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Sample records for accelerated atherosclerosis development

  1. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jison; Maron, David J; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex inflammatory disease involving aberrant immune and tissue healing responses, which begins with endothelial dysfunction and ends with plaque development, instability and rupture. The increased risk for coronary artery disease in patients with rheumatologic diseases highlights how aberrancy in the innate and adaptive immune system may be central to development of both disease states and that atherosclerosis may be on a spectrum of immune-mediated conditions. Recognition of the tight association between chronic inflammatory disease and complications of atherosclerosis will impact the understanding of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and change diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in patients with rheumatologic syndromes as well as patients with coronary artery disease. In this review, we provide a summary of the role of the immune system in atherosclerosis, discuss the proposed mechanisms of accelerated atherosclerosis seen in association with rheumatologic diseases, evaluate the effect of immunosuppression on atherosclerosis and provide updates on available risk assessment tools, biomarkers and imaging modalities. PMID:27042216

  2. Overexpression of complement component C5a accelerates the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    An, Guipeng; Li, Bo; Liu, Xiaoman; Zhang, Mingxiang; Gao, Fei; Zhao, Yuxia; An, Fengshuang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the direct effect of C5a overexpression on atherosclerosis. Methods and Results A recombinant adenovirus expressing mouse C5a (Ad-C5a) was constructed and injected intravenously into ApoE−/− mice. After 12 weeks of a high-fat diet, Ad-C5a injection produced more extensive lesions than control adenovirus, and its proathrosclerotic role was significantly blocked by C5a receptor antagonist. Immunohistochemical analysis showed enhanced macrophage infiltration in atherosclerotic regions with C5a overexpression. Trans-well assay revealed C5a receptor-dependent chemotaxis of C5a to macrophages. Furthermore, Ad-C5a overexpression promoted foam cell formation and lipid deposition but reduced collagen content. In addition, with Ad-C5a overexpression, the serum levels of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were upregulated. Conclusions C5a overexpression could accelerate the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice by promoting macrophage recruitment, foam cell formation and inflammatory activation. Furthermore, its proatherogetic role is mediated by the C5a receptor. PMID:27517153

  3. 56Fe accelerates development of atherosclerosis in apoE -/-mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Yu, Tao; Parks, Brian; Yu, Shaohua; Srivastava, Roshni; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Khaled, Saman; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz

    Exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. For example, for women with early breast cancer, the benefit of radiotherapy can be nearly offset by the increased risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Head and neck cancer patients who undergo radiation treatment are at significantly elevated risk of stroke, even in a relatively young patient population that would not normally be at risk for atheroscle-rosis. Similarly, atomic bomb survivors had an increased incidence of mortality from coronary artery disease and stroke. Even radiation technologists working before 1950 (when occupational exposure was higher) had increased mortality due to circulatory diseases. Although much is known about the cardiovascular consequences these exposures to X-raus and gamma radiation, the response to the type of radiation likely to be encountered in prolonged space flight has not been determined. A key component of this cosmic radiation is 56Fe, which is particularly damaging to tissues. Using collimated beams, we selectively irradiated aortic arches and carotids (only) of the well-established apoE -/-atherosclerosis mouse model to test directly whether 56Fe exposure is a cardiovascular risk factor. Mice were sacrificed at 13 weeks post-irradiation and dissected, and aortas were divided into areas that had been targeted by the ion beam and those that were not. The area that was covered by plaques was then quantified. Plaque area at 13 weeks post-irradiation was significantly greater in targeted areas of mice that had received 5 Gy of 56Fe as compared to age-and sex-matched un-irradiated controls. In the carotid arteries and aortic roots, significantly greater atherosclerosis was apparent for a 2Gy exposure as well (the lowest dose tested). This demonstrates that even a single exposure to heavy ion radiation is capable of triggering events that culminate in cardiovascular disease, even long after the exposure has

  4. The effect of mycophenolate mofetil on disease development in the gld.apoE (-/-) mouse model of accelerated atherosclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Richez, Christophe; Richards, Rocco J; Duffau, Pierre; Weitzner, Zachary; Andry, Christopher D; Rifkin, Ian R; Aprahamian, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that is characterized by autoantibody production and inflammatory disease involving multiple organs. Premature atherosclerosis is a common complication of SLE and results in substantial morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). The reasons for the premature atherosclerosis in SLE are incompletely understood, although chronic inflammation is thought to play an important role. There is currently no known preventative treatment of premature atherosclerosis in SLE. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive agent that is commonly used for treatment of patients with SLE. In order to study the impact of this drug on murine lupus disease including premature atherosclerosis development, we treated gld.apoE(-/-) mice, a model of SLE and accelerated atherosclerosis, with MMF. We maintained seven-week old gld.apoE(-/-) mice on a high cholesterol Western diet with or without MMF. After 12 weeks on diet, mice receiving MMF showed decreased atherosclerotic lesion area compared to the control group. MMF treatment also improved the lupus phenotype, indicated by a significant decrease circulating autoantibody levels and ameliorating lupus nephritis associated with this model. This data suggests that the effects of MMF on the immune system may not only be beneficial for lupus, but also for inflammation driving lupus-associated atherosclerosis.

  5. Development of Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis Model Using Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Knock-Out Swine with Balloon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Onishi, Akira; Tsuboi, Shuta; Wada, Hideki; Konishi, Hirokazu; Naito, Ryo; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Kojima, Yuko; Schwartz, Robert S.; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Several animal models have facilitated the evaluation and pathological understanding of atherosclerosis, but a definitive animal model of coronary atherosclerosis is not available. We therefore developed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR-KO) pigs with hypercholesterolemia, a model which rapidly developed coronary atherosclerosis following balloon injury. Methods and Results We deleted LDLR exon regions from cultured porcine fetal fibroblasts and cloned LDLR knockout (LDLR-KO) embryos microinjecting fetal fibroblast nuclei into enucleated oocytes. Twelve LDLR-KO pigs were fed a 2.0% cholesterol and 20% fat diet. Baseline serum LDL cholesterol level was 510.0±86.1 mg/dL. Balloon injury was created in 46 coronary segments and necropsy were obtained 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks later. Coronary artery sections were reviewed to evaluate lesion progression. We found lipid accumulation with foam cells and inflammatory cells beginning four weeks after balloon injury. The mean ratio of macrophages to plaque area was significantly higher in the four- weeks and eight-week animals compared with those at 2-weeks (8.79% ± 5.98% and 17.00% ± 10.38% vs. 1.14% ± 1.88%, P < 0.0001). At 12 weeks the ratio decreased toward the level at 2 week level (4.00% ± 4.56%, P = 0.66 vs. baseline). Advanced coronary atherosclerotic lesions contained lipid pools at eight-weeks with fibrous components beginning at 12 weeks. Conclusions We developed a model of rapid coronary atherosclerosis using LDLR KO pigs with balloon injury. This model may be useful for preclinical evaluation of medication or devices, and may also help investigate mechanisms of plaque progression. PMID:27631974

  6. Hyperglycemia Induced by Glucokinase Deficiency Accelerates Atherosclerosis Development and Impairs Lesion Regression in Combined Heterozygous Glucokinase and the Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Adingupu, Damilola D.; Andréasson, Anne-Christine; Ahnmark, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Models combining diabetes and atherosclerosis are important in evaluating the cardiovascular (CV) effects and safety of antidiabetes drugs in the development of treatments targeting CV complications. Our aim was to evaluate if crossing the heterozygous glucokinase knockout mouse (GK+/−) and hyperlipidemic mouse deficient in apolipoprotein E (ApoE−/−) will generate a disease model exhibiting a diabetic and macrovascular phenotype. Methods. The effects of defective glucokinase on the glucose metabolism and on the progression and regression of atherosclerosis on high-fat diets were studied in both genders of GK+/−ApoE−/− and ApoE−/− mice. Coronary vascular function of the female GK+/−ApoE−/− and ApoE−/− mice was also investigated. Results. GK+/−ApoE−/− mice show a stable hyperglycemia which was increased on Western diet. In oral glucose tolerance test, GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed significant glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Plasma lipids were comparable with ApoE−/− mice; nevertheless the GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed slightly increased atherosclerosis development. Conclusions. The GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed a stable and reproducible hyperglycemia, accelerated atherosclerotic lesion progression, and no lesion regression after lipid lowering. This novel model provides a promising tool for drug discovery, enabling the evaluation of compound effects against both diabetic and cardiovascular endpoints simultaneously in one animal model. PMID:27774459

  7. Accelerated atherosclerosis in SLE: mechanisms and prevention approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Ashley J.; Major, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-organ autoimmune disease characterized by increased serum autoantibody levels and tissue damage. With improved diagnosis and more effective treatment of the resultant kidney disease, accelerated atherosclerosis has become a major cause of morbidity in patients suffering from SLE. Although the exact mechanisms for SLE-accelerated atherosclerosis are unknown, multiple factors have been established as potential players in this process. Among these potential players are dysregulation of T and B cell populations and increased circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, SLE patients exhibit a proatherogenic lipid profile characterized by low HDL and high LDL and triglycerides. Recent therapeutic approaches have focused on targeting B cells, the producers of autoantibodies, but most studies do not consider the effects of these treatments on atherosclerosis. Evidence suggests that T cells play a major role in SLE-accelerated atherosclerosis. Therefore, therapies targeted at T cells may also prove invaluable in treating SLE and atherosclerosis. PMID:24672580

  8. PKCβ Promotes Vascular inflammation and Acceleration of Atherosclerosis in Diabetic ApoE Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Linghua; Shen, Xiaoping; Lin, Lili; Leitges, Michael; Rosario, Rosa; Zou, Yu Shan; Yan, Shi Fang

    2013-01-01

    Objective Diabetic subjects are at high risk for developing atherosclerosis through a variety of mechanisms. As the metabolism of glucose results in production of activators of protein kinase C (PKC)β, it was logical to investigate the role of PKCβ in modulation of atherosclerosis in diabetes. Approach and Results ApoE−/− and PKCβ −/−/ApoE−/− mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin. Quantification of atherosclerosis, gene expression profiling or analysis of signaling molecules was performed on aortic sinus or aortas from diabetic mice. Diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis increased the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and JNK mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases and augmented vascular expression of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased monocyte/macrophage infiltration and CD11c+ cells accumulation in diabetic ApoE−/− mice; processes which were diminished in diabetic PKCβ −/−/ApoE−/− mice. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ reduced atherosclerotic lesion size in diabetic ApoE−/− mice. In vitro, the inhibitors of PKCβ and ERK1/2, as well as small interfering RNA (siRNA) to Egr-1 significantly decreased high glucose-induced expression of CD11c (Itgax), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and interleukin (IL)-1β in U937 macrophages. Conclusions These data link enhanced activation of PKCβ to accelerated diabetic atherosclerosis via a mechanism that includes modulation of gene transcription and signal transduction in the vascular wall; processes that contribute to acceleration of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis in diabetes. Our results uncover a novel role for PKCβ in modulating CD11c expression and inflammatory response of macrophages in the development of diabetic atherosclerosis. These findings support PKCβ activation as a potential therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:23766264

  9. Vascular health late after Kawasaki disease: implications for accelerated atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that primarily affects young children, is the most common acquired paediatric cardiovascular disease in developed countries. While sequelae of arterial inflammation in the acute phase of KD are well documented, its late effects on vascular health are increasingly unveiled. Late vascular dysfunction is characterized by structural alterations and functional impairment in term of arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction and shown to involve both coronary and systemic arteries. Further evidence suggests that continuous low grade inflammation and ongoing active remodeling of coronary arterial lesions occur late after acute illness and may play a role in structural and functional alterations of the arteries. Potential importance of genetic modulation on vascular health late after KD is implicated by associations between mannose binding lectin and inflammatory gene polymorphisms with severity of peripheral arterial stiffening and carotid intima-media thickening. The changes in cholesterol and lipoproteins levels late after KD further appear similar to those proposed to be atherogenic. While data on adverse vascular health are less controversial in patients with persistent or regressed coronary arterial aneurysms, data appear conflicting in individuals with no coronary arterial involvements or only transient coronary ectasia. Notwithstanding, concerns have been raised with regard to predisposition of KD in childhood to accelerated atherosclerosis in adulthood. Until further evidence-based data are available, however, it remains important to assess and monitor cardiovascular risk factors and to promote cardiovascular health in children with a history of KD in the long term. PMID:25550701

  10. Translational Mini-Review Series on Immunology of Vascular Disease: Accelerated atherosclerosis in vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tervaert, J W Cohen

    2009-01-01

    Premature atherosclerosis has been observed during the course of different systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and sytemic lupus erythematosus. Remarkably, relatively few studies have been published on the occurrence of accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with vasculitis. In giant cell arteritis (GCA), mortality because of ischaemic heart disease is not increased. In addition, intima media thickness (IMT) is lower in patients with GCA than in age-matched controls. In contrast, IMT is increased significantly in Takayasu arteritis, another form of large vessel vasculitis occurring in younger patients. In Takayasu arteritis and in Kawasaki disease, a form of medium-sized vessel vasculitis, accelerated atherosclerosis has been well documented. In small vessel vasculitis because of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies-associated vasculitis, cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of mortality. IMT measurements reveal conflicting results. During active disease these patients experience acceleration of the atherosclerotic process. However, when inflammation is controlled, these patients have atherosclerotic development as in healthy subjects. Several risk factors, such as diabetes and hypertension, are present more often in patients with vasculitis compared with healthy controls. In addition, steroids may be pro-atherogenic. Most importantly, many patients have impaired renal function, persistent proteinuria and increased levels of C-reactive protein, well-known risk factors for acceleration of atherosclerosis. Enhanced oxidation processes, persistently activated T cells and reduced numbers of regulatory T cells are among the many pathophysiological factors that play a role during acceleration of atherogenesis. Finally, autoantibodies that may be relevant for acceleration of atherosclerosis are found frequently in elevated titres in patients with vasculitis. Because patients have an increased risk for cardiovascular events, vasculitis

  11. Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Atherosclerosis Updated:Apr 3,2017 Atherosclerosis, or hardening of ... the arteries as you get older. How does atherosclerosis start and progress? It's a complex process. Exactly ...

  12. CD4+CXCR3+ T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells drive accelerated atherosclerosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Clement, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Escoubet, Brigitte; Guedj, Kevin; Chauveheid, Marie-Paule; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Nicoletti, Antonino; Papo, Thomas; Sacre, Karim

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Noteworthy, accelerated atherosclerosis in SLE patients appears to be independant of classical Framingham risk factors. This suggests that aggravated atherosclerosis in SLE patients may be a result of increased inflammation and altered immune responses. However, the mechanisms that mediate the acceleration of atherosclerosis in SLE remain elusive. Based on experimental data which includes both humans (SLE patients and control subjects) and rodents (ApoE-/- mice), we herein propose a multi-step model in which the immune dysfunction associated with SLE (i.e. high level of IFN-α production by TLR 9-stimulated pDCs) is associated with, first, an increased frequency of circulating pro inflammatory CD4+CXCR3+ T cells; second, an increased production of CXCR3 ligands by endothelial cells; third, an increased recruitment of pro-inflammatory CD4+CXCR3+ T cells into the arterial wall, and fourth, the development of atherosclerosis. In showing how SLE may promote accelerated atherosclerosis, our model also points to hypotheses for potential interventions, such as pDCs-targeted therapy, that might be studied in the future.

  13. Risk factors for accelerated atherosclerosis in young women with hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Medic-Stojanoska, Milica; Icin, Tijana; Pletikosic, Ivana; Bajkin, Ivana; Novakovic-Paro, Jovanka; Stokic, Edita; Spasic, Dragan T; Kovacev-Zavisic, Branka; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2015-04-01

    Prolactin is a metabolic hormone. The hypothesis is that hyperprolactinemia can cause metabolic and inflammatory changes which are associated with accelerated atherosclerotic process, but the treatment of hyperprolactinemia with dopamine agonists, leads to reversibility of these processes. The first aim of this study was to determine whether hyperprolactinemia in premenopausal women is accompanied with the increase in body mass index (BMI), changes in body composition, lipid disturbances, the presence of inflammation and changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure as risk factors for the development of early atherosclerosis. The second aim was to know whether the therapy of hyperprolactinemia and prolactin normalization lead to improvement of the observed parameters. Twenty female patients with prolactinomas, before and during treatment with dopamine agonists and 16 healthy controls were evaluated. Prolactin, BMI, total body fat, free fat mass, total body water, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and fibrinogen as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured at baseline and during the therapy. Hyperprolactinemic patients had pathologic and significantly higher levels of prolactin (PRL) than the controls (p=0.000). The BMI, body fat, total body water (TBW), total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL were in normal range and higher in the patients than in the controls. HDL was lower in hyperprolactinemic females than controls. The difference was significant only for body fat (fat % p=0.006; fat kg p=0.009). Fibrinogen was slightly increased in patients compared with the controls. Hyperprolactinemic patients had normal, but increased levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared with the controls. The difference with border significance was found in diastolic blood pressure (p=0.065). The correlation of PRL with all the observed parameters was positive apart from HDL, but relatively

  14. Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance ... flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including Coronary artery ...

  15. Increased Th9 cells and IL-9 levels accelerate disease progression in experimental atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Ming, Tingting; Wang, Yuanmin; Ding, Shaowei; Hu, Chaojie; Zhang, Cuiping; Cao, Qi; Wang, Yiping

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is the number one killer in developed countries, and currently considered a chronic inflammatory disease. The central role of T cells in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is well documented. However, little is known about the newly described T cell subset-Th9 cells and their role in AS pathogenesis. Here, the amounts of Th9 cells as well as their key transcription factors and relevant cytokines during atherosclerosis were assessed in ApoE-/- mice and age-matched C57BL/6J mice. Significantly increased Th9 cell number, Th9 related cytokine (IL-9), and key transcription factor (PU.1) were found in ApoE-/- mice compared with age-matched C57BL/6J mice. Additionally, treatment with rIL-9 accelerated atherosclerotic development, which was attenuated by anti-IL-9 antibodies. These data suggested that both Th9 cells and related IL-9 play key roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and antibodies against these antigens offer a novel therapeutic approach in AS treatment. PMID:28386359

  16. Brown fat activation reduces hypercholesterolaemia and protects from atherosclerosis development

    PubMed Central

    Berbée, Jimmy F. P.; Boon, Mariëtte R; Khedoe, P. Padmini S. J.; Bartelt, Alexander; Schlein, Christian; Worthmann, Anna; Kooijman, Sander; Hoeke, Geerte; Mol, Isabel M.; John, Clara; Jung, Caroline; Vazirpanah, Nadia; Brouwers, Linda P.J.; Gordts, Philip L.S.M.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Havekes, Louis M.; Scheja, Ludger; Heeren, Joerg; Rensen, Patrick C.N.

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) combusts high amounts of fatty acids, thereby lowering plasma triglyceride levels and reducing obesity. However, the precise role of BAT in plasma cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis development remains unclear. Here we show that BAT activation by β3-adrenergic receptor stimulation protects from atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic APOE*3-Leiden.CETP mice, a well-established model for human-like lipoprotein metabolism that unlike hyperlipidemic Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice expresses functional apoE and LDLR. BAT activation increases energy expenditure and decreases plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that BAT activation enhances the selective uptake of fatty acids from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into BAT, subsequently accelerating the hepatic clearance of the cholesterol-enriched remnants. These effects depend on a functional hepatic apoE-LDLR clearance pathway as BAT activation in Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice does not attenuate hypercholesterolaemia and atherosclerosis. We conclude that activation of BAT is a powerful therapeutic avenue to ameliorate hyperlipidaemia and protect from atherosclerosis. PMID:25754609

  17. Oversized vein grafts develop advanced atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic minipigs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accelerated atherosclerosis is the main cause of late aortocoronary vein graft failure. We aimed to develop a large animal model for the study of pathogenesis and treatment of vein graft atherosclerosis. Methods An autologous reversed jugular vein graft was inserted end-to-end into the transected common carotid artery of ten hypercholesteroemic minipigs. The vein grafts were investigated 12-14 weeks later with ultrasound and angiograpy in vivo and microscopy post mortem. Results One minipig died during follow up (patent vein graft at autopsy), and one vein graft thrombosed early. In the remaining eight patent vein grafts, the mean (standard deviation) intima-media thickness was 712 μm (276 μm) versus 204 μm (74 μm) in the contralateral control internal jugular veins (P < .01). Advanced atherosclerotic plaques were found in three of four oversized vein grafts (diameter of graft > diameter of artery). No plaques were found in four non-oversized vein grafts (P < .05). Conclusions Our model of jugular vein graft in the common carotid artery of hypercholesterolemic minipigs displayed the components of human vein graft disease, i.e. thrombosis, intimal hyperplasia, and atherosclerosis. Advanced atherosclerosis, the main cause of late failure of human aortocoronary vein grafts was only seen in oversized grafts. This finding suggests that oversized vein grafts may have detrimental effects on patient outcome. PMID:22463679

  18. Effects of Murine Norovirus on Chlamydia pneumoniae–Accelerated Atherosclerosis in ApoE–/– Mice

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Karuna; Campbell, Lee Ann; Rosenfeld, Michael E; Paik, Jisun; Brabb, Thea; O'Brien, Kevin D; Maggio-Price, Lillian; Hsu, Charlie C

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn), a common respiratory pathogen of humans, is associated with human cardiovascular disease and the acceleration of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic animal models. Our laboratory has demonstrated that murine norovirus (MNV), a prevalent infection of laboratory mice, can unpredictably alter atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic Ldlr−/− and ApoE−/− mice. Given that MNV has a tropism for macrophages and may exacerbate atherogenesis, we investigated whether coinfection with MNV and Cpn might alter macrophage phenotypes in vitro and atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice. In the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein, coinfection of ApoE−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) with MNV and Cpn resulted in significant increases in gene expression of IL6, MCP1, iNOS, and TNFα compared with Cpn-monoinfected BMDM. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that concurrent MNV–Cpn infection might increase plaque lesion size in vivo. As expected, Cpn monoinfection of ApoE−/− mice increased mean plaque size by 62% compared with that in uninfected mice. However, MNV did not significantly alter plaque lesion size in MNV–Cpn-coinfected mice compared with Cpn-monoinfected mice. There were no differences in aortic cytokines locally at the site of plaque development or in peritoneal macrophages at 1 wk after infection in MNV–Cpn-coinfected mice compared with Cpn-monoinfected mice. MNV was not detected in the aortic tissue of MNV-infected mice at 1 or 8 wk after infection regardless of Cpn status. These data suggest that MNV infection does not appreciably alter plaque development in Cpn-accelerated atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice. PMID:27298243

  19. Pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis occurs early after exposure and can be prevented via immunization.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Takanari; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Yusuke; Davey, Michael; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2006-02-01

    Here we report on early inflammatory events associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis-accelerated atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. Animals challenged with P. gingivalis presented with increased macrophage infiltration, innate immune marker expression, and atheroma without elevated systemic inflammatory mediators. This early local inflammatory response was prevented in mice immunized with P. gingivalis. We conclude that localized up-regulation of innate immune markers early after infection, rather than systemic inflammation, contributes to pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  20. Global transcriptomic study of atherosclerosis development in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yao, Hong; Hui, Ji-Yuan; Ding, Sheng-Hao; Fan, Yi-Ling; Pan, Yao-Hua; Chen, Kai-Hong; Wan, Jie-Qing; Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2016-10-30

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease of the arterial wall and a leading cause of death worldwide. Though the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic lesion formation has been studied, we still lack evidence of the global changes in the artery during atherosclerosis. In this report, we induced atherosclerosis in rats and conducted GeneChip analysis on carotid arteries with or without plaque formation. We found that molecular pathways underlying plaque formation in atherosclerosis were related to immune response, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis and hypoxic microenvironments, suggesting that the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is varied. In addition, we showed that three lncRNAs, GAS5, SNHG6 and Zfas1, were significantly increased in the plaque of atherosclerosis patients compared to normal people. A complex interaction of mRNA and lncRNA was identified in atherosclerosis. Our results provide a global transcriptomic network of atherosclerosis development in rats and possible targets that could lead to new clinical applications in the future.

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into low-density lipoprotein-receptor knockout mice and put these on a Western-type diet to induce atherosclerosis. Initially after treatment, we found higher levels of circulating regulatory T cells. In the long-term, overall numbers of effector T cells were reduced by MSC treatment. Moreover, MSC-treated mice displayed a significant 33% reduction in circulating monocytes and a 77% reduction of serum CCL2 levels. Most strikingly, we found a previously unappreciated effect on lipid metabolism. Serum cholesterol was reduced by 33%, due to reduced very low-density lipoprotein levels, likely a result of reduced de novo hepatic lipogenesis as determined by a reduced expression of Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and lipoprotein lipase. MSCs significantly affected lesion development, which was reduced by 33% in the aortic root. These lesions contained 56% less macrophages and showed a 61% reduction in T cell numbers. We show here for the first time that MSC treatment affects not only inflammatory responses but also significantly reduces dyslipidaemia in mice. This makes MSCs a potent candidate for atherosclerosis therapies. PMID:26490642

  2. Metabolomic Profiling of Arginine Metabolome Links Altered Methylation to Chronic Kidney Disease Accelerated Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Anna V; Zeng, Lixia; Byun, Jaeman; Pennathur, Subramaniam

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the mechanisms underlying vascular disease has not been fully understood. As the nitrogen donor in nitric oxide (NO·) synthesis, arginine and its metabolic products are integrally linked to vascular health and information. We hypothesized that derangements in this pathway could explain, in part, increased atherosclerotic risk in CKD. We developed a targeted metabolomic platform to profile quantitatively arginine metabolites in plasma by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Male low-density lipoprotein receptor defcient (LDLr−/−) mice at age 6 weeks were subjected to sham or 5/6 nephrectomy surgery to induce CKD. Subsequently, the animals were maintained on high fat diet for 24 weeks. Targeted metabolomic analysis of arginine metabolites in plasma was performed by isotope dilution LC/MS including asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethyl arginine (SDMA), N-mono-methylarginine (NMMA), arginine and citrulline. Although elevated plasma levels of ADMA and SDMA were found in the CKD mice, only higher ADMA level correlated with degree of atherosclerosis. No significant differences were noted in levels of NMMA between the groups. CKD mice had high levels of citrulline and arginine, but ADMA levels had no correlation with either of these metabolites. These fndings strongly implicate altered arginine methylation and accumulation of ADMA, may in part contribute to CKD accelerated atherosclerosis. It raises the possibility that interrupting pathways that generate ADMA or enhance its metabolism may have therapeutic potential in mitigating atherosclerosis. PMID:26778898

  3. Lipoprotein(a) accelerates atherosclerosis in uremic mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Tanja X.; McCormick, Sally P.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Bro, Susanne; Nielsen, Lars B.

    2010-01-01

    Uremic patients have increased plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels and elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. Lp(a) is a subfraction of LDL, where apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] is disulfide bound to apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Lp(a) binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), and uremia increases lipoprotein-associated OxPL. Thus, Lp(a) may be particularly atherogenic in a uremic setting. We therefore investigated whether transgenic (Tg) expression of human Lp(a) increases atherosclerosis in uremic mice. Moderate uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (NX) in Tg mice with expression of human apo(a) (n = 19), human apoB-100 (n = 20), or human apo(a) + human apoB [Lp(a)] (n = 15), and in wild-type (WT) controls (n = 21). The uremic mice received a high-fat diet, and aortic atherosclerosis was examined 35 weeks later. LDL-cholesterol was increased in apoB-Tg and Lp(a)-Tg mice, but it was normal in apo(a)-Tg and WT mice. Uremia did not result in increased plasma apo(a) or Lp(a). Mean atherosclerotic plaque area in the aortic root was increased 1.8-fold in apo(a)-Tg (P = 0.025) and 3.3-fold (P = 0.0001) in Lp(a)-Tg mice compared with WT mice. Plasma OxPL, as detected with the E06 antibody, was associated with both apo(a) and Lp(a). In conclusion, expression of apo(a) or Lp(a) increased uremia-induced atherosclerosis. Binding of OxPL on apo(a) and Lp(a) may contribute to the atherogenicity of Lp(a) in uremia. PMID:20584868

  4. Imaging Macrophage Development and Fate in Atherosclerosis and Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are central regulators of disease progression in both atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. In atherosclerosis, macrophages are the dominant leukocyte population that influences lesional development. In myocardial infarction, which is caused by atherosclerosis, macrophages accumulate readily and play important roles in inflammation and healing. Molecular imaging has grown considerably as a field and can reveal biological process at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. Here we explore how various imaging modalities, from intravital microscopy in mice to organ-level imaging in patients, are contributing to our understanding of macrophages and their progenitors in cardiovascular disease. PMID:23207281

  5. Marked Acceleration of Atherosclerosis following Lactobacillus casei induced Coronary Arteritis in a Mouse Model of Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Lee, Young Ho; Crother, Timothy R.; Fishbein, Michael; Zhang, Wenxuan; Yilmaz, Atilla; Shimada, Kenichi; Schulte, Danica J; Lehman, Thomas J.A.; Shah, Prediman K.; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate if Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE)-induced Kawasaki Disease (KD) accelerates atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. Method and Resuslts Apoe−/− or Ldlr−/− mice were injected with LCWE (KD mice) or PBS, fed high fat diet for 8 weeks, and atherosclerotic lesions in aortic sinuses (AS), arch (AC) and whole aorta were assessed. KD mice had larger, more complex aortic lesions with abundant collagen, and both extracellular and intracellular lipid and foam cells, compared to lesions in control mice despite similar cholesterol levels. Both Apoe−/− KD and Ldlr−/− KD mice showed dramatic acceleration in atherosclerosis vs. controls, with increases in en face aortic atherosclerosis and plaque size in both the AS and AC plaques. Accelerated atherosclerosis was associated with increased circulating IL-12p40, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and increased macrophage, DC, and T cell recruitment in lesions. Furthermore, daily injections of the IL-1Ra, which inhibits LCWE induced KD vasculitis, prevented the acceleration of atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results suggest an important pathophysiologic link between coronary arteritis/vasculitis in the KD mouse model and subsequent atherosclerotic acceleration, supporting the concept that a similar relation may also be present in KD patients. These results also suggest that KD in childhood may predispose to accelerated and early atherosclerosis as adults. PMID:22628430

  6. SRY gene transferred by extracellular vesicles accelerates atherosclerosis by promotion of leucocyte adherence to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jin; Guan, Weiwei; Tan, Xiaorong; Chen, Caiyu; Li, Liangpeng; Wang, Na; Zou, Xue; Zhou, Faying; Wang, Jialiang; Pei, Fang; Chen, Xinjian; Luo, Hao; Wang, Xinquan; He, Duofen; Zhou, Lin; Jose, Pedro A; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-08-01

    We set out to investigate whether and how SRY (sex-determining region, Y) DNAs in plasma EVs (extracellular vesicles) is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PCR and gene sequencing found the SRY gene fragment in plasma EVs from male, but not female, patients; EVs from male patients with CAD (coronary artery disease) had a higher SRY GCN (gene copy number) than healthy subjects. Additional studies found that leucocytes, the major source of plasma EVs, had higher SRY GCN and mRNA and protein expression in male CAD patients than controls. After incubation with EVs from SRY-transfected HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells, monocytes (THP-1) and HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells), which do not endogenously express SRY protein, were found to express newly synthesized SRY protein. This resulted in an increase in the adherence factors CD11-a in THP-1 cells and ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) in HUVECs. EMSA showed that SRY protein increased the promoter activity of CD11-a in THP-1 cells and ICAM-1 in HUVECs. There was an increase in THP-1 cells adherent to HUVECs after incubation with SRY-EVs. SRY DNAs transferred from EVs have pathophysiological significance in vivo; injection of SRY EVs into ApoE-/- (apolipoprotein-knockout) mice accelerated atherosclerosis. The SRY gene in plasma EVs transferred to vascular endothelial cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; this mechanism provides a new approach to the understanding of inheritable CAD in men.

  7. Brazilian adult individuals with untreated isolated GH deficiency do not have accelerated subclinical atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ursula M M; Oliveira, Carla R P; Salvatori, Roberto; Barreto-Filho, José A S; Campos, Viviane C; Oliveira, Francielle T; Rocha, Ivina E S; Oliveira, Joselina L M; Silva, Wersley A; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H

    2016-01-01

    GH and its principal mediator IGF1 have important effects on metabolic and cardiovascular (CV) status. While acquired GH deficiency (GHD) is often associated with increased CV risk, the consequences of congenital GHD are not known. We have described a large group of patients with isolated GHD (IGHD) due to a homozygous mutation (c.57+1G>A) in the GH releasing hormone receptor gene, and shown that adult GH-naïve individuals have no evidence of clinically evident premature atherosclerosis. To test whether subclinical atherosclerosis is anticipated in untreated IGHD, we performed a cross-sectional study of 25 IGHD and 27 adult controls matched for age and gender. A comprehensive clinical and biochemical panel and coronary artery calcium scores were evaluated by multi-detector tomography. Height, weight, IGF1, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, creatinine and creatininekinase were lower in the IGHD group. Median and interquartile range of calcium scores distribution was similar in the two groups: IGHD 0(0) and control 0(4.9). The vast majority of the calcium scores (20 of 25 IGHD (80%) and 18 of 27 controls (66.6%)) were equal to zero (difference not significant). There was no difference in the calcium scores classification. None of IGHD subjects had minimal calcification, which were present in four controls. Three IGHD and four controls had mild calcification. There were two IGHD individuals with moderate calcification and one control with severe calcification. Our study provides evidence that subjects with congenital isolated lifetime and untreated severe IGHD do not have accelerated subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:26811426

  8. Accelerated Management Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Kenn

    1974-01-01

    Western Electric's accelerated management development program for hand picked college graduate students consists of a high risk training project in which the management candidate accomplishes his task or is terminated. The success of such projects puts candidates in third level management in seven years or half the normal time. (DS)

  9. Advanced accelerator theory development

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Houck, T.L.; Poole, B.; Tishchenko, N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wang, I.

    1998-02-09

    A new accelerator technology, the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA), is potentially an ultra compact accelerator/pulsed power driver. This new accelerator relies on three new components: the ultra-high gradient insulator, the asymmetric Blumlein and low jitter switches. In this report, we focused our attention on the first two components of the DWA system the insulators and the asymmetric Blumlein. First, we sought to develop the necessary design tools to model and scale the behavior of the high gradient insulator. To perform this task we concentrated on modeling the discharge processes (i.e., initiation and creation of the surface discharge). In addition, because these high gradient structures exhibit favorable microwave properties in certain accelerator configurations, we performed experiments and calculations to determine the relevant electromagnetic properties. Second, we performed circuit modeling to understand energy coupling to dynamic loads by the asymmetric Blumlein. Further, we have experimentally observed a non-linear coupling effect in certain asymmetric Blumlein configurations. That is, as these structures are stacked into a complete module, the output voltage does not sum linearly and a lower than expected output voltage results. Although we solved this effect experimentally, we performed calculations to understand this effect more fully to allow better optimization of this DWA pulse-forming line system.

  10. Probucol via inhibition of NHE1 attenuates LPS-accelerated atherosclerosis and promotes plaque stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Fei; Chen, Song; Feng, Jun-Duo; Zhang, Ming-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    2014-04-01

    Activation of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) via Ca(2+)/calpain is responsible in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis and to the process of atherosclerosis. Probucol is a lipid-lowering drug which has an anti-atherosclerosis effect. The mechanism remains poorly understood. Here we hypothesized that probucol via inhibition of NHE1 in VSMCs attenuates LPS-accelerated atherosclerosis and promotes plaque stability. Our results revealed that treatment of VSMCs with LPS increased the NHE1 activity in a time-dependent manner, associated with the increased Ca(2+)i. Probucol inhibited the LPS-induced increase of NHE1 activity in a dose-dependent manner in VSMCs for 24-hour co-incubation, as well as the change of Ca(2+)i. In addition, LPS enhanced the calpain activity. Both probucol and calcium chelation of Ca(2+) abolished the LPS-induced increase of calpain activity. Treatment of VSMCs with LPS reduced the expression of Bcl-2 without altering the mRNA level. Probucol inhibited the LPS-reduced expression of Bcl-2 protein in VSMCs. Animal studies indicated administration of probucol suppressed LPS-accelerated apoptosis, atherosclerosis and plaque instability in Apoe(-/-) mice. In conclusion, probucol via inhibition of NHE1 attenuates atherosclerosis lesion growth and promotes plaque stability.

  11. Hypercholesterolemia increases coronary endothelial dysfunction, lipid content, and accelerated atherosclerosis after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Perrault, L P; Mahlberg, F; Breugnot, C; Bidouard, J P; Villeneuve, N; Vilaine, J P; Vanhoutte, P M

    2000-03-01

    Hyperlipidemia may increase endothelial damage and promote accelerated atherogenesis in graft coronary vasculopathy. To study the effects of hypercholesterolemia on coronary endothelial dysfunction, intimal hyperplasia, and lipid content, a porcine model of heterotopic heart transplantation, allowing nonacute rejection without immunosuppressive drugs, was used. A high cholesterol diet was fed to donor and recipient swine 1 month before and after transplantation. The endothelial function of coronary arteries of native and transplanted hearts from cholesterol-fed animals was studied in organ chambers 30 days after implantation and compared with endothelial function in arteries from animals fed a normal diet. The total serum cholesterol increased 3-fold in donors and recipients. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to serotonin, to the alpha(2)-adrenergic agonist UK14,304, and to the direct G-protein activator sodium fluoride were decreased significantly in allografted hearts compared with native hearts from both groups. Relaxations to the calcium ionophore A23187 and bradykinin were decreased significantly in allografts from animals fed the high cholesterol diet. The prevalence of intimal hyperplasia was significantly increased in coronary arteries from hypercholesterolemic swine. There was a significant increase in the lipid content of allograft arteries of hypercholesterolemic recipients. Hypercholesterolemia causes a general coronary endothelial dysfunction, increases the prevalence of intimal hyperplasia, and augments the incorporation of lipids in the vascular wall after heart transplantation. Hyperlipidemia accelerates graft coronary atherosclerosis through its effects on the endothelium.

  12. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Deficiency Attenuates the Development of Atherosclerosis in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Watson, Anna M.D.; Li, Jiaze; Paavonen, Karri; Koitka, Audrey; Calkin, Anna C.; Barit, David; Coughlan, Melinda T.; Drew, Brian G.; Lancaster, Graeme I.; Thomas, Merlin; Forbes, Josephine M.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Cooper, Mark E.; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in diabetic vasculature is considered to be a key mediator of atherogenesis. This study examines the effects of deletion of RAGE on the development of atherosclerosis in the diabetic apoE−/− model of accelerated atherosclerosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—ApoE−/− and RAGE−/−/apoE−/− double knockout mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin and followed for 20 weeks, at which time plaque accumulation was assessed by en face analysis. RESULTS—Although diabetic apoE−/− mice showed increased plaque accumulation (14.9 ± 1.7%), diabetic RAGE−/−/apoE−/− mice had significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque area (4.9 ± 0.4%) to levels not significantly different from control apoE−/− mice (4.3 ± 0.4%). These beneficial effects on the vasculature were associated with attenuation of leukocyte recruitment; decreased expression of proinflammatory mediators, including the nuclear factor-κB subunit p65, VCAM-1, and MCP-1; and reduced oxidative stress, as reflected by staining for nitrotyrosine and reduced expression of various NADPH oxidase subunits, gp91phox, p47phox, and rac-1. Both RAGE and RAGE ligands, including S100A8/A9, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), and the advanced glycation end product (AGE) carboxymethyllysine were increased in plaques from diabetic apoE−/− mice. Furthermore, the accumulation of AGEs and other ligands to RAGE was reduced in diabetic RAGE−/−/apoE−/− mice. CONCLUSIONS—This study provides evidence for RAGE playing a central role in the development of accelerated atherosclerosis associated with diabetes. These findings emphasize the potential utility of strategies targeting RAGE activation in the prevention and treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:18511846

  13. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in T cells accelerates atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Anna-Karin L.; Rudling, Mats; Zhou, Xinghua; Gorelik, Leonid; Flavell, Richard A.; Hansson, Göran K.

    2003-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease promoted by hypercholesterolemia. The role of adaptive immunity has been controversial, however. We hypothesized that proatherogenic T cells are controlled by immunoregulatory cytokines. Among them, TGF-β has been implied in atherosclerosis, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. We crossed atherosclerosis-prone ApoE-knockout mice with transgenic mice carrying a dominant negative TGF-β receptor II in T cells. The ApoE-knockout mice with disrupted TGF-β signaling in T cells exhibited a sixfold increase in aortic lesion surface area, a threefold increase in aortic root lesion size, and a 125-fold increase in aortic IFN-γ mRNA when compared with age-matched ApoE-knockout littermates. When comparing size-matched lesions, those of mice with T cell–specific blockade of TGF-β signaling displayed increased T cells, activated macrophages, and reduced collagen, consistent with a more vulnerable phenotype. Ab’s to oxidized LDL, circulating T cell cytokines, and spleen T cell activity were all increased in ApoE-knockout mice with dominant negative TGF-β receptors in T cells. Taken together, these results show that abrogation of TGF-β signaling in T cells increases atherosclerosis and suggest that TGF-β reduces atherosclerosis by dampening T cell activation. Inhibition of T cell activation may therefore represent a strategy for antiatherosclerotic therapy. PMID:14568988

  14. Oxidized high-density lipoprotein accelerates atherosclerosis progression by inducing the imbalance between treg and teff in LDLR knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ru, Ding; Zhiqing, He; Lin, Zhu; Feng, Wu; Feng, Zhang; Jiayou, Zhang; Yusheng, Ren; Min, Fan; Chun, Liang; Zonggui, Wu

    2015-05-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) dysfunction has been widely reported in clinic, and oxidation of HDL (ox-HDL) was shown to be one of the most common modifications in vivo and participate in the progression of atherosclerosis. But the behind mechanisms are still elusive. In this study, we firstly analyzed and found strong relationship between serum ox-HDL levels and risk factors of coronary artery diseases in clinic, then the effects of ox-HDL in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis in LDLR knockout mice were investigated by infusion of ox-HDL dissolved in chitosan hydrogel before the formation of lesions in vivo. Several new evidence were shown: (i) the serum levels of ox-HDL peaked early before the formation of lesions in LDLR mice fed with high fat diet similar to oxidative low density lipoprotein, (ii) the formation of atherosclerotic lesions could be accelerated by infusion of ox-HDL, (iii) the pro-atherosclerotic effects of ox-HDL were accompanied by imbalanced levels of effector and regulatory T cells and relative gene expressions, which implied that imbalance of teff and treg might contribute to the pro-atherosclerosis effects of ox-HDL.

  15. IL-17A is proatherogenic in high-fat diet-induced and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-accelerated atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Zhang, Wenxuan; Huang, Ganghua; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-11-01

    The role of IL-17 in atherogenesis remains controversial. We previously reported that the TLR/MyD88 signaling pathway plays an important role in high-fat diet as well as Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection-mediated acceleration of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. In this study, we investigated the role of the IL-17A in high-fat diet (HFD)- and C. pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis. The aortic sinus plaque and aortic lesion size and lipid composition as well as macrophage accumulation in the lesions were significantly diminished in IL-17A(-/-) mice fed an HFD compared with wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 control mice. As expected, C. pneumoniae infection led to a significant increase in size and lipid content of the atherosclerotic lesions in WT mice. However, IL-17A(-/-) mice developed significantly less acceleration of lesion size following C. pneumoniae infection compared with WT control despite similar levels of blood cholesterol levels. Furthermore, C. pneumoniae infection in WT but not in IL-17A(-/-) mice was associated with significant increases in serum concentrations of IL-12p40, CCL2, IFN-γ, and numbers of macrophages in their plaques. Additionally, in vitro studies suggest that IL-17A activates vascular endothelial cells, which secrete cytokines that in turn enhance foam cell formation in macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that IL-17A is proatherogenic and that it plays an important role in both diet-induced atherosclerotic lesion development, and C. pneumoniae infection-mediated acceleration of atherosclerotic lesions in the presence of HFD.

  16. Apolipoprotein E4 domain interaction accelerates diet-induced atherosclerosis in hypomorphic Arg-61 Apoe mice

    PubMed Central

    Eberlé, Delphine; Kim, Roy Y.; Luk, Fu Sang; de Mochel, Nabora Soledad Reyes; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Olivas, Victor R.; Kumar, Nikit; Posada, Jessica M.; Birkeland, Andrew C.; Rapp, Joseph H.; Raffai, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is an established risk factor for atherosclerosis, but the structural components underlying this association remain unclear. ApoE4 is characterized by two biophysical properties: domain interaction and molten globule state. Substituting Arg-61 for Thr-61 in mouse apoE introduces domain interaction without molten globule state, allowing us to delineate potential pro-atherogenic effects of domain interaction in vivo. Methods and Results We studied atherosclerosis susceptibility of hypomorphic Apoe mice expressing either Thr-61 or Arg-61 apoE (ApoeTh/h or ApoeRh/h mice). On a chow diet, both mouse models were normo-lipidemic with similar levels of plasma apoE and lipoproteins. However, on a high cholesterol diet, ApoeRh/h mice displayed increased levels of total plasma cholesterol and VLDL as well as larger atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic root, arch and descending aorta compared to ApoeTh/h mice. In addition, evidence of cellular dysfunction was identified in peritoneal ApoeRh/h macrophages which released lower amounts of apoE in culture medium and displayed increased expression of MHC class II molecules. Conclusions These data indicate that domain interaction mediates pro-atherogenic effects of apoE4 in part by modulating lipoprotein metabolism and macrophage biology. Pharmaceutical targeting of domain interaction could lead to new treatments for atherosclerosis in apoE4 individuals. PMID:22441102

  17. 2013 Russell Ross memorial lecture in vascular biology: cellular and molecular mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-accelerated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2014-04-01

    Adults with diabetes mellitus are much more likely to have cardiovascular disease than those without diabetes mellitus. Genetically engineered mouse models have started to provide important insight into the mechanisms whereby diabetes mellitus promotes atherosclerosis. Such models have demonstrated that diabetes mellitus promotes formation of atherosclerotic lesions, progression of lesions into advanced hemorrhaged lesions, and that it prevents lesion regression. The proatherosclerotic effects of diabetes mellitus are driven in part by the altered function of myeloid cells. The protein S100A9 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are important modulators of the effect of diabetes mellitus on myelopoiesis, which might promote monocyte accumulation in lesions. Furthermore, myeloid cell expression of the enzyme acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1), which converts long-chain fatty acids into their acyl-CoA derivatives, has emerged as causal to diabetes mellitus-induced lesion initiation. The protective effects of myeloid ACSL1-deficiency in diabetic mice, but not in nondiabetic mice, indicate that myeloid cells are activated by diabetes mellitus through mechanisms that play minor roles in the absence of diabetes mellitus. The roles of reactive oxygen species and insulin resistance in diabetes mellitus-accelerated atherosclerosis are also discussed, primarily in relation to endothelial cells. Translational studies addressing whether the mechanisms identified in mouse models are equally important in humans with diabetes mellitus will be paramount.

  18. TLR/MyD88 and liver X receptor alpha signaling pathways reciprocally control Chlamydia pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Naiki, Yoshikazu; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Wong, Michelle H; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Yilmaz, Atilla; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Crother, Timothy R; Bulut, Yonca; Doherty, Terence M; Bradley, Michelle; Shaposhnik, Zory; Peterson, Ellena M; Tontonoz, Peter; Shah, Prediman K; Arditi, Moshe

    2008-11-15

    Experimental and clinical studies link Chlamydia pneumoniae infection to atherogenesis and atherothrombotic events, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E (ApoE)(-/-) mice is reciprocally modulated by activation of TLR-mediated innate immune and liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha) signaling pathways. We infected ApoE(-/-) mice and ApoE(-/-) mice that also lacked TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, or LXRalpha intranasally with C. pneumoniae followed by feeding of a high fat diet for 4 mo. Mock-infected littermates served as controls. Atherosclerosis was assessed in aortic sinuses and in en face preparation of whole aorta. The numbers of activated dendritic cells (DCs) within plaques and the serum levels of cholesterol and proinflammatory cytokines were also measured. C. pneumoniae infection markedly accelerated atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice that was associated with increased numbers of activated DCs in aortic sinus plaques and higher circulating levels of MCP-1, IL-12p40, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. In contrast, C. pneumoniae infection had only a minimal effect on atherosclerosis, accumulation of activated DCs in the sinus plaques, or circulating cytokine increases in ApoE(-/-) mice that were also deficient in TLR2, TLR4, or MyD88. However, C. pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice was further enhanced in ApoE(-/-)LXRalpha(-/-) double knockout mice and was accompanied by higher serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha. We conclude that C. pneumoniae infection accelerates atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice predominantly through a TLR/MyD88-dependent mechanism and that LXRalpha appears to reciprocally modulate and reduce the proatherogenic effects of C. pneumoniae infection.

  19. STAT4 deficiency reduces the development of atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Gjurich, Breanne N; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Kaplan, Mark H; Dobrian, Anca D; Nadler, Jerry L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process that leads to plaque formation in large and medium sized vessels. T helper 1 (Th1) cells constitute the majority of plaque infiltrating pro-atherogenic T cells and are induced via IFNγ-dependent activation of T-box (Tbet) and/or IL-12-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4). We thus aimed to define a role for STAT4 in atherosclerosis. STAT4-deficiency resulted in a ∼71% reduction (p < 0.001) in plaque burden in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) vs Apoe(-/-) mice fed chow diet and significantly attenuated atherosclerosis (∼31%, p < 0.01) in western diet fed Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, reduced atherogenesis in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice was not due to attenuated IFNγ production in vivo by Th1 cells, suggesting an at least partially IFNγ-independent pro-atherogenic role of STAT4. STAT4 is expressed in T cells, but also detected in macrophages (MΦs). Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-)in vitro differentiated M1 or M2 MΦs had reduced cytokine production compare to Apoe(-/-) M1 and M2 MΦs that was accompanied by reduced induction of CD69, I-A(b), and CD86 in response to LPS stimulation. Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) MΦs expressed attenuated levels of CCR2 and demonstrated reduced migration toward CCL2 in a transwell assay. Importantly, the percentage of aortic CD11b(+)F4/80(+)Ly6C(hi) MΦs was reduced in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) vs Apoe(-/-) mice. Thus, this study identifies for the first time a pro-atherogenic role of STAT4 that is at least partially independent of Th1 cell-derived IFNγ, and primarily involving the modulation of MΦ responses.

  20. DNMT1-PPARγ pathway in macrophages regulates chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu; Chen, Guozhu; Deng, Mengyang; Kang, Huali; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase-mediated proinflammatory activation of macrophages is causally linked to the development of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the role of DNMT1, a DNA methylation maintenance enzyme, in macrophage polarization and AS development remains obscure. Here, we established transgenic mice with macrophage-specific overexpression of DNMT1 (TgDNMT1) or PPAR-γ (TgPPAR-γ) to investigate their effects on AS progression in ApoE-knockout mice fed an atherogenic diet. Primary macrophages were extracted to study the role of the DNMT1/PPAR-γ pathway in regulating inflammatory cytokine production. We demonstrated that TgDNMT1 significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and plasma, and it accelerated the progression of AS in the atherogenic diet-treated ApoE-knockout mice. Further, we found that the DNA methylation status of the proximal PPAR-γ promoter was regulated by DNMT1 in macrophages. Notably, additional TgPPAR-γ or pharmacological activation of PPAR-γ effectively prevented TgDNMT1-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and AS development in the mouse model. Finally, we demonstrated that elevated DNMT1 was correlated with decreased PPAR-γ, and increased proinflammatory cytokine production in the peripheral blood monocytes isolated from the patients with AS, compared to those of healthy donors. Our findings shed light on a novel strategy for the prevention and therapy of AS. PMID:27530451

  1. Leishmania major Self-Limited Infection Increases Blood Cholesterol and Promotes Atherosclerosis Development.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luciana R; Ribeiro, Ana Cecília C; Segatto, Marcela; Santos, Luís Felipe F F; Amaral, Joana; Portugal, Luciane R; Leite, Jacqueline I A

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania major infection of resistant mice causes a self-limited lesion characterized by macrophage activation and a Th1 proinflammatory response. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease involving hypercholesterolemia and macrophage activation. In this study, we evaluated the influence of L. major infection on the development of atherosclerosis using atherosclerosis-susceptible apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE KO) mice. After 6 weeks of infection, apoE KO mice exhibited reduced footpad swelling and parasitemia similar to C57BL/6 controls, confirming that both strains are resistant to infection with L. major. L. major-infected mice had increased plasma cholesterol levels and reduced triacylglycerols. With regard to atherosclerosis, noninfected mice developed only fatty streak lesions, while the infected mice presented with advanced lesions containing a necrotic core and an abundant inflammatory infiltrate. CD36 expression was increased in the aortic valve of the infected mice, indicating increased macrophage activation. In conclusion, L. major infection, although localized and self-limited in resistant apoE KO mice, has a detrimental effect on the blood lipid profile, increases the inflammatory cell migration to atherosclerotic lesions, and promotes atherogenesis. These effects are consequences of the stimulation of the immune system by L. major, which promotes the inflammatory components of atherosclerosis, which are primarily the parasite-activated macrophages.

  2. Leishmania major Self-Limited Infection Increases Blood Cholesterol and Promotes Atherosclerosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luciana R.; Ribeiro, Ana Cecília C.; Segatto, Marcela; Santos, Luís Felipe F. F.; Amaral, Joana; Portugal, Luciane R.; Leite, Jacqueline I. A.

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania major infection of resistant mice causes a self-limited lesion characterized by macrophage activation and a Th1 proinflammatory response. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease involving hypercholesterolemia and macrophage activation. In this study, we evaluated the influence of L. major infection on the development of atherosclerosis using atherosclerosis-susceptible apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE KO) mice. After 6 weeks of infection, apoE KO mice exhibited reduced footpad swelling and parasitemia similar to C57BL/6 controls, confirming that both strains are resistant to infection with L. major. L. major-infected mice had increased plasma cholesterol levels and reduced triacylglycerols. With regard to atherosclerosis, noninfected mice developed only fatty streak lesions, while the infected mice presented with advanced lesions containing a necrotic core and an abundant inflammatory infiltrate. CD36 expression was increased in the aortic valve of the infected mice, indicating increased macrophage activation. In conclusion, L. major infection, although localized and self-limited in resistant apoE KO mice, has a detrimental effect on the blood lipid profile, increases the inflammatory cell migration to atherosclerotic lesions, and promotes atherogenesis. These effects are consequences of the stimulation of the immune system by L. major, which promotes the inflammatory components of atherosclerosis, which are primarily the parasite-activated macrophages. PMID:23710353

  3. The regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1) an important factor involved in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases development.

    PubMed

    Torac, E; Gaman, L; Atanasiu, V

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, one of the main causes of cardiovascular diseases, is a complex process that involves manifold factors. Besides the vascular lipids accumulation, inflammatory factors could be considered as a proatherogenic factor - RCAN1. RCAN1 is a regulator of calcineurin, both of them being calcium dependent proteins. Recent studies have shown that RCAN1 has an important role in heart valve development. In the same time researchers found that, the atherosclerotic plaques have an up-regulated RCAN1 gene expression. In the near future, it is desirable to elucidate the RCAN1 function and classify it as a possible biochemical marker to diagnose infancy atherosclerosis.

  4. Embryonic development during chronic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Abbott, U. K.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments carried out on chicken eggs indicate that the embryo is affected during very early development, especially over the first four days, and during hatching. In the first four days, the brain develops as well as the anlage for all other organs. In addition, the heart commences to function and the extraembryonic membranes that compartmentalize the egg contents form. The latter require an appreciable extension and folding of tissue which may be disrupted by the mechanical load. Observations of embryonic abnormalities that occur during chronic acceleration suggest an inhibition of development of the axial skeleton, which is rarely seen otherwise, a general retardation of embryonic growth, and circulatory problems. The final stages of development (after 18 days) involve the uptake of fluids, the transition to aerial respiration, and the reorientation of the embryo into a normal hatching position. At 4 G mortality is very high during this period, with a majority of embryos failing to reorient into the normal hatching position.

  5. UCLA accelerator research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  6. Novel function of histamine signaling in hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis: Histamine H1 receptors protect and H2 receptors accelerate atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Wang, Ke-Yong; Tanimoto, Akihide; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2015-02-01

    Histamine is not only essential for acute inflammatory reactions, but it also participates in a chronic inflammatory disorder. We generated apolipoprotein E (apoE) and histamine receptors (HHRs), including the major H1 and H2 receptors (HH1R, HH2R) double knockout mice (DKO) to clarify the role of HHRs in hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis, in which apoE-KO and DKO mice were fed a high cholesterol diet. We found that pronounced hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerotic progression occurred in HH1R/apoE-DKO mice, but in HH2R/apoE-DKO mice less atherosclerosis, despite pro-atherogenic serum cholesterol levels compared with apoE-KO mice. Furthermore, the increased expressions of scavenger receptors (SRs), such as SR-A, CD36 and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1), nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or liver X receptor (LXR)-related inflammatory signaling factors, were consistent with the pro-atherogenic phenotype of HH2R/apoE-DKO mice. We hypothesize that histamine/HH1R and HH2R signaling has conflicting innate functions, inflammatory/atherogenic and anti-inflammatory/anti-atherogenic actions, and that there are innate links between histamine signaling and hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis, independently of serum cholesterol metabolism. Specific histamine signaling blockers, in particular, HH2R blockers, are a possible novel therapeutic target for hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis.

  7. Renin-angiotensin system activation accelerates atherosclerosis in experimental renal failure by promoting endoplasmic reticulum stress-related inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jia; Zhang, Xi; Yu, Xinyi; Tang, Weixue; Gan, Hua

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the association between the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and atherosclerosis (AS) in uremic apolipo-protein E knockout (apoE−/−) mice. Mild uremia was induced by a 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx) in 10-week-old apoE−/− mice. Four weeks after nephrectomy, the mice received losartan or no treatment for 16 weeks. Sham-operated mice served as the controls. We found that uremia accelerated AS at the aortic root. The activation of ER stress and the significant upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed in the uremic mice. Phosphorylated inositol-requiring 1α (p-IRE1α), an ER stress marker protein, was mainly expressed in macrophages in the atherosclerotic lesions. Treatment with losartan significantly attenuated aortic AS, inhibited ER stress and reduced aortic inflammation. In in vitro experiments, angiotensin II (Ang II) increased the levels of the common ER stress maker, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and the phosphorylation of IRE1α in RAW264.7 macrophages. Treatment with losartan inhibited the activation of ER stress and the upregulation of GRP78, and enhanced the expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor (IκB) in Ang II-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. IRE1α-siRNA suppressed inflammation and downregulated IκB expression and IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation, which inhibited IκB degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in Ang II-treated RAW264.7 macrophages. These findings suggest that RAS activation accelerates AS by promoting ER stress-related inflammation in uremic mice. PMID:28098884

  8. Effect of Cyp27A1 gene dosage on atherosclerosis development in ApoE-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zurkinden, Line; Solcà, Curzio; Vögeli, Isabelle A; Vogt, Bruno; Ackermann, Daniel; Erickson, Sandra K; Frey, Felix J; Sviridov, Dmitri; Escher, Geneviève

    2014-03-01

    In humans, sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) deficiency leads to cholesterol deposition in tendons and vasculature. Thus, in addition to its role in bile acid synthesis, where it converts cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC), CYP27A1 may also be atheroprotective. Cyp27A1-deficient (Cyp27A1(-/-)) mice were crossed with apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice. Cyp27A1(+/+)/apoE(-/-) [ApoE-knockout (KO)], Cyp27A1(+/-)/apoE(-/-) heterozygous (het), and Cyp27A1(-/-)/apoE(-/-) [double-knockout (DKO)] mice were challenged with a Western diet (WD) for 3 and 6 mo. ApoE-KO mice fed a chow diet or a WD were used as the control. The severity of atherosclerosis in DKO mice was reduced 10-fold. Compared with the control, the DKO mice had no 27-OHC, total plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein and very low density lipoprotein (LDL/VLDL) concentrations were reduced 2-fold, and HDL was elevated 2-fold. Expression of hepatic CYP7A1, CYP3A, and CYP8B1 were 5- to 10-fold higher. 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity increased 4-fold. Fecal cholesterol was increased. In contrast, het mice fed a WD developed accelerated atherosclerosis and severe skin lesions, possibly because of reduced reverse cholesterol transport due to diminished 27-OHC production. CYP27A1 activity is involved in the control of cholesterol homeostasis and development of atherosclerosis with a distinct gene dose-dependent effect.

  9. TLR signaling and trapped vascular dendritic cells in the development of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Terence M; Fisher, Edward A; Arditi, Moshe

    2006-05-01

    The Framingham Heart Study established a link between serum lipoproteins and atherosclerosis but a crucially important feature of the disease has been neglected: it is primarily an immunological disorder. Here, we reframe atherosclerosis in terms of recent progress in understanding the immunological mechanisms underlying the disorder, and advance a new conceptual model for the future. We place vascular dendritic cells squarely at the forefront, and propose that a sentinel network of vascular dendritic cells (DCs) sample and process exogenous and endogenous antigens that can trigger an inflammatory nidus within the arterial wall. Our model postulates that two components are essential to the development of atheromata: vascular DCs and intact myeloid differentiation (MyD)88-dependent signaling by Toll-like receptors.

  10. Pleiotropic effects of acarbose on atherosclerosis development in rabbits are mediated via upregulating AMPK signals

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kuei-Chuan; Yu, Meng-Hsun; Lin, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Chien-Ning; Chung, Dai-Jung; Lee, Yi-Ju; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Acarbose, an α-glucosidase inhibitor, is reported to reduce the incidence of silent myocardial infarction and slow the progression of intima-media thickening in patients with glucose intolerance. Here we investigate other impacts of acarbose on atherosclerosis development and the underlying mechanisms of atherosclerosis initiation and progression in vivo and in vitro. Rabbits fed a high cholesterol diet (HCD) were treated with acarbose (2.5–5.0 mg kg−1). Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Ras, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), IL-6, β-galactosidase, and p-AMPK in atherosclerotic lesions. Treatment with acarbose in HCD-fed rabbits was found to significantly reduce the severity of aortic atheroma and neointimal expression of α-actin, PCNA, IL-6, TNF-α, Ras, and β-galactosidase; to significantly increase expression of iNOS and p-AMPK, but not to affect serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, and LDL. Western blot analysis showed acarbose dose-dependently decreased β-galactosidase and Ras expression and increased p-AMPK expression in TNF-α-treated A7r5 cells. In addition, acarbose restored p-AMPK and iNOS levels in AMPK inhibitor- and iNOS inhibitor-treated A7r5 cells, respectively. In conclusion, acarbose can pleiotropically inhibit rabbit atherosclerosis by reducing inflammation, senescence, and VSMCs proliferation/migration via upregulating AMPK signals. PMID:27924924

  11. New developments in atherosclerosis: clinical potential of PCSK9 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Giunzioni, Ilaria; Tavori, Hagai

    2015-01-01

    Pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a secreted 692-amino acid protein that binds surface low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) and targets it toward lysosomal degradation. As a consequence, the number of LDLRs at the cell surface is decreased, and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) clearance is reduced, a phenomenon that is magnified by gain-of-function mutations of PCSK9. In contrast, loss-of-function mutations of PCSK9 result in increased surface LDLR and improved LDL-C clearance. This provides the rationale for targeting PCSK9 in hypercholesterolemic subjects as a means to lower LDL-C levels. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against PCSK9 that block its interaction with the LDLR have been developed in the past decade. Two companies have recently received the approval for their anti-PCSK9 mAbs by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) Regeneron/Sanofi, with alirocumab (commercial name--PRALUENT(®)) and, Amgen with evolocumab (commercial name--Repatha™). The introduction of anti-PCSK9 mAbs will provide an alternative therapeutic strategy to address many of the unmet needs of current lipid-lowering therapies, such as inability to achieve goal LDL-C level, or intolerance and aversion to statins. This review will focus on the kinetics of PCSK9, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anti-PCSK9 mAbs, and recent data linking PCSK9 and anti-PCSK9 mAbs to cardiovascular events. Moreover, it will highlight the unanswered questions that still need to be addressed in order to understand the physiologic function, kinetics, and dynamics of PCSK9.

  12. Taurine and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Taurine is abundantly present in most mammalian tissues and plays a role in many important physiological functions. Atherosclerosis is the underlying mechanism of cardiovascular disease including myocardial infarctions, strokes and peripheral artery disease and remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Studies conducted in laboratory animal models using both genetic and dietary models of hyperlipidemia have demonstrated that taurine supplementation retards the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Epidemiological studies have also suggested that taurine exerts preventive effects on cardiovascular diseases. The present review focuses on the effects of taurine on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In addition, the potential mechanisms by which taurine suppress the development of atherosclerosis will be discussed.

  13. The interaction of estrogen and CSE/H2S pathway in the development of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhu; Mani, Sarathi; Wu, Lingyun; Fu, Ming; Shuang, Tian; Xu, Changqing; Wang, Rui

    2017-03-01

    Both estrogen and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have been shown to inhibit the development of atherosclerosis. We previously reported that cystathionine γ-lyase knockout (CSE-KO) male mice develop atherosclerosis earlier than male wild-type (WT) mice. The present study investigated the interaction of CSE/H2S pathway and estrogen on the development of atherosclerosis in female mice. Plasma estrogen levels were significantly lower in female CSE-KO mice than in female WT mice. NaHS treatment had no effect on plasma estrogen levels in both WT and CSE-KO female mice. After CSE-KO and WT female mice were fed with atherogenic diet for 12 wk, plasma lipid levels were significantly increased and triglyceride levels decreased compared with those of control diet-fed mice. Atherogenic diet induced more atherosclerotic lesion, oxidative stress, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and NF-κB in CSE-KO mice than in WT mice. Estrogen treatment of atherogenic diet-fed WT mice attenuated hypercholesterolemia, oxidative stress, ICAM-1 expression, and NF-κB in WT mice but not in atherogenic diet-fed CSE-KO mice. Furthermore, H2S production in both the liver and vascular tissues was enhanced by estrogen in WT mice but not in CSE-KO mice. It is concluded that the antiatherosclerotic effect of estrogen is mediated by CSE-generated H2S. This study provides new insights into the interaction of H2S and estrogen signaling pathways on the regulation of cardiovascular functions.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Female cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE)-knockout mice have significantly lower plasma estrogen levels and more severe early atherosclerotic lesion than female wild-type mice. H2S production in liver and vascular tissues is enhanced by estrogen via its stimulatory effect on CSE activity. The antiatherosclerotic effect of estrogen is mediated by CSE-generated H2S.

  14. Atherosclerosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of the arteries in which fatty material is deposited in the vessel wall, ... muscle leads to symptoms such as chest pain. Atherosclerosis shows no symptoms until a complication occurs.

  15. Clopidogrel significantly lowers the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heim, Christian; Gebhardt, Julia; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Jacobi, Johannes; Weyand, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan M

    2016-05-01

    The anti-platelet drug clopidogrel has been shown to modulate adhesion molecule and cytokine expression, both playing an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of clopidogrel on the development and progression of atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) mice fed an atherogenic diet (cholesterol: 1 %) for 6 months received a daily dose of clopidogrel (1 mg/kg) by i.p. injection. Anti-platelet treatment was started immediately in one experimental group, and in another group clopidogrel was started 2 month after beginning of the atherogenic diet. Blood was analysed at days 30, 60 and 120 to monitor the lipid profile. After 6 months the aortic arch and brachiocephalic artery were analysed by Sudan IV staining for plaque size and by morphometry for luminal occlusion. Serum levels of various adhesion molecules were investigated by ELISA and the cellular infiltrate was analysed by immunofluorescence. After daily treatment with 1 mg/kg clopidogrel mice showed a significant reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in the thoracic aorta and within cross sections of the aortic arch [plaque formation 55.2 % (clopidogrel/start) vs. 76.5 % (untreated control) n = 8, P < 0.05]. After treatment with clopidogrel P-/E-selectin levels and cytokine levels of MCP-1 and PDGFβ were significantly reduced as compared to controls. The cellular infiltrate showed significantly reduced macrophage and T-cell infiltration in clopidogrel-treated animals. These results show that clopidogrel can effectively delay the development and progression of 'de-novo' atherosclerosis. However, once atherosclerotic lesions were already present, anti-platelet treatment alone did not result in reverse remodelling of these lesions.

  16. Deletion of Macrophage Vitamin D Receptor Promotes Insulin Resistance and Monocyte Cholesterol Transport to Accelerate Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisu; Riek, Amy E.; Darwech, Isra; Funai, Katsuhiko; Shao, JianSu; Chin, Kathleen; Sierra, Oscar L.; Carmeliet, Geert; Ostlund, Richard E.; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Summary Intense effort has been devoted to understanding predisposition to chronic systemic inflammation as this contributes to cardiometabolic disease. We demonstrate that deletion of the macrophage vitamin D receptor (VDR) in mice (KODMAC) is sufficient to induce insulin resistance by promoting M2 macrophage accumulation in the liver, as well as increase cytokine secretion and hepatic glucose production. Moreover, VDR deletion increases atherosclerosis by enabling lipid-laden M2 monocytes to adhere, migrate, and carry cholesterol into the atherosclerotic plaque, and by increasing macrophage cholesterol uptake and esterification. Increased foam cell formation results from lack of VDR-SERCA2b interaction, causing SERCA dysfunction, activation of ER stress-CaMKII-JNKp-PPARγ signaling, and induction of the scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-A1. BM transplant of VDR-expressing cells into KODMAC mice improved insulin sensitivity, suppressed atherosclerosis, and decreased foam cell formation. The immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D in macrophages are thus critical in diet-induced insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in mice. Graphical Abstract PMID:25801026

  17. NADPH oxidase 4 protects against development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Langbein, Heike; Brunssen, Coy; Hofmann, Anja; Cimalla, Peter; Brux, Melanie; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Deussen, Andreas; Koch, Edmund; Morawietz, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Aims Endothelial dysfunction is an early step in the development of atherosclerosis. Increased formation of superoxide anions by NADPH oxidase Nox1, 2, and 5 reduces nitric oxide availability and can promote endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, recent evidence supports a vasoprotective role of H2O2 produced by main endothelial isoform Nox4. Therefore, we analysed the impact of genetic deletion of Nox4 on endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) knockout model. Methods and results Ex vivo analysis of endothelial function by Mulvany myograph showed impaired endothelial function in thoracic aorta of Nox4−/−/Ldlr−/− mice. Further progression of endothelial dysfunction due to high-fat diet increased atherosclerotic plaque burden and galectin-3 staining in Nox4−/−/Ldlr−/− mice compared with Ldlr−/− mice. Under physiological conditions, loss of Nox4 does not influence aortic vascular function. In this setting, loss of Nox4-derived H2O2 production could be partially compensated for by nNOS upregulation. Using an innovative optical coherence tomography approach, we were able to analyse endothelial function by flow-mediated vasodilation in the murine saphenous artery in vivo. This new approach revealed an altered flow-mediated dilation in Nox4−/− mice, indicating a role for Nox4 under physiological conditions in peripheral arteries in vivo. Conclusions Nox4 plays an important role in maintaining endothelial function under physiological and pathological conditions. Loss of Nox4-derived H2O2 could be partially compensated for by nNOS upregulation, but severe endothelial dysfunction is not reversible. This leads to increased atherosclerosis under atherosclerotic prone conditions. PMID:26578199

  18. Statins attenuate the development of atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction induced by exposure to urban particulate matter (PM{sub 10})

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Hiraiwa, Kunihiko; Cheng, Jui Chih; Bai, Ni; Vincent, Renaud; Francis, Gordon A.; Sin, Don D.; Van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to ambient air particulate matter (particles less than 10 μm or PM{sub 10}) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have well-established anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of statins on the adverse functional and morphological changes in blood vessels induced by PM{sub 10}. New Zealand White rabbits fed with a high fat diet were subjected to balloon injury to their abdominal aorta followed by PM{sub 10}/saline exposure for 4 weeks ± lovastatin (5 mg/kg/day) treatment. PM{sub 10} exposure accelerated balloon catheter induced plaque formation and increased intimal macrophages and lipid accumulation while lovastatin attenuated these changes and promoted smooth muscle cell recruitment into plaques. PM{sub 10} impaired vascular acetylcholine (Ach) responses and increased vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine as assessed by wire myograph. Supplementation of nitric oxide improved the impaired Ach responses. PM{sub 10} increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in blood vessels and increased the plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1). Incubation with specific inhibitors for iNOS, COX-2 or ET-1 in the myograph chambers significantly improved the impaired vascular function. Lovastatin decreased the expression of these mediators in atherosclerotic lesions and improved endothelial dysfunction. However, lovastatin was unable to reduce blood lipid levels to the baseline level in rabbits exposed to PM{sub 10}. Taken together, statins protect against PM{sub 10}-induced cardiovascular disease by reducing atherosclerosis and improving endothelial function via their anti-inflammatory properties. - Highlights: • Coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) accelerated balloon injury-induced plaque formation. • Lovastatin decreased intimal

  19. Suppressive effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Midori; Baba, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that the cacao polyphenols, (-)-epicatechin and its oligomers, prevent in vitro and ex vivo low-density lipoprotein oxidation mediated by free radical generators and metal ions and also reduce plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice. Mice aged 8 weeks (n = 90) were randomized into three groups, and fed either normal mouse chow (controls) or chow supplemented with 0.25 or 0.40 % cacao polyphenols for 16 weeks. The mean plaque area in cross-sections of the brachiocephalic trunk was measured and found to be lower in the 0.25 % cacao polyphenol group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Pathological observations showed that accumulation of cholesterol crystals in the plaque area was greater in the control group compared with the 0.40 % cacao polyphenol group (p < 0.05). Immunochemical staining in the 0.25 and 0.40 % groups showed that expression of the cell adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1) and production of oxidative stress markers (4-hydroxynonenal, hexanoyl-lysine, and dityrosine) were reduced in cross-sections of the brachiocephalic trunk. These results suggest that cacao polyphenols inhibit the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice by reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  20. Chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure-induced atherosclerosis: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongmei; Fang, Guoqiang; Greenberg, Harly; Liu, Shu Fang

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the USA and is recognized as an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Identification of atherosclerosis risk factor attributable to OSA may provide opportunity to develop preventive measures for cardiovascular risk reduction. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a prominent feature of OSA pathophysiology and may be a major mechanism linking OSA to arteriosclerosis. Animal studies demonstrated that CIH exposure facilitated high-cholesterol diet (HCD)-induced atherosclerosis, accelerated the progression of existing atherosclerosis, and induced atherosclerotic lesions in the absence of other atherosclerosis risk factors, demonstrating that CIH is an independent causal factor of atherosclerosis. Comparative studies revealed major differences between CIH-induced and the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis. Systemically, CIH was a much weaker inducer of atherosclerosis. CIH and HCD differentially activated inflammatory pathways. Histologically, CIH-induced atherosclerotic plaques had no clear necrotic core, contained a large number of CD31+ endothelial cells, and had mainly elastin deposition, whereas HCD-induced plaques had typical necrotic cores and fibrous caps, contained few endothelial cells, and had mainly collagen deposition. Metabolically, CIH caused mild, but HCD caused more severe dyslipidemia. Mechanistically, CIH did not, but HCD did, cause macrophage foam cell formation. NF-κB p50 gene deletion augmented CIH-induced, but not HCD-induced atherosclerosis. These differences reflect the intrinsic differences between the two types of atherosclerosis in terms of pathological nature and underlying mechanisms and support the notion that CIH-induced atherosclerosis is a new paradigm that differs from the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis.

  1. Targeted Interleukin-10 Nanotherapeutics Developed with a Microfluidic Chip Enhance Resolution of Inflammation in Advanced Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kamaly, Nazila; Fredman, Gabrielle; Fojas, Jhalique Jane R; Subramanian, Manikandan; Choi, Won Ii; Zepeda, Katherine; Vilos, Cristian; Yu, Mikyung; Gadde, Suresh; Wu, Jun; Milton, Jaclyn; Carvalho Leitao, Renata; Rosa Fernandes, Livia; Hasan, Moaraj; Gao, Huayi; Nguyen, Vance; Harris, Jordan; Tabas, Ira; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2016-05-24

    Inflammation is an essential protective biological response involving a coordinated cascade of signals between cytokines and immune signaling molecules that facilitate return to tissue homeostasis after acute injury or infection. However, inflammation is not effectively resolved in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and can lead to tissue damage and exacerbation of the underlying condition. Therapeutics that dampen inflammation and enhance resolution are currently of considerable interest, in particular those that temper inflammation with minimal host collateral damage. Here we present the development and efficacy investigations of controlled-release polymeric nanoparticles incorporating the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10) for targeted delivery to atherosclerotic plaques. Nanoparticles were nanoengineered via self-assembly of biodegradable polyester polymers by nanoprecipitation using a rapid micromixer chip capable of producing nanoparticles with retained IL-10 bioactivity post-exposure to organic solvent. A systematic combinatorial approach was taken to screen nanoparticles, resulting in an optimal bioactive formulation from in vitro and ex vivo studies. The most potent nanoparticle termed Col-IV IL-10 NP22 significantly tempered acute inflammation in a self-limited peritonitis model and was shown to be more potent than native IL-10. Furthermore, the Col-IV IL-10 nanoparticles prevented vulnerable plaque formation by increasing fibrous cap thickness and decreasing necrotic cores in advanced lesions of high fat-fed LDLr(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate the efficacy and pro-resolving potential of this engineered nanoparticle for controlled delivery of the potent IL-10 cytokine for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  2. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  3. Accelerating development of advanced inverters :

    SciTech Connect

    Neely, Jason C.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ropp, Michael; Schutz, Dustin

    2013-11-01

    The high penetration of utility interconnected photovoltaic (PV) systems is causing heightened concern over the effect that variable renewable generation will have on the electrical power system (EPS). These concerns have initiated the need to amend the utility interconnection standard to allow advanced inverter control functionalities that provide: (1) reactive power control for voltage support, (2) real power control for frequency support and (3) better tolerance of grid disturbances. These capabilities are aimed at minimizing the negative impact distributed PV systems may have on EPS voltage and frequency. Unfortunately, these advanced control functions may interfere with island detection schemes, and further development of advanced inverter functions requires a study of the effect of advanced functions on the efficacy of antiislanding schemes employed in industry. This report summarizes the analytical, simulation and experimental work to study interactions between advanced inverter functions and anti-islanding schemes being employed in distributed PV systems.

  4. Accelerated Leadership Development: Fast Tracking School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter; Jones, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    "Accelerated Leadership Development" captures and communicates the lessons learned from successful fast-track leadership programmes in the private and public sector, and provides a model which schools can follow and customize as they plan their own leadership development strategies. As large numbers of headteachers and other senior staff…

  5. Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder Predispose Youth to Accelerated Atherosclerosis and Early Cardiovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Benjamin I; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Matthews, Karen A; McIntyre, Roger S; Miller, Gregory E; Raghuveer, Geetha; Stoney, Catherine M; Wasiak, Hank; McCrindle, Brian W

    2015-09-08

    In the 2011 "Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents," several medical conditions among youth were identified that predispose to accelerated atherosclerosis and early cardiovascular disease (CVD), and risk stratification and management strategies for youth with these conditions were elaborated. Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) among youth satisfy the criteria set for, and therefore merit inclusion among, Expert Panel tier II moderate-risk conditions. The combined prevalence of MDD and BD among adolescents in the United States is ≈10%, at least 10 times greater than the prevalence of the existing moderate-risk conditions combined. The high prevalence of MDD and BD underscores the importance of positioning these diseases alongside other pediatric diseases previously identified as moderate risk for CVD. The overall objective of this statement is to increase awareness and recognition of MDD and BD among youth as moderate-risk conditions for early CVD. To achieve this objective, the primary specific aims of this statement are to (1) summarize evidence that MDD and BD are tier II moderate-risk conditions associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and early CVD and (2) position MDD and BD as tier II moderate-risk conditions that require the application of risk stratification and management strategies in accordance with Expert Panel recommendations. In this scientific statement, there is an integration of the various factors that putatively underlie the association of MDD and BD with CVD, including pathophysiological mechanisms, traditional CVD risk factors, behavioral and environmental factors, and psychiatric medications.

  6. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors Reduce the Development of Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ulu, Arzu; Davis, Benjamin B.; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Kim, In-Hae; Morisseau, Christophe; Inceoglu, Bora; Fiehn, Oliver; Hammock, Bruce D.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine whether sEH inhibitors influence atherosclerotic lesion formation, we utilized an established murine model of accelerated atherogenesis, ApoE knockout (−/−) mice. The sEH inhibitor, 1-adamantan-3-(5-(2-(2-ethylethoxy)ethoxy)pentyl)urea (AEPU) was delivered in drinking water. All animals were fed an atherogenic diet while simultaneously infused with angiotensin II by osmotic minipump to induce atherosclerosis. In AEPU-treated animals, there was a 53% reduction in atherosclerotic lesions in the descending aortae as compared to control aortae. AEPU and its major metabolites were detected in the plasma of animals which received it. As expected from the inhibition of sEH, a significant increase in linoleic and arachidonic acid epoxides, as well as an increase in individual 11,12-EET/DHET and 14,15-EET/DHET ratios, were observed. The reduction in atherosclerotic lesion area was inversely correlated with 11,12- and 14,15- EET/DHET ratios, suggesting that the reduction corresponds to the inhibition of sEH. Our data suggest that orally-available sEH inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:18791465

  7. High average power linear induction accelerator development

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, J.R.; Adler, R.J.

    1987-07-01

    There is increasing interest in linear induction accelerators (LIAs) for applications including free electron lasers, high power microwave generators and other types of radiation sources. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed LIA technology in combination with magnetic pulse compression techniques to achieve very impressive performance levels. In this paper we will briefly discuss the LIA concept and describe our development program. Our goals are to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of LIA systems. An accelerator is presently under construction to demonstrate these improvements at an energy of 1.6 MeV in 2 kA, 65 ns beam pulses at an average beam power of approximately 30 kW. The unique features of this system are a low cost accelerator design and an SCR-switched, magnetically compressed, pulse power system. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits development of atherosclerosis through up-regulating protein S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Chen, Yulong; Zhu, Ninghong; Zhao, Sihai; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous signaling molecule that serves many important regulatory roles in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. H2S exerts an anti-atherosclerotic effect through mediating the biological functions of nitric oxide (NO). However, its mechanism of action is unclear. The purpose of this study is to explore the effect mechanism of H2S on the development of atherosclerosis with regard to protein S-nitrosylation. A total of 45 male apoE(-/-) mice were randomly divided into three groups. Atherosclerosis was induced by Western diet (21% fat and 0.15% cholesterol) with/without administration of a H2S donor (NaHS) or an endogenous cystathionine γ-lyase inhibitor (d, l-propargylglycine) for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, plasma lipid and plasma NO levels were measured. Aortic gross lesion area and histopathological features of aortic lesion were determined. Additionally, the level of S-nitrosylated proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was detected using immunofluorescence in aorta. Rat VSMCs were performed in an in vitro experiment. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression, NO generation, protein S-nitrosylation, and cell proliferation and migration were measured. We found that H2S significantly reduced the aortic atherosclerotic lesion area (P=0.006) and inhibited lipid and macrophage accumulation (P=0.004, P=0.002) and VSMC proliferation (P=0.019) in apoE(-/-) mice. H2S could up-regulate levels of plasma NO and protein S-nitrosylation in aorta VSMCs. However, d, l- propargylglycine had the opposite effect, increasing the lesion area and the content of lipids and macrophages in the lesions of apoE(-/-) mice and down-regulating plasma NO levels and protein S-nitrosylation in aorta VSMCs. In vitro experiments, H2S could significantly reverse the reduction of iNOS expression and NO generation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein in VSMCs. Moreover, H2S could increase the protein S

  9. Inhibition of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase by guava tea leaves prevents development of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Otsuki, Akemi; Mori, Yoshiko; Kawakami, Yuki; Ito, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the crucial steps for atherosclerosis development, and an essential role of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase expressed in macrophages in this process has been demonstrated. The biochemical mechanism of the oxidation of circulating LDL by leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase in macrophages has been proposed. The major ingredients in guava tea leaves which inhibited the catalytic activity of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase were quercetin and ethyl gallate. Administration of extracts from guava tea leaves to apoE-deficient mice significantly attenuated atherogenic lesions in the aorta and aortic sinus. We recently showed that Qing Shan Lu Shui inhibited the catalytic activity of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase. The major components inhibiting the enzyme contained in Qing Shan Lu Shui were identified to be novel monoterpene glycosides. The anti-atherogenic effect of the tea leaves might be attributed to the inhibition of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase by these components.

  10. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  11. Target and accelerator developments at CTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvord, C. W.; Mendez, A. J.; Wittner, D. E.

    2001-07-01

    The accelerator products marketed by CTI have exclusively focused on proton-only, low energy (11 MeV) designs. This choice best suited the research customer, interested in producing several doses a day of a variety of positron emitting compounds. The PET cyclotron market has evolved into a high output, cost driven, competitive radiotracer production environment. A thoughtful analysis of the choices of energy and particle reveals that an 11 MeV proton accelerator outfitted with target changers and automated target loading and unloading equipment is still the best choice for FDG distribution. However technological innovations are required to face the challenges of the rapidly growing PET radiotracer business. Modifications to the CTI line of accelerators developed to face this evolving need will be presented.

  12. [Atherosclerosis. Old problem, new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Cortez, J

    2000-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of mortality in the population of the, so called, developed countries of western culture. Since the first half of this century, hypercholesterolemia was the hallmark for the investigation of atherosclerosis, improving the level of knowledge about the complex metabolism of lipoproteins. The occurrence of atherosclerosis in normolipidaemic subjects, and the relationship between this illness, other dysmetabolic features and certain infectious agents, led to the reformulation, in the last decade, of the pathophysiological archtypes, atherosclerosis was included in the group of the inflammatory processes. The inflammatory response to aggression of the arterial wall is the innovative issue of atherosclerosis investigation and laboratory follow-up in the new millennium.

  13. Accelerated vaccine development against emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Pierre R; Yuan, Jianping; Brauns, Tim; Gelfand, Jeffrey A; Poznansky, Mark C

    2012-07-01

    Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases represent a major challenge to vaccine development since it involves two seemingly contradictory requirements. Rapid and flexible vaccine generation while using technologies and processes that can facilitate accelerated regulatory review. Development in the "-omics" in combination with advances in vaccinology offer novel opportunities to meet these requirements. Here we describe how a consortium of five different organizations from academia and industry is addressing these challenges. This novel approach has the potential to become the new standard in vaccine development allowing timely deployment to avert potential pandemics.

  14. Curcuma oil attenuates accelerated atherosclerosis and macrophage foam-cell formation by modulating genes involved in plaque stability, lipid homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishal; Rana, Minakshi; Jain, Manish; Singh, Niharika; Naqvi, Arshi; Malasoni, Richa; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-14

    In the present study, the anti-atherosclerotic effect and the underlying mechanism of curcuma oil (C. oil), a lipophilic fraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), was evaluated in a hamster model of accelerated atherosclerosis and in THP-1 macrophages. Male golden Syrian hamsters were subjected to partial carotid ligation (PCL) or FeCl3-induced arterial oxidative injury (Ox-injury) after 1 week of treatment with a high-cholesterol (HC) diet or HC diet plus C. oil (100 and 300 mg/kg, orally). Hamsters fed with the HC diet were analysed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks following carotid injury. The HC diet plus C. oil-fed group was analysed at 5 weeks. In hyperlipidaemic hamsters with PCL or Ox-injury, C. oil (300 mg/kg) reduced elevated plasma and aortic lipid levels, arterial macrophage accumulation, and stenosis when compared with those subjected to arterial injury alone. Similarly, elevated mRNA transcripts of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, cluster of differentiation 45 (CD45), TNF-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β and IL-6 were reduced in atherosclerotic arteries, while those of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and IL-10 were increased after the C. oil treatment (300 mg/kg). The treatment with C. oil prevented HC diet- and oxidised LDL (OxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation, decreased the mRNA expression of CD68 and CD36, and increased the mRNA expression of PPARα, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 in both hyperlipidaemic hamster-derived peritoneal and THP-1 macrophages. The administration of C. oil suppressed the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ and increased the expression of TGF-β in peritoneal macrophages. In THP-1 macrophages, C. oil supplementation prevented OxLDL-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β and increased the levels of TGF-β. The present study shows that C. oil attenuates arterial injury-induced accelerated atherosclerosis, inflammation and macrophage foam-cell formation.

  15. Developing acceleration schedules for NDCX-II

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.A.; Waldron, W.L.

    2008-08-01

    The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy-Ion Fusion Science is developing a physics design for NDCX-II, an experiment to study warm dense matter heated by ions near the Bragg-peak energy. Present plans call for using about thirty induction cells to accelerate 30 nC of Li+ ions to more than 3 MeV, followed by neutralized drift-compression. To heat targets to useful temperatures, the beam must be compressed to a millimeter-scale radius and a duration of about 1 ns. An interactive 1-D particle-in-cell simulation with an electrostatic field solver, acceleration-gap fringe fields, and a library of realizable analytic waveforms has been used for developing NDCX-II acceleration schedules. Axisymmetric simulations with WARP have validated this 1-D model and have been used both to design transverse focusing and to compensate for injection non-uniformities and radial variation of the fields. Highlights of this work are presented here.

  16. Accelerator Structure Development for NLC/GLC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J

    2004-03-05

    The NLC (Next Linear Collider) and GLC (Global Linear Collider) [1,2] are e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider proposals based on room-temperature accelerator technology--so called ''warm machines'' in comparison with the TESLA ''cold machine'' that is based on superconducting accelerator technology. There have been two major challenges in developing X-band (11.4 GHz) accelerator structures for the GLC/NLC. The first is to demonstrate stable, long-term operation at the high gradient (65 MV/m) that is required to optimize the machine cost. The second is to strongly suppress the beam induced long-range wakefields, which is required to achieve high luminosity. The development of high gradient structures has been a high priority in recent years. Nearly thirty X-band structures with various rf parameters, cavity shapes and coupler types have been fabricated and tested since 2000. This program has been a successful collaborative effort among groups at SLAC, KEK, FNAL and other labs. A summary of the main achievements and experiences are presented in this paper as well as a status report on the structure design, high power performance, manufacturing techniques, and other structure related issues.

  17. Protective Autoimmunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. It is accompanied by an autoimmune response against ApoB100, the core protein of LDL, which manifests as CD4 T cell and antibody responses. Approach and Results To assess the role of the autoimmune response in atherosclerosis, the nature of the CD4 T cell response against ApoB100 was studied with and without vaccination with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides. The immunological basis of autoimmunity in atherosclerosis is discussed in the framework of theories of adaptive immunity. Older vaccination approaches are also discussed. Vaccinating Apoe−/− mice with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides reduces atheroma burden in the aorta by ~40%. The protective mechanism likely includes secretion of IL-10. Conclusion Protective autoimmunity limits atherosclerosis in mice and suggests potential for developing preventative and therapeutic vaccines for humans. PMID:26821946

  18. [Epigenetics in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Montse; Vallvé, Joan C; Zaina, Silvio; Ribalta, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The association studies based on candidate genes carried on for decades have helped in visualizing the influence of the genetic component in complex diseases such as atherosclerosis, also showing the interaction between different genes and environmental factors. Even with all the knowledge accumulated, there is still some way to go to decipher the individual predisposition to disease, and if we consider the great influence that environmental factors play in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, epigenetics is presented as a key element in trying to expand our knowledge on individual predisposition to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Epigenetics can be described as the discipline that studies the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, independent of changes in the sequence of DNA, and mostly induced by environmental factors. This review aims to describe what epigenetics is and how epigenetic mechanisms are involved in atherosclerosis.

  19. Guidelines for Developing an Academic Acceleration Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colangelo, Nicholas; Assouline, Susan G.; Marron, Maureen A.; Castellano, Jaime A.; Clinkenbeard, Pamela R.; Rogers, Karen; Calvert, Eric; Malek, Rosanne; Smith, Donnajo

    2010-01-01

    As an educational intervention, acceleration is decidedly effective for high-ability students. The research support for acceleration that has accumulated over many decades is robust and consistent and allows us to confidently state that carefully planned acceleration decisions are successful. Both grade-based and content-based acceleration are…

  20. ABCA12 regulates ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux from macrophages and the development of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Mukhamedova, Nigora; Ip, Sally; D'Souza, Wilissa; Henley, Katya J; DiTommaso, Tia; Kesani, Rajitha; Ditiatkovski, Michael; Jones, Lynelle; Lane, Rachael M; Jennings, Garry; Smyth, Ian M; Kile, Benjamin T; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2013-08-06

    ABCA12 is involved in the transport of ceramides in skin, but it may play a wider role in lipid metabolism. We show that, in Abca12-deficient macrophages, cholesterol efflux failed to respond to activation with LXR agonists. Abca12 deficiency caused a reduction in the abundance of Abca1, Abcg1, and Lxrβ. Overexpression of Lxrβ reversed the effects. Mechanistically, Abca12 deficiency did not affect expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Instead, a physical association between Abca1, Abca12, and Lxrβ proteins was established. Abca12 deficiency enhanced interaction between Abca1 and Lxrβ and the degradation of Abca1. Overexpression of ABCA12 in HeLa-ABCA1 cells increased the abundance and stability of ABCA1. Abca12 deficiency caused an accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages and the formation of foam cells, impaired reverse cholesterol transport in vivo, and increased the development of atherosclerosis in irradiated Apoe(-/-) mice reconstituted with Apoe(-/-)Abca12(-/-) bone marrow. Thus, ABCA12 regulates the cellular cholesterol metabolism via an LXRβ-dependent posttranscriptional mechanism.

  1. Autoimmune atherosclerosis in 3D: How it develops, how to diagnose and what to do.

    PubMed

    Szekanecz, Zoltán; Kerekes, György; Végh, Edit; Kardos, Zsófia; Baráth, Zsuzsa; Tamási, László; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been associated with autoimmune atherosclerosis leading to increased cardiovascular risk. Traditional risk factors, genetics, as well as the role of systemic inflammation including inflammatory cells, cytokines, chemokines, proteases, autoantibodies, adhesion receptors and others have been implicated in the development of these vascular pathologies. Cardiovascular risk may be determined by the use of currently available tools. In addition, non-invasive assessment of vascular pathophysiology by imaging, as well as laboratory biomarkers can help to refine risk assessment. With respect to prevention and therapy, traditional vasculoprotection using statins, ACE inhibitors, aspirin should be applied to patients at risk. Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and corticosteroids may be pro-atherogenic, on the other hand, they may also be beneficial due to their anti-inflammatory nation. Traditional and biologic DMARDs may have significant vascular and metabolic effects. Decreasing inflammatory activity by any of these agents may lead to better CV outcome. The official EULAR recommendations on the assessment and management of cardiovascular disease in arthritides may guide the rheumatologist during the process of CV screening, prevention and treatment.

  2. Nutrition and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Nimbe; Guevara-Cruz, Martha; Velázquez-Villegas, Laura A; Tovar, Armando R

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a universal problem in modern society. Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of CVD resulting in high rate of mortality in the population. Nutrition science has focused on the role of essential nutrients in preventing deficiencies, at the present time, the nutritional strategies are crucial to promote health and intervene with these global noncommunicable diseases. In many cases, diet is a major driving force, which is much easier to change and follow than other factors. It is important to establish that the first strategy to treat atherosclerosis is to modify lifestyle habits, focusing on the beneficial properties of specific nutrients. In the last decades, epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that diet plays a central role in the prevention of atherosclerosis. In this review we will focus on the effect of specific foods, nutrients and bioactive compounds, including epidemiological facts, potential mechanisms of action and dietary recommendations to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis. In particular, we include information about fiber, plant sterols and stanols, niacin, taurine, olive oil, omega 3 fatty acids, antioxidants, minerals, methyl nutrients and soy. In addition, we also show that dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota associated with a consumption of certain animal food sources can generate some metabolites that are involved in the development of atherosclerosis and its consequences on CVD. According to the epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies we suggest a recommendation for some dietary foods, nutrients and bioactive compounds to support the complementary clinical management of patients with atherosclerosis.

  3. Metabolomic analyses for atherosclerosis, diabetes, and obesity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, and atherosclerosis is a global health problem. A portfolio of abnormalities of metabolic and vascular homeostasis accompanies T2DM and obesity, which are believed to conspire to lead to accelerated atherosclerosis and premature death. The complexity of metabolic changes in the diseases presents challenges for a full understanding of the molecular pathways contributing to the development of these diseases. The recent advent of new technologies in this area termed “Metabolomics” may aid in comprehensive metabolic analysis of these diseases. Therefore, metabolomics has been extensively applied to the metabolites of T2DM, obesity, and atherosclerosis not only for the assessment of disease development and prognosis, but also for the biomarker discovery of disease diagnosis. Herein, we summarize the recent applications of metabolomics technology and the generated datasets in the metabolic profiling of these diseases, in particular, the applications of these technologies to these diseases at the cellular, animal models, and human disease levels. In addition, we also extensively discuss the mechanisms linking the metabolic profiling in insulin resistance, T2DM, obesity, and atherosclerosis, with a particular emphasis on potential roles of increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria dysfunctions. PMID:24252331

  4. Antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidant efficacies of zerumbone on the formation, development, and establishment of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hemn, Hassan Othman; Noordin, Muhammad Mustapha; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Hazilawati, Hamza; Zuki, Abubakr; Chartrand, Max Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the high incidence of cholesterol-induced cardiovascular disease, particularly atherosclerosis, the current study was designed to investigate the preventive and therapeutic efficacies of dietary zerumbone (ZER) supplementation on the formation and development of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with a high cholesterol diet. A total of 72 New Zealand white rabbits were divided randomly on two experimental studies carried out 8 weeks apart. The first experiment was designed to investigate the prophylactic efficacy of ZER in preventing early developed atheromatous lesion. The second experimental trial was aimed at investigating the therapeutic effect of ZER in reducing the atherosclerotic lesion progression and establishment. Sudanophilia, histopathological, and ultrastructural changes showed pronounced reduction in the plaque size in ZER-medicated aortas. On the other hand, dietary supplementation of ZER for almost 10 weeks as a prophylactic measure indicated substantially decreasing lipid profile values, and similarly, plaque size in comparison with high-cholesterol non-supplemented rabbits. Furthermore, the results of oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarker evaluation indicated that ZER is a potent antioxidant in suppressing the generation of free radicals in terms of atherosclerosis prevention and treatment. ZER significantly reduced the value of malondialdehyde and augmented the value of superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, our data indicated that dietary supplementation of ZER at doses of 8, 16, and 20 mg/kg alone as a prophylactic measure, and as a supplementary treatment with simvastatin, significantly reduced early plague formation, development, and establishment via significant reduction in serum lipid profile, together with suppression of oxidative damage, and therefore alleviated atherosclerosis lesions. PMID:26347047

  5. Vanguard industrial linear accelerator rapid product development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harroun, Jim

    1994-07-01

    Siemens' ability to take the VanguardTM Industrial Linear Accelerator from the development stage to the market place in less than two years is described. Emphasis is on the development process, from the business plan through the shipment of the first commercial sale. Included are discussions on the evolution of the marketing specifications, with emphasis on imaging system requirements, as well as flexibility for expansion into other markets. Requirements used to create the engineering specifications, how they were incorporated into the design, and lessons learned from the demonstration system are covered. Some real-life examples of unanticipated problems are presented, as well as how they were resolved, including some discussion of the special problems encountered in developing a user interface and a training program for an international customer.

  6. Efficacy of bioactive compounds from extra virgin olive oil to modulate atherosclerosis development.

    PubMed

    Lou-Bonafonte, José M; Arnal, Carmen; Navarro, María A; Osada, Jesús

    2012-07-01

    As olive oil is the main source of calories in the Mediterranean diet, a great deal of research has been devoted to characterizing its role in atherosclerosis. Virgin olive oil is an oily matrix that contains hydrocarbons, mainly squalene; triterpenes such as uvaol, erythrodiol, oleanolic, and maslinic acid; phytosterols; and a wide range of phenolic compounds comprising simple phenols, flavonoids, secoiridoids, and lignans. In this review, we analyze the studies dealing with atherosclerosis and olive oil in several species. A protective role of virgin olive oil against atherosclerosis has been shown in ApoE-deficient mice and hamsters. In the former animal, sex, dose, and dietary cholesterol are modulators of the outcome. Contradictory findings have been reported for rabbits, a circumstance that could be due to the profusion of experimental designs, differing in terms of doses and animal strains, as well as sources of olive oils. This role has yet to be fully validated in humans. Minor components of olive oil have been shown to be involved in atherosclerosis protection. Nevertheless, evidence of the potential of isolated compounds or the right combination of them to achieve the antiatherosclerotic effect of virgin olive oil is inconclusive and will undoubtedly require further experimental support.

  7. Developments in accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1985-05-01

    The long term goal of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is the development of an accelerator with the large beam power, large beam stored-energy, and high brightness needed to implode small deuterium-tritium capsules for fusion power. While studies of an rf linac/storage ring combination as an inertial fusion driver continue in Japan and Europe, the US program in recent times has concentrated on the study of the suitability of linear induction acceleration of ions for this purpose. Novel features required include use of multiple beams, beam current amplification in the linac, and manipulation of long beam bunches with a large velocity difference between head and tail. Recent experiments with an intense bright beam of cesium ions have established that much higher currents can be transported in a long quadrupole system than was believed possible a few years ago. A proof-of-principle ion induction linac to demonstrate beam current amplification with multiple beams is at present being fabricated at LBL. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Sulforaphane attenuates the development of atherosclerosis and improves endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Suddek, Ghada M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to explore possible protective effects of sulforaphane (SFN) against atherosclerosis development and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Rabbits were assigned to three groups of five: group I fed normal chow diet for four weeks, group II fed 1% high cholesterol diet (HCD) and group III fed HCD + SFN (0.25 mg/kg/day). Blood samples were collected for measurement of serum triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Aortic malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) were measured. Vascular reactivity and intima/media (I/M) ratio were analyzed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in aortic endothelial cells was identified immunohistochemically. HCD induced significant increases in serum TGs, TC, LDL-C, LDH, and CRP, and aortic MDA and SOD. Moreover, HCD caused significant reductions in serum HDL-C, aortic GSH and NOx. SFN administration significantly decreased HCD-induced elevations in serum TC, LDL-C, CRP, and LDH. while significantly increased HDL-C and GSH levels and normalized aortic SOD and NOx. Additionally, SFN significantly improved rabbit aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. Moreover, SFN significantly reduced the elevation in I/M ratio. This effect was confirmed by aortic histopathologic examination. The expression of NF-κB in aortic tissue showed a marked reduction upon treatment with SFN. In conclusion, this study reveals that SFN has the ability to ameliorate HCD-induced atherosclerotic lesions progression and vascular dysfunction, possibly via its lipid-lowering and antioxidant effects and suppression of NF-κB-mediated inflammation. PMID:26490346

  9. A novel in vitro model for the study of plaque development in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dorweiler, Bernhard; Torzewski, Michael; Dahm, Manfred; Ochsenhirt, Viola; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Lackner, Karl J; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich

    2006-01-01

    For the study of atherogenesis in vitro, coculture systems have been devised, in which two or more cell types can be cultured in close contact to each other. Herein, we describe a novel in vitro model that aims at the simulation of the morphology of a normal muscular artery allowing for the study of the initial events in atherosclerosis. Using a modified fibrin gel as a scaffold for the coculture of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), we generated an autologous in vitro model with a multilayer growth of SMCs (intima-like structure) covered by an endothelium. The production of extracellular matrix (ECM) could be visualized histologically and verified by (i) ascorbic-acid dependent secretion of procollagen I into the supernatant and (ii) deposition of collagens I and III as well as laminin in the gel as assessed by immunohistochemistry. By BrdU-incorporation and Ki67 expression, the SMCs exhibited minimal proliferative activity, even when the culture period was extended to 6 weeks. Lipoprotein insudation was investigated under simulated hypo-, normo- and hypercholesterolemic conditions through addition of 0.5, 1 or 2 mg/mL LDL to the medium with subsequent time and dose dependent insudation of LDL. When human monocytes were added to the culture medium, infiltration and foam cell formation of macrophages and SMCs as well as expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) was demonstrated. The in vitro model of the human vascular wall described herein appears to be suitable for the study of pivotal events in atherosclerotic plaque development. The applicability for long-term culture, the ability to study cell-matrix interactions and the opportunities for histomorphological and immunohistochemical examinations represent additional advantages of this model.

  10. Neutron Diagnostic Development for the Z Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Kelly; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Jones, B.; Gomez, M. R.; Knapp, P. F.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Norris, E.; Torres, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Frenje, J.; Lahmann, B.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Fittinghoff, D.; May, M.; Snyder, L.; Moy, K.; Buckles, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    We are studying Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) and Gas Puff fusion neutron sources on the Z accelerator. MagLIF experiments have produced up to 3e12 primary DD neutrons with 2-3 keV ion temperatures and 1-2 ns burn widths. Gas puff experiments have produced up to 5e13 primary DD neutrons with higher ion temperatures, longer burn times, and evidence of non-thermonuclear production. For MagLIF, the yield is expected to increase rapidly with increased energy coupling, yet it remains unclear if Gas Puffs would scale as attractively. We review neutron measurements for these experiments and plans for developing neutron diagnostics for these two very different sources. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits the Development of Atherosclerosis with Suppressing CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Duojiao; Zhang, Alian; Gu, Ting; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Changqian

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, as a novel gaseous mediator, has been suggested to play a key role in atherogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms by which H2S affects atherosclerosis remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the potential role of H2S in atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism with respect to chemokines (CCL2, CCL5 and CX3CL1) and chemokine receptors (CCR2, CCR5, and CX3CR1) in macrophages. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 or mouse peritoneal macrophages were pre-incubated with saline or NaHS (50 µM, 100 µM, 200 µM), an H2S donor, and then stimulated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was found that NaHS dose-dependently inhibited IFN-γ or LPS-induced CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression, as well as CX3CR1-mediated chemotaxis in macrophages. Overexpression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), an enzyme that catalyzes H2S biosynthesis resulted in a significant reduction in CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression as well as CX3CR1-mediated chemotaxis in stimulated macrophages. The inhibitory effect of H2S on CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression was mediated by modulation of proliferators-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and NF-κB pathway. Furthermore, male apoE−/− mice were fed a high-fat diet and then randomly given NaHS (1 mg/kg, i.p., daily) or DL-propargylglycine (PAG, 10 mg/kg, i.p., daily). NaHS significantly inhibited aortic CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression and impeded aortic plaque development. NaHS had a better anti-atherogenic benefit when it was applied at the early stage of atherosclerosis. However, inhibition of H2S formation by PAG increased aortic CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression and exacerbated the extent of atherosclerosis. In addition, H2S had minimal effect on the expression of CCL2, CCL5, CCR2 and CCR5 in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, these data indicate that H2S hampers the progression of atherosclerosis in fat-fed apoE−/− mice and downregulates CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression on macrophages and in lesion

  12. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits the development of atherosclerosis with suppressing CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huili; Guo, Changfa; Wu, Duojiao; Zhang, Alian; Gu, Ting; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Changqian

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, as a novel gaseous mediator, has been suggested to play a key role in atherogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms by which H(2)S affects atherosclerosis remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the potential role of H(2)S in atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism with respect to chemokines (CCL2, CCL5 and CX3CL1) and chemokine receptors (CCR2, CCR5, and CX3CR1) in macrophages. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 or mouse peritoneal macrophages were pre-incubated with saline or NaHS (50 µM, 100 µM, 200 µM), an H(2)S donor, and then stimulated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was found that NaHS dose-dependently inhibited IFN-γ or LPS-induced CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression, as well as CX3CR1-mediated chemotaxis in macrophages. Overexpression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), an enzyme that catalyzes H(2)S biosynthesis resulted in a significant reduction in CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression as well as CX3CR1-mediated chemotaxis in stimulated macrophages. The inhibitory effect of H(2)S on CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression was mediated by modulation of proliferators-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and NF-κB pathway. Furthermore, male apoE(-/-) mice were fed a high-fat diet and then randomly given NaHS (1 mg/kg, i.p., daily) or DL-propargylglycine (PAG, 10 mg/kg, i.p., daily). NaHS significantly inhibited aortic CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression and impeded aortic plaque development. NaHS had a better anti-atherogenic benefit when it was applied at the early stage of atherosclerosis. However, inhibition of H(2)S formation by PAG increased aortic CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression and exacerbated the extent of atherosclerosis. In addition, H(2)S had minimal effect on the expression of CCL2, CCL5, CCR2 and CCR5 in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, these data indicate that H(2)S hampers the progression of atherosclerosis in fat-fed apoE(-/-) mice and downregulates CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression on macrophages and in

  13. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) development ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is increasingly being adopted as a tool for organizing and summarizing the mechanistic information connecting molecular perturbations by environmental stressors with adverse outcomes relevant for ecological and human health outcomes. However, the conventional process for assembly of these AOPs is time and resource intensive, and has been a rate limiting step for AOP use and development. Therefore computational approaches to accelerate the process need to be developed. We previously developed a method for generating computationally predicted AOPs (cpAOPs) by association mining and integration of data from publicly available databases. In this work, a cpAOP network of ~21,000 associations was established between 105 phenotypes from TG-GATEs rat liver data from different time points (including microarray, pathological effects and clinical chemistry data), 994 REACTOME pathways, 688 High-throughput assays from ToxCast and 194 chemicals. A second network of 128,536 associations was generated by connecting 255 biological target genes from ToxCast to 4,980 diseases from CTD using either HT screening activity from ToxCast for 286 chemicals or CTD gene expression changes in response to 2,330 chemicals. Both networks were separately evaluated through manual extraction of disease-specific cpAOPs and comparison with expert curation of the relevant literature. By employing data integration strategies that involve the weighting of n

  14. Molecular imaging in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Slart, Riemer H J A; Bozzao, Alessandro; Bonanno, Elena; Arca, Marcello; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, which still has the leading position in morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Many risk factors and pathobiological processes are acting together in the development of atherosclerosis. This leads to different remodelling stages (positive and negative) which are both associated with plaque physiology and clinical presentation. The different remodelling stages of atherosclerosis are explained with their clinical relevance. Recent advances in basic science have established that atherosclerosis is not only a lipid storage disease, but that also inflammation has a fundamental role in all stages of the disease. The molecular events leading to atherosclerosis will be extensively reviewed and described. Further on in this review different modalities and their role in the different stages of atherosclerosis will be discussed. Non-nuclear invasive imaging techniques (intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, intracoronary angioscopy and intravascular optical coherence tomography) and non-nuclear non-invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound with Doppler flow, electron-bean computed tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography, MRI and coronary artery MR angiography) will be reviewed. After that we focus on nuclear imaging techniques for detecting atherosclerotic plaques, divided into three groups: atherosclerotic lesion components, inflammation and thrombosis. This emerging area of nuclear imaging techniques can provide measures of biological activity of atherosclerotic plaques, thereby improving the prediction of clinical events. As we will see in the future perspectives, at present, there is no special tracer that can be called the diagnostic tool to diagnose prospective stroke or infarction in patients. Nevertheless, we expect such a tracer to be developed in the next few years and maybe, theoretically, it could even be used for targeted therapy (in the form of a beta-emitter) to combat

  15. Imaging Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tarkin, Jason M.; Dweck, Marc R.; Evans, Nicholas R.; Takx, Richard A.P.; Brown, Adam J.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in atherosclerosis imaging technology and research have provided a range of diagnostic tools to characterize high-risk plaque in vivo; however, these important vascular imaging methods additionally promise great scientific and translational applications beyond this quest. When combined with conventional anatomic- and hemodynamic-based assessments of disease severity, cross-sectional multimodal imaging incorporating molecular probes and other novel noninvasive techniques can add detailed interrogation of plaque composition, activity, and overall disease burden. In the catheterization laboratory, intravascular imaging provides unparalleled access to the world beneath the plaque surface, allowing tissue characterization and measurement of cap thickness with micrometer spatial resolution. Atherosclerosis imaging captures key data that reveal snapshots into underlying biology, which can test our understanding of fundamental research questions and shape our approach toward patient management. Imaging can also be used to quantify response to therapeutic interventions and ultimately help predict cardiovascular risk. Although there are undeniable barriers to clinical translation, many of these hold-ups might soon be surpassed by rapidly evolving innovations to improve image acquisition, coregistration, motion correction, and reduce radiation exposure. This article provides a comprehensive review of current and experimental atherosclerosis imaging methods and their uses in research and potential for translation to the clinic. PMID:26892971

  16. Accelerated Application Development: The ORNL Titan Experience

    DOE PAGES

    Joubert, Wayne; Archibald, Richard K.; Berrill, Mark A.; ...

    2015-05-09

    The use of computational accelerators such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi processors is now widespread in the high performance computing community, with many applications delivering impressive performance gains. However, programming these systems for high performance, performance portability and software maintainability has been a challenge. In this paper we discuss experiences porting applications to the Titan system. Titan, which began planning in 2009 and was deployed for general use in 2013, was the first multi-petaflop system based on accelerator hardware. To ready applications for accelerated computing, a preparedness effort was undertaken prior to delivery of Titan. In this papermore » we report experiences and lessons learned from this process and describe how users are currently making use of computational accelerators on Titan.« less

  17. Accelerated Application Development: The ORNL Titan Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Wayne; Archibald, Richard K.; Berrill, Mark A.; Brown, W. Michael; Eisenbach, Markus; Grout, Ray; Larkin, Jeff; Levesque, John; Messer, Bronson; Norman, Matthew R.; Philip, Bobby; Sankaran, Ramanan; Tharrington, Arnold N.; Turner, John A.

    2015-05-09

    The use of computational accelerators such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi processors is now widespread in the high performance computing community, with many applications delivering impressive performance gains. However, programming these systems for high performance, performance portability and software maintainability has been a challenge. In this paper we discuss experiences porting applications to the Titan system. Titan, which began planning in 2009 and was deployed for general use in 2013, was the first multi-petaflop system based on accelerator hardware. To ready applications for accelerated computing, a preparedness effort was undertaken prior to delivery of Titan. In this paper we report experiences and lessons learned from this process and describe how users are currently making use of computational accelerators on Titan.

  18. Food restriction by intermittent fasting induces diabetes and obesity and aggravates spontaneous atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolaemic mice.

    PubMed

    Dorighello, Gabriel G; Rovani, Juliana C; Luhman, Christopher J F; Paim, Bruno A; Raposo, Helena F; Vercesi, Anibal E; Oliveira, Helena C F

    2014-03-28

    Different regimens of food restriction have been associated with protection against obesity, diabetes and CVD. In the present study, we hypothesised that food restriction would bring benefits to atherosclerosis- and diabetes-prone hypercholesterolaemic LDL-receptor knockout mice. For this purpose, 2-month-old mice were submitted to an intermittent fasting (IF) regimen (fasting every other day) over a 3-month period, which resulted in an overall 20 % reduction in food intake. Contrary to our expectation, epididymal and carcass fat depots and adipocyte size were significantly enlarged by 15, 72 and 68 %, respectively, in the IF mice compared with the ad libitum-fed mice. Accordingly, plasma levels of leptin were 50 % higher in the IF mice than in the ad libitum-fed mice. In addition, the IF mice showed increased plasma levels of total cholesterol (37 %), VLDL-cholesterol (195 %) and LDL-cholesterol (50 %). As expected, in wild-type mice, the IF regimen decreased plasma cholesterol levels and epididymal fat mass. Glucose homeostasis was also disturbed by the IF regimen in LDL-receptor knockout mice. Elevated levels of glycaemia (40 %), insulinaemia (50 %), glucose intolerance and insulin resistance were observed in the IF mice. Systemic inflammatory markers, TNF-α and C-reactive protein, were significantly increased and spontaneous atherosclerosis development were markedly increased (3-fold) in the IF mice. In conclusion, the IF regimen induced obesity and diabetes and worsened the development of spontaneous atherosclerosis in LDL-receptor knockout mice. Although being efficient in a wild-type background, this type of food restriction is not beneficial in the context of genetic hypercholesterolaemia.

  19. Atherosclerosis development in SLE patients is not determined by monocytes ability to bind/endocytose Ox-LDL.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Lina M; Londoño, Julián; Montoya, Guillermo; De Sanctis, Juan B; Rojas, Mauricio; Ramírez, Luis A; García, Luis F; Vásquez, Gloria

    2011-05-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease; however, the mechanisms involved in the early onset of atherosclerosis in these patients are not clear. Scavenger receptors, CD36 and CD163 are expressed by mononuclear phagocytes and participate in the binding and uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (Ox-LDL), contributing to foam-cells formation and atherosclerosis development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate CD36(+) and CD163(+) expression and Ox-LDL removal by monocytes from SLE and atherosclerotic patients, compared to similar age-range healthy controls. Healthy controls, SLE, and atherosclerotic patients were evaluated for carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), lipid profile, and native LDL (N-LDL) and Ox-LDL binding/endocytosis. SLE patients presented decreased high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and increased Triglyceride levels, and half of the SLE patients had increased CIMT, compared to their healthy controls (HC(SLE)). The number of CD14(+)CD163(+) cells was increased in atherosclerosis healthy controls (HC(Atheros)) compared to HC(SLE), but there were no differences between SLE or atherosclerotic patients and their respective healthy controls. Clearance assays revealed a similar capacity to bind/endocytose Ox-LDL by monocytes from SLE patients and HC(SLE), and an increased binding and endocytosis of Ox-LDL by monocytes from atherosclerotic patients, compared to HC(Atheros). The decreased CD36 and CD163 expression observed in atherosclerotic and SLE patients, respectively, suggest that these inflammatory conditions modulate these receptors differentially. The increased CIMT observed in SLE patients cannot be explained by Ox-LDL binding/endocytosis, which was comparable to their controls.

  20. B Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Heather M.; Bender, Timothy P.; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease. PMID:23248624

  1. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the Australian National University's 14UD accelerator: experience and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, L. K.; Ophel, T. R.; Allan, G. L.; Bird, J. R.; Davie, R. F.

    1990-12-01

    Although the major emphasis of the joint ANU/ANSTO accelerator mass spectrometry program has been the measurement of 36Cl samples, both 14C and 10Be capabilities have been implemented recently on the 14UD accelerator. The new developments and operating experience are reviewed.

  2. Immune mechanisms in atherosclerosis, especially in diabetes type 2.

    PubMed

    Frostegård, Johan

    2013-10-29

    Atherosclerosis and ensuing cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major complications of diabetes type 2. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition involving immunocompetent cells of different types present in the lesions. Even though inflammation and immune activation may be more pronounced in atherosclerosis in diabetes type 2, there does not appear to be any major differences between diabetics and non-diabetics. Similar factors are thus implicated in atherosclerosis-associated immune activation in both groups. The cause of immune activation is not known and different mutually non-exclusive possibilities exist. Oxidized and/or enzymatically modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and dead cells are present in atherosclerotic plaques. OxLDL could play a role, being pro-inflammatory and immunostimulatory as it activates T-cells and is cytotoxic at higher concentrations. Inflammatory phospholipids in OxLDL are implicated, with phosphorylcholine (PC) as one of the exposed antigens. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) are anti-atherogenic in mouse studies, and anti-PC is negatively associated with development of atherosclerosis and CVD in humans. Bacteria and virus have been discussed as potential causes of immune activation, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence supporting this hypothesis, and antibiotic trials in humans have been negative or inconclusive. Heat shock proteins (HSP) could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and also lipid mediators as leukotrienes. In addition, in diabetes, hyperglycemia and oxidative stress appear to accelerate the development of atherosclerosis, one mechanism could be via promotion of immune reactions. To prove that immune reactions are causative of atherosclerosis and CVD, further studies with immune-modulatory treatments are needed.

  3. Gradient Echo MRI Characterization of Development of Atherosclerosis in the Abdominal Aorta in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J. Kuribayashi, Hideto; Wagberg, Maria; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tessier, Jean J.; Waterton, John C.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit provides an important model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. With a strain of WHHL rabbits which do not develop abdominal aorta lumen stenosis even with advanced atherosclerosis, we studied the MRI-histology correlation, and the natural progression of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. In addition, intra-reader segmentation repeatability and scan-rescan reproducibility were assessed. Methods. Two batches of female WHHL rabbits were used. The first batch of 6 rabbits was scanned at 20 weeks old. A second batch of 17 rabbits was scanned at 50 weeks old and then randomly divided into two subgroups: 8 were killed for histologic investigation; 9 were kept alive for follow-up, with repeat scanning a week later to assess scan-rescan reproducibility, and again at 73 weeks old to assess disease progression. MR images were acquired at 4.7 T using a chemical shift selective fat suppression gradient echo with a saturation band suppressing blood signal within the aortic lumen. Five slices per animal were acquired, centered around the renal artery region of the abdominal aorta, with in-plane resolution of 0.195 mm and slice thickness of 3 mm. Results. The coefficient of variation for intra-reader reproducibility for aortic wall thickness measurements was 2.5% for repeat segmentations of the same scans on the same day, but segmentations of these same scans made 8 months later showed a systematic change, suggesting that intra-reader bias as well as increased variability could compromise assessments made over time. Comparative analyses were therefore performed in one postprocessing session. The coefficient of variation for scan-rescan reproducibility for aortic wall thickness was 5.5% for nine pairs of scans acquired a week apart and segmented on the same day. Good MRI-histology correlation was obtained. The MRI-measured mean aortic wall thickness of animals at 20 weeks of age was 76% that of animals at 50 weeks of

  4. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  5. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose atherosclerosis based on ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  6. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated? Treatments for atherosclerosis may include heart-healthy ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  7. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  8. What Is Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Atherosclerosis? Español Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque ... problems, including heart attack , stroke , or even death. Atherosclerosis Figure A shows a normal artery with normal ...

  9. Inhibition of lysophosphatidic acid receptors 1 and 3 attenuates atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Kritikou, Eva; van Puijvelde, Gijs H. M.; van der Heijden, Thomas; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Swart, Maarten; Schaftenaar, Frank H.; Kröner, Mara J.; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural lysophospholipid present at high concentrations within lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques. Upon local accumulation in the damaged vessels, LPA can act as a potent activator for various types of immune cells through its specific membrane receptors LPA1/3. LPA elicits chemotactic, pro-inflammatory and apoptotic effects that lead to atherosclerotic plaque progression. In this study we aimed to inhibit LPA signaling by means of LPA1/3 antagonism using the small molecule Ki16425. We show that LPA1/3 inhibition significantly impaired atherosclerosis progression. Treatment with Ki16425 also resulted in reduced CCL2 production and secretion, which led to less monocyte and neutrophil infiltration. Furthermore, we provide evidence that LPA1/3 blockade enhanced the percentage of non-inflammatory, Ly6Clow monocytes and CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells. Finally, we demonstrate that LPA1/3 antagonism mildly reduced plasma LDL cholesterol levels. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of LPA1/3 receptors may prove a promising approach to diminish atherosclerosis development. PMID:27883026

  10. Inhibition of lysophosphatidic acid receptors 1 and 3 attenuates atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Eva; van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; van der Heijden, Thomas; van Santbrink, Peter J; Swart, Maarten; Schaftenaar, Frank H; Kröner, Mara J; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2016-11-24

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural lysophospholipid present at high concentrations within lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques. Upon local accumulation in the damaged vessels, LPA can act as a potent activator for various types of immune cells through its specific membrane receptors LPA1/3. LPA elicits chemotactic, pro-inflammatory and apoptotic effects that lead to atherosclerotic plaque progression. In this study we aimed to inhibit LPA signaling by means of LPA1/3 antagonism using the small molecule Ki16425. We show that LPA1/3 inhibition significantly impaired atherosclerosis progression. Treatment with Ki16425 also resulted in reduced CCL2 production and secretion, which led to less monocyte and neutrophil infiltration. Furthermore, we provide evidence that LPA1/3 blockade enhanced the percentage of non-inflammatory, Ly6C(low) monocytes and CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T-regulatory cells. Finally, we demonstrate that LPA1/3 antagonism mildly reduced plasma LDL cholesterol levels. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of LPA1/3 receptors may prove a promising approach to diminish atherosclerosis development.

  11. Feedback in Flow for Accelerated Reaction Development.

    PubMed

    Reizman, Brandon J; Jensen, Klavs F

    2016-09-20

    The pharmaceutical industry is investing in continuous flow and high-throughput experimentation as tools for rapid process development accelerated scale-up. Coupled with automation, these technologies offer the potential for comprehensive reaction characterization and optimization, but with the cost of conducting exhaustive multifactor screens. Automated feedback in flow offers researchers an alternative strategy for efficient characterization of reactions based on the use of continuous technology to control chemical reaction conditions and optimize in lieu of screening. Optimization with feedback allows experiments to be conducted where the most information can be gained from the chemistry, enabling product yields to be maximized and kinetic models to be generated while the total number of experiments is minimized. This Account opens by reviewing select examples of feedback optimization in flow and applications to chemical research. Systems in the literature are classified into (i) deterministic "black box" optimization systems that do not model the reaction system and are therefore limited in the utility of results for scale-up, (ii) deterministic model-based optimization systems from which reaction kinetics and/or mechanisms can be automatically evaluated, and (iii) stochastic systems. Though diverse in application, flow feedback systems have predominantly focused upon the optimization of continuous variables, i.e., variables such as time, temperature, and concentration that can be ramped from one experiment to the next. Unfortunately, this implies that the screening of discrete variables such as catalyst, ligand, or solvent generally does not factor into automated flow optimization, resulting in incomplete process knowledge. Herein, we present a system and strategy developed for optimizing discrete and continuous variables of a chemical reaction simultaneously. The approach couples automated feedback with high-throughput reaction screening in droplet flow

  12. Rapid Progression of Coronary Atherosclerosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priyank; Bajaj, Sharad; Virk, Hartaj; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is chronic disease, the prevalence of which has increased steadily as the population ages. Vascular injury is believed to be critical initiating event in pathogenesis of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Syndrome of accelerated atherosclerosis has been classically described in patients undergoing heart transplantation, coronary artery bypass graft, and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. In contrast to spontaneous atherosclerosis, denuding endothelial injury followed by thrombus formation and initial predominant smooth muscle cell proliferation is believed to be playing a significant role in accelerated atherosclerosis. There is no universal definition of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. However most studies describing the phenomenon have used the following definition: (i) > or = 10% diameter reduction of at least one preexisting stenosis > or = 50%, (ii) > or = 30% diameter reduction of a preexisting stenosis <50%, and (iii) progression of a lesion to total occlusion within few months. Recent studies have described the role of coronary vasospasm, human immunodeficiency virus, various inflammatory markers, and some genetic mutations as predictors of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. As research in the field of vascular biology continues, more factors are likely to be implicated in the pathogenesis of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26823982

  13. Recent Highlights of ATVB Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanistic studies over the past decades using in vitro systems, animal models, and human tissues have highlighted the complexity of pathophysiological processes of atherosclerosis. Hypercholesterolemia, as one of the major risk factors for the development and progression of atherosclerosis, is still the focus of many mechanistic studies and the major therapeutic target of atherosclerosis. Although there is a dire need to validate many experimental findings in humans, there is a large number of approaches that have been showing promise for contributing to future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25717174

  14. Assessment of relationship on excess fluoride intake from drinking water and carotid atherosclerosis development in adults in fluoride endemic areas, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Gao, Yanhui; Sun, Liyan; Li, Mang; Li, Bingyun; Sun, Dianjun

    2014-03-01

    Cross-sectional analysis was conducted to access the relationships between developing carotid artery atherosclerosis through consuming high fluoride in drinking water and its possible mechanism, using the baseline data collected from 585 study subjects. In the cross sectional analysis, subjects were divided into four groups based on the concentrations of fluoride in their drinking water. The range of fluoride concentrations was: normal group (less than 1.20 mg/L), mild group (1.21-2.00 mg/L), moderate group (2.01-3.00 mg/L), and high concentration group (more than 3.01 mg/L). The prevalence rate of carotid artery atherosclerosis in the subjects in each group was found to be 16.13%, 27.22%, 27.10%, and 29.69%, respectively. Significant difference between the prevalence of carotid artery atherosclerosis in the mild, moderate and high fluoride exposure group and in the normal group was observed (P<0.05). In addition, it was found that elevated intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and reduced glutathione peroxidases (GPx) was associated with carotid artery atherosclerosis in fluoride endemic areas. The findings of the research study revealed a significant positive relationship between excess fluoride exposure from drinking water and prevalence of carotid artery atherosclerosis in adults living in fluoride endemic areas. The possible mechanism was the excess fluoride induced the decreasing level of GPx causing the systemic inflammation and endothelial activation by oxidative stress.

  15. Improved animal models for testing gene therapy for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike lesions that develop rapidly in vessels that are amenable to efficient gene delivery. Moreover, because human atherosclerosis develops in normal vessels, gene therapy that prevents atherosclerosis is most logically tested in relatively normal arteries. Similarly, gene therapy that causes atherosclerosis regression requires gene delivery to an existing lesion. Here we report development of three new rabbit models for testing vessel-wall-directed gene therapy that either prevents or reverses atherosclerosis. Carotid artery intimal lesions in these new models develop within 2-7 months after initiation of a high-fat diet and are 20-80 times larger than lesions in a model we described previously. Individual models allow generation of lesions that are relatively rich in either macrophages or smooth muscle cells, permitting testing of gene therapy strategies targeted at either cell type. Two of the models include gene delivery to essentially normal arteries and will be useful for identifying strategies that prevent lesion development. The third model generates lesions rapidly in vector-naïve animals and can be used for testing gene therapy that promotes lesion regression. These models are optimized for testing helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated gene therapy; however, they could be easily adapted for testing of other vectors or of different types of molecular therapies, delivered directly to the blood vessel wall. Our data also supports the promise of HDAd to deliver long

  16. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  17. Long-term effects intensive medical therapy on the development and progression of subclinical atherosclerosis and the metabolic syndrome in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiwen; Zhou, Zhiguang; Huang, Gan; Xiao, Yang; Li, Zhen; Liu, Cong; Na, Risu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Few studies have investigated the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study was to compare the long-term effects of intensive medical therapy on the development and progression of subclinical atherosclerosis and MetS in Chinese T2DM patients with that of a conventional treatment regimen. Methods: A total of 316 T2DM patients were randomized to receive conventional pharmacological treatment or intensive medical therapy, consisting of diet and exercise counseling, from 2002 to 2014 at our hospital in Changsha, China. Clinical indicators of subclinical atherosclerosis and MetS were evaluated over the 12-year follow-up period. A χ2 analysis or t tests was used to compare the data between the 2 groups. Risk factors for subclinical atherosclerosis were identified using Cox proportional hazard models. Results: The incidence of subclinical atherosclerosis increased in both groups over time, and did not differ significantly between the 2 groups at the end of the study. However, after 6 years of treatment, the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis was significantly lower in the intensive medical therapy group, based on intima-media thickness (IMT) measurements, compared with that in the conventional treatment (44.2% vs. 69.7%; P < 0.01). Age, creatinine, and IMT of the common iliac artery were significantly associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. Although the indicators of MetS did not differ significantly at the end of study, the success rate for the management of MetS in the intensive medical therapy group was significantly higher than that in the conventional treatment group in 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012. Conclusions: The incidence of atherosclerosis in the intensive medical therapy group was significantly lower than that in the conventional treatment group from 2006 to 2010 (P < 0.05), and the incidence of MetS in the intensive medical

  18. Miniature penetrator (MinPen) acceleration recorder development test

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, R.J.; Platzbecker, M.R.

    1998-08-01

    The Telemetry Technology Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories actively develops and tests acceleration recorders for penetrating weapons. This new acceleration recorder (MinPen) utilizes a microprocessor-based architecture for operational flexibility while maintaining electronics and packaging techniques developed over years of penetrator testing. MinPen has been demonstrated to function in shock environments up to 20,000 Gs. The MinPen instrumentation development has resulted in a rugged, versatile, miniature acceleration recorder and is a valuable tool for penetrator testing in a wide range of applications.

  19. Accelerator and rf system development for NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Callin, R.; Deruyter, H.

    1993-04-01

    An experimental station for an X-band Next Linear Collider has been constructed at SLAC. This station consists of a klystron and modulator, a low-loss waveguide system for rf power distribution, a SLED II pulse-compression and peak-power multiplication system, acceleration sections and beam-line components (gun, prebuncher, preaccelerator, focussing elements and spectrometer). An extensive program of experiments to evaluate the performance of all components is underway. The station is described in detail in this paper, and results to date are presented.

  20. Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) project is part of NASA s Instrument Technology Development program to develop advanced sensor systems. The primary focus of the AMAMS project is to develop microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for acceleration sensor systems to replace existing electromechanical sensor systems presently used to assess relative gravity levels aboard spacecraft. These systems are used to characterize both vehicle and payload responses to low-gravity vibroacoustic environments. The collection of microgravity acceleration data is useful to the microgravity life sciences, microgravity physical sciences, and structural dynamics communities. The inherent advantages of semiconductor-based systems are reduced size, mass, and power consumption, with enhanced long-term calibration stability.

  1. Danhong injection inhibits the development of atherosclerosis in both Apoe⁻/⁻ and Ldlr⁻/⁻ mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanli; Liu, Mengyang; Zhao, Tao; Zhao, Buchang; Jia, Lifu; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Boli; Gao, Xiumei; Li, Guangliang; Li, Xiaoju; Xiang, Rong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2014-05-01

    Danhong injection (DHI), a certificated Chinese medical product made from radix salviae miltiorrhizae and flos carthami, is prescribed to patients with coronary heart disease in China. To investigate if DHI can inhibit atherosclerosis, apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe⁻/⁻) or low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr⁻/⁻) mice on high-fat diet were divided into 2 groups and received daily intraperitoneal injection of saline and DHI, respectively, for 16 or 20 weeks. After the treatment, mouse aortas were collected to determine lesions, expression of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage accumulation. Additionally, serum lipid profiles and expression of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase messenger RNA and low-density lipoprotein receptor protein were determined. We observed that DHI inhibited lesions in both Apoe⁻/⁻ and Ldlr⁻/⁻ mice. Associated with the decreased lesions, the aortic adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 expression was increased, whereas the macrophage accumulation was decreased in male Apoe⁻/⁻ mice and both male and female Ldlr⁻/⁻ mice. Although DHI reduced HMG-CoA reductase messenger RNA expression in both female Apoe⁻/⁻ and Ldlr⁻/⁻ mice, it decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels only in female Apoe⁻/⁻ mice. In addition to attenuation of lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 in macrophages, and human C-reactive protein in hepatocytes, respectively, at the transcriptional level in vitro, DHI also reduced TNF-α protein expression in aortic root of both Apoe⁻/⁻ and Ldlr⁻/⁻ mice, suggesting the importance of the anti-inflammatory properties of DHI in the inhibition of lesion development. Taken together, our study demonstrates that DHI inhibits atherosclerosis in both Apoe⁻/⁻ and Ldlr⁻/⁻ mice with various mechanisms, including anti-inflammation. The inhibition of atherosclerosis

  2. Cytochrome P450 1B1 Contributes to the Development of Atherosclerosis and Hypertension in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Chi Young; Ghafoor, Khuzema; Ghafoor, Hafiz U; Khan, Nayaab S; Thirunavukkarasu, Shyamala; Jennings, Brett L; Estes, Anne M; Zaidi, Sahar; Bridges, Dave; Tso, Patrick; Gonzalez, Frank J; Malik, Kafait U

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 contributes to vascular smooth muscle cell growth and hypertension in male mice. This study was conducted to determine the contribution of CYP1B1 to the development of atherosclerosis and hypertension and associated pathogenesis in 8-week-old male apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)/Cyp1b1(+/+)), and ApoE- and CYP1B1-deficient (ApoE(-/-)/Cyp1b1(-/-)) mice fed a normal or atherogenic diet for 12 weeks. A separate group of ApoE(-/-)/Cyp1b1(+/+) mice on an atherogenic diet was injected every third day with the CYP1B1 inhibitor, 2,3',4,5'-tetramethoxystilbene (300 μg/kg), or its vehicle, dimethyl sulfoxide (30 μL, IP); systolic blood pressure was measured by the tail cuff method. After 12 weeks, mice were euthanized, blood collected for lipid analysis, and aortas harvested for measuring lesions and remodeling, and for infiltration of inflammatory cells by histological and immunohistochemical analysis, respectively, and for reactive oxygen species production. Blood pressure, areas of lipids and collagen deposition, elastin breaks, infiltration of macrophages and T lymphocytes, reactive oxygen species generation in the aorta, and plasma lipid levels were increased in ApoE(-/-)/Cyp1b1(+/+) mice on an atherogenic diet; these changes were minimized in mice given 2,3',4,5'-tetramethoxystilbene, and in ApoE(-/-)/Cyp1b1(-/-) mice on an atherogenic diet; absorption/production of lipids remained unaltered in these mice. These data suggest that aortic lesions, hypertension, and associated pathogenesis in ApoE(-/-)/Cyp1b1(+/+) mice on an atherogenic diet are most likely dependent on CYP1B1-generated oxidative stress and increased plasma lipid levels independent of blood pressure and absorption of lipids. CYP1B1 could serve as a novel target for developing drugs to treat atherosclerosis and hypertension caused by hypercholesterolemia.

  3. Immune response to lipoproteins in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Samson, Sonia; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  4. Development of compact linear accelerator in KBSI

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jang-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Won, Mi-Sook

    2012-02-15

    The compact linear accelerator using a 28 GHz ECRIS is under construction in KBSI, South Korea. The main capability of this facility is the production of fast neurons for the neutron radiography. The designing of a superconducting magnet, microwave transmission system, beam extraction, and plasma chamber of ECRIS were finished. The nominal axial design fields of the magnets are 3.6 T at injection and 2.2 T at extraction; the nominal radial design field strength at the plasma chamber wall is 2.1 T. We already installed 10 kW, 28 GHz gyrotron, and tested a microwave power from gyrotron using a dummy load. The current status will be discussed in this paper.

  5. Development of compact linear accelerator in KBSI.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jang-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Won, Mi-Sook

    2012-02-01

    The compact linear accelerator using a 28 GHz ECRIS is under construction in KBSI, South Korea. The main capability of this facility is the production of fast neurons for the neutron radiography. The designing of a superconducting magnet, microwave transmission system, beam extraction, and plasma chamber of ECRIS were finished. The nominal axial design fields of the magnets are 3.6 T at injection and 2.2 T at extraction; the nominal radial design field strength at the plasma chamber wall is 2.1 T. We already installed 10 kW, 28 GHz gyrotron, and tested a microwave power from gyrotron using a dummy load. The current status will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Development of compact linear accelerator in KBSIa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jang-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Won, Mi-Sook

    2012-02-01

    The compact linear accelerator using a 28 GHz ECRIS is under construction in KBSI, South Korea. The main capability of this facility is the production of fast neurons for the neutron radiography. The designing of a superconducting magnet, microwave transmission system, beam extraction, and plasma chamber of ECRIS were finished. The nominal axial design fields of the magnets are 3.6 T at injection and 2.2 T at extraction; the nominal radial design field strength at the plasma chamber wall is 2.1 T. We already installed 10 kW, 28 GHz gyrotron, and tested a microwave power from gyrotron using a dummy load. The current status will be discussed in this paper.

  7. MicroRNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Rotllan, Noemi; Aranda, Juan F.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (~22nucleotide) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level. MiRNA/mRNA base pairing complementarity provokes mRNA decay and consequent gene silencing. These endogenous gene expression inhibitors were primarily described in cancer but recent exciting findings have also demonstrated a key role in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. MiRNAs controls endothelial cell (EC), vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) and macrophage functions, and thereby regulate the progression of atherosclerosis. MiRNAs expression is modulated by different stimuli involved in every stage of atherosclerosis and conversely miRNAs modulates several pathways implicated in plaque development such as cholesterol metabolism. In the present review, we focus on the importance of miRNAs in atherosclerosis and we further discuss their potential use as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:23512606

  8. Baicalin and geniposide inhibit the development of atherosclerosis by increasing Wnt1 and inhibiting dickkopf-related protein-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Liao, Ping-Ping; Liu, Li-Hua; Fang, Xin; Li, Wei; Guan, Si-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous study showed that the combined Chinese herbs containing scutellaria baicalensis georgi and gardenia jasminoids ellis inhibited atherosclerosis. In this study, we sought to determine if baicalin and geniposide could inhibit atherosclerosis through Wnt1 and dickkopf-related protein-1 (DKK1). Methods The wild-type and ApoE−/− mice were treated with baicalin, geniposide, and baicalin plus geniposide daily by gavage for 12 weeks. Blood lipid levels were measured with an automatic biochemistry analyzer. Aortic atherosclerotic lesion areas were analyzed with Image-ProPlus software. The mRNA and protein expression of DKK1, Wnt1 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were measured with RT-PCR and Western Blot. Serum levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12) were quantified with ELISA. Results The baicalin or geniposide monotherapy as well as combination therapy inhibited the development of atherosclerotic lesions, increased Wnt1 and decreased DKK1 expression and elevated the ratio of Wnt1/DKK1 compared with high-lipid diet group. However, only baicalin or geniposide monotherapy decreased NF-κB expression. Moreover, baicalin and geniposide mono- or combination therapy lowered IL-12 levels. Geniposide reduced both serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels, while baicalin either alone or in combination with geniposide did not affect serum lipid levels. In human, umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated by oxidized low density lipoprotein, baicalin and geniposide also increased Wnt1 and decreased DKK1 expression and elevated the ratio of Wnt1/DKK1. Conclusions Baicalin and geniposide exert inflammation-regulatory effects and may prevent atherosclerotic lesions through enhancing Wnt1 and inhibiting DKK1 expression. PMID:27928227

  9. Nutraceutical therapies for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Joe W.E.; Ramji, Dipak P.

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory disease affecting large and medium arteries and is considered to be a major underlying cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the development of pharmacotherapies to treat CVD has resulted in a decline in cardiac mortality in the past few decades, CVD is estimated to be the cause of one in three global deaths. Nutraceuticals are natural nutritional compounds that are beneficial for the prevention or treatment of disease and, therefore, represent a possible therapeutic avenue for the treatment of atherosclerosis. The purpose of this review is to highlight potential nutraceuticals for use as anti-atherogenic therapies, with evidence from in vitro, in vivo, clinical, and observational studies. PMID:27383080

  10. Immunological aspects of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Kevin J

    2013-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in several countries. The underlying process is atherosclerosis, a slowly progressing chronic disorder that can lead to intravascular thrombosis. There is overwhelming evidence for the underlying importance of our immune system in atherosclerosis. Monocytes, which comprise part of the innate immune system, can be recruited to inflamed endothelium and this recruitment has been shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerotic disease. Monocytes undergo migration into the vasculature, they differentiate into macrophage phenotypes, which are highly phagocytic and can scavenge modified lipids, leading to foam cell formation and development of the lipid-rich atheroma core. This increased influx leads to a highly inflammatory environment and along with other immune cells can increase the risk in the development of the unstable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype. The present review provides an overview and description of the immunological aspect of innate and adaptive immune cell subsets in atherosclerosis, by defining their interaction with the vascular environment, modified lipids and other cellular exchanges. There is a particular focus on monocytes and macrophages, but shorter descriptions of dendritic cells, lymphocyte populations, neutrophils, mast cells and platelets are also included.

  11. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype.

  12. Endothelin-1 exacerbates development of hypertension and atherosclerosis in modest insulin resistant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Jie; Juan, Chi-Chang; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Hsu, Yung-Pei; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Chen, Chin-Chang; Ho, Low-Tone

    2015-05-08

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as potent vasoconstrictor, by virtue of its mitogenic effects, and may deteriorate the process of hypertension and atherosclerosis by aggravating hyperplasia and migration in VSMCs. Our previous study demonstrated that insulin infusion caused sequential induction of hyperinsulinemia, hyperendothelinemia, insulin resistance, and then hypertension in rats. However, the underlying mechanism of ET-1 interfere insulin signaling in VSMCs remains unclear. To characterize insulin signaling during modest insulin resistant syndrome, we established and monitored rats by feeding high fructose-diet (HFD) until high blood pressure and modest insulin resistance occurred. To explore the role of ET-1/ETAR during insulin resistance, ETAR expression, ET-1 binding, and insulin signaling were investigated in the HFD-fed rats and cultured A-10 VSMCs. Results showed that high blood pressure, tunica medial wall thickening, plasma ET-1 and insulin, and accompanied with modest insulin resistance without overweight and hyperglycemia occurred in early-stage HFD-fed rats. In the endothelium-denuded aorta from HFD-fed rats, ETAR expression, but not ETBR, and ET-1 binding in aorta were increased. Moreover, decreasing of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and increasing of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation were observed in aorta during modest insulin resistance. Interestingly, in ET-1 pretreated VSMCs, the increment of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was decreased whereas the increment of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation was increased. In addition, insulin potentiated ET-1-induced VSMCs migration and proliferation due to increasing ET-1 binding. ETAR antagonist reversed effects of ET-1 on insulin-induced signaling and VSMCs migration and proliferation. In summary, modest insulin resistance syndrome accompanied with hyperinsulinemia leading to the potentiation on ET-1-induced actions in aortic VSMCs. ET-1 via ETAR pathway suppressed insulin-induced AKT

  13. Computational Tools for Accelerating Carbon Capture Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David; Sahinidis, N V; Cozad, A; Lee, A; Kim, H; Morinelly, J; Eslick, J; Yuan, Z

    2013-06-04

    This presentation reports development of advanced computational tools to accelerate next generation technology development. These tools are to develop an optimized process using rigorous models. They include: Process Models; Simulation-Based Optimization; Optimized Process; Uncertainty Quantification; Algebraic Surrogate Models; and Superstructure Optimization (Determine Configuration).

  14. The role of the immune system in atherosclerosis: molecules, mechanisms and implications for management of cardiovascular risk and disease in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Skaggs, Brian J.; Hahn, Bevra H.; McMahon, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Rapid-onset cardiovascular disease is a major concern for many patients suffering from SLE. Cardiovascular events are more frequent and occur much earlier in SLE patients compared to healthy controls. Traditional risk factors such as altered lipid levels, older age and smoking do not fully explain the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, strongly suggesting that autoimmunity contributes to accelerated atherosclerosis. Altered immune system function is recognized as the primary contributor to both the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Multiple manifestations of autoimmunity, including autoantibodies, altered cytokine levels and innate immunity response, adipokines, dysfunctional lipids, and oxidative stress appear to contribute to atherosclerotic risk. In addition, multiple SLE therapeutics appear to affect the development and progression of atherosclerosis both positively and negatively. SLE-specific biomarkers for identifying patients at risk of developing accelerated atherosclerosis are starting to be identified by multiple groups, and a comprehensive, clinically testable biomarker panel could be invaluable for identifying and treating these patients. PMID:22331061

  15. Sex Differences in Inflammation During Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, DeLisa

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide, yet more men die from atherosclerosis than women, and at a younger age. Women, on the other hand, mainly develop atherosclerosis following menopause, and particularly if they have one or more autoimmune diseases, suggesting that the immune mechanisms that increase disease in men are different from those in women. The key processes in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis are vascular inflammation, lipid accumulation, intimal thickening and fibrosis, remodeling, and plaque rupture or erosion leading to myocardial infarction and ischemia. Evidence indicates that sex hormones alter the immune response during atherosclerosis, resulting in different disease phenotypes according to sex. Women, for example, respond to infection and damage with increased antibody and autoantibody responses, while men have elevated innate immune activation. This review describes current knowledge regarding sex differences in the inflammatory immune response during atherosclerosis. Understanding sex differences is critical for improving individualized medicine. PMID:25983559

  16. Stacked subsea templates accelerate deepwater development

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.F.; Blincow, R.M.; Pickard, R.D. )

    1991-10-21

    This paper reports on a deepwater project that can be brought on-line more quickly because of stackable drilling and production templates. Historically, one of the primary barriers to the economic development of deepwater reserves has been the long lead time from discovery to first production. Typically, production facilities must be built and often installed before development wells are drilled. The use of three-slot drilling templates allows development drilling to proceed while the production templates, Christmas trees, flow lines, and production platform are constructed. Thus, the time from initial investment to first revenue reduced. Enserch Exploration Inc., along with partners Petrofina Delaware Inc. and AGIP Petroleum, is using a piggy-back or transportable stacked template system to develop deepwater gas reserves in Mississippi Canyon Block 441, approximately 50 miles south of Grand Isle, La. The discovery is located in 1,410-1,520 ft of water. The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) safety fairway running north to south covers the eastern three fourths of Mississippi Canyon Block 441 and rules out surface production facilities over the well locations.

  17. Endothelin-1 exacerbates development of hypertension and atherosclerosis in modest insulin resistant syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yan-Jie; Juan, Chi-Chang; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Hsu, Yung-Pei; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Chen, Chin-Chang; Ho, Low-Tone

    2015-05-08

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as potent vasoconstrictor, by virtue of its mitogenic effects, and may deteriorate the process of hypertension and atherosclerosis by aggravating hyperplasia and migration in VSMCs. Our previous study demonstrated that insulin infusion caused sequential induction of hyperinsulinemia, hyperendothelinemia, insulin resistance, and then hypertension in rats. However, the underlying mechanism of ET-1 interfere insulin signaling in VSMCs remains unclear. To characterize insulin signaling during modest insulin resistant syndrome, we established and monitored rats by feeding high fructose-diet (HFD) until high blood pressure and modest insulin resistance occurred. To explore the role of ET-1/ET{sub A}R during insulin resistance, ET{sub A}R expression, ET-1 binding, and insulin signaling were investigated in the HFD-fed rats and cultured A-10 VSMCs. Results showed that high blood pressure, tunica medial wall thickening, plasma ET-1 and insulin, and accompanied with modest insulin resistance without overweight and hyperglycemia occurred in early-stage HFD-fed rats. In the endothelium-denuded aorta from HFD-fed rats, ET{sub A}R expression, but not ET{sub B}R, and ET-1 binding in aorta were increased. Moreover, decreasing of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and increasing of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation were observed in aorta during modest insulin resistance. Interestingly, in ET-1 pretreated VSMCs, the increment of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was decreased whereas the increment of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation was increased. In addition, insulin potentiated ET-1-induced VSMCs migration and proliferation due to increasing ET-1 binding. ETAR antagonist reversed effects of ET-1 on insulin-induced signaling and VSMCs migration and proliferation. In summary, modest insulin resistance syndrome accompanied with hyperinsulinemia leading to the potentiation on ET-1-induced actions in aortic VSMCs. ET-1 via ET{sub A}R pathway

  18. Computational Tools to Accelerate Commercial Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C

    2013-01-01

    The goals of the work reported are: to develop new computational tools and models to enable industry to more rapidly develop and deploy new advanced energy technologies; to demonstrate the capabilities of the CCSI Toolset on non-proprietary case studies; and to deploy the CCSI Toolset to industry. Challenges of simulating carbon capture (and other) processes include: dealing with multiple scales (particle, device, and whole process scales); integration across scales; verification, validation, and uncertainty; and decision support. The tools cover: risk analysis and decision making; validated, high-fidelity CFD; high-resolution filtered sub-models; process design and optimization tools; advanced process control and dynamics; process models; basic data sub-models; and cross-cutting integration tools.

  19. Status of high temperature superconductor development for accelerator magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirabayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    High temperature superconductors are still under development for various applications. As far as conductors for magnets are concerned, the development has just been started. Small coils wound by silver sheathed Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 oxide conductors have been reported by a few authors. Essential properties of high T(sub c) superconductors like pinning force, coherent length, intergrain coupling, weak link, thermal property, AC loss and mechanical strength are still not sufficiently understandable. In this talk, a review is given with comparison between the present achievement and the final requirement for high T(sub c) superconductors, which could be particularly used in accelerator magnets. Discussions on how to develop high T(sub c) superconductors for accelerator magnets are included with key parameters of essential properties. A proposal of how to make a prototype accelerator magnet with high T(sub c) superconductors with prospect for future development is also given.

  20. Niacin Reduces Atherosclerosis Development in APOE*3Leiden.CETP Mice Mainly by Reducing NonHDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Mattijs M.; Pieterman, Elsbet J.; van Klinken, Jan B.; van den Berg, Sjoerd A. A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; van der Hoorn, José W. A.; Princen, Hans M. G.; Jukema, J. Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Objective Niacin potently lowers triglycerides, mildly decreases LDL-cholesterol, and largely increases HDL-cholesterol. Despite evidence for an atheroprotective effect of niacin from previous small clinical studies, the large outcome trials, AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE did not reveal additional beneficial effects of niacin (alone or in combination with laropiprant) on top of statin treatment. We aimed to address this apparent discrepancy by investigating the effects of niacin without and with simvastatin on atherosclerosis development and determine the underlying mechanisms, in APOE*3Leiden.CETP mice, a model for familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD). Approach and Results Mice were fed a western-type diet containing cholesterol without or with niacin (120 mg/kg/day), simvastatin (36 mg/kg/day) or their combination for 18 weeks. Similarly as in FD patients, niacin reduced total cholesterol by -39% and triglycerides by −50%, (both P<0.001). Simvastatin and the combination reduced total cholesterol (−30%; −55%, P<0.001) where the combination revealed a greater reduction compared to simvastatin (−36%, P<0.001). Niacin decreased total cholesterol and triglycerides primarily by increasing VLDL clearance. Niacin increased HDL-cholesterol (+28%, P<0.01) and mildly increased reverse cholesterol transport. All treatments reduced monocyte adhesion to the endothelium (−46%; −47%, P<0.01; −53%, P<0.001), atherosclerotic lesion area (−78%; −49%, P<0.01; −87%, P<0.001) and severity. Compared to simvastatin, the combination increased plaque stability index [(SMC+collagen)/macrophages] (3-fold, P<0.01). Niacin and the combination reduced T cells in the aortic root (−71%, P<0.01; −81%, P<0.001). Lesion area was strongly predicted by nonHDL-cholesterol (R2 = 0.69, P<0.001) and to a much lesser extent by HDL-cholesterol (R2 = 0.20, P<0.001). Conclusion Niacin decreases atherosclerosis development mainly by reducing nonHDL-cholesterol with modest HDL

  1. Accelerated larvae development of Ascaris lumbricoides eggs with ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladawi, M. A.; Albarodi, H.; Hammoudeh, A.; Shamma, M.; Sharabi, N.

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of UV radiation on the development of Ascaris lumbricoides larvae, eggs were exposed to increasing UV doses. Filtered wastewater from the secondary effluent taken from the Damascus wastewater treatment plant (DWTP) was used as irradiation and incubation medium. The progressive and accelerated embryonation stages were microscopically observed and the percentages of completely developed larvae were determined weekly. Results indicated that the UV radiation accelerated the development of larvae with increasing UV dose. Preliminary information about the relationship between the UV radiation dose and rate of embryonation is also presented.

  2. Space Launch System Accelerated Booster Development Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arockiam, Nicole; Whittecar, William; Edwards, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, NASA is seeking to reinvigorate the national space program and recapture the public s interest in human space exploration by developing missions to the Moon, near-earth asteroids, Lagrange points, Mars, and beyond. The would-be successor to the Space Shuttle, NASA s Constellation Program, planned to take humans back to the Moon by 2020, but due to budgetary constraints was cancelled in 2010 in search of a more "affordable, sustainable, and realistic" concept2. Following a number of studies, the much anticipated Space Launch System (SLS) was unveiled in September of 2011. The SLS core architecture consists of a cryogenic first stage with five Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs), and a cryogenic second stage using a new J-2X engine3. The baseline configuration employs two 5-segment solid rocket boosters to achieve a 70 metric ton payload capability, but a new, more capable booster system will be required to attain the goal of 130 metric tons to orbit. To this end, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center recently released a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) entitled "Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction." The increased emphasis on affordability is evident in the language used in the NRA, which is focused on risk reduction "leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS" and "enabling competition" to "enhance SLS affordability. The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to perform an independent assessment of the elements that make up an affordable and realistic path forward for the SLS booster system, utilizing advanced design methods and technology evaluation techniques. The goal is to identify elements that will enable a more sustainable development program by exploring the trade space of heavy lift booster systems and focusing on affordability, operability, and reliability at the system and subsystem levels5. For this study

  3. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Stroke Inspirational Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Atherosclerosis and Stroke Updated:Oct 24,2016 Excerpted and ... cause difficulty walking and eventually gangrene. Stroke and atherosclerosis There are two types of ischemic stroke caused ...

  4. Living with Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Atherosclerosis Improved treatments have reduced the number of deaths ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  5. Abnormal blood rheology and chronic low grade inflammation: possible risk factors for accelerated atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease in Lewis negative subjects

    PubMed Central

    Alexy, Tamas; Pais, Eszter; Wenby, Rosalinda B.; Mack, Wendy J.; Hodis, Howard N.; Kono, Naoko; Wang, Jun; Baskurt, Oguz K.; Fisher, Timothy C.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that abnormal hemorheology and chronic low-grade inflammation are more prevalent in Lewis negative individuals, possibly contributing to premature atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We enrolled 223 healthy subjects (154 females, mean age: 64yrs). Conventional risk factors, markers of inflammation and hemorheological profiles were measured; Lewis blood group was determined by serology. Conventional risk factors (age, gender, BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, smoking habit) did not differ among Lewis phenotypes. However, markers of inflammation (WBC, hs-CRP, ESR) were significantly elevated and rheological parameters (RBC aggregation, plasma viscosity) were abnormal in Lewis negative subjects, especially when compared to the Le(a−b+) group. Conclusions With a prevalence of 33% in select populations, our data support the hypothesis that Le(a−b−) represents a pro-inflammatory phenotype that may contribute to the elevated cardiovascular risk in this group. PMID:25626016

  6. Low doses of LPS and minimally oxidized LDL cooperatively activate macrophages via NF-kappaB and AP-1: Possible mechanism for acceleration of atherosclerosis by subclinical endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Philipp; Choi, Soo-Ho; Almazan, Felicidad; Benner, Christopher; Huang, Wendy; Diehl, Cody J.; Gonen, Ayelet; Butler, Susan; Witztum, Joseph L.; Glass, Christopher K.; Miller, Yury I.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is an important determinant of inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions. It has also been documented that certain chronic infectious diseases, such as periodontitis and chlamydial infection, exacerbate clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis. In addition, low-level but persistent metabolic endotoxemia is often found in diabetic and obese subjects and is induced in mice fed a high-fat diet. Objective In this study, we examined cooperative macrophage activation by low levels of bacterial LPS and by minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL), as a model for subclinical endotoxemia-complicated atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We found that both in vitro and in vivo, mmLDL and LPS (Kdo2-LipidA) cooperatively activated macrophages to express pro-inflammatory cytokines Cxcl2 (MIP-2), Ccl3 (MIP-1alpha), and Ccl4 (MIP-1beta). Importantly, the mmLDL and LPS cooperative effects were evident at a threshold LPS concentration (1 ng/ml) at which LPS alone induced only a limited macrophage response. Analyzing microarray data with a de novo motif discovery algorithm, we found that genes transcribed by promoters containing an AP-1 binding site were significantly upregulated by co-stimulation with mmLDL and LPS. In a nuclear factor-DNA binding assay, the cooperative effect of mmLDL and LPS co-stimulation on c-Jun and c-Fos DNA binding, but not on p65 or p50, was dependent on mmLDL-induced activation of ERK1/2. In addition, mmLDL induced JNK-dependent derepression of AP-1 by removing the corepressor NCoR from the chemokine promoters. Conclusions The cooperative engagement of AP-1 and NF-kappaB by mmLDL and LPS may constitute a mechanism of increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines within atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:20489162

  7. An accelerated fusion power development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.; Baker, Charles C.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Kinkead, Susan D.

    1991-06-01

    Energy for electricity and transportation is a national issue with worldwide environmental and political implications. The world must have energy options for the next century that are not vulnerable to possible disruption for technical, environmental, public confidence, or other reasons. Growing concerns about the greenhouse effect and the safety of transporting oil may lead to reduced burning of coal and other fossil fuels, and the incidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, as well as nuclear waste storage problems, have eroded public acceptance of nuclear fission. Meeting future world energy needs will require improvements in energy efficiency and conservation. However, the world will soon need new central station power plants and increasing amounts of fuel for the transportation sector. The use of fossil fuels, and possibly even fission power, will very likely be restricted because of environmental, safety, and, eventually, supply considerations. Time is running out for policymakers. New energy technologies cannot be brought to the marketplace overnight. Decades are required to bring a new energy production technology from conception to full market penetration. With the added urgency to mitigate deleterious environmental effects of energy use, policymakers must act decisively now to establish and support vigorous energy technology development programs. The U.S. has invested 8 billion over the past 40 years in fusion research and development. If the U.S. fusion program proceeds according to its present strategy, an additional 40 years, and more money, will be expended before fusion will provide commercial electricity. Such an extended schedule is neither cost-effective nor technically necessary. It is time to launch a national venture to construct and operate a fusion power pilot plant. Such a plant could be operational within 15 years of a national commitment to proceed.

  8. Accelerating Leadership Development via Immersive Learning and Cognitive Apprenticeship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backus, Clark; Keegan, Kevin; Gluck, Charles; Gulick, Lisa M. V.

    2010-01-01

    The authors put forward an approach to leadership development that builds on the principle of accelerated learning. They argue that leadership development, particularly in a period of recession or slow economic growth, needs to deliver results more quickly and with fewer resources. Indeed, they raise the question of whether or not this is what is…

  9. No Time To Kill: Entrainment and Accelerating Courseware Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millington, Paula Crnkovich

    This paper examines the concept of time in multimedia, World Wide Web-based courseware development. The biological concept of entrainment (the alignment of rhythms within and between systems) to accelerate courseware development is explored. The discussion begins with the foundational concepts of entrainment from biological systems and social…

  10. Development of wide area environment accelerator operation and diagnostics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Akito; Furukawa, Kazuro

    2015-08-01

    Remote operation and diagnostic systems for particle accelerators have been developed for beam operation and maintenance in various situations. Even though fully remote experiments are not necessary, the remote diagnosis and maintenance of the accelerator is required. Considering remote-operation operator interfaces (OPIs), the use of standard protocols such as the hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) is advantageous, because system-dependent protocols are unnecessary between the remote client and the on-site server. Here, we have developed a client system based on WebSocket, which is a new protocol provided by the Internet Engineering Task Force for Web-based systems, as a next-generation Web-based OPI using the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System Channel Access protocol. As a result of this implementation, WebSocket-based client systems have become available for remote operation. Also, as regards practical application, the remote operation of an accelerator via a wide area network (WAN) faces a number of challenges, e.g., the accelerator has both experimental device and radiation generator characteristics. Any error in remote control system operation could result in an immediate breakdown. Therefore, we propose the implementation of an operator intervention system for remote accelerator diagnostics and support that can obviate any differences between the local control room and remote locations. Here, remote-operation Web-based OPIs, which resolve security issues, are developed.

  11. Epigenetic regulation of NKG2D ligands is involved in exacerbated atherosclerosis development in Sirt6 heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Ren, Si-Chong; Tan, Ying; Li, Zuo-Zhi; Tang, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Ting-Ting; Hao, De-Long; Zhao, Xiang; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2016-01-01

    Sirt6 is a member of the class III histone deacetylase family which is associated with aging and longevity. Sirt6 deficient mice show an aging-like phenotype, while male transgenic mice of Sirt6 show increased longevity. Sirt6 acts as a tumor suppressor and deficiency of Sirt6 leads to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Whether Sirt6 is involved in atherosclerosis development, the major cause of cardiovascular diseases, is unknown. We found that the expression of Sirt6 is lower in human atherosclerotic plaques than that in controls. When Sirt6+/−ApoE−/− and ApoE−/− mice are fed with high fat diet for 16 weeks, Sirt6+/−ApoE−/− mice show increased plaque fromation and exhibit feature of plaque instability. Furthermore, Sirt6 downregulation increases expression of NKG2D ligands, which leads to increased cytokine expression. Blocking NKG2D ligand almost completely blocks this effect. Mechanistically, Sirt6 binds to promoters of NKG2D ligand genes and regulates the H3K9 and H3K56 acetylation levels. PMID:27045575

  12. Effect of dietary cholesterol and cholesterol oxides on blood cholesterol, lipids, and the development of atherosclerosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hur, Sun Jin; Min, Byungrok; Nam, Ki Chang; Lee, Eun Joo; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2013-06-17

    Two studies were conducted to determine the effects of dietary cholesterol (CHO) and cholesterol oxides (COPs) on the development of atherosclerosis and the changes in fatty acid and blood characteristics in rabbits. In the first study, forty male New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 5 groups and fed commercial rabbit chow with no added CHO or COPs, 1 g CHO, 0.9 g CHO + 0.1 g COPs, 0.8 g CHO + 0.2 g COPs, or 0.5 g CHO + 0.5 g COPs per kg diet. In the second study, 24 male New Zealand White rabbits were divided into 3 groups and fed a diet containing 2 g CHO, 1.6 g CHO + 0.4 g COPs, or 1.2 g CHO + 0.8 g COPs per kg diet. All diets induced atherosclerotic lesions in the rabbits' ascending thoracic aorta. The serum CHO and triglyceride levels (p < 0.05) increased significantly with the increased levels of CHO in the diets. Dietary CHO or COPs did not influence high-density lipoprotein CHO levels. The ratio of saturated fatty acid to unsaturated fatty acid increased as the level of dietary CHO and COPs increased.

  13. Immunity and early atherosclerosis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haładyj, Ewa; Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries associated with various risk factors that promote lipid abnormalities, development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions, plaque rupture, and vascular thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is accelerated in autoimmune diseases. Non-invasive investigations showed increased intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque, and coronary artery calcifications in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease compared to controls. The balance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines allows the immune equilibrium to be maintained. In autoimmune diseases the prevalence of proinflammatory factors leads to premature atherosclerosis. This review presents complementary knowledge on innate and adaptive immunity, cytokines and the role of inflammasomes in progression of early atherosclerosis.

  14. Immunity and early atherosclerosis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease and antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries associated with various risk factors that promote lipid abnormalities, development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions, plaque rupture, and vascular thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is accelerated in autoimmune diseases. Non-invasive investigations showed increased intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque, and coronary artery calcifications in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease compared to controls. The balance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines allows the immune equilibrium to be maintained. In autoimmune diseases the prevalence of proinflammatory factors leads to premature atherosclerosis. This review presents complementary knowledge on innate and adaptive immunity, cytokines and the role of inflammasomes in progression of early atherosclerosis. PMID:27826173

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT RADIOGRAPHY ACCELERATOR USING DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; McCarrick, J; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2005-06-02

    We are developing an inexpensive compact accelerator system primarily intended for pulsed radiography. Design characteristics are an 8 MeV endpoint energy, 2 kA beam current, a cell gradient of approximately 3 MV/m (for an overall accelerator length is 2-3 m), and <$1/Volt capital costs. Such designs have been made possible with the development of high specific energy dielectrics (>10J/cm{sup 3}), specialized transmission line designs and multi-gap laser triggered low jitter (<1 ns) gas switches. In this geometry, the pulse forming lines, switches, and insulator/beam pipe are fully integrated within each cell to form a compact, stand-alone, stackable unit. We detail our research and modeling to date, recent high voltage test results, and the integration concept of the cells into a radiographic system.

  16. Novel anti-inflammatory therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Razi; Spagnoli, Vincent; Tardif, Jean-Claude; L'Allier, Philippe L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying role of inflammation in atherosclerosis has been characterized. However, current treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) predominantly consists of targeted reductions in serum lipoprotein levels rather than combating the deleterious effects of acute and chronic inflammation. Vascular inflammation acts by a number of different molecular and cellular pathways to contribute to atherogenesis. Over the last decades, both basic studies and clinical trials have provided evidence for the potential benefits of treatment of inflammation in CAD. During this period, development of pharmacotherapies directed towards inflammation in atherosclerosis has accelerated quickly. This review will highlight specific therapies targeting interleukin-1β (IL-1β), P-selectin and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It will also aim to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of serpin administration, colchicine and intravenous HDL-directed treatment of CAD. We summarize the mechanistic rationale and evidence for these novel anti-inflammatory treatments at both the experimental and clinical levels.

  17. Accelerating Child Survival and Development in Dark Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, James P.

    Measures were proposed that would enable UNICEF, in association with others and despite prevailing difficult economic circumstances, to more effectively bring well-being and hope to hundreds of millions of children. Specific proposals were designed to help most countries accelerate child survival and development. Most particularly, it was…

  18. Accelerating Early Language Development with Multi-Sensory Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorn, Piia M.; Kakkuri, Irma; Karvonen, Pirkko; Leppanen, Paavo H. T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the outcome of a multi-sensory intervention on infant language skills. A programme titled "Rhyming Game and Exercise Club", which included kinaesthetic-tactile mother-child rhyming games performed in natural joint attention situations, was intended to accelerate Finnish six- to eight-month-old infants' language development. The…

  19. Bilberry anthocyanin-rich extract alters expression of genes related to atherosclerosis development in aorta of apo E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mauray, A; Felgines, C; Morand, C; Mazur, A; Scalbert, A; Milenkovic, D

    2012-01-01

    Intake of anthocyanin-rich foods has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases. We recently reported that a nutritional supplementation with a bilberry anthocyanin-rich extract (BE) attenuates atherosclerotic lesion development in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE⁻/⁻) mice. However, the mechanism(s) of their preventive action are not completely understood. Anthocyanins may alter mRNA levels of genes related to atherosclerosis in cultured macrophages and endothelial cells, but in vivo studies remain scarce. The aim of the present study was to explore the in vivo mechanisms of action of the same bilberry extract, administered by supplementation at a nutritional level, in the aorta of apo E⁻/⁻ mice using a global transcriptomic approach. This study focused on the early stage of atherosclerosis development for better assessment of BE action on initiation mechanisms of this pathology. After a two week period, plasma lipid and antioxidant capacity were evaluated and the global genomic analysis was carried out using pangenomic microarrays. BE supplementation significantly improved hypercholesterolemia whereas the plasmatic antioxidant status remained unchanged. Nutrigenomic analysis identified 1261 genes which expression was modulated by BE in the aorta. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these genes are implicated in different cellular processes such as oxidative stress, inflammation, transendothelial migration and angiogenesis, processes associated with atherosclerosis development/protection. Some of the most significantly down-regulated genes included genes coding for AOX1, CYP2E1 or TXNIP implicated in the regulation of oxidative stress, JAM-A coding for adhesion molecules or VEGFR2 implicate in regulation of angiogenesis. Other genes were up-regulated, such as CRB3, CLDN14 or CDH4 potentially associated with increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased paracellular permeability. These results provide a global integrated view of the

  20. Development of a Wireless Displacement Measurement System Using Acceleration Responses

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han; Jung, Hyung-Jo; Spencer, Billie F.

    2013-01-01

    Displacement measurements are useful information for various engineering applications such as structural health monitoring (SHM), earthquake engineering and system identification. Most existing displacement measurement methods are costly, labor-intensive, and have difficulties particularly when applying to full-scale civil structures because the methods require stationary reference points. Indirect estimation methods converting acceleration to displacement can be a good alternative as acceleration transducers are generally cost-effective, easy to install, and have low noise. However, the application of acceleration-based methods to full-scale civil structures such as long span bridges is challenging due to the need to install cables to connect the sensors to a base station. This article proposes a low-cost wireless displacement measurement system using acceleration. Developed with smart sensors that are low-cost, wireless, and capable of on-board computation, the wireless displacement measurement system has significant potential to impact many applications that need displacement information at multiple locations of a structure. The system implements an FIR-filter type displacement estimation algorithm that can remove low frequency drifts typically caused by numerical integration of discrete acceleration signals. To verify the accuracy and feasibility of the proposed system, laboratory tests are carried out using a shaking table and on a three storey shear building model, experimentally confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system. PMID:23881123

  1. Development of a fast voltage control method for electrostatic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.; Linardakis, Peter; Tsifakis, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    The concept of a novel fast voltage control loop for tandem electrostatic accelerators is described. This control loop utilises high-frequency components of the ion beam current intercepted by the image slits to generate a correction voltage that is applied to the first few gaps of the low- and high-energy acceleration tubes adjoining the high voltage terminal. New techniques for the direct measurement of the transfer function of an ultra-high impedance structure, such as an electrostatic accelerator, have been developed. For the first time, the transfer function for the fast feedback loop has been measured directly. Slow voltage variations are stabilised with common corona control loop and the relationship between transfer functions for the slow and new fast control loops required for optimum operation is discussed. The main source of terminal voltage instabilities, which are due to variation of the charging current caused by mechanical oscillations of charging chains, has been analysed.

  2. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-03-04

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD.

  3. BIOLOGICAL IMAGING OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS: MOVING BEYOND ANATOMY

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Johan W.; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological or molecular imaging is now providing exciting new strategies to study atherosclerosis in both animals and humans. These technologies hold the promise to provide disease-specific, molecular information within the context of a systemic or organ-specific disease beyond traditional anatomical-based imaging. By integration of biological, chemical and anatomical imaging knowledge into diagnostic strategies, a more comprehensive and predictive picture of atherosclerosis is likely to emerge. As such, biological imaging is well-positioned to study different stages of atherosclerosis and its treatment, including the sequence of atheroma initiation, progression, and plaque rupture. In this review we describe the evolving concepts in atherosclerosis imaging with a focus on coronary artery disease, and we provide an overview of recent exciting translational developments in biological imaging. The illuminated examples and discussions will highlight how biological imaging is providing new clinical approaches to identify high-risk plaques, and to streamline the development process of new atherosclerosis therapies. PMID:23733542

  4. [Control of atherosclerosis in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Quiroz Martínez, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Diabetic patients develop atherosclerosis in an accelerated way as compared to non-diabetic patients. This is due to a generalized metabolic disorder that includes hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidosis, loss of the endothelial regulatory function, a tendency for vasoconstriction, and a prothrombotic state. The main complications are coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease. In all these manifestations and at all severity levels, diabetic patients, in particular post-menopausal women, have the worst prognosis with any type of treatment as compared to non-diabetic patients. These findings lead to consider the sole presentation of diabetes mellitus to be equivalent to cardiovascular risk. The largest reduction in risk is achieved by controlling hypertension, followed by a control of glycemia, reduction of glycosylated hemoglobulin and control of dyslipidosis. Benefits in the cardiovascular realm have not extended to other vascular territories, such as the lower extremities or the brain.

  5. [How corticoids, growth hormone and oestrogens influence lipids and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Marek, J; Hána, V; Krsek, M

    2007-04-01

    The hormones with a strong influence on the lipid spectrum and the development of atherosclerosis include cortisol, growth hormone and oestrogens. Cortisol accelerates atherosclerosis both through dyslipidemia and through an increase in visceral fat, hypertension, increased insulin resistance and the development of reduced glucose tolerance which may result in diabetes mellitus. Even when a cortisol excess disappears, as is the case of patients cured of Cushing syndrome, arterial walls remain permanently vulnerable to the atherosclerotic process. In conditions involving a lack of growth hormone, dyslipidemia develops and increases the burden on the cardiovascular system if not treated in a timely manner by the substitution of growth hormone. Oestrogens have a double effect: they have an anti-atherogenic effect on artery walls that are not yet damaged by an atherosclerotic process, but where atherosclerosis has already developed they have a prothrombotic effect and destabilise the atheromatous plaques. If oestrogen is to be used as protection against the onset of atherogenesis, it is necessary to start in a period when the atherosclerotic process has not yet begun to damage the woman's arterial walls and it is best to use natural hormones (estradiol) and to prevent endometriosis it should be combined with crystalline progesterone applied locally--inravaginally. Oestrogens should be given in small doses, preferably parenterally. Even this will not prevent genetic oestrogen effects though.

  6. The Vascular Biology of Atherosclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States, Europe, a vast majority of Asia, and is likely to be the greatest...threat to overall health worldwide. As a major cause of cardiovascular disease , the development of atherosclerosis starts early in childhood. Despite this

  7. Accelerating clinical insights: how to use accelerator mass spectrometry to make better early development decisions.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Mark

    2010-12-01

    This paper is an overview of the applications of the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) in the biomedical drug development field. The work described here has been carried out at Xceleron (York, UK and Germantown, MD, USA), and it aims to apply AMS to provide better information about the human pharmacokinetic/metabolic behaviour of drugs or drug candidates as early as possible. It is hoped that the use of this technique will contribute to the delivery of better, more effective drugs onto the market sooner, which will be good news for all concerned.

  8. Accelerating Vaccine Formulation Development Using Design of Experiment Stability Studies.

    PubMed

    Ahl, Patrick L; Mensch, Christopher; Hu, Binghua; Pixley, Heidi; Zhang, Lan; Dieter, Lance; Russell, Ryann; Smith, William J; Przysiecki, Craig; Kosinski, Mike; Blue, Jeffrey T

    2016-10-01

    Vaccine drug product thermal stability often depends on formulation input factors and how they interact. Scientific understanding and professional experience typically allows vaccine formulators to accurately predict the thermal stability output based on formulation input factors such as pH, ionic strength, and excipients. Thermal stability predictions, however, are not enough for regulators. Stability claims must be supported by experimental data. The Quality by Design approach of Design of Experiment (DoE) is well suited to describe formulation outputs such as thermal stability in terms of formulation input factors. A DoE approach particularly at elevated temperatures that induce accelerated degradation can provide empirical understanding of how vaccine formulation input factors and interactions affect vaccine stability output performance. This is possible even when clear scientific understanding of particular formulation stability mechanisms are lacking. A DoE approach was used in an accelerated 37(°)C stability study of an aluminum adjuvant Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B vaccine. Formulation stability differences were identified after only 15 days into the study. We believe this study demonstrates the power of combining DoE methodology with accelerated stress stability studies to accelerate and improve vaccine formulation development programs particularly during the preformulation stage.

  9. Advances in Parallel Electromagnetic Codes for Accelerator Science and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Kwok; Candel, Arno; Ge, Lixin; Kabel, Andreas; Lee, Rich; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Rawat, Vineet; Schussman, Greg; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    Over a decade of concerted effort in code development for accelerator applications has resulted in a new set of electromagnetic codes which are based on higher-order finite elements for superior geometry fidelity and better solution accuracy. SLAC's ACE3P code suite is designed to harness the power of massively parallel computers to tackle large complex problems with the increased memory and solve them at greater speed. The US DOE supports the computational science R&D under the SciDAC project to improve the scalability of ACE3P, and provides the high performance computing resources needed for the applications. This paper summarizes the advances in the ACE3P set of codes, explains the capabilities of the modules, and presents results from selected applications covering a range of problems in accelerator science and development important to the Office of Science.

  10. Impact of accelerated plant growth on seed variety development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophersen, Eric

    1998-01-01

    The commercial lives of agricultural seed products have steadily declined in recent years. The introduction of genetically engineered crop seeds in 1966 has accentuated that trend. Widespread grower demand for genetically engineered seed requires competitive response by industry followers in order to avert market share losses to the industry leaders. Limitations on plant transformation technology, regulatory requirements and patent impediments require companies to rapidly convert transformed lines into elite commercial products. Massive multigenerational backcrossing efforts are required to distribute genetically engineered traits into a broad product mix. Significant incidents of expression failures, or ``gene silencing,'' have occurred unexpectedly, requiring product substitution strategies. First-to-market strategies, competitive response, broad germplasm conversion and rescue of product failures all share the element of urgency. Technologies which reliably accelerate product development rates can expect favorable reception by commercial seed developers. A growth chamber which dramatically accelerates the rate of plant growth is described.

  11. Development of X-Band Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2010-11-04

    This paper presents a progress report on the development and testing of X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Recent tests on several quartz DLA structures with different inner diameters are reported. Designs for gap-free DLA structures are presented. Also, planned new experiments are discussed, including higher gradient traveling-wave and standing-wave structures and special grooved structures for multipactor suppression.

  12. Rail accelerator development for ultra-high pressure research

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Nellis, W.J.; Rego, J.; Susoeff, A.R.; Newman, G.H.

    1983-09-20

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a rail accelerator system for launching hypervelocity projectiles suitable for ultrahigh pressure shockwave research. The primary goal is to accelerate 1 g projectiles with disk impactors to velocities in excess of 12 km/s and generate uniform, planar shockwaves at pressures above 0.5 TPa (5 Mbar) in metal targets. In order to generate precisely controlled impacts and shockwaves, several strigent requirements are imposed on the railgun system. During the last year, we have begun detailed development of a railgun launcher and power source. We are developing a launcher with a gas injector. The injector accelerates the projectile to more than 1 km/s reducing the dwell time of the plasma arc and the erosion of the rails. The injected projectile, with a fuse, also serves as the main switch in the power supply circuit. Current pulse shaping is used to control the applied stress to the projectile and launcher. Results of experiments with the new system will be reported and compared to computer simulations.

  13. Rail accelerator development for ultra-high pressure research

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Nellis, W.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a rail accelerator system for launching hypervelocity projectiles suitable for ultrahigh pressure shockwave research. The primary goal is to accelerate 1 g projectiles with disk impactors to velocities in excess of 12 km/s and generate uniform, planar shockwaves at pressures above 0.5 TPa (5 Mbar) in metal targets. In order to generate precisely controlled impacts and shockwaves, several stringent requirements are imposed on the railgun system. During the last year, detailed development of a railgun launcher and power source has begun. A launcher with a gas injector is being developed. The injector accelerates the projectile to more than 1 km/s reducing the dwell time of the plasma arc and the erosion of the rails. The injected projectile, with a fuse, also serves as the main switch in the power supply circuit. Current pulse shaping is used to control the applied stress to the projectile and launcher. Results of experiments with the new system are reported and compared to computer simulations.

  14. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Benjamin M.; Paul, Kevin; Mullowney, Paul J.; Messmer, Peter; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Esarey, Eric; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Leemans, Wim; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-22

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating >10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of {approx}2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  15. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2008-09-10

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  16. Research and Development for Ultra-High Gradient Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Research on the basic physics of high-gradient, high frequency accelerator structures and the associated RF/microwave technology are essential for the future of discovery science, medicine and biology, energy and environment, and national security. We will review the state-of-the-art for the development of high gradient linear accelerators. We will present the research activities aimed at exploring the basic physics phenomenon of RF breakdown. We present the experimental results of a true systematic study in which the surface processing, geometry, and materials of the structures have been varied, one parameter at a time. The breakdown rate or alternatively, the probability of breakdown/pulse/meter has been recorded for different operating parameters. These statistical data reveal a strong dependence of breakdown probability on surface magnetic field, or alternatively on surface pulsed heating. This is in contrast to the classical view of electric field dependence.

  17. Rail-accelerator development for ultra-high-pressure research

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Nellis, W.J.; Rego, J.; Susoeff, A.R.; Newman, G.H.

    1983-09-14

    During the last year, we have begun detailed development of a railgun launcher and power source. We are developing a launcher with a gas injector. The injector accelerates the projectile to more than 1 km/s reducing the dwell time of the plasma arc and the erosion of the rails. The injected projectile, with a fuse, also serves as the main switch in the power supply circuit. Current pulse shaping is used to control the applied stress to the projectile and launcher. Results of experiments with the new system will be reported and compared to computer simulations.

  18. Development of the brine shrimp Artemia is accelerated during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Metcalf, J.; DeBell, L.; Paulsen, A.; Noren, W.; Guikema, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Developmentally arrested brine shrimp cysts have been reactivated during orbital spaceflight on two different Space Shuttle missions (STS-50 and STS-54), and their subsequent development has been compared with that of simultaneously reactivated ground controls. Flight and control brine shrimp do not significantly differ with respect to hatching rates or larval morphology at the scanning and transmission EM levels. A small percentage of the flight larvae had defective nauplier eye development, but the observation was not statistically significant. However, in three different experiments on two different flights, involving a total of 232 larvae that developed in space, a highly significant difference in degree of flight to control development was found. By as early as 2.25 days after reactivation of development, spaceflight brine shrimp were accelerated, by a full instar, over ground control brine shrimp. Although developing more rapidly, flight shrimp grew as long as control shrimp at each developmental instar or stage.

  19. Development of the brine shrimp Artemia is accelerated during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Spooner, B S; Metcalf, J; DeBell, L; Paulsen, A; Noren, W; Guikema, J A

    1994-07-01

    Developmentally arrested brine shrimp cysts have been reactivated during orbital spaceflight on two different Space Shuttle missions (STS-50 and STS-54), and their subsequent development has been compared with that of simultaneously reactivated ground controls. Flight and control brine shrimp do not significantly differ with respect to hatching rates or larval morphology at the scanning and transmission EM levels. A small percentage of the flight larvae had defective nauplier eye development, but the observation was not statistically significant. However, in three different experiments on two different flights, involving a total of 232 larvae that developed in space, a highly significant difference in degree of flight to control development was found. By as early as 2.25 days after reactivation of development, spaceflight brine shrimp were accelerated, by a full instar, over ground control brine shrimp. Although developing more rapidly, flight shrimp grew as long as control shrimp at each developmental instar or stage.

  20. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  1. Development of a sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator

    PubMed

    Verbeke; Leung; Vujic

    2000-10-01

    Sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generators are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for applications ranging from neutron radiography to boron neutron capture therapy and neutron activation analysis. The new generation of high-output neutron generators is based on the D-T fusion reaction, producing 14.1-MeV neutrons. The main components of the neutron tube--the ion source, the accelerator and the target--are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Thick-target neutron yield computations are performed in this paper to estimate the neutron yield of titanium and scandium targets. With an average deuteron beam current of 1 A and an energy of 120 keV, a time-averaged neutron production of approximately 10(14) n/s can be estimated for a tritiated target, for both pulsed and cw operations. In mixed deuteron/triton beam operation, a beam current of 2 A at 150 keV is required for the same neutron output. Recent experimental results on ion sources and accelerator columns are presented and discussed.

  2. Aorta Atherosclerosis Lesion Analysis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Sarajo; Yin, Changjun; Weber, Christian; Hu, Desheng; Habenicht, Andreas JR

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium-sized arteries. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice are used as experimental models to study human atherosclerosis. ApoE-/- mice are constitutively hyperlipidemic and develop intima plaques that resemble human plaques. Various issues including experimental design for lesion analysis, dietary conditions, isolation of the aorta, staining methods, morphometry, group size, age, the location within the arterial tree, and statistical analyses are important parameters that need to be addressed to obtain robust data. Here, we provide detailed methods to quantify aorta atherosclerosis. PMID:27366759

  3. Latest Diagnostic Electronics Development for the PROSCAN Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Duperrex, P.A.; Frei, U.; Gamma, G.; Mueller, U.; Rezzonico, L.

    2004-11-10

    New VME-based diagnostic electronics are being developed for PROSCAN, a proton accelerator for medical application presently under construction at PSI. One new development is a VME-based multi-channel logarithmic amplifier for converting current to voltage (LogIV). The LogIV boards are used for measuring current from the multiple wire (harp) profile monitors. The LogIV calibration method, current dependant bandwidth and temperature stability are presented. Another development is a BPM front end, based on the newest digital receiver techniques. Features of this new system are the remote control of the preamplifier stage and the continuous monitoring of each individual signal overall gain. Characteristics of the developed prototype are given.

  4. A novel role for the Krüppel-like factor 14 on macrophage inflammatory response and atherosclerosis development.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao; Yang, Ruomei; Wang, Chengpan; Jian, Xun; Li, Ling; Liu, Hua; Yang, Gangyi; Li, Zhiyong

    Genome-wide association studies have shown that Krüppel-like factor 14 (KLF14) is associated with both Type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid metabolism. However, its role in chronic inflammatory responses and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unknown. The present study was designed to investigate both in vivo and in vitro the impact of KLF14 on chronic inflammatory responses and atherosclerosis. ApoE KO mice, a well-established animal model of atherosclerosis, had higher expressions of KLF14 in aorta tissues than that in C57BL/6 J mice when fed the high-fat diet (HFD) or standard chow diet. Adenovirus-mediated KLF14 knockdown markedly reduced the circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and the formation of atherosclerotic lesions in HFD-fed ApoE KO mice. In the in vitro study, KLF14 overexpression in the RAW264.7 macrophages significantly increased the expressions of inflammatory cytokines, total cholesterol (TC), cholesteryl ester (CE), and the ratio of CE to TC in the cells treated with acetylated low-density lipoproteins (AcLDL). Conversely, KLF14 knockdown remarkably attenuated AcLDL-induced increase in TC, CE, and the ratio of CE to TC as well as the expressions of inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, up-regulation or down-regulation of KLF14 markedly elevated or inhibited the phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 in AcLDL-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively. Importantly, treatment with p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 inhibitor nullified the effects of KLF14 on inflammatory cytokine expressions in the cells. These data demonstrate an important role for KLF14 expression in atherosclerotic lesion formation.

  5. Impaired Vitamin D Signaling in Endothelial Cell Leads to an Enhanced Leukocyte-Endothelium Interplay: Implications for Atherosclerosis Development.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Milica; Álvarez, Ángeles; de Pablo, Carmen; Sanchez-Niño, Maria-Dolores; Ortiz, Alberto; Dolcet, Xavier; Encinas, Mario; Fernandez, Elvira; Valdivielso, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell activation leading to leukocyte recruitment and adhesion plays an essential role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Vitamin D has cardioprotective actions, while its deficiency is a risk factor for the progression of cardiovascular damage. Our aim was to assess the role of basal levels of vitamin D receptor (VDR) on the early leukocyte recruitment and related endothelial cell-adhesion-molecule expression, as essential prerequisites for the onset of atherosclerosis. Knockdown of VDR in endothelial cells (shVDR) led to endothelial cell activation, characterized by upregulation of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and IL-6, decreased peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) rolling velocity and increased PBMC rolling flux and adhesion to the endothelium. shVDR cells showed decreased IκBα levels and accumulation of p65 in the nucleus compared to shRNA controls. Inhibition of NF-κB activation with super-repressor IκBα blunted all signs of endothelial cell activation caused by downregulation of VDR in endothelial cells. In vivo, deletion of VDR led to significantly larger aortic arch and aortic root lesions in apoE-/- mice, with higher macrophage content. apoE-/-VDR-/-mice showed higher aortic expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and IL-6 when compared to apoE-/-VDR+/+ mice. Our data demonstrate that lack of VDR signaling in endothelial cells leads to a state of endothelial activation with increased leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions that may contribute to the more severe plaque accumulation observed in apoE-/-VDR-/- mice. The results reveal an important role for basal levels of endothelial VDR in limiting endothelial cell inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  6. Impaired Vitamin D Signaling in Endothelial Cell Leads to an Enhanced Leukocyte-Endothelium Interplay: Implications for Atherosclerosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Milica; Álvarez, Ángeles; de Pablo, Carmen; Sanchez-Niño, Maria-Dolores; Ortiz, Alberto; Dolcet, Xavier; Encinas, Mario; Fernandez, Elvira; Valdivielso, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell activation leading to leukocyte recruitment and adhesion plays an essential role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Vitamin D has cardioprotective actions, while its deficiency is a risk factor for the progression of cardiovascular damage. Our aim was to assess the role of basal levels of vitamin D receptor (VDR) on the early leukocyte recruitment and related endothelial cell-adhesion-molecule expression, as essential prerequisites for the onset of atherosclerosis. Knockdown of VDR in endothelial cells (shVDR) led to endothelial cell activation, characterized by upregulation of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and IL-6, decreased peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) rolling velocity and increased PBMC rolling flux and adhesion to the endothelium. shVDR cells showed decreased IκBα levels and accumulation of p65 in the nucleus compared to shRNA controls. Inhibition of NF-κB activation with super-repressor IκBα blunted all signs of endothelial cell activation caused by downregulation of VDR in endothelial cells. In vivo, deletion of VDR led to significantly larger aortic arch and aortic root lesions in apoE-/- mice, with higher macrophage content. apoE-/-VDR-/-mice showed higher aortic expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and IL-6 when compared to apoE-/-VDR+/+ mice. Our data demonstrate that lack of VDR signaling in endothelial cells leads to a state of endothelial activation with increased leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions that may contribute to the more severe plaque accumulation observed in apoE-/-VDR-/- mice. The results reveal an important role for basal levels of endothelial VDR in limiting endothelial cell inflammation and atherosclerosis. PMID:26322890

  7. Accelerator-driven subcritical facility:Conceptual design development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry; Bolshinsky, Igor; Naberezhnev, Dmitry; Duo, Jose; Belch, Henry; Bailey, James

    2006-06-01

    A conceptual design development of an accelerator-driven subcritical facility has been carried out in the preparation of a joint activity with Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine. The main functions of the facility are the medical isotope production and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. An electron accelerator is considered to drive the subcritical assembly. The neutron source intensity and spectrum have been studied. The energy deposition, spatial neutron generation, neutron utilization fraction, and target dimensions have been quantified to define the main target performance parameters, and to select the target material and beam parameters. Different target conceptual designs have been developed based the engineering requirements including heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux level with a Keff of 0.98. Different fuel materials, uranium enrichments, and reflector materials are considered in the design process. The possibility of using low enrichment uranium without penalizing the facility performance is carefully evaluated. The mechanical design of the facility has been developed to maximize its utility and minimize the time for replacing the target and the fuel assemblies. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements, upgrades, and new missions. In addition, it has large design margins to accommodate different operating conditions and parameters. In this paper, the conceptual design and the design analyses of the facility will be presented.

  8. Obesity and aging: determinants of endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias

    2010-10-01

    Endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. After the discovery of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) by Robert F. Furchgott in 1980 it soon became clear that endothelial cells also release vasoactive factors distinct from nitric oxide (NO) namely, endothelium-derived contracting factors (EDCF) as well as hyperpolarizing factors (EDHF). Vasoactive factors derived from endothelial cells include NO/EDRF, reactive oxygen species, endothelins and angiotensins which have either EDRF or EDCF functions, cyclooxygenase-derived EDCFs and EDRFs, and EDHFs. Endothelial factors are formed by enzymes such as NO synthase, cyclooxygenase, converting enyzmes, NADPH oxidases, and epoxigenases, among others, and participate in the regulation of vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions; however, their abnormal regulation due to endothelial cell dysfunction contributes to disease processes such as atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, and renal disease. Because of recent changes in world demographics and the declining health status of the world's population, both aging and obesity as independent risk factors for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease and stroke, will continue to increase in the years to come. Obesity and associated conditions such as arterial hypertension and diabetes are now also some of the primary health concerns among children and adolescents. The similarities of pathomechanisms activated in obesity and aging suggest that obesity--at least in the vasculature--can be considered to have effects consistent with accelerated, "premature" aging. Pathomechanisms as well as the clinical issues of obesity- and aging-associated vascular changes important for atherosclerosis development and prevention are discussed.

  9. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  10. Development of the SCRF Power Coupler for the APT Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schmierer, E.N.; Lujan, R.E.; Rusnak, B.; Smith, B.; Haynes, W.B.; Gautier, C.; Waynert, J.A.; Krawczyk, F.; Gioia, J.

    1999-03-01

    The team responsible for the design of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) superconducting (SC) radio frequency (RF) power coupler has developed two 700-MHz, helium gas-cooled power couplers. One has a fixed inner conductor and the other has an adjustable inner conductor (gamma prototype and alpha prototype). The power couplers will be performance tested in the near future. This paper discusses the mechanical design and fabrication techniques employed in the development of each power coupler. This includes material selection, copper coating, assembly sequences, and metal joining procedures, as well as the engineering analyses performed to determine the dynamic response of the inner conductors due to environmental excitations. A bellows is used in both prototype inner conductors in the area near the ceramic RF window, to compensate for thermal expansion and mechanical tolerance build-up. In addition, a bellows is used near the tip of the inner conductor of the alpha prototype for running the power coupler after it is installed on the accelerator. Extensive analytical work has been performed to determine the static loads transmitted by the bellows due to thermally induced expansion on the inner conductor and on the RF window. This paper also discusses this analysis, as well as the mechanical analysis performed to determine the final geometric shape of the bellows. Finally, a discussion of the electromagnetic analysis used to optimize the performance of the power couplers is included.

  11. A strategic plan to accelerate development of acute stroke treatments.

    PubMed

    Marler, John R

    2012-09-01

    In order to reenergize acute stroke research and accelerate the development of new treatments, we need to transform the usual design and conduct of clinical trials to test for small but significant improvements in effectiveness, and treat patients as soon as possible after stroke onset when treatment effects are most detectable. This requires trials that include thousands of acute stroke patients. A plan to make these trials possible is proposed. There are four components: (1) free access to the electronic medical record; (2) a large stroke emergency network and clinical trial coordinating center connected in real time to hundreds of emergency departments; (3) a clinical trial technology development center; and (4) strategic leadership to raise funds, motivate clinicians to participate, and interact with politicians, insurers, legislators, and other national and international organizations working to advance the quality of stroke care.

  12. Improving and Accelerating Drug Development for Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pankevich, Diana E.; Altevogt, Bruce M.; Dunlop, John; Gage, Fred H.; Hyman, Steve E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the neurosciences have placed the field in the position where it is poised to significantly reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. However, drug discovery, development and translation for nervous system disorders still pose many unique challenges. The key scientific challenges can be summarized as follows: mechanisms of disease, target identification and validation, predictive models, biomarkers for patient stratification and as endpoints for clinical trials, clear regulatory pathways, reliability and reproducibility of published data, and data sharing and collaboration. To accelerate nervous system drug development the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders has hosted a series of public workshops that brought together representatives of industry, government (including both research funding and regulatory agencies), academia, and patient groups to discuss these challenges and offer potential strategies to improve the translational neuroscience. PMID:25442933

  13. Highly Productive Application Development with ViennaCL for Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, K.; Weinbub, J.; Rudolf, F.

    2012-12-01

    The use of graphics processing units (GPUs) for the acceleration of general purpose computations has become very attractive over the last years, and accelerators based on many integrated CPU cores are about to hit the market. However, there are discussions about the benefit of GPU computing when comparing the reduction of execution times with the increased development effort [1]. To counter these concerns, our open-source linear algebra library ViennaCL [2,3] uses modern programming techniques such as generic programming in order to provide a convenient access layer for accelerator and GPU computing. Other GPU-accelerated libraries are primarily tuned for performance, but less tailored to productivity and portability: MAGMA [4] provides dense linear algebra operations via a LAPACK-comparable interface, but no dedicated matrix and vector types. Cusp [5] is closest in functionality to ViennaCL for sparse matrices, but is based on CUDA and thus restricted to devices from NVIDIA. However, no convenience layer for dense linear algebra is provided with Cusp. ViennaCL is written in C++ and uses OpenCL to access the resources of accelerators, GPUs and multi-core CPUs in a unified way. On the one hand, the library provides iterative solvers from the family of Krylov methods, including various preconditioners, for the solution of linear systems typically obtained from the discretization of partial differential equations. On the other hand, dense linear algebra operations are supported, including algorithms such as QR factorization and singular value decomposition. The user application interface of ViennaCL is compatible to uBLAS [6], which is part of the peer-reviewed Boost C++ libraries [7]. This allows to port existing applications based on uBLAS with a minimum of effort to ViennaCL. Conversely, the interface compatibility allows to use the iterative solvers from ViennaCL with uBLAS types directly, thus enabling code reuse beyond CPU-GPU boundaries. Out-of-the-box support

  14. Macrophages, dendritic cells, and regression of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Jonathan E.; Feig, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and other cellular elements present in the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the focus of this review will be primarily on the macrophages and DCs. The role of these two cell types in atherosclerosis is discussed, with a particular emphasis on their involvement in atherosclerosis regression. PMID:22934038

  15. [Atherosclerosis, oxidative stress and physical activity. Review].

    PubMed

    Calderón, Juan Camilo; Fernández, Ana Zita; María de Jesús, Alina Isabel

    2008-09-01

    Atherosclerosis and related diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world and, therefore, as a problem of public health. Free radicals and reactive oxygen species have been suggested to be part of the pathophysiology of these diseases. It is well known that physical activity plays an important role as a public health measure by reducing the risk of developing atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular events in the general population. It is also known that physical activity increases in some tissues, the reactive oxygen species production. In this review the atherosclerosis-oxidative stress-physical activity relationship is focused on the apparent paradox by which physical activity reduces atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk in parallel with the activation of an apparently damaging mechanism which is an increased oxidative stress. A hypothesis including the experimental and clinical evidence is presented to explain the aforementioned paradox.

  16. Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Packard, René R. S.; Lichtman, Andrew H.; Libby, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder, involves both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response that mediate the initiation, progression, and ultimate thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis. Most fatal thromboses, which may manifest as acute myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke, result from frank rupture or superficial erosion of the fibrous cap overlying the atheroma, processes that occur in inflammatorily active, rupture-prone plaques. Appreciation of the inflammatory character of atherosclerosis has led to the application of C-reactive protein as a biomarker of cardiovascular risk, and the characterization of the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory actions of the statin class of drugs. An improved understanding of the pathobiology of atherosclerosis and further studies of its immune mechanisms provide avenues for the development of future strategies directed toward better risk stratification of patients as well as the identification of novel anti-inflammatory therapies. This review retraces leukocyte subsets involved in innate and adaptive immunity and their contributions to atherogenesis. PMID:19449008

  17. Development of an accelerating piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, J.; Loiseau, J.; Higgins, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest for a number of scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. In the implosion-driven launcher (ILD) concept, explosives are used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures than the propellant of conventional light-gas guns. The propellant of the IDL is compressed through the linear implosion of a pressurized tube. The imploding tube behaves like a piston which travels into the light gas at the explosive detonation velocity, thus forming an increasingly long column of shock-compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill designed IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This work will focus on the implementation of a novel launch cycle in which the explosively driven piston is accelerated in order to gradually increase driver gas compression, thus maintaining a relatively constant projectile driving pressure. The theoretical potential of the concept as well as the experimental development of an accelerating piston driver will be examined.

  18. Protective Role of the Interleukin 33 rs3939286 Gene Polymorphism in the Development of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Robustillo-Villarino, Montserrat; García-Bermúdez, Mercedes; Llorca, Javier; Corrales, Alfonso; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Ubilla, Begoña; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Mijares, Verónica; Pina, Trinitario; Blanco, Ricardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Ramírez Huaranga, Marco A.; Mínguez Sánchez, María D.; Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Vicente, Esther; Carmona, F. David; Castañeda, Santos; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the interleukin-33 (IL-33)-interleukin-1 receptor like 1 (IL-1RL1) signaling pathway is implicated in the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A total of 576 Spanish RA patients from Northern Spain were genotyped for 6 well-known IL33-IL1RL1 polymorphisms (IL33 rs3939286, IL33 rs7025417, IL33 rs7044343, IL1RL1 rs2058660, IL1RL1 rs2310173 and IL1RL1 rs13015714) by TaqMan genotyping assay. The presence of subclinical atherosclerosis was determined by the assessment of carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) by carotid ultrasound (US). Results RA patients carrying the TT genotype of the IL33 rs3939286 polymorphism had lower cIMT values than those homozygous for the CC genotype (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 0.71 ± 0.14 mm versus 0.76 ± 0.16 mm, respectively) while patients carrying the CT genotype had intermediate cIMT values (mean ± SD: 0.73 ± 0.17 mm). Moreover, RA patients carrying the mutant allele T of the IL33 rs3939286 polymorphism exhibited significantly lower cIMT values than those carrying the wild allele C (mean ± SD: 0.72 ± 0.16 mm versus 0.75 ± 0.18 mm respectively; p = 0.04). The association of both genotype and allele frequencies of IL33 rs3939286 and cIMT levels remained statistically significant after adjustment for sex, age at the time of US study, follow-up and center (p = 0.006 and p = 0.0023, respectively), evidencing that the potential effect conferred by IL33 rs3939286 may be independent of confounder factors. No association with other IL33-IL1RL1 genetic variants was observed. Conclusions In conclusion, our results may suggest a potential protective effect of the IL33 rs3939286 allele T in the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with RA. PMID:26571131

  19. Developing an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) based on electron accelerators and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizi, H.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    An ADS based on electron accelerators has been developed specifically for energy generation and medical applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using FLUKA code to design a hybrid electron target and the core components. The composition, geometry of conversion targets and the coolant system have been optimized for electron beam energies of 20 to 100 MeV . Furthermore, the photon and photoneutron energy spectra, distribution and energy deposition for various incoming electron beam powers have been studied. Light-heavy water of various mixtures have been used as heat removal for the targets, as γ-n converters and as neutron moderators. We have shown that an electron LINAC, as a neutron production driver for ADSs, is capable of producing a neutron output of > 3.5 × 1014 (n/s/mA). Accordingly, the feasibility of an electron-based ADS employing the designed features is promising for energy generation and high intense neutron production which have various applications such as medical therapies.

  20. Inflammation in Atherosclerosis: From Pathophysiology to Practice

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Peter; Ridker, Paul M; Hansson, Göran K.

    2010-01-01

    Just three decades ago the prevailing viewpoint envisaged atherosclerosis as a bland proliferative process. (1) According to that concept, endothelial denuding injury led to platelet aggregation and release of platelet-derived growth factor which would trigger the proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the arterial intima, and form the nidus of the atherosclerotic plaque. This cellular model of atherosclerosis updated Virchow's concepts of atherosclerosis as a response to injury formulated in the mid-nineteenth century. The advent of the cell biological era of atherosclerosis supplanted the simplistic concept of the atheroma as a passive deposition of lipid debris on the artery wall. Beyond the vascular smooth muscle cells long recognized in atherosclerotic lesions, subsequent work identified immune cells and mediators at work in atheromata, implicating inflammatory mechanisms in disease development. (2) The advent of gene-targeting technology enabled the testing of the roles of specific molecules in the development of experimental atherosclerosis in mice. Such data demonstrated a critical role for hypercholesterolemia and also supported the participation of immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. (3) Multiple independent pathways of evidence now pinpoint inflammation as a key regulatory process that links multiple risk factors for atherosclerosis and its complications with altered arterial biology. This revolution in our thinking about the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis has begun to provide clinical insight and practical tools that may aid patient management. This review provides an update of the role of inflammation in atherogenesis and highlights how translation of these advances in basic science promises to change clinical practice. PMID:19942084

  1. [Genomic instability in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Dzhokhadze, T A; Buadze, T Zh; Gaiozishvili, M N; Kakauridze, N G; Lezhava, T A

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study of the level of genomic instability, parameters of quantitative and structural mutations of chromosomes (aberration, aneuploidy, polyploidy) in lymphocyte cultures from patients with atherosclerosis of age 80 years and older (control group - 30-35 years old) was conducted. The possibility of correction of disturbed genomic indicators by peptide bioregulators - Livagen (Lys-Glu-Asp-Ala) and cobalt ions with separate application or in combination was also studied. Control was lymphocyte culture of two healthy respective age groups. It was also shown that patients with atherosclerosis exhibit high level of genomic instability in all studied parameters, regardless of age, which may suggest that there is marked increase in chromatin condensation in atherosclerosis. It was also shown that Livagen (characterized by modifying influence on chromatin) separately and in combination with cobalt ions, promotes normalization of altered genomic indicators of atherosclerosis in both age groups. The results show that Livagen separately and in combination with cobalt ions has impact on chromatin of patients with atherosclerosis. The identified protective action of Livagen proves its efficacy in prevention of atherosclerosis.

  2. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Tikellis, Chris; Thomas, Merlin C; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a homolog of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) which generates angiotensin II from angiotensin I. ACE, its product angiotensin II and the downstream angiotensin type I receptor are important components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin II, the most important component of the RAS, promotes the development of atherosclerosis. The identification of ACE2 in 2000 opened a new chapter of research on the regulation of the RAS. ACE2 degrades pro-atherosclerotic angiotensin II and generates anti-atherosclerotic angiotensin 1-7. In this review, we explored the importance of ACE2 in protecting experimental animals from developing atherosclerosis and its involvement in human atherosclerosis. We also examined the published evidence assessing the importance of ACE2 in different cell types relevant to atherosclerosis and putative underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms linking ACE2 with protection from atherosclerosis. ACE2 shifts the balance from angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7 inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis in animal models.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis: model of systemic inflammation driving atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ivy A; Imboden, John B; Hsue, Priscilla Y; Ganz, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Similarities between the inflammatory pathways in atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are striking. Chronic systemic inflammation in RA patients leads to cardiovascular (CV) events beyond traditional cardiac risk factors. Clinicians typically focus on treating the joint manifestations of RA while neglecting to eliminate systemic inflammation, which leaves RA patients vulnerable to adverse CV events. In this review we provide an understanding of how systemic inflammation in RA accelerates atherosclerosis. This knowledge should guide therapeutic targets to minimize CV risk in RA, and may lead to insights into the inflammatory mechanisms of atherosclerosis in general.

  4. Resource for the Development of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Turteltaub, K. W.; Bench, G.; Buchholz, B. A.; Enright, H.; Kulp, K.; McCartt, A. D.; Malfatti, M.; Ognibene, T.; Loots, G.; Stewart, B. J.

    2016-04-08

    The NIH Research Resource for Biomedical AMS was originally funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1999 to develop and apply the technology of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in broad- based biomedical research. The Resource’s niche is to fill needs for ultra high sensitivity quantitation when isotope-labeled agents are used. The Research Resource’s Technology Research and Development (TR&D) efforts will focus on the needs of the biomedical research community in the context of seven Driving Biomedical Projects (DBPs) that will drive the Center’s technical capabilities through three core TR&Ds. We will expand our present capabilities by developing a fully integrated HPLC AMS to increase our capabilities for metabolic measurements, we will develop methods to understand cellular processes and we will develop and validate methods for the application of AMS in human studies, which is a growing area of demand by collaborators and service users. In addition, we will continue to support new and ongoing collaborative and service projects that require the capabilities of the Resource. The Center will continue to train researchers in the use of the AMS capabilities being developed, and the results of all efforts will be widely disseminated to advance progress in biomedical research. Towards these goals, our specific aims are to:1.) Increase the value and information content of AMS measurements by combining molecular speciation with quantitation of defined macromolecular isolates. Specifically, develop and validate methods for macromolecule labeling, characterization and quantitation.2.) Develop and validate methods and strategies to enable AMS to become more broadly used in human studies. Specifically, demonstrate robust methods for conducting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies in humans and model systems.3.) Increase the accessibility of AMS to the Biomedical research community and the throughput of AMS through direct coupling to separatory

  5. Infection and atherosclerosis: emerging mechanistic paradigms.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S E; Zhou, Y F; Zhu, J

    1999-07-27

    Although definitive proof of a causal role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Moreover, both Chlamydia pneumoniae and cytomegalovirus exacerbate lesion development in animal models of atherosclerosis and restenosis. The fact that multiple pathogens have been associated with atherosclerosis implies that many "atherogenic" pathogens exist, and recent data suggest that the risk of atherosclerosis conveyed by infection relates to the number of atherogenic pathogens with which an individual is infected. It also is evident that variability in host susceptibility to the atherogenic effects of pathogens exists; this variability appears to be related at least in part to whether the host can generate an immune response that successfully controls pathogen inflammatory activity and in part to the specific pattern of immune response--humoral or cellular. The latter may relate to host capacity to control pathogen activity and to a pathogen-induced autoimmune component of the atherogenic process. Additional animal and human studies are necessary to further test the validity of the infection/atherosclerosis link and to provide more insight into the mechanisms by which infection may contribute to atherosclerosis, information critical for devising strategies to reduce or eliminate any contribution to atherosclerosis caused by infection.

  6. Hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression in mice.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Kumar, Nikit; Olivas, Victor R; Eberlé, Delphine; Stephens, Kyle; Raffai, Robert L

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic patients are known to be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and its associated cardiovascular complications. However, the effects of hyperglycemia on atherosclerosis regression remain unclear. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression by modulating the biological function of lesional macrophages. HypoE (Apoe(h/h)Mx1-Cre) mice express low levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) and develop atherosclerosis when fed a high-fat diet. Atherosclerosis regression occurs in these mice upon plasma lipid lowering induced by a change in diet and the restoration of apoE expression. We examined the morphological characteristics of regressed lesions and assessed the biological function of lesional macrophages isolated with laser-capture microdissection in euglycemic and hyperglycemic HypoE mice. Hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin treatment impaired lesion size reduction (36% versus 14%) and lipid loss (38% versus 26%) after the reversal of hyperlipidemia. However, decreases in lesional macrophage content and remodeling in both groups of mice were similar. Gene expression analysis revealed that hyperglycemia impaired cholesterol transport by modulating ATP-binding cassette A1, ATP-binding cassette G1, scavenger receptor class B family member (CD36), scavenger receptor class B1, and wound healing pathways in lesional macrophages during atherosclerosis regression. Hyperglycemia impairs both reduction in size and loss of lipids from atherosclerotic lesions upon plasma lipid lowering without significantly affecting the remodeling of the vascular wall.

  7. Local factors modify the dose dependence of 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Yu, Tao; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz; Yu, Shaohua

    2012-07-01

    Radiation exposure from a number of terrestrial sources is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence establishing whether high-LET radiation has similar effects has been lacking. We recently demonstrated that 600 MeV/n 56Fe induces atherosclerosis as well. Ten-week old male apolipoprotein-E deficient mice, a well-characterized atherosclerosis animal model, were exposed to 0 (control) 2, or 5Gy 56Fe targeted to the chest and neck. In these mice, 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis was similar in character to that induced by X-rays in the same mouse model and to that resulting from therapeutic radiation in cancer patients. Atherosclerosis was exacerbated by 56Fe only in targeted areas, however, suggesting a direct effect of the radiation on the arteries themselves. This is in contrast to some other risk factors, such as high cholesterol or tobacco use, which have systemic effects. The radiation dose required to accelerate development of atherosclerotic plaques, however, differed depending on the vessel that was irradiated and even the location within the vessel. For example, atherosclerosis in the aortic arch was accelerated only by the highest dose (5 Gy), while the carotid arteries and the aortic root showed effects at 2 Gy (a dose four- to eight-fold lower than the dose of X-rays that produces similar effects in this model). Since shear stress is disrupted in the area of the aortic root, it is likely that at least part of the site-specificity is due to additive or synergistic effects of radiation and local hydrodynamics. Other factors, such as local oxidative stress or gene expression may also have been involved. Since the pro-atherogenic effects of 56Fe depend on additional local factors, this suggests that radiation exposure, when unavoidable, might be mitigated by modification of factors unrelated to the radiation itself.

  8. A minipig model of high-fat/high-sucrose diet-induced diabetes and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Shoumin; Yin, Weidong; Wang, Zongbao; Kusunoki, Masataka; Lian, Xin; Koike, Tomonari; Fan, Jianglin; Zhang, Qiuju

    2004-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major risk factor of the development of atherosclerosis in humans. However, studies examining mechanisms underlying diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis have been limited by the lack of suitable humanoid animal models. Pigs have a cardiovascular system that is very similar to that of humans and is useful as a model for human physiology and pathophysiology. In this study, we established a new miniature pig model for studying dyslipidaemia and atherosclerosis in diabetes. Chinese Guizhou minipigs were fed a normal control diet or a high-fat/high-sucrose diet (HFSD) for 6 months. Plasma total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), insulin and glucose were quantified at monthly intervals. The induction of insulin resistance and dysfunction of the pancreatic β-cell were assessed by oral glucose tolerance test and insulin sensitivity test. The aortic fatty streak lesions were quantified following lipid staining with Sudan IV. During the feeding period, mild high plasma TC and TG were induced. At the end of 6 months, in HFSD-fed animals, the adipocytes were hypertrophic, fat deposit in the liver was observed, loss of pancreatic β-cells was observed, and the aortic fatty streak lesions were clearly present in the animals' aortas. Our study established that miniature pigs that were fed a HFSD without adding dietary cholesterol developed insulin resistance, mild diabetes and atherosclerotic lesions. HFSD-fed miniature pigs may be good animal models for research on the treatment of diabetic dyslipidaemia complicated with atherosclerosis. PMID:15312127

  9. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway Development Using Publicly Available Data Sources.

    PubMed

    Oki, Noffisat O; Nelms, Mark D; Bell, Shannon M; Mortensen, Holly M; Edwards, Stephen W

    2016-03-01

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept links molecular perturbations with organism and population-level outcomes to support high-throughput toxicity (HTT) testing. International efforts are underway to define AOPs and store the information supporting these AOPs in a central knowledge base; however, this process is currently labor-intensive and time-consuming. Publicly available data sources provide a wealth of information that could be used to define computationally predicted AOPs (cpAOPs), which could serve as a basis for creating expert-derived AOPs in a much more efficient way. Computational tools for mining large datasets provide the means for extracting and organizing the information captured in these public data sources. Using cpAOPs as a starting point for expert-derived AOPs should accelerate AOP development. Coupling this with tools to coordinate and facilitate the expert development efforts will increase the number and quality of AOPs produced, which should play a key role in advancing the adoption of HTT testing, thereby reducing the use of animals in toxicity testing and greatly increasing the number of chemicals that can be tested.

  10. Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Srivastava, Rameshwar D.; Ciferno, Jared; Litynski, John; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2013-08-15

    This special section of Energy & Fuels comprises a selection of papers presented at the topical conference “Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation”, sponsored and organized by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as part of the 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting held in Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 28-Nov 2, 2012. That topical conference focused on the latest research and development efforts in five main areas related to fossil energy, with each area focusing on the utilization of both experimental and computational approaches: (1) gas separations (membranes, sorbents, and solvents for CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} production), (2) CO{sub 2} utilization (enhanced oil recovery, chemical production, mineralization, etc.), (3) carbon sequestration (flow in natural systems), (4) advanced power cycles (oxy-combustion, chemical looping, gasification, etc.), and (5) fuel processing (H{sub 2} production for fuel cells).

  11. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... role in atherosclerosis risk. Other Factors That Affect Atherosclerosis Other factors also may raise your risk for ...

  12. Prenatal stress enhances severity of atherosclerosis in the adult apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse offspring via inflammatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Ho, H; Lhotak, S; Solano, M E; Karimi, K; Pincus, M K; Austin, R C; Arck, P

    2013-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Endothelial cell dysfunctions are early events in atherosclerosis, resulting in the recruitment of circulating monocytes. The immune system can elicit an inflammatory response toward the atherosclerotic lesion, thereby accelerating lesion growth. Risk factors for atherosclerosis include hypertension, smoking, stress perception or low birth weight. As prenatal stress challenge decreases the birth weight and affects the offspring's postnatal immune response, we aimed to investigate whether prenatal stress contributes to the development of atherosclerosis in mice. Syngenic pregnant apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) dams were exposed to sound stress on gestation days 12.5 and 14.5. The presence and size of atherosclerotic plaques in the offspring at the age of 15 weeks was evaluated by histomorphology, accompanied by flow cytometric analysis of the frequency and phenotype of monocytes/macrophages and regulatory T (Treg) cells in the blood. Further, cytokine secretion of peripheral blood lymphocytes was analyzed. In response to prenatal stress challenge, an increased frequency of large atherosclerotic plaques was detectable in apoE-/- offspring, which was particularly profound in females. Prenatal stress also resulted in alterations of the offspring's immune response, such as a decreased frequency of Treg cells in blood, alterations of macrophage populations in blood and an increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines. We provide novel evidence that prenatally stressed adult offspring show an increased severity of atherosclerosis. As Treg cells are key players in dampening inflammation, the observed increase in atherosclerosis may be due to the lack of Treg cell frequency. Future interdisciplinary research is urgently required to understand the developmental origin of prenatal stress-induced atherosclerosis. The availability of our model may facilitate and foster such research endeavors.

  13. Associations between Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Middle-Aged Adults: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study

    PubMed Central

    VanWagner, Lisa B.; Ning, Hongyan; Lewis, Cora E.; Shay, Christina M.; Wilkins, John; Carr, J Jeffrey; Terry, James G.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Jacobs, David R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an obesity-related condition associated with cardiovascular mortality. Yet, whether or not NAFLD is independently related to atherosclerosis is unclear. In a population-based cross-sectional sample of middle-aged adults free from liver or heart disease, we tested the hypothesis that NAFLD is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC)) independent of obesity. Methods Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study with CT quantification of liver fat, CAC and AAC were included (n=2,424). NAFLD was defined as liver attenuation ≤ 40 Hounsfield Units after exclusion of other causes of liver fat. CAC and AAC presence was defined as Agatston score > 0. Results Mean participant age was 50.1±3.6 years, (42.7% men, 50.0% black) and BMI was 30.6±7.2 kg/m2. The prevalence of NAFLD, CAC, and AAC was 9.6%, 27.1%, and 51.4%. NAFLD participants had increased prevalence of CAC (37.9% vs. 26.0%, p<0.001) and AAC (65.1% vs. 49.9%, p<0.001). NAFLD remained associated with CAC (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.001–1.82) and AAC (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.29–2.35) after adjustment for demographics and health behaviors. However, these associations were attenuated after additional adjustment for visceral adipose tissue (CAC OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.74–1.48, AAC OR=1.20; 95% CI, 0.86–1.67). There was no interaction by race or sex. Conclusion In contrast to prior research, these findings suggest that obesity attenuates the relationship between NAFLD and subclinical atherosclerosis. Further studies evaluating the role of NAFLD duration on atherosclerotic progression and cardiovascular events are needed. PMID:24956534

  14. The UPR in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Alex X.; Tabas, Ira

    2014-01-01

    Multiple systemic factors and local stressors in the arterial wall can disturb the functions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing ER stress in endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and macrophages during the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. As a protective response to restore ER homeostasis, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is initiated by three major ER sensors: protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring protein 1α (IRE1α), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). The activation of the various UPR signaling pathways displays a temporal pattern of activation at different stages of the disease. The ATF6 and IRE1α pathways that promote the expression of protein chaperones in ER are activated in ECs in athero-susceptible regions of prelesional arteries and before the appearance of foam cells. The PERK pathway that reduces ER protein client load by blocking protein translation is activated in SMCs and macrophages in early lesions. The activation of these UPR signaling pathways aims to cope with the ER stress and plays a pro-survival role in the early stage of atherosclerosis. However, with the progression of atherosclerosis, the extended duration and increased intensity of ER stress in lesions lead to prolonged and enhanced UPR signaling. Under this circumstance, the PERK pathway induces expression of death effectors, and possibly IRE1α activates apoptosis signaling pathways, leading to apoptosis of macrophages and SMCs in advanced lesions. Importantly, UPR-mediated cell death is associated with plaque instability and the clinical progression of atherosclerosis. Moreover, UPR signaling is linked to inflammation and possibly to macrophage differentiation in lesions. Therapeutic approaches targeting the UPR may have promise in the prevention and/or regression of atherosclerosis. However, more progress is needed to fully understand all of the roles of the UPR in atherosclerosis and to harness this information

  15. Risk factors for atherosclerosis in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Misra, A

    2000-06-01

    Atherosclerosis starts in childhood, and is accelerated in some individuals. A cluster of clinical and biochemical factors constitute the risk profile for many of them, perhaps most important being metabolic insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin resistance and its components for children and adolescents, especially obesity and dyslipidemia, are generators of hypertension, glucose intolerance and complications of atherosclerosis in adulthood. Some individuals are genetically predisposed, particularly those with the family history of such disorders. For many subjects, there is 'tracking' of metabolic and lifestyle factors from early age to adulthood. Several new risk factors of atherosclerosis (e.g. level of lipoprotein (a), procoagulant state, hyperhomocysteinemia, low birth weight and adverse in-utero environment, and possibly inflammatory markers) are current and potentially future areas of research concerning children and young individuals. Definition of and research on new and hitherto not investigated factors and formulation of strategies to neutralize the known factors are of paramount importance for primary prevention of atherosclerosis. Simple and effective measures for prevention include increasing awareness of the diseases, maintenance of ideal body weight, regular physical exercise, avoidance of smoking and chewing of tobacco, eating a balanced diet, and early periodic monitoring of blood pressure and metabolic status. These measures, starting from childhood, should be applied to all and in particular to the susceptible offspring, predisposed individuals, and populations.

  16. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the association between insulin resistance and vascular disease, and this has led to wide acceptance of the clustering of hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and obesity as a clinical entity, the metabolic syndrome. While insulin resistance, by promoting dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities, is part of the proatherogenic milieu, it is possible that insulin resistance itself in the vascular wall does not promote atherosclerosis. Recent findings suggest that insulin resistance and atherosclerosis could represent independent and ultimately maladaptive responses to the disruption of cellular homeostasis caused by the excess delivery of fuel. PMID:16823479

  17. Accelerated Nuclear Energy Materials Development with Multiple Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Bench, G

    2009-08-19

    A fundamental issue in nuclear energy is the changes in material properties as a consequence of time, temperature, and neutron fluence. Usually, candidate materials for nuclear energy applications are tested in nuclear reactors to understand and model the changes that arise from a combination of atomic displacements, helium and hydrogen production, and other nuclear transmutations (e.g. fission and the production of fission products). Experiments may be carried out under neutron irradiation conditions in existing nuclear materials test reactors (at rates of 10 to 20 displacements per atom (DPA) per year or burn-up rates of a few percent per year for fertile fuels), but such an approach takes much too long for many high neutron fluence scenarios (300 DPA for example) expected in reactors of the next generation. Indeed it is reasonable to say that there are no neutron sources available today to accomplish sufficiently rapid accelerated aging let alone also provide the temperature and spectral characteristics of future fast spectrum nuclear energy systems (fusion and fission both). Consequently, materials research and development progress continues to be severely limited by this bottleneck.

  18. Activation of protein kinase C and disruption of endothelial monolayer integrity by sodium arsenite-Potential mechanism in the development of atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Flavia E. . E-mail: flavia.pereira@umontana.edu; Coffin, J. Douglas . E-mail: douglas.coffin@umontana.edu; Beall, Howard D. . E-mail: howard.beall@umontana.edu

    2007-04-15

    Arsenic exposure has been shown to exacerbate atherosclerosis, beginning with activation of the endothelium that lines the vessel wall. Endothelial barrier integrity is maintained by proteins of the adherens junction (AJ) such as vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) and {beta}-catenin and their association with the actin cytoskeleton. In the present study, human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were exposed to 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M sodium arsenite [As(III)] for 1, 6, 12 and 24 h, and the effects on endothelial barrier integrity were determined. Immunofluorescence studies revealed formation of actin stress fibers and non-uniform VE-cadherin and {beta}-catenin staining at cell-cell junctions that were concentration- and time-dependent. Intercellular gaps were observed with a measured increase in endothelial permeability. In addition, concentration-dependent increases in tyrosine phosphorylation (PY) of {beta}-catenin and activation of protein kinase C{alpha} (PKC{alpha}) were observed. Inhibition of PKC{alpha} restored VE-cadherin and {beta}-catenin staining at cell-cell junctions and abolished the As(III)-induced formation of actin stress fibers and intercellular gaps. Endothelial permeability and PY of {beta}-catenin were also reduced to basal levels. These results demonstrate that As(III) induces activation of PKC{alpha}, which leads to increased PY of {beta}-catenin downstream of PKC{alpha} activation. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin plausibly severs the association of VE-cadherin and {beta}-catenin, which along with formation of actin stress fibers, results in intercellular gap formation and increased endothelial permeability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that As(III) causes a loss of endothelial monolayer integrity, which potentially could contribute to the development of atherosclerosis.

  19. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods: introduction and recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Voter, Arthur F; Perez, Danny; Shim, Y; Amar, J G

    2009-01-01

    reaction pathways may be important, we return instead to a molecular dynamics treatment, in which the trajectory itself finds an appropriate way to escape from each state of the system. Since a direct integration of the trajectory would be limited to nanoseconds, while we are seeking to follow the system for much longer times, we modify the dynamics in some way to cause the first escape to happen much more quickly, thereby accelerating the dynamics. The key is to design the modified dynamics in a way that does as little damage as possible to the probability for escaping along a given pathway - i.e., we try to preserve the relative rate constants for the different possible escape paths out of the state. We can then use this modified dynamics to follow the system from state to state, reaching much longer times than we could reach with direct MD. The dynamics within any one state may no longer be meaningful, but the state-to-state dynamics, in the best case, as we discuss in the paper, can be exact. We have developed three methods in this accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD) class, in each case appealing to TST, either implicitly or explicitly, to design the modified dynamics. Each of these methods has its own advantages, and we and others have applied these methods to a wide range of problems. The purpose of this article is to give the reader a brief introduction to how these methods work, and discuss some of the recent developments that have been made to improve their power and applicability. Note that this brief review does not claim to be exhaustive: various other methods aiming at similar goals have been proposed in the literature. For the sake of brevity, our focus will exclusively be on the methods developed by the group.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopic detection of virus-induced atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei-dong; Perk, Masis; Nation, Patric N.; Power, Robert F.; Liu, Liying; Jiang, Xiuyan; Lucas, Alexandra

    1994-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LF) has been developed as a diagnostic tool for the detection of atherosclerosis. We have examined the use of LF for the identification of accelerated atherosclerotic plaque growth induced by Marek's Disease Virus (MDV) infection in White Leghorn rooster chicks (R) as well as plaque regression after treatment. Twenty-eight newborn R were infected with 12,000 cfu of MDV. Twelve parallel control R had saline injection. LF spectra were recorded from the arteries in vitro with a CeramOptec laser angioplasty catheter during 308 nm XeCl excimer laser excitation. Significant differences were detected at 440 to 475, 525, 550, 600, and 650 nm in MDV-R (p<0.05). In a subsequent study, 60 R were infected with 5,000 cfu of MDV, and were then treated with either Pravastatin (PRV) or placebo at 3 months post infection. These PRV-R were followed for 6 months to detect changes in atherosclerotic plaque development. PRV reduced intimal proliferation produced by MDV infection on histological examination (PRV-R 128.0+/- 44.0 micrometers , placebo-R 412.2+/- 91.5 micrometers , pequals0.007). MDV infected, PRV treated R were examined for LF changes that correlated with decreased atherosclerosis. There was an associated significant increase in LF intensity in PRV-R at 405 to 425 nm (p<0.001). In conclusion, LF can detect intimal proliferation in virus- induced atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic plaque regression after PRV therapy.

  1. Accelerator developments since the ZGS by ZGS people

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.

    1994-12-31

    The ZGS was a facility, as well as an organization, where people got together to pursue a common goal of doing exciting science of the day. In this note, the authors describe notable events related to accelerators and accelerator people since the closing of the ZGS program some 15 years ago. Many of the same ZGS people have been carrying out the state-of-the art accelerator work around the Laboratory with the same dedication that characterized their work in the earlier days. First the authors describe how the activities were re-organized after the closing of the ZGS, the migration of people, and the organizational evolution since that time. Doing this shows the similarity between the birth of the ZGS and the birth of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Then, some of the accelerator work by the former ZGS people are described. These include: (1) Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), (2) GeV Electron Microtron (GEM), (3) Wake Field Accelerator Test Facility, (4) Advanced Photon Source, and (5) IPNS Upgrade.

  2. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1991-01-01

    A residual acceleration data analysis plan is developed that will allow principal investigators of low-gravity experiments to efficiently process their experimental results in conjunction with accelerometer data. The basic approach consisted of the following program of research: (1) identification of sensitive experiments and sensitivity ranges by order of magnitude estimates, numerical modelling, and investigator input; (2) research and development towards reduction, supplementation, and dissemination of residual acceleration data; and (3) implementation of the plan on existing acceleration data bases.

  3. PCSK9 and Atherosclerosis - Lipids and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael D; Fazio, Sergio

    2017-03-09

    Even though it is only a little over a decade from the discovery of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a plasma protein that associates with both high and low cholesterol syndromes, a rich body of knowledge has developed, and drugs inhibiting this target have been approved in many markets. While the majority of research in recent years has focused on the impact of therapeutic antagonism of this molecule, important lines of investigation have emerged characterizing its unique physiology as it relates to cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis. The PCSK9 story is unfolding rapidly but is far from complete. One chapter that is of particular interest is the possible direct link between PCSK9 and atherosclerosis. This review specifically examines this relationship drawing from data produced from experimental models of plaque biology and inflammation, atherosclerosis imaging studies, and observational epidemiology.

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm-an independent disease to atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Toghill, Bradley J; Saratzis, Athanasios; Bown, Matthew J

    Atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are multifactorial and polygenic diseases with known environmental and genetic risk factors that contribute toward disease development. Atherosclerosis represents an important independent risk factor for AAA, as people with AAA often have atherosclerosis. Studies have shown that comorbidity is usually between ~25% and 55%, but it is still not fully known whether this association is causal or a result of common shared risk profiles. Most recent epidemiological, clinical, and biological evidence suggests that the two pathologies are more distinct than traditionally thought. For instance diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity are high risk for atherosclerosis development but are not as pronounced in AAA, whereas smoking, gender, and ethnicity are particularly high risk for AAA but less so for atherosclerosis. In addition, genetic and epigenetic studies have identified independent risk loci involved in AAA susceptibility that are not associated with other cardiovascular diseases, and research on important common cardiovascular biomarkers has illustrated discrepancies in those with AAA.

  5. [Progress in mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Yiting; Peng, Hang; Liu, Pengxia

    2013-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease. However, its etiology has not been yet fully elucidated. Endothelial dysfunction is currently considered to be one of the most important steps in the initiation of atherosclerosis. In addition, vascular smooth muscle cells, which are the main cellular component of de novo and in-stent restenosis lesions, play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Promoting the regeneration of endothelial cells and inhibiting the proliferation of smooth muscle cells are pivotal for the prevention and treatment of vascular injury. Recently, some studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells can home to the site of injury and differentiate into endothelial cells to repair damaged blood vessels. On the contrary, other researches have revealed that mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into vascular smooth muscle cells that are involved in the development of restenosis. Here, we review the fundamental researches of mesenchymal stem cell therapy for atherosclerosis and address the perspectives of mesenchymal stem cells in atherosclerosis treatment.

  6. Adipokines, diabetes and atherosclerosis: an inflammatory association

    PubMed Central

    Freitas Lima, Leandro C.; Braga, Valdir de Andrade; do Socorro de França Silva, Maria; Cruz, Josiane de Campos; Sousa Santos, Sérgio H.; de Oliveira Monteiro, Matheus M.; Balarini, Camille de Moura

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases can be considered the most important cause of death in diabetic population and diabetes can in turn increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Inflammation process is currently recognized as responsible for the development and maintenance of diverse chronic diseases, including diabetes and atherosclerosis. Considering that adipose tissue is an important source of adipokines, which may present anti and proinflammatory effects, the aim of this review is to explore the role of the main adipokines in the pathophysiology of diabetes and atherosclerosis, highlighting the therapeutic options that could arise from the manipulation of these signaling pathways both in humans and in translational models. PMID:26578976

  7. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells.

  8. Quantification of carotid vessel atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Egger, Micaela; Spence, J. D.; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the development of plaques in the arterial wall, which ultimately leads to heart attacks and stroke. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to screen patients' carotid arteries. Plaque measurements obtained from these images may aid in the management and monitoring of patients, and in evaluating the effect of new treatment options. Different types of measures for ultrasound phenotypes of atherosclerosis have been proposed. Here, we report on the development and application of a method used to analyze changes in carotid plaque morphology from 3D US images obtained at two different time points. We evaluated our technique using manual segmentations of the wall and lumen of the carotid artery from images acquired in two US scanning sessions. To incorporate the effect of intraobserver variability in our evaluation, manual segmentation was performed five times each for the arterial wall and lumen. From this set of five segmentations, the mean wall and lumen surfaces were reconstructed, with the standard deviation at each point mapped onto the surfaces. A correspondence map between the mean wall and lumen surfaces was then established, and the thickness of the atherosclerotic plaque at each point in the vessel was estimated to be the distance between each correspondence pairs. The two-sample Student's t-test was used to judge whether the difference between the thickness values at each pair corresponding points of the arteries in the two 3D US images was statistically significant.

  9. Molecular biology of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mannarino, Elmo; Pirro, Matteo

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view of atherosclerosis as a pathological lipid deposition within the artery wall has been redefined by a more complex concept of an ongoing inflammatory disease. The atherosclerotic process is initiated when cardiovascular risk factors, through a chemical, mechanical or immunological insult, activate and/or injury the endothelium, thus contributing to endothelial dysfunction and fragmentation. This triggers a cascade of inflammatory reactions, in which monocytes, macrophages, T lymphocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells actively participate. Particularly, atherosclerotic lesions have been seen to have increased expression of T helper-1 cells together with increased levels of the T helper-1 related pro-inflammatory cytokines. Along with pro-inflammatory cytokines, other molecular factors involved in atherosclerosis appearance, progression and complication include chemokines, growth factors, vasoactive substances, enzymes, apoptosis signals and many others. Many of these molecular factors are both involved as possible markers of the atherosclerotic disease activity and burden, but may also play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In recent years, the discovery of progenitor cells of myeloid origin has offered the prospect of merging the most recent theories on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with the evolving concept of a role of these progenitor cells in the repair of the injured vessel wall and the neovascularisation of ischemic tissues. This review summarizes current knowledge about the biology of atherosclerosis with emphasis on the mechanisms of endothelial damage and repair and on the concept that the turnover and replacement of endothelial cells is a major determinant in the maintenance of vascular integrity. PMID:22460847

  10. Analytical validation of accelerator mass spectrometry for pharmaceutical development

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Bradly D; Ognibene, Ted; Vogel, John S

    2011-01-01

    The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of 14C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the 14C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least 1 year, linear over four orders of magnitude with an analytical range from 0.1 Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Furthermore, accuracy was excellent (between 1 and 3%), while precision expressed as coefficient of variation was between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of 14C, respectively (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with 14C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. Accelerator mass spectrometry provides a sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices. PMID:21083256

  11. Analytical validation of accelerator mass spectrometry for pharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Keck, Bradly D; Ognibene, Ted; Vogel, John S

    2010-03-01

    The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of (14)C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the (14)C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least 1 year, linear over four orders of magnitude with an analytical range from 0.1 Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Furthermore, accuracy was excellent (between 1 and 3%), while precision expressed as coefficient of variation was between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of (14)C, respectively (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with (14)C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. Accelerator mass spectrometry provides a sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices.

  12. Design, development, and acceleration trials of radio-frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S. V. L. S. Jain, Piyush; Pande, Rajni; Roy, Shweta; Mathew, Jose V.; Kumar, Rajesh; Pande, Manjiri; Krishnagopal, S.; Gupta, S. K.; Singh, P.

    2014-04-15

    A deuteron radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, fabricated, and tested at BARC, which will be used for neutron generation. The RFQ operates at a frequency of 350 MHz and needs an inter-vane voltage of 44 kV to accelerate the deuteron beam to 400 keV within a length of 1.03 m. The error analysis shows that the offset of two opposite vanes in the same direction by 100 μm leads to a change in resonant frequency by 1.3 MHz and a significant change of fields in the quadrants (∼±40% with respect to average field). From the 3D analysis, we have observed that the unwanted dipole mode frequencies are very near to the quadrupole mode frequency which will make structure sensitive to the perturbations. In order to move the dipole modes away from the quadrupole modes, we have used the dipole stabilizer rods. The 5 wire transmission line theory was used to study the perturbative analysis of the RFQ and based on this a computer program has been written to tune the cavity to get required field distribution. Based on these studies, a 1.03 m long RFQ made of OFE copper has been fabricated and tested. Even though the RFQ was designed for deuteron (D{sup +}) beam, we tested it by accelerating both the proton (H{sup +}) and D{sup +} beams. The RFQ was operated in pulsed mode and accelerated both H{sup +} and D{sup +} beams to designed values of 200 and 400 keV, respectively. The measured parameters are in good agreement with the designed values validating our simulations and fabrication processes. In this paper, simulations, RF measurements, and beam commissioning results are presented.

  13. Flashover lithium ion source development for large pulsed power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bieg, K.W.; Burns, E.J.T.; Gerber, R.A.; Olsen, J.N.; Lamppa, K.P.

    1986-05-01

    The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II), a light-ion pulsed power accelerator intended for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications, is currently under construction at Sandia National Laboratories. The accelerator will deliver a 30 MV, 5 MA lithium beam from an Applied-B diode to drive an ICF target. The ion source for this diode will require a thin (approx.1 mm), dense (10/sup 16/ cm/sup -2/) anode plasma layer of singly ionized lithium over an anode area of 10/sup 3/ cm/sup 2/. One type of source being investigated is the flashover ion source, which generates the anode plasma via vacuum flashover of a lithium-bearing dielectric material. Experiments with a LiF flashover source on the 0.03 TW Nereus accelerator have shown that contaminant ions account for as much as 70% of the extracted ion beam current. To overcome this, we have explored in-diode cleaning of the externally prepared anode surface by glow discharge cleaning and vacuum baking as well as in-diode preparation of the anode surface by vacuum evaporation of the lithium dielectric. Lithium-bearing dielectric materials which have been investigated include LiF, LiI, LiNO/sub 3/, and Li/sub 3/N. These techniques have resulted in a two to threefold improvement in the extracted lithium ion purity. As a result, a glow-discharge cleaned LiF flashover source will be used for initial pulsed-power testing on PBFA II.

  14. Flashover lithium ion source development for large pulsed power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bieg, K.W.; Burns, E.J.T.; Gerber, R.A.; Olsen, J.N.; Lamppa, K.P.

    1985-01-01

    PBFA II, a light-ion pulsed power accelerator intended for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications, is currently under construction at Sandia National Laboratories. The accelerator will deliver a 30 MV, 5 MA lithium beam from an Applied-B diode to drive an ICF target. The ion source for this diode will require a thin (approx.1 mm), dense (10 W cm S) anode plasma layer of singly-ionized lithium over an anode area of 10T cmS. One type of source being investigated is the flashover ion source, which generates the anode plasma via vacuum flashover of a lithium-bearing dielectric material. Experiments with a LiF flashover source on the 0.03 TW Nereus accelerator have shown that contaminant ions account for as much as 70% of the extracted ion beam current. To overcome this, we have explored in-diode cleaning of the externally-prepared anode surface by glow discharge cleaning and vacuum baking as well as in-diode preparation of the anode surface by vacuum evaporation of the lithium dielectric. Lithium-bearing dielectric materials which have been investigated include LiF, LiI, LiNO3, and Li3N. These techniques have resulted in a two- to three-fold improvement in the extracted lithium ion purity. As a result, a glow-discharge cleaned LiF flashover source will be used for initial pulsed-power testing on PBFA II.

  15. Analysis of Male Pheromones That Accelerate Female Reproductive Organ Development

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Kelly A.; Webb, William; Stowers, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Male odors can influence a female's reproductive physiology. In the mouse, the odor of male urine results in an early onset of female puberty. Several volatile and protein pheromones have previously been reported to each account for this bioactivity. Here we bioassay inbred BALB/cJ females to study pheromone-accelerated uterine growth, a developmental hallmark of puberty. We evaluate the response of wild-type and mutant mice lacking a specialized sensory transduction channel, TrpC2, and find TrpC2 function to be necessary for pheromone-mediated uterine growth. We analyze the relative effectiveness of pheromones previously identified to accelerate puberty through direct bioassay and find none to significantly accelerate uterine growth in BALB/cJ females. Complementary to this analysis, we have devised a strategy of partial purification of the uterine growth bioactivity from male urine and applied it to purify bioactivity from three different laboratory strains. The biochemical characteristics of the active fraction of all three strains are inconsistent with that of previously known pheromones. When directly analyzed, we are unable to detect previously known pheromones in urine fractions that generate uterine growth. Our analysis indicates that pheromones emitted by males to advance female puberty remain to be identified. PMID:21347429

  16. Role of Micronutrients on Subclinical Atherosclerosis Micronutrients in Subclinical Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, Duygu; Gurses, Kadri Murat; Yalcin, Muhammed Ulvi; Tokgozoglu, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) leading to coronary heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. Nutrition is one of the key factors in the etiology of atherosclerosis. Micronutrient supplements are widely used to prevent many chronic diseases including atherosclerosis. However, scientific evidence regarding this issue is still insufficient and current data on the association of dietary micronutrients and CVD risk is contradictory. Most of the randomized studies have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of micronutrient supplementation on markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. In this review, role of each micronutrient on subclinical atherosclerosis will be evaluated thoroughly.

  17. Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Linda

    2016-07-07

    The objective of the proposal was to develop graduate student training in materials and engineering research relevant to the development of particle accelerators. Many components used in today's accelerators or storage rings are at the limit of performance. The path forward in many cases requires the development of new materials or fabrication techniques, or a novel engineering approach. Often, accelerator-based laboratories find it difficult to get top-level engineers or materials experts with the motivation to work on these problems. The three years of funding provided by this grant was used to support development of accelerator components through a multidisciplinary approach that cut across the disciplinary boundaries of accelerator physics, materials science, and surface chemistry. The following results were achieved: (1) significant scientific results on fabrication of novel photocathodes, (2) application of surface science and superconducting materials expertise to accelerator problems through faculty involvement, (3) development of instrumentation for fabrication and characterization of materials for accelerator components, (4) student involvement with problems at the interface of material science and accelerator physics.

  18. Associations of retrospective and concurrent lipid levels with subclinical atherosclerosis prediction after 20 years of follow-up: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study

    PubMed Central

    Raynor, Lewis A.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Loria, Catherine M.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Pletcher, Mark J.; Shikany, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Using data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, we sought to determine how well lipids measured at baseline and at 20 years predict the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods Complete risk factor, coronary artery calcification (CAC), and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) data were available for 2435 participants. Lipids were categorized into quartiles, CAC at Y20 was dichotomized as present/absent, and CIMT was dichotomized as ≥84 or <84th overall percentile. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the association between lipids and CAC/CIMT. C statistics were used to assess the discriminative value of each lipid measure in predicting the presence of CAC or CIMT at Y20. Results Lipid levels measured in young adulthood as well as middle age were both associated with subclinical disease in middle age. The discriminatory value of lipids was virtually identical at baseline, when participants were 18–30 years of age, and 20 years later. Neither baseline nor Y20 lipid data were strong predictors of Y20 subclinical disease despite statistically significant associations. Conclusions These results are consistent with a growing body of evidence that early-life exposure to nonoptimal lipids matters and lifestyle modifications administered earlier in the lifespan could slow the progress of the atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:23889858

  19. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    The research performed consisted of three stages: (1) identification of sensitive IML-1 experiments and sensitivity ranges by order of magnitude estimates, numerical modeling, and investigator input; (2) research and development towards reduction, supplementation, and dissemination of residual acceleration data; and (3) implementation of the plan on existing acceleration databases.

  20. Zebrafish Models for Dyslipidemia and Atherosclerosis Research

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death. Elevated circulating concentrations of lipids are a central pathogenetic driver of atherosclerosis. While numerous effective therapies for this condition have been developed, there is substantial unmet need for this pandemic illness. Here, I will review nutritional, physiological, genetic, and pathological discoveries in the emerging zebrafish model for studying dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. The technical and physiological advantages and the pharmacological potential of this organism for discovery and validation of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis targets are stressed through summary of recent findings. An emerging literature shows that zebrafish, through retention of a cetp ortholog gene and high sensitivity to ingestion of excess cholesterol, rapidly develops hypercholesterolemia, with a pattern of distribution of lipid species in lipoprotein particles similar to humans. Furthermore, recent studies leveraging the optical transparency of zebrafish larvae to monitor the fate of these ingested lipids have provided exciting insights to the development of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. Future directions for investigation are considered, with particular attention to the potential for in vivo cell biological study of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:28018294

  1. Role of gut microbiota in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Annika Lindskog; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2017-02-01

    Infections have been linked to the development of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Findings from the past decade have identified microbial ecosystems residing in different habitats of the human body that contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular-related disorders. In this Review, we describe three pathways by which microbiota might affect atherogenesis. First, local or distant infections might cause a harmful inflammatory response that aggravates plaque development or triggers plaque rupture. Second, metabolism of cholesterol and lipids by gut microbiota can affect the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Third, diet and specific components that are metabolized by gut microbiota can have various effects on atherosclerosis; for example, dietary fibre is beneficial, whereas the bacterial metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide is considered harmful. Although specific bacterial taxa have been associated with atherosclerosis, which is supported by increasing mechanistic evidence, several questions remain to be answered to understand fully how the microbiota contributes to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Such knowledge might pave the way for novel diagnostics and therapeutics based on microbiota.

  2. Photoacoustic tomography: applications for atherosclerosis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a debilitating condition that increases a patient’s risk for intermittent claudication, limb amputation, myocardial infarction, and stroke, thereby causing approximately 50% of deaths in the western world. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and optical imaging remain suboptimal for detecting development of early stage plaques. This is largely due to the lack of compositional information, penetration depth, and/or clinical efficiency of these traditional imaging techniques. Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality that could address some of these limitations to improve the diagnosis and characterization of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Photoacoustic imaging uses near-infrared light to induce acoustic waves, which can be used to recreate compositional images of tissue. Recent developments in photoacoustic techniques show its potential in noninvasively characterizing atherosclerotic plaques deeper than traditional optical imaging approaches. In this review, we discuss the significance and development of atherosclerosis, current and novel clinical diagnostic methods, and recent works that highlight the potential of photoacoustic imaging for both experimental and clinical studies of atherosclerosis.

  3. Jefferson Lab Accelerator Operations Training and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Epps

    2008-01-23

    The mission of the Jefferson Lab Operations Group is to provide safe and efficient delivery of high quality electron beam for Jefferson Laboratory's nuclear and accelerator physics programs. The Operations staff must be able to setup, transport, maintain, and troubleshoot beam to all three experimental halls in a safe, efficient, and expeditious manner. Due to the nature of shift work, high employee turnover is always as issue. This creates a unique situation where highly trained staff members must quickly be produced and maintained in order to meet the needs of the Laboratory. Some methods used to address this problem will be presented here.

  4. Strong correlation between early stage atherosclerosis and electromechanical coupling of aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Yan, F.; Niu, L. L.; Chen, Q. N.; Zheng, H. R.; Li, J. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases that are responsible for many deaths in the world, and the early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is highly desirable. The existing imaging methods, however, are not capable of detecting the early stage of atherosclerosis development due to their limited spatial resolution. Using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), we show that the piezoelectric response of an aortic wall increases as atherosclerosis advances, while the stiffness of the aorta shows a less evident correlation with atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we show that there is strong correlation between the coercive electric field necessary to switch the polarity of the artery and the development of atherosclerosis. Thus by measuring the electromechanical coupling of the aortic wall, it is possible to probe atherosclerosis at the early stage of its development, not only improving the spatial resolution by orders of magnitude, but also providing comprehensive quantitative information on the biomechanical properties of the artery.

  5. LXR signaling pathways and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna; Tontonoz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    First discovered as orphan receptors, liver X receptors (LXRs) were subsequently identified as the nuclear receptor target of the cholesterol metabolites, oxysterols.1 There are 2 LXR receptors encoded by distinct genes: LXRα is most highly expressed in the liver, adipose, kidney, adrenal tissues and macrophages, and LXRβ is ubiquitously expressed. Despite differential tissue distribution, these isoforms have 78% homology in their ligand-binding domain and appear to respond to the same endogenous ligands. Work over the past 10 years has shown that the LXR pathway regulates lipid metabolism and inflammation via both the induction and repression of target genes. Given the importance of cholesterol regulation and inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease, it is not surprising that activation of the LXR pathway attenuates various mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic plaque development.2 In this minireview we will discuss the impact of the LXR pathway on both cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis. PMID:20631351

  6. Linking immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Burkhard; Freigang, Stefan; Jäggi, Martin; Kurrer, Michael O.; Pei, Yao-Chang; Vlk, Lenka; Odermatt, Bernhard; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Arterial inflammatory responses are thought to be a significant component of atherosclerotic disease. We describe here, using a transgenic approach, the mutual perpetuation of immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Mice expressing the bacterial transgene β-galactosidase exclusively in cardiomyocytes and in smooth muscle cells in lung arteries and the aorta (SM-LacZ), and hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-deficient SM-LacZ mice (SM-LacZ/apoE−/−) developed myocarditis and arteritis after immunization with dendritic cells presenting a β-galactosidase-derived immunogenic peptide. Hypercholesterolemia amplified acute arteritis and perpetuated chronic arterial inflammation in SM-LacZ/apoE−/− mice, but had no major impact on acute myocarditis or the subsequent development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Conversely, arteritis significantly accelerated cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the linkage of immune-mediated arteritis and hypercholesterolemia favors initiation and maintenance of atherosclerotic lesion formation. Therapeutic strategies to prevent or disrupt such self-perpetuating vicious circles may be crucial for the successful treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:11050173

  7. Does vasectomy increase the risk of atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Clarkson, T B; Alexander, N J

    1980-11-15

    The work that stimulated a series of experiments, conducted to determine the relationship between vasectomy and atherosclerosis in nonhuman primates, is summarized along with results in 2 nonhuman primate species. Attention is directed to the following: immunologic injury and atherosclerosis; immunologic responses to vasectomy; effects of atherogenic diet and vasectomy; and the effects of vasectomy alone. Using rabbits as the animal model, early workers found that inducing both immunologic serum sickness and hyperlipoproteinemia caused more extensive atherosclerosis than did hyperlipoproteinemia alone and that the resulting lesions more closely resembled those of human beings in both morphologic characteristics and anatomic location. The mechanism by which immunologic injury exacerbates atherosclerosis still remains unclear, but studies focusing on injury to the vascular endothelium as an important mechanism in atherogenesis are currently of considerable interest. Sperm agglutination, sperm immobilization, and immunofluorescence have all been used to demonstrate circulating free antisperm antibodies after vasectomy. Such antibodies occur in about 50% of vasectomized men and in vasectomized males of several animal species. It is unclear why circulating free antisperm antibodies have not been found in all vasectomized men and male animals. The development of an antibody response to sperm antigen in vasectomized rhesus monkeys has been shown to correlate with high sperm counts before vasectomy and similar observations have been made in studies of men. Results in nonhuman primate species showed that vasectomized monkeys developed more extensive and severe atherosclerosis than did nonvasectomized monkeys of the same age and dietary history. In 2 species of monkeys, the effect of vasectomy on atherogenesis seemed to be present whether the animals were hyperlipoproteinemic or had plasma lipid concentrations in the normal range. The presumed mechanism of atherosclerosis

  8. Serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels Are Associated with the Presence of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Healthy Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Seung Joo; Heo, Jin Young; Yun, Bo Hyon; Jung, Yeon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Menopause is a natural aging process causing estrogen deficiency, accelerating atherogenic processes including dyslipidemia. Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction is also high in postmenopausal women, and it is known to elevate the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we are to study on the associations in between serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and prevalence of CVD in postmenopausal women who have normal thyroid function. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 247 Korean postmenopausal women who visited the health promotion center from January, 2007 to December, 2009. Postmenopausal women with normal serum TSH were included in the study. Coronary atherosclerosis was assessed by 64-row multidetector computed tomography. Results In multiple linear regression analysis, serum TSH was associated with serum triglyceride (TG) (β = 0.146, P = 0.023). In multiple logistic regression analysis, increasing age and serum TSH were associated with an increased risk of coronary atherosclerosis in euthyroid postmenopausal women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.107 [1.024-1.197], P = 0.011 and OR = 1.303 [1.024-1.658], P = 0.031, respectively). Conclusions It revealed that significant predictor of serum TSH was serum TG, and increasing age and TSH were found to have associations with an increased risk of coronary atherosclerosis in euthyroid postmenopausal women. Screening and assessing risks for CVD in healthy postmenopausal women would be helpful before atherosclerosis develops. PMID:28119894

  9. Development of a 20 MeV Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.; Long, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lombardi, M.; Lewis, D.; Bruce, R.W.; /Unlisted

    2007-04-13

    This paper presents a progress report on a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the magnicon facility at NRL. The accelerator will be powered by an experimental 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier that presently produces 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator will include a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate DLA structures up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by ANL, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. SLAC has developed components to distribute the power from the two magnicon output arms to the injector and to the DLA accelerating structure with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRL, has investigated means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by a brazing process using an intense 83-GHz beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  10. Angiotensin II Promotes the Development of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Patients via Regulating the T Cells Activities: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Zhanpu; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Specific T cell phenotype has been reported to potentially contribute to the development of angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced several vascular disorders. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is intimately associated with cardiovascular disease. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between T cell phenotypes and Ang II in T2DM patients combined with carotid atherosclerosis (CA). Material/Methods This study was performed on 50 patients with T2DM in our hospital. Based on the presence of CA, they were divided into CA group (presence of CA, n=30) or T2DM group (absence of CA, n=20). Additionally, 10 healthy participants were selected as controls. Basic characteristics of all participants were collected and recorded. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients and controls with or without Ang II and Ang II receptor blocker (ARB) treatment were used to detect Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell proportions, mRNA levels of T-bet, GATA3, and RORγt as well as the expression of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17 by flow cytometry, ELISA, and Real-Time PCR. Results Ang II levels were notably higher in patients in the CA group than those in the T2DM and control group (p<0.05). Th1 and Th17 positive cells, mRNA levels of T-bet and RORγt as well as the expression of IFN-γ and IL-17 were significantly increased in the CA group compared with the T2DM group and control group (p<0.05). Moreover, the activities of T cells and related cytokines were significantly increased of healthy controls after Ang II treatment (p<0.05), while these changes were notably weakened by ARB treatment (p<0.05). Conclusions Ang II promotes the development of CA in T2DM patients by regulating T cells activities. PMID:27782101

  11. EuCARD2: enhanced accelerator research and development in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. EuCARD2 is an European research project which will be realized during 2013-2017 inside the EC FP7 framework. The project concerns the development and coordination of European Accelerator Research and Development. The project is particularly important, to a number of domestic laboratories, due to some plans to build large accelerator infrastructure in Poland. Large accelerator infrastructure of fundamental and applied research character stimulates around it the development and industrial applications as well as biomedical of advanced accelerators, material research and engineering, cryo-technology, mechatronics, robotics, and in particular electronics - like networked measurement and control systems, sensors, computer systems, automation and control systems. The paper presents a digest of the European project EuCARD2 which is Enhanced European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper presents a digest of the research results and assumptions in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator R&D, and the kick-off meeting of the EuCARD2. There are debated a few basic groups of accelerator systems components like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution, high field magnets, superconducting cavities, novel beam collimators, etc. The paper bases on the following materials: Internet and Intranet documents combined with EuCARD2, Description of Work FP7 EuCARD-2 DoW-312453, 2013-02-13, and discussions and preparatory materials worked on by Eucard-2 initiators.

  12. Correlation between the characteristics of acceleration and visco elasticity of artery wall under pulsatile flow conditions (physical meaning of I* as a parameter of progressive behaviors of atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis).

    PubMed

    Yokobori, A Toshimitsu; Ohmi, Toshihito; Monma, Ryouhei; Tomono, Yuki; Inoue, Kyousuke; Owa, Michiaki; Ichiki, Masataka; Mochizuki, Noriko; Yamashita, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Previously, I* parameter has been proposed to diagnose noninvasively the progressive degree of atherosclerosis which is considered to concern the discrimination of the progressive degree of visco elasticity of blood vessel wall. However, the detailed physical meaning of this parameter has not yet been clarified. In this paper, the theoretical analysis and experiments were conducted and the detailed physical meaning of I* parameter was clarified. The following results were obtained. I* parameter was found to well correlate with the progressive degree of visco elasticity of blood vessel wall characterized by the Ith* parameter derived based on the analysis of visco elasticity in this paper. That is, I* was found to have the physical meaning of representing the progressive degree of visco elasticity of blood vessel wall. On the basis of this results, using clinical data, two dimensional representation between the progressive degree of visco elasticity of blood vessel wall by I* and the decrease in the rigidity of blood vessel wall by PWV was found to be useful to conduct much more detailed diagnosis of atherosclerosis.

  13. Detection and treatment of atherosclerosis using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zu, Yujiao; Dhanasekara, Chathurika S; Li, Jun; Wu, Dayong; Fan, Zhaoyang; Wang, Shu

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the key pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, which is a silent killer and a leading cause of death in the United States. Atherosclerosis starts with the adhesion of inflammatory monocytes on the activated endothelial cells in response to inflammatory stimuli. These monocytes can further migrate into the intimal layer of the blood vessel where they differentiate into macrophages, which take up oxidized low-density lipoproteins and release inflammatory factors to amplify the local inflammatory response. After accumulation of cholesterol, the lipid-laden macrophages are transformed into foam cells, the hallmark of the early stage of atherosclerosis. Foam cells can die from apoptosis or necrosis, and the intracellular lipid is deposed in the artery wall forming lesions. The angiogenesis for nurturing cells is enhanced during lesion development. Proteases released from macrophages, foam cells, and other cells degrade the fibrous cap of the lesion, resulting in rupture of the lesion and subsequent thrombus formation. Thrombi can block blood circulation, which represents a major cause of acute heart events and stroke. There are generally no symptoms in the early stages of atherosclerosis. Current detection techniques cannot easily, safely, and effectively detect the lesions in the early stages, nor can they characterize the lesion features such as the vulnerability. While the available therapeutic modalities cannot target specific molecules, cells, and processes in the lesions, nanoparticles appear to have a promising potential in improving atherosclerosis detection and treatment via targeting the intimal macrophages, foam cells, endothelial cells, angiogenesis, proteolysis, apoptosis, and thrombosis. Indeed, many nanoparticles have been developed in improving blood lipid profile and decreasing inflammatory response for enhancing therapeutic efficacy of drugs and decreasing their side effects. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1412. doi: 10

  14. Development of a Compact Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator at 11.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    This paper presents a progress report on the development of a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the Magnicon Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The accelerator will be powered by an 11.4-GHz magnicon amplifier that provides up to 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator includes a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures of up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Euclid Techlabs, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone rf testing at NRL at accelerating gradients up to 15 MV/m. The first stage of the accelerator, including the 5-MeV injector, has recently begun operation, and initial operation of the complete dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  15. Challenging developments in three decades of accelerator mass spectrometry at ETH: from large particle accelerators to table size instruments.

    PubMed

    Suter, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was invented for the detection of radiocarbon at natural isotopic concentrations (10(-12) to 10(-15)) more than 30 years ago. Meanwhile this method has also been applied for the analysis of many other long-lived radioisotopes, which are found at very low concentrations. The first investigations were made at large tandem accelerators originally built for nuclear physics research and operating at voltages of 6-12 MV. Today dedicated instruments are mostly used for AMS, which are optimized for associated applications. In the past 15 years, a new generation of much smaller instruments has been developed. For many years it was believed that accelerators with voltages of 2 MV or higher are needed to eliminate the molecular interferences. At these energies the ions are predominantly stripped to charge state 3+, thereby removing the binding electrons of the molecules. In contrast, the new compact facilities use 1+ or 2+ ions. In this case the molecular destruction process is based on molecule-atom collisions in the gas cell. The cross sections for this destruction are sufficiently large that the intensity of molecular components such as (12)CH(2) and (13)CH can be reduced by 10 orders of magnitude. These new facilities can be built much smaller due to the lower energies. Universal instruments providing analysis for many isotopes over the whole range of periodic table have a space requirement of about 4 x 6 m(2); dedicated radiocarbon facilities based on a 200 kV accelerator have a footprint of about 2.5 x 3 m(2). This smallest category of instruments use special technologies: The high voltage terminal with the gas stripper canal is vacuum insulated and the gas is pumped to ground potential through a ceramic pipe. A conventional 200 kV power supply provides the terminal voltage from outside. A review of this new generation of compact AMS facilities is given. Design considerations and performance of these new instruments will be presented

  16. Defining the Relationship Between Biomarkers of Oxidation and Inflammatory Stress and the Risk for Atherosclerosis in Astronauts During and After Long-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    Future human space travel will consist primarily of long-duration missions onboard the International Space Station (ISS) or exploration-class missions to Mars, its moons, or nearby asteroids. These missions will expose astronauts to increased risk of oxidative and inflammatory damage from a variety of sources, including radiation, psychological stress, reduced physical activity, diminished nutritional status, and hyperoxic exposure during extravehicular activity. Evidence exists that increased oxidative damage and inflammation can accelerate the development of atherosclerosis.

  17. Developments in laser wakefield accelerators: From single-stage to two-stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Tao; Wang, Wen-Tao; Liu, Jian-Sheng; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Qi, Rong; Yu, Chang-Hai; Li, Ru-Xin; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2015-01-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are compact accelerators which can produce femtosecond high-energy electron beams on a much smaller scale than the conventional radiofrequency accelerators. It is attributed to their high acceleration gradient which is about 3 orders of magnitude larger than the traditional ones. The past decade has witnessed the major breakthroughs and progress in developing the laser wakfield accelerators. To achieve the LWFAs suitable for applications, more and more attention has been paid to optimize the LWFAs for high-quality electron beams. A single-staged LWFA does not favor generating controllable electron beams beyond 1 GeV since electron injection and acceleration are coupled and cannot be independently controlled. Staged LWFAs provide a promising route to overcome this disadvantage by decoupling injection from acceleration and thus the electron-beam quality as well as the stability can be greatly improved. This paper provides an overview of the physical conceptions of the LWFA, as well as the major breakthroughs and progress in developing LWFAs from single-stage to two-stage LWFAs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11127901, 11425418, and 61221064), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808100), and the Science and Technology Talent Project of Shanghai City, China (Grant Nos. 12XD1405200 and 12ZR1451700).

  18. Group living accelerates bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) development.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Virna L; Santangelo, Richard G; Vargo, Edward L; Schal, Coby

    2014-01-01

    For many insect species, group living provides physiological and behavioral benefits, including faster development. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) live in aggregations composed of eggs, nymphs, and adults of various ages. Our aim was to determine whether bed bug nymphs reared in groups develop faster than solitary nymphs. We reared first instars either in isolation or in groups from hatching to adult emergence and recorded their development time. In addition, we investigated the effects of group housing on same-age nymphs versus nymphs reared with adults. Nymphal development was 2.2 d faster in grouped nymphs than in solitary-housed nymphs, representing 7.3% faster overall development. However, this grouping effect did not appear to be influenced by group composition. Thus, similar to other gregarious insect species, nymph development in bed bugs is faster in aggregations than in isolation.

  19. Developments and applications of accelerator system at the Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatori, S.; Kurita, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yamada, H.; Mori, J.; Hamachi, H.; Kimura, S.; Shimoda, T.; Hiroto, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Ohtani, N.; Yasuda, K.; Ishigami, R.; Sasase, M.; Ito, Y.; Hatashita, M.; Takagi, K.; Kume, K.; Fukuda, S.; Yokohama, N.; Kagiya, G.; Fukumoto, S.; Kondo, M.

    2005-12-01

    At the Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center (WERC), an accelerator system with a 5 MV tandem accelerator and a 200 MeV proton synchrotron is used for ion beam analyses and irradiation experiments. The study of cancer therapy with a proton beam is also performed. Therefore, the stable operation and efficient sharing of beam time of the system are required, based on the treatment standard. Recent developments and the operation status of the system put stress on the tandem accelerator operation, magnifying the problems.

  20. Accelerated Development of a High Field Single Electron Spin Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    software has been developed for that. (3) Satisfactory millimeter wave excitations have been achieved with the developed mm wave power amplifiers and strip...incoherent SESM signal – a prelude to handle quantum information. Today we can report the successful solution of all these problems, although the...been achieved with the developed mm wave power amplifiers and strip-line resonators. At the time of writing this report the SESM construction is

  1. Laboratory selection for an accelerated mosquito sexual development rate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    accelerated sexual maturation when compared with the wild strain. This outcome demonstrates the kinds of selection that can be expected during insect colonization and maintenance, particularly when generations are non-overlapping and similar-age males must compete for mates. PMID:21595988

  2. Latest Development in Superconducting RF Structures for beta=1 Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel

    2006-06-26

    Superconducting RF technology is since nearly a decade routinely applied to different kinds of accelerating devices: linear accelerators, storage rings, synchrotron light sources and FEL's. With the technology recommendation for the International Linear Collider (ILC) a year ago, new emphasis has been placed on improving the performance of accelerating cavities both in Q-value and in accelerating gradients with the goal to achieve performance levels close to the fundamental limits given by the material parameters of the choice material, niobium. This paper will summarize the challenges to SRF technology and will review the latest developments in superconducting structure design. Additionally, it will give an overview of the newest results and will report on the developments in alternative materials and technologies.

  3. Accelerating the Development of Adaptive Performance: Validating the Think Like a Commander Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Report 1868 Accelerating the Development of Adaptive Performance...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (from... to) February 2007 Final March 2005 to March 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER Accelerating ...deliberate training methods may be more effective and efficient than live, virtual, or constructive experiential learning environments. 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  4. Developing the Systems Engineering Experience Accelerator (SEEA) Prototype and Roadmap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-24

    Figure 1: Notional Diagram of the SEEA Prototype Simulator .......................................... 1 Figure 2: A Day in the Life of a PSE ...and Program Systems Engineer ( PSE ) competency model, known as the SPRDE-SE/ PSE . 2. Developing and maturing systems thinking skills. 3. Developing...mental templates which can be applied to similar future situations Figure 2: A Day in the Life of a PSE UNCLASSIFIED Contract Number: H98230

  5. New science-based endpoints to accelerate oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    Kelloff, Gary J; Sigman, Caroline C

    2005-03-01

    Although several new oncology drugs have reached the market, more than 80% of drugs for all indications entering clinical development do not get marketing approval, with many failing late in development often in Phase III trials, because of unexpected safety issues or difficulty determining efficacy, including confounded outcomes. These factors contribute to the high costs of oncology drug development and clearly show the need for faster, more cost-effective strategies for evaluating oncology drugs and better definition of patients who will benefit from treatment. Remarkable advances in the understanding of neoplastic progression at the cellular and molecular levels have spurred the discovery of molecularly targeted drugs. This progress along with advances in imaging and bioassay technologies are the basis for describing and evaluating new biomarker endpoints as well as for defining other biomarkers for identifying patient populations, potential toxicity, and providing evidence of drug effect and efficacy. Definitions and classifications of these biomarkers for use in oncology drug development are presented in this paper. Science-based and practical criteria for validating biomarkers have been developed including considerations of mechanistic plausibility, available methods and technology, and clinical feasibility. New promising tools for measuring biomarkers have also been developed and are based on genomics and proteomics, direct visualisation by microscopy (e.g., confocal microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis of cellular features), nanotechnologies, and direct and remote imaging (e.g., fluorescence endoscopy and anatomical, functional and molecular imaging techniques). The identification and evaluation of potential surrogate endpoints and other biomarkers require access to and analysis of large amounts of data, new technologies and extensive research resources. Further, there is a requirement for a convergence of research, regulatory and drug developer

  6. Development and initial operating characteristics of the 20 megawatt linear plasma accelerator facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, A. F.; Weaver, W. R.; Mcfarland, D. R.; Wood, G. P.

    1971-01-01

    A 20-megawatt linear plasma accelerator facility, a steady flow, Faraday-type plasma accelerator facility for high velocity aerodynamic testing, was constructed, developed, and brought to an operational status. The accelerator has a 63.5-mm-square and 0.5-meter-long channel and utilizes nitrogen-seeded with 2 % mole fraction of cesium vapor. Modification of the original accelerator design characteristics and the improvements necessary to make the arc heater a suitable plasma source are described. The measured accelerator electrode current distribution and the electrode-wall potential distributions are given. The computed and the measured values are in good agreement. Measured pitot pressure indicates that an accelerator exit velocity of 9.2 km/sec, is obtained with 30 of the 36 electrode pairs powered and corresponds to a velocity increase to about 2 1/4 times the computed entrance velocity. The computed stagnation enthalpy at the accelerator exit is 92 MJ/kg, and the mass density corresponds to an altitude of about 58 km. The 92 MJ/kg stagnation enthalpy corresponds to a kinetic energy content at low temperature equivalent to a velocity of 13.6 km/sec.

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zulkifli; Amin, Hilman Z; Amin, Lukman Z

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep respiratory disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of complete or partial airway obstruction, resulting in apneas or hypopneas. OSA could contribute to atherosclerosis through direct and indirect mechanisms. Endothelial dysfunction, sympathetic stimulation, and proinflammatory cytokine modulation caused by OSA play significant role to an atherosclesrotic event. Other risk factors of atherosclerosis like hypertension and diabetes mellitus also associated with OSA. Animal and clinical studies recently showed promising data to prove association between OSA, atherosclerosis, and its risk factors. However, provided data has not showed consistent result. In the future, demand of further research both basic and clinical sciences need to be fulfilled.

  8. Sustainable Energy in Remote Indonesian Grids. Accelerating Project Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Brian; Burman, Kari; Davidson, Carolyn; Elchinger, Michael; Hardison, R.; Karsiwulan, D.; Castermans, B.

    2015-06-30

    Sustainable Energy for Remote Indonesian Grids (SERIG) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to support Indonesia’s efforts to develop clean energy and increase access to electricity in remote locations throughout the country. With DOE support, the SERIG implementation team consists of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Winrock International’s Jakarta, Indonesia office. Through technical assistance that includes techno-economic feasibility evaluation for selected projects, government-to-government coordination, infrastructure assessment, stakeholder outreach, and policy analysis, SERIG seeks to provide opportunities for individual project development and a collective framework for national replication office.

  9. [Invasive diagnostic imaging of coronary atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Gamou, Tadatsugu; Kawashiri, Masaaki; Tada, Hayato; Hayashi, Kenshi; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    Invasive diagnostic imaging technique of coronary atherosclerosis has rapidly developed. For example, intravascular ultrasound(IVUS) is recognized as an essential device for percutaneous coronary intervention to evaluate the vessel wall, vascular lumen and coronary plaque morphologies because of its accuracy for quantitative analysis capability. Recently new imaging modalities such as radio-frequency signal analysis, elastography and contrast harmonic echography have been developed for the evaluation of histological characteristics. Also, optical coherence tomography(OCT), which provides approximately ten-times higher-resolutional cross-section images of the coronary arterial wall in comparison with IVUS, became available in clinical setting. In this article, we review the latest progress of the invasive diagnostic imaging of coronary atherosclerosis.

  10. Leukotriene signaling in atherosclerosis and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Bäck, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The inflammatory process of atherosclerosis is associated with several pathophysiological reactions within the vascular wall. The arachidonic acid released by phospholipase A2 serves as substrate for the production of a group of lipid mediators known as the leukotrienes, which induce pro-inflammatory signaling through activation of specific BLT and CysLT receptors. Discussion Leukotriene signaling has been implicated in early lipid retention and foam cell accumulation, as well as in the development of intimal hyperplasia and advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, the association of leukotrienes with degradation of extracellular matrix has suggested a role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Finally, studies of either myocardial or cerebral ischemia and reperfusion indicate that leukotriene signaling in addition may be involved in the development of ischemic injury. Conclusion Both leukotriene synthesis inhibitors and leukotriene receptor antagonists have been suggested to induce beneficial effects at different stages of the atherosclerosis process. PMID:18949546

  11. Fast Track Teaching: Beginning the Experiment in Accelerated Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churches, Richard; Hutchinson, Geraldine; Jones, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the development of the Fast Track teaching programme and personalised nature of the training and support that has been delivered. Fast Track teacher promotion rates are compared to national statistics demonstrating significant progression for certain groups, particularly women. (Contains 3 tables and 3 figures.)

  12. Follicle-stimulating hormone accelerates mouse oocyte development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Demeestere, Isabelle; Streiff, Agathe K; Suzuki, João; Al-Khabouri, Shaima; Mahrous, Enas; Tan, Seang Lin; Clarke, Hugh J

    2012-07-01

    During folliculogenesis, oocytes grow and acquire developmental competence in a mutually dependent relationship with their adjacent somatic cells. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) plays an essential and well-established role in the differentiation of somatic follicular cells, but its function in the development of the oocyte has still not been elucidated. We report here that oocytes of Fshb(-/-) mice, which cannot produce FSH, grow at the same rate and reach the same size as those of wild-type mice. Consistent with this observation, the granulosa cells of Fshb(-/-) mice express the normal quantity of mRNA encoding Kit ligand, which has been implicated in oocyte growth. Oocytes of Fshb(-/-) mice also accumulate normal quantities of cyclin B1 and CDK1 proteins and mitochondrial DNA. Moreover, they acquire the ability to complete meiotic maturation in vitro and undergo transition from non-surrounded nucleolus to surrounded nucleolus. However, these events of late oocyte development are significantly delayed. Following in vitro maturation and fertilization, only a small number of embryos derived from oocytes of Fshb(-/-) mice reach the blastocyst stage. Administration of equine chorionic gonadotropin, which provides FSH activity, 48 h before in vitro maturation increases the number of blastocysts obtained subsequently. These results indicate that FSH is not absolutely required for oocyte development in vivo but that this process occurs more rapidly in its presence. We suggest that FSH may coordinate the development of the germline and somatic compartments of the follicle, ensuring that ovulation releases a developmentally competent egg.

  13. Fast economic development accelerates biological invasions in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Zhou, Guofa; Cheng, Xinyue; Xu, Rumei

    2007-11-21

    Increasing levels of global trade and intercontinental travel have been cited as the major causes of biological invasion. However, indirect factors such as economic development that affect the intensity of invasion have not been quantitatively explored. Herein, using principal factor analysis, we investigated the relationship between biological invasion and economic development together with climatic information for China from the 1970s to present. We demonstrate that the increase in biological invasion is coincident with the rapid economic development that has occurred in China over the past three decades. The results indicate that the geographic prevalence of invasive species varies substantially on the provincial scale, but can be surprisingly well predicted using the combination of economic development (R(2) = 0.378) and climatic factors (R(2) = 0.347). Economic factors are proven to be at least equal to if not more determinant of the occurrence of invasive species than climatic factors. International travel and trade are shown to have played a less significant role in accounting for the intensity of biological invasion in China. Our results demonstrate that more attention should be paid to economic factors to improve the understanding, prediction and management of biological invasions.

  14. Systemic antiphospholipid syndrome and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Vera-Lastra, Olga

    2007-04-01

    Atherosclerosis (AT) is a metabolic, systemic inflammatory/immune disease characterized by lipoproteins metabolism alteration that leads to immune/inflammatory system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth-muscle cells, narrowing arteries and atheroma formation. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by thrombophilic state and circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) including anti beta2-GPI. Experimental studies and human observations suggest that APS is associated with AT. In fact, innate and adaptive immune responses participate in the pathogenesis of both diseases. Anti-oxLDL, anti-aPL, anti beta2GPI, anti-HSP antibodies, among others, has been found in patients with APS and AT. Endothelial dysfunctions, oxidative stress, increase of cell adhesion molecules, active platelets, are common findings in both diseases. Macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cell activation, CD40-CD40 ligand interaction, are considered as pathogenic mechanism of AT and APS. Premature AT may be the first symptom of APS. Thrombophilia, aPL antibodies, and APS may be present in patients with premature AT. An association between AT and venous thrombosis (a clinical hallmark of APS) has been proposed in unselected patients with deep venous thrombosis of the legs without symptomatic AT. Asymptomatic AT, defined in terms of carotid intima media thickness and lumen diameter decrease, was observed in patients with APS. Premenopausal female patients with PAPS have a higher prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in comparison with male patients. Accelerated AT and hormones could be the explanation of these findings. High levels of aCLs, significantly predict the risk of future ischemic stroke in women but not in men. AT is one of the main features of systemic APS and offer opportunities for new treatment strategies.

  15. Advanced low-beta cavity development for proton and ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Z. A.; Kelly, M. P.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in designing and processing low-beta superconducting cavities at Argonne National Laboratory are very encouraging for future applications requiring compact proton and ion accelerators. One of the major benefits of these accelerating structures is achieving real-estate accelerating gradients greater than 3 MV/m very efficiently either continuously or for long-duty cycle operation (>1%). The technology has been implemented in low-beta accelerator cryomodules for the Argonne ATLAS heavy-ion linac where the cryomodules are required to have real-estate gradients of more than 3 MV/m. In offline testing low-beta cavities with even higher gradients have already been achieved. This paper will review this work where we have achieved surface fields greater than 166 mT magnetic and 117 MV/m electric in a 72 MHz quarter-wave resonator optimized for β = 0.077 ions.

  16. Computational Tools for Accelerating Carbon Capture Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David

    2013-01-01

    The goals of the work reported are: to develop new computational tools and models to enable industry to more rapidly develop and deploy new advanced energy technologies; to demonstrate the capabilities of the CCSI Toolset on non-proprietary case studies; and to deploy the CCSI Toolset to industry. Challenges of simulating carbon capture (and other) processes include: dealing with multiple scales (particle, device, and whole process scales); integration across scales; verification, validation, and uncertainty; and decision support. The tools cover: risk analysis and decision making; validated, high-fidelity CFD; high-resolution filtered sub-models; process design and optimization tools; advanced process control and dynamics; process models; basic data sub-models; and cross-cutting integration tools.

  17. Accelerator Developments and their Application to Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirao, Yasuo

    2011-05-06

    Basic phenomena in irradiations of X-ray and particle beams and comparison among various radiations are described. Total doses and fractionations for several sites in case of carbon beam are shown in comparison with X-ray and proton beam. Typical results of carbon beam treatments are shown. Original facility was too large. Then, smaller design of 2{sup nd} stage facility of carbon therapy was carried out as well as the further technical developments.

  18. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  19. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  20. Computer assessment of atherosclerosis from angiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Brooks, S. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Cashin, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A computer method for detection and quantification of atherosclerosis from angiograms has been developed and used to measure lesion change in human clinical trials. The technique involves tracking the vessel edges and measuring individual lesions as well as the overall irregularity of the arterial image. Application of the technique to conventional arterial-injection femoral and coronary angiograms is outlined and an experimental study to extend the technique to analysis of intravenous angiograms of the carotid and cornary arteries is described.

  1. Curing atherosclerosis should be the next major cardiovascular prevention goal.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer G; Gidding, Samuel S

    2014-07-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading cause of death in developed and developing countries. Despite decades of effort, unhealthy lifestyle habits and ASCVD risk factor levels remain high and are increasing in many population groups. A new approach to ASCVD prevention is needed. Multiple lines of evidence from animal and human studies suggest that atherosclerosis regression and normalization of vessel function can occur when low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering occurs early in the course of atherosclerosis or when very aggressive LDL-C lowering occurs somewhat later. We propose a new paradigm focused on curing atherosclerosis early in the course of the disease. An approach that resets the vascular aging clock composed of initial regression therapy followed by periodic retreatment to suppress atherosclerosis development may be possible, with the ultimate goal of preventing subsequent ASCVD events. Proof-of-concept studies are needed to determine: 1) the optimal age and/or extent of atherosclerosis for intervention and LDL-C-lowering therapy; 2) the intensity and duration of therapy for inducing atherosclerosis regression; and 3) documenting the normalization of vascular function. Ultimately, this new paradigm will need to be evaluated in ASCVD outcomes trials.

  2. Ageing induced vascular smooth muscle cell senescence in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna K; Bennett, Martin R

    2016-04-15

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of ageing in that its incidence and prevalence increase with age. However, atherosclerosis is also associated with biological ageing, manifest by a number of typical hallmarks of ageing in the atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, accelerated biological ageing may be superimposed on the effects of chronological ageing in atherosclerosis. Tissue ageing is seen in all cells that comprise the plaque, but particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hallmarks of ageing include evidence of cell senescence, DNA damage (including telomere attrition), mitochondrial dysfunction, a pro-inflammatory secretory phenotype, defects in proteostasis, epigenetic changes, deregulated nutrient sensing, and exhaustion of progenitor cells. In this model, initial damage to DNA (genomic, telomeric, mitochondrial and epigenetic changes) results in a number of cellular responses (cellular senescence, deregulated nutrient sensing and defects in proteostasis). Ultimately, ongoing damage and attempts at repair by continued proliferation overwhelm reparative capacity, causing loss of specialised cell functions, cell death and inflammation. This review summarises the evidence for accelerated biological ageing in atherosclerosis, the functional consequences of cell ageing on cells comprising the plaque, and the causal role that VSMC senescence plays in atherogenesis.

  3. Pre-Implementation and Performance Plan for the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroga, Marcelo

    2007-03-30

    This report discusses the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center (Center) and its innovative economic development program. The chapters describe the organization and the operations of a two-pillar model for training and business acceleration and how the program focuses on the economic development of a disadvantaged Chicago, Illinois, Hispanic community located in Humboldt Park. The Humboldt Park community is located 3 miles west of Chicago's affluent downtown. Humboldt Park residents have income levels below the poverty line and unemployment rates twice the national average.

  4. MicroRNA-33 in atherosclerosis etiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wu-Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Guo-Jun; Fu, Yuchang; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhu, Hai-Bo; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNAs are a group of endogenous, small non-coding RNA molecules that can induce translation repression of target genes within metazoan cells by specific base pairing with the mRNA of target genes. Recently, microRNA-33 has been discovered as a key regulator in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. This review highlights the impact of microRNA-33-mediated regulation in the major cardiometabolic risk factors of atherosclerosis including lipid metabolism (HDL biogenesis and cholesterol homeostasis, fatty acid, phospholipid and triglyceride, bile acids metabolism), inflammatory response, insulin signaling and glucose/energy homeostasis, cell cycle progression and proliferation, and myeloid cell differentiation. Understanding the etiology and pathophysiology of microRNA-33 in atherosclerosis may provide basic knowledge for the development of novel therapeutic targets for ameliorating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

  5. Accelerating materials discovery through the development of polymer databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra

    In our line of business we create chemical solutions for a wide range of applications, such as home and personal care, printing and packaging, automotive and structural coatings, and structural plastics and foams applications. In this environment, stable and highly automated workflows suitable to handle complex systems are a must. By satisfying these prerequisites, efficiency for the development of new materials can be significantly improved by combining modeling and experimental approaches. This is in fact in line with recent Materials Genome Initiative efforts sponsored by the US administration. From our experience, we know, that valuable contributions to product development are possible today by combining existing modeling techniques in an intelligent fashion, provided modeling and experiment work closely together. In my presentation I intend to review approaches to build and parameterize soft matter systems. As an example of our standard workflow, I will show a few applications, which include the design of a stabilizer molecule for dispersing polymer particles and the simulation of polystyrene dispersions.

  6. Accelerated hepatocellular carcinoma development in CUL4B transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jupeng; Jiang, Baichun; Zhang, Aizhen; Qian, Yanyan; Tan, Haining; Gao, Jiangang; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2015-06-20

    Cullin 4B (CUL4B) is a component of the Cullin 4B-Ring E3 ligase (CRL4B) complex that functions in proteolysis and in epigenetic regulation. CUL4B possesses tumor-promoting properties and is markedly upregulated in many types of human cancers. To determine the role of CUL4B in liver tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice that expressed human CUL4B in livers and other tissues and evaluated the development of spontaneous and chemically-induced hepatocellular carcinomas. We observed that CUL4B transgenic mice spontaneously developed liver tumors at a high incidence at old ages and exhibited enhanced DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. There was a high proliferation rate in the livers of CUL4B transgenic mice that was accompanied by increased levels of Cdk1, Cdk4 and cyclin D1 and decreased level of p16. The transgenic mice also exhibited increased compensatory proliferation after DEN-induced liver injury, which was accompanied by activation of Akt, Erk, p38 and NF-κB. We also found that Prdx3 was downregulated and that DEN induced a higher level of reactive oxygen species in the livers of transgenic mice. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role of CUL4B in hepatocarcinogenesis in mice.

  7. Large animal models of atherosclerosis--new tools for persistent problems in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Shim, J; Al-Mashhadi, R H; Sørensen, C B; Bentzon, J F

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke caused by atherosclerosis are leading causes of illness and death worldwide. Small animal models have provided insight into the fundamental mechanisms driving early atherosclerosis, but it is increasingly clear that new strategies and research tools are needed to translate these discoveries into improved prevention and treatment of symptomatic atherosclerosis in humans. Key challenges include better understanding of processes in late atherosclerosis, factors affecting atherosclerosis in the coronary bed, and the development of reliable imaging biomarker tools for risk stratification and monitoring of drug effects in humans. Efficient large animal models of atherosclerosis may help tackle these problems. Recent years have seen tremendous advances in gene-editing tools for large animals. This has made it possible to create gene-modified minipigs that develop atherosclerosis with many similarities to humans in terms of predilection for lesion sites and histopathology. Together with existing porcine models of atherosclerosis that are based on spontaneous mutations or severe diabetes, such models open new avenues for translational research in atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss the merits of different animal models of atherosclerosis and give examples of important research problems where porcine models could prove pivotal for progress.

  8. Noninvasive Laser Probing of Ultrashort Single Electron Bunches for Accelerator And Light Source Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.; /SLAC

    2007-06-11

    Companion development of ultrafast electron beam diagnostics capable of noninvasively resolving single bunch detail is essential for the development of high energy, high brightness accelerator facilities and associated beam-based light source applications. Existing conventional accelerators can exhibit timing-jitter down to the 100 femtosecond level which exceeds their single bunch duration capability. At the other extreme, in relatively jitterless environments, laser-plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can generate single electron bunches of duration estimated to be of order 10 femtoseconds making this setting a valuable testbed for development of broadband electron bunch diagnostics. Characteristics of electro-optic schemes and laser-induced reflectance are discussed with emphasis on temporal resolution.

  9. Refining each process step to accelerate the development of biorefineries

    DOE PAGES

    Chandra, Richard P.; Ragauskas, Art J.

    2016-06-21

    Research over the past decade has been mainly focused on overcoming hurdles in the pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation steps of biochemical processing. Pretreatments have improved significantly in their ability to fractionate and recover the cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin components of biomass while producing substrates containing carbohydrates that can be easily broken down by hydrolytic enzymes. There is a rapid movement towards pretreatment processes that incorporate mechanical treatments that make use of existing infrastructure in the pulp and paper industry, which has experienced a downturn in its traditional markets. Enzyme performance has also made great strides with breakthrough developments inmore » nonhydrolytic protein components, such as lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases, as well as the improvement of enzyme cocktails.The fermentability of pretreated and hydrolyzed sugar streams has been improved through strategies such as the use of reducing agents for detoxification, strain selection, and strain improvements. Although significant progress has been made, tremendous challenges still remain to advance each step of biochemical conversion, especially when processing woody biomass. In addition to technical and scale-up issues within each step of the bioconversion process, biomass feedstock supply and logistics challenges still remain at the forefront of biorefinery research.« less

  10. Accelerating development of a predictive science of climate.

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, John B; Jones, Phil

    2007-01-01

    Climate change and studies of its implications are front page news. Could the heat waves of July 2006 in Europe and the US be caused by global warming? Are increased incidences of strong tropical storms and hurricanes like Katrina to be expected? Will coastal cities be flooded due to sea level rise? The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) which archives all weather data for the nation reports that global surface temperatures have increased at a rate near 0.6 C over the last century but that the trend is three times larger since 1976 [Easterling, 2006]. Will this rate continue or will climate change be even more abrupt? Stepping back from the flurry of questions, scientists must take a systematic approach and develop a predictive framework. With responsibility for advising on energy and technology strategies, the Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research has chosen to bolster the science of climate in order to get the story straight on the factors that cause climate change and the role of carbon loading from fossil fuel use.

  11. Refining each process step to accelerate the development of biorefineries

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Richard P.; Ragauskas, Art J.

    2016-06-21

    Research over the past decade has been mainly focused on overcoming hurdles in the pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation steps of biochemical processing. Pretreatments have improved significantly in their ability to fractionate and recover the cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin components of biomass while producing substrates containing carbohydrates that can be easily broken down by hydrolytic enzymes. There is a rapid movement towards pretreatment processes that incorporate mechanical treatments that make use of existing infrastructure in the pulp and paper industry, which has experienced a downturn in its traditional markets. Enzyme performance has also made great strides with breakthrough developments in nonhydrolytic protein components, such as lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases, as well as the improvement of enzyme cocktails.The fermentability of pretreated and hydrolyzed sugar streams has been improved through strategies such as the use of reducing agents for detoxification, strain selection, and strain improvements. Although significant progress has been made, tremendous challenges still remain to advance each step of biochemical conversion, especially when processing woody biomass. In addition to technical and scale-up issues within each step of the bioconversion process, biomass feedstock supply and logistics challenges still remain at the forefront of biorefinery research.

  12. Gamma interferon: a central mediator in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leon, M L Alfaro; Zuckerman, S H

    2005-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vasculature with lesions developing in the arterial wall, frequently in the coronary and carotid arteries. The interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes within the atherosclerotic lesion microenvironment exemplifies a site where both innate and adaptive immunity contribute towards disease progression. As gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), the classic macrophage activating factor, has been localized to atherosclerotic lesions, this review will focus on its contribution to plaque pathology and will finally consider how current therapies, as exemplified by HMG CoA reductase inhibitors or statins, may impact this process beyond lipid lowering, in part by inhibiting IFN-gamma dependent processes. IFN-gamma sources within the atheroma as well as receptors, signaling pathways and its effects on macrophages as well as on vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells will be considered. Therapeutic interventions targeting molecular events associated with IFN-gamma signaling offer novel approaches to the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  13. Current status of carotid ultrasound in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) primarily caused by atherosclerosis is a major cause of death and disability in developed countries. Sonographic carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is widely studied as a surrogate marker for detecting subclinical atherosclerosis for risk prediction and disease progress to guide medical intervention. However, there is no standardized CIMT measurement methodology in clinical studies resulting in inconsistent findings, thereby undermining the clinical value of CIMT. Increasing evidences show that CIMT alone has weak predictive value for CVD while CIMT including plaque presence consistently improves the predictive power. Quantification of plaque burden further enhances the predictive power beyond plaque presence. Sonographic carotid plaque characteristics have been found to be predictive of cerebral ischaemic events. With advances in ultrasound technology, enhanced assessment of carotid plaques is feasible to detect high-risk/vulnerable plaques, and provide risk assessment for ischemic stroke beyond measurement of luminal stenosis. PMID:27429912

  14. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1992-01-01

    The main thrust of our work in the third year of contract NAG8-759 was the development and analysis of various data processing techniques that may be applicable to residual acceleration data. Our goal is the development of a data processing guide that low gravity principal investigators can use to assess their need for accelerometer data and then formulate an acceleration data analysis strategy. The work focused on the flight of the first International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) mission. We are also developing a data base management system to handle large quantities of residual acceleration data. This type of system should be an integral tool in the detailed analysis of accelerometer data. The system will manage a large graphics data base in the support of supervised and unsupervised pattern recognition. The goal of the pattern recognition phase is to identify specific classes of accelerations so that these classes can be easily recognized in any data base. The data base management system is being tested on the Spacelab 3 (SL3) residual acceleration data.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS AND CARDIAC INFARCTS IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Wilgram, George F.

    1959-01-01

    Marked obesity was induced in rats by feeding a high fat, egg yolk-rich diet. The obese rats were hyperlipemic and showed an increased incidence of lipomatous coronary lesions, but did not develop severe atheromatous lesions. Spontaneous vascular lesions of several kinds have been observed in aging rats. Among them, plaques containing a fibrin-like material seem to be conspicuous. However, these lesions differ from the experimentally induced changes, which were more fatty. Atherosclerosis, as it is defined in human pathology, has not been observed to develop spontaneously in rats. Experimental induction of marked hyperlipemia and hypercholesterolemia by feeding a high fat egg yolk-rich diet (supplemented with cholesterol, choleate, and thiouracil), and use of viosterol to cause vascular injury, led to severe atherosclerosis, coronary occlusion, and myocardial infarction. A consideration of all the findings reported here leads to renewed support of the concept that atherosclerosis has a combination of causes (Aschoff, Anitschkow, Page). Of all the etiological factors considered here, elevation of blood lipides and vascular injury are thought to be the most important ones. PMID:13620855

  16. Innate immunity, Toll-like receptors, and atherosclerosis: mouse models and methods.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and aberrant lipid metabolism represent hallmarks of atherosclerosis. Innate immunity critically depends upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling. Recent data directly implicate signalling by TLR4 and TLR2 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The role that TLRs play in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be assessed by using several animal models, which provide a double genetic deficiency in TLRs and molecules implicated in the lipid metabolism, such as ApoE or LDL receptor. Furthermore, a more recent technique, such as the bone marrow transplantation (BMT), can be a useful and straightforward method to elucidate the role of stromal versus hematopoietic cells in the acceleration of the atheroma.

  17. Activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes contributes to hyperhomocysteinemia-aggravated inflammation and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renqing; Wang, Yiqin; Mu, Nana; Lou, Xiaoying; Li, Weixuan; Chen, Yanming; Fan, Dong; Tan, Hongmei

    2017-04-10

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) has been shown to promote vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been identified as the cellular machinery responsible for activation of inflammatory processes. In this study, we hypothesized that the activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes contributes to HHcy-induced inflammation and atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) mice were fed regular chow, high-fat (HF) diet, or HF plus high methionine diet to induce HHcy. To assess the role of NLRP3 inflammasomes in HHcy-aggravated atherosclerosis, NLRP3 shRNA viral suspension was injected via tail vein to knock down the NLRP3 gene. Increased plasma levels of IL-1β and IL-18, aggravated macrophage infiltration into atherosclerotic lesions, and accelerated development of atherosclerosis were detected in HHcy mice as compared with control mice, and were associated with the activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes. Silencing the NLRP3 gene significantly suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation, reduced plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines, attenuated macrophage infiltration and improved HHcy-induced atherosclerosis. We also examined the effect of homocysteine (Hcy) on NLRP3 inflammasome activation in THP-1-differentiated macrophages in the presence or absence of NLRP3 siRNA or the caspase-1 inhibitor Z-WEHD-FMK. We found that Hcy activated NLRP3 inflammasomes and promoted subsequent production of IL-1β and IL-18 in macrophages, which were blocked by NLRP3 gene silencing or Z-WEHD-FMK. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) may have a central role in NLRP3 inflammasome activation, we next investigated whether antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) prevented Hcy-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. We found Hcy-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation was abolished by NAC. Treatment with NAC in HHcy mice also suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation and improved HHcy-induced atherosclerosis. These data suggest that the

  18. Influence of coronary artery disease and subclinical atherosclerosis related polymorphisms on the risk of atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    López-Mejías, Raquel; Corrales, Alfonso; Vicente, Esther; Robustillo-Villarino, Montserrat; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; Genre, Fernanda; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Huaranga, Marco A. Ramírez; Pina, Trinitario; Blanco, Ricardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Raya, Enrique; Mijares, Verónica; Ubilla, Begoña; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Balsa, Alejandro; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Carreira, Patricia; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Ocejo-Vinyals, J. Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Castañeda, Santos; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    A genetic component influences the development of atherosclerosis in the general population and also in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, genetic polymorphisms associated with atherosclerosis in the general population are not always involved in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in RA. Accordingly, a study in North-American RA patients did not show the association reported in the general population of coronary artery disease with a series of relevant polymorphisms (TCF21, LPA, HHIPL1, RASD1-PEMT, MRPS6, CYP17A1-CNNM2-NT5C2, SMG6-SRR, PHACTR1, WDR12 and COL4A1-COL4A2). In the present study, we assessed the potential association of these polymorphisms with CVD in Southern European RA patients. We also assessed if polymorphisms implicated in the increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in non-rheumatic Caucasians (ZHX2, PINX1, SLC17A4, LRIG1 and LDLR) may influence the risk for CVD in RA. 2,609 Spanish patients were genotyped by TaqMan assays. Subclinical atherosclerosis was determined in 1,258 of them by carotid ultrasonography (assessment of carotid intima media thickness and presence/absence of carotid plaques). No statistically significant differences were found when each polymorphism was assessed according to the presence/absence of cardiovascular events and subclinical atherosclerosis, after adjustment for potential confounder factors. Our results do not show an association between these 15 polymorphisms and atherosclerosis in RA. PMID:28059143

  19. Influence of coronary artery disease and subclinical atherosclerosis related polymorphisms on the risk of atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    López-Mejías, Raquel; Corrales, Alfonso; Vicente, Esther; Robustillo-Villarino, Montserrat; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; Genre, Fernanda; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Huaranga, Marco A Ramírez; Pina, Trinitario; Blanco, Ricardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J; Raya, Enrique; Mijares, Verónica; Ubilla, Begoña; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Balsa, Alejandro; López-Longo, Francisco J; Carreira, Patricia; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Ocejo-Vinyals, J Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Castañeda, Santos; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2017-01-06

    A genetic component influences the development of atherosclerosis in the general population and also in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, genetic polymorphisms associated with atherosclerosis in the general population are not always involved in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in RA. Accordingly, a study in North-American RA patients did not show the association reported in the general population of coronary artery disease with a series of relevant polymorphisms (TCF21, LPA, HHIPL1, RASD1-PEMT, MRPS6, CYP17A1-CNNM2-NT5C2, SMG6-SRR, PHACTR1, WDR12 and COL4A1-COL4A2). In the present study, we assessed the potential association of these polymorphisms with CVD in Southern European RA patients. We also assessed if polymorphisms implicated in the increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in non-rheumatic Caucasians (ZHX2, PINX1, SLC17A4, LRIG1 and LDLR) may influence the risk for CVD in RA. 2,609 Spanish patients were genotyped by TaqMan assays. Subclinical atherosclerosis was determined in 1,258 of them by carotid ultrasonography (assessment of carotid intima media thickness and presence/absence of carotid plaques). No statistically significant differences were found when each polymorphism was assessed according to the presence/absence of cardiovascular events and subclinical atherosclerosis, after adjustment for potential confounder factors. Our results do not show an association between these 15 polymorphisms and atherosclerosis in RA.

  20. Future imaging of atherosclerosis: molecular imaging of coronary atherosclerosis with 18F positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Psaltis, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of complex atheroma lesions (plaques) in arteries that pose risk by their flow-limiting nature and propensity for rupture and thrombotic occlusion. It develops in the context of disturbances to lipid metabolism and immune response, with inflammation underpinning all stages of plaque formation, progression and rupture. As the primary disease process responsible for myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. A precise understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms is therefore critically important. Integral to this is the role of vascular wall imaging. Over recent years, the rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging has begun to revolutionize our ability to image beyond just the anatomical substrate of vascular disease, and more dynamically assess its pathobiology. Nuclear imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) can target specific molecular and biological pathways involved in atherosclerosis, with the application of 18Fluoride PET imaging being widely studied for its potential to identify plaques that are vulnerable or high risk. In this review, we discuss the emergence of 18Fluoride PET as a promising modality for the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis, focusing on the strengths and limitations of the two main radionuclide tracers that have been investigated to date: 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and sodium 18F-fluoride (18F-NaF). PMID:27500093

  1. The MIT Accelerator Laboratory for Diagnostic Development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Orozco, D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Hahn, K.; Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products, which are used for development of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved with this accelerator, and fluence and energy of the fusion products are accurately characterized. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) CVD-diamond-based bang time detector. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  2. Fe-Radiation-Induced Alterations in Circulating Leukocyte Populations in the ApoE Mouse Atherosclerosis Model are Temporary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Yu, Shaohua; Parks, Brian W.; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Khaled, Saman; Chang, Polly Y.; Srivastava, Roshni; Kabarowski, Janusz H. S.; Kucik, Dennis F.

    2008-06-01

    Radiation is associated with an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, likely due in part to vascular inflammation. One model used to understand this is the apoE mouse, where gamma irradiation accelerates development of atherosclerosis. Less is known, though, about the effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, such as 56Fe, likely to be encountered by astronauts in deep space. Radiation, however, also affects leukocyte numbers. For example, whole-body 56Fe irradiation has been shown to decrease circulating B-cells and T-cells, but whether this was due to radiation of the thymus, of the bone marrow, or both was not determined. We irradiated ApoE mice with 56Fe focused to the aorta and carotids to determine how irradiation of the thymus with 56Fe affects circulating lymphocyte number, and ultimately to determine the effect of iron ion irradiation on development of atherosclerosis. We found that only T-cells were affected at 13 weeks post-irradiation, but even these recovered at 40 weeks, suggesting that effects on the immune system are limited and temporary. Analysis of atherosclerosis development is pending sacrifice and histological analysis of irradiated mice.

  3. The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility for Diagnostic Development for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, C. E.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Birkel, A.; Kabadi, N. V.; Lahmann, B.; Milanese, L. M.; Simpson, R. A.; Sio, H.; Sutcliffe, G. D.; Wink, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2016-10-01

    The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility utilizes a 135-keV linear electrostatic ion accelerator, DT and DD neutron sources, and two x-ray sources for development and characterization of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. The accelerator generates DD and D3He fusion products through the acceleration of D+ ions onto a 3He-doped Erbium-Deuteride target. Accurately characterized fusion product rates of around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved. The DT and DD neutron sources generate up to 6x108, and 1x107 neutrons/s, respectively. One x-ray generator is a thick-target W source with a peak energy of 225 keV and a maximum dose rate of 12 Gy/min; the other uses Cu, Mo, or Ti elemental tubes to generate x-rays with a maximum energy of 40 keV. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39-based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) and Magnetic PTOF CVD-diamond-based bang time detectors. The accelerator is also a valuable hands-on tool for graduate and undergraduate education at MIT. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DoE, SNL, LLE and LLNL.

  4. Developing a Model of Compulsory Basic Education Completion Acceleration in Support of Millennium Development Goals in Magelang, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukarno; Haryati, Sri

    2015-01-01

    This article reports Year One of a two-year study to develop a model to accelerate compulsory basic education completion toward Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in Magelang, Indonesia. The study focuses on five issues: (1) profile of MDGs in Magelang, (2) achievement of MDGs, (3) problems in MDGs implementation, (4) model of compulsary basic…

  5. Emerging role of IL-17 in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The IL-23-IL-17 axis is emerging as a critical regulatory system that bridges the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Th17 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in various stages of atherogenesis remains poorly understood and is only beginning to be elucidated. While IL-17 is a predominantly proinflammatory cytokine, it has a pleiotropic function and it has been implicated both as an instigator in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory disorders as well as being protective in certain inflammatory disease models. Therefore, it is not surprising that the current literature is conflicting on the role of IL-17 during atherosclerotic lesion development. Various approaches have been used by several groups to discern the involvement of IL-17 in atherosclerosis. While one study found that IL-17 is protective against atherosclerosis, several other recent studies have suggested that IL-17 plays a proatherogenic role. Thus, the function of IL-17 remains controversial and awaits more direct studies to address the issue. In this review, we will highlight all the latest studies involving IL-17 and atherosclerosis, including both clinical and experimental research.

  6. Accelerated Learning in Adult Education and Training and Development. Trends and Issues Alert.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    In adult education, the term "accelerated learning" (AL) is usually associated with programs designed to meet the needs of adult learners whose many commitments prevent them from participating in traditional programs. Within the field of training and development, however, AL identifies an approach to learning that is multidimensional in…

  7. Accelerated Professional Development and Peer Consultation: Two Strategies for Continuing Professional Education for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Gail; Clinton, Michael; Edwards, Helen; Evans, Katie; Lunney, Paul; Posner, Natasha; Tooth, Barbara; Weir, Derek; Ryan, Yoni

    2000-01-01

    A comparison was made of accelerated professional development (APD) for nurses (n=64), involving peer consultation and reflective practice, and peer consultation alone (n=30). Although APD participants had a higher completion rate, improvements in caregiver behaviors and work environment were not significantly different. (SK)

  8. Methoprene and protein supplements accelerate reproductive development and improve mating success of male tephritid flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have been studying the physiological mechanisms responsible for coordination of reproductive maturity and sex pheromone communication in males of tephritid flies in order to develop methods for acceleration of reproductive maturity among sterilized males. Our studies revealed that the juvenile ho...

  9. Accelerating the Early Numeracy Development of Kindergartners with Limited Working Memory Skills through Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toll, Sylke W. M.; Van Luit, Johannes E. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Young children with limited working memory skills are a special interest group among all children that score below average on early numeracy tests. This study examines the effect of accelerating the early numeracy development of these children through remedial education, by comparing them with children with typically working memory…

  10. [Acceleration of Embryonic Development of Pinus sibirica Trees with a One-Year Reproductive Cycle].

    PubMed

    Tret'yakova, I N; Lukina, N V

    2016-01-01

    The study of the formation of embryonic structures in Pinus sibirica forms with a one-year reproductive cycle showed that the acceleration of the embryonic process manifested itself as a reduction of the coenocytic stage of the female gametophyte development (1.5 months instead of 1 year). The egg was not fertilized because of the asynchronous maturation of male and female gametophytes. Seeds without embryos were formed. We assumed that the acceleration of the reproductive process in Pinus sibirica was caused by a mutation in the female generative organs.

  11. Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Rodolfo; Bolego, Chiara; Poli, Andrea; Cignarella, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches. PMID:17319458

  12. Helicon Plasma Injector and Ion Cyclotron Acceleration Development in the VASIMR Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang, Franklin R.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; McCaskill, Greg E.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    In the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) radio frequency (rf) waves both produce the plasma and then accelerate the ions. The plasma production is done by action of helicon waves. These waves are circular polarized waves in the direction of the electron gyromotion. The ion acceleration is performed by ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) acceleration. The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) is actively developing efficient helicon plasma production and ICRF acceleration. The VASIMR experimental device at the ASPL is called VX-10. It is configured to demonstrate the plasma production and acceleration at the 10kW level to support a space flight demonstration design. The VX-10 consists of three electromagnets integrated into a vacuum chamber that produce magnetic fields up to 0.5 Tesla. Magnetic field shaping is achieved by independent magnet current control and placement of the magnets. We have generated both helium and hydrogen high density (>10(exp 18) cu m) discharges with the helicon source. ICRF experiments are underway. This paper describes the VX-10 device, presents recent results and discusses future plans.

  13. Mosaic evolution of neural development in anurans: acceleration of spinal cord development in the direct developing frog Eleutherodactylus coqui.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Gerhard

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that spinal cord development in direct developing frogs of the genus Eleutherodactylus, which have evolutionarily lost the tadpole stage, differs from that in biphasically developing anurans (with the larval and the adult stage separated by metamorphosis). The present study of spinal cord development in Eleutherodactylus coqui provides additional information about neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and growth analyzed by immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), in situ hybridization for NeuroD, and morphometric measurements in various developmental stages. Furthermore, spinal cord development in the frogs Discoglossus pictus, Xenopus laevis, and Physalaemus pustulosus, which belong to different anuran families but all exhibit biphasic development, was similarly analyzed. This comparative analysis allows inference of the ancestral anuran pattern of spinal cord development and how it has been modified during the evolution of Eleutherodactylus. All biphasically developing frogs analyzed share a similar pattern of spinal cord development, suggesting that this is ancestral for anurans: after neural tube closure, levels of proliferation and neurogenesis in the spinal cord were low throughout embryogenesis until they were upregulated drastically at early larval stages followed by development of the lateral motor columns. In contrast, no such quiescent embryonic period exists in E. coqui, where rapid growth, high levels of proliferation and neurogenesis, and early formation of lateral motor columns occur shortly after neural tube closure, while other parts of the central nervous system develop more slowly. Thus, spinal cord development has been accelerated during the evolution of Eleutherodactylus relative to the development of other parts of the central nervous system, probably related to the precocious development of limbs in this lineage.

  14. Developing The Physics Desing for NDCS-II, A Unique Pulse-Compressing Ion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J -; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-09-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the 'warm dense matter' regime at {approx}< 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a {approx}500 ns pulse of Li{sup +} ions to {approx} 1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over {approx} 15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  15. DEVELOPING THE PHYSICS DESIGN FOR NDCX-II, A UNIQUE PULSE-COMPRESSING ION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Sharp, W. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J-Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2009-07-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory(a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the"warm dense matter" regime at<~;; 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a ~;;500 ns pulse of Li+ ions to ~;;1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over ~;;15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  16. Accelerated stress testing of thin film solar cells: Development of test methods and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    If thin film cells are to be considered a viable option for terrestrial power generation their reliability attributes will need to be explored and confidence in their stability obtained through accelerated testing. Development of a thin film accelerated test program will be more difficult than was the case for crystalline cells because of the monolithic construction nature of the cells. Specially constructed test samples will need to be fabricated, requiring committment to the concept of accelerated testing by the manufacturers. A new test schedule appropriate to thin film cells will need to be developed which will be different from that used in connection with crystalline cells. Preliminary work has been started to seek thin film schedule variations to two of the simplest tests: unbiased temperature and unbiased temperature humidity. Still to be examined are tests which involve the passage of current during temperature and/or humidity stress, either by biasing in the forward (or reverse) directions or by the application of light during stress. Investigation of these current (voltage) accelerated tests will involve development of methods of reliably contacting the thin conductive films during stress.

  17. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Jia, Ru; Cai, Yu; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis. PMID:26783845

  18. Narrow bandwidth Thomson photon source and diagnostic development using laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Tsai, Hai-En; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Nakamura, Kei; Quiter, Brian J.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Steinke, Sven; Swanson, Kelly; Toth, Csaba; Vay, Jean-Luc; Vetter, Kai; Zhang, Yigong; Leemans, Wim

    2017-03-01

    Compact, high-quality photon sources at MeV energies are being developed based on Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPAs), and these sources at the same time provide precision diagnostics of beam evolution to support LPA development. We review design of experiments and laser capabilities to realize a photon source, integrating LPA acceleration for compactness, control of scattering to increase photon flux, and electron deceleration to mitigate beam dump size. These experiments are developing a compact photon source system with the potential to enable new monoenergetic photon applications currently restricted by source size, including nuclear nonproliferation. Diagnostic use of the energy-angle spectra of Thomson scattered photons is presented to support development of LPAs to meet the needs of advanced high yield/low-energy-spread photon sources and future high energy physics colliders.

  19. Chemokines in atherosclerosis: proceedings resumed.

    PubMed

    Zernecke, Alma; Weber, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Chemokines play important roles in atherosclerotic vascular disease. Expressed by not only cells of the vessel wall but also emigrated leukocytes, chemokines were initially discovered to direct leukocytes to sites of inflammation. However, chemokines can also exert multiple functions beyond cell recruitment. Here, we discuss novel and recently emerging aspects of chemokines and their involvement in atherosclerosis. While reviewing newly identified roles of chemokines and their receptors in monocyte and neutrophil recruitment during atherogenesis and atheroregression, we also revisit homeostatic functions of chemokines, including their roles in cell homeostasis and foam cell formation. The functional diversity of chemokines in atherosclerosis warrants a clear-cut mechanistic dissection and stage-specific assessment to better appreciate the full scope of their actions in vascular inflammation and to identify pathways that harbor the potential for a therapeutic targeting of chemokines in atherosclerosis.

  20. Analysis of requirements for accelerating the development of geothermal energy resources in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    Various resource data are presented showing that geothermal energy has the potential of satisfying a singificant part of California's increasing energy needs. General factors slowing the development of geothermal energy in California are discussed and required actions to accelerate its progress are presented. Finally, scenarios for developing the most promising prospects in the state directed at timely on-line power are given. Specific actions required to realize each of these individual scenarios are identified.

  1. Low ambient oxygen prevents atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Sung, Ho Joong; Amar, Marcelo J; Pryor, Milton; Remaley, Alan T; Allen, Michele D; Noguchi, Audrey C; Springer, Danielle A; Kwon, Jaeyul; Chen, Jichun; Park, Ji-hoon; Wang, Ping-yuan; Hwang, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    Large population studies have shown that living at higher altitudes, which lowers ambient oxygen exposure, is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease mortality. However, hypoxia has also been reported to promote atherosclerosis by worsening lipid metabolism and inflammation. We sought to address these disparate reports by reducing the ambient oxygen exposure of ApoE-/- mice. We observed that long-term adaptation to 10% O2 (equivalent to oxygen content at ∼5000 m), compared to 21% O2 (room air at sea level), resulted in a marked decrease in aortic atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice. This effect was associated with increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), known to be anti-atherogenic and regulated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α). Supporting these observations, ApoE-/- mice that were deficient in IL-10 (IL10-/- ApoE-/- double knockout) failed to show reduced atherosclerosis in 10% oxygen. Our study reveals a specific mechanism that can help explain the decreased prevalence of ischemic heart disease in populations living at high altitudes and identifies ambient oxygen exposure as a potential factor that could be modulated to alter pathogenesis. Key messages: Chronic low ambient oxygen exposure decreases atherosclerosis in mice. Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 levels are increased by low ambient O2. This is consistent with the established role of HIF-1α in IL10 transactivation. Absence of IL-10 results in the loss of the anti-atherosclerosis effect of low O2. This mechanism may contribute to decreased atherosclerosis at high altitudes.

  2. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed? Taking action to control ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  3. New electronic control systems for ILU accelerators, initiating the development of unique irradiation systems based on them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglov, V. V.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Vlasov, A. Y.; Kokin, E. N.; Shtarklev, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    This study is devoted to the development and industrial implementation of automated electronbeam irradiation systems based on ILU type accelerators, as well as the development of electronics and software for the creation of new technological solutions on the industrial application of accelerated electron beams. This study gives a description of the power-supply and control systems for an independent electronbeam scanning unit included in a universal one- or four-window extraction unit. The new control and protection systems for ILU accelerator pulsed power supply are also described; these systems resulted in the development of a unique 3-modulator power supply for the multiresonator ILU-14 accelerator.

  4. Imaging and Nanomedicine in Inflammatory Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Willem J. M.; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Bioengineering provides unique opportunities to better understand and manage atherosclerotic disease. The field is entering a new era that merges the latest biological insights into inflammatory disease processes with targeted imaging and nanomedicine. Preclinical cardiovascular molecular imaging allows the in vivo study of targeted nanotherapeutics specifically directed toward immune system components that drive atherosclerotic plaque development and complication. The first multicenter trials highlight the potential contribution of multimodality imaging to more efficient drug development. This review describes how the integration of engineering, nanotechnology, and cardiovascular immunology may yield precision diagnostics and efficient therapeutics for atherosclerosis and its ischemic complications. PMID:24898749

  5. Long noncoding RNAs and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Ding, Jia-wang; Wang, Xin-an; Zheng, Xia-xia

    2016-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is universally recognized as a chronic lipid-induced inflammation of the vessel wall in response to dyslipidemia and haemodynamic stress involving dysfunction and activation of resident vascular cells as well as infiltration of leukocytes. As members of nonprotein-coding RNAs, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in various biological processes. Accumulating evidences suggest that lncRNAs regulate the function of vascular wall, activation of macrophages, lipid metabolism and immune response. Here, we review the effects of lncRNAs on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  6. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  7. A Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Development of Lift on Wings in Accelerated Longitudinal Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Thomas R.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the development of lift on a wing during a simulated constant-acceleration catapult take-off. The investigation included models of a two-dimensional wing, an unswept wing having an aspect ratio of 6, a 35 deg. swept wing having an aspect ratio of 3.05, and a 60 deg. delta wing having an aspect ratio of 2.31. All the wings investigated developed at least 90 percent of their steady-state lift in the first 7 chord lengths of travel. The development of lift was essentially independent of the acceleration when based on chord lengths traveled, and was in qualitative agreement with theory.

  8. Progress In Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Cassibry, Jason T.; Griffin, Steven; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a coaxial pulsed plasma thruster (Figure 1). It has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approx.50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet has been photographed with 10-ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure (Figure 2). Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes and magnetic probes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma and current transit respectively at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  9. Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners: A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a pulsed plasma thruster and has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approximately 50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet structure has been photographed with 10 ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure. Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma transit at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  10. ApoE-/-Fas-/- C57BL/6 mice: a novel murine model simultaneously exhibits lupus nephritis, atherosclerosis, and osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuebing; Li, Hongyun; Rumbin, Alexis A; Wang, Xuping; La Cava, Antonio; Brechtelsbauer, Katherine; Castellani, Lawrence W; Witztum, Joseph L; Lusis, Aldons J; Tsao, Betty P

    2007-04-01

    To establish a mouse model of accelerated atherosclerosis in lupus, we generated apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) and Fas(lpr/lpr) (Fas(-/-)) C57BL/6 mice. On a normal chow diet, 5 month old apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mice had enlarged glomerular tuft areas, severe proteinuria, increased circulating autoantibody levels, and increased apoptotic cells in renal and vascular lesions compared with either single knockout mice. Also, double knockout mice developed increased atherosclerotic lesions but decreased serum levels of total and non-HDL cholesterol compared with apoE(-/-)Fas(+/+) littermates. Moreover, female apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mice had lower vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) and bone volume density (BV/TV) than age-matched female apoE(-/-)Fas(+/+) mice. Compared with apoE(-/-)Fas(+/+) and apoE(+/+)Fas(-/-) mice, apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mice had decreased circulating oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) content on apoB-100 containing lipoprotein particles and increased serum IgG antibodies to OxPL, which were significantly correlated with aortic lesion areas (r = 0.58), glomerular tuft areas (r = 0.87), BMD (r = -0.57), and BV/TV (r = -0.72). These results suggest that the apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mouse model might be used to study atherosclerosis and osteopenia in lupus. Correlations of IgG anti-OxPL with lupus-like disease, atherosclerosis, and bone loss suggested a shared pathway of these disease processes.

  11. Why did ancient people have atherosclerosis?: from autopsies to computed tomography to potential causes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory S; Wann, L Samuel; Allam, Adel H; Thompson, Randall C; Michalik, David E; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Lombardi, Guido P; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Valladolid, Clide M; Abd El-Maksoud, Gomaa; Al-Tohamy Soliman, Muhammad; Badr, Ibrahem; el-Halim Nur el-Din, Abd; Clarke, Emily M; Thomas, Ian G; Miyamoto, Michael I; Kaplan, Hillard S; Frohlich, Bruno; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Zink, Albert; Finch, Caleb E

    2014-06-01

    Computed tomographic findings of atherosclerosis in the ancient cultures of Egypt, Peru, the American Southwest and the Aleutian Islands challenge our understanding of the fundamental causes of atherosclerosis. Could these findings be true? Is so, what traditional risk factors might be present in these cultures that could explain this apparent paradox? The recent computed tomographic findings are consistent with multiple autopsy studies dating as far back as 1852 that demonstrate calcific atherosclerosis in ancient Egyptians and Peruvians. A nontraditional cause of atherosclerosis that could explain this burden of atherosclerosis is the microbial and parasitic inflammatory burden likely to be present in ancient cultures inherently lacking modern hygiene and antimicrobials. Patients with chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of today, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and human immunodeficiency virus infection, experience premature atherosclerosis and coronary events. Might the chronic inflammatory load of ancient times secondary to infection have resulted in atherosclerosis? Smoke inhalation from the use of open fires for daily cooking and illumination represents another potential cause. Undiscovered risk factors could also have been present, potential causes that technologically cannot currently be measured in our serum or other tissue. A synthesis of these findings suggests that a gene-environmental interplay is causal for atherosclerosis. That is, humans have an inherent genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis, whereas the speed and severity of its development are secondary to known and potentially unknown environmental factors.

  12. GSTM1 polymorphism in patients with clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, D A; Martins, J V M; E Silva, K S F; Costa, I R; Lagares, M H; Campedelli, F L; Barbosa, A M; de Morais, M P; Moura, K K V O

    2017-03-15

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by lesions, called atheroma or atheromatous plaques, in the inner layer of blood vessels, which block the vascular lumen and weaken the underlying tunica media. Several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis exist. The modifiable risk factors include hypertension, smoking, obesity, high LDL and low HDL cholesterol levels, sedentary lifestyle, and stress; the non-modifiable factors include diabetes mellitus, family history of hypertension and heart disease, thrombophilia, sex, age, and genetic factors. The association of polymorphisms in GST with coronary artery disease has been studied since the polymorphisms can affect enzyme activity and contribute to the onset of atherosclerosis. We analyzed polymorphisms in GSTM1 in individuals diagnosed with atherosclerosis as well as in healthy individuals (control group). The frequency of the GSTM1 present genotype in the atherosclerosis group was 1.2 times higher than that observed in the control group. We found no sex- or alcohol-consumption-dependent differences between the occurrences of the present and null genotypes. However, the GSTM1 present genotype occurred in 52.6% individuals with atherosclerosis who reported smoking 20 or more cigarettes per day and in 60% individuals who smoked 10 to 20 cigarettes per day (P = 0.0035). In addition, the GSTM1 present genotype was more frequent in individuals who reported being former smokers - 45.5% in individuals with atherosclerosis who smoked for more than 20 years and 50% each for individuals in the control group who smoked for less than 10 years or for 10 to 20 years, respectively (P = 0.0240).

  13. Hazard identification of particulate matter on vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter; Mikkelsen, Lone; Vesterdal, Lise Kristine; Folkmann, Janne Kjærsgaard; Forchhammer, Lykke; Roursgaard, Martin; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Loft, Steffen

    2011-04-01

    The development and use of nanoparticles have alerted toxicologists and regulators to issues of safety testing. By analogy with ambient air particles, it can be expected that small doses are associated with a small increase in risk of cardiovascular diseases, possibly through oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways. We have assessed the effect of exposure to particulate matter on progression of atherosclerosis and vasomotor function in humans, animals, and ex vivo experimental systems. The type of particles that have been tested in these systems encompass TiO(2), carbon black, fullerene C(60), single-walled carbon nanotubes, ambient air particles, and diesel exhaust particles. Exposure to ambient air particles is associated with accelerated progression of atherosclerosis and vasomotor dysfunction in both healthy and susceptible animal models and humans at risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. The vasomotor dysfunction includes increased vasoconstriction as well as reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation; endothelium-independent vasodilatation is often unaffected indicating mainly endothelial dysfunction. Pulmonary exposure to TiO(2), carbon black, and engineered nanoparticles generate vasomotor dysfunction; the effect size is similar to that generated by combustion-derived particles, although the effect could depend on the exposure period and the administered dose, route, and mode. The relative risk associated with exposure to nanoparticles may be small compared to some traditional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, but superimposed on these and possible exposure to large parts of the population it is a significant public health concern. Overall, assessment of vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis are promising tools for understanding the effects of particulate matter.

  14. Interleukin 27 inhibits atherosclerosis via immunoregulation of macrophages in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirase, Tetsuaki; Hara, Hiromitsu; Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki; Ide, Noriko; Nishimoto-Hazuku, Ai; Fujimoto, Hirokazu; Saris, Christiaan J M; Yoshida, Hiroki; Node, Koichi

    2013-08-01

    Chronic inflammation in arterial wall that is driven by immune cells and cytokines plays pivotal roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Interleukin 27 (IL-27) is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that consists of IL-27p28 and Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 3 (EBI3) and has anti-inflammatory properties that regulate T cell polarization and cytokine production. IL-27-deficient (Ldlr-/-Ebi3-/-) and IL-27 receptor-deficient (Ldlr-/-WSX-1-/-) Ldlr-/- mice were generated and fed with a high-cholesterol diet to induce atherosclerosis. Roles of bone marrow-derived cells in vivo and macrophages in vitro were studied using bone marrow reconstitution by transplantation and cultured peritoneal macrophages, respectively. We demonstrate that mice lacking IL-27 or IL-27 receptor are more susceptible to atherosclerosis compared with wild type due to enhanced accumulation and activation of macrophages in arterial walls. The number of circulating proinflammatory Ly6C(hi) monocytes showed no significant difference between wild-type mice and mice lacking IL-27 or IL-27 receptor. Administration of IL-27 suppressed the development of atherosclerosis in vivo and macrophage activation in vitro that was indicated by increased uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein and augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines. These findings define a novel inhibitory role for IL-27 in atherosclerosis that regulates macrophage activation in mice.

  15. AdipoRon may be benefit for atherosclerosis prevention

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Maryam; Shabab, Nooshin; Saidijam, Massoud

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis has serious role in coronary arteries disease, so it is important to establish effective strategies for prevention or even treatment of atherosclerosis. Adiponectin, as one of the most abundant adipokines, has insulin sensitivity, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties. Disturbed adiponectin actions through its receptor, (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) may be involved in atherosclerosis development. Some adiponectin effects are mediated by AMPK and PPAR-α signaling. AdipoRon is an orally active synthetic molecule which can bind to AdipoR1, Adipo R2 and activate them. AdipoRon can activate AdipoR1-AMPK- PGC-1α pathway and AdipoR2-PPAR-α pathway. Some studies indicated insulin sensitivity, anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative effect of AdipoRon. We hypothesize that AdipoRon has anti atherosclerotic effect and may suppress atherosclerosis processes. With confirmation the benefit role of AdipoRon on atherosclerosis, it may be used in patients at risk of atherosclerotic development.

  16. Preventing and arresting coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W C

    1995-09-01

    The good news about coronary atherosclerosis is that it takes an awful lot of plaque before symptoms of myocardial ischemia occur. The bad news is that despite the need for large quantities of plaque for symptoms to occur, nevertheless nearly half of us in the United States eventually have the necessary quantity. Atherosclerosis is infrequently hereditary in origin. Most of us get atherosclerosis because we consume too much fat, cholesterol, and calories. The consequence is an elevated ( > 150 mg/dl) serum total cholesterol level, and the higher the number is above 150, the greater is the quantity of plaque deposited in our arteries. If the serum total cholesterol level can be prevented from rising to more than 150 mg/dl, plaques are not laid down; if elevated levels are lowered to 150 mg/dl, further plaque does not form, and parts of those present may vanish. A fruit-vegetarian-starch diet is necessary as a rule to achieve the 150 mg/dl level in most adults. Lipid-lowering drugs are required in the patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and in most patients with atherosclerotic events. The best news about atherosclerosis is that it can be prevented in those without the hereditary form, and it can be arrested by lowering elevated serum total (and LDL) cholesterol to the 150 mg/dl level.

  17. Vitamin K Intake and Atherosclerosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been hypothesized that insufficient intake of vitamin K may increase soft tissue calcification due to impaired gamma-carboxylation of the vitamin K-dependent protein, matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (MGP). The evidence to support this putative role of vitamin K intake in atherosclerosis is ...

  18. openSE: a Systems Engineering Framework Particularly Suited to Particle Accelerator Studies and Development Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnal, P.; Féral, B.; Kershaw, K.; Nicquevert, B.; Baudin, M.; Lari, L.; Le Cardinal, J.

    2016-07-15

    Particle accelerator projects share many characteristics with industrial projects. However, experience has shown that best practice of industrial project management is not always well suited to particle accelerator projects. Major differences include the number and complexity of technologies involved, the importance of collaborative work, development phases that can last more than a decade, and the importance of telerobotics and remote handling to address future preventive and corrective maintenance requirements due to induced radioactivity, to cite just a few. The openSE framework it is a systems engineering and project management framework specifically designed for scientific facilities’ systems and equipment studies and development projects. Best practices in project management, in systems and requirements engineering, in telerobotics and remote handling and in radiation safety management were used as sources of inspiration, together with analysis of current practices surveyed at CERN, GSI and ESS.

  19. A linear electrostatic accelerator for education and advanced diagnostics development for OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinenian, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C.; Orozco, D.; Penna, J.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Ruiz, C.; Sangster, T.; Leeper, R.; Kilkenny, J.

    2013-10-01

    The MIT Linear Electrostatic Accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products, which are used for development of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA and the NIF. Fusion reaction rates of about 106 s-1 are routinely achieved, and fluence and energy of the fusion products have been accurately characterized. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) CVD-diamond-based bang time detector. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  20. Toward understanding the molecular basis of atherosclerosis with genetics and genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaoyu; Rollins, Jarod; Paigen, Beverly; Wang, Xiaosong

    2007-01-01

    Summary Atherosclerosis is a very complex disease involving both genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interactions. In the general population, genetic polymorphisms of many genes in the pathways of lipid metabolism, inflammation, and thrombogenesis are likely responsible for the wide range of susceptibilities to myocardial infarction, the most deadly consequence of atherosclerosis. To identify these polymorphisms, genetic linkage studies have been carried out in both humans and mouse models. Approximately 40 quantitative trait loci for atherosclerotic disease have been found in humans, and approximately 30 in mice. Recently, genome-wide association studies have been used to identify atherosclerosis-susceptibility polymorphisms. Although finding new atherosclerosis genes through these approaches remains challenging, the pace of finding these polymorphisms is accelerating due to the rapidly improving bioinformatics resources and biotechnologies. The results from these efforts will not only reveal the molecular basis of, but will facilitate finding drug targets and individualized medicine for, atherosclerotic disease. PMID:17767904

  1. Priority research areas to accelerate the development of practical ultraconductive copper conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dominic F.; Burwell, Malcolm; Stillman, H.

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the findings at an Ultraconductive Copper Strategy Meeting held on March 11, 2015 in Washington DC. The aim of this meeting was to bring together researchers of ultraconductive copper in the U.S. to identify and prioritize critical non-proprietary research activities that will enhance the understanding in the material and accelerate its development into practical conductors. Every effort has been made to ensure that the discussion and findings are accurately reported in this document.

  2. Design and Development Tools for the Systems Engineering Experience Accelerator. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-20

    INCOSE) 2012 International Symposium/European Conference on Systems Engineering (EUSEC), Rome , Italy, July 9-12. • Bodner, D., Wade, J., Squires, A...Editor in War Craft III. The map is named Defense of the Ancients (DotA) and has attracted millions of players using it for gaming worldwide. Since its... Rome , Italy. 7. Wade, J. P., "Design and Development Tools for the Systems Engineering Experience Accelerator," Systems Engineering Research

  3. Development of the C{sup 6+} laser ablation ion source for the KEK digital accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Munemoto, Naoya; Takayama, Ken; Takano, Susumu; Okamura, Masahiro; Kumaki, Masahumi

    2014-02-15

    A laser ion source that provides a fully ionized carbon ion beam is under joint development at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Long-pulse (6 ns) and short-pulse (500 ps) laser systems were tested by using them to irradiate a graphite target. Notable differences between the systems were observed in these experiments. Preliminary experimental results, such as the charge-state spectrum, beam intensity, and stability, are discussed.

  4. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Luo, Y.; Paskvan, D.; Perry, A.; Schrage, D.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Sommer, R.; Toter, W.; Zinkann, G.

    2012-11-01

    The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW) RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf) measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O5+ ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  5. Replacement of Dietary Saturated Fat by PUFA-Rich Pumpkin Seed Oil Attenuates Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Atherosclerosis Development, with Additional Health Effects of Virgin over Refined Oil

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Martine C.; Mulder, Petra; Stavro, P. Mark; Suárez, Manuel; Arola-Arnal, Anna; van Duyvenvoorde, Wim; Kooistra, Teake; Wielinga, Peter Y.; Kleemann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims As dietary saturated fatty acids are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disease, a potentially interesting strategy to reduce disease risk is modification of the quality of fat consumed. Vegetable oils represent an attractive target for intervention, as they largely determine the intake of dietary fats. Furthermore, besides potential health effects conferred by the type of fatty acids in a vegetable oil, other minor components (e.g. phytochemicals) may also have health benefits. Here, we investigated the potential long-term health effects of isocaloric substitution of dietary fat (i.e. partial replacement of saturated by unsaturated fats), as well as putative additional effects of phytochemicals present in unrefined (virgin) oil on development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and associated atherosclerosis. For this, we used pumpkin seed oil, because it is high in unsaturated fatty acids and a rich source of phytochemicals. Methods ApoE*3Leiden mice were fed a Western-type diet (CON) containing cocoa butter (15% w/w) and cholesterol (1% w/w) for 20 weeks to induce risk factors and disease endpoints. In separate groups, cocoa butter was replaced by refined (REF) or virgin (VIR) pumpkin seed oil (comparable in fatty acid composition, but different in phytochemical content). Results Both oils improved dyslipidaemia, with decreased (V)LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels in comparison with CON, and additional cholesterol-lowering effects of VIR over REF. While REF did not affect plasma inflammatory markers, VIR reduced circulating serum amyloid A and soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1. NAFLD and atherosclerosis development was modestly reduced in REF, and VIR strongly decreased liver steatosis and inflammation as well as atherosclerotic lesion area and severity. Conclusions Overall, we show that an isocaloric switch from a diet rich in saturated fat to a diet rich in unsaturated fat can attenuate NAFLD and atherosclerosis

  6. Caveolae and Caveolin-1 Integrate Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Inflammation in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Zhu, Neng; Ao, Bao-Xue; Liu, Chan; Shi, Ya-Ning; Du, Ke; Chen, Jian-Xiong; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-03-22

    Lipid disorder and inflammation play critical roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Reverse cholesterol transport is a key event in lipid metabolism. Caveolae and caveolin-1 are in the center stage of cholesterol transportation and inflammation in macrophages. Here, we propose that reverse cholesterol transport and inflammation in atherosclerosis can be integrated by caveolae and caveolin-1.

  7. Caveolae and Caveolin-1 Integrate Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Zhu, Neng; Ao, Bao-Xue; Liu, Chan; Shi, Ya-Ning; Du, Ke; Chen, Jian-Xiong; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Lipid disorder and inflammation play critical roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Reverse cholesterol transport is a key event in lipid metabolism. Caveolae and caveolin-1 are in the center stage of cholesterol transportation and inflammation in macrophages. Here, we propose that reverse cholesterol transport and inflammation in atherosclerosis can be integrated by caveolae and caveolin-1. PMID:27011179

  8. Requirements and Development of an Acceleration Measurement System for International Space Station Microgravity Science Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Space Station is being developed by NASA and international partners as a versatile user platform to allow long term on-orbit investigations of a variety of scientific and technology arenas. In particular, scientific studies are planned within a research class known as microgravity science in areas such as biotechnology, combustion, fluid physics, and materials sciences. An acceleration measurement system is in development to aid such research conducted in the on-orbit conditions of apparent weightlessness. This system provides a general purpose acceleration measurement capability in support of these payloads and investigators. Such capability allows for systematic study of scientific phenomena by obtaining information regarding the local accelerations present during experiment operations. Preparations for implementing this flight measurement system involves two distinct stages: requirements development prior to initiating the design activity, and the design activity itself. This paper defines the requirements definition approach taken, provides an overview of the results of the requirements phase, and outlines the initial design considerations being addressed for this measurement system. Some preliminary engineering approaches are also described.

  9. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  10. The trade-off between maturation and growth during accelerated development in frogs.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Casey A; Augustine, Starrlight; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M; Kearney, Michael R; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-09-01

    Developmental energetics are crucial to a species' life history and ecology but are poorly understood from a mechanistic perspective. Traditional energy and mass budgeting does not distinguish between costs of growth and maturation, making it difficult to account for accelerated development. We apply a metabolic theory that uniquely considers maturation costs (Dynamic Energy Budget theory, DEB) to interpret empirical data on the energetics of accelerated development in amphibians. We measured energy use until metamorphosis in two related frogs, Crinia georgiana and Pseudophryne bibronii. Mass and energy content of fresh ova were comparable between the species. However, development to metamorphosis was 1.7 times faster in C. georgiana while P. bibronii produced nine times the dry biomass at metamorphosis and had lower mass-specific oxygen requirements. DEB theory explained these patterns through differences in ontogenetic energy allocation to maturation. P. bibronii partitioned energy in the same (constant) way throughout development whereas C. georgiana increased the fraction of energy allocated to maturation over growth between hatching and the onset of feeding. DEB parameter estimation for additional, direct-developing taxa suggests that a change in energy allocation during development may result from a selective pressure to increase development rate, and not as a result of development mode.

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis mediated periodontal disease and atherosclerosis: disparate diseases with commonalities in pathogenesis through TLRs.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Furthermore hyperlipidemic mice deficient in TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 signaling exhibit diminished inflammatory responses and decreased atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence has implicated specific infectious agents including the periodontal disease pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis in the progression of atherosclerosis. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. We have established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate immune signaling in the context of local and distant chronic inflammation induced by this pathogen. We have demonstrated that P. gingivalis requires TLR2 to induce oral inflammatory bone lose in mice. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that P. gingivalis infection accelerates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice with an associated increase in expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in atherosclerotic lesions. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. Improved understanding of the mechanisms driving infection, and chronic inflammation during atherosclerosis may ultimately provide new targets for therapy.

  12. Atherosclerosis in LDLR-Knockout Mice Is Inhibited, but Not Reversed, by the PPARγ Ligand Pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Hideaki; Summers, Barbara D.; Nicholson, Andrew C.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Hajjar, David P.; Han, Jihong

    2009-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of drugs for the treatment of type-2 diabetes, are synthetic ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. They have been demonstrated to possess cardioprotective effects in humans and anti-atherogenic properties in animal models. However, the question remains whether a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ligand can reverse the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we tested the effects of pioglitazone on the development of established atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice. We observed that atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice progressed when mice were fed a high-fat diet. Pioglitazone treatment of atherogenic mice prevented this progression of atherosclerosis from its middle stages of disease, but was not able to reverse it. Withdrawal of the high-fat diet from mice with advanced atherosclerosis did not result in a reduction in lesion sizes. Pioglitazone treatment also had no effect on advanced atherosclerosis. Levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol correlated inversely with lesion development when pioglitazone was given during lesion progression. However, pioglitazone had no effect on circulating high density lipoprotein levels in mice in which treatment was initiated following 14 weeks on the high-fat diet. These findings have implications for the analysis of therapeutic agents in murine models of atherosclerosis and the use of pioglitazone in patients with established atherosclerosis. PMID:19435790

  13. Attenuated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning predicts accelerated pubertal development in girls 1 year later.

    PubMed

    Saxbe, Darby E; Negriff, Sonya; Susman, Elizabeth J; Trickett, Penelope K

    2015-08-01

    Accelerated pubertal development has been linked to adverse early environments and may heighten subsequent mental and physical health risks. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning has been posited as a mechanism whereby stress may affect pubertal development, but the literature lacks prospective tests of this mechanism. The current study assessed 277 youth (M = 10.84 years, SD = 1.14), 138 boys and 139 girls, who reported on their pubertal development and underwent the Trier Social Stress Test for Children at baseline and returned to the laboratory approximately 1 year later (M = 1.12 years, range = 0.59-1.98 years). For girls, lower cortisol area under the curve (with respect to ground) at Time 1 predicted more advanced pubertal development at Time 2, controlling for Time 1 pubertal development. This association persisted after additional covariates including age, body mass index, race, and maltreatment history were introduced, and was driven by adrenal rather than gonadal development. Cortisol was not linked to boys' subsequent pubertal development, and no interaction by gender or by maltreatment appeared. These results suggest that attenuated cortisol, reported in other studies of children exposed to early adversity, may contribute to accelerated pubertal tempo in girls.

  14. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-02-15

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  15. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-02-01

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  16. New Accelerated Testing and Lifetime Modeling Methods Promise Faster Development of More Durable MEAs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierpont, D. M.; Hicks, M. T.; Turner, P. L.; Watschke, T. M.

    2005-11-01

    For the successful commercialization of fuel cell technology, it is imperative that membrane electrode assembly (MEA) durability is understood and quantified. MEA lifetimes of 40,000 hours remain a key target for stationary power applications. Since it is impractical to wait 40,000 hours for durability results, it is critical to learn as much information as possible in as short a time period as possible to determine if an MEA sample will survive past its lifetime target. Consequently, 3M has utilized accelerated testing and statistical lifetime modeling tools to develop a methodology for evaluating MEA lifetime. Construction and implementation of a multi-cell test stand have allowed for multiple accelerated tests and stronger statistical data for learning about durability.

  17. Update on the development of externally powered dielectric-loaded accelerating structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Liu, W.; Kanareykin, A.; Gold, S.; Kinkead, A. K.; High Energy Physics; EuclidTechlabs,; Naval Research Lab.; Icarus Research

    2009-01-01

    We report on recent progress in a program to develop an RF-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure, capable of supporting high gradient acceleration. Previous high power tests revealed that the earlier DLA structures suffered from multipactor and arcing at the dielectric joint. A few new DLA structures have been designed to alleviate this limitation including the coaxial coupler based DLA structure and the clamped DLA structure. These structures were recently fabricated and high power tested at the NRL X-band Magnicon facility. Results show the multipactor can be reduced by the TiN coating on the dielectric surface. Gradient of 15 MV/m has also been tested without dielectric breakdown in the test of the clamped DLA structure. Detailed results are reported, and future plans discussed.

  18. Update on the Development of Externally Powered Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Liu, W.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2009-01-22

    We report on recent progress in a program to develop an RF-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure, capable of supporting high gradient acceleration. Previous high power tests revealed that the earlier DLA structures suffered from multipactor and arcing at the dielectric joint. A few new DLA structures have been designed to alleviate this limitation including the coaxial coupler based DLA structure and the clamped DLA structure. These structures were recently fabricated and high power tested at the NRL X-band Magnicon facility. Results show the multipactor can be reduced by the TiN coating on the dielectric surface. Gradient of 15 MV/m has also been tested without dielectric breakdown in the test of the clamped DLA structure. Detailed results are reported, and future plans discussed.

  19. Macrophages and Their Role in Atherosclerosis: Pathophysiology and Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Nikiforov, Nikita G.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis can be regarded as a chronic inflammatory state, in which macrophages play different and important roles. Phagocytic proinflammatory cells populate growing atherosclerotic lesions, where they actively participate in cholesterol accumulation. Moreover, macrophages promote formation of complicated and unstable plaques by maintaining proinflammatory microenvironment. At the same time, anti-inflammatory macrophages contribute to tissue repair and remodelling and plaque stabilization. Macrophages therefore represent attractive targets for development of antiatherosclerotic therapy, which can aim to reduce monocyte recruitment to the lesion site, inhibit proinflammatory macrophages, or stimulate anti-inflammatory responses and cholesterol efflux. More studies are needed, however, to create a comprehensive classification of different macrophage phenotypes and to define their roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on macrophage diversity, activation, and plasticity in atherosclerosis and describe macrophage-based cellular tests for evaluation of potential antiatherosclerotic substances. PMID:27493969

  20. Nanomedicine for the prevention, treatment and imaging of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Psarros, Costas; Lee, Regent; Margaritis, Marios; Antoniades, Charalambos

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries, with an increasing prevalence due to an aging population. The pathology underpinning CVD is atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory state involving the arterial wall. Accumulation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) laden macrophages in the arterial wall and their subsequent transformation into foam cells lead to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Progression of atherosclerotic lesions may gradually lead to plaque related complications and clinically manifest as acute vascular syndromes including acute myocardial or cerebral ischemia. Nanotechnology offers emerging therapeutic strategies, which may have advantage overclassical treatments for atherosclerosis. In this review, we present the potential applications of nanotechnology toward prevention, identification and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  1. Prostaglandin E receptors as inflammatory therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui; Liu, Xiuxia; Cao, Qing; Liang, Qian; Qiu, Xiaohua

    2011-01-31

    Prostaglandin E receptors (EPs) are the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that respond to type E(2) prostaglandin (PGE(2)). Data has shown that PGE(2) may function as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator by suppressing the production of cytokines. However, other studies have demonstrated that PGE(2), a pro-inflammatory mediator produced by various cell types within the wounded vascular wall, plays a crucial role in early atherosclerotic development. These contradictory results may be due to the versatility of EPs. Experimental data suggest an individual role for each PGE(2) receptor, such as EP(1), EP(2), EP(3) and EP(4), in atherosclerosis. In this review, the roles of EPs in atherosclerosis are summarized, and the value of EPs as new therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis is explored.

  2. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-02-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  3. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  4. Education and Skills for Development in South Africa: Reflections on the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, S.; Akoojee, Salim

    2007-01-01

    In July 2005, President Mbeki announced the launch of the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (AsgiSA), a new development strategy designed to help the South African state meet the ANC's 2004 election pledges, namely: (1) halve unemployment; (2) halve poverty; (3) accelerate employment equity; and (4) improve broad-based…

  5. [Non-enzymatic glycosylation of lipoproteins in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in diabetics].

    PubMed

    Calvo, C

    1997-04-01

    A significant factor associated with hiperglycaemia in diabetes is the resultant post-translational non-enzymatic glycation of plasma and cellular proteins. This process occurs in vivo by direct chemical reaction of glucose with protein alpha and epsilon amino groups. Because of the diverse evidences for direct involvement of non-enzymatic glycation of lipoproteins in the accelerated development of atherosclerosis in diabetic patients, most attention has been focused on the pathological properties of glycated lipoproteins. Glycation of LDL was found significantly increased in diabetic patients compared with normal subjects, even in the presence of good glycemic control. Metabolic abnormalities associated with glycation of LDL include diminished recognition of LDL by the classical LDL-receptor, and enhancement uptake of LDL by a low-affinity, high capacity receptor pathway on macrophages, thus stimulating foam cell formation, an early feature of atherosclerosis. Moreover, glycated LDL are more susceptible to oxidative modification than non-glycated LDL and glycation of LDL may alter their structure sufficiently to render them immunogenic. Being immunogenic, glycated-LDL accumulates in plasma and may enhance cholesterol ester accumulation in macrophages. Non-enzymatic glycation of HDL impairs its recognition by cells and induce a diminished efflux of cholesterol from cell membranes to HDL particles. Furthermore, glycated apolipoprotein A-1 isolated from plasma of diabetic subjects was deficient in activating lecithin: cholesterol acyl transferase, the driving force in reverse cholesterol transport, pathway responsible of the antiatherogenic properties of HDL.

  6. [Hyperinsulinemia--the common denominator in type II diabetes mellitus,obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Málková, J; Andĕl, M; Stolba, P; Kimlová, I

    1994-01-17

    During the last twenty years we witnessed a remarkable increase in knowledge of the mechanism as regards insulin action, the central hormone of metabolic regulations. Interest in cellular and molecular mechanisms of action was conditioned by a high prevalence of insulin resistance and the fact that insulin resistance holds a key position in the pathogenesis of many diseases, in particular atherosclerosis, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus type II, ovarian hyperandrogenism and others. The syndrome of hyperinsulinaemia/insulin resistance is the basic component of the so-called X syndrome defined in 1988 by Reaven. It is encountered in subjects with a normal glucose tolerance but a predisposition for diabetes type II. If this disposition, probably genetic by nature, is potentiated by the central type of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle it can influence the development of hypertension and dyslipidemia. The sum of these factors promotes acceleration of atherosclerosis and frequently its premature manifestations: myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases which hold the first place as regards causes of death on a world wide scale. It is important to identify but also to treat this complex not only metabolic risk factors for macrovascular diseases. It is a paradox that some drugs used as antihypertensives can cause deterioration of insulin resistance, subsequently influence in an adverse manner dyslipidemia and thus increase the metabolic risk of cardiovascular diseases. In the submitted paper the authors tried to summarize hitherto expressed views on the syndrome of hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance, using as a basic the results of their own work.

  7. Post-translational modifications in rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis: Focus on citrullination and carbamylation.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Pecani, Arbi; Conti, Fabrizio; Mancini, Riccardo; Alessandri, Cristiano; Valesini, Guido

    2016-09-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease known to be associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. The role of inflammation and immunity in atherosclerotic process offers possible explanations for the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with RA. The immune response to citrullinated peptides has been extensively studied in RA; antibodies directed to citrullinated peptides are now a cornerstone for RA diagnosis. However, few studies have investigated the response to citrullinated peptides and the development of atherosclerotic plaque. Antibodies to carbamylated proteins can be detected before the clinical onset of RA, suggesting a potential predictive role for these antibodies; on the other hand, carbamylation of lipoproteins has been described in patients with cardiovascular disease. This review examines the role of citrullination and carbamylation, two post-translational protein modifications that appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of both RA and atherosclerosis, expanding the similarities between these two diseases. Further investigation on the role of the immune response to modified proteins may contribute to a better comprehension of cardiovascular disease in patients with RA.

  8. Biothermal modeling of post-cryoplasty atherosclerosis in restenotic patients.

    PubMed

    Men-Chi, H; Ravigururajan, T S

    2007-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of heart diseases and mortality around the world. Recently, cryoplasty has emerged as a potential alternative method to treat arterial atherosclerosis. Finite element heat transfer and mass transfer models are developed using ANSYS in this study. The model analyzes the heat transfer within the atherosclerotic plaque and arterial wall during the cryoplasty procedure. The model is useful in predicting the transient temperature through the diseased wall tissues. The results may be used to decide required treatment procedure to effectively freeze the plaque with minimal damage to the healthy arterial tissues. Finally, the model investigates the parameters that may effect temperature distribution within the tissues during the ablative procedure.

  9. The Influence of Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Witztum, Joseph L.; Lichtman, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Both the chronic development of atherosclerotic lesions and the acute changes in lesion phenotype that lead to clinical cardiovascular events are significantly influenced by the innate and adaptive immune responses to lipoprotein deposition and oxidation in the arterial wall. The rapid pace of discovery of mechanisms of immunologic recognition, effector functions, and regulation has significantly influenced the study of atherosclerosis, and our new knowledge is beginning to affect how we treat this ubiquitous disease. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how innate and adaptive immunity contribute to atherosclerosis, as well as therapeutic opportunities that arise from this knowledge. PMID:23937439

  10. Development of a Patient-Specific Multi-Scale Model to Understand Atherosclerosis and Calcification Locations: Comparison with In vivo Data in an Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Mona; Pichardo-Almarza, Cesar; Agu, Obiekezie; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification results in stiffening of the aorta and is associated with hypertension and atherosclerosis. Atherogenesis is a complex, multifactorial, and systemic process; the result of a number of factors, each operating simultaneously at several spatial and temporal scales. The ability to predict sites of atherogenesis would be of great use to clinicians in order to improve diagnostic and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a mathematical model as a tool to understand why atherosclerotic plaque and calcifications occur in specific locations. This model is then used to analyze vascular calcification and atherosclerotic areas in an aortic dissection patient using a mechanistic, multi-scale modeling approach, coupling patient-specific, fluid-structure interaction simulations with a model of endothelial mechanotransduction. A number of hemodynamic factors based on state-of-the-art literature are used as inputs to the endothelial permeability model, in order to investigate plaque and calcification distributions, which are compared with clinical imaging data. A significantly improved correlation between elevated hydraulic conductivity or volume flux and the presence of calcification and plaques was achieved by using a shear index comprising both mean and oscillatory shear components (HOLMES) and a non-Newtonian viscosity model as inputs, as compared to widely used hemodynamic indicators. The proposed approach shows promise as a predictive tool. The improvements obtained using the combined biomechanical/biochemical modeling approach highlight the benefits of mechanistic modeling as a powerful tool to understand complex phenomena and provides insight into the relative importance of key hemodynamic parameters. PMID:27445834

  11. Therapies targeting innate immunity for fighting inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Itzhak; Yacov, Niva; Harats, Dror; Breitbart, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a smoldering disease of the vasculature that can lead to the occlusion of the arteries, resulting in ischemia of the heart and brain. For many years, the asserted underlying mechanism of atherosclerosis, supported by its epidemiology, was based on the "cholesterol hypothesis" that people with high blood cholesterol are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This hypothesis instigated a vigorous search for treatment that yielded the generation of statins, which specifically reduce LDL cholesterol. Since then, statins have revolutionized the way people are treated for the prevention of atherosclerosis. Nonetheless, despite this potent class of drugs, cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death in many parts of the world, suggesting that additional mechanisms are involved in disease pathogenesis. Intensive research has revealed that the atherosclerotic plaque is enriched with leukocytes, and that macrophages constitute the majority of immune cells in the lesion. Monocytes/macrophages are now recognized as the prime immune cells involved in the development of atherosclerosis and are implicated to affect the size, composition and vulnerability of the atherosclerotic plaque. While many of the macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory mechanisms associated with atherogenesis have been characterized, such as cell adhesion, cytokine production and protease secretion, there is a dearth of drugs that specifically target innate immunity for treating patients with atherosclerosis. This review presents pre-clinical studies, and in most cases following clinical trials with antagonists and agonists that have been designed to counteract inflammation in atherosclerosis and associated diseases, highlighting targets expressed predominantly in monocytes.

  12. Mechanisms that regulate macrophage burden in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) relevant to atherosclerosis include monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs). A decade ago, studies on macrophage behavior in atherosclerotic lesions were often limited to quantification of total macrophage area in cross-sections of plaques. While technological advances are still needed to examine plaque MP populations in an increasingly dynamic and informative manner, innovative methods to interrogate the biology of MPs in atherosclerotic plaques developed in the last few years point to a number of mechanisms that regulate the accumulation and function of MPs within plaques. Here, I review the evolution of atherosclerotic plaques with respect to changes in the MP compartment from the initiation of plaque to its progression and regression, discussing the roles that recruitment, proliferation, and retention of MPs play at these different disease stages. Additional work in the future will be needed to better distinguish macrophages and DCs in plaque and to address some basic unknowns in the field, including just how cholesterol drives accumulation of macrophages in lesions to build plaques in the first place and how macrophages as major effectors of innate immunity work together with components of the adaptive immune response to drive atherosclerosis. Answers to these questions are sought with the goal in mind of reversing disease where it exists and preventing its development where it does not. PMID:24855200

  13. Endothelial dysfunction: the early predictor of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mudau, Mashudu; Genis, Amanda; Lochner, Amanda; Strijdom, Hans

    2012-05-01

    Since the discovery in the 1980s that nitric oxide (NO) is in fact the elusive endothelium-derived relaxing factor, it has become evident that NO is not only a major cardiovascular signalling molecule, but that changes in its bioavailability are crucial in determining whether atherosclerosis will develop or not. Sustained high levels of harmful circulating stimuli associated with cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus elicit responses in endothelial cells that appear sequentially, namely endothelial cell activation and endothelial dysfunction (ED). ED, characterised by reduced NO bioavailability, is now recognised by many as an early, reversible precursor of atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of ED is multifactorial; however, oxidative stress appears to be the common underlying cellular mechanism in the ensuing loss of vaso-active, inflammatory, haemostatic and redox homeostasis in the body's vascular system. The role of ED as a pathophysiological link between early endothelial cell changes associated with cardiovascular risk factors and the development of ischaemic heart disease is of importance to basic scientists and clinicians alike.

  14. Accelerating vaccine development and deployment: report of a Royal Society satellite meeting

    PubMed Central

    Bregu, Migena; Draper, Simon J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Greenwood, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    The Royal Society convened a meeting on the 17th and 18th November 2010 to review the current ways in which vaccines are developed and deployed, and to make recommendations as to how each of these processes might be accelerated. The meeting brought together academics, industry representatives, research sponsors, regulators, government advisors and representatives of international public health agencies from a broad geographical background. Discussions were held under Chatham House rules. High-throughput screening of new vaccine antigens and candidates was seen as a driving force for vaccine discovery. Multi-stakeholder, small-scale manufacturing facilities capable of rapid production of clinical grade vaccines are currently too few and need to be expanded. In both the human and veterinary areas, there is a need for tiered regulatory standards, differentially tailored for experimental and commercial vaccines, to allow accelerated vaccine efficacy testing. Improved cross-fertilization of knowledge between industry and academia, and between human and veterinary vaccine developers, could lead to more rapid application of promising approaches and technologies to new product development. Identification of best-practices and development of checklists for product development plans and implementation programmes were seen as low-cost opportunities to shorten the timeline for vaccine progression from the laboratory bench to the people who need it. PMID:21893549

  15. Accelerated development of CuSbS2 thin film photovoltaic device prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Zawadzki, Pawel; DeHart, Clay; Johnston, Steve; Lany, Stephan; Wolden, Colin A.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-02-03

    Development of alternative thin film photovoltaic technologies is an important research topic because of the potential of low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells to produce terawatt levels of clean power. However, this development of unexplored yet promising absorbers can be hindered by complications that arise during solar cell fabrication. Here, a high-throughput combinatorial method is applied to accelerate development of photovoltaic devices, in this case, using the novel CuSbS2 absorber via a newly developed three-stage self-regulated growth process to control absorber purity and orientation. Photovoltaic performance of the absorber, using the typical substrate CuInxGa1 - xSe2 (CIGS) device architecture, is explored as a function of absorber quality and thickness using a variety of back contacts. This study yields CuSbS2 device prototypes with ~1% conversion efficiency, suggesting that the optimal CuSbS2 device fabrication parameters and contact selection criteria are quite different than for CIGS, despite the similarity of these two absorbers. The CuSbS2 device efficiency is at present limited by low short-circuit current because of bulk recombination related to defects, and a small open-circuit voltage because of a theoretically predicted cliff-type conduction band offset between CuSbS2 and CdS. Overall, these results illustrate both the potential and limits of combinatorial methods to accelerate the development of thin film photovoltaic devices using novel absorbers.

  16. Performance and Environmental Test Results of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Mathers, Alex

    2012-01-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorate's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is sponsoring the development of a 3.5 kW-class engineering development unit Hall thruster for implementation in NASA science and exploration missions. NASA Glenn and Aerojet are developing a high fidelity high voltage Hall accelerator that can achieve specific impulse magnitudes greater than 2,700 seconds and xenon throughput capability in excess of 300 kilograms. Performance, plume mappings, thermal characterization, and vibration tests of the high voltage Hall accelerator engineering development unit have been performed. Performance test results indicated that at 3.9 kW the thruster achieved a total thrust efficiency and specific impulse of 58%, and 2,700 sec, respectively. Thermal characterization tests indicated that the thruster component temperatures were within the prescribed material maximum operating temperature limits during full power thruster operation. Finally, thruster vibration tests indicated that the thruster survived the 3-axes qualification full-level random vibration test series. Pre and post-vibration test performance mappings indicated almost identical thruster performance. Finally, an update on the development progress of a power processing unit and a xenon feed system is provided.

  17. Vocal sac development and accelerated sexual maturity in the lesser swimming frog, Pseudis minuta (Anura, Hylidae).

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Javier; Barrasso, Diego A; Agostini, M Gabriela; Quinzio, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Sexual maturity involves the differentiation of the reproductive system, the maturation of germ cells, and the development of secondary sexual characteristics. Even though this topic has received much attention, little is known about the sequence of events that encompass reproductive maturation in anurans and what it could reveal about the developmental basis of life cycle evolution. The discovery of froglets of Pseudis minuta with incipient vocal sacs calling in breeding pools alongside several larger adult specimens with fully developed vocal sacs raised the question of the timing of sexual maturity in this species. Here we describe the sequence and timing of differentiation, development and maturation of the vocal sac apparatus and the testes in P. minuta (Anura, Hylidae), in order to establish a timeline of events leading to sexual maturity. Differentiation of the vocal sac apparatus begins at the final metamorphic stages, earlier than reported for other species, and the vocal sac acquires its final shape during the early postmetamorphic period. These modifications occur after gonadal differentiation, which begins early during the larval period and proceeds with a highly accelerated rate of development (e.g., secondary spermatids appear well before metamorphic climax), a situation reported previously for other anuran species only in the genus Pseudis. These results, together with a skeletochronological analysis showing that some calling specimens presented no lines of arrested growth, indicate acceleration in the timing of sexual maturity in Pseudis, and raise questions about the interdependence/decoupling during the development of the different components involved in reaching the adult stage.

  18. Using Uncertainty Analysis to Guide the Development of Accelerated Stress Tests (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2014-03-01

    Extrapolation of accelerated testing to the long-term results expected in the field has uncertainty associated with the acceleration factors and the range of possible stresses in the field. When multiple stresses (such as temperature and humidity) can be used to increase the acceleration, the uncertainty may be reduced according to which stress factors are used to accelerate the degradation.

  19. Teacher Attitudes toward Subject-Specific Acceleration: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambo, Karen E.; McCoach, D. Betsy

    2012-01-01

    Despite the research supporting acceleration, some teachers are still hesitant to recommend acceleration for advanced students. The Teacher Attitudes Toward Subject-Specific Acceleration (TATSSA) instrument was designed to uncover the factors that influence teacher decisions to recommend students for subject-specific acceleration. First, we…

  20. [Vitamin E, antioxidants and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Lecerf, J M; Luc, G; Fruchart, J C

    1994-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a process in which lipid and factors are mixed. When LDL are oxydized, they are catabolized by the macrophage's pathway, leading to foam cells which constitute the fatty streak, the earliest lesion in atherogenesis, and they have cytotoxic, chemotactic effects. Many protective devices against free radicals and oxydation mechanisms exist, particularly antioxydant vitamins and other natural dietary antioxydants. After a brief recall of their mechanisms, epidemiological, experimental and clinical data are reviewed. To day it seems necessary to take into consideration these factors in prevention and therapeutic of atherosclerosis and dylipidaemia. Many inquiries keep going, particularly about susceptible of LDL to oxydation. One is waiting for intervention surveys in order to conclude about nutritional and medical treatments.

  1. WInd-and-react Bi-2212 coil development for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Acosta, P.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D. R.; Mentink, M. G. T.; Prestemon, S. O.; Meinesz, M.; Hong, S.; Huang, Y.; Miao, H.; Parrell, J.; Sabbi, G.L.

    2009-10-13

    Sub-scale coils are being manufactured and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in order to develop wind-and-react Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} (Bi-2212) magnet technology for future graded accelerator magnet use. Previous Bi-2212 coils showed significant leakage of the conductors core constituents to the environment, which can occur during the partial melt reaction around 890 C in pure oxygen. The main origin of the observed leakage is intrinsic leakage of the wires, and the issue is therefore being addressed at the wire manufacturing level. We report on further compatibility studies, and the performance of new sub-scale coils that were manufactured using improved conductors. These coils exhibit significantly reduced leakage, and carry currents that are about 70% of the witness wire critical current (I{sub c}). The coils demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of round wire Bi-2212 conductors for accelerator magnet technology use. Successful high temperature superconductor coil technology will enable the manufacture of graded accelerator magnets that can surpass the, already closely approached, intrinsic magnetic field limitations of Nb-based superconducting magnets.

  2. Advanced laser particle accelerator development at LANL: from fast ignition to radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A; Offermann, D T; Cobble, J A; Schmitt, M J; Gautier, D C; Kwan, T J T; Montgomery, D S; Kluge, Thomas; Bussmann, Micheal; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Gall, B; Geissel, M; Korgan, G; Kovaleski, S; Lockard, T; Malekos, S; Schollmeier, M; Sentoku, Y; Cowan, T E

    2010-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, SN M detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high current and high energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology in conjunction with our partners at the ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent etliciencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  3. Vibration-Based Method Developed to Detect Cracks in Rotors During Acceleration Through Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in developing rotating machinery shaft crack-detection methodologies and online techniques. Shaft crack problems present a significant safety and loss hazard in nearly every application of modern turbomachinery. In many cases, the rotors of modern machines are rapidly accelerated from rest to operating speed, to reduce the excessive vibrations at the critical speeds. The vibration monitoring during startup or shutdown has been receiving growing attention (ref. 1), especially for machines such as aircraft engines, which are subjected to frequent starts and stops, as well as high speeds and acceleration rates. It has been recognized that the presence of angular acceleration strongly affects the rotor's maximum response to unbalance and the speed at which it occurs. Unfortunately, conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods have unacceptable limits in terms of their application for online crack detection. Some of these techniques are time consuming and inconvenient for turbomachinery service testing. Almost all of these techniques require that the vicinity of the damage be known in advance, and they can provide only local information, with no indication of the structural strength at a component or system level. In addition, the effectiveness of these experimental techniques is affected by the high measurement noise levels existing in complex turbomachine structures. Therefore, the use of vibration monitoring along with vibration analysis has been receiving increasing attention.

  4. Accelerator production of tritium plant design and supporting engineering development and demonstration work

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1997-11-01

    Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen with a half life of 12.3 years. Because it is essential for US thermonuclear weapons to function, tritium must be periodically replenished. Since K reactor at Savannah River Site stopped operating in 1988, tritium has been recycled from dismantled nuclear weapons. This process is possible only as long as many weapons are being retired. Maintaining the stockpile at the level called for in the present Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START-I) will require the Department of Energy to have an operational tritium production capability in the 2005--2007 time frame. To make the required amount of tritium using an accelerator based system (APT), neutrons will be produced through high energy proton reactions with tungsten and lead. Those neutrons will be moderated and captured in {sup 3}He to make tritium. The APT plant design will use a 1,700 MeV linear accelerator operated at 100 mA. In preparation for engineering design, starting in October 1997 and subsequent construction, a program of engineering development and demonstration is underway. That work includes assembly and testing of the first 20 MeV of the low energy plant linac at 100 mA, high-energy linac accelerating structure prototyping, radiofrequency power system improvements, neutronic efficiency measurements, and materials qualifications.

  5. Development of vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion accelerator injectors and ion implantation technology (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.

    1998-02-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development and upgrade of MEVVA-type ion sources over the last two years since the previous ICIS-95 is reviewed. There are two main application fields for this ion source: heavy ion accelerators and material surface implantation technology. For particle accelerator ion injection to accelerators it is important to enhance the fractions of multiply charged ions in the ion beam as well as controlling the charge state distribution, and to improve of beam current stability (i.e., to minimize the beam noise) and pulse-to-pulse reproducibility. For ion implantation application we need to increase both the implantation dose rate and the source lifetime (between required maintenance downtime) as well as making this kind of source more reliable and of yet low cost. Most of experimental results reported on here have been obtained in a collaborative program between research groups LBNL (Berkeley, USA), GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), HCEI (Tomsk, Russia), and other important contributions have been made by the groups at (BNU, Beijing, China), EDU (Izmir, Turkey), and elsewhere.

  6. Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Kwan, T. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Gall, B.; Kovaleski, S.; Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M.; Korgan, G.; Malekos, S.; Lockard, T.

    2010-11-04

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  7. Fetal programming of atherosclerosis: possible role of the mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Line; Levy, Emile; Bouity-Voubou, Maurice; Delvin, Edgard

    2010-04-01

    Growing evidence indicates that being small size at birth from malnutrition is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Atherosclerosis is common to these aforementioned disorders, and oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are now considered as initiating events in its development, with endothelial cell dysfunction being an early, fundamental step. According to the fetal programming hypothesis, growth-restricted neonates exposed to placental insufficiency exhibit endothelial cell dysfunction very early in life that later on predisposes them to atherosclerosis. Although many investigations have reported early alterations in vascular function in children and adolescents with low birth weight, the mechanisms of such fetal programming of atherosclerosis remain largely unknown. Experimental studies have demonstrated that low birth weight infants are prenatally subjected to conditions of oxidative stress and inflammation that might be involved in the later occurrence of atherosclerosis. Arterial endothelial dysfunction has been encountered in term infants, children and young adults with low birth weight. The loss of appropriate endothelium function with decreased nitric oxide production or activity, manifested as impaired vasodilatation, is considered a basic step in atherosclerosis development and progression. Several lines of evidence indicate that mitochondrial damage is central to this process and that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it is well-accepted that the mitochondria are a major source of chronic ROS production under physiological conditions. On the other hand, it is known that ROS generation damages lipids, proteins and mitochondrial DNA, leading to dysregulated mitochondrial function. Elevated mitochondrial ROS production is associated with endothelial cell dysfunction as well as vascular smooth muscle cell

  8. Immunity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory condition with immune competent cells in lesions producing mainly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dead cells and oxidized forms of low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are abundant. The major direct cause of CVD appears to be rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. oxLDL has proinflammatory and immune-stimulatory properties, causes cell death at higher concentrations and contains inflammatory phospholipids with phosphorylcholine (PC) as an interesting epitope. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) may be atheroprotective, one mechanism being anti-inflammatory. Bacteria and virus have been discussed, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence, and antibiotic trials have not been successful. Heat shock proteins could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. To prove that inflammation is a cause of atherosclerosis and CVD, clinical studies with anti-inflammatory and/or immune-modulatory treatment are needed. The potential causes of immune reactions and inflammation in atherosclerosis and how inflammation can be targeted therapeutically to provide novel treatments for CVD are reviewed. PMID:23635324

  9. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Xing; Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target. Data Sources: This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30, 2015. Articles were selected using the following search terms: “Intestinal microbiota”, “trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)”, “trimethylamine (TMA)”, “cardiovascular”, and “atherosclerosis”. Study Selection: Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis. Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included. Results: A new CVD risk factor, TMAO, was recently identified. It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota, resulting in TMA release. TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver. Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD, particularly atherosclerosis; however, the details of this relationship remain unclear. Conclusions: Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management. PMID:26481750

  10. Targeting macrophage necroptosis for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Denuja; Geoffrion, Michele; Wei, Lihui; Gan, Wei; Richards, Laura; Shangari, Prakriti; DeKemp, Ella M.; Beanlands, Rachelle A.; Perisic, Ljubica; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hedin, Ulf; Sad, Subash; Guo, Liang; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Ruddy, Terrence; Rayner, Katey J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from maladaptive inflammation driven primarily by macrophages, whose recruitment and proliferation drive plaque progression. In advanced plaques, macrophage death contributes centrally to the formation of plaque necrosis, which underlies the instability that promotes plaque rupture and myocardial infarction. Hence, targeting macrophage cell death pathways may offer promise for the stabilization of vulnerable plaques. Necroptosis is a recently discovered pathway of programmed cell necrosis regulated by RIP3 and MLKL kinases that, in contrast to apoptosis, induces a proinflammatory state. We show herein that necroptotic cell death is activated in human advanced atherosclerotic plaques and can be targeted in experimental atherosclerosis for both therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. In humans with unstable carotid atherosclerosis, expression of RIP3 and MLKL is increased, and MLKL phosphorylation, a key step in the commitment to necroptosis, is detected in advanced atheromas. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying necroptosis showed that atherogenic forms of low-density lipoprotein increase RIP3 and MLKL transcription and phosphorylation—two critical steps in the execution of necroptosis. Using a radiotracer developed with the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), we show that 123I-Nec-1 localizes specifically to atherosclerotic plaques in Apoe−/− mice, and its uptake is tightly correlated to lesion areas by ex vivo nuclear imaging. Furthermore, treatment of Apoe−/− mice with established atherosclerosis with Nec-1 reduced lesion size and markers of plaque instability, including necrotic core formation. Collectively, our findings offer molecular insight into the mechanisms of macrophage cell death that drive necrotic core formation in atherosclerosis and suggest that this pathway can be used as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the treatment of unstable atherosclerosis. PMID:27532042

  11. Hematopoietic Akt2 deficiency attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rotllan, Noemi; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aránzazu; Araldi, Elisa; Wanschel, Amarylis C.; Aryal, Binod; Aranda, Juan F.; Goedeke, Leigh; Salerno, Alessandro G.; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Sessa, William C.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of death and disability in diabetic and obese subjects with insulin resistance. Akt2, a phosphoinositide-dependent serine-threonine protein kinase, is highly express in insulin-responsive tissues; however, its role during the progression of atherosclerosis remains unknown. Thus, we aimed to investigate the contribution of Akt2 during the progression of atherosclerosis. We found that germ-line Akt2-deficient mice develop similar atherosclerotic plaques as wild-type mice despite higher plasma lipids and glucose levels. It is noteworthy that transplantation of bone marrow cells isolated from Akt2−/− mice to Ldlr−/− mice results in marked reduction of the progression of atherosclerosis compared with Ldlr−/− mice transplanted with wild-type bone marrow cells. In vitro studies indicate that Akt2 is required for macrophage migration in response to proatherogenic cytokines (monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Moreover, Akt2−/− macrophages accumulate less cholesterol and have an alternative activated or M2-type phenotype when stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines. Together, these results provide evidence that macrophage Akt2 regulates migration, the inflammatory response and cholesterol metabolism and suggest that targeting Akt2 in macrophages might be beneficial for treating atherosclerosis.—Rotllan, N., Chamorro-Jorganes, A., Araldi, E., Wanschel, A. C., Aryal, B., Aranda, J. F., Goedeke, L., Salerno, A. G., Ramírez, C. M., Sessa,W. C., Suárez, Y., Fernández-Hernando, C. Hematopoietic Akt2 deficiency attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25392271

  12. Human Genetic Evidence for Involvement of CD137 in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Söderström, Leif Å; Gertow, Karl; Folkersen, Lasse; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Sundman, Eva; Sheikine, Yuri; Goel, Anuj; Baldassarre, Damiano; Humphries, Steve E; de Faire, Ulf; Watkins, Hugh; Tremoli, Elena; Veglia, Fabrizio; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Göran K; Olofsson, Peder S

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease and the main cause of cardiovascular disease. Inflammation promotes plaque instability and clinical disease, such as myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Subclinical atherosclerosis begins with thickening of the arterial intimal layer, and increased intima-media thickness (IMT) in the carotid artery is a widely used measurement of subclinical atherosclerosis. Activation of CD137 (tumor necrosis factor receptor super family 9) promotes inflammation and disease development in murine atherosclerosis. CD137 is expressed in human atherosclerosis, but its role is largely unknown. This study uses a genetic approach to investigate CD137 in human atherosclerotic disease. In publicly available data on genotype and gene expression from the HapMap project, the minor T allele of rs2453021, a single nucleotide polymorphism in CD137, was significantly associated with CD137 gene expression. In the PROCARDIS and Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) cohorts of 13,029 cases and controls, no significant association was detected between the minor T allele of rs2453021 and risk for coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction. However, in the IMPROVE multicenter study of 3,418 individuals, the minor T allele of rs2453021 was associated with increased IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA), as measured by ultrasonography, with presence of plaque in CCA and with increased incidence of adverse noncardiac vascular events. Taken together, this study shows that the minor T allele of rs2453021 is associated with increased IMT in the CCA and increased risk of incident noncardiac vascular events, thus providing the first human genetic evidence for involvement of CD137 in atherosclerosis. PMID:25032953

  13. Animal Models in Cardiovascular Research: Hypertension and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chun-Yi; Jaarin, Kamsiah

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and atherosclerosis are among the most common causes of mortality in both developed and developing countries. Experimental animal models of hypertension and atherosclerosis have become a valuable tool for providing information on etiology, pathophysiology, and complications of the disease and on the efficacy and mechanism of action of various drugs and compounds used in treatment. An animal model has been developed to study hypertension and atherosclerosis for several reasons. Compared to human models, an animal model is easily manageable, as compounding effects of dietary and environmental factors can be controlled. Blood vessels and cardiac tissue samples can be taken for detailed experimental and biomolecular examination. Choice of animal model is often determined by the research aim, as well as financial and technical factors. A thorough understanding of the animal models used and complete analysis must be validated so that the data can be extrapolated to humans. In conclusion, animal models for hypertension and atherosclerosis are invaluable in improving our understanding of cardiovascular disease and developing new pharmacological therapies. PMID:26064920

  14. Quantum dot mediated imaging of atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayagopal, Ashwath; Su, Yan Ru; Blakemore, John L.; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2009-04-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis is associated with leukocyte infiltration within lesions. We describe a technique for the ex vivo imaging of cellular recruitment in atherogenesis which utilizes quantum dots (QD) to color-code different cell types within lesion areas. Spectrally distinct QD were coated with the cell-penetrating peptide maurocalcine to fluorescently-label immunomagnetically isolated monocyte/macrophages and T lymphocytes. QD-maurocalcine bioconjugates labeled both cell types with a high efficiency, preserved cell viability, and did not perturb native leukocyte function in cytokine release and endothelial adhesion assays. QD-labeled monocyte/macrophages and T lymphocytes were reinfused in an ApoE-/- mouse model of atherosclerosis and age-matched controls and tracked for up to four weeks to investigate the incorporation of cells within aortic lesion areas, as determined by oil red O (ORO) and immunofluorescence ex vivo staining. QD-labeled cells were visible in atherosclerotic plaques within two days of injection, and the two cell types colocalized within areas of subsequent ORO staining. Our method for tracking leukocytes in lesions enables high signal-to-noise ratio imaging of multiple cell types and biomarkers simultaneously within the same specimen. It also has great utility in studies aimed at investigating the role of distinct circulating leukocyte subsets in plaque development and progression.

  15. Cardiac CT: atherosclerosis to acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Munnur, Ravi Kiran; Cameron, James D.; Ko, Brian S.; Meredith, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is a robust non-invasive method to assess coronary artery disease (CAD). Qualitative and quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic coronary stenosis with CCTA has been favourably compared with invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Importantly, it allows the study of preclinical stages of atherosclerotic disease, may help improve risk stratification and monitor the progressive course of the disease. The diagnostic accuracy of CCTA in the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG) is excellent and the constantly improving technology is making the evaluation of stents feasible. Novel techniques are being developed to assess the functional significance of coronary stenosis. The excellent negative predictive value of CCTA in ruling out disease enables early and safe discharge of patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the Emergency Department (ED). In addition, CCTA is useful in predicting clinical outcomes based on the extent of coronary atherosclerosis and also based on individual plaque characteristics such as low attenuation plaque (LAP), positive remodelling and spotty calcification. In this article, we review the role of CCTA in the detection of coronary atherosclerosis in native vessels, stented vessels, calcified arteries and grafts; the assessment of plaque progression, evaluation of chest pain in the ED, assessment of functional significance of stenosis and the prognostic significance of CCTA. PMID:25610801

  16. UCLA accelerator research and development. Progress report, [November 1, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-09-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  17. Niobium cavity development for the high-energy linac of the rare isotope accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    D. Barni; C. Pagani; P. Pierini; C. Compton; T. Grimm; W. Hartung; H. Podlech; R. York; G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel

    2001-08-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is being designed to supply an intense beam of exotic isotopes for nuclear physics research [1]. Superconducting cavities are to be used to accelerate the CW beam of heavy ions to 400 MeV per nucleon, with a beam power of up to 400 kW. Because of the varying velocity of the ion beam along the linac, a number of different types of superconducting structures are needed. The RIA linac will accelerate heavy ions over the same velocity range as the proton linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). It was decided to use the 6-cell axisymmetric 805 MHz cavities and cryostats of SNS for the downstream portion of the RIA linac, thereby saving the non-recurring development and engineering costs. For additional cost saving, it was decided to extend the SNS multi-cell axisymmetric cavity design to lower velocity, {beta} = v/c = 0.4, using the same cryostats and RF systems. Axisymmetric cavities will thus constitute about three-quarters of RIA's total accelerating voltage, and most of that voltage will be provided by cavities already developed for SNS. The axisymmetric cavities will accelerate the RIA beam from {beta} = 0.4 to {beta} = 0.72. This velocity range can be efficiently covered with two different types of 6-cell cavities, one with a geometric {beta}, {beta}{sub g}, of 0.47, and the other with a {beta}{sub g} of 0.61. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 cavity will be of the existing SNS design; some {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 SNS cavities may also be desired at the end of the RIA linac for acceleration of light ions above 400 MeV per nucleon. Prototypes for both {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 and {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 have been fabricated and tested [2]. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.47 cavity is the focus of the present work. The reduction in {beta}{sub g} to 0.47 results in less favourable electromagnetic and mechanical properties, and opens up the possibility of multipacting, but several groups have already designed and prototyped cavities in this range. These

  18. Neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development: an ideal model in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chism, David D; Woods, Michael E; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) has been shown to confer a survival advantage in two randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis. Despite level 1 evidence supporting its benefit, utilization remains dismal with nearly one-half of patients ineligible for cisplatin-based therapy because of renal dysfunction, impaired performance status, and/or coexisting medical problems. This situation highlights the need for the development of novel therapies for the management of MIBC, a disease with a lethal phenotype. The neoadjuvant paradigm in bladder cancer offers many advantages for accelerated drug development. First, there is a greater likelihood of successful therapy at an earlier disease state that may be characterized by less genomic instability compared with the metastatic setting, with an early readout of activity with results determined in months rather than years. Second, pre- and post-treatment tumor tissue collection in patients with MIBC is performed as the standard of care without the need for research-directed biopsies, allowing for the ability to perform important correlative studies and to monitor tumor response to therapy in "real time." Third, pathological complete response (pT0) predicts for improved outcome in patients with MIBC. Fourth, there is a strong biological rationale with rapidly accumulating evidence for actionable targets in bladder cancer. This review focuses on the neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development using bladder cancer as the ideal model.

  19. Surface water geochemical and isotopic variations in an area of accelerating Marcellus Shale gas development.

    PubMed

    Pelak, Adam J; Sharma, Shikha

    2014-12-01

    Water samples were collected from 50 streams in an area of accelerating shale gas development in the eastern U.S.A. The geochemical/isotopic characteristics show no correlation with the five categories of Marcellus Shale production. The sub-watersheds with the greatest density of Marcellus Shale development have also undergone extensive coal mining. Hence, geochemical/isotopic compositions were used to understand sources of salinity and effects of coal mining and shale gas development in the area. The data indicates that while some streams appear to be impacted by mine drainage; none appear to have received sustained contribution from deep brines or produced waters associated with shale gas production. However, it is important to note that our interpretations are based on one time synoptic base flow sampling of a few sampling stations and hence do account potential intermittent changes in chemistry that may result from major/minor spills or specific mine discharges on the surface water chemistry.

  20. Microorganisms in the aetiology of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morre, S; Stooker, W; Lagrand, W; van den Brule, A J C; Niessen, H

    2000-01-01

    Recent publications have suggested that infective pathogens might play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This review focuses on these microorganisms in the process of atherosclerosis. The results of in vitro studies, animal studies, tissue studies, and serological studies will be summarised, followed by an overall conclusion concerning the strength of the association of the microorganism with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The role of the bacteria Chlamydia pneumoniae and Helicobacter pylori, and the viruses human immunodeficiency virus, coxsackie B virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus, and measles virus will be discussed. Key Words: atherosclerosis • Chlamydia pneumoniae • Helicobacter pylori PMID:11041053

  1. Sublingual vaccine with GroEL attenuates atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, M; Kurita-Ochiai, T; Kobayashi, R; Hashizume-Takizawa, T; Yamazaki, K; Yamamoto, M

    2014-04-01

    Autoimmune responses to heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60) contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis, whereas immunization with HSP60 may induce atheroprotective responses. We assessed the capacity of an atheroprotective vaccine that targeted a recombinant HSP60 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (rGroEL) to induce a protective mucosal immune response. Female apolipoprotein E-deficient spontaneously hyperlipidemic (Apoe(shl)) mice received sublingual delivery of rGroEL prior to P. gingivalis 381 injection. The animals were euthanized 16 weeks later. Sublingual immunization with rGroEL induced significant rGroEL-specific serum IgG responses. Antigen-specific cells isolated from spleen produced significantly high levels of IL-10 and IFN-γ after antigen re-stimulation in vitro. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the frequencies of both IL-10(+) and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells increased significantly in submandibular glands (SMG). Furthermore, sublingual immunization with rGroEL significantly reduced atherosclerosis lesion formation in the aortic sinus and decreased serum CRP, MCP-1, and ox-LDL levels. These findings suggest that sublingual immunization with rGroEL is associated with the increase of IFNγ(+) or IL-10(+) Foxp3(+) cells in SMG and a systemic humoral response, which could be an effective strategy for the prevention of naturally occurring or P. gingivalis-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  2. Development of an accelerated leach test(s) for low-level waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.R.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1985-01-01

    An accelerated leach test(s) is being developed to predict long-term leaching behavior of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) forms in their disposal environments. As necessary background, a literature survey of reported leaching mechanisms, available mathematical models and factors that affect leaching of LLW forms has been compiled. Mechanisms which have been identified include diffusion, dissolution, ion exchange, corrosion and surface effects. A computerized data base of LLW leaching data and mathematical models is being developed. The data is being used for model evaluation by curve fitting and statistical analysis according to standard procedures of statistical quality control. Long-term leach tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms. Initial results on the effect of temperature on leachability indicate that the leach rates of cement and VES waste forms increase with increasing temperature, whereas, the leach rate of bitumen is little affected. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Neutron research and facility development at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator 1970 to 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, R.W.; Harvey, J.A.; Maienschein, F.C.; Weston, L.W.; Olsen, D.K.; Larson, D.C.; Macklin, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    This report reviews the accomplishments of the first decade of operation of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) and discusses the plans for the facility in the coming decade. Motivations for scientific and applied research during the next decade are included. In addition, ORELA is compared with competing facilities, and prospects for ORELA's improvement and even replacement are reported. Development efforts for the next few years are outlined that are consistent with the anticipated research goals. Recommendations for hardware development include improving the electron injection system to give much larger short-pulse currents on a reliable basis, constructing an Electron Beam Injector Laboratory to help make this improvement possible, continuing a study of possibly replacing the electron accelerator with a proton machine, and replacing or upgrading the facility's data-acquistion and immediate-analysis computer systems. Increased operating time and more involvement of nuclear theorists are recommended, and an effective staff size for optimum use of this unique facility is discussed. A bibliography of all ORELA-related publications is included.

  4. Rebamipide ameliorates atherosclerosis by controlling lipid metabolism and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Na, Hyun Sik; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Hoon; Jung, KyungAh; Min, Jun-Ki; Cho, Mi-La

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the accumulation of excess lipid in the aorta and the severity is regulated by T lymphocytes subsets. Rebamipide has therapeutic activity in collagen induced arthritis (CIA) by controlling the balance between T helper (Th) 17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells. In this study, we aimed to determine whether rebamipide reduces the development of atherosclerosis. To investigate the therapeutic effect of rebamipide, ApoE-KO mice fed a western diet were administered rebamipide orally for 8 weeks. Mice were sacrificed followed by the evaluation of plaque formation in the aorta or immunohistochemistry for IL-17 and Foxp3. Serum was also prepared to determine the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. The ability of rebamipide to regulate lipid metabolism or inflammation was confirmed ex vivo. Results The oral administration of rebamipide decreased plaque formation in atherosclerotic lesions as well as the markers of metabolic disorder in ApoE-deficient mice with atherosclerosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were also suppressed by rebamapide. In addition, the population of Th17 was decreased, whereas Treg was increased in the spleen of rebamipide-treated ApoE deficient mice. Rebamipide also ameliorated the severity of obese arthritis and has the capability to reduce the development of atherosclerosis by controlling the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. Thus, rebamipide could be a therapeutic agent to improve the progression of inflammation in metabolic diseases. PMID:28241014

  5. Effects of Prenatal Irradiation with an Accelerated Heavy-Ion Beam on Postnatal Development in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Murakami, M.; Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Nojima, K.; Shang, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Fujita, K.; Coffigny, H.; Hayata, I.

    Effects on postnatal neurophysiological development in offspring were studied following exposure of pregnant Wistar rats to accelerated neon-ion beams with a LET value of about 30 keV mu m at a dose range from 0 1 Gy to 2 0Gy on the 15th day of gestation The age at which four physiologic markers appeared and five reflexes were acquired was examined prior to weaning Gain in body weight was monitored until the offspring were 3 months old Male offspring were evaluated as young adults using two behavioral tests The effects of X-rays at 200 kVp measured for the same biological end points were studied for comparison Our previous study on carbon-ion beams with a LET value of about 13 keV mu m was also cited to elucidate a possible LET-related effect For most of the endpoints at early age significant alteration was even observed in offspring prenatally received 0 1 Gy of accelerated neon ions while neither X rays nor carbon-ions under the same dose resulted in such a significant alteration compared to that from the sham-irradiated dams All offspring whose mothers received 2 0 Gy died prior to weaning Offspring from dams irradiated with accelerated neon ions generally showed higher incidences of prenatal death and preweaning mortality markedly delayed accomplishment in their physiological markers and reflexes and gain in body weight compared to those exposed to X-rays or carbon ions at doses of 0 1 to 1 5 Gy Significantly reduced ratios of main organ weight to body weight at postnatal ages of 30 60 and 90 days were also observed

  6. High Voltage Hall Accelerator Propulsion System Development for NASA Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John; Mathers, Alex

    2013-01-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorates In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is sponsoring the development of a 3.8 kW-class engineering development unit Hall thruster for implementation in NASA science and exploration missions. NASA Glenn Research Center and Aerojet are developing a high fidelity high voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster that can achieve specific impulse magnitudes greater than 2,700 seconds and xenon throughput capability in excess of 300 kilograms. Performance, plume mappings, thermal characterization, and vibration tests of the HiVHAc engineering development unit thruster have been performed. In addition, the HiVHAc project is also pursuing the development of a power processing unit (PPU) and xenon feed system (XFS) for integration with the HiVHAc engineering development unit thruster. Colorado Power Electronics and NASA Glenn Research Center have tested a brassboard PPU for more than 1,500 hours in a vacuum environment, and a new brassboard and engineering model PPU units are under development. VACCO Industries developed a xenon flow control module which has undergone qualification testing and will be integrated with the HiVHAc thruster extended duration tests. Finally, recent mission studies have shown that the HiVHAc propulsion system has sufficient performance for four Discovery- and two New Frontiers-class NASA design reference missions.

  7. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis? Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause signs and symptoms ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  8. Fibronectin and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stenman, S; von Smitten, K; Vaheri, A

    1980-01-01

    Fibronectin is a polymorphic glycoprotein of plasma, other body fluids and connective tissue, and it occurs in an insoluble and a soluble form. Insoluble fibronectin is found associated with basement membranes and in loose connective tissue matrix as well as in the pericellular matrix formed around cultured adherent cells, such as endothelial, fibroblastic and smooth muscle cells. In these positions fibronectin apparently functions as a substrate for cell attachment and as a scaffold for cell migration and movement. Soluble fibronectin, present e.g. in the circulation (300 micronm/ml) exhibits some important interations with other proteins. It is covalently cross-linked to fibrin during thrombus formation and binds to collagen. Fibronectin is released from platelets during their aggregation and soluble fibronectin potentiates the action of plasminogen activator. We have detected fibronectin in the sub-endothelium, in the matrix of smooth muscle cells of the media and in the adventitia of arteries. By using immunohistological techniques we have further found that fibronectin is prominent in atherosclerotic lesions of the intima, especially in developing fibrous plaques. Fibronectin was also prominent in experimentally induced atherosclerotic lesions. These findings suggest that fibronectin is an indicator of connective tissue formation in atherosclerotic processes and that the protein can have a role in their pathogenesis.

  9. Accelerating Development of EV Batteries Through Computer-Aided Engineering (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.; Santhanagopalan, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Energy's Vehicle Technology Program has launched the Computer-Aided Engineering for Automotive Batteries (CAEBAT) project to work with national labs, industry and software venders to develop sophisticated software. As coordinator, NREL has teamed with a number of companies to help improve and accelerate battery design and production. This presentation provides an overview of CAEBAT, including its predictive computer simulation of Li-ion batteries known as the Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional (MSMD) model framework. MSMD's modular, flexible architecture connects the physics of battery charge/discharge processes, thermal control, safety and reliability in a computationally efficient manner. This allows independent development of submodels at the cell and pack levels.

  10. Preparative Scale Resolution of Enantiomers Enables Accelerated Drug Discovery and Development.

    PubMed

    Leek, Hanna; Andersson, Shalini

    2017-01-18

    The provision of pure enantiomers is of increasing importance not only for the pharmaceutical industry but also for agro-chemistry and biotechnology. In drug discovery and development, the enantiomers of a chiral drug depict unique chemical and pharmacological behaviors in a chiral environment, such as the human body, in which the stereochemistry of the chiral drugs determines their pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and toxicological properties. We present a number of challenging case studies of up-to-kilogram separations of racemic or enriched isomer mixtures using preparative liquid chromatography and super critical fluid chromatography to generate individual enantiomers that have enabled the development of new candidate drugs within AstraZeneca. The combination of chromatography and racemization as well as strategies on when to apply preparative chiral chromatography of enantiomers in a multi-step synthesis of a drug compound can further facilitate accelerated drug discovery and the early clinical evaluation of the drug candidates.

  11. Coronary Atherosclerosis and Interventional Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Peña-Duque, Marco Antonio; Romero-Ibarra, José Luis; Gaxiola-Macías, Manuel Ben Adoniram; Arias-Sánchez, Eduardo A

    2015-07-01

    The atherosclerotic process in coronary arteries begins with endothelial dysfunction and may provoke thrombotic total occlusion and myocardial infarction. In this state-of-the-art review, we discuss recent evidence of atheroslerosis, vulnerable plaque, and hemodynamic changes in the coronary tree, as well as the current techniques we implement in the catheterization lab to evaluate coronary stenosis. It is clear that atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition with several consequences in the coronary tree, however, we are able now to characterize the plaque and to select the appropriate treatment for many patients.

  12. Development and construction of a neutron beam line for accelerator-based boron neutron capture synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Gierga, D P; Yanch, J C; Shefer, R E

    2000-01-01

    A potential application of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li nuclear reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, termed Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), is under investigation. In an arthritic joint, the synovial lining becomes inflamed and is a source of great pain and discomfort for the afflicted patient. The goal of BNCS is to ablate the synovium, thereby eliminating the symptoms of the arthritis. A BNCS treatment would consist of an intra-articular injection of boron followed by neutron irradiation of the joint. Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations have been used to develop an accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam line for BNCS treatments. The model includes a moderator/reflector assembly, neutron producing target, target cooling system, and arthritic joint phantom. Single and parallel opposed beam irradiations have been modeled for the human knee, human finger, and rabbit knee joints. Additional reflectors, placed to the side and back of the joint, have been added to the model and have been shown to improve treatment times and skin doses by about a factor of 2. Several neutron-producing charged particle reactions have been examined for BNCS, including the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies of 4 and 3.7 MeV, the 9Be(d,n) reaction at deuteron energies of 1.5 and 2.6 MeV, and the 7Li(p,n) reaction at a proton energy of 2.5 MeV. For an accelerator beam current of 1 mA and synovial boron uptake of 1000 ppm, the time to deliver a therapy dose of 10,000 RBEcGy ranges from 3 to 48 min, depending on the treated joint and the neutron producing charged particle reaction. The whole-body effective dose that a human would incur during a knee treatment has been estimated to be 3.6 rem or 0.75 rem, for 1000 ppm or 19,000 ppm synovial boron uptake, respectively, although the shielding configuration has not yet been optimized. The Monte Carlo design process culminated in the construction, installation, and testing of a dedicated BNCS beam line on the high

  13. Development of a PYTHON-based emittance calculator at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. T.

    Beam emittance is an important characteristic describing charged particle beams. In linear accelerators (linac), it is critical to characterize the beam phase space parameters and, in particular, to precisely measure transverse beam emittance. The quadrupole scan (quad-scan) is a well-established technique used to characterize transverse beam parameters in four-dimensional phase space, including beam emittance. A computational algorithm with PYTHON scripts has been developed to estimate beam parameters, in particular beam emittance, using the quad-scan technique in the electron linac at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. This script has been implemented in conjunction with an automated quad-scan tool (also written in PYTHON) and has decreased the time it takes to perform a single quad-scan from an hour to a few minutes. From the experimental data, the emittance calculator quickly delivers several results including: geometrical and normalized transverse emittance, Courant-Snyder parameters, and plots of the beam size versus quadrupole field strength, among others. This paper will discuss the details of the techniques used, the results from several quad-scans preformed at FAST during the electron injector commissioning, and the PYTHON code used to obtain the results.

  14. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC`s seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility`s structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a {open_quotes}reality basis{close_quotes} for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures.

  15. Development of a dual-layered dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chunguang; Kanareykin, Alexei; Kazakov, Sergey; Liu, Wanming; Nenasheva, Elizaveta; Schoessow, Paul; Gai, Wei

    2008-09-01

    rf Power attenuation is a critical problem in the development of dielectric-loaded structures for particle acceleration. In a previous paper [C. Jing, W. Liu, W. Gai, J. Power, T. Wong, Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 539 (2005) 445] we suggested the use of a Multilayer Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structure (MDLA) as a possible approach for reducing the rf losses in a single layer device. The MDLA is based on the principle of Bragg reflection familiar from optics that is used to partially confine the fields inside the dielectric layers and reduce the wall current losses at the outer boundary. We report here on the design, construction and testing of a prototype X-band double-layer structure (2DLA). The measurements show an rf power attenuation for the 2DLA more than ten times smaller than that of a comparable single-layer structure, in good agreement with the analytic results. Testing and operation of MDLAs also requires efficient power coupling from test equipment or rf power systems to the device. We describe the design and construction of two novel structures: a TM 03 mode launcher for cold testing and a power coupler for planned high-gradient experiments.

  16. Recent advances in the development of high average power induction accelerators for industrial and environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1994-09-01

    Short-pulse accelerator technology developed during the early 1960`s through the late 1980`s is being extended to high average power systems capable of use in industrial and environmental applications. Processes requiring high dose levels and/or high volume throughput will require systems with beam power levels from several hundreds of kilowatts to megawatts. Beam accelerating potentials can range from less than 1 MeV to as much as 10 MeV depending on the type of beam, depth of penetration required, and the density of the product being treated. This paper addresses the present status of a family of high average power systems, with output beam power levels up to 200 kW, now in operation that use saturable core switches to achieve output pulse widths of 50 to 80 nanoseconds. Inductive adders and field emission cathodes are used to generate beams of electrons or x-rays at up to 2.5 MeV over areas of 1000 cm{sup 2}. Similar high average power technology is being used at {le} 1 MeV to drive repetitive ion beam sources for treatment of material surfaces over 100`s of cm{sup 2}.

  17. Development of Velocity Guidance Assistance System by Haptic Accelerator Pedal Reaction Force Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feilong; Hayashi, Ryuzo; Raksincharoensak, Pongsathorn; Nagai, Masao

    This research proposes a haptic velocity guidance assistance system for realizing eco-driving as well as enhancing traffic capacity by cooperating with ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems). The proposed guidance system generates the desired accelerator pedal (abbreviated as pedal) stroke with respect to the desired velocity obtained from ITS considering vehicle dynamics, and provides the desired pedal stroke to the driver via a haptic pedal whose reaction force is controllable and guides the driver in order to trace the desired velocity in real time. The main purpose of this paper is to discuss the feasibility of the haptic velocity guidance. A haptic velocity guidance system for research is developed on the Driving Simulator of TUAT (DS), by attaching a low-inertia, low-friction motor to the pedal, which does not change the original characteristics of the original pedal when it is not operated, implementing an algorithm regarding the desired pedal stroke calculation and the reaction force controller. The haptic guidance maneuver is designed based on human pedal stepping experiments. A simple velocity profile with acceleration, deceleration and cruising is synthesized according to naturalistic driving for testing the proposed system. The experiment result of 9 drivers shows that the haptic guidance provides high accuracy and quick response in velocity tracking. These results prove that the haptic guidance is a promising velocity guidance method from the viewpoint of HMI (Human Machine Interface).

  18. Status of engineering development of CCDTL for accelerator production of tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.L.; Billen, J.H.; Hunter, W.T.; Leslie, P.O.; Roybal, R.J.; Sigler, F.E.

    1998-12-31

    The Coupled-Cavity Drift Tube Linac (CCDTL) is a relatively new RF accelerator structure which plays a major role in the APT Low-Energy Linac (LEL) design. Engineering development is pushing ahead on several fronts, including thermal management, fabrication procedures, cavity and coupling slot tuning, high-power prototype fabrication and testing, supports and alignment, vacuum, and provisions for beam diagnostics. Fabrication of the CCDTL Low-Beta Hot Model is nearly complete, and high-power RF tests will commence soon. In 1999, the authors will begin the fabrication of 11 meters of CCDTL to be added to the Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator. In 2001, it will take the 100 mA beam from 6.7 MeV to 10.05 MeV, producing the world`s most powerful proton beam. The authors are also starting the design of a CCDTL 96 MeV Hot Model to demonstrate cooling of an intermediate-Beta version of the structure. The 14cm-long, 9cm diameter drift tube has roughly 5kW dissipated on it. This all leads to the final mechanical design of the 113m long CCDTL for the APT plant linac.

  19. New options for developing of nuclear energy using an accelerator-driven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1997-09-01

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor. Thus, the necessity of early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. High reliability of the proton accelerator, which is essential to implementing an accelerator-driven reactor in the nuclear energy field can be achieved by a slight extension of the accelerator`s length, with only a small economical penalty. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options including high neutron economy producing the fuel, transmuting high-level wastes, such as minor actinides, and of converting efficiently the excess Pu and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel.

  20. Macrophages heterogeneity in atherosclerosis – implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease occurring within the artery wall and is an underlying cause of cardiovascular complications, including myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Its pathogenesis involves many immune cell types with a well accepted role for monocyte/macrophages. Cholesterol-loaded macrophages are a characteristic feature of plaques and are major players in all stages of plaque development. As well as modulating lipid metabolism, macrophages secrete inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that drive pathogenesis. They also produce proteases and tissue factor that contribute to plaque rupture and thrombosis. Macrophages are however heterogeneous cells and when appropriately activated, they phagocytose cytotoxic lipoproteins, clear apoptotic bodies, secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and synthesize matrix repair proteins that stabilize vulnerable plaques. Pharmacological modulation of macrophage activity therefore represents a potential therapeutic strategy for atherosclerosis. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current understanding of the different macrophage subsets and their monocyte precursors, and, the implications of these subsets for atherosclerosis. This will present a foundation for highlighting novel opportunities to exploit the heterogeneity of macrophages as important diagnostic and therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis and its associated diseases. PMID:20629993

  1. Molecular mechanisms of diabetes and atherosclerosis: role of adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Ken; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2012-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a disease characterized by inadequate beta-cell response due to progressive insulin resistance that typically accompanies physical inactivity and weight gain. T2DM is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality related to the associated atherosclerotic cardiovascular risks and diabetic vasculopathies, including microangiopathies (e.g., blindness and renal failure) and macroangiopathies (atherosclerosis). The increasing global prevalence of T2DM is linked to the rising rates of obesity, especially abdominal obesity. Visceral fat accumulation is upstream of obesity-related disorders including atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD), and is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and atherosclerosis through dysregulated production of adipocytokines, especially hypoadiponectinemia. This review article discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for T2DM and atherosclerosis, focusing on adiponectin. Clinical and experimental studies have shown that hypoadiponectinemia contributes to a variety of life style-related diseases including T2DM and atherosclerosis. It is likely that life-style modification, visceral fat reduction and use of medications that increase serum adiponectin levels (e.g., rimonabant, thiazolidinediones, fibrates, angiotensin receptor blocker and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade) when provided in combination can improve hypoadiponectinemia and thus prevent the development of life style-related diseases including T2DM and ACVD.

  2. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  3. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1992-01-01

    The need to record some measure of the low-gravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle was recognized at an early stage of the U.S. Space Program. Such information was considered important for both the assessment of an astronaut's physical condition during and after space missions and the analysis of the fluid physics, materials processing, and biological sciences experiments run in space. Various measurement systems were developed and flown on space platforms beginning in the early 1970's. Similar in concept to land based seismometers that measure vibrations caused by earthquakes and explosions, accelerometers mounted on orbiting space vehicles measure vibrations in and of the vehicle due to internal and external sources, as well as vibrations in a sensor's relative acceleration with respect to the vehicle to which it is attached. The data collected over the years have helped to alter the perception of gravity on-board a space vehicle from the public's early concept of zero-gravity to the science community's evolution of thought from microgravity to milligravity to g-jitter or vibrational environment. Since the advent of the Shuttle Orbiter Program, especially since the start of Spacelab flights dedicated to scientific investigations, the interest in measuring the low-gravity environment in which experiments are run has increased. This interest led to the development and flight of numerous accelerometer systems dedicated to specific experiments. It also prompted the development of the NASA MSAD-sponsored Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). The first SAMS units flew in the Spacelab on STS-40 in June 1991 in support of the first Spacelab Life Sciences mission (SLS-1). SAMS is currently manifested to fly on all future Spacelab missions.

  4. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1992-09-01

    The need to record some measure of the low-gravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle was recognized at an early stage of the U.S. Space Program. Such information was considered important for both the assessment of an astronaut's physical condition during and after space missions and the analysis of the fluid physics, materials processing, and biological sciences experiments run in space. Various measurement systems were developed and flown on space platforms beginning in the early 1970's. Similar in concept to land based seismometers that measure vibrations caused by earthquakes and explosions, accelerometers mounted on orbiting space vehicles measure vibrations in and of the vehicle due to internal and external sources, as well as vibrations in a sensor's relative acceleration with respect to the vehicle to which it is attached. The data collected over the years have helped to alter the perception of gravity on-board a space vehicle from the public's early concept of zero-gravity to the science community's evolution of thought from microgravity to milligravity to g-jitter or vibrational environment. Since the advent of the Shuttle Orbiter Program, especially since the start of Spacelab flights dedicated to scientific investigations, the interest in measuring the low-gravity environment in which experiments are run has increased. This interest led to the development and flight of numerous accelerometer systems dedicated to specific experiments. It also prompted the development of the NASA MSAD-sponsored Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). The first SAMS units flew in the Spacelab on STS-40 in June 1991 in support of the first Spacelab Life Sciences mission (SLS-1). SAMS is currently manifested to fly on all future Spacelab missions.

  5. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick; Arndt, G. D.; Ngo, Phong

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of microwave technology for treating Atherosclerosis while preserving the endothelium. The system uses catheter antennas as part of the system that is intended to treat atherosclerosis. The concept is to use a microwave catheter for heating the atherosclerotic lesions, and reduce constriction in the artery.

  6. Subclinical Atherosclerosis and Obesity Phenotypes Among Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Susan T.; Smulevitz, Beverly; Vatcheva, Kristina P.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Reininger, Belinda; McPherson, David D.; McCormick, Joseph B.; Fisher‐Hoch, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on the influence of obesity on atherosclerosis in Hispanics are inconsistent, possibly related to varying cardiometabolic risk among obese individuals. We aimed to determine the association of obesity and cardiometabolic risk with subclinical atherosclerosis in Mexican‐Americans. Methods and Results Participants (n=503) were drawn from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort. Metabolic health was defined as <2 of the following: blood pressure ≥130/85; triglyceride ≥150 mg/dL; high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol <40 mg/dL (men) or <50 mg/dL (women); fasting glucose ≥100 mg/dL; homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance value >5.13; or high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein >3 mg/L. Carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) was measured. A high proportion of participants (77.8%) were metabolically unhealthy; they were more likely to be male, older, with fewer years of education, and less likely to meet daily recommendations regarding fruit and vegetable servings. One‐third (31.8%) had abnormal carotid ultrasound findings. After adjusting for covariates, mean cIMT varied across the obesity phenotypes (P=0.0001); there was no difference among the metabolically unhealthy regardless of whether they were obese or not. In multivariable analysis, after adjusting for covariates, cardiometabolic risk (P=0.0159), but not obesity (P=0.1446), was significantly associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. Conclusions In Mexican‐Americans, cardiometabolic risk has a greater effect on early atherosclerosis development than body mass index. Non‐obese but metabolically unhealthy participants had similar development of subclinical atherosclerosis as their obese counterparts. Interventions to maintain metabolic health among obese and non‐obese patients may be a more important goal than weight loss alone. PMID:25787312

  7. 10-Year Study Links Faster Progression of Atherosclerosis to Air Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Air Pollution Study (MESA Air) was the first U.S. research study to measure directly how long-term exposure to air pollution contributes to the development of heart disease.

  8. Platelets: cell proliferation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, R

    1979-04-01

    Intimal smooth muscle proliferation is the hallmark of the lesions of atherosclerosis. Endothelial injury is postulated to precede this intimal smooth muscle proliferative response, which is mediated by a potent mitogenic factor derived from adherence, aggregation, and release by platelets at sites of endothelial injury. Smooth muscle proliferation is accompanied by varying amounts of connective tissue formation and intracellular and extracellular lipid deposition, dependent upon the risk factors encountered in each patient. The platelet-derived mitogen (PF) is a stable, cationic, relatively low molecular weight (10,000-30,000) protein that has been partially purified by ion exchange chromotography and gel filtration. Less than 100 ng of PF/ml culture medium can stimulate sparse 3T3 cells or smooth muscle cells, but not endothelial cells, to undergo multiple cell divisions in the presence of 5% cell-free, plasma-derived serum. The latter contains no mitogenic activity. The interaction of the platelet mitogen and plasma-derived components, including lipoproteins, plays a critical role in smooth muscle proliferation in vitro and in vivo in the induction of the lesions of atherosclerosis.

  9. [Nanotechnology, a new paradigm in atherosclerosis treatment].

    PubMed

    Martín Giménez, Virna M; Ruiz-Roso, María Belén; Camargo, Alejandra Beatriz; Kassuha, Diego; Manucha, Walter

    2016-11-30

    Atherosclerosis, a known and prevalent disease, causes progressive deterioration of affected vessels, inducing a blood flow reduction with different complications, and its symptoms usually manifest in advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the classic therapeutic alternatives are insufficient because the damages are many times irreversible. For this reason, there is a need to implement intelligent forms of drug administration and develop new therapeutic targets that reduce the progression of atherosclerotic lesion. The implementation of new tools for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of this cardiovascular disease is of special interest, focusing our attention on achieving a more effective control of the immune system. Finally, this review highlights the latest knowledge about nanotechnology as a powerful, modern, and promising therapeutic alternative applied to atherosclerotic disease, as well as warning of the potential complications with their use.

  10. Methylglyoxal and glyoxalase I in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Nordin M J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease, caused predominantly by atherosclerotic plaque rupture, remains one of the leading causes of death. However, the mechanism of plaque rupture remains largely unknown. Recent studies have linked high metabolic activity in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques to the development of plaque rupture. AGEs (advanced glycation end-products) are known to be formed as a result of high metabolic activity and are higher in rupture-prone than stable plaques. Furthermore, AGEs seem to be more than mere markers of metabolic activity, as recent studies have elucidated that AGEs and their major precursor, MG (methylglyoxal), may have an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis and plaque rupture. MG can be detoxified by Glo1 (glyoxalase I), thereby preventing the accumulation of MG and MG-derived AGEs. In the present review, data concerning MG, Glo1 and AGEs in the context of plaque phenotype are discussed.

  11. Vasa Vasorum in Atherosclerosis and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Lu, Xiaotong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to several acute cardiovascular complications with poor prognosis. For decades, the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum (VV) in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis has received broad attention. The presence of VV neovascularization precedes the apparent symptoms of clinical atherosclerosis. VV also mediates inflammatory cell infiltration, intimal thickening, intraplaque hemorrhage, and subsequent atherothrombosis that results in stroke or myocardial infarction. Intraplaque neovessels originating from VV can be immature and hence susceptible to leakage, and are thus regarded as the leading cause of intraplaque hemorrhage. Evidence supports VV as a new surrogate target of atherosclerosis evaluation and treatment. This review provides an overview into the relationship between VV and atherosclerosis, including the anatomy and function of VV, the stimuli of VV neovascularization, and the available underlying mechanisms that lead to poor prognosis. We also summarize translational researches on VV imaging modalities and potential therapies that target VV neovascularization or its stimuli. PMID:26006236

  12. Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation ferritic steels for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Sridharan, K.

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys that can be fabricated using conventional steelmaking methods. The new alloys are expected to have superior high-temperature creep performance and excellent radiation resistance as compared to Grade 91. The designed alloys were fabricated using arc-melting and drop-casting, followed by hot rolling and conventional heat treatments. Comprehensive experimental studies have been conducted on the developed alloys to evaluate their hardness, tensile properties, creep resistance, Charpy impact toughness, and aging resistance, as well as resistance to proton and heavy ion (Fe2+) irradiation.

  13. Narrow bandwidth Thomson photon source development using Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, C. G. R.; van Tilborg, J.; Tsai, H.-E.; Toth, Cs.; Vay, J.-L.; Lehe, R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Rykovanov, S. G.; Grote, D. P.; Friedman, A.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-10-01

    Compact, high-quality photon sources at MeV energies are being developed based on Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). An independent scattering laser with controlled pulse shaping in frequency and amplitude can be used together with laser guiding to realize high photon yield and narrow bandwidth. Simulations are presented on production of controllable narrow bandwidth sources using the beam and plasma capabilities of LPAs. Recent experiments and simulations demonstrate controllable LPAs in the energy range appropriate to MeV Thomson sources. Design of experiments and laser capabilities to combine these elements will be presented, towards a compact photon source system. A dedicated facility under construction will be described. Work supported by US DOE NNSA DNN R&D and by Sc. HEP under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  14. Prevention of induced atherosclerosis by diversion of bile or blockade of intestinal lymphatics in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, P J; Karipineni, R C; Pertsemlidis, D; Danese, C A

    1976-01-01

    The prevention of induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis was studied by means of intestinal lymphatic blockade and of bile diversion in the dog. Hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis were produced by high cholesterol feeding after induction of hypothyroidism with radio-iodine plus thiouracil. Complete diversion of bile, by shunting all bile into the urinary bladder, effectively prevented hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis; in contrast, blockade of the intestinal lymphatics failed to prevent the consequences of the atherogenic regimen, because of the development of collateral lymphatic channels. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:817679

  15. Atherosclerosis in Psoriatic Arthritis: A Multiparametric Analysis Using Imaging Technique and Laboratory Markers of Inflammation and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Garg, Nidhi; Krishan, Pawan; Syngle, Ashit

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Pathogenesis of accelerated atherosclerosis in PsA remains to be elucidated. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) often precedes manifesting atherosclerosis. This study aims to assess carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), a marker of atherosclerosis in PsA, in context of markers of inflammation and vascular function. A cross-sectional study was performed in 18 PsA patients who were compared with 18 controls matched for age and sex. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) assessed by AngioDefender (Everist Health, Ann Arbor, MI), endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) quantified by flow cytometry and CIMT measured ultrasonographically. Inflammatory measures included disease activity score of 28 joints count and disease activity index in psoriatic arthritis. We also assayed markers of inflammation, including C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α), and endothelial dysfunction, including lipids, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and EPCs. CIMT is significantly higher in PsA patients compared with controls (0.062 ± 0.18 vs. 0.045 ± 0.10 cm, p < 0.01) whereas FMD%, EPCs%, and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol are significantly reduced in PsA compared with controls (p < 0.05). Compared with controls, PsA patients had significantly increased concentrations of ESR, CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. In PsA, CIMT positively correlated with IL-6 and ICAM-1 and inversely correlated with FMD, HDL, and EPCs (p < 0.05). In PsA, FMD and CIMT were impaired, indicating endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis, respectively. PsA-related inflammatory mechanisms (TNF-α, IL-6) and markers of vascular function (CRP, ICAM-1, and EPCs) may all be involved in the development of vascular disease in Ps

  16. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice

  17. Self-accelerated development of salt karst during flash floods along the Dead Sea Coast, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avni, Yoav; Lensky, Nadav; Dente, Elad; Shviro, Maayan; Arav, Reuma; Gavrieli, Ittai; Yechieli, Yoseph; Abelson, Meir; Lutzky, Hallel; Filin, Sagi; Haviv, Itai; Baer, Gidon

    2016-01-01

    We document and analyze the rapid development of a real-time karst system within the subsurface salt layers of the Ze'elim Fan, Dead Sea, Israel by a multidisciplinary study that combines interferometric synthetic aperture radar and light detection and ranging measurements, sinkhole mapping, time-lapse camera monitoring, groundwater level measurements and chemical and isotopic analyses of surface runoff and groundwater. The >1 m/yr drop of Dead Sea water level and the subsequent change in the adjacent groundwater system since the 1960s resulted in flushing of the coastal aquifer by fresh groundwater, subsurface salt dissolution, gradual land subsidence and formation of sinkholes. Since 2010 this process accelerated dramatically as flash floods at the Ze'elim Fan were drained by newly formed sinkholes. During and immediately after these flood events the dissolution rates of the subsurface salt layer increased dramatically, the overlying ground surface subsided, a large number of sinkholes developed over short time periods (hours to days), and salt-saturated water resurged downstream. Groundwater flow velocities increased by more than 2 orders of magnitudes compared to previously measured velocities along the Dead Sea. The process is self-accelerating as salt dissolution enhances subsidence and sinkhole formation, which in turn increase the ponding areas of flood water and generate additional draining conduits to the subsurface. The rapid terrain response is predominantly due to the highly soluble salt. It is enhanced by the shallow depth of the salt layer, the low competence of the newly exposed unconsolidated overburden and the moderate topographic gradients of the Ze'elim Fan.

  18. Intermittent hypoxia and hypercapnia induce pulmonary artery atherosclerosis and ventricular dysfunction in low density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Karen; Pattison, Jennifer; Peterson, Alexander B.; Juliano, Joseph; Dalton, Nancy D.; Gu, Yusu; Alvarez, Erika; Imamura, Toshihiro; Peterson, Kirk L.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Li, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea, who experience episodic hypoxia and hypercapnia during sleep, often demonstrate increased inflammation, oxidative stress, and dyslipidemia. We hypothesized that sleep apnea patients would be predisposed to the development of atherosclerosis. To dissect the mechanisms involved, we developed an animal model in mice whereby we expose mice to intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia (IHH) in normobaric environments. Two- to three-month-old low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr−/−) mice were fed a high-fat diet for 8 or 16 wk while being exposed to IHH for either 10 h/day or 24 h/day. Plasma lipid levels, pulmonary artery and aortic atherosclerotic lesions, and cardiac function were then assayed. Surprisingly, atherosclerosis in the aorta of IHH mice was similar compared with controls. However, in IHH mice, atherosclerosis was markedly increased in the trunk and proximal branches of the pulmonary artery of exposed mice; even though plasma cholesterol and triglycerides were lower than in controls. Hemodynamic analysis revealed that right ventricular maximum pressure and isovolumic relaxation constant were significantly increased in IHH exposed mice and left ventricular % fractional shortening was reduced. In conclusion, 1) Intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia remarkably accelerated atherosclerotic lesions in the pulmonary artery of Ldlr−/− mice and 2) increased lesion formation in the pulmonary artery was associated with right and left ventricular dysfunction. These findings raise the possibility that patients with obstructive sleep apnea may be susceptible to atherosclerotic disease in the pulmonary vasculature, an observation that has not been previously recognized. PMID:23990245

  19. Economic analysis of opportunities to accelerate Alzheimer’s disease research and development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Troy J; O'Connor, Alan C; Link, Albert N; Beaulieu, Travis J

    2014-01-01

    The development of disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) faces a number of barriers. Among these are the lack of surrogate biomarkers, the exceptional size and duration of clinical trials, difficulties in identifying appropriate populations for clinical trials, and the limitations of monotherapies in addressing such a complex multifactorial disease. This study sets out to first estimate the consequent impact on the expected cost of developing disease-modifying treatments for AD and then to estimate the potential benefits of bringing together industry, academic, and government stakeholders to co-invest in, for example, developing better biomarkers and cognitive assessment tools, building out advanced registries and clinical trial-readiness cohorts, and establishing clinical trial platforms to investigate combinations of candidate drugs and biomarkers from the portfolios of multiple companies. Estimates based on interviews with experts on AD research and development suggest that the cost of one new drug is now $5.7 billion (95% confidence interval (CI) $3.7–9.5 billion) and could be reduced to $2.0 billion (95% CI $1.5–2.9 billion). The associated acceleration in the arrival of disease-modifying treatments could reduce the number of case years of dementia by 7.0 million (95% CI 4.4–9.4 million) in the United States from 2025 through 2040. PMID:24673372

  20. Microdosing, imaging biomarkers and SPECT: a multi-sided tripod to accelerate drug development.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ernest K J; Bergstrom, Kim; Mariani, Giuliano; Kairemo, Kalevi

    2009-01-01

    The advances of nuclear medicine imaging instrumentation and radiopharmaceutical sciences allow their involvement in the developmental processes of therapeutic drugs. New chemical entities, meant as potential drugs, need to comply with the proof-of-principle. Tomographic imaging methods as PET, SPECT and CT have been used for small animal and human studies at an early stage of drug development. Using a drug candidate in a radiolabeled form in obtaining quantitative imaging data provides opportunity for a complete morphological and functional overview of targeting properties and overall pharmacokinetics. This can be helpful in go/no-go decision making. Microdosing, using e.g.1% of the proposed dose of the radiolabeled potential drug plays an important part in this early development and notably reduces the risk of serious adverse effects in human volunteers or patients. This paper primarily focuses on the way in which microdosing and SPECT imaging may contribute to the development of drugs. Furthermore, this paper illustrates how these techniques may help to eliminate weak drug candidates at early stage, making time and funds available for potential lead compounds. Eventually this approach facilitates and accelerates new drug approval. The present paper highlights how these techniques make drug development easier in the field of oncology and neurology.

  1. An accelerated remedial strategy developed for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, C.R.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wrobel, J.

    1995-06-01

    For an installation with many disposal sites and multiple contaminant sources, successful remediation at minimum cost can be complicated by insufficient geologic and hydrogeologic information, incomplete records of historical disposal activities, and uncertainty about the effectiveness of different investigative methods. To reduce these uncertainties and to increase the probability of successful remediation at minimum cost, a ``Phased and pilot`` accelerated remedial strategy has been developed for the J-Field area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The strategy includes four phases. First, the most contaminated site is selected as a pilot for detailed investigation. Second, the most contaminated areas within the pilot site are chosen as a pilot source area for interim action study, and a remedial action is developed to remove the primary contaminant sources. The subsequent sitewide investigation uses the effective tools developed in the first phase. Third, a cleanup operation is initiated in the pilot source area, while a sitewide feasibility study is developed by taking advantage of lessons learned in the interim action. Fourth, a sitewide cleanup operation proceeds.

  2. Economic analysis of opportunities to accelerate Alzheimer's disease research and development.

    PubMed

    Scott, Troy J; O'Connor, Alan C; Link, Albert N; Beaulieu, Travis J

    2014-04-01

    The development of disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) faces a number of barriers. Among these are the lack of surrogate biomarkers, the exceptional size and duration of clinical trials, difficulties in identifying appropriate populations for clinical trials, and the limitations of monotherapies in addressing such a complex multifactorial disease. This study sets out to first estimate the consequent impact on the expected cost of developing disease-modifying treatments for AD and then to estimate the potential benefits of bringing together industry, academic, and government stakeholders to co-invest in, for example, developing better biomarkers and cognitive assessment tools, building out advanced registries and clinical trial-readiness cohorts, and establishing clinical trial platforms to investigate combinations of candidate drugs and biomarkers from the portfolios of multiple companies. Estimates based on interviews with experts on AD research and development suggest that the cost of one new drug is now $5.7 billion (95% confidence interval (CI) $3.7-9.5 billion) and could be reduced to $2.0 billion (95% CI $1.5-2.9 billion). The associated acceleration in the arrival of disease-modifying treatments could reduce the number of case years of dementia by 7.0 million (95% CI 4.4-9.4 million) in the United States from 2025 through 2040.

  3. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  4. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  5. Development of integrated superconducting quadrupole doublet modules for operation in the SIS100 accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J.; Bleile, A.; Ceballos Velasco, J.; Fischer, E.; Hess, G.; Macavei, J.; Spiller, P.

    2015-12-01

    The FAIR project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) evolves and builds an international accelerator- and experimental facility for basic research activities in various fields of modern physics. Within the course of this project, integrated quadrupole doublet modules are in development. The quadrupole doublet modules provide a pair of superconducting main quadrupoles (focusing and defocusing), corrector magnets, cryogenic collimators and beam position monitors as integrated sets of ion-optical elements. Furthermore LHe cooled beam pipes and vacuum cold-warm transitions are used as ultra-high vacuum components for beam transportation. Superconducting bus bars are used for 13 kA current supply of the main quadrupole magnets. All components are integrated as one common cold mass into one cryostat. High temperature super conductor local current leads will be applied for the low current supply of corrector magnets. The quadrupole doublet modules will be operated in the SIS100 heavy ion accelerator, the core component of the FAIR project. A first version of a corrector magnet has already been manufactured at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Russia, and is now ready for testing. The ion-optical lattice structure of SIS100 requires multiple configurations of named components. Eleven different configurations, organized in four categories, provide the required quadrupole doublet module setups. The high integration level of multiple ion-optical, mechanical and cryogenic functions, based on requirements of operation safety, is leading towards a sophisticated mechanical structure and cooling solution, to satisfy the demanding requirements on position preservation during thermal cycling. The mechanical and cryogenic design solutions will be discussed.

  6. Optimising translational oncology in clinical practice: strategies to accelerate progress in drug development.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R; Bogaerts, J; Ciardiello, F; de Ruysscher, D; Dubsky, P; Ducreux, M; Finn, S; Laurent-Puig, P; Peters, S; Piccart, M; Smit, E; Sotiriou, C; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; Tabernero, J

    2015-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the socioeconomic burden of cancer remains unacceptably high and treatment advances for many common cancers have been limited, suggesting a need for a new approach to drug development. One issue central to this lack of progress is the heterogeneity and genetic complexity of many tumours. This results in considerable variability in therapeutic response and requires knowledge of the molecular profile of the tumour to guide appropriate treatment selection for individual patients. While recent advances in the molecular characterisation of different cancer types have the potential to transform cancer treatment through precision medicine, such an approach presents a major economic challenge for drug development, since novel targeted agents may only be suitable for a small cohort of patients. Identifying the patients who would benefit from individual therapies and recruiting sufficient numbers of patients with particular cancer subtypes into clinical trials is challenging, and will require collaborative efforts from research groups and industry in order to accelerate progress. A number of molecular screening platforms have already been initiated across Europe, and it is hoped that these networks, along with future collaborations, will benefit not only patients but also society through cost reductions as a result of more efficient use of resources. This review discusses how current developments in translational oncology may be applied in clinical practice in the future, assesses current programmes for the molecular characterisation of cancer and describes possible collaborative approaches designed to maximise the benefits of translational science for patients with cancer.

  7. Accelerating the development of improved analgesic treatments: the ACTION public-private partnership.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2011-07-01

    There has been considerable progress identifying pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but analgesic medications with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability still represent an unmet public health need. Numerous treatments examined in recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have failed to show efficacy for neuropathic pain, including treatments that had previously demonstrated efficacy. This suggests that at least some negative results reflect limited assay sensitivity of RCTs to distinguish efficacious treatments from placebo. Patient characteristics, clinical trial research designs and methods, outcome measures, approaches to data analysis, and statistical power may all play a role in accounting for difficulties in demonstrating the benefits of efficacious analgesic treatments vs placebo. The identification of specific clinical trial characteristics associated with assay sensitivity in existing data has the potential to provide an evidence-based approach to the design of analgesic clinical trials. The US Food and Drug Administration recently launched the Analgesic Clinical Trial Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) public-private partnership, which is designed to facilitate the discovery and development of analgesics with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability for acute and chronic pain conditions. ACTION will establish a collaborative effort to prioritize research objectives, develop a standardized analgesic database platform, and conduct methodologically focused studies to increase the assay sensitivity and efficiency of analgesic clinical trials. The results of these activities have the potential to inform and accelerate the development of improved pain management interventions of all types, not just pharmacologic treatments.

  8. Engagement of specific innate immune signaling pathways during Porphyromonas gingivalis induced chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frank C; Ukai, Takashi; Genco, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The expression of TLRs are markedly augmented in human atherosclerotic lesions and this occurs preferentially by endothelial cells and macrophages in areas infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Furthermore polymorphisms in the human gene encoding one TLR receptor (TLR4) which attenuates receptor signaling and diminishes the inflammatory response to gram-negative pathogens, is associated with low levels of certain circulating mediators of inflammation and a decreased risk for atherosclerosis in humans. Recent advances have established a fundamental role for inflammation in mediating all stages of atherosclerosis. However, the triggers that initiate and sustain the inflammatory process have not been definitively identified. Although definitive proof of a role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. We have also established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate

  9. [Potential protective role of nitric oxide and Hsp70 linked to functional foods in the atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Camargo, Alejandra B; Manucha, Walter

    Atherosclerosis, one of the main pathologic entities considered epidemic and a worldwide public health problem, is currently under constant review as regards its basic determining mechanisms and therapeutic possibilities. In this regard, all patients afflicted with the disease exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation. Interestingly, nitric oxide - a known vasoactive messenger gas - has been closely related to the inflammatory, oxidative and mitochondrial dysfunctional process that characterizes atherosclerosis. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that alterations in the bioavailability of nitric oxide would induce the expression of heat shock proteins. This agrees with the use of functional foods as a strategy to prevent both vascular aging and the development of atherosclerosis. Finally, a greater knowledge regarding the mechanisms implied in the development of atherosclerosis will enable proposing new and possible hygiene, health and therapeutic interventions.

  10. Development of a Laser-Powered Dielectric Structure-Based Accelerator as a Stand-Alone Particle Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, R. B.; Travish, G.; Arab, E. R.; Fong, D.; Hoyer, Z.; Lacroix, U. H.; Vartanian, N.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2010-11-01

    An experimental program to develop and build a dielectric-based slab-symmetric structure (the micro-accelerator platform, or MAP) for generating and accelerating low-energy electrons is underway at UCLA and Manhattanville College. This optical acceleration structure is effectively a resonant cavity powered by a side-coupled laser, and has applications as a radiation source for medicine or industry. We present recent experimental and computational results on the accelerator, and progress toward its incorporation into a self-contained particle source. Such a particle source would incorporate a micron-scale electron emitter and a non-relativistic capture region to enable self-injection into the synchronous field within the accelerator. A prototype of the accelerator itself has been constructed from candidate dielectric materials using micromanufacturing techniques; the current status of the testing program is described. A novel electron emitter incorporating pyroelectric crystals with field-enhancing tips has been demonstrated to produce steady currents; the results are dependent on tip geometry, and appear suitable for injection into a microstructure. Extension of the MAP concept to non-relativistic velocities, as in the stand-alone source, requires a tapered structure that gives rise to numerous complications including beam defocusing and manufacturing challenges; approaches for addressing these complications are mentioned.

  11. Development of a dual-pulse RF driver for an S-band (= 2856 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki; Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hui Su; Buaphad, Pikad

    2016-04-01

    The radiation equipment research division of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has developed a Container Inspection System (CIS) using a Radio Frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for port security. The primary purpose of the CIS is to detect nuclear materials and explosives, as well country-specific prohibited substances, e.g., smuggled. The CIS consists of a 9/6 MeV dualenergy electron linear accelerator for distinguishing between organic and inorganic materials. The accelerator consists of an electron gun, an RF accelerating structure, an RF driver, a modulator, electromagnets, a cooling system, a X-ray generating target, X-ray collimator, a detector, and a container moving system. The RF driver is an important part of the configuration because it is the RF power source: it supplies the RF power to the accelerating structure. A unique aspect of the RF driver is that it generates dual RF power to generate dual energy (9/6 MeV). The advantage of this RF driver is that it can allow the pulse width to vary and can be used to obtain a wide range of energy output, and pulse repetition rates up to 300 Hz. For this reason, 140 W (5 MW - 9 MeV) and 37 W (3.4 MW - 6 MeV) power outputs are available independently. A high power test for 20 minutes demonstrate that stable dual output powers can be generated. Moreover, the dual power can be applied to the accelerator which has stable accelerator operation. In this paper, the design, fabrication and high power test of the RF driver for the RF electron linear accelerator (linac) are presented.

  12. Development of a subway operation incident delay model using accelerated failure time approaches.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Zheng, Yang; Yan, Xuedong; Meng, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to develop a subway operational incident delay model using the parametric accelerated time failure (AFT) approach. Six parametric AFT models including the log-logistic, lognormal and Weibull models, with fixed and random parameters are built based on the Hong Kong subway operation incident data from 2005 to 2012, respectively. In addition, the Weibull model with gamma heterogeneity is also considered to compare the model performance. The goodness-of-fit test results show that the log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is most suitable for estimating the subway incident delay. First, the results show that a longer subway operation incident delay is highly correlated with the following factors: power cable failure, signal cable failure, turnout communication disruption and crashes involving a casualty. Vehicle failure makes the least impact on the increment of subway operation incident delay. According to these results, several possible measures, such as the use of short-distance and wireless communication technology (e.g., Wifi and Zigbee) are suggested to shorten the delay caused by subway operation incidents. Finally, the temporal transferability test results show that the developed log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is stable over time.

  13. Accelerating the development of formal thinking in middle and high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adey, Philip; Shayer, Michael

    In an attempt to accelerate the development of formal operations in average young adolescents, intervention lessons relating to all formal schemata were designed in the context of school science courses. Over a period of two years, up to 30 intervention lessons were given by science teachers to their classes in eight schools. Boys who started the program aged 12+ showed a pre-posttest effect size on Piagetian tests of 0.89 SD compared with control classes. In terms of British norms for the development of operational thinking this was a mean change from the 51st to the 74th percentile. Neither the middle school students nor the 12+ girls showed greater gain than the controls. Gains were shown by girls in one 11+ class and in the two 11+ laboratory classes. In the laboratory school students given intervention lessons by the researchers maintained their gains over controls in formal operations at a delayed posttest one year after cessation of the program. There was no effect on tests of science achievement during the intervention. It was argued that the interventions needed to be accompanied by in-service training designed to enable teachers to change their teaching style in line with their students' increased operational thinking capacity.

  14. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Chung, Wen-Ting; Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan; Wu, Meei-Maan; Tseng, Hung-Pin; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  15. Angiotensin-(1-7): new perspectives in atherosclerosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Jun; Li, Su-Fang; Song, Jun-Xian; Ren, Jing-Yi; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) is recognized as a new bioactive peptide in renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang-II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have found that Ang-(1-7) played an important role in reducing smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, improving endothelial function and regulating lipid metabolism, leading to inhibition of atherosclerotic lesions and increase of plaque stability. Although clinical application of Ang-(1-7) is restricted due to its pharmacokinetic properties, identification of stabilized compounds, including more stable analogues and specific delivery compounds, has enabled clinical application of Ang-(1-7). In this review, we discussed recent findings concerning the biological role of Ang-(1-7) and related mechanism during atherosclerosis development. In addition, we highlighted the perspective to develop therapeutic strategies using Ang-(1-7) to treat atherosclerosis. PMID:26788046

  16. Development of a new concept automatic frequency controller for an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Tsukuda, Kazuhiro; Kokubo, Masaki; Miura, Sadao; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-08-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional, image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. The system has pursuing irradiation capability in addition to precise irradiation capability, owing to its agile x-ray head. The moving x-ray head requires a very small C-band accelerator guide. The heat intensity of the accelerator guide is much higher than that of conventional S-band medical linear accelerators. The resonance frequency varies over almost 1.0 MHz with a thermal time constant of about 30 s. An automatic frequency controller (AFC) is employed to compensate for this variation in resonance frequency. Furthermore, we noted that fast AFC response is important for step-and-shoot intensity modulation radiotherapy (IMRT), in which the beam is turned on and off frequently. Therefore, we invented a digital AFC, based on a new concept, to provide effective compensation for the thermal characteristics of the accelerator guide and to ensure stable and optimized x-ray treatment. An important aspect of the performance of the AFC is the capture-frequency range over which the AFC can seek, lock on to, and track the resonance frequency. The conventional, analog AFC used in S-band medical linear accelerators would have a capture-frequency range of about 0.9 MHz, if applied to our accelerator guide, and would be inappropriate. Conversely, our new AFC has a capture-frequency range of 24 MHz, which is well suited to our accelerator guide. The design concept behind this new AFC has been developed and verified. A full prototype system was constructed and tested on an existing accelerator guide at the rated x-ray output (500 cGy/min) of our radiotherapy system, with a pulse-repetition frequency of 300 Hz. The AFC acquired the resonance frequency of the accelerator guide within 0.15 s after beam-on, and provided stable tracking and adjustment of the frequency of the microwave source to the resonance frequency of the accelerator guide. With a planned improvement of the

  17. Development of an Accelerated Test Design for Predicting the Service Life of the Solar Array at Mead, Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, G. B.; Thomas, R. E.; Noel, G. T.; Shilliday, T. S.; Wood, V. E.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    An accelerated life test is described which was developed to predict the life of the 25 kW photovoltaic array installed near Mead, Nebraska. A quantitative model for accelerating testing using multiple environmental stresses was used to develop the test design. The model accounts for the effects of thermal stress by a relation of the Arrhenius form. This relation was then corrected for the effects of nonthermal environmental stresses, such as relative humidity, atmospheric pollutants, and ultraviolet radiation. The correction factors for the nonthermal stresses included temperature-dependent exponents to account for the effects of interactions between thermal and nonthermal stresses on the rate of degradation of power output. The test conditions, measurements, and data analyses for the accelerated tests are presented. Constant-temperature, cyclic-temperature, and UV types of tests are specified, incorporating selected levels of relative humidity and chemical contamination and an imposed forward-bias current and static electric field.

  18. Development and applications of a multi-purpose digital controller with a System-on-Chip FPGA for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurimoto, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Keigo

    2016-12-01

    J-PARC Main Ring (MR) is a high intensity proton synchrotron which accelerates protons from 3 GeV to 30 GeV. It has operated at a beam intensity of 390 kW and an upgrade toward the megawatt rating is scheduled. For higher beam intensity, some of the accelerator components require more intelligent and complicated functions. To consolidate such functions among various components, we developed multi-purpose digital boards using a System-on-Chip Field-Programmable Gated Array (SoC FPGA). In this paper, we describe the details of our developed boards as well as their possible applications. As an application of the boards, we have successfully performed the measurement of the betatron amplitude function during beam acceleration in J-PARC MR. The experimental setup and results of the measurement are also described in detail.

  19. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  20. A nuclear microscopy study of trace elements Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu in atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Rajendran, R.; Ren, M. Q.; Tan, B. K. H.; Halliwell, B.

    2006-08-01

    Quantitative mapping of trace elements Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be achieved in biological tissue using a nuclear microprobe. Presented here is a brief review of the work we have carried out in the last decade using the nuclear microscope to try and elucidate the role of trace elements Fe, Zn, Cu and Ca in induced atherosclerosis in New Zealand White rabbits fed on a 1% cholesterol diet. The lesions were studied using nuclear microscopy, incorporating a combination of ion beam techniques: particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). Iron is present in early lesions at concentrations around seven times higher than the artery wall. Measurements of localized lesion iron concentrations were observed to be highly correlated with the depth of the lesion in the artery wall for each individual animal, implying that local elevated concentrations may provide an accelerated process of atherosclerosis in specific regions of the artery. When the rabbits were kept mildly anaemic, thereby reducing iron levels in the lesion, the progression of the disease was significantly slowed. Iron chelation using desferal showed that early treatment (three weeks into the high fat diet) for relatively long periods (nine weeks) significantly retarded the progression of the disease. Zinc is depleted in the lesion and is also observed to be anti-correlated with local lesion development and feeding the rabbits on a high fat diet with zinc supplements inhibited lesion development, although since no significant increase in lesion zinc levels was measured, this anti-atherosclerotic effect may be indirect. Copper, measured at low levels (∼3 ppm) in the early lesion, is also depleted compared to the artery wall, suggesting that it is not a major factor in atherogenesis. Calcium is also depleted in early lesions, although at a later stage mineral deposition (hydroxyapatite) is observed to take place in the lesion

  1. A perspective for atherosclerosis vaccination: is there a place for plant-based vaccines?

    PubMed

    Salazar-González, Jorge Alberto; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2013-02-27

    Alternatives to pharmacological treatments for atherosclerosis are highly desirable in terms of cost and compliance. During the last two decades several vaccination strategies have been reported as an effort to develop immunotherapeutic treatments. This approach consists on eliciting immune responses able to modulate either the atherosclerosis-associated inflammatory processes or the activity of some physiological mechanisms that are up-regulated under this pathologic condition. In particular, the apolipoprotein B100 (ApoB100) and the cholesterilester transferase protein (CETP) have been targeted in these strategies. It is considered that recent progress in the development of experimental models of oral vaccines against atherosclerosis has opened a new avenue in the field: as plant-based vaccines are considered a viable platform for vaccine production and delivery at low costs, they could serve as an oral-delivered therapeutic approach for atherosclerosis in an economical and patient-friendly manner. The rationale of the design, development and evaluation of possible plant-based vaccines against atherosclerosis is discussed in this review. We identify within this approach a significant trend that will positively impact the field of atherosclerosis vaccination.

  2. The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility for education and advanced diagnostics development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Han, H. W.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Orozco, D.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Sio, H.; Sutcliffe, G.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Leeper, R.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility utilizes a 135-keV linear electrostatic ion accelerator, a D-T neutron source and two x-ray sources for development and characterization of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. The ion accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products through acceleration of D ions onto a 3He-doped Erbium-Deuteride target. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved, and fluence and energy of the fusion products have been accurately characterized. The D-T neutron source generates up to 6 × 108 neutrons/s. The two x-ray generators produce spectra with peak energies of 35 keV and 225 keV and maximum dose rates of 0.5 Gy/min and 12 Gy/min, respectively. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) and Magnetic PTOF CVD-diamond-based bang time detectors. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF WATER JET PLASMA MIRROR FOR STAGING OF LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Leemans, Wim; Nakamura, Kei; Shu, Anthony; Toth, Csaba

    2009-05-04

    Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs) is necessary in order to reach beam energies of 100 GeV and above. This requires incoupling of additional laser beams into accelerating stages. In order to maintain the high average accelerating gradient of a staged LPA, it is imperative to minimize the distance that is needed for laser incoupling. A plasma mirror is proposed as the final coupling optic reducing the coupling distance from tens of meters, using a conventional optic, to as small as a few cm. Both a planar water jet and a nitrocellulose foil are used as reflecting surfacesand characterized. A maximum reflectivity of 70percent was obtained using both surfaces.

  4. Understanding the Role of B cells in Atherosclerosis: Potential Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Morris-Rosenfeld, Samuel; Lipinski, Michael J.; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive inflammatory disease of the medium to large arteries that is the largest contributor to cardiovascular disease (CVD). B cell subsets have been shown in animal models of atherosclerosis to have both atherogenic and atheroprotective properties. In this review we highlight the research that developed our understanding of the role of B cells in atherosclerosis both in humans and mice. From this we discuss the potential clinical impact B cells could have both as diagnostic biomarkers and as targets for immunotherapy. Finally, we recognize the inherent difficulty in translating findings from animal models into humans given the differences in both cardivascular disease and the immune system between mice and humans, making the case for greater efforts at addressing the role of B cells in humans atherosclerosis. PMID:24308836

  5. Cytokines and Immune Responses in Murine Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Pascal J H; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the vessel wall characterized by activation of the innate immune system, with macrophages as the main players, as well as the adaptive immune system, characterized by a Th1-dominant immune response. Cytokines play a major role in the initiation and regulation of inflammation. In recent years, many studies have investigated the role of these molecules in experimental models of atherosclerosis. While some cytokines such as TNF or IFNγ clearly had atherogenic effects, others such as IL-10 were found to be atheroprotective. However, studies investigating the different cytokines in experimental atherosclerosis revealed that the cytokine system is complex with both disease stage-dependent and site-specific effects. In this review, we strive to provide an overview of the main cytokines involved in atherosclerosis and to shed light on their individual role during atherogenesis.

  6. Readapting the adaptive immune response - therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sage, Andrew P; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-01-04

    Cardiovascular diseases remain a major global health issue, with the development of atherosclerosis as a major underlying cause. Our treatment of cardiovascular disease has improved greatly over the past three decades, but much remains to be done reduce disease burden. Current priorities include reducing atherosclerosis advancement to clinically significant stages and preventing plaque rupture or erosion. Inflammation and involvement of the adaptive immune system influences all these aspects and therefore is one focus for future therapeutic development. The atherosclerotic vascular wall is now recognized to be invaded from both sides (arterial lumen and adventitia), for better or worse, by the adaptive immune system. Atherosclerosis is also affected at several stages by adaptive immune responses, overall providing many opportunities to target these responses and to reduce disease progression. Protective influences that may be defective in diseased individuals include humoral responses to modified LDL and regulatory T cell responses. There are many strategies in development to boost these pathways in humans, including vaccine-based therapies. The effects of various existing adaptive immune targeting therapies, such as blocking critical co-stimulatory pathways or B cell depletion, on cardiovascular disease are beginning to emerge with important consequences for both autoimmune disease patients and the potential for wider use of such therapies. Entering the translation phase for adaptive immune targeting therapies is an exciting and promising prospect.

  7. Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in developing skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Rianon, Nahid; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Munivez, Elda; Bertin, Terry; Dawson, Brian; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Lee, Brendan; Yang, Tao; Bae, Yangjin

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are a group of anti-hypertensive drugs that are widely used to treat pediatric hypertension. Recent application of ARBs to treat diseases such as Marfan syndrome or Alport syndrome has shown positive outcomes in animal and human studies, suggesting a broader therapeutic potential for this class of drugs. Multiple studies have reported a benefit of ARBs on adult bone homeostasis; however, its effect on the growing skeleton in children is unknown. We investigated the effect of Losartan, an ARB, in regulating bone mass and cartilage during development in mice. Wild type mice were treated with Losartan from birth until 6 weeks of age, after which bones were collected for microCT and histomorphometric analyses. Losartan increased trabecular bone volume vs. tissue volume (a 98% increase) and cortical thickness (a 9% increase) in 6-weeks old wild type mice. The bone changes were attributed to decreased osteoclastogenesis as demonstrated by reduced osteoclast number per bone surface in vivo and suppressed osteoclast differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in RAW cells was attenuated by Losartan. Similarly, RANKL-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was suppressed by Losartan, suggesting a convergence of RANKL and angiotensin signaling at the level of ERK1/2 regulation. To assess the effect of Losartan on cartilage development, we examined the cartilage phenotype of wild type mice treated with Losartan in utero from conception to 1 day of age. Growth plates of these mice showed an elongated hypertrophic chondrocyte zone and increased Col10a1 expression level, with minimal changes in chondrocyte proliferation. Altogether, inhibition of the angiotensin pathway by Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in growth plate during skeletal development. PMID:25779879

  8. Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in developing skeleton.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan; Grover, Monica; Sibai, Tarek; Black, Jennifer; Rianon, Nahid; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Munivez, Elda; Bertin, Terry; Dawson, Brian; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Lee, Brendan; Yang, Tao; Bae, Yangjin

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are a group of anti-hypertensive drugs that are widely used to treat pediatric hypertension. Recent application of ARBs to treat diseases such as Marfan syndrome or Alport syndrome has shown positive outcomes in animal and human studies, suggesting a broader therapeutic potential for this class of drugs. Multiple studies have reported a benefit of ARBs on adult bone homeostasis; however, its effect on the growing skeleton in children is unknown. We investigated the effect of Losartan, an ARB, in regulating bone mass and cartilage during development in mice. Wild type mice were treated with Losartan from birth until 6 weeks of age, after which bones were collected for microCT and histomorphometric analyses. Losartan increased trabecular bone volume vs. tissue volume (a 98% increase) and cortical thickness (a 9% increase) in 6-weeks old wild type mice. The bone changes were attributed to decreased osteoclastogenesis as demonstrated by reduced osteoclast number per bone surface in vivo and suppressed osteoclast differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in RAW cells was attenuated by Losartan. Similarly, RANKL-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was suppressed by Losartan, suggesting a convergence of RANKL and angiotensin signaling at the level of ERK1/2 regulation. To assess the effect of Losartan on cartilage development, we examined the cartilage phenotype of wild type mice treated with Losartan in utero from conception to 1 day of age. Growth plates of these mice showed an elongated hypertrophic chondrocyte zone and increased Col10a1 expression level, with minimal changes in chondrocyte proliferation. Altogether, inhibition of the angiotensin pathway by Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in growth plate during skeletal development.

  9. Development of TiN Coating System for Long Beam Ducts of Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kyo; Hisamatsu, Hiromi; Kanazawa, Ken-Ichi; Suetsugu, Yusuke; Shirai, Mitsuru

    A Titanium Nitride (TiN) coating system for long beam ducts of accelerators was developed to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) from the inner surface and to mitigate the electron cloud effect. Coating was carried out by DC magnetron sputtering of pure titanium in argon (2.0 Pa) and nitrogen (0.5 Pa) atmospheres. A copper beam duct with a maximum length of 3.6 m was set vertically, and a titanium rod as a cathode was suspended from the top along the central axis of the duct. A movable solenoid coil with a length of 0.8 m externally supplied a magnetic field of 16 mT to accommodate the long duct. By moving the solenoid coil at specified time intervals, the TiN film was uniformly coated on the inner surface. The thickness of the coating was 200 nm, and the temperature of the ducts during the coating was 130°C. Several coated ducts were installed into the KEKB positron ring during the summer shutdown in 2007. In the subsequent beam operation, the reduction of electrons in the coated duct was confirmed.

  10. Anticancer properties of nimbolide and pharmacokinetic considerations to accelerate its development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingzhi; Phan, Do Dang Khoa; Zhang, Jingwen; Ong, Pei-Shi; Thuya, Win Lwin; Soo, Ross; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Yong, Wei Peng; Lee, Soo Chin; Ho, Paul Chi-Lui; Sethi, Gautam; Goh, Boon Cher

    2016-01-01

    Nimbolide is one of the main components in the leaf extract of Azadirachta indica (A. indica). Accumulating evidence from various in vitro and in vivo studies indicates that nimbolide possesses potent anticancer activity against several types of cancer and also shows potential chemopreventive activity in animal models. The main mechanisms of action of nimbolide include anti-proliferation, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of metastasis and angiogenesis, and modulation of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes. Although multiple pharmacodynamic (PD) studies have been carried out, nimbolide is still at the infant stage in the drug development pipeline due to the lack of systematic pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and long-term toxicological studies. Preclinical PK and toxicological studies are vital in determining the dosage range to support the safety of nimbolide for first-in-human clinical trials. In this review, we will provide a comprehensive summary for the current status of nimbolide as an anticancer and chemopreventive lead compound, and highlight the importance of systematic preclinical PK and toxicological studies in accelerating the process of application of nimbolide as a therapeutic agent against various malignancies. PMID:27027349

  11. Development of a 15 T Nb3Sn accelerator dipole demonstrator at Fermilab

    DOE PAGES

    Novitski, I.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Here, a 100 TeV scale Hadron Collider (HC) with a nominal operation field of at least 15 T is being considered for the post-LHC era, which requires using the Nb3Sn technology. Practical demonstration of this field level in an accelerator-quality magnet and substantial reduction of the magnet costs are the key conditions for realization of such a machine. FNAL has started the development of a 15 T Nb3Sn dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale HC. The magnet design is based on 4-layer shell type coils, graded between the inner and outer layers to maximize the performance and reduce themore » cost. The experience gained during the Nb3Sn magnet R&D is applied to different aspects of the magnet design. This paper describes the magnetic and structural designs and parameters of the 15 T Nb3Sn dipole and the steps towards the demonstration model fabrication.« less

  12. New developments of 11C post-accelerated beams for hadron therapy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, R. S.; Mendonca, T. M.; Wenander, F.; Penescu, L.; Orecchia, R.; Parodi, K.; Ferrari, A.; Stora, T.

    2016-06-01

    Hadron therapy was first proposed in 1946 and is by now widespread throughout the world, as witnessed with the design and construction of the CNAO, HIT, PROSCAN and MedAustron treatment centres, among others. The clinical interest in hadron therapy lies in the fact that it delivers precision treatment of tumours, exploiting the characteristic shape (the Bragg peak) of the energy deposition in the tissues for charged hadrons. In particular, carbon ion therapy is found to be biologically more effective, with respect to protons, on certain types of tumours. Following an approach tested at NIRS in Japan [1], carbon ion therapy treatments based on 12C could be combined or fully replaced with 11C PET radioactive ions post-accelerated to the same energy. This approach allows providing a beam for treatment and, at the same time, to collect information on the 3D distributions of the implanted ions by PET imaging. The production of 11C ion beams can be performed using two methods. A first one is based on the production using compact PET cyclotrons with 10-20 MeV protons via 14N(p,α)11C reactions following an approach developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [2]. A second route exploits spallation reactions 19F(p,X)11C and 23Na(p,X)11C on a molten fluoride salt target using the ISOL (isotope separation on-line) technique [3]. This approach can be seriously envisaged at CERN-ISOLDE following recent progresses made on 11C+ production [4] and proven post-acceleration of pure 10C3/6+ beams in the REX-ISOLDE linac [5]. Part of the required components is operational in radioactive ion beam facilities or commercial medical PET cyclotrons. The driver could be a 70 MeV, 1.2 mA proton commercial cyclotron, which would lead to 8.1 × 10711C6+ per spill. This intensity is appropriate using 11C ions alone for both imaging and treatment. Here we report on the ongoing feasibility studies of such approach, using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA [6,7] to simulate

  13. Developments in accelerators and instrumentation relevant to imaging with charged particles and positron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1980-11-01

    In past years particle accelerators have become increasingly important tools for the advancement of medical science. From the pace of advancing technology and current directions in medical research, it is clear that this relationship between accelerators and medicine will only grow stronger in future years. In view of this importance, this relationship is investigated in some detail, with an eye not so much towards the medical uses of the beams produced, but more towards the technology associated with these accelerators and the criteria which make for successful incorporation of these machines into the clinical environment. In order to lay the necessary groundwork, the different kinds of accelerators found in medical use today are reviewed briefly discussing salient points of each.

  14. Report of the Subpanel on Accelerator Research and Development of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Accelerator R and D in the US High Energy Physics (HEP) program is reviewed. As a result of this study, some shift in priority, particularly as regards long-range accelerator R and D, is suggested to best serve the future needs of the US HEP program. Some specific new directions for the US R and D effort are set forth. 18 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

  15. Development of a second generation stereotactic apparatus for linear accelerator radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Colombo, F; Casentini, L; Pozza, F; Chierego, G; Marchetti, C

    1991-01-01

    Linear accelerator radiosurgery technique is based on a multiple intersecting arc irradiations procedure. The coincidence of the axis of two rotation movements (of gantry and treatment couch) into the isocenter is critical for focusing irradiation. In October 1989, our linear accelerator was changed and the stereotactic apparatus had to be adapted to the new machine. After multiple mechanical tests of the new machine, the stereotactic head frame was fixed to the roller bearing allowing rotation of the couch. The new apparatus is described.

  16. Accelerator Development for the NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Free Electron Laser Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    34triple point" junction of the vacuum , ceramic insulator , and metal electrode. This leads to the flashover of the insulator , causing an arc which acts as...tungsten wire (25.4 um) into the transport vacuum system. The diode is housed in an Astron ceramic insulator stack. The voltage profile across the diode...accelerator vacuum wall. It is across these insulating breaks that the accelerating voltage is applied to the electron beam and any breakdown in these gaps

  17. Increased Cardiovascular Events and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: 1 Year Prospective Single Centre Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruscitti, Piero; Cipriani, Paola; Masedu, Francesco; Romano, Silvio; Berardicurti, Onorina; Liakouli, Vasiliki; Carubbi, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Paola; Alvaro, Saverio; Penco, Maria; Valenti, Marco; Giacomelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Several studies showed the close relationship between Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and cerebro-cardiovascular events (CVEs) and subclinical atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis during the course of RA and we evaluated the possible role of both traditional cardiovascular (CV) and disease related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and the onset of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods We designed a single centre, bias-adjusted, prospective, observational study to investigate, in a homogeneous subset of RA patients, the occurrence of new onset of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the role of traditional CV and disease-related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Results We enrolled 347 RA patients prospectively followed for 12 months. An increased percentage of patients experienced CVEs, developed subclinical atherosclerosis and was affected by systemic arterial hypertension (SAH), type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS), at the end of follow up. Our analysis showed that the insurgence of both SAH and MS, during the follow up, the older age, the CVE familiarity and the lack of clinical response, were associated with a significantly increased risk to experience CVEs and to develop subclinical atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our study quantifies the increased expected risk for CVEs in a cohort of RA patients prospectively followed for 1 year. The occurrence of both new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients may be explained by inflammatory burden as well as traditional CV risk factors. PMID:28103312

  18. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yujun; Li, Jian-Dong; Yan, Chen

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  19. Development and Use of Mark Sense Record Cards for Recording Medical Data on Pilots Subjected to Acceleration Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedal, Harald A.; Havill, C. Dewey

    1962-01-01

    A TIME-HONORED system of recording medical histories and the data obtained on physical and laboratory examination has been that of writing the information on record sheets that go into a folder for each patient. In order to have information which would be more readily retrieved, 'a program was initiated in 1952 by the U. S. Naval School of Aviation Medicine in connection with their "Care of the Flyer" study to place this information on machine record cards. In 1958, a machine record card method was developed for recording medical data in connection with the astronaut selection program. Machine record cards were also developed by the Aero Medical Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, and the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory, Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania, for use in connection with a variety of tests including acceleration stress.1 Therefore, a variety of systems resulted in which data of a medical nature could easily be recalled. During the NASA, Ames Research Center centrifuge studies/'S the pilot subjects were interviewed after each centrifuge run, or series of runs, and subjective information was recorded in a log book by the usual history taking methods referred to above. After the methods Were reviewed, it' was recognized that a card system would be very useful in recording data from our pilots after they had been exposed to acceleration stress. Since the acceleration stress cards already developed did not meet our requirements, it was decided a different card was needed.

  20. Lysophospholipids and their G protein-coupled receptors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Feng; Li, Rong-Shan; Samuel, Sonia B; Cueto, Ramon; Li, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are bioactive lipid-derived signaling molecules generated by the enzymatic and chemical processes of regiospecific phospholipases on substrates such as membrane phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs). They play a major role as extracellular mediators by activating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and stimulating diverse cellular responses from their signaling pathways. LPLs are involved in various pathologies of the vasculature system including coronary heart disease and hypertension. Many studies suggest the importance of LPLs in their association with the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic and severe vascular disease. This paper focuses on the pathophysiological effects of different lysophospholipids on atherosclerosis, which may promote the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction and strokes. Their atherogenic biological activities take place in vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, monocytes and macrophages, dendritic cells, T-lymphocytes, platelets, etc.

  1. Lysophospholipids and their G protein-coupled receptors in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-Feng; Li, Rong-Shan; Samuel, Sonia B.; Cueto, Ramon; Li, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are bioactive lipid-derived signaling molecules generated by the enzymatic and chemical processes of regiospecific phospholipases on substrates such as membrane phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs). They play a major role as extracellular mediators by activating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and stimulating diverse cellular responses from their signaling pathways. LPLs are involved in various pathologies of the vasculature system including coronary heart disease and hypertension. Many studies suggest the importance of LPLs in their association with the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic and severe vascular disease. This paper focuses on the pathophysiological effects of different lysophospholipids on atherosclerosis, which may promote the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction and strokes. Their atherogenic biological activities take place in vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, monocytes and macrophages, dendritic cells, T-lymphocytes, platelets, etc. PMID:26594106

  2. Increased ABCA1 activity protects against atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Singaraja, Roshni R; Fievet, Catherine; Castro, Graciela; James, Erick R; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Clee, Susanne M; Bissada, Nagat; Choy, Jonathan C; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; McManus, Bruce M; Staels, Bart; Hayden, Michael R

    2002-07-01

    The ABC transporter ABCA1 plays a key role in the first steps of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway by mediating lipid efflux from macrophages. Previously, it was demonstrated that human ABCA1 overexpression in vivo in transgenic mice results in a mild elevation of plasma HDL levels and increased efflux of cholesterol from macrophages. In this study, we determined the effect of overexpression of ABCA1 on atherosclerosis development. Human ABCA1 transgenic mice (BAC(+)) were crossed with ApoE(-/-) mice, a strain that spontaneously develop atherosclerotic lesions. BAC(+)ApoE(-/-) mice developed dramatically smaller, less-complex lesions as compared with their ApoE(-/-) counterparts. In addition, there was increased efflux of cholesterol from macrophages isolated from the BAC(+)ApoE(-/-) mice. Although the increase in plasma HDL cholesterol levels was small, HDL particles from BAC(+)ApoE(-/-) mice were significantly better acceptors of cholesterol. Lipid analysis of HDL particles from BAC(+)ApoE(-/-) mice revealed an increase in phospholipid levels, which was correlated significantly with their ability to enhance cholesterol efflux.

  3. Development of design technique for vacuum insulation in large size multi-aperture multi-grid accelerator for nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, A. Hanada, M.; Tobari, H.; Nishikiori, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yamano, Y.; Grisham, L. R.

    2016-02-15

    Design techniques for the vacuum insulation have been developed in order to realize a reliable voltage holding capability of multi-aperture multi-grid (MAMuG) accelerators for fusion application. In this method, the nested multi-stage configuration of the MAMuG accelerator can be uniquely designed to satisfy the target voltage within given boundary conditions. The evaluation of the voltage holding capabilities of each acceleration stages was based on the previous experimental results about the area effect and the multi-aperture effect. Since the multi-grid effect was found to be the extension of the area effect by the total facing area this time, the total voltage holding capability of the multi-stage can be estimated from that per single stage by assuming the stage with the highest electric field, the total facing area, and the total apertures. By applying these consideration, the analysis on the 3-stage MAMuG accelerator for JT-60SA agreed well with the past gap-scan experiments with an accuracy of less than 10% variation, which demonstrated the high reliability to design MAMuG accelerators and also multi-stage high voltage bushings.

  4. Development of design technique for vacuum insulation in large size multi-aperture multi-grid accelerator for nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Hanada, M; Tobari, H; Nishikiori, R; Hiratsuka, J; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Yoshida, M; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2016-02-01

    Design techniques for the vacuum insulation have been developed in order to realize a reliable voltage holding capability of multi-aperture multi-grid (MAMuG) accelerators for fusion application. In this method, the nested multi-stage configuration of the MAMuG accelerator can be uniquely designed to satisfy the target voltage within given boundary conditions. The evaluation of the voltage holding capabilities of each acceleration stages was based on the previous experimental results about the area effect and the multi-aperture effect. Since the multi-grid effect was found to be the extension of the area effect by the total facing area this time, the total voltage holding capability of the multi-stage can be estimated from that per single stage by assuming the stage with the highest electric field, the total facing area, and the total apertures. By applying these consideration, the analysis on the 3-stage MAMuG accelerator for JT-60SA agreed well with the past gap-scan experiments with an accuracy of less than 10% variation, which demonstrated the high reliability to design MAMuG accelerators and also multi-stage high voltage bushings.

  5. Ghrelin accelerates synapse formation and activity development in cultured cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While ghrelin was initially related to appetite stimulation and growth hormone secretion, it also has a neuroprotective effect in neurodegenerative diseases and regulates cognitive function. The cellular basis of those processes is related to synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Previous studies have shown that ghrelin not only stimulates synapse formation in cultured cortical neurons and hippocampal slices, but also alters some of the electrophysiological properties of neurons in the hypothalamus, amygdala and other subcortical areas. However, direct evidence for ghrelin’s ability to modulate the activity in cortical neurons is not available yet. In this study, we investigated the effect of acylated ghrelin on the development of the activity level and activity patterns in cortical neurons, in relation to its effect on synaptogenesis. Additionally, we quantitatively evaluated the expression of the receptor for acylated ghrelin – growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a (GHSR-1a) during development. Results We performed electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry on dissociated cortical cultures from neonates, treated chronically with acylated ghrelin. On average 76 ± 4.6% of the cortical neurons expressed GHSR-1a. Synapse density was found to be much higher in ghrelin treated cultures than in controls across all age groups (1, 2 or 3 weeks). In all cultures (control and ghrelin treated), network activity gradually increased until it reached a maximum after approximately 3 weeks, followed by a slight decrease towards a plateau. During early developmental stages (1–2 weeks), the activity was much higher in ghrelin treated cultures and consequently, they reached the plateau value almost a week earlier than controls. Conclusions Acylated ghrelin leads to earlier network formation and activation in cultured cortical neuronal networks, the latter being a possibly consequence of accelerated synaptogenesis. PMID:24742241

  6. a Development of Accelerated Life Test Method for Blower Motor for Automobile Using Inverse Power Law Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Wae-Gyeong; Lee, Soo-Hong

    Reliability of automotive parts has been one of the most interesting fields in the automotive industry. Especially small DC motor was issued because of the increasing adoption for passengers' safety and convenience. This study was performed to develop the accelerated life test method using Inverse power law model for small DC motors. The failure mode of small DC motor includes brush wear-out. Inverse power law model is applied effectively the electronic components to reduce the testing time and to achieve the accelerating test conditions. Accelerated life testing method was induced to bring on the brush wear-out as increasing voltage of motor. Life distribution of the small DC motor was supposed to follow Weibull distribution and life test time was calculated under the conditions of B10 life and 90% confidence level.

  7. Eating the Dead to Keep Atherosclerosis at Bay

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Megan L.; Dong, Yunzhou; Wu, Hao; Rahman, H. N. Ashiqur; Song, Kai; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Despite effective lipid-lowering therapies and prevention programs, atherosclerosis is still the leading cause of mortality in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of CHD in developing countries worldwide is rapidly increasing at a rate expected to overtake those of cancer and diabetes. Prominent risk factors include the hardening of arteries and high levels of cholesterol, which lead to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. However, cell death and efferocytosis are critical components of both atherosclerotic plaque progression and regression, yet, few currently available therapies focus on these processes. Thus, understanding the causes of cell death within the atherosclerotic plaque, the consequences of cell death, and the mechanisms of apoptotic cell clearance may enable the development of new therapies to treat cardiovascular disease. Here, we review how endoplasmic reticulum stress and cholesterol metabolism lead to cell death and inflammation, how dying cells affect plaque progression, and how autophagy and the clearance of dead cells ameliorates the inflammatory environment of the plaque. In addition, we review current research aimed at alleviating these processes and specifically targeting therapeutics to the site of the plaque. PMID:28194400

  8. Molecular Imaging of Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Swirski, Filip K.; Zernecke, Alma

    2013-01-01

    Acute rupture of vulnerable plaques frequently leads to myocardial infarction and stroke. Within the last decades, several cellular and molecular players have been identified that promote atherosclerotic lesion formation, maturation and plaque rupture. It is now widely recognized that inflammation of the vessel wall and distinct leukocyte subsets are involved throughout all phases of atherosclerotic lesion development. The mechanisms that render a stable plaque unstable and prone to rupture, however, remain unknown and the identification of the vulnerable plaque remains a major challenge in cardiovascular medicine. Imaging technologies used in the clinic offer minimal information about the underlying biology and potential risk for rupture. New imaging technologies are therefore being developed, and in the preclinical setting have enabled new and dynamic insights into the vessel wall for a better understanding of this complex disease. Molecular imaging has the potential to track biological processes, such as the activity of cellular and molecular biomarkers in vivo and over time. Similarly, novel imaging technologies specifically detect effects of therapies that aim to stabilize vulnerable plaques and silence vascular inflammation. Here we will review the potential of established and new molecular imaging technologies in the setting of atherosclerosis, and discuss the cumbersome steps required for translating molecular imaging approaches into the clinic. PMID:24312156

  9. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces atherosclerosis by NF-κB-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Song, D; Fang, G; Mao, S-Z; Ye, X; Liu, G; Gong, Y; Liu, S F

    2012-11-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) causes atherosclerosis in mice fed a high cholesterol diet (HCD). The mechanisms by which CIH promotes atherosclerosis are incompletely understood. This study defined the mechanistic role of NF-κB pathway in CIH+HCD induced atherosclerosis. Wild type (WT) and mice deficient in the p50 subunit of NF-κB (p50-KO) were fed normal chow diet (ND) or HCD, and exposed to sham or CIH. Atherosclerotic lesions on the en face aortic preparation and cross-sections of aortic root were examined. In WT mice, neither CIH nor HCD exposure alone caused, but CIH+HCD caused evident atherosclerotic lesions on both preparations after 20weeks of exposure. WT mice on ND and exposed to CIH for 35.6weeks did not develop atherosclerotic lesions. P50 gene deletion diminished CIH+HCD induced NF-κB activation and abolished CIH+HCD induced atherosclerosis. P50 gene deletion inhibited vascular wall inflammation, reduced hepatic TNF-α level, attenuated the elevation in serum cholesterol level and diminished macrophage foam cell formation induced by CIH+HCD exposure. These results demonstrate that inhibition of NF-κB activation abrogates the activation of three major atherogenic mechanisms associated with an abolition of CIH+HCD induced atherosclerosis. NF-κB may be a central common pathway through which CIH+HCD exposure activates multiple atherogenic mechanisms, leading to atherosclerosis.

  10. Integrative analysis of ocular complications in atherosclerosis unveils pathway convergence and crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Akanksha; Mohanty, Pallavi; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2015-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a life-threatening disease and a major cause of mortalities worldwide. While many of the atherosclerotic sequelae are reflected as microvascular effects in the eye, the molecular mechanisms of their development is not yet known. In this study, we employed a systems biology approach to unveil the most significant events and key molecular mediators of ophthalmic sequelae caused by atherosclerosis. Literature mining was used to identify the proteins involved in both atherosclerosis and ophthalmic diseases. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was prepared using the literature-mined seed nodes. Network topological analysis was carried out using Cytoscape, while network nodes were annotated using database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery in order to identify the most enriched pathways and processes. Network analysis revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) and protein kinase C occur with highest betweenness centrality, degree and closeness centrality, thus reflecting their functional importance to the network. Our analysis shows that atherosclerosis-associated ophthalmic complications are caused by the convergence of neurotrophin signaling pathways, multiple immune response pathways and focal adhesion pathway on the MAPK signaling pathway. The PPI network shares features with vasoregression, a process underlying multiple vascular eye diseases. Our study presents a first clear and composite picture of the components and crosstalk of the main pathways of atherosclerosis-induced ocular diseases. The hub bottleneck nodes highlight the presence of molecules important for mediating the ophthalmic complications of atherosclerosis and contain five established drug targets for future therapeutic modulation efforts.