of the fundamental physics of the interactions of charged particles treated individually while they interact with fast mode magnetohydrodynamic shocks. Numerical simulation and analytical theory are used to develop predictions of the expected characteristics of this process strong upstream anisotropies directed along the magnetic field and downstream anisotropies tending to be peaked more perpendicular to the field; relatively more of the enhancement of higher-energy particles occurring upstream; sensitive dependence on shock normal to magnetic field angle of the efficiency of energization. Observations which display all of the above characteristics are reviewed. Also discussed is the relationship of shock drift acceleration to the models for stochastic transport of charged particles in the vicinity of shocks. Extensions of this work in both the observational and theoretical approaches are discussed.

  5. Particle acceleration and plasma energization in substorms: MHD and test particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, Joachim

    2015-07-16

    The author organizes his slide presentation under the following topics: background, MHD simulation, orbit integration, typical orbits, spatial and temporal features, acceleration mechanisms, source locations, and source energies. Field-­aligned energetic particle fluxes are shown for 45-keV electrons and 80-keV protons. It is concluded that the onset from local thin current sheet is electron tearing. Acceleration is mainly from field collapse, governed by Ey = -vxXBz: importance of localization; betatron acceleration (similar if nonadiabatic); 1st order Fermi, type B (or A; current sheet acceleration). There are two source regions (of comparable importance in magnetotail): - flanks, inner tail - drift entry - early, higher energy - outer plasma sheet - reconnection entry - later, lower energy. Both thermal and suprathermal sources are important, with limited energy range for acceleration

  6. Cosmic bullets as particle accelerators and radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung; Tregillis, I. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated in two dimensions the dynamical evolution of dense gas clouds(`cosmic bullets') moving supersonically through a uniform low-density medium. The diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic protons (cosmic rays) and their dynamical feedback on the background flow are included by the two-fluid model for this process. The acceleration of relativistic electrons is approximated by a test-particle model, and a passive magnetic field is followed by a simple advection scheme. Strong bow shocks, with Mach numbers similar to that of a bullet's motion, are the most important particle accelerators in the flow, while tail shocks and shocks inside the bullets do not play generally significant roles in this regard. For our simulation parameters, approximately greater than 10% of the initial bullet kinetic energy is converted to a combination of internal energy of gas and cosmic-ray protons by the time the bullets begin to be disrupted. Characteristically, the cosmic rays gain several percent of the available kinetic energy. Bullet destruction on timescales only a little larger than the ram pressure bullet crushing time begins in response to Kelvin-Helmholtz and especially to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities along the forward bullet surface. For dense bullets this happens before the bullet is stopped by ram pressure. According to our simple model for synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated and transported within the flows, that emission increases rapidly as the bullet begins to fragment, when it is strongly dominated by field enhancement in sheared flows. Synchrotron emission from the acceleration region within the bow shock is, by contrast, much weaker.

  7. Cosmic bullets as particle accelerators and radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung; Tregillis, I. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated in two dimensions the dynamical evolution of dense gas clouds(`cosmic bullets') moving supersonically through a uniform low-density medium. The diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic protons (cosmic rays) and their dynamical feedback on the background flow are included by the two-fluid model for this process. The acceleration of relativistic electrons is approximated by a test-particle model, and a passive magnetic field is followed by a simple advection scheme. Strong bow shocks, with Mach numbers similar to that of a bullet's motion, are the most important particle accelerators in the flow, while tail shocks and shocks inside the bullets do not play generally significant roles in this regard. For our simulation parameters, approximately greater than 10% of the initial bullet kinetic energy is converted to a combination of internal energy of gas and cosmic-ray protons by the time the bullets begin to be disrupted. Characteristically, the cosmic rays gain several percent of the available kinetic energy. Bullet destruction on timescales only a little larger than the ram pressure bullet crushing time begins in response to Kelvin-Helmholtz and especially to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities along the forward bullet surface. For dense bullets this happens before the bullet is stopped by ram pressure. According to our simple model for synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated and transported within the flows, that emission increases rapidly as the bullet begins to fragment, when it is strongly dominated by field enhancement in sheared flows. Synchrotron emission from the acceleration region within the bow shock is, by contrast, much weaker.

  8. Particle acceleration near X-type magnetic neutral lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deeg, Hans-Jorg; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Duric, Nebojsa

    1991-01-01

    The behavior of charged particles near X-type magnetic neutral lines is investigated. The magnetic field is taken to be hyperbolic and time stationary, with a uniform electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. The general properties of the orbits of noninteracting particles in that field geometry are examined. Approximate analytic solutions to the orbit equations are derived by considering a magnetic-insulation picture where there is a hole in the magnetic insulation around the neutral line. Scaling laws for the dependence of the energy gain on strengths of the magnetic and electric fields are derived. The kinetic-energy distribution function for accelerated particles is derived for particles flowing past the neutral line. These analytic derivations are supported by computer simulations, in which the relativistic equations of motion for single test particles are numerically solved and the orbits and kinetic-energy gains of the particles are obtained. A number of simulations were performed and one parameter at a time was varied. Applications of the results to magnetic-neutral-line regions in space physics and astrophysics are possible.

  9. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks in Extragalactic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2009-11-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at relativistic shocks is expected to be an important acceleration mechanism in a variety of astrophysical objects including extragalactic jets in active galactic nuclei and gamma ray bursts. These sources remain strong and interesting candidate sites for the generation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. In this paper, key predictions of DSA at relativistic shocks that are salient to the issue of cosmic ray ion and electron production are outlined. Results from a Monte Carlo simulation of such diffusive acceleration in test-particle, relativistic, oblique, MHD shocks are presented. Simulation output is described for both large angle and small angle scattering scenarios, and a variety of shock obliquities including superluminal regimes when the de Hoffman-Teller frame does not exist. The distribution function power-law indices compare favorably with results from other techniques. They are found to depend sensitively on the mean magnetic field orientation in the shock, and the nature of MHD turbulence that propagates along fields in shock environs. An interesting regime of flat spectrum generation is addressed, providing evidence for its origin being due to shock drift acceleration. The impact of these theoretical results on gamma-ray burst and blazar science is outlined. Specifically, Fermi gamma-ray observations of these cosmic sources are already providing significant constraints on important environmental quantities for relativistic shocks, namely the frequency of scattering and the level of field turbulence.

  10. Anomalous diffusion of energetic particles: implications for diffusive particle acceleration at a quasi-perpendicular shock

    SciTech Connect

    Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Le Roux, Jakobus A.

    2005-08-01

    We study energetic particle transport in turbulent magnetic fields. The composite turbulence is modeled by a nonlinear structure (vortex) and a randomly fluctuating background magnetic field. Results of our numerical simulations show that an anomalous diffusion regime (subdiffusion and superdiffusion) occurs when the correlation length of the magnetic field disturbances is about the same or larger than the average particle gyroradius. Subdiffusion of cosmic rays in the vicinity of a quasi-perpendicular shock can lower the density of particles at the shock front. Particles become temporarily trapped in the turbulent magnetic fields. The particle spectrum in this case can steepen as compared to the spectrum in the classic diffusive acceleration case. We estimate a power law index for the particle spectrum for a number of cases and discuss implications for cosmic ray transport in the heliosphere.

  11. The Particle Accelerator Simulation Code PyORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlov, Timofey V; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2015-01-01

    The particle accelerator simulation code PyORBIT is presented. The structure, implementation, history, parallel and simulation capabilities, and future development of the code are discussed. The PyORBIT code is a new implementation and extension of algorithms of the original ORBIT code that was developed for the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The PyORBIT code has a two level structure. The upper level uses the Python programming language to control the flow of intensive calculations performed by the lower level code implemented in the C++ language. The parallel capabilities are based on MPI communications. The PyORBIT is an open source code accessible to the public through the Google Open Source Projects Hosting service.

  12. Shock waves and particle acceleration in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung; Ha, Ji-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    During the formation of the large-scale structure of the universe, intracluster media (ICMs), which fills the volume of galaxy clusters and is composed of hot, high-beta plasma, are continuously disturbed by major and minor mergers of clumps as well as infall along filaments of the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). Such activities induce shock waves, which are observed in radio and X-ray mostly in cluster outskirts. These shocks are collisionless, as in other astrophysical environments, and are thought to accelerate cosmic rays (CRs) via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. Here, we present the properties of shocks in ICMs and their roles in the generation of nonthermal particles, studied with high-resolution simulations. We also discuss the implications on the observations of diffuse radio emission from galaxy clusters, such as radio relics.

  13. Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC'07)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2007-08-01

    The twenty-second Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC'07, took place at the Albuquerque Convention Centre in Albuquerque, the largest city in New Mexico, from Monday to Friday, 2007 June 25 to 29. It was attended by over 1350 delegates from 25 different countries (63% North America, 24% Europe, 11% Asia and 2% Other), and was held under the auspices of the two professional societies that oversee and make holding this series of conferences possible, the Division of Physics of Beams within APS, and the Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society within IEEE. As host of the conference, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is especially thanked for their many contributions and assistance both prior to and during the conference. The Convention Center was an ideal location for information sharing and discussions between the interdisciplinary aspects of the accelerator community, as well as for related meetings and ad-hoc 'rump' sessions.

  14. STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION OF SUPRATHERMAL PARTICLES UNDER PRESSURE BALANCE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Antecki, T.; Schlickeiser, R.; Zhang, M. E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2013-02-10

    The acceleration of suprathermal charged particles in the heliosphere under pressure balance conditions including for the first time the radial spatial particle diffusion and convection in the solar wind is investigated. The physical conditions are derived for which the stationary phase space distribution of suprathermal particles approaches the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5}, which is often seen in spacecraft observations. For separable source distributions in momentum and position we analytically solve the stationary particle transport equation for a radially constant solar wind speed V {sub 0} and a momentum-independent radial spatial diffusion coefficient. The resulting stationary solution at any position within the finite heliosphere is the superposition of an infinite sum of power laws in momentum below and above the (assumed mono-momentum) injection momentum p{sub I} . The smallest spatial eigenvalue determines the flattest power law, to which the full stationary solution approaches at large and small enough momenta. Only for the case of a reflecting inner and a free-escape outer spatial boundary, does one small eigenvalue exist, yielding the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5} at sufficiently large momentum values. The other three spatial boundary conditions imply steeper momentum spectra. Momentum spectra and radial profiles of suprathermal particles are calculated by adopting a uniform outer ring spatial source distribution.

  15. The use of particle accelerators for space projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Ari

    2006-05-01

    With the introduction of CMOS technology radiation effects in components became an important issue in satellite and space mission projects. At the end of the cold war, the market of radiation hard (RadHard) components crashed and during the 90's their fabrication practically stopped. The use of ''commercial-off-the-shelf'' (COTS) components became more common but required increased evaluation activities at radiation test sites. Component manufacturers and space project engineers were directed towards these test sites, in particular, towards particle accelerators. Many accelerator laboratories developed special beam lines and constructed dedicated test areas for component evaluations. The space environment was simulated at these test sites and components were tested to levels often exceeding mission requirements. In general, space projects environments were predicted in respects to particle mass and energy distributions with the expected fluxes and fluences. In order to validate this information in tests, concepts like stopping power, linear energy transfer, ion penetration ranges etc. have to be understood. The knowledge from the component structure also defines the way of irradiation. For example, the higher ion energies resulting in much deeper ion penetration ranges allow successful reverse side irradiation of thinned Integrated Circuits (ICs). So overall increased demands for radiation testing attracted the European Space Agency (ESA) to the JYFL-accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. A contract was signed between ESA and JYFL for the development of a ''High Penetrating Heavy Ion Test Site'' [1]. Following one year development, this test site was commissioned in May 2005. This paper addresses the various issues around the JYFL laboratory with its accelerator and radiation effects facility as the focal point in service of component evaluations for the space community.

  16. Particle acceleration in the vacuum gaps in black hole magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptitsyna, K.; Neronov, A.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We consider particle acceleration in the vacuum gaps in magnetospheres of black holes powered by the Blandford-Znajek mechanism and embedded in the radiatively-inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) environment. In this situation, the gap height is limited by the onset of gamma-gamma pair production on the infrared photons originating in the RIAF. Methods: We numerically calculated the acceleration and propagation of charged particles by taking the detailed structure of the electric and magnetic fields in the gap and in the entire black hole magnetosphere into account, as well as the radiative energy losses and interactions of γ-rays produced by the propagated charged particles with the background radiation field of the RIAF. Results: We show that the presence of the vacuum gap has clear observational signatures. The spectra of emission from gaps embedded in a relatively high-luminosity RIAF are dominated by the inverse Compton emission with a sharp, super-exponential cut-off in the very-high-energy gamma-ray band. The cut-off energy is determined by the properties of the RIAF and is largely independent of the structure of magnetosphere and geometry of the gap. The spectra of the gap residing in low-luminosity RIAFs are dominated by synchrotron or curvature emission with the spectra extending into 1-100 GeV energy range. We also consider the effect of possible acceleration of protons in the gap and find that proton energies could reach the ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) range only in extremely low-luminosity RIAFs.

  17. Accelerated heavy particles and the lens. 1. Cataracogenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, G.R.; Worgul, B.V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Zaider, M.; Rossi, H.H.

    1984-04-01

    The effect of varying doses of accelerated (570 MeV/amu) argon ions on the rat lens is described with detailed observations on the sequence of development of the cataracts, the time-dose relationship, and the analysis of their cataractogenic potential. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the heavy particles for cataract production, compared to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (X-rays), has been established. These data indicate that, as with neutrons, the RBE increases with decreasing dose and that at a dose of 0.05 Gy an RBE of about 40 was observed.

  18. New modes of particle accelerations techniques and sources. Formal report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on New Modes of Particle Accelerations - Techniques and Sources, August 19-23, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  19. Radio Emission by Particles Accelerated in Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. M. C.; Gangadhara, R. T.

    2003-03-01

    We present a relativistic model of pulsar radio emission by plasma accelerated along the rotating magnetic field lines projected on to a 2D plane perpendicular to the rotation axis. We have derived the expression for the trajectory of a particle, and estimated the spectrum of radio emission by the plasma bunches. We used the parameters given in the paper by Peyman and Gangadhara (2002). Further the analystical expressions for the Stokes parameters are derived, and compared them with the observed profiles. The one sense of circular polarization, observed in many pulsars, can be explained in the light of our model.

  20. Black holes are neither particle accelerators nor dark matter probes.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean T

    2013-01-04

    It has been suggested that maximally spinning black holes can serve as particle accelerators, reaching arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. Despite several objections regarding the practical achievability of such high energies, and demonstrations past and present that such large energies could never reach a distant observer, interest in this problem has remained substantial. We show that, unfortunately, a maximally spinning black hole can never serve as a probe of high energy collisions, even in principle and despite the correctness of the original diverging energy calculation. Black holes can indeed facilitate dark matter annihilation, but the most energetic photons can carry little more than the rest energy of the dark matter particles to a distant observer, and those photons are actually generated relatively far from the black hole where relativistic effects are negligible. Therefore, any strong gravitational potential could probe dark matter equally well, and an appeal to black holes for facilitating such collisions is unnecessary.

  1. Laser magneto-cumulative accelerator of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Skvortsov, V.

    2011-02-01

    High energy ion generation (energy in order of 10 Gev) have been estimated by interaction of picosecond laser pulses with an intensity of 6x1014 W/cm2 with metallic target in vacuum and gas atmosphere. In this paper we shall discuss the production of very high magnetic fields by flux compression in laser-induced plasmas and show experimental results on particle acceleration due to an explosively collapsed magnetic fields. Different nuclear track detectors have been used for heavy charged particle identification: synthetic mica, plastic nuclear detector CR-39, and glasses. Magnetic fields generated in laser-induced plasmas of order 30 -130 MGauss have been estimated by means of Faraday rotation and interferometric diagnostics with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  2. Laser magneto-cumulative accelerator of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Skvortsov, V.

    2010-09-01

    High energy ion generation (energy in order of 10 Gev) have been estimated by interaction of picosecond laser pulses with an intensity of 6x1014 W/cm2 with metallic target in vacuum and gas atmosphere. In this paper we shall discuss the production of very high magnetic fields by flux compression in laser-induced plasmas and show experimental results on particle acceleration due to an explosively collapsed magnetic fields. Different nuclear track detectors have been used for heavy charged particle identification: synthetic mica, plastic nuclear detector CR-39, and glasses. Magnetic fields generated in laser-induced plasmas of order 30 -130 MGauss have been estimated by means of Faraday rotation and interferometric diagnostics with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  3. Transition Radiation and its uses in particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Tiago F.; Jahnke, Cristiane; Lima, Roberto R.; Malafronte, Alexandre A.; Vanin, Vito R.; Martins, Marcos N.

    2011-08-01

    Transition Radiation (TR) is a physical process in which a uniformly moving charge emits radiation. For emission to occur, it is necessary a variation of the electromagnetic properties of the media that surrounds the particle. The main characteristics of this kind of radiation are: linearity between the radiation intensity and the generating charge, polarization and formation time. The continuous spectrum covers a wide wavelength range, including visible light (Optical Transition Radiation—OTR). These characteristics make OTR an excellent tool for beam diagnostics in particle accelerators. In this work we discuss the role OTR plays in beam instrumentation and the progress of the undergoing project of an OTR based diagnostic tool for the IFUSP Microtron. This is an innovative design since it is planned to be used to diagnose a low energy and low current electron beam.

  4. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Interplanetary Shock Accelerated Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, G. C.; Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Desai, M. I.; Hu, Q.; Kasper, J.

    2006-01-01

    We use simultaneous measurements from the Wind and ACE spacecraft to determine the spatial properties of both interplanetary (IP) shocks and the shock-associated energetic particle events. We combine plasma, magnetic field and energetic particle data from ACE and Wind for 124 energetic storm particle (ESP) events from 1998 to 2003 and examine the spatial and temporal variations of these events in the Earth's vicinity. We find that even though the two spacecraft were occasionally separated by more than 400 RE, the plasma, field, and energetic particle time-intensity profiles during the events were very similar. In addition, we find that the ion composition and energy spectra in individual IP shock events are identical at the two spacecraft locations. We also use the fitted shock velocity along the normal from ACE and estimate the shock transit time to Wind location. In general, there is poor agreement between the estimated transit time and the actual measured transit time. Hence, our assumptions that a) the IP shock at 1 AU propagates radially, and/or b) the IP shock is spherically symmetric at 1 AU are not valid. In this paper, we will also study, for the first time, the anisotropy measurements of low-energy IP shock-associated ions at both ACE and Wind. We will then compare these new anisotropy analyses with locally measured shock parameters and identify possible signatures of different shock acceleration processes as predicted by the first-order Fermi and shock-drift models.

  5. Field-aligned Transport and Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, D.; Sokolov, I.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) phenomena represent one of the major components of space weather. Often, but not exclusively associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), they pose a significant scientific as well as practical interest. As these particles originate at such explosive events, they have energies up to several GeV. SEP may cause disruptions in operations of space instruments and spacecrafts and are dangerous to astronauts. For this reason, studies of SEP events and predictions of their impact are of great importance. The motion and acceleration of SEP, though kinetic in nature, is governed by Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and its disturbances. Therefore, a consistent and accurate simulation and predictive tool must include a realistic MHD model of IMF. At the same time, transport of SEP is essentially one-dimensional as at high energies particles are tied to magnetic field lines. This allows building a model that can effectively map active regions on the solar surface onto various regions of the Solar System thus predicting the affected regions of the at any distance from the Sun. We present the first attempt to construct a model that employs coupling of MHD and kinetic models. The former describes the evolution of IMF disturbed by CME, while the latter simulates particles moving along the field lines extracted from MHD model. The first results are provided.

  6. Particle acceleration and transport in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    During periods of sporadic flare activity, the Sun releases energy stored in the magnetic field into the plasma of the solar atmosphere. This is an extremely efficient process, with a large fraction of the magnetic energy going into plasma particles. The solar flares are accompanied by prompt electromagnetic emission virtually over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma-rays down to radio frequencies. The Sun, through its activity, also plays a driving role in the Sun-Earth system that substantially influences geophysical space. Solar flare energetic particles from the Sun are detected in interplanetary space by in-situ measurements making them a vital component of the single Sun-Earth system. Although a qualitative picture is generally agreed upon, many processes solar flare processes are poorly understood. Specifically, the processes of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles interacting on various physical scales remain major challenges in solar physics and basic plasma physics. In the talk, I will review the current understanding of solar flare energetic particles focusing on recent observational progress, which became possible due to the numerous spacecraft and ground-based observations.

  7. Induced radioactivity in and around high-energy particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vincke, Helmut; Theis, Chris; Roesler, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Particle accelerators and their surroundings are locations of residual radioactivity production that is induced by the interaction of high-energy particles with matter. This paper gives an overview of the principles of activation caused at proton accelerators, which are the main machines operated at Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire. It describes the parameters defining radio-nuclide production caused by beam losses. The second part of the paper concentrates on the analytic calculation of activation and the Monte Carlo approach as it is implemented in the FLUKA code. Techniques used to obtain, on the one hand, estimates of radioactivity in Becquerel and, on the other hand, residual dose rates caused by the activated material are discussed. The last part of the paper focuses on experiments that allow for benchmarking FLUKA activation calculations and on simulations used to predict activation in and around high-energy proton machines. In that respect, the paper addresses the residual dose rate that will be induced by proton-proton collisions at an energy of two times 7 TeV in and around the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. Besides activation of solid materials, the air activation expected in the CMS cavern caused by this beam operation is also discussed.

  8. Rotating Hayward's regular black hole as particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Muhammed; Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, Bañados, Silk and West (BSW) demonstrated that the extremal Kerr black hole can act as a particle accelerator with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy ( E CM) when the collision takes place near the horizon. The rotating Hayward's regular black hole, apart from Mass ( M) and angular momentum ( a), has a new parameter g ( g > 0 is a constant) that provides a deviation from the Kerr black hole. We demonstrate that for each g, with M = 1, there exist critical a E and r {/H E }, which corresponds to a regular extremal black hole with degenerate horizons, and a E decreases whereas r {/H E } increases with increase in g. While a < a E describe a regular non-extremal black hole with outer and inner horizons. We apply the BSW process to the rotating Hayward's regular black hole, for different g, and demonstrate numerically that the E CM diverges in the vicinity of the horizon for the extremal cases thereby suggesting that a rotating regular black hole can also act as a particle accelerator and thus in turn provide a suitable framework for Plank-scale physics. For a non-extremal case, there always exist a finite upper bound for the E CM, which increases with the deviation parameter g.

  9. Requirements for Simulating Space Radiation With Particle Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Kim, M-H Y.

    2004-01-01

    Interplanetary space radiation consists of fully ionized nuclei of atomic elements with high energy for which only the few lowest energy ions can be stopped in shielding materials. The health risk from exposure to these ions and their secondary radiations generated in the materials of spacecraft and planetary surface enclosures is a major limiting factor in the management of space radiation risk. Accurate risk prediction depends on a knowledge of basic radiobiological mechanisms and how they are modified in the living tissues of a whole organism. To a large extent, this knowledge is not currently available. It is best developed at ground-based laboratories, using particle accelerator beams to simulate the components of space radiation. Different particles, in different energy regions, are required to study different biological effects, including beams of argon and iron nuclei in the energy range 600 to several thousand MeV/nucleon and carbon beams in the energy range of approximately 100 MeV/nucleon to approximately 1000 MeV/nucleon. Three facilities, one each in the United States, in Germany and in Japan, currently have the partial capability to satisfy these constraints. A facility has been proposed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster Synchrotron in the United States; in conjunction with other on-site accelerators, it will be able to provide the full range of heavy ion beams and energies required. International cooperation in the use of these facilities is essential to the development of a safe international space program.

  10. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé

    2016-10-01

    Observations relating the characteristics of electrons seen near Earth (solar energetic particles [SEPs]) and those producing flare radiation show that in certain (prompt) events the origin of both populations appears to be the flare site, which shows strong correlation between the number and spectral index of SEP and hard X-ray radiating electrons, but in others (delayed), which are associated with fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), this relation is complex and SEPs tend to be harder. Prompt event spectral relation disagrees with that expected in thick or thin target models. We show that using a more accurate treatment of the transport of the accelerated electrons to the footpoints and to Earth can account for this discrepancy. Our results are consistent with those found by Chen & Petrosian for two flares using nonparametric inversion methods, according to which we have weak diffusion conditions, and trapping mediated by magnetic field convergence. The weaker correlations and harder spectra of delayed events can come about by reacceleration of electrons in the CME shock environment. We describe under what conditions such a hardening can be achieved. Using this (acceleration at the flare and reacceleration in the CME) scenario, we show that we can describe the similar dichotomy that exists between the so-called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions), and softer SEP events and stronger, more gradual SEP events with near-normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. These methods can be used to distinguish the acceleration mechanisms and to constrain their characteristics.

  11. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  12. The Detection of Coronal Suprathermal Particles Required to Seed Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J.; Laming, J. M.; Tylka, A.; Ko, Y.; Rakowski, C.; Ng, C. K.

    2012-12-01

    An extensive body of evidence identifies shocks driven by very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) starting within a few solar radii of the Sun as the primary particle accelerators in large, gradual solar energetic particles (SEP) events. These large SEP events are major radiation hazards for astronauts and for space borne instrumentation, making a reliable SEP predictive capability a high priority for Heliophysics research. Diverse lines of evidence indicate that the rapid production of large intensities of high-energy particles is greatly enhanced when the pre-event environment has been primed with a population of suprathermal ions having energies well above the typical thermal particle energy, usually in the range from a few to tens of keV in the solar corona. However, at present we have no direct evidence that suprathermal ions actually exist in the corona in numbers sufficient to serve as "seed particles" for diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). We will review the evidence indicating seed particles are required to produce energetic SEPs on the observed time scales. One technique with the potential for directly observing these seed particles is the use of high-throughput UV spectroscopy to quantify broadening of the Ly-α line resulting from charge exchange between suprathermal protons and neutral atoms in the corona. Attempts to use this technique with SOHO UVCS have not produced clear evidence for the detection of coronal suprathermals. We will present revised spectroscopic computations of the influence of seed particles on the Ly-α line spectrum and describe the instrumental requirements for observing this line broadening.

  13. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Dérouillat, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. In this paper, we compare the results given by different codes and point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. These limitations are illustrated in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy particle acceleration.

  14. Feature-based Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G R; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E Wes

    2013-08-02

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  15. Feature-based analysis of plasma-based particle acceleration data.

    PubMed

    Rübel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G R; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E Wes

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam, and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  16. Feature-Based Analysis of Plasma-Based Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E. Wes

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  17. 3D reconstruction and particle acceleration properties of Coronal Shock Waves During Powerful Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Vourlidas, Angelos; Tylka, Allan J.; Pinto, Rui; Rouillard, Alexis; Tirole, Margot

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the physical mechanisms that produce the most energetic particles is a long-standing observational and theoretical challenge in astrophysics. Strong pressure waves have been proposed as efficient accelerators both in the solar and astrophysical contexts via various mechanisms such as diffusive-shock/shock-drift acceleration and betatron effects. In diffusive-shock acceleration, the efficacy of the process relies on shock waves being super-critical or moving several times faster than the characteristic speed of the medium they propagate through (a high Alfven Mach number) and on the orientation of the magnetic field upstream of the shock front. High-cadence, multipoint imaging using the NASA STEREO, SOHO and SDO spacecrafts now permits the 3-D reconstruction of pressure waves formed during the eruption of coronal mass ejections. Using these unprecedented capabilities, some recent studies have provided new insights on the timing and longitudinal extent of solar energetic particles, including the first derivations of the time-dependent 3-dimensional distribution of the expansion speed and Mach numbers of coronal shock waves. We will review these recent developments by focusing on particle events that occurred between 2011 and 2015. These new techniques also provide the opportunity to investigate the enigmatic long-duration gamma ray events.

  18. Symplectic maps and chromatic optics in particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai

    2015-07-06

    Here, we have applied the nonlinear map method to comprehensively characterize the chromatic optics in particle accelerators. Our approach is built on the foundation of symplectic transfer maps of magnetic elements. The chromatic lattice parameters can be transported from one element to another by the maps. We also introduce a Jacobian operator that provides an intrinsic linkage between the maps and the matrix with parameter dependence. The link allows us to directly apply the formulation of the linear optics to compute the chromatic lattice parameters. As an illustration, we analyze an alternating-gradient cell with nonlinear sextupoles, octupoles, and decapoles and derive analytically their settings for the local chromatic compensation. Finally, the cell becomes nearly perfect up to the third-order of the momentum deviation.

  19. Symplectic maps and chromatic optics in particle accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Cai, Yunhai

    2015-07-06

    Here, we have applied the nonlinear map method to comprehensively characterize the chromatic optics in particle accelerators. Our approach is built on the foundation of symplectic transfer maps of magnetic elements. The chromatic lattice parameters can be transported from one element to another by the maps. We also introduce a Jacobian operator that provides an intrinsic linkage between the maps and the matrix with parameter dependence. The link allows us to directly apply the formulation of the linear optics to compute the chromatic lattice parameters. As an illustration, we analyze an alternating-gradient cell with nonlinear sextupoles, octupoles, and decapoles andmore » derive analytically their settings for the local chromatic compensation. Finally, the cell becomes nearly perfect up to the third-order of the momentum deviation.« less

  20. Particle acceleration by stimulated emission of radiation in cylindrical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiu-Fang; Wu, Cong-Feng; Jia, Qi-Ka

    2015-07-01

    In particle acceleration by stimulated emission of radiation (PASER), efficient interaction occurs when a train of micro-bunches has periodicity identical to the resonance frequency of the medium. Previous theoretical calculations based on the simplified model have only considered the energy exchange in the boundless condition. Under experimental conditions, however, the gas active medium must be guided by the metal waveguide. In this paper, we have developed a model of the energy exchange between a train of micro-bunches and a gas mixture active medium in a waveguide boundary for the first time, based on the theory of electromagnetic fields, and made detailed analysis and calculations with MathCAD. The results show that energy density can be optimized to a certain value to get the maximum energy exchange. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10675116) and Major State Basic Research Development Programme of China (2011CB808301)

  1. Designing a Portable Architecture for Intelligent Particle Accelerator Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, William B.; Stern, Carl R.; Luger, George F.; Olsson, Eric T.

    1997-05-01

    We present a portable system for intelligent control of particle accelerators.(Supported by DOE/SBIR Grant DE-FG05-94ER81897) This system is based on a hierarchical distributed architecture. At the lowest level, a physical access layer provides an object-oriented abstraction of the target system. A series of intermediate layers implement general algorithms for control, optimization, data interpretation, and diagnosis. Decision making and planning are organized by knowledge-based components that utilize knowledge acquired from human experts to appropriately direct and configure lower level services. The general nature of the representations and algorithms at lower levels gives this architecture a high degree of potential portability. The knowledge-based decision-making and planning at higher levels gives this system an adaptive real-time capability as well as making it readily configurable to new environments. Significant successes of this work are reported at this conference.

  2. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, James E

    2010-11-23

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  3. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema

    Brau, James E [University of Oregon

    2016-07-12

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  4. Symplectic maps and chromatic optics in particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yunhai

    2015-10-01

    We have applied the nonlinear map method to comprehensively characterize the chromatic optics in particle accelerators. Our approach is built on the foundation of symplectic transfer maps of magnetic elements. The chromatic lattice parameters can be transported from one element to another by the maps. We introduce a Jacobian operator that provides an intrinsic linkage between the maps and the matrix with parameter dependence. The link allows us to directly apply the formulation of the linear optics to compute the chromatic lattice parameters. As an illustration, we analyze an alternating-gradient cell with nonlinear sextupoles, octupoles, and decapoles and derive analytically their settings for the local chromatic compensation. As a result, the cell becomes nearly perfect up to the third-order of the momentum deviation.

  5. Relativistically strong CO{sub 2} laser driver for plasma-channeled particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Long-wavelength, short-duration laser pulses are desirable for plasma wakefield particle acceleration and plasma waveguiding. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser is under development to test laser-driven electron acceleration schemes.

  6. Preformed transient gas channels for laser wakefield particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.M.

    1994-11-01

    Acceleration of electrons by laser-driven plasma wake fields is limited by the range over which a laser pulse can maintain its intensity. This distance is typically given by the Rayleigh range for the focused laser beam, usually on the order of 0.1 mm to 1 mm. For practical particle acceleration, interaction distances on the order of centimeters are required. Therefore, some means of guiding high intensity laser pulses is necessary. Light intensities on the order of a few times 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} are required for laser wakefield acceleration schemes using near IR radiation. Gas densities on the order of or greater than 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} are also needed. Laser-atom interaction studies in this density and intensity regime are generally limited by the concomitant problems in beam propagation introduced by the creation of a plasma. In addition to the interaction distance limit imposed by the Rayleigh range, defocusing of the high intensity laser pulse further limits the peak intensity which can be achieved. To solve the problem of beam propagation limitations in laser-plasma wakefield experiments, two potential methods for creating transient propagation channels in gaseous targets are investigated. The first involves creation of a charge-neutral channel in a gas by an initial laser pulse, which then is ionized by a second, ultrashort, high-intensity pulse to create a waveguide. The second method involves the ionization of a gas column by an ultrashort pulse; a transient waveguide is formed by the subsequent expansion of the heated plasma into the neutral gas.

  7. Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibers for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; Spencer, James E.; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; /Sydney U.

    2011-08-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency pass-bands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2-D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially-made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of the first prototype PBG fibers specifically designed to support speed-of-light TM modes.

  8. Challenges/issues of NIS used in particle accelerator facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faircloth, Dan

    2013-09-01

    High current, high duty cycle negative ion sources are an essential component of many high power particle accelerators. This talk gives an overview of the state-of-the-art sources used around the world. Volume, surface and charge exchange negative ion production processes are detailed. Cesiated magnetron and Penning surface plasma sources are discussed along with surface converter sources. Multicusp volume sources with filament and LaB6 cathodes are described before moving onto RF inductively coupled volume sources with internal and external antennas. The major challenges facing accelerator facilities are detailed. Beam current, source lifetime and reliability are the most pressing. The pros and cons of each source technology is discussed along with their development programs. The uncertainties and unknowns common to these sources are discussed. The dynamics of cesium surface coverage and the causes of source variability are still unknown. Minimizing beam emittance is essential to maximizing the transport of high current beams; space charge effects are very important. The basic physics of negative ion production is still not well understood, theoretical and experimental programs continue to improve this, but there are still many mysteries to be solved.

  9. Experimental Evidence for Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Banna, Samer; Berezovsky, Valery; Schaechter, Levi

    2006-11-27

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with free electrons in the presence of an active medium has several appealing outcomes. Among them the PASER scheme, standing for Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. In the framework of this scheme, energy stored in an active medium (microscopic cavities) is transferred directly to an e-beam traversing the medium, and therefore, accelerating the former. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment of this concept was performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory reaching a gain of 200keV in the kinetic energy of a 5ps, 0.1nc and 45MeV quasi-mono-energetic macro-bunch which is modulated by its interaction with a CO2 laser pulse in an adequate wiggler. In the framework of this proof-of-principle experiment both the fundamental frequency of the train of micro-bunches and the medium's resonance frequency (CO2 mixture) are matched. A good agreement is found between the energy gain and a 2D analytic model that has been developed.

  10. Coulomb Sum Rule for 40Ca, 48Ca, and 56Fe for |q-->|<=550 MeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziani, Z. E.; Barreau, P.; Bernheim, M.; Morgenstern, J.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Altemus, R.; McCarthy, J.; Orphanos, L. J.; Whitney, R. R.; Capitani, G. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.

    1984-06-01

    Deep-inelastic electron scattering from 40Ca, 48Ca, and 56Fe has been measured at 60°, 90°, and 140° and at inelasticities up to and including the Δ(3, 3) region. Longitudinal response functions in the momentum interval 300 MeV/c<|q-->|<600 MeV/c were extracted. The experimental Coulomb sum rule is observed between the two calcium isotopes.

  11. Nonresonant Charged-Particle Acceleration by Electrostatic Waves Propagating across Fluctuating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the effect of nonresonant charged-particle acceleration by an electrostatic wave propagating across the background magnetic field. We show that in the absence of resonance (i.e., when particle velocities are much smaller than the wave phase velocity) particles can be accelerated by electrostatic waves provided that the adiabaticity of particle motion is destroyed by magnetic field fluctuations. Thus, in a system with stochastic particle dynamics the electrostatic wave should be damped even in the absence of Landau resonance. The proposed mechanism is responsible for the acceleration of particles that cannot be accelerated via resonant wave-particle interactions. Simplicity of this straightforward acceleration scenario indicates a wide range of possible applications.

  12. Diagnostic resonant cavity for a charged particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Barov, Nikolai

    2007-10-02

    Disclosed is a diagnostic resonant cavity for determining characteristics of a charged particle beam, such as an electron beam, produced in a charged particle accelerator. The cavity is based on resonant quadrupole-mode and higher order cavities. Enhanced shunt impedance in such cavities is obtained by the incorporation of a set of four or more electrically conductive rods extending inwardly from either one or both of the end walls of the cavity, so as to form capacitive gaps near the outer radius of the beam tube. For typical diagnostic cavity applications, a five-fold increase in shunt impedance can be obtained. In alternative embodiments the cavity may include either four or more opposing pairs of rods which extend coaxially toward one another from the opposite end walls of the cavity and are spaced from one another to form capacitative gaps; or the cavity may include a single set of individual rods that extend from one end wall to a point adjacent the opposing end wall.

  13. Measurement of the magnetic field coefficients of particle accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, J.; Ganetis, G.; Hogue, R.; Rogers, E.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1989-01-01

    An important aspect in the development of magnets to be used in particle accelerators is the measurement of the magnetic field in the beam aperture. In general it is necessary to measure the harmonic multipoles in the dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets for a series of stationary currents (plateaus). This is the case for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) which will be ramped to high field over a long period (/approximately/1000 sec.) and then remain on the flat top for the duration of the particle collision phase. In contrast to this mode of operation, the Booster ring being constructed for the Brookhaven AGS, will have a fast ramp rate of approximately 10 Hz. The multipole fields for these Booster magnets must therefore be determined ''on the ramp.'' In this way the effect of eddy currents will be taken into account. The measurement system which we will describe in this paper is an outgrowth of that used for the SSC dipoles. It has the capability of measuring the field multipoles on both a plateau or during a fast ramp. In addition, the same basic coil assembly is used to obtain the magnetic multipoles in dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Heating and acceleration of charged particles during magnetic dipolarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, E. E.; Kronberg, E. A.; Daly, P. W.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the thermal and energy characteristics of the plasma components observed during the magnetic dipolarizations in the near tail by the Cluster satellites. It was previously found that the first dipolarization the ratio of proton and electron temperatures ( T p/ T e) was 6-7. At the time of the observation of the first dipolarization front T p/ T e decreases by up to 3-4. The minimum value T p/ T e ( 2.0) is observed behind the front during the turbulent dipolarization phase. Decreases in T p/ T e observed at this time are associated with an increase in T e, whereas the proton temperature either decreases or remains unchanged. Decreases of the value T p/ T e during the magnetic dipolarizations coincide with increase in wave activity in the wide frequency band up to electron gyrofrequency f ce. High-frequency modes can resonantly interact with electrons causing their heating. The acceleration of ions with different masses up to energies of several hundred kiloelectron-volts is also observed during dipolarizations. In this case, the index of the energy spectrum decreases (a fraction of energetic ions increases) during the enhancement of low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuations at frequencies that correspond to the gyrofrequency of this ion component. Thus, we can conclude that the processes of the interaction between waves and particles play an important role in increasing the energy of plasma particles during magnetic dipolarizations.

  15. Shock Surface Undulation and Particle Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Considering the average Parker spiral magnetic field configuration, CME-driven interplanetary (IP) shocks within 1 AU should have oblique portions over much of their domain. Indeed, CME-driven shocks observed close to Earth are often oblique. However, it is well known that the standard diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, which relies on self-consistent wave generation via upstream propagating ions and their scattering, becomes increasingly inefficient with greater shock normal angle. Not only is a higher threshold energy required for the ions to leave the shock upstream, but also, approximately-parallel propagating waves are more quickly convected back into the shock, and the growth rate for waves propagating normal to the shock (the ones with the largest convective growth) decreases. As a result, typical, small-scale hybrid simulations of oblique shocks only show a dilute upstream beam, similar to what is often observed at the oblique Earth's bow shock - and no scattered, highly-energized ions. On the other hand, there are many "energetic storm particle" (ESP) events associated with oblique shocks that have significant fluxes of energetic ions. Recently, we have found that when run for a long time, our hybrid simulations (kinetic ions, electron fluid) show that the initial, weak beam is sufficient to generate compressive, steepening upstream waves. These waves are capable of disturbing the shock surface, resulting in an undulation that is propagating along the surface and growing in amplitude over time. The process is akin to that of the well-known reformation occurring at sufficiently strong quasi-parallel shocks. However, here the perturbations require at least two dimensions, show a strong spatial correlation, and travel along the shock surface. This process not only leads to enhanced ion acceleration, but also means that the shock characteristics are difficult to pinpoint, observationally: both the local jumps and the shock normal angle are highly variable

  16. Early Effects of Whole-Body 56Fe Irradiation on Hippocampal Function in C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Gwendolen E.; Yeiser, Lauren; Olsen, Reid H. J.; Davis, Matthew J.; Johnson, Lance A.; Raber, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Relatively little is known about early irradiation effects on hippocampal function in wild-type mice. In this study, the effects of 56Fe irradiation on hippocampal function were assessed starting 2 weeks after whole-body irradiation. Compared to sham irradiation, radiation impaired novel object recognition in female and male C57BL/6J wild-type mice. There were no effects of irradiation on contextual fear conditioning or spatial memory retention in the water maze. It is possible that oxidative damage might contribute to radiation-induced cognitive changes. Therefore, hippocampal and cortical levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) and lipid peroxidation, measures of oxidative damage were assessed. There were no effects of irradiation on these measures of oxidative damage. As 56Fe irradiation can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, which may contribute to the impairments in novel object recognition, the effects of the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) on cognition following sham irradiation and irradiation were also assessed. ALA did not prevent radiation-induced impairments in novel object recognition and impaired spatial memory retention of sham-irradiated and irradiated mice in the probe trial after the first day of hidden platform training in the water maze. Thus, the novel object recognition test is particularly sensitive to detect early cognitive effects of 56Fe irradiation through a mechanism unlikely involving ROS or oxidative damage. PMID:23510274

  17. Effects of (56)Fe radiation on hippocampal function in mice deficient in chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2).

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Allen, Antiño R; Rosi, Susanna; Sharma, Sourabh; Dayger, Catherine; Davis, Matthew J; Fike, John R

    2013-06-01

    (56)Fe irradiation affects hippocampus-dependent cognition. The underlying mechanisms may involve alterations in neurogenesis, expression of the plasticity-related immediate early gene Arc, and inflammation. Chemokine receptor-2 (CCR2), which mediates the recruitment of infiltrating and resident microglia to sites of CNS inflammation, is upregulated by (56)Fe irradiation. CCR2 KO and wild-type mice were used to compare effects of (56)Fe radiation (600MeV, 0.25Gy) on hippocampal function using contextual fear conditioning involving tone shock pairing during training (+/+) and exposure to the same environment without tone shock pairings (-/-). In the -/- condition, irradiation enhanced habituation in WT mice, but not CCR2 KO mice, suggesting that a lack of CCR2 was associated with reduced cognitive performance. In the +/+ condition, irradiation reduced freezing but there was no genotype differences. There were no significant correlations between the number of Arc-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and freezing in either genotype. While measures of neurogenesis and gliogenesis appeared to be modulated by CCR2, there were no effects of genotype on the total numbers of newly born activated microglia before or after irradiation, indicating that other mechanisms are involved in the genotype-dependent radiation response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Astrophysical particle acceleration mechanisms in colliding magnetized laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Park, J.; Deng, W.; Fiksel, G.; Spitkovsky, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2017-09-01

    Significant particle energization is observed to occur in numerous astrophysical environments, and in the standard models, this acceleration occurs alongside energy conversion processes including collisionless shocks or magnetic reconnection. Recent platforms for laboratory experiments using magnetized laser-produced plasmas have opened opportunities to study these particle acceleration processes in the laboratory. Through fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate acceleration mechanisms in experiments with colliding magnetized laser-produced plasmas, with geometry and parameters matched to recent high-Mach number reconnection experiments with externally controlled magnetic fields. 2-D simulations demonstrate significant particle acceleration with three phases of energization: first, a "direct" Fermi acceleration driven by approaching magnetized plumes; second, x-line acceleration during magnetic reconnection of anti-parallel fields; and finally, an additional Fermi energization of particles trapped in contracting and relaxing magnetic islands produced by reconnection. The relative effectiveness of these mechanisms depends on plasma and magnetic field parameters of the experiments.

  19. Particle Acceleration At Small-Scale Flux Ropes In The Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Li, G.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Decker, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands or flux roped. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We discuss the basic physics of particle acceleration by single magnetic islands and describe how to incorporate these ideas in a distributed "sea of magnetic islands". We describe briefly some observations, selected simulations, and then introduce a transport approach for describing particle acceleration at small-scale flux ropes. We discuss particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind and extend these ideas to particle acceleration at shock waves. These models are appropriate to the acceleration of both electrons and ions. We describe model predictions and supporting observations.

  20. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Taniguchi, M; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  1. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  2. Single particle dynamics and nonlinear resonances in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to single particle dynamics in circular accelerators with an emphasis on nonlinear resonances. We begin with the Hamiltonian and the equations of motion in the neighborhood of the design orbit. In the linear theory this yields linear betatron oscillations about a closed orbit. It is useful then to introduce the action-angle variables of the linear problem. Next we discuss the nonlinear terms which are present in an actual accelerator, and in particular, we motivate the inclusion of sextupoles to cure chromatic effects. To study the effects of the nonlinear terms, we next discuss canonical perturbation theory which leads us to nonlinear resonances. After showing a few examples of perturbation theory, we abandon it when very close to a resonance. This leads to the study of an isolated resonance in one degree of freedom with a 'time'-dependent Hamiltonian. We see the familiar resonance structure in phase space which is simply closed islands when the nonlinear amplitude dependence of the frequency or 'tune' is included. To show the limits of the validity of the isolated resonance approximation, we discuss two criteria for the onset of chaotic motion. Finally, we study an isolated coupling resonance in two degrees of freedom with a 'time'-dependent Hamiltonian and calculate the two invariants in this case. This leads to a surface of section which is a 2-torus in 4-dimensional phase space. However, we show that it remains a 2-torus when projected into particular 3-dimensional subspaces, and thus can be viewed in perspective.

  3. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures for particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The production of neutrons, 4 to 7 MeW nuclear gamma rays, positrons and pions resulting from the interaction of flare accelerated particles with the solar atmosphere was calculated. For the energy spectra of these particles the Bessel function predicted by stochastic acceleration and power laws which could result from acceleration at large-scale planar shocks was used, with the thick-target model. It is assumed that in the interaction region the accelerated particles are isotropic. The neutron-to-2.223 MeV photon conversion factors for various flare locations on the Sun are derived by averaging conversion factors over these spectra. Comparing calculations with data confirms that for most gamma-ray flares the bulk of the accelerated particles remain trapped at the Sun and that these particles have spectra similar to the spectra of flare particles observed in interplanetary space.

  4. A new mechanism for relativistic particle acceleration via wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto

    2006-10-01

    Often in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasma, high energy populations are observed. Two puzzling factors still defy our understanding. First, such populations of high energy particles produce power law distributions that are not only ubiquitous but also persistent in time. Such persistence is in direct contradiction to the H theorem that states the ineluctable transition of physical systems towards thermodynamic equilibrium, and ergo Maxwellian distributions. Second, such high energy populations are efficiently produced, much more efficiently than processes that we know can produce. A classic example of such a situation is cosmic rays where power alws extend up to tremendolus energy ranges. In the present work, we identify a new mechanism for particle acceleration via wave-particle interaction. The mechanism is peculiar to special relativity and has no classical equivalent. That explains why it is not observed in most simulation studies of plasma processes, based on classical physics. The mechanism is likely to be active in systems undergoing streaming instabilities and in particular shocked systems. The new mechanism can produce energy increases vastly superior to previously known mechanisms (such as Fermi acceleration) and can hold the promise of explaining at least some of the observed power laws.

  5. On the Radio-emitting Particles of the Crab Nebula: Stochastic Acceleration Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuta J.; Asano, Katsuaki

    2017-06-01

    The broadband emission of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) is well described by non-thermal emissions from accelerated electrons and positrons. However, the standard shock acceleration model of PWNe does not account for the hard spectrum in radio wavelengths. The origin of the radio-emitting particles is also important to determine the pair production efficiency in the pulsar magnetosphere. Here, we propose a possible resolution for the particle energy distribution in PWNe; the radio-emitting particles are not accelerated at the pulsar wind termination shock but are stochastically accelerated by turbulence inside PWNe. We upgrade our past one-zone spectral evolution model to include the energy diffusion, i.e., the stochastic acceleration, and apply the model to the Crab Nebula. A fairly simple form of the energy diffusion coefficient is assumed for this demonstrative study. For a particle injection to the stochastic acceleration process, we consider the continuous injection from the supernova ejecta or the impulsive injection associated with supernova explosion. The observed broadband spectrum and the decay of the radio flux are reproduced by tuning the amount of the particle injected to the stochastic acceleration process. The acceleration timescale and the duration of the acceleration are required to be a few decades and a few hundred years, respectively. Our results imply that some unveiled mechanisms, such as back reaction to the turbulence, are required to make the energies of stochastically and shock-accelerated particles comparable.

  6. Particle acceleration model for gas--solid suspensions at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Sudheer; Garg, Rahul; Hrenya, Christine; Fox, Rodney; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2009-11-01

    Particle granular temperature plays an important role in the prediction of core annular structure in riser flows. The covariance of fluctuating particle acceleration and fluctuating particle velocity governs the evolution of the granular temperature in homogeneous suspensions undergoing elastic collisions. Koch and co--workers (Phys. Fluid. 1990, JFM 1999) showed that the granular temperature has a source term due to hydrodynamic interactions in gas--solid suspensions in the Stokes flow regime. We performed direct numerical simulations (DNS) of freely evolving suspensions at moderate Reynolds numbers using the immersed boundary method (IBM). We found that simple extension of a class of mean particle acceleration models to their instantaneous counterparts does not predict the correct fluctuating particle acceleration--fluctuating velocity covariance that is obtained from DNS. The fluctuating particle velocity autocorrelation function decay and the Lagrangian structure function obtained from DNS motivate the use of a Langevin model for the instantaneous particle acceleration.

  7. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  8. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  9. New evidence for extreme particle acceleration in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Piano, G.; Sabatini, S.

    Microquasars are binary systems consisting of a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole accreting gas from a companion star and producing relativistic jets. Here we report the AGILE detections of gamma -ray emission from the microquasars Cyg X-1 and Cyg-3 between 100 MeV and 3 GeV. A significant transient gamma-ray emission was detected on 2009, October 16, during a spectral ``hard state" of Cyg X-1. This shows that extreme particle acceleration can occasionally occur in microquasars also in the hard state, for which a spectral cutoff above 1 MeV is predicted by theoretical models. No persistent emission was found for Cyg X-1 integrating all our data accumulated in the period between 2007 July and 2009 October, during which the source was in the hard state, confirming the overall spectral cutoff above 1 MeV. Several flaring episodes were instead detected for Cyg X-3 following a repetitive pattern. The gamma -ray emission detected by AGILE always occured while the source was in the ``soft state", and always preceding a major radio flare. These gamma -ray intense flares thus turn out to occur during the preparation and energy charging before the plasmoid energization and ejection.

  10. Particle Acceleration: From Galaxies to Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, Peter L.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady; Moiseenko, Sergej

    2005-09-28

    In this brief review we discuss current efforts to understand the origin of energetic particles, focussing here on the recent work on the physics of supernova explosions. Acceleration to the highest energy may come from jets and hot spots emanating from massive black holes. If the sky remains smooth in the arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays to the highest energies, then we need new sources, and one extreme speculation would be to invoke Lorentz Invariance Violation, with proton decay, neutron survival, and no strong photomeson interaction to higher energy. For the Galactic cosmic rays explosions of red supergiant stars and Wolf Rayet stars may provide much of the cosmic rays. This is intimately connected with the physics of their explosion, and implies that the magneto-rotational mechanism is the main one chosen by Nature. This offers a consistent picture for the X-ray fans of Cas A, and gamma ray bursts. Each of these concepts leads to clear predictions. It will be quite an achievement to prove this or any other proposal -- none is without difficulties. We do have potentially a full theory to account for cosmic rays at all energies; crucial tests will be performed with the current new instruments.

  11. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  12. Hawking radiation of scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillani, Usman A.; Rehman, Mudassar; Saifullah, K. E-mail: mudassar051@yahoo.com

    2011-06-01

    Hawking radiation of uncharged and charged scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes is studied. We calculate the tunneling probabilities of these particles from the rotation and acceleration horizons of these black holes. Using this method we recover the correct Hawking temperature as well.

  13. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  14. Review of Basic Physics of Laser-Accelerated Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.; Jang, H.; Kim, J.

    2007-07-11

    Laser-plasma wake wave can accelerate charged particles, especially electrons with an enormously large acceleration gradient. The electrons in the plasma wake wave have complicated motions in the longitudinal and transverse directions. In this paper, basic physics of the laser-accelerated electron beam is reviewed.

  15. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  16. DC-like Phase Space Manipulation and Particle Acceleration Using Chirped AC Fields

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2009-06-17

    Waves in plasmas can accelerate particles that are resonant with the wave. A DC electric field also accelerates particles, but without a resonance discrimination, which makes the acceleration mechanism profoundly different. We investigate the effect on a Hamiltonian distribution of an accelerating potential waveform, which could, for example, represent the average ponderomotive effect of two counterpropagating electromagnetic waves. In particular, we examine the apparent DC-like time-asymptotic response of the distribution in regimes where the potential structure is accelerated adiabatically. A highly resonant population within the distribution is always present, and we characterize its nonadiabatic response during wave-particle resonance using an integral method in the noninertial reference frame moving with the wave. Finally, we show that in the limit of infinitely slow acceleration of the wave, these highly resonant particles disappear and the response

  17. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. I. Particle energy spectra and acceleration mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-20

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M{sub s} = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ≅ 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  18. Non-thermal Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. I. Particle Energy Spectra and Acceleration Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-10-01

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (Ms <~ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with Ms = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ~= 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  19. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration mechanisms with colliding magnetized laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.; Nilson, P.; Haberberger, D.; Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D.

    2015-11-01

    Significant particle energization is observed to occur in many astrophysical environments, and in the standard models this acceleration occurs as a part of the energy conversion processes associated with collisionless shocks or magnetic reconnection. A recent generation of laboratory experiments conducted using magnetized laser-produced plasmas has opened opportunities to study these particle acceleration processes in the laboratory. Ablated plasma plumes are externally magnetized using an externally-applied magnetic field in combination with a low-density background plasma. Colliding unmagnetized plasmas demonstrated ion-driven Weibel instability while colliding magnetized plasmas drive magnetic reconnection. Both magnetized and unmagnetized colliding plasma are modeled with electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations which provide an end-to-end model of the experiments. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we provide predictions of particle acceleration driven by reconnection, resulting from both direct x-line acceleration and Fermi-like acceleration at contracting magnetic fields lines near magnetic islands.

  20. Magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration in high Mach number shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2015-11-01

    The amplification of magnetic fields is a central ingredient in understanding particle acceleration in supernova remnant shocks. I will present results from multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of shock formation and particle acceleration for different magnetization levels. These first principles simulations, for unprecedented temporal and spatial scales, help bridge the gap between fully kinetic and hybrid modeling. The results show that depending on the magnetization the turbulence responsible for particle injection and acceleration is determined by different processes, which include Weibel and Bell-type instabilities, but also magnetic reconnection. At high Mach numbers both electrons and ions are shown to be efficiently injected and accelerated. I will discuss the importance of these results for current astrophysical models and the possibility of studying these magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration processes in near future high energy density laboratory experiments.

  1. Design of a plasma discharge circuit for particle wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anania, M. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Ferrario, M.; Flora, F.; Gallerano, G. P.; Ghigo, A.; Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F.; Mostacci, A.; Mezi, L.; Musumeci, P.; Serio, M.

    2014-03-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10-100 GV m-1), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimetres. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators; radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in the accelerating field (10-100 MV m-1) requiring therefore kilometric distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. Combining high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC-LAB [1,2]. In particular, here we focus on the ionization process; we show a simplified model to study the evolution of plasma induced by discharge, very useful to design the discharge circuit able to fully ionize the gas and bring the plasma at the needed temperature and density.

  2. Relationship of solar flare accelerated particles to solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in the interplanetary medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.P.

    2005-08-01

    Observations of hard X-ray (HXR)/gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines produced by energetic electrons and ions, respectively, colliding with the solar atmosphere, have shown that large solar flares can accelerate ions up to many GeV and electrons up to hundreds of MeV. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are observed by spacecraft near 1 AU and by ground-based instrumentation to extend up to similar energies, but these appear to be accelerated by shocks associated with fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) mission provides high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging of flare HXRs and gamma-rays. Here we review RHESSI observations for large solar flares and SEP events. The 23 July gamma-ray line flare was associated with a fast, wide CME but no SEPs were observed, while the 21 April 2002 flare had no detectable gamma-ray line emission but a fast CME and strong SEP event were observed. The October- November 2003 series of large flares and associated fast CMEs produced both gamma-ray line emission and strong SEP events. The spectra of flare-accelerated protons, inferred from the gamma-ray line emission observed by RHESSI, is found to be essentially identical to the spectra of the SEPs observed near 1 AU for the well-connected 2 November and 20 January events.

  3. Effects of solar cycle on auroral particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattell, C. A.; Nguyen, T.; Temerin, M.; Lennartsson, W.; Peterson, W.

    We present the results of two studies designed to assess the effect of solar cycle on auroral particle acceleration processes. The first study is of data obtained from the S3-3 satellite at geocentric distances from 1.3 to 2.2 Re during solar minimum and the rising phase of the solar cycle. The S3-3 study included electrostatic shocks, ion beams and conics, and electron beams, but did not include ion composition. The second study is of data obtained by the ISEE-1 satellite when the ion mass spectrometer was operating in a special mode designed to study auroral ion distributions. This study covers geocentric distances from ˜2.5 to 7 Re during solar maximum and includes O+ and H+ beams and conics, and electrostatic shocks and low frequency turbulence. The S3-3 statistics for shocks with ion beams imply that the auroral parallel potential drop usually occurs above ˜2.2 Re at solar maximum, while the ISEE-1 observations suggest the potential drop, at solar maximum, may be located at ˜2.5 to 4 Re. The ISEE-1 beam observations (usually at energies less than or equal to 1 keV) imply that the potential drop is less, on average, for solar maximum than for solar minimum. Both data sets provide evidence for increased perpendicular acceleration of ions during solar maximum, associated with electrostatic shocks and enhanced low frequency turbulence. The ISEE-1 data show that the flux of upflowing O+ continues to increase as F10.7 increases from "low" to "high" solar maximum. These data also provide evidence that the ion two-stream instability is important in modifying the ion distributions. Most of these observations may be understood as being due to increased heating of the atmosphere during solar maximum which results in an increase in the H+ - O+ charge exchange altitude and an increase in the ionospheric density and temperature. Some effects, including the F10.7 dependence of the local time distribution of electrostatic shocks and the apparent decrease in the magnitude

  4. Apolipoprotein E Genotype-Dependent Paradoxical Short-Term Effects of {sup 56}Fe Irradiation on the Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Gwendolen E.; Villasana, Laura; Dayger, Catherine; Davis, Matthew J.; Raber, Jacob

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: In humans, apolipoprotein E (apoE) is encoded by three major alleles ({epsilon}2, {epsilon}3, and {epsilon}4) and, compared to apoE3, apoE4 increases the risk of developing Alzheimer disease and cognitive impairments following various environmental challenges. Exposure to irradiation, including that of {sup 56}Fe, during space missions poses a significant risk to the central nervous system, and apoE isoform might modulate this risk. Methods and Materials: We investigated whether apoE isoform modulates hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance starting 2 weeks after {sup 56}Fe irradiation. Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect cognition and are induced by irradiation. Therefore, after cognitive testing, we assessed hippocampal ROS levels in ex vivo brain slices, using the ROS-sensitive fluorescent probe, dihydroethidium (DHE). Brain levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), extracellular SOD, and apoE were assessed using Western blotting analysis. Results: In the water maze, spatial memory retention was impaired by irradiation in apoE2 and apoE4 mice but enhanced by irradiation in apoE3 mice. Irradiation reduced DHE-oxidation levels in the enclosed blade of the dentate gyrus and levels of 3-NT and CuZnSOD in apoE2 but not apoE3 or apoE4 mice. Finally, irradiation increased apoE levels in apoE3 but not apoE2 or apoE4 mice. Conclusions: The short-term effects of {sup 56}Fe irradiation on hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention are apoE isoform-dependent.

  5. Particle Acceleration and Transport in 3D Reconnection: Implications for the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, J.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from 3D kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection aimed at addressing the problem of particle transport and acceleration in the heliosheath. It has recently been suggested that sectored field in the heliosheath reconnects, generating magnetic islands which would accelerate and trap energetic particles. A kinetic treatment is necessary to capture vital aspects of this system, as feedback from particle heating significantly impacts the reconnection dynamics. Our 3D approach is also capable of producing the complex island structures and stochastic fields which are not captured in 2D. In our new simulations, we find that particles may be trapped inside 3D magnetic islands for a significant amount of time. We calculate diffusion coefficients over the full range of particle rigidity and find that transport in the transverse heliographic direction is greatly suppressed. We also examine particle acceleration during 3D reconnection, presenting energy spectra and evaluating the relative importance of different acceleration mechanisms.

  6. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  7. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-04-15

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity.

  8. Electromagnetic field-computation for particle accelerators, today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Kettunen, L.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we first review the magnets needed in accelerators, then discuss computations for accelerator magnets performed with present codes, and finally describe a new volume integral code which shows promise, and should be suitable for parallel computation. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Luis

    2010-09-10

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Interplanetary Quasi-perpendicular Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, F.-J.; Qin, G.; Zhang, L.-H.

    2017-08-01

    Using test particle simulations we study particle acceleration at highly perpendicular ({θ }{Bn}≥slant 75^\\circ ) shocks under conditions of modeling magnetic turbulence. We adopt a backward-in-time method to solve the Newton-Lorentz equation using the observed shock parameters for quasi-perpendicular interplanetary shocks, and compare the simulation results with ACE/EPAM observations to obtain the injection energy and timescale of particle acceleration. With our modeling and observations, we find that a large upstream speed is responsible for efficient particle acceleration. Our results also show that the quasi-perpendicular shocks are capable of accelerating thermal particles to high energies of the order of MeV for both kappa and Maxwellian upstream distributions, which may originate from the fact that in our model, the local background magnetic field has a component parallel to the shock normal.

  11. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis

    2010-09-01

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  12. The Effect of Cooling on Particle Trajectories and Acceleration in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Daniel; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-12-01

    The maximum synchrotron burnoff limit of 160 MeV represents a fundamental limit to radiation resulting from electromagnetic particle acceleration in one-zone ideal plasmas. In magnetic reconnection, however, particle acceleration and radiation are decoupled because the electric field is larger than the magnetic field in the diffusion region. We carry out two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to determine the extent to which magnetic reconnection can produce synchrotron radiation above the burnoff limit. We use the test particle comparison (TPC) method to isolate the effects of cooling by comparing the trajectories and acceleration efficiencies of test particles incident on such a reconnection region with and without cooling them. We find that the cooled and uncooled particle trajectories are typically similar during acceleration in the reconnection region, and derive an effective limit on particle acceleration that is inversely proportional to the average magnetic field experienced by the particle during acceleration. Using the calculated distribution of this average magnetic field as a function of uncooled final particle energy, we find analytically that cooling does not affect power-law particle energy spectra except at energies far above the synchrotron burnoff limit. Finally, we compare fully cooled and uncooled simulations of reconnection, confirming that the synchrotron burnoff limit does not produce a cutoff in the particle energy spectrum. Our results indicate that the TPC method accurately predicts the effects of cooling on particle acceleration in relativistic reconnection, and that, even far above the burnoff limit, the synchrotron energy of radiation produced in reconnection is not limited by cooling.

  13. A new type of accelerator for charged particle cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2013-04-01

    Non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerators (ns-FFAGs) show great potential for the acceleration of protons and light ions for the treatment of certain cancers. They have unique features as they combine techniques from the existing types of accelerators, cyclotrons and synchrotrons, and hence look to have advantages over both for this application. However, these unique features meant that it was necessary to build one of these accelerators to show that it works and to undertake a detailed conceptual design of a medical machine. Both of these have now been done. This paper will describe the concepts of this type of accelerator, show results from the proof-of-principle machine (EMMA) and described the medical machine (PAMELA).

  14. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, T. J., Jr.; Crandall, K. R.; Hamm, R. W.; Hansborough, L. D.; Hoeberling, R. F.; Jameson, R. A.; Knapp, E. A.; Mueller, D. W.; Potter, J. M.; Stokes, R. H.

    The philosophy used in developing the PIGMI (pion generator for medical irradiation) technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. This allowed the elimination of the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements are described.

  15. A new type of accelerator for charged particle cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Edgecock, Rob

    2013-04-19

    Non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerators (ns-FFAGs) show great potential for the acceleration of protons and light ions for the treatment of certain cancers. They have unique features as they combine techniques from the existing types of accelerators, cyclotrons and synchrotrons, and hence look to have advantages over both for this application. However, these unique features meant that it was necessary to build one of these accelerators to show that it works and to undertake a detailed conceptual design of a medical machine. Both of these have now been done. This paper will describe the concepts of this type of accelerator, show results from the proof-of-principle machine (EMMA) and described the medical machine (PAMELA).

  16. Short-term effects of whole-body exposure to (56)fe ions in combination with musculoskeletal disuse on bone cells.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Kenji; Globus, Ruth K; Mojarrab, Rose; Arakaki, Joy; Wang, Angela; Searby, Nancy D; Almeida, Eduardo A C; Limoli, Charles L

    2010-04-01

    Space travel and prolonged bed rest cause bone loss due to musculoskeletal disuse. In space, radiation fields may also have detrimental consequences because charged particles traversing the tissues of the body can elicit a wide range of cytotoxic and genotoxic lesions. The effects of heavy-ion radiation exposure in combination with musculoskeletal disuse on bone cells and tissue are not known. To explore this, normally loaded 16-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to (56)Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon) at doses of 0 cGy (sham), 10 cGy, 50 cGy or 2 Gy 3 days before tissue harvest. Additional mice were hindlimb unloaded by tail traction continuously for 1 week to simulate weightlessness and exposed to (56)Fe-ion radiation (0 cGy, 50 cGy, 2 Gy) 3 days before tissue harvest. Despite the short duration of this study, low-dose (10, 50 cGy) irradiation of normally loaded mice reduced trabecular volume fraction (BV/TV) in the proximal tibiae by 18% relative to sham-irradiated controls. Hindlimb unloading together with 50 cGy radiation caused a 126% increase in the number of TRAP(+) osteoclasts on cancellous bone surfaces relative to normally loaded, sham-irradiated controls. Together, radiation and hindlimb unloading had a greater effect on suppressing osteoblastogenesis ex vivo than either treatment alone. In sum, low-dose exposure to heavy ions (50 cGy) caused rapid cancellous bone loss in normally loaded mice and increased osteoclast numbers in hindlimb unloaded mice. In vitro irradiation also was more detrimental to osteoblastogenesis in bone marrow cells that were recovered from hindlimb unloaded mice compared to cells from normally loaded mice. Furthermore, irradiation in vitro stimulated osteoclast formation in a macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) in the presence of RANKL (25 ng/ml), showing that heavy-ion radiation can stimulate osteoclast differentiation even in the absence of osteoblasts. Thus heavy-ion radiation can acutely increase osteoclast numbers in cancellous

  17. Particle Acceleration at shocks: some modern aspects of an old problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, P.

    2004-11-01

    The acceleration of charged particles at astrophysical collisionless shock waves is one of the best studied pro- cesses for the energization of particles to ultrarelativistic energies, required by multifrequency observations in a variety of astrophysical situations. In this paper we discuss some work aimed at describing one of the main progresses made in the theory of shock acceleration, namely the introduction of the non-linear backreaction of the accelerated particles onto the shocked fluid. The implications for the investigation of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic rays will be discussed.

  18. Pickup Particle Acceleration at Comets, Moons and Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Andrew J.

    2017-09-01

    Ionisation of neutrals plays a key role in the plasma interactions of comets and moons, and in magnetospheres. Following ionisation, ions and electrons are ‘picked up’ in the plasma flow, initially accelerating along the electric field and then gyrating around the magnetic field. For an ion with mass m (amu) this leads to an acceleration of up to 4m times the energy of the flowing plasma. Further scattering in pitch angle and energy may increase the acceleration further. Here, we illustrate the process at work with relevant plasma measurements from comets including Rosetta’s comet 67P, from Titan and near Enceladus and Rhea.

  19. Pulsed power for particle beam accelerators in military applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, I.D.

    1980-06-20

    Techniques useful for generating and conditioning power for high energy pulsed accelerators with potential weapon applications are described. Pulsed electron accelerators are exemplified by ETA and ATA at Lawrence Livermore Laboratories and RADLAC at Sandia Laboratories Albuquerque. Pulse-power techniques used in other applications are briefly mentioned, including some that may be useful for collective ion accelerators. The limitations of pulse-power and the general directions of desirable development are illustrated. The main needs are to increase repetition rate and to decrease size.

  20. The status and evolution of plasma Wakefield particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2006-03-15

    The status and evolution of the electron beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme is described. In particular, the effects of the radial electric field of the wake on the drive beam such as multiple envelope oscillations, hosing instability and emission of betatron radiation are described. Using ultra-short electron bunches, high-density plasmas can be produced by field ionization by the electric field of the bunch itself. Wakes excited in such plasmas have accelerated electrons in the back of the drive beam to greater that 4 G eV in just 10 cm in experiments carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre.

  1. Particle physicist's dreams about PetaelectronVolt laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Vesztergombi, G.

    2012-07-09

    Present day accelerators are working well in the multi TeV energy scale and one is expecting exciting results in the coming years. Conventional technologies, however, can offer only incremental (factor 2 or 3) increase in beam energies which does not follow the usual speed of progress in the frontiers of high energy physics. Laser plasma accelerators theoretically provide unique possibilities to achieve orders of magnitude increases entering the PetaelectronVolt (PeV) energy range. It will be discussed what kind of new perspectives could be opened for the physics at this new energy scale. What type of accelerators would be required?.

  2. Optimization of accelerated charged particle beam for ADS energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Paraipan, M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2017-01-01

    A comparative analysis and optimization of energy efficiency for proton and ion beams in ADS systems is performed via simulation using a GEANT4 code with account for energy consumption for different accelerator types. It is demonstrated that for light nuclei, beginning from 7Li, with energies above 1 GeV/nucleon, ion beams are considerably (several times) more efficient than the 1-3 GeV proton beam. The possibility of achieving energy deposition equivalent to 1 GeV protons in a quasi-infinite uranium target with higher efficiency (and twice as small accelerator size) in the case of acceleration of light ions is substantiated.

  3. A phenomenological cost model for high energy particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator-based facilities have enabled forefront research in high-energy physics for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of colliders has progressed immensely, while beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  4. A Dust Particle Accelerator for Laboratory Simulations of Cosmic Dust Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, H. L. K.

    2001-11-01

    Dusty environments in the solar system such as around comets and interstellar dust are the focus of many current investigations. Instruments performing in-situ measurements of dust particles require laboratory testing and calibrating prior to their launch. This laboratory testing is most often done with a high-speed dust particle accelerator. In addition, studies of physical processing of planetary surfaces and spacecraft materials due to micro-dust particle impacts can also be performed with a dust particle accelerator. In 1975, Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota acquired a 2MeV dust particle accelerator from NASA/GSFC which is still fully functioning and currently being updated. Improvements to the electronic detection system have also been undertaken. We have designed a means to detect and record the charge and velocity of the dust particles with a computer system. Prior to these modifications, we had no means of correlating the particle's properties with the time the particles were detected. Other improvements to the vacuum system are slated. Besides improvements to the facilities, we have improved the performance characteristics of the accelerator. Our traditional dust material is 1-5 micron carbonyl iron. With this dust source, particles acquire velocities up to 14 km/sec. We have successfully used 70nm copper dust resulting in particles with speeds of 22km/sec and possibly higher.

  5. Non-linear interactions of plasma waves in the context of solar particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos-Cruz, A.; Perez-Peraza, J.

    2001-08-01

    Stochastic particle acceleration in plasmas by means of MHD turbulence in-volves a wide range of alternatives according to, the specific wave mode, the frequency regime of the turbulence, the kind of particles to be accelerated, the assumed plasma model and so on. At present most of the alternatives have been studied with relatively deepness, though some features are not yet com-pletely understood. One of them is the delimitation of the real importance of non-lineal effects of turbulence waves in the process of particle acceleration. In this work we analyse such effects taking into account the temporal evolution of the turbulence. For illustration we exemplify our analysis with the fast MHD mode. Our results show that in some specific stages of the turbulence evolu-tion, non-linear interactions have important effects in the process of particle acceleration.

  6. Particle acceleration magnetic field generation, and emission in Relativistic pair jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) are responsible for particle acceleration in relativistic pair jets. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic pair jet propagating through a pair plasma. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. Simulation results show that this instability generates and amplifies highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter' I radiation from deflected electrons can have different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. The growth rate of the Weibel instability and the resulting particle acceleration depend on the magnetic field strength and orientation, and on the initial particle distribution function. In this presentation we explore some of the dependencies of the Weibel instability and resulting particle acceleration on the magnetic field strength and orientation, and the particle distribution function.

  7. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND WAVE EXCITATION IN QUASI-PARALLEL HIGH-MACH-NUMBER COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS: PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.

    2015-04-01

    We herein investigate shock formation and particle acceleration processes for both protons and electrons in a quasi-parallel high-Mach-number collisionless shock through a long-term, large-scale, particle-in-cell simulation. We show that both protons and electrons are accelerated in the shock and that these accelerated particles generate large-amplitude Alfvénic waves in the upstream region of the shock. After the upstream waves have grown sufficiently, the local structure of the collisionless shock becomes substantially similar to that of a quasi-perpendicular shock due to the large transverse magnetic field of the waves. A fraction of protons are accelerated in the shock with a power-law-like energy distribution. The rate of proton injection to the acceleration process is approximately constant, and in the injection process, the phase-trapping mechanism for the protons by the upstream waves can play an important role. The dominant acceleration process is a Fermi-like process through repeated shock crossings of the protons. This process is a “fast” process in the sense that the time required for most of the accelerated protons to complete one cycle of the acceleration process is much shorter than the diffusion time. A fraction of the electrons are also accelerated by the same mechanism, and have a power-law-like energy distribution. However, the injection does not enter a steady state during the simulation, which may be related to the intermittent activity of the upstream waves. Upstream of the shock, a fraction of the electrons are pre-accelerated before reaching the shock, which may contribute to steady electron injection at a later time.

  8. Particle Acceleration and Wave Excitation in Quasi-parallel High-Mach-number Collisionless Shocks: Particle-in-cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.

    2015-04-01

    We herein investigate shock formation and particle acceleration processes for both protons and electrons in a quasi-parallel high-Mach-number collisionless shock through a long-term, large-scale, particle-in-cell simulation. We show that both protons and electrons are accelerated in the shock and that these accelerated particles generate large-amplitude Alfvénic waves in the upstream region of the shock. After the upstream waves have grown sufficiently, the local structure of the collisionless shock becomes substantially similar to that of a quasi-perpendicular shock due to the large transverse magnetic field of the waves. A fraction of protons are accelerated in the shock with a power-law-like energy distribution. The rate of proton injection to the acceleration process is approximately constant, and in the injection process, the phase-trapping mechanism for the protons by the upstream waves can play an important role. The dominant acceleration process is a Fermi-like process through repeated shock crossings of the protons. This process is a “fast” process in the sense that the time required for most of the accelerated protons to complete one cycle of the acceleration process is much shorter than the diffusion time. A fraction of the electrons are also accelerated by the same mechanism, and have a power-law-like energy distribution. However, the injection does not enter a steady state during the simulation, which may be related to the intermittent activity of the upstream waves. Upstream of the shock, a fraction of the electrons are pre-accelerated before reaching the shock, which may contribute to steady electron injection at a later time.

  9. On the Distribution of Particle Acceleration Sites in Plasmoid-dominated Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Cerutti, Benoît; Werner, Gregory R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the distribution of particle acceleration sites, independently of the actual acceleration mechanism, during plasmoid-dominated, relativistic collisionless magnetic reconnection by analyzing the results of a particle-in-cell numerical simulation. The simulation is initiated with Harris-type current layers in pair plasma with no guide magnetic field, negligible radiative losses, no initial perturbation, and using periodic boundary conditions. We find that the plasmoids develop a robust internal structure, with colder dense cores and hotter outer shells, that is recovered after each plasmoid merger on a dynamical timescale. We use spacetime diagrams of the reconnection layers to probe the evolution of plasmoids, and in this context we investigate the individual particle histories for a representative sample of energetic electrons. We distinguish three classes of particle acceleration sites associated with (1) magnetic X-points, (2) regions between merging plasmoids, and (3) the trailing edges of accelerating plasmoids. We evaluate the contribution of each class of acceleration sites to the final energy distribution of energetic electrons: magnetic X-points dominate at moderate energies, and the regions between merging plasmoids dominate at higher energies. We also identify the dominant acceleration scenarios, in order of decreasing importance: (1) single acceleration between merging plasmoids, (2) single acceleration at a magnetic X-point, and (3) acceleration at a magnetic X-point followed by acceleration in a plasmoid. Particle acceleration is absent only in the vicinity of stationary plasmoids. The effect of magnetic mirrors due to plasmoid contraction does not appear to be significant in relativistic reconnection.

  10. ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION SITES IN PLASMOID-DOMINATED RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Cerutti, Benoit; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-12-20

    We investigate the distribution of particle acceleration sites, independently of the actual acceleration mechanism, during plasmoid-dominated, relativistic collisionless magnetic reconnection by analyzing the results of a particle-in-cell numerical simulation. The simulation is initiated with Harris-type current layers in pair plasma with no guide magnetic field, negligible radiative losses, no initial perturbation, and using periodic boundary conditions. We find that the plasmoids develop a robust internal structure, with colder dense cores and hotter outer shells, that is recovered after each plasmoid merger on a dynamical timescale. We use spacetime diagrams of the reconnection layers to probe the evolution of plasmoids, and in this context we investigate the individual particle histories for a representative sample of energetic electrons. We distinguish three classes of particle acceleration sites associated with (1) magnetic X-points, (2) regions between merging plasmoids, and (3) the trailing edges of accelerating plasmoids. We evaluate the contribution of each class of acceleration sites to the final energy distribution of energetic electrons: magnetic X-points dominate at moderate energies, and the regions between merging plasmoids dominate at higher energies. We also identify the dominant acceleration scenarios, in order of decreasing importance: (1) single acceleration between merging plasmoids, (2) single acceleration at a magnetic X-point, and (3) acceleration at a magnetic X-point followed by acceleration in a plasmoid. Particle acceleration is absent only in the vicinity of stationary plasmoids. The effect of magnetic mirrors due to plasmoid contraction does not appear to be significant in relativistic reconnection.

  11. Particle Acceleration at Filamentary Structures Downstream of Collisionless Shocks in the Heliosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    Collisionless shocks are an important feature in astrophysical, heliospheric and magnetospheric settings. At these structures plasma is heated, the properties of flows are changed, and particles are accelerated to high energies. Particles are accelerated throughout the heliosphere. There are no times or conditions where suprathermal ions forming tails are not present on the solar wind ion distribution, and given the low speeds of these particles they must be accelerated locally in the heliosphere. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) accelerate particles up to 10s of MeV/nucleon. The termination shock of the solar and the heliosheath produce energetic particles including the Anomalous Cosmic Rays (ACRs), with energies in excess of 100 MeV. In the last few years' very interesting observations at low energies showing power laws that cannot be explained with commonly accepted acceleration mechanisms and thus increased the need for alternative acceleration processes. Fully consistent kinetic particle simulations such as hybrid simulations appear to be a powerful tool to investigated ion acceleration. Nowadays these simulations can be performed in 3D and relative large simulation domains covering up to hundreds of ion inertial length in size and thus representing the MHD scale. These 3D hybrid simulations show filamentary magnetic and density structures, which could be interpreted as small-scale flux ropes. The growth of these small-scale structures is also associated with ion acceleration. In this talk we will discuss properties of these filamentary structures, their spatial and temporal evolution and the particle dynamics during the acceleration process. The results of this study may be of particular importance for future high resolution magnetospheric and heliospheric mission such as THOR.

  12. Particle Acceleration during Magnetic Reconnection in a Low-beta Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaocan; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Li, Gang

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a primary mechanism for particle energization in space and astrophysical plasmas. By carrying out two-dimensional (2D) fully kinetic simulations, we study particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection in plasmas with different plasma β (the ratio between the thermal pressure and the magnetic pressure). For the high-β cases, we do not observe significant particle acceleration. In the low-β regime (β < 0.1), we find that reconnection is efficient at energizing both electrons and ions. While the distribution of accelerated particles integrated over the whole simulation box appears highly non-thermal, it is actually the superposition of a series of distributions in different sectors of a 2D magnetic island. Each of those distributions has only a small non-thermal component compared with its thermal core. By tracking a large number of particles, we show that particles get energized in X-line regions, contracting magnetic islands, and magnetic island coalescence regions. We obtain the particle energization rate {\\boldsymbol{j}}\\cdot {\\boldsymbol{E}} by averaging over particle drift motions and find that it agrees well with the particle kinetic energy change. We quantify the contribution of curvature drift, gradient drift, polarization drift, magnetization, non-gyrotropic effect, and parallel electric field in different acceleration regions. We find that the major energization is due to particle curvature drift along the motional electric field. The other particle motions contribute less but may become important in different acceleration regions. The highly efficient particle energization in low-β plasmas may help us understand the strong particle energization in solar flares and accretion disk coronae.

  13. APT related papers presented at the 1997 particle accelerator conference, Vancouver, May 12--16, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.

    1997-07-01

    Tritium is essential for the US nuclear weapons to function, but because it is radioactive with a half-life of 12.3 years, the supply must be periodically replenished. Presently, only reactor or accelerator systems can be used to produce tritium. This report is a compilation of 31 papers given at the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference which dealt with the accelerator production of tritium. The papers are grouped into two categories, invited and contributed.

  14. The acceleration of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium by transit-time damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Transit time damping is examined as a possible means for accelerating low energy particles in co-rotating streams and interstellar ions. Data show that: the protons in co-rotating streams may be accelerated by transient-time damping the small-scale variations in the field magnitude that are observed at a low level in the inner solar system. The interstellar ions may be accelerated by transit time damping large-scale field variations in the outer solar system.

  15. Double beat-wave mechanism to keep particle in phase with accelerating plasma wave

    SciTech Connect

    Csonka, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two mechanisms are described by which the phase matching between accelerated particle and accelerating plasma wave in a plasma beat-wave accelerator can be maintained indefinitely. (1) Interference between two beat-waves to cancel (a) the fields in the interfering electromagnetic waves, and (b) electron oscillations which would otherwise be set up by those waves. (2) Alternating plasma density used in conjunction with one or two beat-waves.

  16. Dust particle injector for hypervelocity accelerators provides high charge-to-mass ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, O. E.

    1966-01-01

    Injector imparts a high charge-to-mass ratio to microparticles and injects them into an electrostatic accelerator so that the particles are accelerated to meteoric speeds. It employs relatively large masses in the anode and cathode structures with a relatively wide separation, thus permitting a large increase in the allowable injection voltages.

  17. Single crystal niobium tubes for particle colliders accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James E

    2013-02-28

    The objective of this research project is to produce single crystal niobium (Nb) tubes for use as particle accelerator cavities for the Fermi laboratory’s International Linear Collider project. Single crystal Nb tubes may have superior performance compared to a polycrystalline tubes because the absence of grain boundaries may permit the use of higher accelerating voltages. In addition, Nb tubes that are subjected to the high temperature, high vacuum crystallization process are very pure and well annealed. Any impurity with a significantly higher vapor pressure than Nb should be decreased by the relatively long exposure at high temperature to the high vacuum environment. After application of the single crystal process, the surfaces of the Nb tubes are bright and shiny, and the tube resembles an electro polished Nb tube. For these reasons, there is interest in single crystal Nb tubes and in a process that will produce single crystal tubes. To convert a polycrystalline niobium tube into a single crystal, the tube is heated to within a few hundred °C of the melting temperature of niobium, which is 2477 °C. RF heating is used to rapidly heat the tube in a narrow zone and after reaching the operating temperature, the hot zone is slowly passed along the length of the tube. For crystallization tests with Nb tubes, the traverse rate was in the range of 1-10 cm per hour. All the crystallization tests in this study were performed in a water-cooled, stainless steel chamber under a vacuum of 5 x10-6 torr or better. In earliest tests of the single crystal growth process, the Nb tubes had an OD of 1.9 cm and a wall thickness of 0.15 mm. With these relatively small Nb tubes, the single crystal process was always successful in producing single crystal tubes. In these early tests, the operating temperature was normally maintained at 2200 °C, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In the next test series, the Nb tube size was increased to 3.8 cm OD and the wall thickness was

  18. Particle acceleration and transport in a chaotic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Li, G.; Dasgupta, B.

    2012-12-01

    Time-dependent chaotic magnetic field can arise from a simple asymmetric current wire-loop system (CWLS). Such simple CWLSs exist, for example, in solar flares. Indeed one can use an ensemble of such systems to model solar active region magnetic field [1,2]. Here we use test particle simulation to investigate particle transport and energization in such a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field, and through induction, a chaotic electric field. We first construct an ensemble of simple systems based on the estimated size and field strength of solar active region. By following the trajectories of single charged particles, we will examine how particle energy is changed. Diffusion coefficients in both real space and momentum space can be calculated as well as the average trapped time of the particles within chaotic field region. Particle energy spectrum as a function of time will be examined. [1] Dasgupta, B. and Abhay K. Ram, (2007) Chaotic magnetic fields due to asymmetric current configurations -application to cross field diffusion of particles in cosmic rays, (Presented at the 49th Annual Meeting of the DPP, APS, Abstract # BP8.00102) [2] G. Li, B. Dasgupta, G. Webb, and A. K. Ram, (2009) Particle Motion and Energization in a Chaotic Magnetic Field, AIP Conf. Proc. 1183, pp. 201-211; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3266777

  19. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  20. Particle Acceleration at Oblique CME-driven Shock Using Improved PATH Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Li, G.; Parker, L. N.; Zank, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    .Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are generally accepted to be caused by particle acceleration at coronal mass ejection(CME)-driven shocks. In this work we improved the PATH(Particle Acceleration and Transport in the Heliosphere) model by initiating a 2D CME-driven shock to investigate particle acceleration at different locations of an oblique CME-drive shock, where the shock has different obliquity angle(θBN). Thus we can study problems like whether quasi-perpendicular or quasi-parallel shock is more efficient in particle acceleration.The PATH model is based on the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The core of the model consists of a 3D Zeus module, which computes numerically the background solar wind and the CME-drive shock as inputs; and a shell module where the convection and diffusion of accelerated particles within the shock complex are followed. The 2D CME-driven shock is generated by perturbing the boundary condition of a steady background solar wind in certain patterns.