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Sample records for accelerated cavitation damage

  1. Mechanisms of thrombolysis acceleration by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Selvaraj, Prashanth; Ahadi, Golnaz; Voie, Arne; Hoelscher, Thilo; Okita, Kohei; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Szeri, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies, in vitro and in vivo, have shown that High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) accelerates thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, for ischemic stroke. Although the mechanisms are not fully understood, cavitation is thought to play an important role in sonothrombolysis. The damage to a blood clot's fibrin fiber network from cavitation in a HIFU field is studied using two independent approaches for an embedded bubble. One method is extended to the more important scenario of a bubble outside a blood clot that collapses asymmetrically creating a jet towards the clot. There is significantly more damage potential from a bubble undergoing cavitation collapse outside the clot compared to a rapidly expanding bubble embedded within the clot structure. Also, the effects of the physical properties of skull bone when a HIFU wave propagates through it are examined by use of computer simulation. The dynamics of a test bubble placed at the focus is used in understanding of the pressure field. All other things being equal, the analysis suggests that skull thickness can alter the wave at the focus, which in turn can change the nature of cavitation bubble dynamics and the amount of energy available for clot damage. Now at MSOE.

  2. A study of pump cavitation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-11-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  3. Cavitation damage in blood clots under HIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Ahadi, Golnaz; Hoelscher, Thilo; Szeri, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to accelerate thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, in vitro and in vivo, for treatment of ischemic stroke. Cavitation in sonothrombolysis is thought to play an important role, although the mechanisms are not fully understood. The damage to a blood clot associated with bubble collapses in a HIFU field is studied. The region of damage caused by a bubble collapse on the fibrin network of the blood clot exposed to HIFU is estimated, and compared with experimental assessment of the damage. The mechanical damage to the network caused by a bubble is probed using two independent approaches, a strain based method and an energy based method. Immunoflourescent fibrin staining is used to assess the region of damage experimentally.

  4. Cavitation damage prediction for the JSNS mercury target vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Wakui, Takashi; Haga, Katsuhiro; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Takada, Hiroshi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    The liquid mercury target system for the Japan Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS) at the Materials and Life science experimental Facility (MLF) in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is designed to produce pulsed neutrons. The mercury target vessel in this system, which is made of type 316L stainless steel, is damaged by pressure wave-induced cavitation due to proton beam bombardment. Currently, cavitation damage is considered to be the dominant factor influencing the service life of the target vessel rather than radiation damage. In this study, cavitation damage to the interior surface of the target vessel was predicted on the basis of accumulated damage data from off-beam and on-beam experiments. The predicted damage was compared with the damage observed in a used target vessel. Furthermore, the effect of injecting gas microbubbles on cavitation damage was predicted through the measurement of the acoustic vibration of the target vessel. It was shown that the predicted depth of cavitation damage is reasonably coincident with the observed results. Moreover, it was confirmed that the injection of gas microbubbles had an effect on cavitation damage.

  5. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Alternative approach for cavitation damage study utilizing repetitive laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation is a common phenomenon in fluid systems that can lead to dramatic degradation of solid materials surface in contact with the cavitating media. Study of cavitation damage has great significance in many engineering fields. Current techniques for cavitation damage study either require large scale equipments or tend to introduce damages from other mechanisms. In this project, we utilized the cavitation phenomenon induced by laser optical breakdown and developed a prototype apparatus for cavitation damage study. In our approach, cavitation was generated by the repetitive pressure waves induced by high-power laser pulses. As proof of principal study, stainless steel and aluminum samples were tested using the novel apparatus. Surface characterization via scanning electron microscopy revealed damages such as indentation and surface pitting, which were similar to those reported in literature using other state-of-the-art techniques. These preliminary results demonstrated the new device was capable of generating cavitation damages and could be used as an alternative method for cavitation damage study.

  7. A continuum damage relation for hydrogen attack cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, M.W.D. van der; Giessen, E. van der

    1997-07-01

    A continuum damage relation (CDR) is proposed to describe the failure process of hydrogen attack, i.e., grain boundary cavitation of steels under conditions of high temperature and high hydrogen pressure. The cavitation is caused by the chemical reaction of hydrogen with grain boundary carbides forming cavities filled with high pressure methane. The micromechanisms described are the grain boundary cavitation and the dislocation creep of the grains. The CDR is based on two extreme cavitation rate distribution modes. In the first mode, the cavitation rate along the facets is uniform, resulting in a hydrostatic dilatation while the creep deformations remain relatively small. In the second mode, cavitation proceeds predominantly on grain boundary facets transverse to the principal macroscopic stress. This part of the CDR builds on Tvergaard`s constitutive relation for intergranular creep rupture [Tvergaard, V., Acta Metallurgica, 1984, 32, 1977] where the facet cavitation is constrained by creep of the surrounding grains. The mode corresponding to the highest cavitation rate is the active mode. The two-dimensional version of the CDR is verified against detailed finite element analyses of hydrogen attack in planar polycrystalline aggregates. Finally, the generalization to a three-dimensional CDR is discussed.

  8. Microscopic investigation of cavitation erosion damage in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackworh, J. V.; Adler, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The results of research to identify the cavitation erosion damage mechanisms at the microscopic level for three metals (aluminum, stainless steel, and titanium) representing a range of properties and microstructure are presented. The metals were exposed to cavitation generated in distilled water by a 20-kHz ultrasonic facility operating at a vibration amplitude of 2 mils. Representative properties of the metals and experimental details are summarized. Replicas of the eroded surfaces of the specimens obtained periodically during exposure were examined with a transmission electron microscope to follow progression of the erosion damage and identify dominant erosion mechanisms as a function of exposure time. Eroded surfaces of selected specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope to assist in the interpretation.

  9. Development of a Pulsed Pressure-Based Technique for Cavitation Damage Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Liu, Yun; Wang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in many fluid systems and can lead to severe material damage. To assist the study of cavitation damage, a novel testing method utilizing pulsed pressure was developed. In this talk, the scientific background and the technical approach of this development are present and preliminary testing results are discussed. It is expected that this technique can be used to evaluate cavitation damage under various testing conditions including harsh environments such as those relevant to geothermal power generation.

  10. A study of pump cavitation damage. [space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  11. Measurement of Electro-Optic Shock and Electron Acceleration in a Strongly Cavitated Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Helle, M. H.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D. F.; Ting, A.

    2010-09-03

    Conically emitted second harmonic radiation was observed when a relativistically intense, ultrashort laser pulse was focused into a jet of gas. This second harmonic electro-optic shock is the result of frequency mixing within the sheath of electrons surrounding a highly cavitated plasma region created by the ponderomotive force of the laser. Strong correlation between the second harmonic characteristics and electron acceleration has been observed.

  12. Measurement of electro-optic shock and electron acceleration in a strongly cavitated laser wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D; Gordon, D F; Ting, A

    2010-09-01

    Conically emitted second harmonic radiation was observed when a relativistically intense, ultrashort laser pulse was focused into a jet of gas. This second harmonic electro-optic shock is the result of frequency mixing within the sheath of electrons surrounding a highly cavitated plasma region created by the ponderomotive force of the laser. Strong correlation between the second harmonic characteristics and electron acceleration has been observed. PMID:20867524

  13. A Tissue Phantom for Evaluation of Mechanical Damage Caused by Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Adam; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alex; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a phantom which acts as an indicator of mechanical tissue damage caused by cavitation in therapeutic ultrasound such as histotripsy. The phantom is an optically-transparent gel, allowing real-time visualization of cavitation. Lesions are visible as a change in transparency, giving immediate feedback of the damage. The phantom was formed in 3 layers of agarose gel, with the center layer containing 5% porcine red blood cells. It was found that the acoustic and mechanical properties are similar to tissue. To compare lesions induced in the phantom and tissue, phantoms and ex-vivo kidney were treated using a focused 1-MHz transducer applying 15 cycle pulses at a rate of 100 Hz and peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Cavitation caused lysis of red blood cells, which changed the affected area from translucent red to transparent. Lesion morphology of the phantom was similar to tissue, with no cellular structures remaining inside the lesion and sharp boundaries between the transparent and translucent zones. Lesions in the phantom produced a hypoechoic appearance in the phantom on a B-Mode ultrasound image, as previously observed with histotripsy lesions generated in tissue. High-speed imaging was used to correlate cavitation activity with the formation of lesions spatially. During ultrasound exposure, cavitation clouds were observed in the phantom by high-speed optical imaging. Lesions in the gel only formed when and where cavitation was observed. The tissue phantom allows immediate visualization of cavitation and cavitational tissue damage providing a useful research tool for cavitational ultrasound therapy studies such as testing acoustic parameters or scanning algorithms.

  14. Effect of Tensile Stress on Cavitation Erosion and Damage of Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, M.; Inaba, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kishimoto, K.; Hayabusa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation erosion tests for epoxy, unsaturated polyester, polycarbonate, and acrylic resin were conducted under various tensile stress conditions (Tensile-Cavitation test). A new testing device was designed to conduct the Tensile-Cavitation test and observe specimen surface during the experiment based on ASTM G32. When tensile stress of 1.31 MPa was loaded on epoxy resin, cracks occurred on the specimen after 0.5 hours during cavitation erosion. When no tensile stress was loaded on the epoxy resin, the damage was general cavitation erosion only. As well as the epoxy resin, unsaturated polyester resin applied tensile stress of 1.31 MPa and polycarbonate resin of 6.54 MPa indicated erosion damages and cracks. When tensile stress of 6.54 MPa was loaded on acrylic resin, the erosion damage was almost the same as the results without tensile stress. We confirmed that anti-cavitation property of epoxy resin was higher than those of acrylic and polycarbonate without tensile stress while the damage of epoxy resin was much serious than that of acrylic resins under tensile stress loadings.

  15. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in-vitro and predict in-vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom’s response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue, at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-Mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High speed imaging of the optically-transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation. PMID:21030142

  16. Investigation of cavitation as a possible damage mechanism in blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goeller, Jacques; Wardlaw, Andrew; Treichler, Derrick; O'Bruba, Joseph; Weiss, Greg

    2012-07-01

    Cavitation was investigated as a possible damage mechanism for war-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to an improvised explosive device (IED) blast. When a frontal blast wave encounters the head, a shock wave is transmitted through the skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tissue, causing negative pressure at the contrecoup that may result in cavitation. Numerical simulations and shock tube experiments were conducted to determine the possibility of cranial cavitation from realistic IED non-impact blast loading. Simplified surrogate models of the head consisted of a transparent polycarbonate ellipsoid. The first series of tests in the 18-inch-diameter shock tube were conducted on an ellipsoid filled with degassed water to simulate CSF and tissue. In the second series, Sylgard gel, surrounded by a layer of degassed water, was used to represent the tissue and CSF, respectively. Simulated blast overpressure in the shock tube tests ranged from a nominal 10-25 pounds per square inch gauge (psig; 69-170 kPa). Pressure in the simulated CSF was determined by Kulite thin line pressure sensors at the coup, center, and contrecoup positions. Using video taken at 10,000 frames/sec, we verified the presence of cavitation bubbles at the contrecoup in both ellipsoid models. In all tests, cavitation at the contrecoup was observed to coincide temporally with periods of negative pressure. Collapse of the cavitation bubbles caused by the surrounding pressure and elastic rebound of the skull resulted in significant pressure spikes in the simulated CSF. Numerical simulations using the DYSMAS hydrocode to predict onset of cavitation and pressure spikes during cavity collapse were in good agreement with the tests. The numerical simulations and experiments indicate that skull deformation is a significant factor causing cavitation. These results suggest that cavitation may be a damage mechanism contributing to TBI that requires future study. PMID:22489674

  17. Cavitation damage prediction for spallation target vessels by assessment of acoustic vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Ikeda, Dr. Yujiro; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Haines, John R; Bauer, Guenter; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Okita, Dr. Kohei; Fujiwara, Dr. Akiko; Matsumoto, Dr. Yoichiro; Tanaka, Dr. Nobuatsu

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed around the world. Proton beams are used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. In order to estimate the cavitation erosion, i.e. the pitting damage formed by the collapse of cavitation bubbles, off-beam tests were performed by using an electric magnetic impact testing machine (MIMTM), which can impose equivalent pressure pulses in mercury. The damage potential was defined based on the relationship between the pitting damage and the time-integrated acoustic vibration induced by impact due to the bubble collapses. Additionally, the damage potential was measured in on-beam tests carried out by using the proton beam at WNR (Weapons Neutron Research) facility in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In this paper, the concept of the damage potential, the relationship between the pitting damage formation and the damage potential both in off-beam and on-beam tests is shown.

  18. SIMULATION AND MOCKUP OF SNS JET-FLOW TARGET WITH WALL JET FOR CAVITATION DAMAGE MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Felde, David K

    2014-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory induce cavitation damage on the stainless steel target container. The cavitation damage is thought to limit the lifetime of the target for power levels at and above 1 MW. Severe through-wall cavitation damage on an internal wall near the beam entrance window has been observed in spent-targets. Surprisingly though, there is very little damage on the walls that bound an annular mercury channel that wraps around the front and outside of the target. The mercury flow through this channel is characterized by smooth, attached streamlines. One theory to explain this lack of damage is that the uni-directional flow biases the direction of the collapsing cavitation bubble, reducing the impact pressure and subsequent damage. The theory has been reinforced by in-beam separate effects data. For this reason, a second-generation SNS mercury target has been designed with an internal wall jet configuration intended to protect the concave wall where damage has been observed. The wall jet mimics the annular flow channel streamlines, but since the jet is bounded on only one side, the momentum is gradually diffused by the bulk flow interactions as it progresses around the cicular path of the target nose. Numerical simulations of the flow through this jet-flow target have been completed, and a water loop has been assembled with a transparent test target in order to visualize and measure the flow field. This paper presents the wall jet simulation results, as well as early experimental data from the test loop.

  19. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  20. Cavitation Damage Experiments for Mercury Spallation Targets At the LANSCE WNR in 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K

    2010-01-01

    Proton beam experiments investigating cavitation damage in short pulse mercury spallation targets were performed at LANSCE WNR in July of 2008. They included two main areas for investigation: damage dependence on mercury velocity using geometry more prototypic to the SNS target than previously employed and damage dependence on incident proton beam flux intensity. The flow dependence experiment employed six test targets with mercury velocity in the channel ranging from 0 to more than 4 m/s. Each was hit with 100 WNR beam pulses with peak proton flux equivalent to that of SNS operating at 2.7 MW. Damage dependence on incident proton beam flux intensity was also investigated with three intensity levels used on simple rectangular shaped targets without mercury flow. Intensity variation was imposed by focusing the beam differently while maintaining protons per pulse. This kept total energy deposited in each target constant. A fourth test target was hit with various beams: constant protons and varied spot size; constant spot size and varied protons. No damage will be assessed in this case. Instead, acoustic emissions associated with cavitation collapse were measured by laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) from readings of exterior vessel motions as well as by mercury wetted acoustic transducers. This paper will provide a description of the experiment and present available results. Damage assessment will require several months before surface analysis can be completed and was not available in time for IWSMT-9.

  1. Initial stages of cavitation damage and erosion on copper and brass tested in a rotating disk device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, B. C. S.; Rao, N. S. L.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the differences in flow and experimental conditions, there has been a continuing debate as to whether or not the ultrasonic method of producing cavitation damage is similar to the damage occurring in cavitating flow systems, namely, venturi and rotating disk devices. In this paper, the progress of cavitation damage during incubation periods on polycrystalline copper and brass tested in a rotating disk device is presented. The results indicate several similarities and differences in the damage mechanism encountered in a rotating disk device (which simulates field rotary devices) and a magnetostriction apparatus. The macroscopic erosion appears similar to that in the vibratory device except for nonuniform erosion and apparent plastic flow during the initial damage phase.

  2. Investigations of the Cavitation and Damage Thresholds of Histotripsy and Applications in Targeted Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli

    Histotripsy is a noninvasive ultrasound therapy that controls acoustic cavitation to mechanically fractionate soft tissue. This dissertation investigates the physical thresholds to initiate cavitation and produce tissue damage in histotripsy and factors affecting these thresholds in order to develop novel strategies for targeted tissue ablation. In the first part of this dissertation, the effects of tissue properties on histotripsy cavitation thresholds and damage thresholds were investigated. Results demonstrated that the histotripsy shock scattering threshold using multi-cycle pulses increases in stiffer tissues, while the histotripsy intrinsic threshold using single-cycle pulses is independent of tissue stiffness. Further, the intrinsic threshold slightly decreases with lower frequencies and significantly decreases with increasing temperature. The effects of tissue properties on the susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage were also investigated, demonstrating that stiffer tissues are more resistant to histotripsy. Two strategies were investigated for increasing the effectiveness of histotripsy for the treatment of stiffer tissues, with results showing that thermal preconditioning may be used to alter tissue susceptibility to histotripsy and that lower frequency treatments may increase the efficiency of histotripsy tissue ablation due to enhanced bubble expansion. In the second part of this dissertation, the feasibility of using histotripsy for targeted liver ablation was investigated in an intact in vivo porcine model, with results demonstrating that histotripsy was capable of non-invasively creating precise lesions throughout the entire liver. Additionally, a tissue selective ablation approach was developed, where histotripsy completely fractionated the liver tissue surrounding the major hepatic vessels and gallbladder while being self-limited at the boundaries of these critical structures. Finally, the long-term effects of histotripsy liver

  3. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  4. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  5. Tunable droplet momentum and cavitation process for damage-free cleaning of challenging particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouk, Roman; Papanu, James; Li, Fred; Jeon, Jason; Liu, Tong; Yalamanchili, Rao

    2008-10-01

    Particle removal without damage has been demonstrated for <60nm photomask sub-resolution assist features with droplet momentum cleaning technology that employs NanoDropletTM mixed-fluid jet nozzle. Although 99%+ particle removal efficiency can be achieved for standard Si3N4 particles with broad size distribution, there are some cleaning challenges with small (<100nm) and large contact area (>500nm) particles. It was found that tunable uniform cavitation can provide the additional physical assist force needed to improve cleaning efficiency of these challenging particles while meeting the damage-fee cleaning requirement. An integrated cleaning process was developed that combines both droplet momentum and damage-free cavitation technology. Cleaning tests were performed with different types of challenging particles. The results showed 5-8% particle removal efficiency improvement as compared to momentum based only cleaning. All masks were processed using the TetraTM mask cleaning tool configured with NanoDropletTM mixed fluid jet technology and full face megasonics.

  6. RESULTS FROM CAVITATION DAMAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH MERCURY SPALLATION TARGETS AT THE LANSCE WNR IN 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    Damage assessment from proton beam induced cavitation experiments on mercury spallation targets done at the LANSCE WNR facility has been completed. The experiments investigated two key questions for the Spallation Neutron Source target, namely, how damage is affected by flow velocity in the SNS coolant channel geometry, and how damage scales with proton beam intensity at a given constant charge per pulse. With regard to the former question, prior in-beam experiments indicated that the coolant channel geometry with stagnant mercury was especially vulnerable to damage which might warrant a design change. Yet other results indicated a reduction in damage with the introduction of flow. Using more prototypic to the SNS, the 2008 experiment damage results show the channel is less vulnerable than the bulk mercury side of the vessel wall. They also show no benefit from increasing channel flow velocity beyond nominal SNS speeds. The second question probed a consensus belief that damage scales with beam intensity (protons per unit area) by a power law dependence with exponent of around 4. Results from a 2005 experiment did not support this power law dependence but some observations were inconsistent and unexplained. These latest results show weaker damage dependence.

  7. Cavitation-induced damage in soft tissue phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Hutchens, Shelby B.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation in soft tissues, similar to that in purely hydrodynamic configurations, is thought to cause tissue injury in therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Our goal is to generalize bubble dynamics models to represent this phenomenon, which we pursue experimentally with observations in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide and agarose phantoms and semi-analytic generalization of Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics models. The phantoms were imaged with high-speed cameras while subjected to a series of multiple pressure wave bursts, of the kind being considered specifically for burst-wave lithotripsy (BWL). The experimental observations show bubble activation at multiple sites during the initial pulses. After multiple pulses, a further onset of cavitation is observed at some new locations suggesting material failure due to fatigue under cyclic loading. A nonlinear strain-energy with strain hardening is used to represent the elasticity of the surrounding medium. Griffith's fracture criterion is then applied in order to determine the onset of material damage. The damaged material is then represented as a Newtonian fluid. By assuming that such a decrease in the fracture toughness occurs under cyclic loading, the fatigue behavior observed in the experiments can be reproduced by our model. This work was supported by NIH grant NIDDK PO1-DK043881.

  8. Oxidative DNA damage caused by pulsed discharge with cavitation on the bactericidal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Ken-ichi; Ito, Hironori; Ihara, Satoshi; Terato, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-based techniques are expected to have practical use for wastewater purification with a potential for killing contaminated microorganisms and degrading recalcitrant materials. In the present study, we analysed oxidative DNA damage in bacterial cells treated by the plasma to unveil its mechanisms in the bactericidal process. Escherichia coli cell suspension was exposed to the plasma induced by applying an alternating-current voltage of about 1 kV with bubbling formed by water-cavitation, termed pulsed discharge with cavitation. Chromosomal DNA damage, such as double strand break (DSB) and oxidative base lesions, increased proportionally with the applied energy, as determined by electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analyses. Among the base lesions identified, the yields of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-G) and 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OH-C) in chromosomal DNA increased by up to 4- and 15-fold, respectively, compared to untreated samples. The progeny DNA sequences, derived from plasmid DNA exposed to the plasma, indicated that the production rate of 5-OH-C exceeded that of 8-OH-G, as G:C to A:T transitions accounted for 65% of all base changes, but only a few G:C to T:A transversions were observed. The cell viabilities of E. coli cells decreased in direct proportion to increases in the applied energy. Therefore, the plasma-induced bactericidal mechanism appears to relate to oxidative damage caused to bacterial DNA. These results were confirmed by observing the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide molecules following the plasma exposure. We also compared our results with the plasma to those obtained with 137Cs γ-rays, as a well-known ROS generator to confirm the DNA-damaging mechanism involved.

  9. Multi million-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cavitation-Induced Damage on a Silica Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Adarsh; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Cavitation bubble collapse causes severe damage to materials. For example, cavitation erosion is a major threat to the safety of nuclear power plants. The cavitation bubbles may also be utilized for preventing stress corrosion cracking with water jet peening technology. We have performed multi million-to-billion atoms molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the shock-induced cavitation damage mechanism on an amorphous silica slab in water. The system consists of a 60nm thick silica slab immersed in water in an MD box of dimension 285 x 200 x 200 nm3. A nanobubble is created by removing water molecules within a sphere of radius 100 nm. To apply a planar shock, we assign a uniform particle velocity vp on the entire system towards a planar momentum mirror. We have performed the simulation with two kinds of bubbles, an empty bubble and a bubble filled with inert gas. The simulation results reveal nanojet formation during bubble collapse causing damage on the silica surface; however, the damage was significantly reduced in the case of the filled bubble. We will discuss the effect of the presence of inter gas inside the nanobubble on the pressure distribution, the extent of damage, and collapse behavior corresponding the shock front.

  10. Development of a gas layer to mitigate cavitation damage in liquid mercury spallation targets

    SciTech Connect

    Felde, David K; Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie

    2008-01-01

    Establish of a gas layer between the flowing liquid and container wall is proposed for mitigating the effects of cavitation in mercury spallation targets. Previous work has shown an order of magnitude decrease in damage for a gas layer developed in a stagnant mercury target for an in-beam experiment. This work is aimed at extending these results to the more complex conditions introduced by a flowing mercury target system. A water-loop has been fabricated to provide initial insights on potential gas injection methods into a flowing liquid. An existing full-scale flow loop designed to simulate the Spallation Neutron Source target system will be used to extend these studies to mercury. A parallel analytical effort is being conducted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to provide direction to the experimental effort. Some preliminary simulations of gas injection through a single hole have been completed and show behavior of the models that is qualitatively meaningful.

  11. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  12. Cavitation distribution within large phantom vessel and mechanical damage formed on surrounding vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yangzi; Yin, Hui; Li, Zhaopeng; Wan, Mingxi

    2013-11-01

    Blood vessel is one of the most important targets encountered during focused ultrasound (FU) therapy. The lasting high temperature caused by continuous FU can result in structural modification of small vessel. For the vessel with a diameter larger than 2mm, convective cooling can significantly weaken the thermal effect of FU. Meanwhile, the continued presence of ultrasound will cause repetitive cavitation and acoustic microstreaming, making comprehension of continuous wave induced cavitation effect in large vessels necessary. The Sonoluminescence (SL) method, mechanical damage observation and high-speed camera were used in this study to investigate the combination effect of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and continuous FU in large phantom vessels with a diameter of 10mm without consideration of thermal effect. When the focus was positioned at the proximal wall, cylindrical hole along the acoustic axis opposite the ultrasound wave propagation direction was observed at the input power equal to or greater than 50 W. When the focus was located at the distal wall, only small tunnels can be found. The place where the cylindrical hole formed was corresponding to where bubbles gathered and emitted brilliant light near the wall. Without UCAs neither such bright SL nor cylindrical hole can be found. However, the UCAs concentration had little influence on the SL distribution and the length of cylindrical hole. The SL intensity near the proximal vessel wall and the length of the cylindrical hole both increased with the input power. It is suggested that these findings need to be considered in the large vessel therapy and UCAs usage. PMID:23623758

  13. The influence of cavitation damage upon high temperature creep under stationary and non-stationary loading conditions. Part III: Creep at steady increasing load and true stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boček, M.; Hoffmann, M.

    1984-11-01

    In this paper for ideally plastic materials the influence of high temperature cavitation damage upon creep at steady increasing loads is investigated. The damage function A(t) enters a constitutive equation for plastíc flow through an effective stress σ e. For given loading conditions the latter is derived from the solution of Hart's tensile test equation. In the present paper the case of time linear increase in load ( F = constant) and in true stress ( /.s = constant) is investigated. The creep equations for cavitating as well as for non-cavitating materials are derived and the volume change during creep at /.F = constant are calculated.

  14. Cavitation-induced damage of soft materials by focused ultrasound bursts: A fracture-based bubble dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D; Hutchens, Shelby B; Freund, Jonathan B

    2016-08-01

    A generalized Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics model with a damage mechanism is developed for cavitation and damage of soft materials by focused ultrasound bursts. This study is linked to recent experimental observations in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide and agar gel phantoms subjected to bursts of a kind being considered specifically for lithotripsy. These show bubble activation at multiple sites during the initial pulses. More cavities appear continuously through the course of the observations, similar to what is deduced in pig kidney tissues in shock-wave lithotripsy. Two different material models are used to represent the distinct properties of the two gel materials. The polyacrylamide gel is represented with a neo-Hookean elastic model and damaged based upon a maximum-strain criterion; the agar gel is represented with a strain-hardening Fung model and damaged according to the strain-energy-based Griffith's fracture criterion. Estimates based upon independently determined elasticity and viscosity of the two gel materials suggest that bubble confinement should be sufficient to prevent damage in the gels, and presumably injury in some tissues. Damage accumulation is therefore proposed to occur via a material fatigue, which is shown to be consistent with observed delays in widespread cavitation activity. PMID:27586763

  15. Impact of shock wave pattern and cavitation bubble size on tissue damage during ureteroscopic electrohydraulic lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Corleis, R; Klotz, T; Bernards, P; Engelmann, U

    1995-03-01

    It is known that electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) during ureteroscopy may cause ureteral damage. To evaluate this trauma potential, find its mechanism and make it possible to avoid it, our research employed photographic evaluation, tissue studies, shock wave measurements and disintegration tests. The setup included a 3.3 F probe attached to an experimental generator with adjustable voltages and capacities providing energies from 25 mJ. to 1300 mJ. per pulse. In general, we distinguish between two traumatic mechanisms: (1) After placing the probe directly on the mucosa the rapid initial plasma penetrates the tissue resulting in a small, nonthermal, punched-like defect, whose depth depends on the energy applied. This trauma has minor clinical implications and is avoided by maintaining a minimum safety distance of 1 mm.; (2) According to physics, each plasma is followed by a cavitation bubble. The maximum size of this bubble depends on the energy applied and ranges from 3 mm. (25 mJ) to > 15 mm. (1300 mJ). In proportion to the bubble size, the ureteral wall may be distended or disrupted, even when the probe is not in direct contact with the mucosa. Therefore, the goal should be to obtain a low energy pressure pulse with high disintegration efficacy. Our evaluation of the pressure waves revealed that the selection of a high voltage and a low capacity leads to short and steep "laser-like" pulses. These pulses have a significant higher impact on stone disintegration than the broader pulses of the same energy provided by currently available generators. PMID:7861549

  16. Correlation between simulations and cavitation-induced erosion damage in Spallation Neutron Source target modules after operation

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; McClintock, David A; Kaminskas, Saulius; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2014-01-01

    An explicit finite element (FE) technique developed for estimating dynamic strain in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) mercury target module vessel is now providing insight into cavitation damage patterns observed in used targets. The technique uses an empirically developed material model for the mercury that describes liquid-like volumetric stiffness combined with a tensile pressure cut-off limit that approximates cavitation. The longest period each point in the mercury is at the tensile cut-off threshold is denoted its saturation time. Now, the pattern of saturation time can be obtained from these simulations and is being positively correlated with observed damage patterns and is interpreted as a qualitative measure of damage potential. Saturation time has been advocated by collaborators at J-Parc as a factor in predicting bubble nuclei growth and collapse intensity. The larger the ratio of maximum bubble size to nucleus, the greater the bubble collapse intensity to be expected; longer saturation times result in greater ratios. With the recent development of a user subroutine for the FE solver saturation time is now provided over the entire mercury domain. Its pattern agrees with spots of damage seen above and below the beam axis on the SNS inner vessel beam window and elsewhere. The other simulation result being compared to observed damage patterns is mercury velocity at the wall. Related R&D has provided evidence for the damage mitigation that higher wall velocity provides. In comparison to observations in SNS targets, inverse correlation of high velocity to damage is seen. In effect, it is the combination of the patterns of saturation time and low velocity that seems to match actual damage patterns.

  17. Acceleration of lithotripsy using cavitation bubbles induced by second-harmonic superimposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuga, Masamizu; Yasuda, Jun; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy potentially produces residual stone fragments too large to pass through ureters and significant injury to the normal tissue surrounding the stone. Previous works have shown that the collapse of cavitation bubbles induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound can produce small stone fragments via cavitation erosion. However, the erosion rate is hypothesized to be reduced by ultrasound attenuation by excessively generated bubble clouds. If so, it is important to generate the bubbles only on the stone surface. The effects of peak-negative-enhanced (PNE) and peak-positive-enhanced (PPE) waves obtained by second-harmonic superimposition were investigated to control cavitation bubbles. With the PNE waves, the bubbles were generated only on the stone surface and the maximum erosion rate was 232 ± 32 mg/min. All the fragments were smaller than 2 mm, which makes them pass through ureters naturally. The proposed method shows the potential to significantly improve the speed of lithotripsy.

  18. EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS WITH LARGE GAS BUBBLES IN MERCURY TOWARDS ESTABLISHING A GAS LAYER TO MITIGATE CAVITATION DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Felde, David K; Ruggles, Arthur; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2006-01-01

    One of several options that shows promise for protecting solid surfaces from cavitation damage in liquid metal spallation targets, involves introducing an interstitial gas layer between the liquid metal and the containment vessel wall. Several approaches toward establishing such a protective gas layer are being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory including large bubble injection, and methods that involve stabilization of the layer by surface modifications to enhance gas hold-up on the wall or by inserting a porous media. It has previously been reported that using a gas layer configuration in a test target showed an order-of-magnitude decrease in damage for an in-beam experiment. Video images that were taken of the successful gas/mercury flow configuration have been analyzed and correlated. The results show that the success was obtained under conditions where only 60% of the solid wall was covered with gas. Such a result implies that this mitigation scheme may have much more potential. Additional experiments with gas injection into water are underway. Multi-component flow simulations are also being used to provide direction for these new experiments. These simulations have been used to size the gas layer and position multiple inlet nozzles.

  19. (Microstructural dependence of the cavitation damage function in the FCC materials: Annual report, 1990--1991)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The interface damage function (IDF) defines an area fraction of damage on crystallite interfaces. This function, which is material and condition dependent, sustains a complete geometrical description of grain boundaries and identifies those types of interfaces which are preferentially damaged. Included in the IDF is functional dependence, not only upon lattice orientations or misorientations, but also upon grain boundary normal; this dependence has been largely neglected in other studies examining damage inhomogeneity of polycrystals. The experimental method used in describing the damaged microstructures included random sectioning of the damaged specimen, and the manual or semi-automatic construction of grain maps describing the observed microstructure. The grain maps for the initial IDF determination were constructed from scanning electron micrographs. Several of these micrographs were joined together and the grain boundaries were traced. There were manually fed back into the computer using a digitizing pad with each grain boundary intersection defined by an (x,y) pair of coordinates. Using algorithms written as a part of this work, the computer then reconstructs the grain map from this series of points. Manual correction of the computer generated maps was required to obtain an acceptable digitized reproduction of the observed microstructure.

  20. Electron Acceleration in Cavitated Channels Formed by a Petawatt Laser in Low-Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mangles, S.P.D.; Walton, B.R.; Najmudin, Z.; Dangor, A.E.; Gopal, A.; Rozmus, W.; Tatarakis, M.; Thomas, A.G.R.; Wei, M.S.; Krushelnick, K.; Tzoufras, M.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; Clarke, R.J.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Evans, R.G.; Fritzler, S.

    2005-06-24

    The spectra of energetic electrons produced by a laser interaction with underdense plasma have been measured at intensities >3x10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}. Electron energies in excess of 300 MeV have been observed. Measurements of the transmitted laser spectrum indicate that there is no correlation between the acceleration of electrons and plasma wave production. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the laser ponderomotive force produces an ion channel. The interaction of the laser field with the nonlinear focusing force of the channel leads to electron acceleration. The majority of the electrons never reach the betatron resonance but those which gain the highest energies do so. The acceleration process exhibits a strong sensitivity to initial conditions with particles that start within a fraction of a laser wavelength following completely different trajectories and gaining markedly different energies.

  1. Modeling polyethylene wear acceleration due to femoral head dislocation damage.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Karen M; Tikekar, Nishant M; Heiner, Anneliese D; Lannutti, John J; Callaghan, John J; Brown, Thomas D

    2014-08-01

    Scratching, scraping, and metal transfer to femoral heads commonly accompany acetabular shell contact during dislocation and closed reduction maneuvers. While head damage conceptually leads to accelerated wear, reports on this subject are mainly anecdotal, and differ widely on the potency of such effect. Towards better understanding this relationship, a physically validated finite element (FE) model was used to compute polyethylene wear acceleration propensity of specific head damage patterns on thirteen retrievals. These FE models estimated wear increases averaging half an order of magnitude when compared to simulations for undamaged heads. There was no correlation between the number of dislocations sustained and wear acceleration. These results underscore the importance of implant-gentle closed reduction, and heightened wear monitoring of successfully reduced dislocation patients. PMID:24851789

  2. Current research in cavitating fluid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E. (Editor); Ball, J. H. (Editor); Khonsari, M. M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    A review of the current research of cavitation in fluid films is presented. Phenomena and experimental observations include gaseous cavitation, vapor cavitation, and gas entrainment. Cavitation in flooded, starved, and dynamically loaded journal bearings, as well as squeeze films are reviewed. Observations of cavitation damage in bearings and the possibility of cavitation between parallel plates with microasperities were discussed. The transcavity fluid transport process, meniscus motion and geometry or form of the film during rupture, and reformation were summarized. Performance effects were related to heat transfer models in the cavitated region and hysteresis influence on rotor dynamics coefficients. A number of cavitation algorithms was presented together with solution procedures using the finite difference and finite element methods. Although Newtonian fluids were assumed in most of the discussions, the effect of non-Newtonian fluids on cavitation was also discussed.

  3. Studying Radiation Damage in Structural Materials by Using Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials is of major concern and a limiting factor for a wide range of engineering and scientific applications, including nuclear power production, medical applications, or components for scientific radiation sources. The usefulness of these applications is largely limited by the damage a material can sustain in the extreme environments of radiation, temperature, stress, and fatigue, over long periods of time. Although a wide range of materials has been extensively studied in nuclear reactors and neutron spallation sources since the beginning of the nuclear age, ion beam irradiations using particle accelerators are a more cost-effective alternative to study radiation damage in materials in a rather short period of time, allowing researchers to gain fundamental insights into the damage processes and to estimate the property changes due to irradiation. However, the comparison of results gained from ion beam irradiation, large-scale neutron irradiation, and a variety of experimental setups is not straightforward, and several effects have to be taken into account. It is the intention of this article to introduce the reader to the basic phenomena taking place and to point out the differences between classic reactor irradiations and ion irradiations. It will also provide an assessment of how accelerator-based ion beam irradiation is used today to gain insight into the damage in structural materials for large-scale engineering applications.

  4. Causes and formation of cavitation in mechanical heart valves.

    PubMed

    Graf, T; Reul, H; Detlefs, C; Wilmes, R; Rau, G

    1994-04-01

    Cavitation may develop on mechanical valvular prostheses in the mitral position; it causes blood damage and, under particularly adverse conditions, it may result in sudden failure of the prosthesis. Therefore, with regard to future development of mechanical heart valves, the pattern of cavitation and its predisposing factors in different types of prostheses were investigated in in vitro studies, which focused on the analysis of valve closure dynamics and the influence of design parameters on the cavitation-inducing pressure drop at the artificial valve. It was found that cavitation is produced primarily by the deceleration of the closing body of the valve. At 900g, the measured deceleration of the closing bodies falls in the range of the decelerations determined in oscillation experiments for investigating cavitation-induced material erosion. The pressure drop produced thereby is overlapped by the pressure drop in accelerated or turbulent flow regions produced by design characteristics at outlet struts, stop faces or sealing lips during backflow through the closing disc. These phenomena exist particularly in regions of high flow velocity, i.e. at the instant of closure at the maximum distance from the bearing axis of the closing body (12 o'clock position). The onset of cavitation is additionally promoted in this position by a tight joint between the closing body and the ring. Oscillations of the closing body generally have a negligible effect on the cavitation behavior. From these relationships one can infer that cavitation can be avoided in future in mechanical heart valves by locally limited design measures. Especially, unsteadiness in the backflow through the closing valve is to be avoided. PMID:8061870

  5. Mechanics of collapsing cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Leen

    2016-03-01

    A brief survey is given of the dynamical phenomena accompanying the collapse of cavitation bubbles. The discussion includes shock waves, microjets and the various ways in which collapsing bubbles produce damage. PMID:25890856

  6. Effects of Accelerated Aging on Fiber Damage Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Setchell, R.E.

    1999-02-15

    internal defects. Damage characteristics obtained from fibers subjected to each of these aging environments were compared to results from fresh fibers tested under identical conditions. A surprising result was that internal damage was not observed in any of the tested fibers. Only breakdown at the fiber entrance face and catastrophic damage at both end faces were observed. Fiber end faces were not sealed during the accelerated aging environments, and thresholds at these faces were significantly lower in the aged fibers. However, most fibers transmitted relatively high pulse energies before damaging, and a large fraction never damaged before we reached the limits of our test laser. The absence of any observable affect on internal damage thresholds is encouraging, but the current results do not rule out the possibility that some other approach to accelerated aging could reveal a growth mechanism for internal defects.

  7. Cavitation in medicine.

    PubMed

    Brennen, Christopher Earls

    2015-10-01

    We generally think of bubbles as benign and harmless and yet they can manifest the most remarkable range of physical effects. Some of those effects are the stuff of our everyday experience as in the tinkling of a brook or the sounds of breaking waves at the beach. But even these mundane effects are examples of the ability of bubbles to gather, focus and radiate energy (acoustic energy in the above examples). In other contexts that focusing of energy can lead to serious technological problems as when cavitation bubbles eat great holes through ships' propeller blades or cause a threat to the integrity of the spillways at the Hoover Dam. In liquid-propelled rocket engines, bubbles pose a danger to the stability of the propulsion system, and in artificial heart valves they can cause serious damage to the red blood cells. In perhaps the most extraordinary example of energy focusing, collapsing cavitation bubbles can emit not only sound, but also light with black body radiation temperatures equal to that of the sun (Brennen 1995 Cavitation and bubble dynamics). But, harnessed carefully, this almost unique ability to focus energy can also be put to remarkably constructive use. Cavitation bubbles are now used in a remarkable range of surgical and medical procedures, for example to emulsify tissue (most commonly in cataract surgery or in lithotripsy procedures for the reduction of kidney and gall stones) or to manipulate the DNA in individual cells. By creating cavitation bubbles non-invasively thereby depositing and focusing energy non-intrusively, one can generate minute incisions or target cancer cells. This paper will begin by briefly reviewing the history of cavitation phenomena and will end with a vision of the new horizons for the amazing cavitation bubble. PMID:26442145

  8. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wady, P. T.; Draude, A.; Shubeita, S. M.; Smith, A. D.; Mason, N.; Pimblott, S. M.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5-6 cm2, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  9. Cavitation erosion - scale effect and model investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, F.; Rutschmann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The experimental works presented in here contribute to the clarification of erosive effects of hydrodynamic cavitation. Comprehensive cavitation erosion test series were conducted for transient cloud cavitation in the shear layer of prismatic bodies. The erosion pattern and erosion rates were determined with a mineral based volume loss technique and with a metal based pit count system competitively. The results clarified the underlying scale effects and revealed a strong non-linear material dependency, which indicated significantly different damage processes for both material types. Furthermore, the size and dynamics of the cavitation clouds have been assessed by optical detection. The fluctuations of the cloud sizes showed a maximum value for those cavitation numbers related to maximum erosive aggressiveness. The finding suggests the suitability of a model approach which relates the erosion process to cavitation cloud dynamics. An enhanced experimental setup is projected to further clarify these issues.

  10. Dual pulses for cavitation control in lithotripsy: Shock wave-bubble interactions and bioeffects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Dahlia L.

    2002-08-01

    . No significant bubble translation was observed or calculated. The data support the conclusion that cavitation plays an important role in efficient stone comminution and hemolysis. The dual-pulse lithotripter, because of its localized and intensified cavitation field, yields the promise of improved stone comminution efficiency, reduced tissue damage, and accelerated treatment.

  11. Numerical estimation of cavitation intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumenacker, L.; Fortes-Patella, R.; Archer, A.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation may appear in turbomachinery and in hydraulic orifices, venturis or valves, leading to performance losses, vibrations and material erosion. This study propose a new method to predict the cavitation intensity of the flow, based on a post-processing of unsteady CFD calculations. The paper presents the analyses of cavitating structures' evolution at two different scales: • A macroscopic one in which the growth of cavitating structures is calculated using an URANS software based on a homogeneous model. Simulations of cavitating flows are computed using a barotropic law considering presence of air and interfacial tension, and Reboud's correction on the turbulence model. • Then a small one where a Rayleigh-Plesset software calculates the acoustic energy generated by the implosion of the vapor/gas bubbles with input parameters from macroscopic scale. The volume damage rate of the material during incubation time is supposed to be a part of the cumulated acoustic energy received by the solid wall. The proposed analysis method is applied to calculations on hydrofoil and orifice geometries. Comparisons between model results and experimental works concerning flow characteristic (size of cavity, pressure,velocity) as well as pitting (erosion area, relative cavitation intensity) are presented.

  12. Laser damage threshold measurements of optical materials for direct laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken; Byer, R. L.; Colby, E. R.; England, R. J.; Peralta, E. A.

    2012-12-21

    The laser-damage threshold is a fundamental limit for any dielectric laser-driven accelerator and is set by the material of the structure. In this paper, we present a theoretical model of the laser damage mechanism, in comparison with experimental data on the damage threshold of silicon. Additionally, we present damage threshold measurement data of various optical materials, most of which have not been previously characterized in the picosecond-regime.

  13. Application of cavitation system to accelerate aqueous enzymatic extraction of seed oil from Cucurbita pepo L. and evaluation of hypoglycemic effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Juan; Li, Zhu-Gang; Wang, Xun; Han, Jun-Yan; Zhang, Bo; Fu, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Chun-Jian

    2016-12-01

    Cavitation-accelerated aqueous enzymatic extraction (CAEE) of seed oil from Cucurbita pepo was performed. An enzyme cocktail comprised of cellulose, pectinase and proteinase can work synergistically in releasing the oil. The CAEE extraction conditions were optimized by a Plackett-Burman design followed by a central composite methodology. A maximal extraction yield of 58.06% was achieved under optimal conditions of vacuum degree -0.07, enzyme amount 1.05% and extraction time 69min. As compared to soxhlet extraction (SE)-derived oil, CAEE-derived oil exhibited similar physical properties and better oxidation stability. In addition, chemical composition analyzing showed that the content of linoleic acid obtained by CAEE (47.67%) was higher than that of SE (44.51%). Moreover, the IC50 of oil obtained by CAEE and SE, as measured by α-amylase inhibition assay, were 40.68μg/mL and 45.46μg/mL. All results suggest that CAEE represents an excellent alternative protocol for production of oil from oil-bearing materials. PMID:27374549

  14. Reactor for simulation and acceleration of solar ultraviolet damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, E.; Gupta, A.

    1979-01-01

    An environmental test chamber providing acceleration of UV radiation and precise temperature control (+ or -)1 C was designed, constructed and tested. This chamber allows acceleration of solar ultraviolet up to 30 suns while maintaining temperature of the absorbing surface at 30 C - 60 C. This test chamber utilizes a filtered medium pressure mercury arc as the source of radiation, and a combination of selenium radiometer and silicon radiometer to monitor solar ultraviolet (295-340 nm) and total radiant power output, respectively. Details of design and construction and operational procedures are presented along with typical test data.

  15. Real-time damage monitoring scheme in PSC girder bridge using output-only acceleration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Tae; Park, Jae-Hyung; Do, Han-Sung; Lee, Jung-Mi

    2007-04-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been increasingly utilized for structural health monitoring (SHM) due to the advantage that it needs only a few training data to detect damage in structures. In this study, a new damage monitoring method using a set of parallel ANNs and acceleration signals is developed for alarming locations of damage in PSC girder bridges. First, theoretical backgrounds are described. The problem addressed in this paper is defined as the stochastic process. In addition, a parallel ANN-algorithm using output-only acceleration responses is newly designed for damage detection in real time. The cross-covariance of two acceleration-signals measured at two different locations is selected as the feature representing the structural condition. Neural networks are trained for potential loading patterns and damage scenarios of the target structure for which its actual loadings are unknown. The feasibility of the proposed method is evaluated from numerical model tests on PSC beams for which accelerations were acquired before and after several damage cases.

  16. Cavitation you can hold in your hand... for a moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, David Jesse; Pendlebury, Jonathon; Langley, Kenneth; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    In a popular party trick a glass bottle is filled with water and firmly struck at the top, breaking the bottle with nothing but bare hands. We present evidence that this trick is caused by cavitation formed by the acceleration of the fluid. Traditional velocity based methods for determining cavity formation do not successfully predict cavitation onset, however, a dimensionless cavitation equation derived from the Navier-Stokes equation predicts cavitation as a function of pressure head and acceleration. Our experiments utilized accelerometers and high-speed photography to observe cavitation with good agreement between experiments and predictions. Elucidating the onset of cavitation based on these simple parameters will help those who attempt this trick appreciate the physical complexity of this phenomenon and improve their bottle breaking skills.

  17. Evolution of surface roughness of some metallic materials in cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Chiu, K Y; Cheng, F T; Man, H C

    2005-10-01

    The evolution of surface roughness of three common metallic materials (316L stainless steel, CP titanium, and brass) in ultrasonic vibratory cavitation tests was monitored using profilometric measurements. Three stages of roughness change, based on the rate of change of the mean surface roughness d(Ra)/dt, may be identified. In stage I (initial stage), Ra increases almost linearly with the test time; in stage II (transition stage), the rate decreases until stage III (steady-state stage) is reached, in which Ra remains unchanged. Concurrent measurements of mass loss in the ultrasonic cavitation test indicated that stage I approximately coincides with the incubation stage, stage II approximately coincides with the acceleration stage, and stage III approximately coincides with the maximum erosion rate stage as defined by ASTM Standard G 32. Compared with conventional mass loss measurements in assessing material degradation in cavitation erosion, surface roughness measurements provide an alternative and convenient method which possesses several advantages. In the first place, change in surface roughness provides information of material response before mass loss is detected. Secondly, there is no restriction of the size of the component, while weighing is suitable for small samples only. Thirdly, mass loss reflects erosion of the whole surface under cavitation attack, and the mean depth of penetration or erosion only gives an average loss, while in roughness measurement, damage in specific locations may be studied. The present study indicates that roughness measurement may constitute a practical method for monitoring damage in industrial ultrasonic cleaners. PMID:16126092

  18. Prediction of cavitation erosion for marine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquil, T.; Yakubov, S.; Rung, T.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the development of a cavitation erosion prediction method. The approach is tailored to marine applications and embedded into a VoF-based procedure for the simulation of turbulent flows. Supplementary to the frequently employed Euler-Euler models, Euler-Lagrange approaches are employed to simulate cavitation. The study aims to convey the merits of an Euler-Lagrange approach for erosion simulations. Accordingly, the erosion model is able to separate different damage mechanisms, e.g. micro-jets, single and collective bubble collapse, and also quantifies their contribution to the total damage. Emphasis is devoted to the prediction of the cavitation extend, the influence of compressible effects and the performance of the material damage model in practical applications. Examples included refer to 2D validation test cases and reveal a fair predictive accuracy.

  19. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  20. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  1. Analysis of damaging effects of laser-plasma accelerated shrapnels on protecting glass shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkova, Michaela; Kalal, Milan; Shmatov, Mikhail L.

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of the damage caused by laser plasma accelerated fragments of metal target was performed. Measured as well as calculated parameters of craters and shrapnel found in BK7 glass blastshield are presented. Method applied for the measurement of parameters of craters is described. Potential damage of optical elements by the so-called striking cores (high-velocity stable objects arising due to collapse of cones or some other target parts toward their axes) that can be generated in IFE related experiments is evaluated.

  2. Measuring Cavitation with Synchrotron X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Daniel; Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Chris; X-Ray Fuel Spray Group, Energy Systems Division Team

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation plays an important role in the formation of sprays from small nozzles such as those found in fuel injection systems. A sharp-edged inlet from the sac into the nozzle of a diesel fuel injector is shown to inititate a strong sheet-like cavitation along the boundary layer of the nozzle throat, which is difficult to measure and can lead to acoustic damage. To investigate this phenomenon, a diagnostic technique capable of mapping the density field of the nozzle through regions of intense cavitation is required. Available visible-light techniques are limited to qualitative observations of the outer extent of cavitation zones. However, brilliant X-rays from a synchrotron source have negligible refraction and are capable of penetrating the full extent of cavitation zones. We present the early results of a novel application of line-of-sight, time-resolved X-ray radiography on a cavitating model nozzle. Experiments were conducted at Sector 7-BM of the Advanced Photon Source. Density and vapor distribution are measured from the quantitative absorption of monochromatic X-rays. The density field can then be tomographically reconstructed from the projections. The density is then validated against a range of compressible and incompressible numerical simulations. This research was performed at the 7-BM beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (DOE-EERE).

  3. Cavitation measurements on a pump-turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.; Kirschner, O.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2015-12-01

    When a hydraulic turbine is operated at off-design conditions, cavitation on the runner and other machine parts can occur. Vibration, noise and erosion caused by cavitation can damage the turbine and lead to a limitation of the operational range. To avoid damage of the turbine, it is fundamental to get knowledge of the presence of cavitation. In this paper, the acoustic emissions at a pump-turbine model at different operating conditions with and without the presence of cavitation were recorded and analysed. High speed video recordings were carried out simultaneously to validate the acoustic measurements. The main goal of the investigation was to compare the acoustic emissions with the visual observations at operating conditions with cavitation on the leading edge of the turbine runner. The analysis of the recorded signals and the visual observations are in good accordance for the investigated operating points.

  4. Research on the characteristics of quasi-steady cavitation in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. X.; Yuan, S. Q.; Li, X. J.; Si, Q. R.; Luo, Y.

    2015-01-01

    With the pressure decreasing, the process of cavitation in a centrifugal pump could be summarized as incipient cavitation, quasi-steady cavitation and unsteady cavitation. Quasi-steady cavitation is the condition that is between the incipient cavitation and unsteady cavitation in a centrifugal pump. Under this condition, the intensity of cavitation is relatively weak, and the head of the pump almost remains unchanged, but the cavitation exists, causing damage to the impeller by pitting and erosion. So it is important to investigate the quasi-steady cavitation. In this paper, both the numerical and experimental methods had been carried out to investigate the characteristics of quasi-steady cavitation. The internal flow in the pump, the performance of cavitation and the inlet and outlet pressure pulsation of the pump measured through experimental method have been studied under different NPSHa conditions. It was found that the head decreases about 0.77%-1.38% from non-cavitation condition and it could be regarded as the quasi-steady cavitation. Little change has been found from the internal flow between non-cavitation condition and quasi-steady cavitation condition. The period of inlet pressure pulsation changes from the time that the blade passes by to the period of shaft rotating with the development of cavitation. The dominant frequency of the inlet pressure pulsation is two times of shaft frequency whose amplitudes decrease firstly and then increase to a peak value, followed by a decrease to a low value in quasi-steady cavitation conditions. The dominant frequency of the outlet pressure pulsation is blade passing frequency whose amplitudes increase firstly and then decrease gradually with the decrease of NPSHa.

  5. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  6. Influence of the empirical coefficients of cavitation model on predicting cavitating flow in the centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hou-lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Haoqin

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of cavitation is an unsteady flow, which is nearly inevitable in pump. It would degrade the pump performance, produce vibration and noise and even damage the pump. Hence, to improve accuracy of the nu¬merical prediction of the pump cavitation performance is much desirable. In the present work, a homogenous model, the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model, is considered to investigate the influence of the empirical coefficients on predicting the pump cavitation performance, concerning a centrifugal pump. Three coefficients are analyzed, namely the nucleation site radius, evaporation and condensation coefficients. Also, the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical simulations. The results indicate that, to get a precise prediction, the approaches of declining the initial bubble radius, the condensation coefficient or increasing the evaporation coefficient are all feasible, especially for de¬clining the condensation coefficient, which is the most effective way.

  7. Influence of cathodic and anodic currents on cavitation erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Auret, J.G.; Damm, O.F.R.A.; Wright, G.J. . Div. of Materials Science and Technology); Robinson, F.P.A. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A vibratory-type cavitation test rig was constructed to study the effect of polarizing currents applied to a cavitating body. The generation of gas by electrolysis reduced mechanical damage suffered by a cavitating body because of bubble collapse cushioning. However, the net effect on overall damage depended on several factors, including the intensity of mechanical attack, corrosion rate, and surface geometrical effects. A cathodic current was shown to always decrease the total volume loss rate, but the volume loss rate sometimes was increased and sometimes was reduced in the anodic current range.

  8. Experiments in thermosensitive cavitation of a cryogenic rocket propellant surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean Benjamin

    Cavitation is a phase-change phenomenon that may appear in practical devices, often leading to loss of performance and possible physical damage. Of particular interest is the presence of cavitation in rocket engine pumps as the cryogenic fluids cavitate in impellers and inducers. Unlike water, which has been studied exhaustively, cryogenic fluids undergo cavitation with significant thermal effect. Past attempts at analyzing this behavior in water have led to poor predictive capability due to the lack of data in the regime defined as thermosensitive cavitation. Fluids flowing near their thermodynamic critical point have a liquid-vapor density ratio that is orders of magnitude less than typical experimental fluids, so that the traditional equation-of-state and cavitation models do not apply. Thermal effects in cavitation have not been fully investigated due to experimental difficulties handling cryogenics. This work investigates the physical effects of thermosensitive cavitation in a model representative of a turbopump inducer in a modern rocket engine. This is achieved by utilizing a room-temperature testing fluid that exhibits a thermal effect equivalent to that experienced by cryogenic propellants. Unsteady surface pressures and high speed imaging collected over the span of thermophysical regimes ranging from thermosensitive to isothermal cavitation offer both quantitative and qualitative insight into the physical process of thermal cavitation. Physical and thermodynamic effects are isolated to identify the source of cavity conditions, oscillations and growth/collapse behavior. Planar laser imaging offers an instantaneous look inside the vapor cavity and at the behavior of the boundary between the two-phase region and freestream liquid. Nondimensional parameters are explored, with cavitation numbers, Reynolds Numbers, coefficient of pressure and nondimensional temperature in a broad range. Results in the form of cavitation regime maps, Strouhal Number of cavity

  9. Effect of austempering temperature on cavitation behaviour of unalloyed ADI material

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcinovic, Marina; Eric, Olivera; Rajnovic, Dragan; Sidjanin, Leposava; Balos, Sebastian

    2013-08-15

    This paper provides an in-depth study and description of cavitation damage and microstructural changes in two types of unalloyed austempered ductile iron (ADI). ADI materials used were austempered at 300 and 400 °C having ausferrite microstructure with 16 and 31.4% of retained austenite, respectively. Metallographic examination was carried out to study the morphology of their cavitation-damaged surfaces. Cavitation damage was initiated at graphite nodules as well as in the interface between a graphite nodule and an ausferrite matrix. Furthermore, microcracking and ferrite/retained austenite morphology were proved to be of great importance for cavitation resistance. Mass loss rate revealed that ADI austempered at 400 °C has a higher cavitation resistance in water than ADI austempered at 300 °C. A higher amount of retained austenite in ADI austempered at 400 °C played an important role in increasing cavitation resistance. The good cavitation behaviour of ADI austempered at 400 °C was due to the matrix hardening by stress assisted phase transformation of retained austenite into martensite (SATRAM) phenomenon, as shown by X-ray diffraction analysis. - Highlights: • Cavitation rate of two ADI materials was tested. • ADI material with a lower hardness has had a lower cavitation rate. • The main reason is microstructural transformations during cavitation. • SATRAM phenomenon increases cavitation resistance.

  10. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  11. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  12. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  13. Importance of the implosion of ESWL-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Delacrétaz, G; Rink, K; Pittomvils, G; Lafaut, J P; Vandeursen, H; Boving, R

    1995-01-01

    The damage induced by an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter is observed with a fiber optic stress sensing technique. When a stone is placed in the focus, besides the expected stress induced by the incoming shock wave emitted by the ESWL apparatus, a second delayed stress is observed some hundreds of microseconds later. The second stress is induced by a shock wave generated at the collapse of a cavitation bubble. Partial reflection of the incoming shock wave at the stone boundary is at the origin of the large cavitation bubble formation. Sensing fiber fracture results always from the second shock wave due to the collapse of the cavitation bubble. Thus the largest stress is generated at the collapse. When no target is placed in the focus of the lithotripter, no large cavitation bubble is formed and no delayed shock wave is observed. Our results demonstrate unambiguously the decisive role of cavitation in ESWL procedures. PMID:7754583

  14. Wavelet Analysis of Acceleration Response of Beam Under the Moving Mass for Damage Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Tanuja; Chatterjee, Animesh

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, acceleration response of cracked beam is analyzed by using the wavelet transform to detect the crack presence, its location and also to predict the crack severity. The equation of motion of beam under the moving mass is solved by using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method. A code is written by expanding the equation for first three vibration modes. Acceleration signal of the damaged beam under the moving mass contains the discontinuity at the crack location. This discontinuity contained in the acceleration signal is sufficiently visible but it is very small for some signals. Therefore, the acceleration signals are transformed using the wavelet analysis. A wavelet coefficient peak occurs at the location of discontinuity, so that we can identify the crack presence and its location. From the value of wavelet coefficient peak, we can also predict the crack effect with respect to the change in velocity of moving mass and change in crack depth. The main advantage of this method is that the wavelet coefficient peak is sufficiently higher even for the higher velocities and small size crack.

  15. Test simulation of neutron damage to electronic components using accelerator facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. B.; Fleming, R. M.; Bielejec, E. S.; McDonald, J. K.; Vizkelethy, G.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate equivalent bipolar transistor damage response to neutrons and silicon ions. We report on irradiation tests performed at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor, the SNL SPHINX accelerator, and the SNL Ion Beam Laboratory using commercial silicon npn bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and III-V Npn heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). Late time and early time gain metrics as well as defect spectra measurements are reported.

  16. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-10-01

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s(-1)). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction. PMID:26442139

  17. TGF-β1 accelerates the DNA damage response in epithelial cells via Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeeyong; Kim, Mi-Ra; Kim, Hyun-Ji; An, You Sun; Yi, Jae Youn

    2016-08-01

    The evidence suggests that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) regulates the DNA-damage response (DDR) upon irradiation, and we previously reported that TGF-β1 induced DNA ligase IV (Lig4) expression and enhanced the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway in irradiated cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on the irradiation-induced DDRs of A431 and HaCaT cells. Cells were pretreated with or without TGF-β1 and irradiated. At 30 min post-irradiation, DDRs were detected by immunoblotting of phospho-ATM, phospho-Chk2, and the presence of histone foci (γH2AX). The levels of all three factors were similar right after irradiation regardless of TGF-β1 pretreatment. However, they soon thereafter exhibited downregulation in TGF-β1-pretreated cells, indicating the acceleration of the DDR. Treatment with a TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor (SB431542) or transfections with siRNAs against Smad2/3 or DNA ligase IV (Lig4) reversed this acceleration of the DDR. Furthermore, the frequency of irradiation-induced apoptosis was decreased by TGF-β1 pretreatment in vivo, but this effect was abrogated by SB431542. These results collectively suggest that TGF-β1 could enhance cell survival by accelerating the DDR via Smad signaling and Lig4 expression. PMID:27237972

  18. Cavitation pressure in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Eric; Balibar, Sébastien; Caupin, Frédéric

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the limiting mechanical tension (negative pressure) that liquid water can sustain before cavitation occurs. The temperature dependence of this quantity is of special interest for water, where it can be used as a probe of a postulated anomaly of its equation of state. After a brief review of previous experiments on cavitation, we describe our method which consists in focusing a high amplitude sound wave in the bulk liquid, away from any walls. We obtain highly reproducible results, allowing us to study in detail the statistics of cavitation, and to give an accurate definition of the cavitation threshold. Two independent pressure calibrations are performed. The cavitation pressure is found to increase monotonically from -26MPa at 0°C to -17MPa at 80°C . While these values lie among the most negative pressures reported in water, they are still far away from the cavitation pressure expected theoretically and reached in the experiment by Angell and his group [Zheng , Science 254, 829 (1991)] (around -120MPa at 40°C ). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are considered.

  19. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  20. Non-Newtonian effects on flow-generated cavitation and on cavitation in a pressure field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, A. T.; Ting, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Observations are presented which show that the stresses in a flow field of very dilute polymer are not well enough described by the Navier-Stokes equations to accurately predict cavitation. The contitutive equation for the particular polymer and concentration used is needed. The second-order fluid form in which accelerations are relatively important appears capable of explaining observed cavitation suppression by changing the pressure field due to flow. Bubble dynamics in stationary dilute polymer solutions are also examined and found to be little different from those in water.

  1. Cavitation guide for control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Tullis, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation.

  2. Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Masanobu; Lee, Sungchil; Kim, Sehwan; Chou, Pai H.

    2011-04-01

    Early detection of pipeline damages has been highlighted in water supply industry. Water pressure change in pipeline due to a sudden rupture causes pipe to vibrate and the pressure change propagates through the pipeline. From the measurement of pipe vibration the rupture can be detected. In this paper, the field test results and observations are provided for implementing next generation of SCADA system for pipeline rupture detection. Two field tests were performed on real buried plastic and metal pipelines for rupture detection. The rupture was simulated by introducing sudden water pressure drop caused by water blow-off and valve control. The measured acceleration data at the pipe surfaces were analyzed in both time and frequency domain. In time domain, the sudden narrow increase of acceleration amplitude was used as an indication of rupture event. For the frequency domain analysis, correlation function and the short time Fourier Transform technique were adopted to trace the dominant frequency shift. The success of rupture detection was found to be dependent on several factors. From the frequency analysis, the dominant frequency of metal water pipe was shifted by the water pressure drop, however, it was hard to identify from the plastic pipeline. Also the influence of existing facility such as airvac on pipe vibrations was observed. Finally, several critical lessons learned in the viewpoint of field measurement are discussed in this paper.

  3. Surface damage correction, and atomic level smoothing of optics by Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, M.; Chau, K.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Svrluga, R.

    2014-10-01

    Surface damage and surface contamination of optics has long been a source of problems for laser, lithography and other industries. Nano-sized surface defects may present significant performance issues in optical materials for deep UV and EUV applications. The effects of nanometer sized surface damage (scratches, pits, and organics) on the surface of optics made of traditional materials and new more exotic materials is a limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, zinc sulfide, BK7 and others presents a unique set of challenges. Exogenesis Corporation, using its proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and contamination and leaves many material surfaces with roughness typically around one angstrom. This process technology has been demonstrated on nonlinear crystals, and various other high-end optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for various materials that have been processed with ANAB. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply normal forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface contaminants, nano-scale scratches, bumps and other asperities under low energy physical sputtering conditions as the removal action proceeds. ANAB may be used to remove a precisely controlled, uniform thickness of material without any increase of surface roughness, regardless of the total amount of material removed. The ANAB process does not

  4. Cavitations induced by plasmas, plasmas induced by cavitations, and plasmas produced in cavitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation bubbles are not static bubbles but have dynamics of expansion, shrinkage, and collapse. Since the collapse of a cavitation bubble is roughly an adiabatic process, the inside of the bubble at the collapse has a high temperature and a high pressure, resulting in the production of a plasma. This talk will be focused on cavitation-related plasma phenomena and the role of the cavitation bubble in the synthesis of nanoparticles. A method for inducing a cavitation bubble is laser ablation in liquid. After the disappearance of laser-produced plasma with optical emission, we have observed the formation of a cavitation bubble. We have found that the inside of the cavitation bubble is the reaction field for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The atomic and molecular species ejected from the ablation target toward the liquid are transported into the cavitation bubble, and they condense into nanoparticles inside it. It is important to note that nanoparticles are stored inside the cavitation bubble until its collapse. We have shown that the size and the structure of nanoparticles are controlled by controlling the dynamics of the cavitation bubbles. Another method for inducing cavitation bubbles is to use ultrasonic power. We have found a simple method for the efficient production of standing cavitation bubbles. The method is just inserting a punching metal plate into water irradiated by ultrasonic wave. The depth of water and the position of the punching plate should be tuned precisely. We have proposed the mechanism of the efficient production of cavitation bubbles by this method. Currently, we try to have electric discharges in cavitation bubbles with the intention of realizing nonequilibrium sonochemistry. In particular, the electric discharge in a laser-induced cavitation bubble shows interesting distortion of the bubble shape, which suggests the electrostatic characteristics of the cavitation bubble.

  5. DNA damage drives accelerated bone aging via an NF-κB-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Kai; Robinson, Andria R.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Blair, Harry C.; Robbins, Paul D.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Ouyang, Hongjiao

    2013-01-01

    Advanced age is one of the most important risk factors for osteoporosis. Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed to contribute to age-related deregulation of osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. ERCC1 (Excision Repair Cross Complementary group 1)-XPF (Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group F) is an evolutionarily conserved structure-specific endonuclease that is required for multiple DNA repair pathways. Inherited mutations affecting expression of ERCC1-XPF cause a severe progeroid syndrome in humans, including early onset of osteopenia and osteoporosis, or anomalies in skeletal development. Herein, we used progeroid ERCC1-XPF deficient mice, including Ercc1-null (Ercc1−/−) and hypomorphic (Ercc1−/Δ) mice, to investigate the mechanism by which DNA damage leads to accelerated bone aging. Compared to their wild-type littermates, both Ercc1−/− and Ercc1−/Δ mice display severe, progressive osteoporosis caused by reduced bone formation and enhanced osteoclastogenesis. ERCC1 deficiency leads to atrophy of osteoblastic progenitors in the bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) population. There is increased cellular senescence of BMSCs and osteoblastic cells, as characterized by reduced proliferation, accumulation of DNA damage and a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). This leads to enhanced secretion of inflammatory cytokines known to drive osteoclastogenesis, such as IL-6, TNFα, and RANKL and thereby induces an inflammatory bone microenvironment favoring osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, we found that the transcription factor NF-κB is activated in osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells of the Ercc1 mutant mice. Importantly, we demonstrated that haploinsufficiency of the p65 NF-κB subunit partially rescued the osteoporosis phenotype of Ercc1−/Δ mice. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of the NF-κB signaling via an IKK inhibitor reversed cellular senescence and SASP in Ercc1−/Δ BMSCs. These results demonstrate that DNA damage drives

  6. Mechanical heart valve cavitation in patients with bileaflet valves.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Tina S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans; Paulsen, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Today, the quality of mechanical heart valves is quite high, and implantation has become a routine clinical procedure with a low operative mortality (< 5%). However, patients still face the risks of blood cell damage, thromboembolic events, and material failure of the prosthetic device. One mechanism found to be a possible contributor to these adverse effects is cavitation. In vitro, cavitation has been directly demonstrated by visualization and indirectly in vivo by registering of high frequency pressure fluctuations (HFPF). Tilting disc valves are thought of having higher cavitation potential than bileaflet valves due to higher closing velocities. However, the thromboembolic potential seems to be the same. Further studies are therefore needed to investigate the cavitation potential of bileaflet valves in vivo. The post processing of HFPF have shown difficulties when applied on bileaflet vavles due to asynchronous closure of the two leaflets. The aim of this study was therefore to isolate the pressure signature from each leaflet closure and perform cavitation analyses on each component. Six patients were included in the study (St. Jude Medical (n=3) and CarboMedics (n=3); all aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves). HFPFs were recorded intraoperatively through a hydrophone at the aortic root. The pressure signature relating to the first and second leaflet closure was isolated and cavitation parameters were calculated (RMS after 50 kHz highpass filtering and signal energy). Data were averaged over 30 heart cycles. For all patients both the RMS value and signal energy of the second leaflet closure were higher than for the first leaflet closure. This indicates that the second leaflet closure is most prone to cause cavitation. Therefore, quantifying cavitation based on the HFPF related to the second leaflet closure may suggest that the cavitation potential for bileaflet valves in vivo may be higher than previous studies have suggested. PMID:25571278

  7. A Study of Cavitation Erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromu Isaka; Masatsugu Tsutsumi; Tadashi Shiraishi; Hiroyuki Kobayashi

    2002-07-01

    The authors performed experimental study for the purpose of the following two items from a viewpoint of cavitation erosion of a cylindrical orifice in view of a problem at the letdown orifice in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor). 1. To get the critical cavitation parameter of the cylindrical orifice to establish the design criteria for prevention of cavitation erosion, and 2. to ascertain the erosion rate in such an eventuality that the cavitation erosion occurs with the orifice made of stainless steel with precipitation hardening (17-4-Cu hardening type stainless steel), so that we confirm the appropriateness of the design criteria. Regarding the 1. item, we carried out the cavitation tests to get the critical cavitation parameters inside and downstream of the orifice. The test results showed that the cavitation parameter at inception is independent of the length or the diameter of the orifice. Moreover, the design criteria of cavitation erosion of cylindrical orifices have been established. Regarding the 2. item, we tested the erosion rate under high-pressure conditions. The cavitation erosion actually occurred in the cylindrical orifice at the tests that was strongly resemble to the erosion occurred at the plant. It will be seldom to reproduce resemble cavitation erosion in a cylindrical orifice with the hard material used at plants. We could establish the criteria for preventing the cavitation erosion from the test results. (authors)

  8. Harness cavitation to improve processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, A.G.; Moholkar, V.S.

    1996-07-01

    Mention cavitation to most chemical engineers, and they undoubtedly think of it as an operational problem. Indeed, the rapid creation and then collapse of bubbles, which is after all what cavitation involves, can destroy pumps and erode other equipment. Cavitation, however, also can have a positive side--presuming it is designed for and not unplanned. In this article, the authors look at how cavitation can be harnessed to improve processes, and the mechanisms for inducing cavitation--ultrasonics and hydrodynamics--and their likely roles. Sonication, that is, the use of ultrasound, is the conventional approach for creating cavitation, and so they turn to it first. Over the past few years, a number of groups have attempted to solve the problem of scale-up and design of ultrasonic reactors. The authors review the systems that already exist and also explore a simpler and efficient alternative to the ultrasonic reactor, the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor.

  9. Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maines, Brant H.; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2000-11-01

    Cavitation in vortical flows is a problem of practical importance, that is relatively unexplored. Vortical structures of importance range from the eddies occurring randomly in space and time in turbulent flows to the developed vortices that occur at the tips of lifting surfaces and at the hubs of propellers and hydraulic turbines. A variety of secondary flow phenomena such as the horse shoe vortices that form around bridge piers, chute blocks and struts, and the secondary vortices found in the clearance passages of turbomachinery are also important cavitation sites. Tip vortex cavitation can be viewed as a canonical problem that captures many of the essential physics associated with vortex cavitation in general. This paper describes the inception process and focuses on the high levels of tension that can be sustained in the flow, which appears to scale with the blade loading. High speed video visualization indicates that the details of how free stream nuclei are ingested plays a major role in the nucleation and inception process. A new photographic technique was used to obtain high quality images of the bubble growth process at framing rates as high as 40,000 fps. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research

  10. Cavitation Erosion in Hydraulic Turbine Components and Mitigation by Coatings: Current Status and Future Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Tiwari, S. K.; Mishra, Suman K.

    2012-07-01

    Cavitation erosion is a frequently observed phenomenon in underwater engineering materials and is the primary reason for component failure. The damage due to cavitation erosion is not yet fully understood, as it is influenced by several parameters, such as hydrodynamics, component design, environment, and material chemistry. This article gives an overview of the current state of understanding of cavitation erosion of materials used in hydroturbines, coatings and coating methodologies for combating cavitation erosion, and methods to characterize cavitation erosion. No single material property fully characterizes the resistance to cavitation erosion. The combination of ultimate resilience, hardness, and toughness rather may be useful to estimate the cavitation erosion resistance of material. Improved hydrodynamic design and appropriate surface engineering practices reduce damage due to cavitation erosion. The coatings suggested for combating the cavitation erosion encompasses carbides (WC Cr2C3, Cr3C2, 20CrC-80WC), cermets of different compositions (e.g., 56W2C/Ni/Cr, 41WC/Ni/Cr/Co), intermetallic composites, intermetallic matrix composites with TiC reinforcement, composite nitrides such as TiAlN and elastomers. A few of them have also been used commercially. Thermal spraying, arc plasma spraying, and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) processes have been used commercially to apply the coatings. Boronizing, laser surface hardening and cladding, chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and plasma nitriding have been tried for surface treatments at laboratory levels and have shown promise to be used on actual components.

  11. Hyperglycemia in the absence of cilia accelerates cystogenesis and induces renal damage.

    PubMed

    Sas, Kelli M; Yin, Hong; Fitzgibbon, Wayne R; Baicu, Catalin F; Zile, Michael R; Steele, Stacy L; Amria, May; Saigusa, Takamitsu; Funk, Jason; Bunni, Marlene A; Siegal, Gene P; Siroky, Brian J; Bissler, John J; Bell, P Darwin

    2015-07-01

    In polycystic kidney disease (PKD), the rate of cyst formation and disease progression is highly variable. The lack of predictability in disease progression may be due to additional environmental factors or pathophysiological processes called "third hits." Diabetes is a growing epidemic, and recent studies suggest that PKD patients may be at an increased risk for this disease. We sought to determine if hyperglycemia enhances the initiation and rate of cystogenesis. Tamoxifen was administered to adult Ift88 conditional floxed allele mice to induce cilia loss in the presence of Cre. Subsequent administration of streptozotocin resulted in equivalent hyperglycemia in cilia(+) and cilia(-) mice. Hyperglycemia with loss of cilia increased the rate of cyst formation and cell proliferation. Structural and functional alterations in the kidney, including focal glomerular foot process effacement, interstitial inflammation, formation of primitive renal tubules, polyuria, and increased proteinuria, were also observed in hyperglycemic cilia(-) mice. Gene array analysis indicated enhanced Wnt and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition signaling in the kidney of hyperglycemic cilia(-) mice. These data show that hyperglycemia, in the absence of cilia, results in renal structural and functional damage and accelerates cystogenesis, suggesting that diabetes is a risk factor in the progression of PKD. PMID:25904703

  12. Residual skin damage in rats 1 year after exposure to x rays or accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, J.T.; McDonald, M.; Howard, J.

    1982-01-01

    In conjunction with a study on the biological effects of accelerated heavy ions on rat spinal cord, we were able to assess the residual skin damage remaining 1 year postirradiation. In this study, rats were irradiated with 230-kVp fractionated doses of either X rays, carbon ions, or neon ions. Four radiation fractions were given at daily intervals. For the carbon and neon ion exposures, rats were irradiated in both the plateau and spread Bragg peak (4 cm) regions of ionization. Comparing doses that produced complete epilation with a slight suggestion of a residual radiation scar, it was found that the relative biological effectivesness (RBE) values 1 year postirradiation for the four fraction irradiations were: carbon ions (plateau ionization region), 1.06; carbon ions (spread Bragg peak ionization region), 1.88; neon ions (plateau region of ionization), 1.55; and neon ions (spread Bragg peak ionization region), 2.26. RBE values for production of paralysis after spinal cord irradiation (using the same X-ray total dose levels for comparison purposes) were in all cases higher than the RBE values obtained from assessment of residual skin injury.

  13. Numerical investigation of cavitation flow in journal bearing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M.; Schmidt, M.; Stücke, P.

    2013-04-01

    The appearance of cavitation is still a problem in technical and industrial applications. Especially in automotive internal combustion engines, hydrodynamic journal bearings are used due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Cavitation flows inside the bearings reduces the load capacity and leads to a risk of material damages. Therefore an understanding of the complex flow phenomena inside the bearing is necessary for the design development of hydrodynamic journal bearings. Experimental investigations in the fluid domain of the journal bearing are difficult to realize founded by the small dimensions of the bearing. In the recent years more and more the advantages of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to investigate the detail of the cavitation flows. The analysis in the paper is carried out in a two-step approach. At first an experimental investigation of journal bearing including cavitation is selected from the literature. The complex numerical model validated with the experimental measured data. In a second step, typically design parameters, such as a groove and feed hole, which are necessary to distribute the oil supply across the gap were added into the model. The paper reflects on the influence of the used design parameters and the variation of the additional supply flow rate through the feed hole regarding to cavitation effects in the bearing. Detailed pictures of the three-dimensional flow structures and the cavitation regions inside the flow film of the bearing are presented.

  14. Computation of Cavitating Flow in a Francis Hydroturbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Daniel; Lindau, Jay

    2013-11-01

    In an effort to improve cavitation characteristics at off-design conditions, a steady, periodic, multiphase, RANS CFD study of an actual Francis hydroturbine was conducted and compared to experimental results. It is well-known that operating hydroturbines at off-design conditions usually results in the formation of large-scale vaporous cavities. These cavities, and their subsequent collapse, reduce efficiency and cause damage and wear to surfaces. The conventional hydro community has expressed interest in increasing their turbine's operating ranges, improving their efficiencies, and reducing damage and wear to critical turbine components. In this work, mixing planes were used to couple rotating and stationary stages of the turbine which have non-multiple periodicity, and provide a coupled solution for the stay vanes, wicket gates, runner blades, and draft tube. The mixture approach is used to simulate the multiphase flow dynamics, and cavitation models were employed to govern the mass transfer between liquid and gas phases. The solution is compared with experimental results across a range of cavitation numbers which display all the major cavitation features in the machine. Unsteady computations are necessary to capture inherently unsteady cavitation phenomena, such as the precessing vortex rope, and the shedding of bubbles from the wicket gates and their subsequent impingement upon the leading edge of the runner blades. To display these features, preliminary unsteady simulations of the full machine are also presented.

  15. Cavitation studies in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobel, Philippe; Obreschkow, Danail; Farhat, Mohamed; Dorsaz, Nicolas; de Bosset, Aurele

    The hydrodynamic cavitation phenomenon is a major source of erosion for many industrial systems such as cryogenic pumps for rocket propulsion, fast ship propellers, hydraulic pipelines and turbines. Erosive processes are associated with liquid jets and shockwaves emission fol-lowing the cavity collapse. Yet, fundamental understanding of these processes requires further cavitation studies inside various geometries of liquid volumes, as the bubble dynamics strongly depends the surrounding pressure field. To this end, microgravity represents a unique platform to produce spherical fluid geometries and remove the hydrostatic pressure gradient induced by gravity. The goal of our first experiment (flown on ESA's parabolic flight campaigns 2005 and 2006) was to study single bubble dynamics inside large spherical water drops (having a radius between 8 and 13 mm) produced in microgravity. The water drops were created by a micro-pump that smoothly expelled the liquid through a custom-designed injector tube. Then, the cavitation bubble was generated through a fast electrical discharge between two electrodes immersed in the liquid from above. High-speed imaging allowed to analyze the implications of isolated finite volumes and spherical free surfaces on bubble evolution, liquid jets formation and shock wave dynamics. Of particular interest are the following results: (A) Bubble lifetimes are shorter than in extended liquid volumes, which could be explain by deriving novel corrective terms to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (B) Transient crowds of micro-bubbles (smaller than 1mm) appeared at the instants of shockwaves emission. A comparison between high-speed visualizations and 3D N-particle simulations of a shock front inside a liquid sphere reveals that focus zones within the drop lead to a significantly increased density of induced cavitation. Considering shock wave crossing and focusing may hence prove crucially useful to understand the important process of cavitation erosion

  16. Cavitation effects in ultrasonic cleaning baths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasscock, Barbara H.

    1995-01-01

    In this project, the effect of cavitation from aqueous ultrasonic cleaning on the surfaces of metal and non-metal sample coupons was studied. After twenty cleaning cycles, the mass loss from the aluminum coupons averaged 0.22 mg/sq cm surface area and 0.014 mg/sq cm for both stainless steel and titanium. The aluminum coupons showed visual evidence of minor cavitation erosion in regions of previously existing surface irregularities. The non-metal samples showed some periods of mass gain. These effects are believed to have minor impact on hardware being cleaned, but should be evaluated in the context of specific hardware requirements. Also the ultrasonic activity in the large cleaning baths was found to be unevenly distributed as measured by damage to sheets of aluminum foil. It is therefore recommended that items being cleaned in an ultrasonic bath be moved or conveyed during the cleaning to more evenly distribute the cavitation action provide more uniform cleaning.

  17. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  18. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  19. Restoration of accelerator facilities damaged by Great East Japan Earthquake at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Takashi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Shimada, Kenzi; Yoshida, Hidetomo P; Shinozuka, Tsutomu; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) of Tohoku University is a joint-use institution for education and research in a wide variety of fields ranging from physics to medicine. Accelerator facilities at the CYRIC provide opportunities for implementing a broad research program, including medical research using positron emission tomography (PET), with accelerated ions and radioisotopes. At the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, no human injuries occurred and a smooth evacuation was made in the CYRIC, thanks to the anti-earthquake measures such as the renovation of the cyclotron building in 2009 mainly to provide seismic strengthening, fixation of shelves to prevent the falling of objects, and securement of the width of the evacuation route. The preparation of an emergency response manual was also helpful. However, the accelerator facilities were damaged because of strong shaking that continued for a few minutes. For example, two columns on which a 930 cyclotron was placed were damaged, and thereby the 930 cyclotron was inclined. All the elements of beam transport lines were deviated from the beam axis. Some peripheral devices in a HM12 cyclotron were broken. Two shielding doors fell from the carriage onto the floor and blocked the entrances to the rooms. The repair work on the accelerator facilities was started at the end of July 2011. During the repair work, the joint use of the accelerator facilities was suspended. After the repair work was completed, the joint use was re-started at October 2012, one and a half years after the earthquake. PMID:25030295

  20. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage-induced cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-04-15

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β-dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP-regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  1. Plastic deformation of a magnesium oxide 001-plane surface produced by cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, S.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Okada, T.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine plastic deformation of a cleaved single-crystal magnesium oxide 001-plane surface exposed to cavitation. Cavitation damage experiments were carried out in distilled water at 25 C by using a magnetostrictive oscillator in close proximity (2 mm) to the surface of the cleaved specimen. The dislocation-etch-pit patterns induced by cavitation were examined and compared with that of microhardness indentations. The results revealed that dislocation-etch-pit patterns around hardness indentations contain both screw and edge dislocations, while the etch-pit patterns on the surface exposed to cavitation contain only screw dislocations. During cavitation, deformation occurred in a thin surface layer, accompanied by work-hardening of the ceramic. The row of screw dislocations underwent a stable growth, which was analyzed crystallographically.

  2. Comparative cavitation erosion test on steels produced by ESR and AOD refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dojčinović, M.

    2011-09-01

    Cavitation erosion studies of steels produced by Electroslag Refining (ESR) and Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD refining) have been carried out. The experiments were conducted using the modified ultrasonically induced cavitation test method. Erosion rates were measured and the morphology of damages under cavitation action was studied by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy techniques. The present work is aimed at understanding the cavitation erosion behaviour of electroslag refined steel (ESR) compared with the steel produced by Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD refining), commonly used in the production of hydraulic machinery parts (Pelton blades). The results exhibited lower cavitation rate of ESR steel compared with AOD steel, as a consequence of its better mechanical properties and homogeneous and fine-grained microstructure.

  3. Cavitation improvement of double suction centrifugal pump HPP Fuhren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škerlavaj, A.; Titzschkau, M.; Pavlin, R.; Vehar, F.; Mežnar, P.; Lipej, A.

    2012-11-01

    A double suction storage pump has been refurbished because of the strong cavitation which resulted in cavitation damage on blade and consequently in frequent repairs of the impeller. The analyses of the old and the new impeller were done by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), performing transient simulations with the commercial solver Ansys CFX. In the simulations, the scale-adaptive-simulation with the curvature correction (SAS-CC) turbulence model was used. No model tests were carried out. Additionally, observations with the digital camera were made through the specially designed plexi-glass window, mounted at the lid at the suction side. The predicted pump head at the operating point agrees well with the pump characteristics measurements, performed with the direct thermodynamic method. The extent of the cavitation predicted by CFD is smaller than the observed one because the cloud cavitation was not predicted. The observations of the cavitation extent show that the impeller design is better than the old one, which was also possible to anticipate based on the CFD results.

  4. Current Status in Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  5. Thresholds of Transient Cavitation Produced by Pulsed Ultrasound in a Controlled Nuclei Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy Katherine Smith

    The possibility of hazardous bioeffects from medical ultrasound examinations and therapy, although not demonstrated in current epidemiologic data, is still of interest to the medical community. In particular, concern persists over the potential of damage at the cellular level due to transient cavitation produced by diagnostic and high intensity therapeutic ultrasound. Transient cavitation is a discrete phenomenon which relies on the existence of stabilized nuclei, or pockets of gas within a host fluid, for its genesis. A convenient descriptor for assessing the likelihood of transient cavitation is the threshold pressure, or the minimum acoustic pressure necessary to initiate bubble growth and subsequent collapse. Experimental measurements of cavitation thresholds are presented here which elucidate the importance of ultrasound host fluid and nuclei parameters in determining these thresholds. These results are interpreted in the context of an approximate theory, included as an appendix, describing the relationship between these parameters and cavitation threshold pressures. An automated experimental apparatus has been developed to determine thresholds for cavitation produced in a fluid by short tone bursts of ultrasound at 0.76, 0.99, and 2.30 MHz. A fluid jet was used to convect potential cavitation nuclei through the focal region of the insonifying transducer. Potential nuclei tested include 1mum polystyrene spheres, microbubbles in the 1-10 μm range that are stabilized with human serum albumin, and whole blood constituents. Cavitation was detected by a passive acoustical technique which is sensitive to sound scattered from cavitation bubbles. Measurements of the transient cavitation threshold in water, in a fluid of higher viscosity, and in diluted whole blood are presented. Results from these experiments which permit the control of nuclei and host fluid properties are compared to the approximate analytical theory for the prediction of the onset of cavitation.

  6. Enhancement of Fluorescent Probe Penetration into Tumors In Vivo Using Unseeded Inertial Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Pillon, Arnaud; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Cartron, Valérie; Cèbe, Patrick; Chansard, Nathalie; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-induced cavitation has found many applications in the field of cancer therapy. One of its beneficial effects is the enhancement of drug intake by tumor cells. Our group has developed a device that can create and control unseeded cavitation in tissue using ultrasound. We conducted experiments on tumor-bearing mice using our device to assess the impact of sonication on the penetration of fluorescent probes into tumor cells. We studied the influence of pressure level, timing of sonication and sonication duration on treatment efficiency. Our results indicate that fluorescent probes penetrate better into tumors exposed to ultrasound. The best results revealed an increase in penetration of 61% and were obtained when sonicating the tumor in presence of the probes with a peak negative pressure at focus of 19 MPa. At this pressure level, the treatment generated only minor skin damage. Treatments could be significantly accelerated as equivalent enhanced penetration of probes was achieved when multiplying the initial raster scan speed by a factor of four. PMID:27087691

  7. Dynamic response of cavitating turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    Stimulated by the pogo instability encountered in many liquid propellant rockets, the dynamic behavior of cavitating inducers is discussed. An experimental facility where the upstream and downstream flows of a cavitating inducer could be perturbed was constructed and tested. The upstream and downstream pressure and mass flow fluctuations were measured. Matrices representing the transfer functions across the inducer pump were calculated from these measurements and from the hydraulic system characteristics for two impellers in various states of cavitation. The transfer matrices when plotted against the perturbing frequency showed significant departure from steady state or quasi-steady predictions especially at higher frequencies.

  8. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  9. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  10. Accelerated alpha radiation damage in a ceramic waste form, interim results

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S. M.; Johnson, S. G.; Moschetti, T. L.; O'Holleran, T. P.; Sinkler, W.; Esh, D.; Goff, K. M.

    1999-11-11

    Interim results are presented on the alpha-decay damage study of a {sup 238}Pu-loaded ceramic waste form (CWF). The waste form was developed to immobilize fission products and transuranic species accumulated from the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. To evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay damage on the waste form the {sup 238}Pu-loaded material was analyzed by (1) x-ray diffraction (XRD), (2) microstructure characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS/WDS) and electron diffraction, (3) bulk density measurements and (4) waste form durability, performed by the product consistency test (PCT). While the predominate phase of plutonium in the CWF, PuO{sub 2}, shows the expected unit cell expansion due to {alpha}-decay damage, currently no significant change has occurred to the macro- or microstructure of the material. The major phase of the waste form is sodalite and contains very little Pu, although the exact amount is unknown. Interestingly, measurement of the sodalite phase unit cell is also showing very slight expansion; again, presumably from {alpha}-decay damage.

  11. Bacterial Sterilization Using Cavitating Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Yohei; Kato, Hiroharu; Usami, Ron; Fukushima, Tadamasa

    In this paper, a new sterilization method using cavitating flow is presented. Water with bacteria was pressurized up to 105 MPa and flushed out through two very small nozzles 0.1-0.31 mm in diameter, where a cavitating jet was generated containing bubbles that collapsed downstream. First, the effects of jet velocity and cavitation number on the sterilization rate of Escherichia coli JCM1649T (E. coli) were examined. The sterilization rate increased with jet velocity. The rate was proportional to the 3rd power of the velocity. All the E. coli cells were killed by three successive treatments at V=355.7 m/s and cavitation number σ=0.154. The sterilization rate has a peak depending on cavitation number at the low-jet-velocity region of less than 300 m/s. An experiment was also performed to compare two types of bacteria, E. coli, as typical Gram-negative bacteria and Bacillus subtilis JCM1465T (B. subtilis), as typical Gram-positive bacteria. Additional tests were performed using Pseudomonas putida JCM13063T, Gram-negative bacteria and Bacillus halodurans JCTM9153, Gram-positive bacteria. The sterilization rate of the Gram-positive bacteria was much lower than that of the Gram-negative bacteria under the same experimental conditions. Gram-positive bacteria have a thicker peptidoglycan layer than Gram-negative bacteria. This may be the reason why B. subtilis is more resistant to the mechanical stress caused by cavitating flow.

  12. Spallation radiation damage and dosimetry for accelerator transmutation of waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, M.S.; Lin, C.; Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F.

    1993-10-01

    Proposals are currently being made for systems to treat radioactive waste based on the use of accelerator-driven neutron sources. A linear proton accelerator with energies as high as 1600 MeV and currents up to 250 ma are anticipated for the driver. The neutron fluxes may reach up to 10{sup 20} neutrons/m{sup 2}s as generated by the spallation reactions that occur when the protons strike target materials. Calculations are described to determine radiation fluxes and flux spectra inherent in such systems and to estimate likely radiation effects on system components. The calculations use LAHET, a Monte Carlo high-energy transport code, and MCNP, a generalized-geometry, coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code. Cross sections for displacement and helium production are presented for spallation neutrons of energies from 21 MeV to 1600 MeV for Inconel 718 (Ni plus 18.5, 18.5, 5.1, and 3 wt % of Cr, Fe, Nb, and Mo, respectively), an alloy that is used for the proton beam entry window in several accelerators. In addition, results for this alloy are presented for the primary knocked-on atom (PKA) spectrum and the transmutation yield for 1600 MeV incident neutrons.

  13. Cavitation instability in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L. H.; Huang, X.; Ling, Z.

    2015-09-01

    Recent experiments have shown that fracture surfaces of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) usually exhibit an intriguing nanoscale corrugation like fractographic feature mediated by nanoscale void formation. We attribute the onset of this nanoscale corrugation to TTZs (tension transformation zones) mediated cavitation. In our recent study, the spall experiments of Zr-based BMG using a single-stage light gas gun were performed. To uncover the mechanisms of the spallation damage nucleation and evolution, the samples were designed to be subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of identical amplitude but with different durations by making use of the multi-stress pulse and the double-flyer techniques. It is clearly revealed that the macroscopic spall fracture in BMGs originates from the nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro-voids. Then, a microvoid nucleation model of BMGs based on free volume theory is proposed, which indicates that the nucleation of microvoids at the early stage of spallation in BMGs is resulted from diffusion and coalescence of free volume. Furthermore, a theoretical model of void growth in BMGs undergoing remote dynamic hydrostatic tension is developed. The critical condition of cavitation instability is obtained. It is found that dynamic void growth in BMGs can be well controlled by a dimensionless inertial number characterizing the competition between intrinsic and extrinsic time scales. To unveil the atomic-level mechanism of cavitation, a systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of spallation behaviour of a binary metallic glass with different impact velocities was performed. It is found that micro-void nucleation is determined TTZs while the growth is controlled by shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale.

  14. Improved laser damage threshold performance of calcium fluoride optical surfaces via Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Svrluga, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optics are not keeping up with the pace of laser advancements. The laser industry is rapidly increasing its power capabilities and reducing wavelengths which have exposed the optics as a weak link in lifetime failures for these advanced systems. Nanometer sized surface defects (scratches, pits, bumps and residual particles) on the surface of optics are a significant limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, magnesium fluoride, zinc sulfide, LBO and others presents a unique challenge for traditional polishing techniques. Exogenesis Corporation, using its new and proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and particle contamination leaving many material surfaces with roughness typically around one Angstrom. This surface defect mitigation via ANAB processing can be shown to increase performance properties of high intensity optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for calcium fluoride laser windows. It further correlates laser damage threshold improvements with the smoothing produced by ANAB surface treatment. All ANAB processing was performed at Exogenesis Corporation using an nAccel100TM Accelerated Particle Beam processing tool. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis on a Park Model XE70 AFM, and all laser damage testing was performed at Spica Technologies, Inc. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply mechanical forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface

  15. Extracting a Whisper from the DIN: A Bayesian-Inductive Approach to Learning an Anticipatory Model of Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1999-11-07

    For several reasons, Bayesian parameter estimation is superior to other methods for inductively learning a model for an anticipatory system. Since it exploits prior knowledge, the analysis begins from a more advantageous starting point than other methods. Also, since "nuisance parameters" can be removed from the Bayesian analysis, the description of the model need not be as complete as is necessary for such methods as matched filtering. In the limit of perfectly random noise and a perfect description of the model, the signal-to-noise ratio improves as the square root of the number of samples in the data. Even with the imperfections of real-world data, Bayesian methods approach this ideal limit of performance more closely than other methods. These capabilities provide a strategy for addressing a major unsolved problem in pump operation: the identification of precursors of cavitation. Cavitation causes immediate degradation of pump performance and ultimate destruction of the pump. However, the most efficient point to operate a pump is just below the threshold of cavitation. It might be hoped that a straightforward method to minimize pump cavitation damage would be to simply adjust the operating point until the inception of cavitation is detected and then to slightly readjust the operating point to let the cavitation vanish. However, due to the continuously evolving state of the fluid moving through the pump, the threshold of cavitation tends to wander. What is needed is to anticipate cavitation, and this requires the detection and identification of precursor features that occur just before cavitation starts.

  16. Real-time diagnostic for charging and damage of dielectrics in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchelkunov, S. V.; Marshall, T. C.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the progress made during the initial stage of our research to study charging rate and charge distribution in a thin walled dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) from a passing charge bunch and the physics of conductivity and discharge phenomena in dielectric materials useful in accelerator applications. The issue is the role played by the beam halo and intense wakefields in charging the dielectric, possibly leading to undesired deflection of charge bunches and degradation of the dielectric material: the effects that may grow over many pulses, albeit perhaps differently at different repetition rates. During the initial stage of development, a microwave apparatus was built and signal processing was developed to observe time-dependent charging of dielectric surfaces and/or plasmas located on or near the inner surface of a thin-wall hollow dielectric tube. Three frequencies were employed to improve the data handling rate and the signal-to-noise. The test and performance results for a plasma test case are presented; in particular, the performance of the test unit shows capability to detect small changes ~0.1% of a dielectric constant, which would correspond to the scraping-off of only 0.3 nC to the walls of the dielectric liner inside the cavity from the passing charge bunch.

  17. Toward a mechanistic understanding of the damage evolution of SnAgCu solder joints in accelerated thermal cycling test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahin Shirazi, Sam

    Accelerated thermal cycling (ATC) tests are the most commonly used tests for the thermo-mechanical performance assessment of microelectronics assemblies. Currently used reliability models have failed to incorporate the microstructural dependency of lead free solder joint behavior and its microstructure evolution during cycling. Thus, it is essential to have a mechanistic understanding of the effect of cycling parameters on damage evolution and failure of lead free solder joints in ATC. Recrystallization has been identified as the damage rate controlling mechanism in ATC. Usually it takes 1/3 of life for completion of recrystallization regardless of cycling parameters. Thus, the life of the solder joints can be predicted by estimating global recrystallization. The objective of the first part of the study was to examine whether the damage scenario applies in service is the same as the harsh thermal cycling tests (i.e. 0/100 °C and -40/125 °C) commonly used in industry. Microstructure analysis results on a variety of lead free solder SnAgCu assemblies subjected to the both harsh (0/100 °C) and mild (20/80 °C) ATC confirmed similar failure mechanism under the both testing conditions. Sn grain morphology (interlaced versus beach ball) has a significant effect on the thermo-mechanical performance (and thus the model) of the lead free solder joints. The longer thermal cycling lifetime observed in the interlaced solder joints subjected to the ATC compared to the beach ball structure was correlated to the different initial microstructure and the microstructure evolution during cycling. For the modeling proposes, the present study was focused on Sn-Ag-Cu solder joints with either a single Sn grain or beach ball structure. Microstructural analysis results of the simulated thermal cycling experiment revealed that, the life can be approximated as determined by the accumulation of a certain amount of work during the high temperature dwells. Finally the effect of precipitates

  18. Optimal design of solenoid valve to minimize cavitation by numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seungbin; Jang, Ilhoon; Song, Simon

    2012-11-01

    Keeping pace with the development of clean energy, hybrid cars and electric vehicles are getting extensive attention recently. In an electronic-control brake system which is essential to those vehicles, a solenoid valve is used to control external hydraulic pressure that boosts up the driver's braking force. However, strong cavitation occurs at the narrow passage between the ball and seat of a solenoid valve due to sudden decrease in pressure, leading to severe damage to the valve. In this study, we investigate the cavitation numerically to discover geometric parameters to affect the cavitation, and an optimal design to minimize the cavitation using optimization technique. As a result, we found four parameters: seat inner radius, seat angle, seat length, and ball radius. Among them, the seat inner radius affects the cavitation most. Also, we found that preventing a sudden reduction in a flow passage is important to reduce cavitation. Finally using an evolutionary algorithm for optimization we minimized cavitation. The optimal design resulted in the maximum vapor volume of fraction of 0.04 while it was 0.7 for reference geometry.

  19. Air emission into a water shear layer through porous media. Part 2: Cavitation induced pressure attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, E.C.; Marboe, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation near the casing of a hydroturbine can lead to damage through both cavitation erosion and mechanical vibration of the casing and the associated piping. Cavitation erosion results from the collapse of cavitation bubbles on or near a surface such as the casing wall. Mechanical vibrations transmitted to the casing directly through the collapse of bubbles on the casing wall indirectly through a coupling of the acoustic pressure pulse due to a nearby collapse on the turbine blade. Air emission along the casing can reduce the intensity of the tip vortex and the gap cavitation through ventilation of the cavity. Reduction in the machinery vibration is obtained by reduction of the intensity of cavitation bubble collapse and attenuation and scattering of the radiated acoustic pressure. This requires a bubble layer which may be introduced in the vicinity of the turbine blade tips. This layer remains for some distance downstream of the blades and is effective for attenuation of tip vortex induced noise and blade surface cavitation noise. For the purpose of characterizing this bubble layer within a water pipe, the authors spanned a pipe with a two dimensional hydrofoil and emitted air through porous media (20 and 100 micron porosity sintered stainless steel) into the shear flow over the hydrofoil. This paper is limited to an investigation of the attenuation of acoustic pressure propagating to the casing rather than the reduction in acoustic source level due to collapse cushioning effects.

  20. Estimations of scale effects on blade cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of scale effects on blade cavitation require consideration of multiple models for both water flows and cavities. In particular, distinction of laminar and turbulent boundary layers is very important. A qualitative impact of selection of models is manifested for blade sheet cavitation. Its quantitative impact is shown for vortex cavitation inception.

  1. Accelerated hand bone mineral density loss is associated with progressive joint damage in hands and feet in recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction To investigate whether accelerated hand bone mineral density (BMD) loss is associated with progressive joint damage in hands and feet in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and whether it is an independent predictor of subsequent progressive total joint damage after 4 years. Methods In 256 recent-onset RA patients, baseline and 1-year hand BMD was measured in metacarpals 2-4 by digital X-ray radiogrammetry. Joint damage in hands and feet were scored in random order according to the Sharp-van der Heijde method at baseline and yearly up to 4 years. Results 68% of the patients had accelerated hand BMD loss (>-0.003 g/cm2) in the first year of RA. Hand BMD loss was associated with progressive joint damage after 1 year both in hands and feet with odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals [CI]) of 5.3 (1.3-20.9) and 3.1 (1.0-9.7). In univariate analysis, hand BMD loss in the first year was a predictor of subsequent progressive total joint damage after 4 years with an OR (95% CI) of 3.1 (1.3-7.6). Multivariate analysis showed that only progressive joint damage in the first year and anti-citrullinated protein antibody positivity were independent predictors of long-term progressive joint damage. Conclusions In the first year of RA, accelerated hand BMD loss is associated with progressive joint damage in both hands and feet. Hand BMD loss in the first year of recent-onset RA predicts subsequent progressive total joint damage, however not independent of progressive joint damage in the first year. PMID:20482894

  2. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  3. Computation and analysis of cavitating flow in Francis-class hydraulic turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Daniel J.

    Hydropower is the most proven renewable energy technology, supplying the world with 16% of its electricity. Conventional hydropower generates a vast majority of that percentage. Although a mature technology, hydroelectric generation shows great promise for expansion through new dams and plants in developing hydro countries. Moreover, in developed hydro countries, such as the United States, installing generating units in existing dams and the modern refurbishment of existing plants can greatly expand generating capabilities with little to no further impact on the environment. In addition, modern computational technology and fluid dynamics expertise has led to substantial improvements in modern turbine design and performance. Cavitation has always presented a problem in hydroturbines, causing performance breakdown, erosion, damage, vibration, and noise. While modern turbines are usually designed to be cavitation-free at their best efficiency point, due to the variable demand of the energy market it is fairly common to operate at off-design conditions. Here, cavitation and its deleterious effects are unavoidable, and hence, cavitation is a limiting factor on the design and operation of these turbines. Multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used in recent years to model cavitating flow for a large range of problems, including turbomachinery. However, CFD of cavitating flow in hydroturbines is still in its infancy. This dissertation presents steady-periodic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of a cavitating Francis-class hydroturbine at model and prototype scales. Computational results of the reduced-scale model and full-scale prototype, undergoing performance breakdown, are compared with empirical model data and prototype performance estimations based on standard industry scalings from the model data. Mesh convergence of the simulations is also displayed. Comparisons are made between the scales to display that cavitation performance breakdown

  4. Prolonged Subcutaneous Administration of Oxytocin Accelerates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Renal Damage in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phie, James; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Newton, Patricia; Constantinoiu, Constantin; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Chilton, Lisa; Kinobe, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin and its receptor are synthesised in the heart and blood vessels but effects of chronic activation of this peripheral oxytocinergic system on cardiovascular function are not known. In acute studies, systemic administration of low dose oxytocin exerted a protective, preconditioning effect in experimental models of myocardial ischemia and infarction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of low dose oxytocin following angiotensin II-induced hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage. Angiotensin II (40 μg/Kg/h) only, oxytocin only (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h), or angiotensin II combined with oxytocin (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h) were infused subcutaneously in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 days. At day 7, oxytocin or angiotensin-II only did not change hemodynamic parameters, but animals that received a combination of oxytocin and angiotensin-II had significantly elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure compared to controls (P < 0.01). Hemodynamic changes were accompanied by significant left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage at day 28 in animals treated with angiotensin II (P < 0.05) or both oxytocin and angiotensin II, compared to controls (P < 0.01). Prolonged oxytocin administration did not affect plasma concentrations of renin and atrial natriuretic peptide, but was associated with the activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, a canonical signalling mechanism in pressure overload-induced cardiovascular disease. These data demonstrate that oxytocin accelerated angiotensin-II induced hypertension and end-organ renal damage, suggesting caution should be exercised in the chronic use of oxytocin in individuals with hypertension. PMID:26393919

  5. Decay-Accelerating Factor Mitigates Controlled Hemorrhage-Instigated Intestinal and Lung Tissue Damage and Hyperkalemia in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J.; Simovic, Milomir; Li, Yansong; Moratz, Chantal; Falabella, Michael; Tsokos, George C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of complement system has been associated with tissue injury after hemorrhage and resuscitation in rats and swine. This study investigated whether administration of human recombinant decay-accelerating factor (DAF; a complement regulatory protein that inhibits classical and alternative pathways) reduces tissue damage in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock. Methods Male Yorkshire swine assigned to four groups were subjected to controlled, isobaric hemorrhage over 15 minutes to a target mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg. Hypotension was maintained for 20 minutes followed by a bolus intravenous injection of DAF or vehicle then animals were observed for 200 minutes. Blood chemistry and physiological parameters were recorded. Tissue samples from lung and small intestine were subjected to histopathological evaluation and detection of tissue deposition of complement proteins by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. Results Administration of DAF significantly reduced intestinal and lung tissue damage in a dose-dependent manner (5, 25, and 50 µg/kg). In addition, DAF treatment improved hemorrhage-induced hyperkalemia. The protective effects of DAF appear to be related to its ability to reduce tissue complement activation and deposition on affected tissues. Conclusions DAF treatment decreased tissue complement activation and deposition in hemorrhaged animals and attenuated tissue damage at 200 minutes post treatment. The observed beneficial effects of DAF treatment on tissue injury after 20 minutes of severe hypotension presents an attractive model of small volume resuscitation, particularly in situations with a restrictive medical logistical footprint such as far-forward access to first responders in the battlefield or in remote rural or mountainous environments. PMID:21795874

  6. Cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with accelerated 56Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, M.; Piao, C.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We examined cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with high-energy 56Fe ions. Cells were irradiated with graded doses of 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon) accelerated with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The survival curves for cells plated 1 h after irradiation (immediate plating) showed little or no shoulder. However, the survival curves for cells plated 24 h after irradiation (delayed plating) had a small initial shoulder. The RBE for 56Fe ions compared to 137Cs gamma rays was 1.99 for immediate plating and 2.73 for delayed plating at the D10. The repair ratio (delayed plating/immediate plating) was 1.67 for 137Cs gamma rays and 1.22 for 56Fe ions. The dose-response curves for initially measured and residual chromatid fragments detected by the Calyculin A-mediated premature chromosome condensation technique showed a linear response. The results indicated that the induction frequency for initially measured fragments was the same for 137Cs gamma rays and 56Fe ions. On the other hand, approximately 85% of the fragments induced by 137Cs gamma rays had rejoined after 24 h of postirradiation incubation; the corresponding amount for 56Fe ions was 37%. Furthermore, the frequency of chromatid exchanges induced by gamma rays measured 24 h after irradiation was higher than that induced by 56Fe ions. No difference in the amount of chromatid damage induced by the two types of radiations was detected when assayed 1 h after irradiation. The results suggest that high-energy 56Fe ions induce a higher frequency of complex, unrepairable damage at both the cellular and chromosomal levels than 137Cs gamma rays in the target cells for radiation-induced lung cancers.

  7. Tamoxifen DNA damage detected in human endometrium using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Brown, Karen; Gaskell, Margaret; Al-Azzawi, Farook; Garner, R Colin; Boocock, David J; Mattock, Elizabeth; Pring, David W; Dingley, Karen; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Smith, Lewis L; White, Ian N H

    2003-12-01

    This study was aimed to establish whether tamoxifen binds irreversibly to uterine DNA when given to women. Patients were given a single therapeutic dose of [(14)C]tamoxifen citrate orally (20 mg, 0.37 or 1.85 MBq) approximately 18 h prior to hysterectomy or breast surgery. Nonmalignant uterine tissue was separated into myometrium and endometrium. DNA and protein were isolated and bound radiolabel determined by the sensitive technique of accelerator mass spectrometry. Levels of irreversible DNA binding of tamoxifen in the endometrium of treated patients were 237 +/- 77 adducts/10(12) nucleotides (mean +/- SE, n = 10). In myometrial tissues, a similar extent of DNA binding was detected (492 +/- 112 adducts/10(12) nucleotides). Binding of tamoxifen to endometrial and myometrial proteins was 10 +/- 3 and 20 +/- 4 fmol/mg, respectively. In breast tissue, sufficient DNA could not be extracted but protein binding was an order of magnitude higher than that seen with endometrial proteins (358 +/- 81 fmol/mg). These results demonstrate that after oral administration, tamoxifen forms adducts in human uterine DNA but at low numbers relative to those previously reported in women after long-term tamoxifen treatment where levels, when detected, ranged from 15000 to 130000 adducts/10(12) nucleotides. Our findings support the hypothesis that the low level of DNA adducts in human uterus is unlikely to be involved with endometrial cancer development. PMID:14679010

  8. Preventing cavitation in butterfly valves

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.D.

    1985-03-18

    Some of the mechanical problems that plagued butterfly valves in the past are discussed. The authors suggest integrated packages to alleviate these problems. These packages include such innovations as backlash-free stem connections, allenclosed actuator packages, and torque-compensated vanes. Some disadvantages to these packages are outlined and examined, including: high noise levels with compressible fluids, and an increased tendency to cavitate with liquids. A discussion follows on cavitation--how it is caused, just how much of it can be tolerated, and how it can be avoided or reduced.

  9. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  10. Cavitation phenomena in mechanical heart valves: studied by using a physical impinging rod system.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Wen; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Li, Chi-Pei; Lu, Po-Chien

    2010-10-01

    When studying mechanical heart valve cavitation, a physical model allows direct flow field and pressure measurements that are difficult to perform with actual valves, as well as separate testing of water hammer and squeeze flow effects. Movable rods of 5 and 10 mm diameter impinged same-sized stationary rods to simulate squeeze flow. A 24 mm piston within a tube simulated water hammer. Adding a 5 mm stationary rod within the tube generated both effects simultaneously. Charged-coupled device (CCD) laser displacement sensors, strobe lighting technique, laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high fidelity piezoelectric pressure transducers measured impact velocities, cavitation images, squeeze flow velocities, vortices, and pressure changes at impact, respectively. The movable rods created cavitation at critical impact velocities of 1.6 and 1.2 m/s; squeeze flow velocities were 2.8 and 4.64 m/s. The isolated water hammer created cavitation at 1.3 m/s piston speed. The combined piston and stationary rod created cavitation at an impact speed of 0.9 m/s and squeeze flow of 3.2 m/s. These results show squeeze flow alone caused cavitation, notably at lower impact velocity as contact area increased. Water hammer alone also caused cavitation with faster displacement. Both effects together were additive. The pressure change at the vortex center was only 150 mmHg, which cannot generate the magnitude of pressure drop required for cavitation bubble formation. Cavitation occurred at 3-5 m/s squeeze flow, significantly different from the 14 m/s derived by Bernoulli's equation; the temporal acceleration of unsteady flow requires further study. PMID:20490686

  11. Pulsed ultrasound therapy accelerates the recovery of skeletal muscle damage induced by Bothrops jararacussu venom.

    PubMed

    Saturnino-Oliveira, J; Tomaz, M A; Fonseca, T F; Gaban, G A; Monteiro-Machado, M; Strauch, M A; Cons, B L; Calil-Elias, S; Martinez, A M B; Melo, P A

    2012-06-01

    We studied the effect of pulsed ultrasound therapy (UST) and antibothropic polyvalent antivenom (PAV) on the regeneration of mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle following damage by Bothrops jararacussu venom. Animals (Swiss male and female mice weighing 25.0 ± 5.0 g; 5 animals per group) received a perimuscular injection of venom (1 mg/kg) and treatment with UST was started 1 h later (1 min/day, 3 MHz, 0.3 W/cm(2), pulsed mode). Three and 28 days after injection, muscles were dissected and processed for light microscopy. The venom caused complete degeneration of muscle fibers. UST alone and combined with PAV (1.0 mL/kg) partially protected these fibers, whereas muscles receiving no treatment showed disorganized fascicules and fibers with reduced diameter. Treatment with UST and PAV decreased the effects of the venom on creatine kinase content and motor activity (approximately 75 and 48%, respectively). Sonication of the venom solution immediately before application decreased the in vivo and ex vivo myotoxic activities (approximately 60 and 50%, respectively). The present data show that UST counteracts some effects of B. jararacussu venom, causing structural and functional improvement of the regenerated muscle after venom injury. PMID:22415117

  12. Numerical investigation of unsteady cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil using OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, V. H.; Luo, X. W.; Escaler, X.; Ji, J.; Aguinaga, A.

    2014-03-01

    The prediction and control of cavitation damage in pumps, propellers, hydro turbines and fluid machinery in general is necessary during the design stage. The present paper deals with a numerical investigation of unsteady cloud cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil. The current study is focused on understanding the dynamic pressures generated during the cavity collapses as a fundamental characteristic in cavitation erosion. A 2D and 3D unsteady flow simulation has been carried out using OpenFOAM. Then, Paraview and Python programming language have been used to characterize dynamic pressure field. Adapted Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Zwart cavitation model have been implemented to improve the analysis of cloud motion and to visualize the bubble expansions. Additional results also confirm the correlation between cavity formation and generated pressures.

  13. Cavitation as a Mechanism to Enhance Wetting in a Mercury Thermal Convection Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, SJ

    2001-07-17

    Type 316L stainless steel was statically tested under cavitation conditions via an ultrasonic transducer externally mounted on a tube filled with ambient mercury. During the preliminary exposure (24 h, 20 kHz, 1.5 MPa), cavitation resulted in apparent wetting of the specimens by mercury as well as general surface roughening and wastage similar to erosion damage. Subsequently, a thermal convection loop identical to those used previously to study thermal gradient mass transfer was modified to include an externally-mounted donut-shaped transducer in order to similarly produce cavitation and wetting at temperatures prototypic of those expected in the SNS target. However, a series of attempts to develop cavitation and wetting on 316L specimens in the thermal convection loop was unsuccessful.

  14. Cavitation in an orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, S.; Sirignano, W. A.; Joseph, D. D.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the potential locations for cavitation induced by total stress on the flow of a liquid through an orifice of an atomizer. A numerical simulation of two-phase incompressible flow is conducted in an axisymmetric geometry of the orifice for Reynolds numbers between 100 and 2000. The orifice has a rounded upstream corner and a sharp downstream corner with length-to-diameter ratio between 0.1 and 5. The total stress including viscous stress and pressure has been calculated in the flow field and, from there, the maximum principal stress is found. The total-stress criterion for cavitation is applied to find the regions where cavitation is likely to occur and compared with those of the traditional pressure criterion. Results show that the viscous stress has significant effects on cavitation. The effect of geometry and occurrence of hydraulic flip in the orifice on the total stress are studied. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically using a finite-volume method and a boundary-fitted orthogonal grid that comes from the streamlines and potential lines of an axisymmetric equipotential flow in the same geometry. A level-set formulation is used to track the interface and model the surface tension.

  15. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mørch, K A

    2015-10-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes. PMID:26442138

  16. Stochastic-field cavitation model

    SciTech Connect

    Dumond, J.; Magagnato, F.; Class, A.

    2013-07-15

    Nonlinear phenomena can often be well described using probability density functions (pdf) and pdf transport models. Traditionally, the simulation of pdf transport requires Monte-Carlo codes based on Lagrangian “particles” or prescribed pdf assumptions including binning techniques. Recently, in the field of combustion, a novel formulation called the stochastic-field method solving pdf transport based on Eulerian fields has been proposed which eliminates the necessity to mix Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques or prescribed pdf assumptions. In the present work, for the first time the stochastic-field method is applied to multi-phase flow and, in particular, to cavitating flow. To validate the proposed stochastic-field cavitation model, two applications are considered. First, sheet cavitation is simulated in a Venturi-type nozzle. The second application is an innovative fluidic diode which exhibits coolant flashing. Agreement with experimental results is obtained for both applications with a fixed set of model constants. The stochastic-field cavitation model captures the wide range of pdf shapes present at different locations.

  17. Scale effects on propeller cavitating hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic performances with non-uniform inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiongfang; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Zhihong

    2013-03-01

    Considering the lack of theoretical models and ingredients necessary to explain the scaling of the results of propeller cavitation inception and cavitating hydroacoustics from model tests to full scale currently, and the insufficient reflection of the nuclei effects on cavitation in the numerical methods, the cavitating hydrodynamics and cavitation low frequency noise spectrum of three geometrically similar 7-bladed highly skewed propellers with non-uniform inflow are addressed. In this process, a numerical bridge from the multiphase viscous simulation of propeller cavitation hydrodynamics to its hydro-acoustics is built, and the scale effects on performances and the applicability of exist scaling law are analyzed. The effects of non-condensable gas(NCG) on cavitation inception are involved explicitly in the improved Sauer's cavitation model, and the cavity volume acceleration related to its characteristic length is used to produce the noise spectrum. Results show that, with the same cavitation number, the cavity extension on propeller blades increases with diameter associated with an earlier shift of the beginning point of thrust decline induced by cavitation, while the three decline slopes of thrust breakdown curves are found to be nearly the same. The power of the scaling law based on local Reynolds number around 0.9 R section is determined as 0.11. As for the smallest propeller, the predominant tonal noise is located at blade passing frequency(BPF), whereas 2BPF for the middle and both 2BPF and 3BPF for the largest, which shows the cavitating line spectrum is fully related to the interaction between non-uniform inflow and fluctuated cavity volume. The predicted spectrum level exceedance from the middle to the large propeller is 6.65 dB at BPF and 5.94 dB at 2BPF. Since it just differs less than 2 dB to the increment obtained by empirical scaling law, it is inferred that the scale effects on them are acceptable with a sufficient model scale, and so do the

  18. A Study on the Mechanism for Cavitation in the Mechanical Heart Valves with an Electrohydraulic Total Artificial Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwansung; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Homma, Akihiko; Kamimura, Tadayuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Soichiro

    It has been conceived that the mechanical heart valves mounted in an artificial heart close much faster than in vivo use, resulting in cavitation bubbles formation. In this study, the mechanisms for cavitation in mechanical heart valves (MHVs) is investigated with monoleaflet and bileaflet valves in the mitral position with an electrohydraulic total artificial heart (EHTAH). The valve-closing velocity and pressure-drop through the valve were done, and a high-speed video camera was employed to investigate the mechanism for MHVs cavitation. The valve-closing velocity and pressure-drop of the bileaflet valves were less than that of the monoleaflet valves. Most of the cavitation bubbles in the monoleaflet valves were observed next to the edge of the valve stop and the inner side of the leaflet. With the bileaflet valves, cavitation bubbles were concentrated along the leaflet tip. Also, the number density of cavitation bubbles in the bileaflet valves was less than that of the monoleaflet valves. The number density of cavitation bubbles increased with an increase in the valve-closing velocity and the valve stop area. It is established that squeeze flow holds the key to cavitation in the mechanical heart valve. In a viewpoint of squeeze flow, the bileaflet valve with slow valve-closing velocity and small valve stop area, is safer to prevent of blood cell damage than the monoleaflet valves.

  19. Tandem shock wave cavitation enhancement for extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Loske, Achim M; Prieto, Fernando E; Fernandez, Francisco; van Cauwelaert, Javier

    2002-11-21

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been successful for more than twenty years in treating patients with kidney stones. Hundreds of underwater shock waves are generated outside the patient's body and focused on the kidney stone. Stones fracture mainly due to spalling, cavitation and layer separation. Cavitation bubbles are produced in the vicinity of the stone by the tensile phase of each shock wave. Bubbles expand, stabilize and finally collapse violently, creating stone-damaging secondary shock waves and microjets. Bubble collapse can be intensified by sending a second shock wave a few hundred microseconds after the first. A novel method of generating two piezoelectrically generated shock waves with an adjustable time delay between 50 and 950 micros is described and tested. The objective is to enhance cavitation-induced damage to kidney stones during ESWL in order to reduce treatment time. In vitro kidney stone model fragmentation efficiency and pressure measurements were compared with those for a standard ESWL system. Results indicate that fragmentation efficiency was significantly enhanced at a shock wave delay of about 400 and 250 micros using rectangular and spherical stone phantoms, respectively. The system presented here could be installed in clinical devices at relatively low cost, without the need for a second shock wave generator. PMID:12476975

  20. Prediction of cryogenic cavitation around hydrofoil by an extensional Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T. Z.; Wei, Y. J.; Wang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Developing a robust computational strategy to address the rich physics characteristic involved in the thermodynamic effects on the cryogenic cavitation remains a challenging problem. The objective of this present study is to model the numerical methodology to simulate the cryogenic cavitation by implanting the thermodynamic effects to the Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model, and coupling the energy equation considered the latent heat. For this purpose, cavitating flows are investigated over a three dimensional hydrofoil in liquid hydrogen and nitrogen. Experimental measurements of pressure and temperature are utilized to validate the extensional Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model. Specifically, the further analysis of the cavitation solution with respect to the thermodynamic term is conducted. The results show that the extensional Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model predicts better accuracy to the quasi-steady cavitation over hydrofoil in the two cryogenic fluids.

  1. A cavitation model for computations of unsteady cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2016-04-01

    A local vortical cavitation (LVC) model for the computation of unsteady cavitation is proposed. The model is derived from the Rayleigh-Plesset equations, and takes into account the relations between the cavitation bubble radius and local vortical effects. Calculations of unsteady cloud cavitating flows around a Clark-Y hydrofoil are performed to assess the predictive capability of the LVC model using well-documented experimental data. Compared with the conventional Zwart's model, better agreement is observed between the predictions of the LVC model and experimental data, including measurements of time-averaged flow structures, instantaneous cavity shapes and the frequency of the cloud cavity shedding process. Based on the predictions of the LVC model, it is demonstrated that the evaporation process largely concentrates in the core region of the leading edge vorticity in accordance with the growth in the attached cavity, and the condensation process concentrates in the core region of the trailing edge vorticity, which corresponds to the spread of the rear component of the attached cavity. When the attached cavity breaks up and moves downstream, the condensation area fully transports to the wake region, which is in accordance with the dissipation of the detached cavity. Furthermore, using vorticity transport equations, we also find that the periodic formation, breakup, and shedding of the sheet/cloud cavities, along with the associated baroclinic torque, are important mechanisms for vorticity production and modification. When the attached cavity grows, the liquid-vapour interface that moves towards the trailing edge enhances the vorticity in the attached cavity closure region. As the re-entrant jet moves upstream, the wavy/bubbly cavity interface enhances the vorticity near the trailing edge. At the end of the cycle, the break-up of the stable attached cavity is the main reason for the vorticity enhancement near the suction surface.

  2. Cavitating flow during water hammer using a generalized interface vaporous cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadafi, Mohamadhosein; Riasi, Alireza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Ahmad

    2012-10-01

    In a transient flow simulation, column separation may occur when the calculated pressure head decreases to the saturated vapor pressure head in a computational grid. Abrupt valve closure or pump failure can result in a fast transient flow with column separation, potentially causing problems such as pipe failure, hydraulic equipment damage, cavitation or corrosion. This paper reports a numerical study of water hammer with column separation in a simple reservoir-pipeline-valve system and pumping station. The governing equations for two-phase transient flow in pipes are solved based on the method of characteristics (MOC) using a generalized interface vaporous cavitating model (GIVCM). The numerical results were compared with the experimental data for validation purposes, and the comparison indicated that the GIVCM describes the experimental results more accurately than the discrete vapor cavity model (DVCM). In particular, the GIVCM correlated better with the experimental data than the DVCM in terms of timing and pressure magnitude. The effects of geometric and hydraulic parameters on flow behavior in a pumping station with column separation were also investigated in this study.

  3. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Császár, Nikolaus B. M.; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Milz, Stefan; Sprecher, Christoph M.; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed; Furia, John P.; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. Methods and Findings We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical Systems, Nyon, Switzerland; D-Actor 200; Storz Medical, Tägerwillen, Switzerland) and a vibrating massage device (Vibracare; G5/General Physiotherapy, Inc., Earth City, MO, USA). To assert potential bioeffects of these treatment modalities we investigated the influence of rESWT and vibrating massage devices on locomotion ability of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms. Results FOPH measurements demonstrated that both rESWT devices generated acoustic waves with comparable pressure and energy flux density. Furthermore, both rESWT devices generated cavitation as evidenced by high-speed imaging and caused mechanical damage on the surface of x-ray film. The vibrating massage device did not show any of these characteristics. Moreover, locomotion ability of C. elegans was statistically significantly impaired after exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves but was unaffected after exposure of worms to the vibrating massage device. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that both energy signature and bioeffects of rESWT devices are fundamentally different from those of vibrating massage devices. Clinical Relevance Prior ESWT studies have shown that tissues treated with sufficient quantities of acoustic sound waves undergo cavitation build-up, mechanotransduction, and ultimately, a biological alteration that “kick-starts” the healing response. Due to their different treatment indications and contra-indications rESWT devices cannot be equated to vibrating

  4. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun

    2014-02-01

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (-200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and -100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  5. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajian, M.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Rezaei-Nejad, S. S.; Assadi, H.; Hadavi, S. M. M.; Chung, K.; Shokouhimehr, M.

    2014-07-01

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3-6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  6. Numerical simulation of cavitation erosion on a NACA0015 hydrofoil based on bubble collapse strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, V.; Luo, X.; Escaler, X.; Huang, R.; Valencia, E.

    2015-12-01

    The prediction of erosion under unsteady cavitation is crucial to prevent damage in hydraulic machinery. The present investigation deals with the numerical simulation of erosive partial cavitation around a NACA0015 hydrofoil. The study presents the calculation of the bubble collapse strength, Sb, based on the bubble potential energy to identify the surface areas with highest risk of damage. The results are obtained with a numerical scheme assuming homogeneous mixture flow, implicit LES and Zwart cavitation model. The 3D unsteady flow simulation has been solved using OpenFOAM. Python language and OpenFOAM calculator (foamCalcEx) have been used to obtain and represent Sb. The obtained results clearly show the instants of erosive bubble collapse and the affected surface areas.

  7. Cavitation study of a pump-turbine at turbine mode with critical cavitation coefficient condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Yang, D.; Xu, J. W.; Liu, J. T.; Jiao, L.

    2016-05-01

    To study the cavitation phenomenon of a pump-turbine at turbine mode when it ran at the critical cavitation coefficient condition, a high-head model pump-turbine was disperse using hexahedron grid. Three dimensional, steady cavitating flow was numerically studied using SST k-ω model. It is confirmed that ZGB cavitation model and SST k-ω model are useful ways to study the two-phase cavitation flow in pump-turbine. Mass flow inlet and pressure outlet were specified at the casing inlet and draft tube outlet, respectively. The static pressure was set according to the cavitation coefficient. The steady cavitating flows at critical cavitation coefficient condition were analysed. The cavitation area in the runner was investigated. It was found that the pressure of the suction on the blade surface was decreasing gradually with the decrease of the cavitation coefficient. In addition, the vortex flow in the draft tube was observed at the critical cavitation coefficient. It was found that the vortex flow appeared at the center of the draft tube inlet with the decreasing of the cavitation coefficient. Compared with the experimental data, the simulation results show reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Measuring Dynamic Transfer Functions of Cavitating Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baun, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A water-flow test facility has been built to enable measurement of dynamic transfer functions (DTFs) of cavitating pumps and of inducers in such pumps. Originally, the facility was intended for use in an investigation of the effects of cavitation in a rocket-engine low-pressure oxygen turbopump. The facility can also be used to measure DTFs of cavitating pumps in general

  9. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton

    2005-11-21

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  10. Dependence of the drag of a conical axisymmetric cavitation body on the cone angle and the cavitation number

    SciTech Connect

    Khomyakov, A.N.

    1995-11-01

    Numerical investigations of flow past axisymmetric conical cavitation bodies have shown that the drag coefficient of the cavitation body, calculated from the maximum cross-sectional area of the cavity (midsection), depends on the cavitation number and the cone angle.

  11. Cavitating Langmuir turbulence in the terrestrial aurora.

    PubMed

    Isham, B; Rietveld, M T; Guio, P; Forme, F R E; Grydeland, T; Mjølhus, E

    2012-03-01

    Langmuir cavitons have been artificially produced in Earth's ionosphere, but evidence of naturally occurring cavitation has been elusive. By measuring and modeling the spectra of electrostatic plasma modes, we show that natural cavitating, or strong, Langmuir turbulence does occur in the ionosphere, via a process in which a beam of auroral electrons drives Langmuir waves, which in turn produce cascading Langmuir and ion-acoustic excitations and cavitating Langmuir turbulence. The data presented here are the first direct evidence of cavitating Langmuir turbulence occurring naturally in any space or astrophysical plasma. PMID:22463417

  12. Cavitation on hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation characteristics of hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge were examined experimentally at a Reynolds number of 7.2 × 105. The hydrofoils had an underlying NACA 634-021 profile and an aspect ratio of 4.3. The sinusoidal leading edge geometries included three amplitudes of 2.5%, 5%, and 12% and two wavelengths of 25% and 50% of the mean chord length. Results revealed that cavitation on the leading edge-modified hydrofoils existed in pockets behind the troughs whereas the baseline hydrofoil produced cavitation along its entire span. Moreover, cavitation on the modified hydrofoils appeared at consistently lower angles of attack than on the baseline hydrofoil.

  13. Cavitation modeling and diesel engine cylinder liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandekar, Gautam; Pardue, Sally

    2003-10-01

    A common occurrence of cavitation damage is the waterside pitting of a wet sleeve liner in a diesel engine. The automotive industry utilizes an ultrasonic test of 20 kHz according to ASTM standards to quantify the effectiveness of engine coolant additives to prevent damage. However, recent tests indicate a mismatch between the ultrasonic test results and actual engine test runs. The focus of this study is to generate numerical models of bubble dynamics using already published literature. In most of the published papers higher-range frequencies (ultrasonic >15 kHz) are used. It is useful to explore the results of lower excitation frequencies as the vibrating frequencies of a diesel engine liner are between 500-9000 Hz. A Rayleigh-Plesset equation, nonlinear in nature, is used to plot the relation between bubble radius and time. Plots of the numerical solution from MATLAB are compared with plots published in the literature. Results from when the frequency of excitation is changed to the liner wall frequency and the fluid properties are changed to approximate engine conditions will be presented. Future work will examine the energy released by the bubble collapse and its correlation with erosion measured as mass change in a standard test button.

  14. Detection of cavitation vortex in hydraulic turbines using acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, I.; Bunea, F.; Dunca, G.; Bucur, D. M.; Ioana, C.; Reeb, B.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation phenomena are known for their destructive capacity in hydraulic machineries and are caused by the pressure decrease followed by an implosion when the cavitation bubbles find an adverse pressure gradient. A helical vortex appears in the turbine diffuser cone at partial flow rate operation and can be cavitating in its core. Cavity volumes and vortex frequencies vary with the under-pressure level. If the vortex frequency comes close to one of the eigen frequencies of the turbine, a resonance phenomenon may occur, the unsteady fluctuations can be amplified and lead to important turbine and hydraulic circuit damage. Conventional cavitation vortex detection techniques are based on passive devices (pressure sensors or accelerometers). Limited sensor bandwidths and low frequency response limit the vortex detection and characterization information provided by the passive techniques. In order to go beyond these techniques and develop a new active one that will remove these drawbacks, previous work in the field has shown that techniques based on acoustic signals using adapted signal content to a particular hydraulic situation, can be more robust and accurate. The cavitation vortex effects in the water flow profile downstream hydraulic turbines runner are responsible for signal content modifications. Basic signal techniques use narrow band signals traveling inside the flow from an emitting transducer to a receiving one (active sensors). Emissions of wide band signals in the flow during the apparition and development of the vortex embeds changes in the received signals. Signal processing methods are used to estimate the cavitation apparition and evolution. Tests done in a reduced scale facility showed that due to the increasing flow rate, the signal -- vortex interaction is seen as modifications on the received signal's high order statistics and bandwidth. Wide band acoustic transducers have a higher dynamic range over mechanical elements; the system's reaction time

  15. Prediction of Shock-Induced Cavitation in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading has wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over pre-existing CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy/NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Prediction of shock-induced cavitation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, A.

    2014-05-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading have wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over preexisting CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation.

  17. Assessment of shock wave lithotripters via cavitation potential

    PubMed Central

    Iloreta, Jonathan I.; Zhou, Yufeng; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    A method to characterize shock wave lithotripters by examining the potential for cavitation associated with the lithotripter shock wave (LSW) has been developed. The method uses the maximum radius achieved by a bubble subjected to a LSW as a representation of the cavitation potential for that region in the lithotripter. It is found that the maximum radius is determined by the work done on a bubble by the LSW. The method is used to characterize two reflectors: an ellipsoidal reflector and an ellipsoidal reflector with an insert. The results show that the use of an insert reduced the −6 dB volume (with respect to peak positive pressure) from 1.6 to 0.4 cm3, the −6 dB volume (with respect to peak negative pressure) from 14.5 to 8.3 cm3, and reduced the volume characterized by high cavitation potential (i.e., regions characterized by bubbles with radii larger than 429 µm) from 103 to 26 cm3. Thus, the insert is an effective way to localize the potentially damaging effects of shock wave lithotripsy, and suggests an approach to optimize the shape of the reflector. PMID:19865493

  18. Analysis of turbulent cavitating flow in a micro channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerer, Christian; Hickel, Stefan; Schmidt, Steffen; Adams, Nikolaus

    2013-11-01

    Associated with the collapse of vapor cavities is the formation of shock waves and liquid micro-jets, which can lead to the damage of material (cavitation erosion) or even failure of engineering devices, e.g. fuel injectors. We performed Large-Eddy Simulations of the turbulent cavitating flow through a micro channel, resembling a throttle valve commonly found in fuel injectors, at two different operating points with the aim of indentifying such erosion sensitive areas. The underlying numerical method of our flow solver INCA solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on a Cartesian adaptive grid for a homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapor in order to account for all relevent physical effects, i.e., compressibility of the liquid-vapor mixture as well as transitional flow and turbulence. The effect of non-represented scales on the represented ones is accounted for by the Adaptive Local Deconvolution Method, a non-linear finite volume scheme for the convective fluxes. We will present a comparison of numerical results with experiments as well as a detailed analysis of the interplay between vortical and cavitation structures. Furthermore, tools enabling the automatic detection of erosion sensitive areas will be discussed and applied.

  19. Cavitation Fatigue. Embolism and Refilling Cycles Can Weaken the Cavitation Resistance of Xylem1

    PubMed Central

    Hacke, Uwe G.; Stiller, Volker; Sperry, John S.; Pittermann, Jarmila; McCulloh, Katherine A.

    2001-01-01

    Although cavitation and refilling cycles could be common in plants, it is unknown whether these cycles weaken the cavitation resistance of xylem. Stem or petiole segments were tested for cavitation resistance before and after a controlled cavitation-refilling cycle. Cavitation was induced by centrifugation, air drying of shoots, or soil drought. Except for droughted plants, material was not significantly water stressed prior to collection. Cavitation resistance was determined from “vulnerability curves” showing the percentage loss of conductivity versus xylem pressure. Two responses were observed. “Resilient” xylem (Acer negundo and Alnus incana stems) showed no change in cavitation resistance after a cavitation-refilling cycle. In contrast, “weakened” xylem (Populus angustifolia, P. tremuloides, Helianthus annuus stems, and Aesculus hippocastanum petioles) showed considerable reduction in cavitation resistance. Weakening was observed whether cavitation was induced by centrifugation, air dehydration, or soil drought. Observations from H. annuus showed that weakening was proportional to the embolism induced by stress. Air injection experiments indicated that the weakened response was a result of an increase in the leakiness of the vascular system to air seeding. The increased air permeability in weakened xylem could result from rupture or loosening of the cellulosic mesh of interconduit pit membranes during the water stress and cavitation treatment. PMID:11161035

  20. A physical model of the extreme mantis shrimp strike: kinematics and cavitation of Ninjabot.

    PubMed

    Cox, S M; Schmidt, D; Modarres-Sadeghi, Y; Patek, S N

    2014-03-01

    To study the mechanical principles and fluid dynamics of ultrafast power-amplified systems, we built Ninjabot, a physical model of the extremely fast mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda). Ninjabot rotates a to-scale appendage within the environmental conditions and close to the kinematic range of mantis shrimp's rotating strike. Ninjabot is an adjustable mechanism that can repeatedly vary independent properties relevant to fast aquatic motions to help isolate their individual effects. Despite exceeding the kinematics of previously published biomimetic jumpers and reaching speeds in excess of 25 m s(-1) at accelerations of 3.2 × 10(4) m s(-2), Ninjabot can still be outstripped by the fastest mantis shrimp, Gonodactylus smithii, measured for the first time in this study. G. smithii reached 30 m s(-1) at accelerations of 1.5 × 10(5) m s(-2). While mantis shrimp produce cavitation upon impact with their prey, they do not cavitate during the forward portion of their strike despite their extreme speeds. In order to determine how closely to match Ninjabot and mantis shrimp kinematics to capture this cavitation behavior, we used Ninjabot to produce strikes of varying kinematics and to measure cavitation presence or absence. Using Akaike Information Criterion to compare statistical models that correlated cavitation with a variety of kinematic properties, we found that in rotating and accelerating biological conditions, cavitation inception is best explained only by maximum linear velocity. PMID:24503516

  1. A numerical and experimental study on the drag of a cavitating underwater vehicle in cavitation tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung-Kyu; Ahn, Byoung-Kwon; Kim, Hyoung-Tae

    2015-09-01

    For Super-Cavitating Underwater Vehicles (SCUV), the numerical analyses and experiments in a large cavitation tunnel are carried out at relatively large Reynolds numbers. The numerical results agree well with experiments and the drag coefficient of SCUV is rarely changed by the Reynolds number. As the cavitation number is decreased, the cavity occurs and grows, the cavitator drag decreases and the body drag is affected by the degree of covering the body with the cavity. The tunnel effects, i.e. the blockage and the friction pressure drop of the tunnel, on the drag and the cavitation of SCUV are examined from the numerical results in between the tunnel and unbounded flows. In the tunnel, a minimum cavitation number exists and the drag of SCUV appears larger than that in unbounded flow. When the super-cavity covers the entire body, the friction drag almost disappears and the total drag of SCUV can be regarded as the pressure drag of cavitator.

  2. Processing of Microalgae: Acoustic Cavitation and Hydrothermal Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenly, Justin Michael

    The production of energy dense fuels from renewable algal biomass feedstocks -- if sustainably developed at a sufficiently large scale -- may reduce the consumption of petroleum from fossil fuels and provide many environmental benefits. Achieving economic feasibility has several technical engineering challenges that arise from dilute concentration of growing algae in aqueous media, small cell sizes, and durable cell walls. For microalgae to be a sustainable source of biofuels and co-products, efficient fractionation and conversion of the cellular contents is necessary. Research was carried out to address two processing options for efficient microalgae biofuel production: 1. Ultrasonic cavitation for cell disruption and 2. Hydrothermal conversion of a model algal triglyceride. 1. Ultrasonic cell disruption, which relies on cavitating bubbles in the suspension to produce damaging shock waves, was investigated experimentally over a range of concentrations and species types. A few seconds of high intensity sonication at fixed frequency yielded significant cell disruption, even for the more durable cells. At longer exposure times, effectiveness was seen to decline and was attributed, using acoustic measurements, to ultrasonic power attenuation in the ensuing cloud of cavitating bubbles. Processing at higher cell concentrations slowed cell disintegration marginally, but increased the effectiveness of dissipating ultrasonic energy. A theoretical study effectively predicted optimal conditions for a variety of parameters that were inaccessible in this experimental investigation. In that study, single bubble collapse was modeled to identify operating conditions that would increase cavitation, and thus cell disruption. Simulations were conducted by varying frequency and pressure amplitude of the ultrasound wave, and initial bubble size. The simulation results indicated that low frequency, high sound wave amplitudes, and small initial bubble size generate the highest shock

  3. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 1: Venturi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.; Anderson, L. M.; Hall, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The results of continuing cavitation studies are reported. The cavitation characteristics of liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen flowing in a transparent plastic Venturi are discussed. Thermodynamic data, consisting of pressure and temperature measurements within fully developed hydrogen cavities, are reported. Details concerning test apparatus, test procedure, and data correlation techniques are given.

  4. Periodicity of Sheet/Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Damien T.; Qin, Qiao; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2004-11-01

    Cloud cavitation is the rapid formation and shedding of vaporous clouds from a cavitating hydrofoil. This type of cavitation occurs under certain conditions that are characterized by the cavitation number and the angle of attack. Associated with cloud cavitation are large, abrupt changes in surface pressure caused by the shedding of the attached cavity. Comparison between experimental data and the linearized flat plate theory of Acosta and Tulin have agreed surprisingly well. Near values of cavitation number divided by twice of the angle of attack equal to 4, a singularity exists in the flat plate theory. Experimental results and numerical simulations indicate that in this region a transition between competing mechanisms of cavity shedding occurs. Recent investigation made possible by high-speed video reveals that the cloud shedding is periodic and that, for each cycle, the cavitating surface becomes fully wetted. In certain cases, the surface can be fully wetted for over 20% of the shedding cycle. Using piezoelectric pressure transducers as a trigger, phase-locked photography is used to investigate the physical processes behind cloud cavitation in this transition region. This technique also enabled a visual comparison between numerical and experimental data. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  5. Observation of cavitation during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    A system was built to detect cavitation in pig kidney during shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) with a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Active detection, using echo on B-mode ultrasound, and passive cavitation detection (PCD), using coincident signals on confocal, orthogonal receivers, were equally sensitive and were used to interrogate the renal collecting system (urine) and the kidney parenchyma (tissue). Cavitation was detected in urine immediately upon SW administration in urine or urine plus X-ray contrast agent, but in tissue, cavitation required hundreds of SWs to initiate. Localization of cavitation was confirmed by fluoroscopy, sonography, and by thermally marking the kidney using the PCD receivers as high intensity focused ultrasound sources. Cavitation collapse times in tissue and native urine were about the same but less than in urine after injection of X-ray contrast agent. Cavitation, especially in the urine space, was observed to evolve from a sparse field to a dense field with strong acoustic collapse emissions to a very dense field that no longer produced detectable collapse. The finding that cavitation occurs in kidney tissue is a critical step toward determining the mechanisms of tissue injury in SWL. [Work sup ported by NIH (DK43881, DK55674, FIRCA), ONRIFO, CRDF and NSBRI SMS00203.

  6. SANS and TEM studies of carbide precipitation and creep damage in type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Ogle, J.C.; Schneibel, J.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were performed to characterize the carbide (M/sub 23/C/sub 6/) precipitation and creep damage induced in type 304 stainless steel in the primary creep stage. The size distribution of matrix carbides evaluated from SANS analyses was consistent with TEM data, and the expected accelerated kinetics of precipitation under applied stress was confirmed. Additional SANS measurements after the postcreep solution annealing were made in order to differentiate cavities from the carbides. Potential advantages and difficulties associated with characterization of creep-induced cavitation by the SANS techniques are discussed.

  7. J-2X Turbopump Cavitation Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, I. Michael; Butas, John P.; Tyler, Thomas R., Jr.; Aguilar, Robert; Sowers, T. Shane

    2010-01-01

    The J-2X is the upper stage engine currently being designed by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) for the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). Propellant supply requirements for the J-2X are defined by the Ares Upper Stage to J-2X Interface Control Document (ICD). Supply conditions outside ICD defined start or run boxes can induce turbopump cavitation leading to interruption of J-2X propellant flow during hot fire operation. In severe cases, cavitation can lead to uncontained engine failure with the potential to cause a vehicle catastrophic event. Turbopump and engine system performance models supported by system design information and test data are required to predict existence, severity, and consequences of a cavitation event. A cavitation model for each of the J-2X fuel and oxidizer turbopumps was developed using data from pump water flow test facilities at Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) together with data from Powerpack 1A testing at Stennis Space Center (SSC) and from heritage systems. These component models were implemented within the PWR J-2X Real Time Model (RTM) to provide a foundation for predicting system level effects following turbopump cavitation. The RTM serves as a general failure simulation platform supporting estimation of J-2X redline system effectiveness. A study to compare cavitation induced conditions with component level structural limit thresholds throughout the engine was performed using the RTM. Results provided insight into system level turbopump cavitation effects and redline system effectiveness in preventing structural limit violations. A need to better understand structural limits and redline system failure mitigation potential in the event of fuel side cavitation was indicated. This paper examines study results, efforts to mature J-2X turbopump cavitation models and structural limits, and issues with engine redline detection of cavitation and the use of vehicle-side abort triggers to augment the

  8. Detection of cavitation in hydraulic turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escaler, Xavier; Egusquiza, Eduard; Farhat, Mohamed; Avellan, François; Coussirat, Miguel

    2006-05-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out in order to evaluate the detection of cavitation in actual hydraulic turbines. The methodology is based on the analysis of structural vibrations, acoustic emissions and hydrodynamic pressures measured in the machine. The proposed techniques have been checked in real prototypes suffering from different types of cavitation. In particular, one Kaplan, two Francis and one Pump-Turbine have been investigated in the field. Additionally, one Francis located in a laboratory has also been tested. First, a brief description of the general features of cavitation phenomenon is given as well as of the main types of cavitation occurring in hydraulic turbines. The work presented here is focused on the most important ones which are the leading edge cavitation due to its erosive power, the bubble cavitation because it affects the machine performance and the draft tube swirl that limits the operation stability. Cavitation detection is based on the previous understanding of the cavity dynamics and its location inside the machine. This knowledge has been gained from flow visualisations and measurements in laboratory devices such as a high-speed cavitation tunnel and a reduced scale turbine test rig. The main techniques are the study of the high frequency spectral content of the signals and of their amplitude demodulation for a given frequency band. Moreover, low frequency spectral content can also be used in certain cases. The results obtained for the various types of cavitation found in the selected machines are presented and discussed in detail in the paper. Conclusions are drawn about the best sensor, measuring location, signal processing and analysis for each type of cavitation, which serve to validate and to improve the detection techniques.

  9. Physical effects in cavitating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesset, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The microscopic and macroscopic aspects of the physical effects of cavitating flows are discussed. The microscopic features are related to the properties of nuclei in liquids and to the moderate tensile strengths which are usually encountered in flows. The macroscopic features are concerned with the growth of vapor or gaseous cavities from a small initial size and with their eventual collapse. Mathematical models are developed to analyze the characteristics of: (1) tensile strength in liquids, (2) growth of vapor bubbles, and (3) collapse of vapor bubbles.

  10. Study of cavitation bubble dynamics during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high-speed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yu, Honggang; Devincentis, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    Although laser lithotripsy is now the preferred treatment option for urolithiasis, the mechanism of laser pulse induced calculus damage is still not fully understood. This is because the process of laser pulse induced calculus damage involves quite a few physical and chemical processes and their time-scales are very short (down to sub micro second level). For laser lithotripsy, the laser pulse induced impact by energy flow can be summarized as: Photon energy in the laser pulse --> photon absorption generated heat in the water liquid and vapor (super heat water or plasma effect) --> shock wave (Bow shock, acoustic wave) --> cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation, and center of bubble movement , super heat water at collapse, sonoluminscence) --> calculus damage and motion (calculus heat up, spallation/melt of stone, breaking of mechanical/chemical bond, debris ejection, and retropulsion of remaining calculus body). Cavitation bubble dynamics is the center piece of the physical processes that links the whole energy flow chain from laser pulse to calculus damage. In this study, cavitation bubble dynamics was investigated by a high-speed camera and a needle hydrophone. A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.1 mu;m, StoneLightTM 30, with pulse energy from 0.5J up to 3.0 J, and pulse width from 150 mu;s up to 800 μs, was used as laser pulse source. The fiber used in the investigation is SureFlexTM fiber, Model S-LLF365, a 365 um core diameter fiber. A high-speed camera with frame rate up to 1 million fps was used in this study. The results revealed the cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation and center of bubble movement) by laser pulse at different energy level and pulse width. More detailed investigation on bubble dynamics by different type of laser, the relationship between cavitation bubble dynamics and calculus damage (fragmentation/dusting) will be conducted as a future study.

  11. Experimental study on the onset of cavitation induced by an impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyama, Akihito; Kurihara, Chihiro; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    We study reasonable expression for predicting the onset of cavitation induced by an impact experimentally. A liquid-filled test tube is dropped and impacts a floor, followed by the emergence of cavitation bubbles inside a liquid. As floor materials, a metal and a resin are chosen. As a wetting liquid, gas-saturated silicone oil was used. Experiments are conducted at room temperature. The condition for cavitation occurrence for a resin floor cannot be described by the typical velocity measured by high-speed imaging, temporal resolution and spatial resolution of which are respectively O(10) μs and O(100) μm. We investigate sudden acceleration at the impact using an accelerometer. Its temporal resolution is O(1) ns, much smaller than that of high-speed imaging. The time history of acceleration for the resin floor is more moderate and peak acceleration is smaller than that for the metal floor. Based on these findings, we discuss the reasonable description of the criterion for the onset of cavitation bubbles, applicable for various floors. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26709007.

  12. Pressurized air injection in an axial hydro-turbine model for the mitigation of tip leakage cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, A.; Angulo, M.; Lucino, C.; Liscia, S.

    2015-12-01

    Tip leakage vortex cavitation in axial hydro-turbines may cause erosion, noise and vibration. Damage due to cavitation can be found at the tip of the runner blades on the low pressure side and the discharge ring. In some cases, the erosion follows an oscillatory pattern that is related to the number of guide vanes. That might suggest that a relationship exists between the flow through the guide vanes and the tip vortex cavitating core that induces this kind of erosion. On the other hand, it is known that air injection has a beneficial effect on reducing the damage by cavitation. In this paper, a methodology to identify the interaction between guide vanes and tip vortex cavitation is presented and the effect of air injection in reducing this particular kind of erosion was studied over a range of operating conditions on a Kaplan scale model. It was found that air injection, at the expense of slightly reducing the efficiency of the turbine, mitigates the erosive potential of tip leakage cavitation, attenuates the interaction between the flow through the guide vanes and the tip vortex and decreases the level of vibration of the structural components.

  13. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2  =  0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2  =  0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r2  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore

  14. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r(2)  =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r(2)  =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r(2)  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response

  15. Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Riemer, Bernie; Ferguson, Phillip D; Carroll, Adam J; Dayton, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions prototypical to the SNS. Post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the target vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

  16. Superplasticity and cavitation in an aluminum-magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Donghyun

    2000-10-01

    Fundamental issues related to the forming performance of superplastic metals include the mechanisms of flow and cavitation occurring during the forming process. Cavitation beyond a critical amount is damaging to the mechanical behavior of fabricated parts. Therefore, the role of process parameters which influence cavitation must be precisely documented and understood. In this study, (1) the mechanism of deformation, (2) cavity formation and growth, and (3) the effect of forming parameters on cavitation are systematically investigated in a fine grain Al-4.7%Mg-0.8%Mn-0.4%Cu alloy. The mechanical flow response of the alloy is characterized by a new type of step strain-rate test which preserves the initial microstructure of the alloy. Under isostructural condition, sigmoidal log s vs. log 3˙ relationship is determined and then analyzed by using a grain-mantle based quantitative model1 for superplastic flow. The activation energies in both grain-mantle creep and core creep are analyzed, and the overall controlling mechanism is found to be dislocation glide and climb. Grain-mantle creep rate in the low strain-rate region is found to be enhanced many times due to a high concentration of vacancies near grain boundaries. Cavitation caused by superplastic straining under uniaxial tension is evaluated by the SEM (for < 0.5mum size) and the number and size of cavities are monitored by image analysis through optical microscopy. Growth of pre-existing cavities and nucleation and growth of new cavities at grain boundary particles are monitored with increasing strain. Cavity nucleation and growth occur in two stages: crack-like growth along the particle-matrix interface by a constrained growth process, and beyond complete debonding growth via plastic deformation of the matrix which is modeled here. Stresses and strain-rates near the void are intensified due to the perturbed flow field near the void, and not relaxed during the time frame associated with superplastic deformation

  17. Unseeded Inertial Cavitation for Enhancing the Delivery of Chemotherapies: A Safety Study.

    PubMed

    Lafond, Maxime; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Prieur, Fabrice; Chettab, Kamel; Geraci, Sandra; Clézardin, Philippe; Lafon, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation can improve local drug delivery in tumors. Without injected external nucleation agents, initiating inertial cavitation requires high negative pressures, which can lead to biological damage. In the present study, unseeded inertial cavitation was obtained in vivo using confocal beams, and the effect of these exposure conditions was assessed on drug structure and activity, shallow tissues and growth of breast tumors. No change was observed in the structure and cytotoxicity of doxorubicin. Experiments were conducted on healthy rats, exposing the thigh and abdomen. Histologic analyses at 72 h and 2 weeks post-treatment demonstrated a modest impact on tissues. Syngeneic 4 T1 breast tumors in mice were sonicated. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that ultrasound did not impact vascular density, proliferation and apoptosis of cancer cells. In addition, ultrasound did not negatively modify cancer cell spreading to the lungs and bone marrow. This provides evidence that these particular parameters can be used safely in vivo. PMID:26478278

  18. Numerical investigation of cavitation flow inside spool valve with large pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; Pan, Dingyi; Xie, Fangfang; Shao, Xueming

    2015-12-01

    Spool valves play an important role in fluid power system. Cavitation phenomena happen frequently inside the spool valves, which cause structure damages, noise and lower down hydrodynamic performance. A numerical tools incorporating the cavitation model, are developed to predict the flow structure and cavitation pattern in the spool valve. Two major flow states in the spool valve chamber, i.e. flow-in and flow-out, are studies. The pressure distributions along the spool wall are first investigated, and the results agree well with the experimental data. For the flow-in cases, the local pressure at the throttling area drops much deeper than the pressure in flow-out cases. Meanwhile, the bubbles are more stable in flow-in cases than those in flow-out cases, which are ruptured and shed into the downstream.

  19. An Anticipatory Model of Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B., Jr.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-05

    The Anticipatory System (AS) formalism developed by Robert Rosen provides some insight into the problem of embedding intelligent behavior in machines. AS emulates the anticipatory behavior of biological systems. AS bases its behavior on its expectations about the near future and those expectations are modified as the system gains experience. The expectation is based on an internal model that is drawn from an appeal to physical reality. To be adaptive, the model must be able to update itself. To be practical, the model must run faster than real-time. The need for a physical model and the requirement that the model execute at extreme speeds, has held back the application of AS to practical problems. Two recent advances make it possible to consider the use of AS for practical intelligent sensors. First, advances in transducer technology make it possible to obtain previously unavailable data from which a model can be derived. For example, acoustic emissions (AE) can be fed into a Bayesian system identifier that enables the separation of a weak characterizing signal, such as the signature of pump cavitation precursors, from a strong masking signal, such as a pump vibration feature. The second advance is the development of extremely fast, but inexpensive, digital signal processing hardware on which it is possible to run an adaptive Bayesian-derived model faster than real-time. This paper reports the investigation of an AS using a model of cavitation based on hydrodynamic principles and Bayesian analysis of data from high-performance AE sensors.

  20. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  1. Cavitation erosion of silver plated coating at different temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Shuji; Motoi, Yoshihiro; Kikuta, Kengo; Tomaru, Hiroshi

    2014-04-11

    Cavitation often occurs in inducer pumps used for space rockets. Silver plated coating on the inducer liner faces the damage of cavitation. Therefore, it is important to study about the cavitation erosion resistance for silver plated coating at several operating conditions in the inducer pumps. In this study, the cavitation erosion tests were carried for silver plated coating in deionized water and ethanol at several liquid temperatures (273K–400K) and pressures (0.10MPa–0.48MPa). The mass loss rate is evaluated in terms of thermodynamic parameter Σ proposed by Brennen [9], suppression pressure p–p{sub v} (p{sub v}: saturated vapor pressure) and acoustic impedance ρc (ρ: density and c: sound speed). Cavitation bubble behaviors depending on the thermodynamic effect and the liquid type were observed by high speed video camera. The mass loss rate is formulated by thermodynamic parameter Σ, suppression pressure p–p{sub v} and acoustic impedance ρc.

  2. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonská, Jana; Kozubková, Milada

    2016-06-01

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ɛ model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  3. Periodic cavitation shedding in a cylindrical orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, C.; Barber, T.; Milton, B.; Rosengarten, G.

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation structures in a large-scale ( D = 8.25 mm), plain orifice style nozzle within a unique experimental rig are investigated using high-speed visualisation and digital image processing techniques. Refractive index matching with an acrylic nozzle is achieved using aqueous sodium iodide for the test fluid. Cavitation collapse length, unsteady shedding frequency and spray angles are measured for cavitation conditions from incipient to supercavitation for a range of Reynolds numbers, for a fixed L/ D ratio of 4.85. Periodic cavitation shedding was shown to occur with frequencies between 500 and 2,000 Hz for conditions in which cavitation occupied less than 30% of the nozzle length. A discontinuity in collapse length was shown to occur once the cavitation exceeded this length, coinciding with a loss of periodic shedding. A mechanism for this behaviour is discussed. Peak spray angles of approximately θ ≈ 14° were recorded for supercavitation conditions indicating the positive influence of cavitation bubble collapse on the jet atomisation process.

  4. Cavitation in ultrasound and shockwave therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic waves, especially high-intensity ultrasound and shock waves, are used for medical imaging and intra- and extra-corporeal manipulation of cells, tissue, and urinary calculi. Waves are currently used to treat kidney stone disease, plantar fasciitis, and bone nonunion, and they are being investigated as a technique to ablate cancer tumors and mediate drug delivery. In many applications, acoustic waves induce the expansion and collapse of preexisting or newly cavitating bubbles whose presence can either mediate the generation of localized stresses or lead to collateral damage, depending on how effectively they can be controlled. We describe efforts aimed at simulating the collapse of bubbles, both individually and in clusters, with the aim to characterize the induced mechanical stresses and strains. To simulate collapse of one or a few bubbles, compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes simulations of multi-component materials are performed with WENO-based shock and interface capturing schemes. Repetitive insonification generates numerous bubbles that are difficult to resolve numerically. Such clouds are also important in traditional engineering applications such as caveating hydrofoils. Models that incorporate the dynamics of an unresolved dispersed phase consisting of the bubble cloud are also developed. The results of several model problems including bubble collapse near rigid surfaces, bubble collapse near compliant surfaces and in small capillaries are analyzed. The results are processed to determine the potential for micron-sized preexisting gas bubbles to damage capillaries. The translation of the fundamental fluid dynamics into improvements in the design and clinical application of shockwave lithotripters will be discussed. NIH Grant PO1-DK043881.

  5. RANS computations of tip vortex cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaix, Jean; Balarac, Guillaume; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed; Münch, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    The present study is related to the development of the tip vortex cavitation in Kaplan turbines. The investigation is carried out on a simplified test case consisting of a NACA0009 blade with a gap between the blade tip and the side wall. Computations with and without cavitation are performed using a R ANS modelling and a transport equation for the liquid volume fraction. Compared with experimental data, the R ANS computations turn out to be able to capture accurately the development of the tip vortex. The simulations have also highlighted the influence of cavitation on the tip vortex trajectory.

  6. Research on the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation condition in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. X.; Yuan, S. Q.; Yuan, J. P.; Ren, X. D.; Pei, J.; Si, Q. R.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to research the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation (AC) condition in a centrifugal pump. The acoustic pressure signals at the pump inlet and outlet were measured respectively during the development of cavitation in a closed hydraulic test rig. It could be found that both the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressures changed obviously with the development of cavitation. The time domain and the power spectrum density of the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressure pulsations were analyzed. The broadband pulses of the acoustic pressure pulsations were found and the reasons for the phenomenon were given.

  7. Cavitation studies on axi-symmetric underwater body with pumpjet propulsor in cavitation tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana, Ch.; Satyanarayana, B.; Ramji, K.; Rao, M. Nageswara

    2010-12-01

    A pumpjet propulsor (PJP) was designed for an underwater body (UWB) with axi-symmetric configuration. Its performance was predicted through CFD study and models were manufactured. The propulsor design was evaluated for its propulsion characteristics through model tests conducted in a Wind Tunnel (WT). In the concluding part of the study, evaluation of the cavitation performance of the pumpjet was undertaken in a cavitation tunnel (CT). In order to assess the cavitation free operation speeds and depths of the body, cavitation tests of the PJP were carried out in behind condition to determine the inception cavitation numbers for rotor, stator and cowl. The model test results obtained were corrected for full scale Reynolds number and subsequently analyzed for cavitation inception speeds at different operating depths. From model tests it was also found that the cavitation inception of the rotor takes place on the tip face side at higher advance ratios and cavitation shifts towards the suction side as the RPS increases whereas the stator and cowl are free from cavitation.

  8. Observations on Rotating Cavitation and Cavitation Surge from the Development of the Fastrac Engine Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2000-01-01

    Observations regarding rotating cavitation and cavitation surge experienced during the development of the Fastrac engine turbopump are discussed. Detailed observations acquired from the analysis of both water flow and liquid oxygen test data are offered in this paper. Scaling and general comparison of rotating cavitation between water flow and liquid oxygen testing are discussed. Complex data features linking the localized rotating cavitation mechanism of the inducer to system surge components are described in detail. Finally a description of a lumped-parameter hydraulic system model developed to better understand observed data is given.

  9. Overview of Rotating Cavitation and Cavitation Surge in the Fastrac Engine LOX Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, Thomas; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations regarding rotating cavitation and cavitation surge experienced during the development of the Fastrac 60 Klbf engine turbopump are discussed. Detailed observations from the analysis of both water flow and liquid oxygen test data are offered. Scaling and general comparison of rotating cavitation between water flow and liquid oxygen testing are discussed. Complex data features linking the localized rotating cavitation mechanism of the inducer to system surge components are described in detail. Finally a description of a simple lumped-parameter hydraulic system model developed to better understand observed data is given.

  10. The effect of chloride ions on the corroded surface layer of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Tong; Xiao, Ning; Shen, Hanjie; Yong, Xingyue

    2016-11-01

    The effects of Cl(-) on the corroded surface layer of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation in chloride solutions were investigated using nanoindentation in conjunction with XRD and XPS. The results demonstrate that Cl(-) had a strong effect on the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer under cavitation, and there was a threshold Cl(-) concentration. Furthermore, a close relationship between the nano-mechanical properties and the cavitation corrosion resistance of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel was observed. The degradation of the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer was accelerated by the synergistic effect between cavitation erosion and corrosion. A key factor was the adsorption of Cl(-), which caused a preferential dissolution of the ferrous oxides in the passive film layer on the corroded surface layer. Cavitation further promoted the preferential dissolution of the ferrous oxides in the passive film layer. Simultaneously, cavitation accelerated the erosion of the ferrite in the corroded surface layer, resulting in the degradation of the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer on 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation. PMID:27245950

  11. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams.

    PubMed

    Raschke, S; Spickermann, S; Toncian, T; Swantusch, M; Boeker, J; Giesen, U; Iliakis, G; Willi, O; Boege, F

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 10(7)-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  12. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  13. An attempt to validate the ultra-accelerated microbar and the concrete performance test with the degree of AAR-induced damage observed in concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas; Merz, Christine

    2013-07-15

    There is little knowledge about the relation between AAR-induced damage observed in structures and the expansion potential obtained with accelerated tests. In this study, aggregates used in structures damaged by AAR were tested with the microbar test (MBT/AFNOR XP 18-594) and the concrete performance test (CPT/AFNOR P18-454). After the tests, the samples were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Based on the results, the significance of the microbar test has to be examined very critically. The agreement of measured expansion, reacted rock types and the composition of the reaction products between the on-site concrete and the reproduced concrete subjected to the CPT clearly indicates that the reaction mechanisms in the structure and in the concrete performance test are comparable. As such, the concrete performance test seems to be an appropriate tool to test the potential reactivity of specific concrete mixtures.

  14. Thermodynamic effects on developed cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holl, J. W.; Billet, M. L.; Weir, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an investigation of thermodynamic effects are presented. Distributions of temperature and pressure in a developed cavity were measured for zero- and quarter-caliber ogives. A semiempirical entrainment theory was developed to correlate the measured temperature depression in the cavity. This theory correlates the maximum temperature depression expressed in dimensionless form as the Jakob number in terms of the dimensionless numbers of Nusselt, Reynolds, Froude, and Peclet, and dimensionless cavity length, L/D. The results show that in general, the temperature depression increases with L/D and temperature and the cavitation number based on measured cavity pressure is a function of L/D for a given model contour, independent of the thermodynamic effect.

  15. CAVITATIONAL HYDROTHERMAL OXIDATION: A NEW REMEDIATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research will explore the emerging science of sonochemistry and its technological applications for organic waste remediation, particularly for water and soil purification. Ultrasound can induce unusual high-energy chemistry through the process of acoustic cavitation: the for...

  16. Numerical calculation for cavitation flow of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, Z. T.; Xie, S. F.; Zhao, L. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    Inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of centrifugal pump. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and then was imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. Effects of the blade number on the performance of an inducer are investigated in the present paper. The inducers were designed on the basis of identical design flow rate and identical pressure elevation at nominal flow rate. The study focuses on the steady behavior of the inducers in cavitating conditions. Evolutions of performance, torque, mass flow rate, and amplitude of radial forces on the shaft according to the inlet pressure are considered. Furthermore, cavitation instabilities are analyzed in the study. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the pressure distribution and vapour volume fraction distribution through numerical simulations using the Navier-stokes solver with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code.

  17. Cavitation for improved sludge conversion into biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, A. H.; Bakker, T. W.; Kramer, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In several studies the beneficial influence of pre-treatment of waste activated sludge with cavitation on the biogas production was demonstrated. It is however, still not fully certain whether this effect should be mainly contributed to an increase in conversion rate of organics into biogas by anaerobic bacteria, and how much cavitation increases the total biogas yield. An increase in yield is only the case if cavitation can further disrupt otherwise inaccessible cell membrane structures and long chain organic molecules. In this study the influence of hydrodynamic cavitation on sludge that was already digested for 30 days was investigated. The total biogas yield could indeed be increased. The effect of the backpressure behind the venturi tube on the yield could not yet be established.

  18. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement.

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2013-08-14

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation. PMID:23947875

  19. Experimental investigation of cavitation in pump inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Roman; Bureček, Adam; Hružík, Lumír; Vašina, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The article deals with experimental research of cavitation development in inlet tube of hydraulic pump. The pressures in inlet and outlet tube of the pump and flow rate were measured. Mineral oil was used as working fluid. The cavitation was visually evaluated in transparent inlet tube. The inlet tube underpressure was achieved by throttle valve. The relationship between the generation of bubbles and the inlet pressure is evaluated.

  20. Cavitation milling of natural cellulose to nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, Dipak Vitthal; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2010-06-01

    Cavitation holds the promise of a new and exciting approach to fabricate both top down and bottom up nanostructures. Cavitation bubbles are created when a liquid boils under less than atmospheric pressure. The collapse process occurs supersonically and generates a host of physical and chemical effects. We have made an attempt to fabricate natural cellulose material using hydrodynamic as well as acoustic cavitation. The cellulose material having initial size of 63 micron was used for the experiments. 1% (w/v) slurry of cellulose sample was circulated through the hydrodynamic cavitation device or devices (orifice) for 6h. The average velocity of the fluid through the device was 10.81m/s while average pressure applied was 7.8 kg/cm(2). Cavitation number was found to be 2.61. The average particle size obtained after treatment was 1.36 micron. This hydrodynamically processed sample was sonicated for 1h 50 min. The average size of ultrasonically processed particles was found to be 301 nm. Further, the cellulose particles were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to see the effect of cavitation on crystallinity (X(c)) as well as on melting temperature (T(m)). Cellulose structures consist of amorphous as well as crystalline regions. The initial raw sample was 86.56% crystalline but due to the effect of cavitation, the crystallinity reduced to 37.76%. Also the melting temperature (T(m)) was found to be reduced from 101.78 degrees C of the original to 60.13 degrees C of the processed sample. SEM images for the cellulose (processed and unprocessed) shows the status and fiber-fiber alignment and its orientation with each other. Finally cavitation has proved to be very efficient tool for reduction in size from millimeter to nano scale for highly crystalline materials. PMID:20362487

  1. Investigation of a Method to Reduce Cavitation in Diesel Engine Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Honaker, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is the effect of producing light from sound and occurs when a gas bubble is trapped in a fluid filled cavity and is forced to collapse under a barrage of sound waves. Frenzel and Schultes discovered this phenomenon in 1934 while exposing acoustic waves to photographic plates. This effect was not well understood until 1988 when Crum and Gaitan discovered the necessary conditions for producing single bubble sonoluminescence in the laboratory. The luminescence is a result of the bubble violently collapsing from sound waves and this shares a close association with vibratory cavitation. Cavitation erosion is known to cause damage to rotational machinery when the collapse is near to surfaces due to the high pressures associated with bubble collapse. With these high pressures and temperatures there is a considerable amount of damage to the outside layer of a bearing, thereby, reducing its useful life. An experiment was constructed to generate sonoluminescence in the laboratory in order to obtain a greater understanding of this phenomenon and its association with bubble cavitation. Most of the research was done to investigate how to obtain single bubble sonoluminescence under different conditions and to determine how to detect it. Success in this has inspired several theories on how to use the methods for generating sonoluminescence to control cavitation in fluids under industrial conditions.

  2. Inducer Design to Avoid Cavitation Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Donghyuk; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Yonezawa, Koichi; Horiguchi, Hironori; Kawata, Yutaka; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu

    2010-06-01

    Three inducers were designed to avoid cavitation instabilities. This was accomplished by avoiding the interaction of tip cavity with the leading edge of the opposing blade. The first one applied extremely larger leading edge sweep, the second and third ones applied smaller incidence angle by reducing the inlet blade angle or increasing the design flow rate, respectively. The inducer with larger design flow rate has larger outlet blade angle to obtain sufficient pressure rise. The inducer with larger sweep could suppress the cavitation instabilities in wide ranges of cavitation number and flow rate, owing to weaker tip leakage vortex cavity with stronger disturbance by backflow vortices. The inducer with larger outlet blade angle could avoid the cavitation instabilities at higher flow rates owing to the extension of the tip cavity along the suction surface of the blade. The inducer with smaller inlet blade angle could avoid the cavitation instabilities at the flow rates larger than the design flow coefficient, owing to the occurrence of the cavity first in the blade passage and its extension upstream. The cavity shape and suction performance were reasonably simulated by three dimensional CFD computations under the steady cavitating condition, except for the backflow vortex cavity. The difference in the growth of cavity for each inducer is explained from the difference of the pressure distribution on the suction side of the blades.

  3. Research on cavitation characteristic of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, N.; Wang, L. Q.; Y Kong, F.; Wu, D. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of a centrifugal pump. The fact which can not be neglected is that the inducer itself is a kind of axial pump. Research on inducer's cavitation characteristic is very important. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. The relationship between cavity length and head breakdown was discussed. With the decrease of NPSH, there is a slight increase in the head just prior to the decrease associated with head breakdown. This conclusion coincides with experimental results. The influence of backflow eddy on the inducer's cavitation characteristic was analyzed, and the change of backflow eddy in the process of cavitation was illustrated. It can be concluded that the correlation between the inducer head breakdown and the relative cavity length is very close which agrees well with the theoretical and experimental results. As the inlet pressure is decreased, inception almost always occurs in the tip vortex generated by the corner where the leading edge meets the tip. And backflow vortex gradually disappears in the process of cavitation.

  4. Large eddy simulation of turbulent cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanaskandan, A.; Mahesh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Large Eddy Simulation is employed to study two turbulent cavitating flows: over a cylinder and a wedge. A homogeneous mixture model is used to treat the mixture of water and water vapor as a compressible fluid. The governing equations are solved using a novel predictor- corrector method. The subgrid terms are modeled using the Dynamic Smagorinsky model. Cavitating flow over a cylinder at Reynolds number (Re) = 3900 and cavitation number (σ) = 1.0 is simulated and the wake characteristics are compared to the single phase results at the same Reynolds number. It is observed that cavitation suppresses turbulence in the near wake and delays three dimensional breakdown of the vortices. Next, cavitating flow over a wedge at Re = 200, 000 and σ = 2.0 is presented. The mean void fraction profiles obtained are compared to experiment and good agreement is obtained. Cavity auto-oscillation is observed, where the sheet cavity breaks up into a cloud cavity periodically. The results suggest LES as an attractive approach for predicting turbulent cavitating flows.

  5. Cavitation on Hydrofoils with Leading Edge Protuberances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, Derrick; Henoch, Charles; Johari, Hamid; Office of Naval Research Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The effects of spanwise-uniform sinusoidal leading edge protuberances on the flow characteristics and forces of finite-span hydrofoils under vaporous cavitation conditions were examined experimentally over angles of attack ranging from -9° α <= 27°. Two planforms were studied, rectangular and swept, at a Reynolds number of ~ 720,000. Two protuberance wavelengths, λ = 0.25 c and 0.50 c, and three amplitudes, A = 0.025 c, 0.05 c, and 0.12 c, were examined as they resemble the humpback whale flipper morphology. All hydrofoils retain a mean NACA 634-021 profile. The forces and moments were measured at a freestream velocity of 7.2 m/s, and high-speed digital photography was used to capture flow field images at several angles of attack. The cavitation number corresponding to incipient leading edge cavitation was also calculated. As far as forces and cavitation number are concerned, results show that the baseline hydrofoil tends to have nearly equal or improved performance over the modified hydrofoils at most angles of attack tested. Flow images reveal that it is possible that the extent of sheet and tip vortex cavitation can be reduced with the introduction of leading edge protuberances. The forces and cavitation characteristics will be presented. Sponsored by the ONR-ULI program.

  6. Particle motion induced by bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-29

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids. PMID:26066438

  7. Influence of Plasma Remelting on the Microstructure and Cavitation Resistance of Arc-Sprayed Fe-Mn-Cr-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukasiewicz, A. G. M.; Alcover, P. R. C.; Capra, A. R.; Paredes, R. S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Surface remelting is an important technique for modifying the microstructure of thermally sprayed coatings as it reduces the porosity and promotes a metallurgical bond between substrate and coating. Many studies have been carried out in the field of materials selection and surface engineering in an attempt to reduce cavitation damage. In this work, an Fe-Mn-Cr-Si alloy was deposited by arc spraying and then remelted by a plasma-transferred arc process. The base metal was a soft martensitic stainless steel. The influence of remelting current on coating and base metal microstructure and cavitation resistance was studied. The use of a lower mean current and a pulsed arc reduced the thickness of the heat-affected zone. In specimens remelted with constant arc current, dendrites were aligned parallel to the path followed by the plasma torch; while in those remelted with a pulsed plasma arc, the alignment of the microstructure was disrupted. The use of a higher peak current in pulsed-current plasma transferred arc remelting reduced mass loss due to cavitation. Fe-Mn-Cr-Si coatings exhibited cavitation-induced hardening, with martensite formation during cavitation tests. This transformation helps to increase the cavitation resistance of the remelted coating compared with the soft martensitic stainless steel base metal.

  8. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-1 attenuates skeletal muscle damage and accelerates muscle regeneration and functional recovery after disuse.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fan; Mathur, Sunita; Liu, Min; Borst, Stephen E; Walter, Glenn A; Sweeney, H Lee; Vandenborne, Krista

    2013-05-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly dynamic tissue that responds to endogenous and external stimuli, including alterations in mechanical loading and growth factors. In particular, the antigravity soleus muscle experiences significant muscle atrophy during disuse and extensive muscle damage upon reloading. Given that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has been implicated as a central regulator of muscle repair and modulation of muscle size, we examined the effect of virally mediated overexpression of IGF-1 on the soleus muscle following hindlimb cast immobilization and upon reloading. Recombinant IGF-1 cDNA virus was injected into one of the posterior hindlimbs of the mice, while the contralateral limb was injected with saline (control). At 20 weeks of age, both hindlimbs were immobilized for 2 weeks to induce muscle atrophy in the soleus and ankle plantarflexor muscle group. Subsequently, the mice were allowed to reambulate, and muscle damage and recovery were monitored over a period of 2-21 days. The primary finding of this study was that IGF-1 overexpression attenuated reloading-induced muscle damage in the soleus muscle, and accelerated muscle regeneration and force recovery. Muscle T2 assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, a non-specific marker of muscle damage, was significantly lower in IGF-1-injected compared with contralateral soleus muscles at 2 and 5 days reambulation (P<0.05). The reduced prevalence of muscle damage in IGF-1-injected soleus muscles was confirmed on histology, with a lower fractional area of abnormal muscle tissue in IGF-1-injected muscles at 2 days reambulation (33.2±3.3 versus 54.1±3.6%, P<0.05). Evidence of the effect of IGF-1 on muscle regeneration included timely increases in the number of central nuclei (21% at 5 days reambulation), paired-box transcription factor 7 (36% at 5 days), embryonic myosin (37% at 10 days) and elevated MyoD mRNA (7-fold at 2 days) in IGF-1-injected limbs (P<0.05). These findings demonstrate a potential role

  9. Damage Based Analysis (DBA): Theory, Derivation and Practical Application - Using Both an Acceleration and Pseudo-Velocity Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillo, Vince

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to give a brief overview of the theory behind the (DBA) method, an overview of the derivation and a practical application of the theory using the Python computer language. The Theory and Derivation will use both Acceleration and Pseudo Velocity methods to derive a series of equations for processing by Python. We will take the results and compare both Acceleration and Pseudo Velocity methods and discuss implementation of the Python functions. Also, we will discuss the efficiency of the methods and the amount of computer time required for the solution. In conclusion, (DBA) offers a powerful method to evaluate the amount of energy imparted into a system in the form of both Amplitude and Duration during qualification testing and flight environments. Many forms of steady state and transient vibratory motion can be characterized using this technique. (DBA) provides a more robust alternative to traditional methods such Power Spectral Density (PSD) using a Maximax approach.

  10. The Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage: Track Structure Effects and Cytogenetic Signatures of High-LET Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to 195 keV/micrometers. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons. All energies of protons have a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges than gamma rays, signifying a cytogenetic signature for proton exposures.

  11. Loss of CCDC6, the First Identified RET Partner Gene, Affects pH2AX S139 Levels and Accelerates Mitotic Entry upon DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Mark T.; Pacelli, Roberto; Fusco, Alfredo; Celetti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    CCDC6 was originally identified in chimeric genes caused by chromosomal translocation involving the RET proto-oncogene in some thryoid tumors mostly upon ionizing radiation exposure. Recognised as a pro-apoptotic phosphoprotein that negatively regulates CREB1-dependent transcription, CCDC6 is an ATM substrate that is responsive to genotoxic stress. Here we report that following genotoxic stress, loss or inactivation of CCDC6 in cancers that carry the CCDC6 fusion, accelerates the dephosphorylation of pH2AX S139, resulting in defective G2 arrest and premature mitotic entry. Moreover, we show that CCDC6 depleted cells appear to repair DNA damaged in a shorter time compared to controls, based on reporter assays in cells. High-troughput proteomic screening predicted the interaction between the CCDC6 gene product and the catalytic subunit of Serin–Threonin Protein Phosphatase 4 (PP4c) recently identified as the evolutionarily conserved pH2AX S139 phosphatase that is activated upon DNA Damage. We describe the interaction between CCDC6 and PP4c and we report the modulation of PP4c enzymatic activity in CCDC6 depleted cells. We discuss the functional significance of CCDC6-PP4c interactions and hypothesize that CCDC6 may act in the DNA Damage Response by negatively modulating PP4c activity. Overall, our data suggest that in primary tumours the loss of CCDC6 function could influence genome stability and thereby contribute to carcinogenesis. PMID:22655027

  12. The effect of regime and structural parameters of an inclined Archimedean screw forepump on the volume of cavitation cavities, their elasticity, and cavitation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorev, Iu. E.; Pilipenko, V. V.

    Improved empiricotheoretical dependences of the volume of cavitation cavities and cavitation resistance on the cavitation number and liquid flowrate at the inlet to an inclined Archimedean centrifugal screw pump are derived. An analysis is presented of the influence of cavitation number, flowrate, and structural parameters of the forepump on the volume and elasticity of cavities, and on cavitation resistance.

  13. Cavitational Hydrothermal Oxidation: A New Remediation Process - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K. S.

    2001-07-05

    During the past year, we have continued to make substantial scientific progress on our understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Our efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions.

  14. The cyanogenic syndrome in rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis: tissue-damage-dependent activation of linamarase and hydroxynitrile lyase accelerates hydrogen cyanide release

    PubMed Central

    Kadow, Daniel; Voß, Karsten; Selmar, Dirk; Lieberei, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The release of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from injured plant tissue affects multiple ecological interactions. Plant-derived HCN can act as a defence against herbivores and also plays an important role in plant–pathogen interactions. Crucial for activity as a feeding deterrent is the amount of HCN generated per unit time, referred to as cyanogenic capacity (HCNc). Strong intraspecific variation in HCNc has been observed among cyanogenic plants. This variation, in addition to genotypic variability (e.g. in Trifolium repens), can result from modifications in the expression level of the enzymes involved in either cyanogenic precursor formation or HCN release (as seen in Sorghum bicolor and Phaseolus lunatus). Thus, a modification or modulation of HCNc in reaction to the environment can only be achieved from one to the next generation when under genetic control and within days or hours when transcriptional regulations are involved. In the present study, it is shown that in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) HCNc is modulated by post-translational activity regulation of the key enzymes for cyanide release. Methods Linamarase (LIN) and hydroxynitrile lyase (HNL) activity was determined by colorimetric assays utilizing dissociation of the substrates p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside and acetone cyanohydrin, respectively. Key Results In rubber tree leaves, LIN and HNL show up to ten-fold increased activity in response to tissue damage. This enzyme activation occurs within seconds and results in accelerated HCN formation. It is restricted to the damaged leaf area and depends on the severity of tissue damage. Conclusions LIN and HNL activation (in contrast to genetic and transcriptional regulations) allows an immediate, local and damage type-dependent modulation of the cyanogenic response. Accordingly, this post-translational activation plays a decisive role in the defence of H. brasiliensis against herbivores as well as pathogens and may allow more flexible

  15. Sound signature of propeller tip vortex cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennings, Pepijn; Westerweel, Jerry; van Terwisga, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The design of an efficient propeller is limited by the harmful effects of cavitation. The insufficient understanding of the role of vortex cavitation in noise and vibration reduces the maximum efficiency by a necessary safety margin. The aim in the present study is to directly relate propeller cavitation sound to tip vortex cavity dynamics. This is achieved by a dedicated experiment in a cavitation tunnel on a specially designed two-bladed propeller using a high-speed video camera and a hydrophone. The sound signature of a tip vortex cavity is not evidently present in the sound spectrum above the tunnel background. The addition of a simulated wake inflow results in a high amplitude broadband sound. With a decrease in the free-stream pressure the centre frequency of this sound decreases as a result of a larger vortex cavity diameter. In the near future each blade passage in the high-speed video will be analyzed in detail. The frequency content of the cavity dynamics can then be directly related to the measured sound. An analytic model for vortex cavity dynamics resulting in a cavity eigenfrequency using a vortex velocity model can finally be evaluated as a design instrument for estimation of broadband sound from propeller cavitation.

  16. Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures for a cavitation erosion resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allenstein, A. N.; Lepienski, C. M.; Buschinelli, A. J. A.; Brunatto, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures in CA-6NM martensitic stainless steel was studied in the present work. Nitriding was performed in H2 + N2 gas mixtures for 5, 10 and 20% N2, in volume, at 773 K (500 °C), during 2 h. Changes in the surface morphology and nitrided layer constitution were characterized by SEM, XRD, roughness analysis, and nanoindentation technique. Cavitation erosion behavior of the nitrided samples was also investigated by means of a 20 kHz ultrasonic vibrator. The study was emphasized for the three first cavitation stages (incubation, acceleration, and maximum erosion rate stage) of the cumulative erosion-time curve. Results indicate that the gas mixture nitrogen content strongly influences the phases' formation and its distribution on the nitrided layer. Better cavitation erosion resistance which was attributed to the finer and more homogeneous distribution of the nitrided layer phases was verified for samples treated at 5% N2. Otherwise, worse cavitation erosion behavior for samples nitrided at 20% N2 is supposed to be due to the formation of multiphase compound layer constituted by Fe4N + Fe2-3N + CrN, which can infer residual stress in treated surface.

  17. Suitability research on the cavitation model and numerical simulation of the unsteady pulsed cavitation jet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. Y.; Yu, X. F.; Luan, D. Y.; Qu, Y. P.; Zhou, C.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the cavitation jet mechanism, it can first study its critical state of single-phase flow before cavity occurrence to explore the trend of pulsed cavitation jet. Then select the cavitation model to simulate the complex multiphase flow state. Such a step-by-step approach is beneficial to advance research reliably and steady, relying on the foundation for further solving the problem. Three turbulence models such as Euler Hybrid Model, Euler Two Phase Model and Euler Lagrange Model are discussed on their suitability. In this paper, it states only RNG k- ε turbulent model can simulate small scale vortex of jet in the transient simulation. Grid independent verification and the effect of time step is presented. The simulation results show that a large scale vortex ring surrounding jet flow in the nozzle, the pressure of vortex core is slightly lower than the upstream nozzle pressure. Considering the capture ability of small scale eddies, an equivalent pressure is established. The single-phase flow turbulence model is modified to simulate the turbulence flow in the self-excited pulsed cavitation after the cavitation occurs. Through different results comparison of not modified cavitation model and the modified cavitation model to the experimental results, it proves that the latter simulation results are relatively accurate.

  18. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Cavitation Characteristics for Pump-jet Propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yao; Pan, Guang; Huang, Qiaogao; Du, Xiaoxu

    2015-09-01

    With k — ε turbulent model, non-cavitating performance of a pump-jet propeller was obtained by calculating RANS equations. The comparison between calculation results and experiment data shown that the numerical model and method was reliable. The cavitating hydrodynamic performance of it was calculated and analyzed with mixture homogeneous flow cavitation model based on Rayleigh-Plesset equations and sliding mesh. The effects of different inlet velocity ratio, cavitation number and flow velocity on cavitation characteristics of pump-jet were studied. When the cavitation occurred on the blades, the propeller thrust and torque decreased significantly, thereby causing open water efficiency reduced 15%. For the same cavitation number, as the inlet velocity ratio decreased, the pump-jet propeller blade cavitation phenomenon was more obvious. While for the same ratio, the smaller the number of cavitation, cavitation phenomenon was more remarkable. The more significant was that while the cavitation number was greater than a certain value, the blade cavitation phenomenon disappeared.

  20. Real-time two-dimensional imaging of microbubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignon, Francois; Shi, W. T.; Powers, J. E.; Liu, J.; Drvol, L.; Lof, J.; Everbach, C.; Gao, S.; Xie, F.; Porter, T.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potential for therapeutic applications, including sonothrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (e.g. stable versus inertial forms of cavitation) and intensity in and around a treatment area. Acoustic Passive Cavitation Detectors (PCDs) have been used but do not provide spatial information. This paper presents a prototype of a 2D cavitation imager capable of producing images of the dominant cavitation state and intensity in a region of interest at a frame rate of 0.6Hz. The system is based on a modified ultrasound scanner (iE33, Philips) with a sector imaging probe (S5-1). Cavitation imaging is based on the spectral analysis of the acoustic signal radiated by the cavitating microbubbles: ultraharmonics of the excitation frequency indicate stable cavitation, while noise bands indicate inertial cavitation. The system demonstrates the capability to robustly identify stable and inertial cavitation thresholds of Definity microbubbles (Lantheus) in a vessel phantom through 3 ex-vivo human temporal bones, as well as to spatially map cavitation activities.

  1. Fundamental studies on cavitation melt processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakis, I.; Hodnett, M.; Lebon, G. S. B.; Eskin, D. G.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-05-01

    The application of ultrasound to industrial casting processes has attracted research interest during the last 50 years. However, the transfer and scale-up of this advanced and promising technology to industry has been hindered by difficulties in treating large volumes of liquid metal due to the lack of understanding of certain fundamentals. In the current study experimental results on ultrasonic processing in deionised water and in liquid aluminium (Al) are reported. Cavitation activity was determined in both liquid environments and acoustic pressures were successfully measured using an advanced high-temperature cavitometer sensor. Results showed that highest cavitation intensity in the liquid bulk is achieved at lower amplitudes of the sonotrode tip than the maximum available, suggesting nonlinearity in energy transfer to the liquid, while the location of the sonotrode is seen to substantially affect cavitation activity within the liquid. Estimation of real-time acoustic pressures distributed inside a crucible with liquid Al was performed for the first time.

  2. On instationary mechanisms in cavitating micro throttles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beban, B.; Legat, S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    The current investigation presents numerical simulations of cavitating flows in a simplified model of a mushroom valve chamber of a piezo common rail injection system. Two discharge throttles with different step diameters are investigated. The developed models are able to predict relevant features of cavitating flow in fuel injectors. Special attention is put on the investigation of wave dynamics and related instationary mechanisms in the discharge throttle and the valve chamber. To this respect, a compressible flow solver with a homogeneous mixture model and barotropic description of the diesel-like-fluid is utilized. Highly unsteady phenomena are observed in both investigated designs. The structure of the cavitating flow is further analyzed with an emphasis on the interaction between collapsing vapor clouds in the throttle step and reentrant motion in the discharge throttle. Furthermore, numerical simulations reveal significant influence of the throttle step diameter on the cavity dynamics.

  3. Numerical simulations of cryogenic cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunji; Kim, Hyeongjun; Min, Daeho; Kim, Chongam

    2015-12-01

    The present study deals with a numerical method for cryogenic cavitating flows. Recently, we have developed an accurate and efficient baseline numerical scheme for all-speed water-gas two-phase flows. By extending such progress, we modify the numerical dissipations to be properly scaled so that it does not show any deficiencies in low Mach number regions. For dealing with cryogenic two-phase flows, previous EOS-dependent shock discontinuity sensing term is replaced with a newly designed EOS-free one. To validate the proposed numerical method, cryogenic cavitating flows around hydrofoil are computed and the pressure and temperature depression effect in cryogenic cavitation are demonstrated. Compared with Hord's experimental data, computed results are turned out to be satisfactory. Afterwards, numerical simulations of flow around KARI turbopump inducer in liquid rocket are carried out under various flow conditions with water and cryogenic fluids, and the difference in inducer flow physics depending on the working fluids are examined.

  4. Inducer Hydrodynamic Forces in a Cavitating Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a measurement device for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The device - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The rotating balance was calibrated statically using a dead-weight load system in order to generate the 6 x 12 calibration matrix later used to convert measured voltages to engineering units. Structural modeling suggested that the rotating assembly first bending mode would be significantly reduced with the balance s inclusion. This reduction in structural stiffness was later confirmed experimentally with a hammer-impact test. This effect, coupled with the relatively large damping associated with the rotating balance waterproofing material, limited the device s bandwidth to approximately 50 Hertz Other pre-test validations included sensing the test article rotating assembly built-in imbalance for two configurations and directly measuring the assembly mass and buoyancy while submerged under water. Both tests matched predictions and confirmed the device s sensitivity while stationary and rotating. The rotating balance was then demonstrated in a water test of a full-scale Space Shuttle Main Engine high-pressure liquid oxygen pump inducer. Experimental data was collected a scaled operating conditions at three flow coefficients across a range of cavitation numbers for the single inducer geometry and radial clearance. Two distinct cavitation modes were observed symmetric tip vortex cavitation and alternate-blade cavitation. Although previous experimental tests on the same inducer demonstrated two additional

  5. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  6. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  7. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  8. Inorganic arsenic in drinking water accelerates N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced bladder tissue damage in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Paul-Yann; Lin, Yung-Lun; Huang, Chin-Chin; Chen, Sin-Syu; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2012-02-15

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that exposure to an arsenic-contaminated environment correlates with the incidence of bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is highly recurrent after intravesical therapy, and most of the deaths from this disease are due to invasive metastasis. In our present study, the role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in a mouse model. This work provides the first evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN)-induced bladder tissue damage, including the urothelium and submucosal layer. This damage to the bladder epithelium induced by BBN includes thickening of the submucosal layer, the loss of the glycosaminoglycan layer and an increase in both the deoxyguanosine oxidation and cytosine methylation levels in the DNA. Further, when 10 ppm inorganic arsenic is combined with BBN, the number of bladder submucosal capillaries is increased. In addition, inorganic arsenic also increases the deoxyguanosine oxidation level, alters the cytosine methylation state, decreases the activities of glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, decreases the protein expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and increases the protein expression of specific protein 1 (Sp1) in bladder tissues. In summary, our data reveal that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes the BBN-induced pre-neoplastic damage of bladder tissue in mice, and that the 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, 5-methylcytosine, NQO-1 protein and Sp1 protein levels may be pre-neoplastic markers of bladder tumors. -- Highlights: ► The role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in mice. ► We examine the changes in the histology and biochemistry of bladder tissues. ► Inorganic arsenic enhances BBN-induced DNA oxidation while decreases BBN-induced DNA methylation in the mouse bladder. ► Inorganic arsenic alters the activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes in

  9. Cellular High-Energy Cavitation Trauma – Description of a Novel In Vitro Trauma Model in Three Different Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yuli; Risling, Mårten; Malm, Elisabeth; Sondén, Anders; Bolling, Magnus Frödin; Sköld, Mattias K.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in traumatic brain injury have yet to be fully characterized. One mechanism that, especially in high-energy trauma, could be of importance is cavitation. Cavitation can be described as a process of vaporization, bubble generation, and bubble implosion as a result of a decrease and subsequent increase in pressure. Cavitation as an injury mechanism is difficult to visualize and model due to its short duration and limited spatial distribution. One strategy to analyze the cellular response of cavitation is to employ suitable in vitro models. The flyer-plate model is an in vitro high-energy trauma model that includes cavitation as a trauma mechanism. A copper fragment is accelerated by means of a laser, hits the bottom of a cell culture well causing cavitation, and shock waves inside the well and cell medium. We have found the flyer-plate model to be efficient, reproducible, and easy to control. In this study, we have used the model to analyze the cellular response to microcavitation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, Caco-2, and C6 glioma cell lines. Mitotic activity in neuroblastoma and glioma was investigated with BrdU staining, and cell numbers were calculated using automated time-lapse imaging. We found variations between cell types and between different zones surrounding the lesion with these methods. It was also shown that the injured cell cultures released S-100B in a dose-dependent manner. Using gene expression microarray, a number of gene families of potential interest were found to be strongly, but differently regulated in neuroblastoma and glioma at 24 h post trauma. The data from the gene expression arrays may be used to identify new candidates for biomarkers in cavitation trauma. We conclude that our model is useful for studies of trauma in vitro and that it could be applied in future treatment studies. PMID:26869990

  10. Correlations of thermodynamic effects for developed cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billet, M. L.; Holl, J. W.; Weir, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    The net positive suction head (NPSH) requirements for a pump are determined by the combined effects of cavitation, fluid properties, pump geometry, and pump operating point. An important part of this determination is the temperature depression (Delta T). Correlations are presented of the temperature depression for various degrees of developed cavitation on venturis and ogives. These correlations, based on a semi-empirical entrainment theory, express Delta T in terms of the dimensionless numbers of Nusselt, Reynolds, Froude, Weber, and Peclet, and dimensionless cavity length (L/D). The Delta T data were obtained in Freon 114, hydrogen and nitrogen for the venturis and in Freon 113 and water for the ogives.

  11. Animal models of cavitation in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Helke, Kris L; Mankowski, Joseph L; Manabe, Yukari C

    2006-09-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis occurs with the highest frequency from patients with extensive, cavitary, pulmonary disease and positive sputum smear microscopy. In animal models of tuberculosis, the development of caseous necrosis is an important prerequisite for the formation of cavities although the immunological triggers for liquefaction are unknown. We review the relative merits and the information gleaned from the available animal models of pulmonary cavitation. Understanding the host-pathogen interaction important to the formation of cavities may lead to new strategies to prevent cavitation and thereby, block transmission. PMID:16359922

  12. Cavitation Inception in Immersed Jet Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockett, R. D.; Ndamuso, N.; Price, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation inception occurring in immersed jets was investigated in a purpose-built mechanical flow rig. The rig utilized custom-built cylindrical and conical nozzles to direct high-velocity jets of variable concentration n-octane-hexadecane mixtures into a fused silica optically accessible receiver. The fluid pressure upstream and down-stream of the nozzles were manually controlled. The study employed a variety of acrylic and metal nozzles. The results show that the critical upstream pressure to downstream pressure ratio for incipient cavitation decreases with increasing n-octane concentration for the cylindrical nozzles, and increases with increasing n-octane concentration for the conical nozzle.

  13. Ideas in action: Solving a cavitation mystery

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Cavitation caused significant erosion from 1985 through 1990 on turbine runners at the 970-MW Murray 1 Power Station operated by Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Authority (SMHEA) in Australia. The problem was perplexing because no obvious cause could be found. Investigation eventually showed the problems stemmed form the runners sagging slightly from the correct height. Corrective measures, which included adjustment of runners and new control settings for the units, appear to have relieved the cavitation. The adjustments also reduced stress on the unit thrust-bearings, eliminating a future maintenance headache.

  14. Development and application of compact and on-chip electron linear accelerators for dynamic tracking cancer therapy and DNA damage/repair analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Demachi, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Fujisawa, H.; Chhatkuli, R. B.; Tsuda, A.; Tanaka, S.; Matsumura, Y.; Otsuki, S.; Kusano, J.; Yamamoto, M.; Nakamura, N.; Tanabe, E.; Koyama, K.; Yoshida, M.; Fujimori, R.; Yasui, A.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing compact electron linear accelerators (hereafter linac) with high RF (Radio Frequency) frequency (9.3 GHz, wavelength 32.3 mm) of X-band and applying to medicine and non-destructive testing. Especially, potable 950 keV and 3.95 MeV linac X-ray sources have been developed for on-site transmission testing at several industrial plants and civil infrastructures including bridges. 6 MeV linac have been made for pinpoint X-ray dynamic tracking cancer therapy. The length of the accelerating tube is ∼600 mm. The electron beam size at the X-ray target is less than 1 mm and X-ray spot size at the cancer is less than 3 mm. Several hardware and software are under construction for dynamic tracking therapy for moving lung cancer. Moreover, as an ultimate compact linac, we are designing and manufacturing a laser dielectric linac of ∼1 MeV with Yr fiber laser (283 THz, wavelength 1.06 pm). Since the wavelength is 1.06 μm, the length of one accelerating strcture is tens pm and the electron beam size is in sub-micro meter. Since the sizes of cell and nuclear are about 10 and 1 μm, respectively, we plan to use this “On-chip” linac for radiation-induced DNA damage/repair analysis. We are thinking a system where DNA in a nucleus of cell is hit by ∼1 μm electron or X-ray beam and observe its repair by proteins and enzymes in live cells in-situ.

  15. POD study of aerated cavitation in a venturi nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, P.; Danlos, A.; Khelladi, S.; Ravelet, F.; Sarraf, C.; Bakir, F.

    2015-12-01

    The fact of injecting bubbles into a cavitating flow influences typical cavitating behavior. Cavitation and aerated cavitation experiments has been carried out on a symmetrical venturi nozzle with convergent/divergent angles of 18° and 8°, respectively. A snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) technique is used to identify different modes in terms of discharge flow velocity, pressure and injected quantity of air. The energy spectrum per given mode is also presented. The first four modes are outlined in the present paper for an aerated and non-aerated cavitating flows.

  16. Influence of surface tension on cavitation noise spectra and particle removal efficiency in high frequency ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerotto, Elisabeth; Brems, Steven; Hauptmann, Marc; Pacco, Antoine; Struyf, Herbert; Mertens, Paul W.; De Gendt, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Physical cleaning methods are applied in the semiconductor industry and have become increasingly challenging due to the continued scaling of semiconductors device elements. Cavitation and acoustic phenomena are known to play a fundamental role in megasonic cleaning. Hence, a better understanding of cavitation phenomena in multi-bubble systems is crucial. Here, a study on the effects of lower bulk surface tension and different O2 concentrations on the bubble activity in the megahertz range is presented. A lower bulk surface tension (45 mN/m) with respect to ultra pure water (72 mN/m) is obtained by adding a non-ionic surface-active agent (Triton X-100). After a thorough surfactant characterization, a Triton X-100-containing cleaning solution is investigated under pulsed and continuous acoustic fields, for different acoustic amplitudes and gas concentrations. It is demonstrated that cavitation activity, measured by means of ultraharmonic cavitation noise, is enhanced in presence of a lower surface tension, under continuous acoustic fields. In addition, cavitation measurements performed under pulsed fields reveal the existence of optimal pulse-off times, for which a maximum of activity is observed. These optimal pulse-off time values are linked to the bubble dissolution theoretical times and experimentally verified. To end, cavitation noise measurements are correlated to cleaning performance in megasonic fields by means of particle removal and damage tests on patterned wafers. A clear increase in particle removal efficiency of 78 nm SiO2 particles is obtained when Triton X-100 is employed, at the optimized process conditions. In addition, the number of defects due to cavitation bubbles is significantly reduced for lower surface tension, at particle removal efficiencies <60%. The results here reported constitute a different approach towards more efficient megasonic cleaning processes.

  17. Controlled Cavitation to Augment SWL Stone Comminution: Mechanistic Insights In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    particulate debris that was small enough to pass through the finest filter used in this study (<2 mm), leaving behind a single primary stone piece (>8 mm) with mass 85.1 ± 1.6% of the original following truncated sonication. The combination of SWL and histotripsy (schemes A, B, and C) resulted in a shift in the size distribution toward smaller fragments and complete elimination of debris >8 mm. When histotripsy controlled cavitation was applied following SWL (B), the increase in exposed stone surface area afforded by shock wave stone subdivision led to enhanced cavitation erosion. When histotripsy controlled cavitation was applied prior to SWL (C), it is likely that stone surface defects induced by cavitation erosion provided sights for crack nucleation and accelerated shock wave stone subdivision. Both these effects are likely at play in the interleaved therapy (A), although shielding of shock waves by remnant histotripsy microbubble nuclei may have limited the efficacy of this scheme. Nevertheless, these results demonstrate the important role played by cavitation in the stone comminution process, and suggest that the application of controlled cavitation at strategic time points can provide an adjunct to traditional SWL therapy. PMID:23357904

  18. Hyperthermic preconditioning severely accelerates neuronal damage in the gerbil ischemic hippocampal dentate gyrus via decreasing SODs expressions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Cho, Geum-Sil; Kim, In Hye; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Hong, Seongkweon; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Jae-Chul

    2015-11-15

    It is well known that neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus are resistant to short period of ischemia. Hyperthermia is a proven risk factor for cerebral ischemia and can produce more extensive brain damage related with mortality rates. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of hyperthermic conditioning (H) on neuronal death, gliosis and expressions of SODs as anti-oxidative enzymes in the gerbil DG following 5 min-transient cerebral ischemia. The animals were randomly assigned to 4 groups: 1) (N+sham)-group was given sham-operation with normothermia (N); 2) (N+ischemia)-group was given 5 min-transient ischemia with N; 3) (H+sham)-group was given sham-operation with H; and 4) (H+ischemia)-group was given 5 min-transient cerebral ischemia with H. H (39±0.5°C) was induced by subjecting the animals to a heating pad for 30 min before and during the operation. In the (N+ischemia)-groups, a significant neuronal death was observed in the polymorphic layer (PL) from 1 day after ischemia-reperfusion. In the (H+ischemia)-groups, neuronal death was also observed in the PL from 1day post-ischemia; the degree of the neuronal death was severer than that in the (N+ischemia)-groups. In addition, we examined the gliosis of astrocytes and microglia using anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and anti- ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1). GFAP(+) and Iba-1(+) glial cells were much more activated in the (H+ischemia)-groups than those in the (N+ischemia)-groups. On the other hand, immunoreactivities and levels of SOD1 rather than SOD2 were significantly lower in the (H+ischemia)-groups than those in the (N+ischemia)-groups. In brief, on the basis of our findings, we suggest that cerebral ischemic insult with hyperthermic conditioning brings up severer neuronal damage and gliosis in the polymorphic layer through reducing SOD1 expression rather than SOD2 expression in the DG. PMID:26365286

  19. Assessment of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of 316LN Stainless Steel Following a Nitro-Carburizing Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2009-11-01

    A nitro-carburizing surface treatment known domestically as the Melonite process was applied to type 316LN stainless steel test pieces and exposed to sonication conditions in mercury using a vibratory horn technique. Cavitation-erosion damage was evaluated for extended exposures and compared to other surface treatments on the same substrate alloy. The results indicate that the Melonite process substantially retards weight loss and crater development for extended periods, but gradually is eroded/destroyed leading to exposure of the substrate and cavitation-erosion behavior similar to untreated specimens. Compared with other surface treatments, cavitation-erosion results indicate that specimens treated with Melonite perform similarly to specimens treated with a simple nitriding process. Neither the simple nitriding nor the Melonite treatment is quite as effective as a previously evaluated low temperature carburizing treatment, the latter being about a factor of three better than Melonite in terms of weight loss during sonication in mercury.

  20. The Influence of Shielding on the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage was assessed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to the either Si-28 (490 or 600 MeV/n), Ti-48 (1000 MeV/n), or Fe-56 (600, 1000, or 5000 MeV/n). LET values for these ions ranged from approximately 50 to 174 keV/micrometers and doses ranged from 10 to 200 cGy. The effect of either aluminum or polyethylene shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each ion. Chromosome exchanges were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes in cells collected 48-56 hours after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. The yield of chromosomal aberrations increased linearly with dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the primary beams, estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for total chromosomal exchanges with respect to gamma-rays, ranged from 14 to 35. The RBE values increased with LET, reaching a maximum for the 1 GeV/n Fe ions with LET of 150 keV/micrometers, and decreased with further increases in LET. When LET of the primary beam was in the region of increasing RBE (i.e. below approximately 100 keV/micrometers), the addition of shielding material increased the effectiveness per unit dose. Whereas shielding decreased the effectiveness per unit dose when the LET of the primary particle beam was higher than 150 keV/micrometers.

  1. Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage Measured in Metaphase and Interphase Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Durante, Marco; Willingham, Veronica; Wu, Honglu; Yang, Tracy C.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were investigated in human lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to 1H-, 3He-, 12C-, 40Ar-, 28Si-, 56Fe-, or 197Au-ion beams, with LET ranging from approximately 0.4-1393 keV/microm in the dose range of 0.075-3 Gy. Dose-response curves for chromosome exchanges, measured at the first mitosis postirradiation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for chromosomal damage with respect to low- or high-dose-rate gamma rays. Estimates of RBEmax values for mitotic spreads, which ranged from near 0.7 to 11.1 for total exchanges, increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 150 keV/microm, and decreased with further increase in LET. RBEs for complex aberrations are undefined due to the lack of an initial slope for gamma rays. Additionally, the effect of mitotic delay on RBE values was investigated by measuring chromosome aberrations in interphase after chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC), and values were up to threefold higher than for metaphase analysis.

  2. Analytical Study of Cavitation Surge in a Hydraulic System.

    PubMed

    Kang, Donghyuk; Yokota, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-01

    In order to clarify effects of an accumulator, pipe lengths and gradients of pressure and suction performances on cavitation surge, one-dimensional stability analyses of cavitation surge were performed in hydraulic systems consisting of an upstream tank, an inlet pipe, a cavitating pump, a downstream pipe, and a downstream tank. An accumulator located upstream or downstream of the cavitating pump was included in the analysis. Increasing the distance between the upstream accumulator and the cavitating pump enlarged the stable region. On the other hand, decreasing the distance between the downstream accumulator and the cavitating pump enlarged the stable region. Furthermore, the negative gradient of a suction performance curve and the positive gradient of a pressure performance curve cause cavitation surge. PMID:25278638

  3. Numerical analysis of unsteady cavitating flow by using a modification based on an assumption of apparent phase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iga, Y.

    2014-03-01

    The prediction accuracy of cavitation by CFD is still not so high even in a simplest flow field around a single hydrofoil especially in transient condition at higher angle of attack, which is common problem in both commercial software and in-house solvers. In the transient condition, unsteady cavitation occurs, in which sheet cavity breaks off and cloud cavity sheds downstream periodically. At that time, the sheet cavity length tends to be underestimated in usual CFD. In the present study, modification for the phase change model is suggested, which is based on an idea of apparent phase equilibrium on gas-liquid interface with unsteady and disturbed flow. At first, a preliminary experiment has been done for evaporation on two gas- liquid interfaces with and without flow, the result contributes the evidence of the idea of apparent phase equilibrium with flow. In the result, the pressure around gas-liquid interface with flow was higher than that without flow on the occasion of evaporation, it means flow accelerates evaporation. I treat the gap of the pressure as a gap of phase equilibrium pressure macroscopically. Then, numerical simulation of cavitating flow around a hydrofoil is performed with a modification of phase change model in the transient condition at higher angle of attack which is most difficult to predict by the present solvers. In the modification, the gap of the pressure with and without flow is taken into account according to a value of a local variation of velocity in the cavitating flow filed. The formulation is similar to the PDF model for phase change model in cavitation by Singhal. The numerical results by the present modification are compared among few pressure variation components which are assumed to accelerate the evaporation in transient cavitation.

  4. The Influence of Shielding on the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goeorge, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome damage was assessed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to the either Si-28 (490 or 600 MeV/n), Ti-48 (1000 MeV/n), or Fe-56 (600, 1000, or 5000 MeV/n). LET values for these ions ranged from 51 to 184 keV/micron and doses ranged from 10 to 200 cGy. The effect of either aluminum or polyethylene shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each ion. Chromosome exchanges were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes in cells collected at G2 and mitosis in first division post irradiation after chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin-A. The yield of chromosomal aberrations increased linearly with dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the primary beams, estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for total chromosomal exchanges with respect to gamma-rays, ranged from 9 to 35. The RBE values increased with LET, reaching a maximum for the 600 MeV/n Fe ions with LET of 184 keV/micron. When the LET of the primary beam was below approximately 100 keV/micron, the addition of shielding material increased the effectiveness per unit dose. Whereas shielding decreased the effectiveness per unit dose when the LET of primary beams was higher than 100 keV/micron. The yield of aberrations correlated with the dose-average LET of the beam after traversal through the shielding.

  5. Cavitation erosion prediction based on analysis of flow dynamics and impact load spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mihatsch, Michael S. Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2015-10-15

    Cavitation erosion is the consequence of repeated collapse-induced high pressure-loads on a material surface. The present paper assesses the prediction of impact load spectra of cavitating flows, i.e., the rate and intensity distribution of collapse events based on a detailed analysis of flow dynamics. Data are obtained from a numerical simulation which employs a density-based finite volume method, taking into account the compressibility of both phases, and resolves collapse-induced pressure waves. To determine the spectrum of collapse events in the fluid domain, we detect and quantify the collapse of isolated vapor structures. As reference configuration we consider the expansion of a liquid into a radially divergent gap which exhibits unsteady sheet and cloud cavitation. Analysis of simulation data shows that global cavitation dynamics and dominant flow events are well resolved, even though the spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve individual vapor bubbles. The inviscid flow model recovers increasingly fine-scale vapor structures and collapses with increasing resolution. We demonstrate that frequency and intensity of these collapse events scale with grid resolution. Scaling laws based on two reference lengths are introduced for this purpose. We show that upon applying these laws impact load spectra recorded on experimental and numerical pressure sensors agree with each other. Furthermore, correlation between experimental pitting rates and collapse-event rates is found. Locations of high maximum wall pressures and high densities of collapse events near walls obtained numerically agree well with areas of erosion damage in the experiment. The investigation shows that impact load spectra of cavitating flows can be inferred from flow data that captures the main vapor structures and wave dynamics without the need for resolving all flow scales.

  6. Cavitation of a Physically Associating Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Satish; Kundu, Santanu

    Self-assembly of block copolymers in selective solvents form ordered structures such as micelles, vesicles, and physically crosslinked gels due to difference in their interaction with solvents. These gels have wide range of applications in tissue engineering, food science and biomedical field due to their tunable properties and responsiveness with changing environmental conditions. Pressurization of a defect inside a physically associating gel can lead to elastic instability (cavitation) leading to failure of the gel. The failure behavior involves dissociation of physical networks. A thermoreversible, physically associating gel with different volume fractions of a triblock copolymer, poly (methyl methacrylate)-poly (n-butyl acrylate)-poly (methyl methacrylate) [PMMA-PnBA-PMMA] in 2-ethyl 1-hexanol, a midblock selective solvent, is considered here. Mechanical properties were investigated using shear rheology and cavitation experiments. The experimental data is fitted with a constitutive model that captures the stiffening behavior followed by softening behavior of a physical gel. Finite element analysis has been performed on cavitation rheology geometry to capture the failure behavior and to calculate energy release rate during cavitation experiments.

  7. Scale effect on unsteady cloud cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dular, M.; Khlifa, I.; Fuzier, S.; Adama Maiga, M.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.

    2012-11-01

    No experiment was conducted, yet, to investigate the scale effects on the dynamics of developed cavitating flow with periodical cloud shedding. The present study was motivated by the unclear results obtained from the experiments in a Venturi-type section that was scaled down 10 times for the purpose of measurements by ultra-fast X-ray imaging (Coutier-Delgosha et al. 2009). Cavitation in the original size scale section (Stutz and Reboud in Exp Fluids 23:191-198, 1997, Exp Fluids 29:545-552 2000) always displays unsteady cloud separation. However, when the geometry was scaled down, the cavitation became quasi steady although some oscillations still existed. To investigate this phenomenon more in detail, experiments were conducted in six geometrically similar Venturi test sections where either width or height or both were scaled. Various types of instabilities are obtained, from simple oscillations of the sheet cavity length to large vapor cloud shedding when the size of the test section is increased. It confirms that small scale has a significant influence on cavitation. Especially the height of the test section plays a major role in the dynamics of the re-entrant jet that drives the periodical shedding observed at large scale. Results suggest that the sheet cavity becomes stabile when the section is scaled down to a certain point because re-entrant jet cannot fully develop.

  8. Optical Measurements of Cavitation in Tribological Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tian; Morris, Nick; Coupland, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes the use of a white light interformeter to measure the cavitation bubble and oil film thickness in a tribological contact and compares the results to theory. It is found that oil film thickness is best predicted by the theory proposed by Coyne and Elrod.

  9. Size scale effect in cavitation erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, B. C.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    An overview and data analyses pertaining to cavitation erosion size scale effects are presented. The exponents n in the power law relationship are found to vary from 1.7 to 4.9 for venturi and rotating disk devices supporting the values reported in the literature. Suggestions for future studies were made to arrive at further true scale effects.

  10. Relating xylem cavitation to transpiration in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic emmisions (AEs) from xylem cavitation events are characteristic of transpiration processes. Even though a body of work employing AE exists with a large number of species, cotton and other agronomically important crops have either not been investigated, or limited information exists. A few s...

  11. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Saurel, Richard; Ahn, Byoung-Kwon; Ko, Sungho

    2011-12-01

    The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008) is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009) is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile). Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  12. Evaporation-induced cavitation in nanofluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chuanhua; Karnik, Rohit; Lu, Ming-Chang; Majumdar, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation, known as the formation of vapor bubbles when liquids are under tension, is of great interest both in condensed matter science as well as in diverse applications such as botany, hydraulic engineering, and medicine. Although widely studied in bulk and microscale-confined liquids, cavitation in the nanoscale is generally believed to be energetically unfavorable and has never been experimentally demonstrated. Here we report evaporation-induced cavitation in water-filled hydrophilic nanochannels under enormous negative pressures up to -7 MPa. As opposed to receding menisci observed in microchannel evaporation, the menisci in nanochannels are pinned at the entrance while vapor bubbles form and expand inside. Evaporation in the channels is found to be aided by advective liquid transport, which leads to an evaporation rate that is an order of magnitude higher than that governed by Fickian vapor diffusion in macro- and microscale evaporation. The vapor bubbles also exhibit unusual motion as well as translational stability and symmetry, which occur because of a balance between two competing mass fluxes driven by thermocapillarity and evaporation. Our studies expand our understanding of cavitation and provide new insights for phase-change phenomena at the nanoscale. PMID:22343530

  13. Laser surface modification of stainless steels for cavitation erosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Chi Tat

    1999-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 (Fe -17.6Cr -11.2Ni -2.5Mo -1.4Mn -0.4Si -0.03C) has higher pitting corrosion resistance but lower cavitation erosion resistance than that of UNS S30400. This is because of its lower tendency for strain induced martensitic transformation and higher stacking fault energy as compared with those of UNS S30400. In order to improve its cavitation erosion resistance, surface modification of S31603 was performed by laser surface melting and laser surface alloying using a 2-kW CW Nd-YAG laser and a 3-kW CW CO2 laser. For laser surface melting, austenitic stainless steel UNS S30400, super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 and martensitic stainless steel UNS S42000 were also investigated for comparison purpose. For laser surface alloying, alloying materials including various elements (Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si & C), alloys (AlSiFe & NiCrSiB), ceramics (Si3N 4, SiC, Cr3C2, TiC, CrB & Cr2O 3) and alloys-ceramics (Co-WC, Ni-WC, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Cr2C3) were used to modify the surface of S31603. The alloyed surface was achieved first by flame spraying or pre-placing of the alloy powder on the S31603 surface and then followed by laser surface remelting. The cavitation erosion characteristics of laser surface modified specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by means of a 20-kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 mum. In addition, their pitting corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The microstructures, compositions, phase changes and damage mechanisms under cavitation erosion were investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, EDAX and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical properties such as microhardness profile were also examined. The cavitation erosion resistance Re (reciprocal of the mean depth of penetration rate) of laser surface melted S31603 was found to be improved by 22% and was attributed to the existence of tensile residual stress. Improvement on the Re of S42000 was found to be 8.5 times

  14. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Background on thermal effects in cavitation. Physical properties of hydrogen. Multi-phase cavitation with thermal effect. Solution procedure. Cavitation model overview. Cavitation source terms. New cavitation model. Source term for bubble growth. One equation les model. Unsteady ogive simulations: liquid nitrogen. Unsteady incompressible flow in a pipe. Time averaged cavity length for NACA15 flowfield.

  15. Evaluation of the surface damage to stainless steel caused by a micro-jet in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Sang-Ok; Kim, Seong-Jong; Jeong, Jae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    As high-speed machines have been developed in marine and offshore industry cavitation damage due to the high speed of rotation of a fluid has been gradually increasing. The damage on the material's surface is a combination of electrochemical corrosion due to the passivity of the films being destroyed by Cl- and cavitation erosion due to the collapse of cavity bubbles. Hence, in this paper, the damage mechanisms for electrochemical corrosion and physical pressure for 415 stainless-steel cavities were evaluated in seawater solutions. The experiments included a galvanostatic experiment in a cavitation environment and a cavitation test with an ultrasonic amplitude of 30 µm at various times. The complex damage behaviors were compared and analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and 3D microscopy after completion of the experiment. As a result of the galvanostatic experiment under a cavitation condition in seawater, damage under a cavitation condition owing to the water cavitation peening effect was relatively less compared to that under a static condition.

  16. Cavitation erosion - corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 runner steel in natural river water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tôn-Thât, L.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation erosion is still one of the most important degradation modes in hydraulic turbine runners. Part of researches in this field focuses on finding new materials, coatings and surface treatments to improve the resistance properties of runners to this phenomenon. However, only few studies are focused on the deleterious effect of the environment. Actually, in some cases a synergistic effect between cavitation erosion mechanisms and corrosion kinetics can establish and increase erosion rate. In the present study, the cavitation erosion-corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 steel in natural river water is investigated. This paper state the approach which has been used to enlighten the synergy between both phenomena. For this, a 20 kHz vibratory test according ASTM G32 standard is coupled to an electrochemical cell to be able to follow the different corrosion parameters during the tests to get evidence of the damaging mechanism. Moreover, mass losses have been followed during the exposure time. The classical degradation parameters (cumulative weight loss and erosion rate) are determined. Furthermore, a particular effort has been implemented to determine the evolution of surface damages in terms of pitting, surface cracking, material removal and surface corrosion. For this, scanning electron microscopy has been used to link the microstructure to the material removal mechanisms.

  17. Transient cavitation produced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioanta, Iulian

    1998-12-01

    Two decades ago, a new medical procedure was introduced, allowing the fragmentation of kidney stones from outside the human body (noninvasively) using a shock wave device termed lithotripter ('stone crusher'). Considered as one of the most important medical inventions of this century, lithotripsy is currently used in more than 80% of urolithiasis cases. Experimental studies have shown that transient or inertial cavitation is generated by this procedure near the stones and in renal tissue. To find a correlation between the number of shocks delivered and the treatment efficiency, the acoustic emission (AE) generated by the oscillation of cavitation bubbles, and its relation with stone fragmentation and tissue damage during shock wave lithotripsy were studied. In vitro experiments were carried out to identify the correlation between the AE signals and the expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles, which were captured by high-speed photography (20,000 frames per second). This correlation has been verified on four different electrohydraulic lithotripters, under multiple experimental conditions. The effects of tissue attenuation on AE and stone fragmentation were also studied. The in vitro results have further allowed the interpretation of AE signals from in vivo experiments with pigs. Although similar in general trend, in vivo AE signals are found to be shorter in expansion and longer in the total ringing times (including the rebound phenomenon) than for in vitro AE signals, indicating a tissue constraining effect on bubble oscillation. Based on this observation a new mechanism for renal vascular and tubular injury is proposed. In addition, changes in AE signals have been observed as the total number of shocks increases, and this dose dependence feature has allowed the determination of a threshold value for extended tissue injury at 20 kV. This result has been confirmed by histological analysis and by results of a theoretical model study of bubble oscillation in a

  18. Mechanistic analysis of cavitation assisted transesterification on biodiesel characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Abdul Aziz, A R; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sonoluminescence transesterification on biodiesel physicochemical properties was investigated and the results were compared to those of traditional mechanical stirring. This study was conducted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasonication by coupling statistical analysis of the experiments into the simulation of cavitation bubble. Different combinations of operational variables were employed for alkali-catalysis transesterification of palm oil. The experimental results showed that transesterification with ultrasound irradiation could change the biodiesel density by about 0.3kg/m(3); the viscosity by 0.12mm(2)/s; the pour point by about 1-2°C and the flash point by 5°C compared to the traditional method. Furthermore, 93.84% of yield with alcohol to oil molar ratio of 6:1 could be achieved through ultrasound assisted transesterification within only 20min. However, only 89.09% of reaction yield was obtained by traditional macro mixing/heating under the same condition. Based on the simulated oscillation velocity value, the cavitation phenomenon significantly contributed to generation of fine micro emulsion and was able to overcome mass transfer restriction. It was found that the sonoluminescence bubbles reached the temperature of 758-713K, pressure of 235.5-159.55bar, oscillation velocity of 3.5-6.5cm/s, and equilibrium radius of 17.9-13.7 times greater than its initial size under the ambient temperature of 50-64°C at the moment of collapse. This showed that the sonoluminescence bubbles were in the condition in which the decomposition phenomena were activated and the reaction rate was accelerated together with a change in the biodiesel properties. PMID:24981808

  19. Reduction of Bubble Cavitation by Modifying the Diffraction Wave from a Lithotripter Aperture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose A new method was devised to suppress the bubble cavitation in the lithotripter focal zone to reduce the propensity of shockwave-induced renal injury. Materials and Methods An edge extender was designed and fabricated to fit on the outside of the ellipsoidal reflector of an electrohydraulic lithotripter to disturb the generation of diffraction wave at the aperture, but with little effect on the acoustic field inside the reflector. Results Although the peak negative pressures at the lithotripter focus using the edge extender at 20 kV were similar to that of the original configuration (-11.1±0.9 vs −10.6±0.7 MPa), the duration of the tensile wave was shortened significantly (3.2±0.54 vs 5.83±0.56 μs, P<0.01). There is no difference, however, in both the amplitude and duration of the compressive shockwaves between these two configurations as well as the −6 dB beam width in the focal plane. The significant suppression effect of bubble cavitation was confirmed by the measured bubble collapse time using passive cavitation detection. At the lithotripter focus, while only about 30 shocks were needed to rupture a blood vessel phantom using the original HM-3 reflector at 20 kV, no damage could be produced after 300 shocks using the edge extender. Meanwhile, the original HM-3 lithotripter at 20 kV can achieve a stone comminution efficiency of 50.4±2.0% on plaster-of-Paris stone phantom after 200 shocks, which is comparable to that of using the edge extender (46.8±4.1%, P=0.005). Conclusions Modifying the diffraction wave at the lithotripter aperture can suppress the shockwave-induced bubble cavitation with significant reduced damage potential on the vessel phantom but satisfactory stone comminution ability. PMID:22332839

  20. Catalase protects HepG2 cells from apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents by accelerating the degradation of p53.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jingxiang; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2003-02-14

    Oxidants such as H(2)O(2) play a role in the toxicity of certain DNA-damaging agents, a process that often involves the tumor suppressor p53. H(2)O(2) is rapidly degraded by catalase, which protects cells against oxidant injury. To study the effect of catalase on apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents, HepG2 cells were infected with adenovirus containing the cDNA of catalase (Ad-Cat). Forty-eight hours after infection, catalase protein and activity was increased 7-10-fold compared with control cells infected with Ad-LacZ. After treatment with Vp16 or mitomycin C, control cells underwent apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner; however, overexpression of catalase inhibited this apoptosis. Basal levels as well as Vp16- or mitomycin C-stimulated levels of p53 and p21 protein were decreased in the catalase-overexpressing cells as compared with control cells; however, p53 mRNA levels were not decreased by catalase. There was no difference in p53 protein synthesis between catalase-overexpressing cells and control cells. However, pulse-chase experiments indicated that p53 protein degradation was enhanced in the catalase-overexpressing cells. Proteasome inhibitors but not calpeptin prevented the catalase-mediated decrease of p53 content. Whereas Vp16 increased, catalase overexpression decreased the phosphorylation of p53. The protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid did not prevent the catalase-mediated down-regulation of p53 or phosphorylated p53. These results demonstrate that catalase protects HepG2 cells from apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents in association with decreasing p53 phosphorylation; the latter may lead to an acceleration in the degradation of p53 protein by the proteasome complex. This suggests that the level of catalase may play a critical role in cell-induced resistance to the effects of anti-cancer drugs which up-regulate p53. PMID:12468545

  1. Cavitation luminescence from flow over a hydrofoil in a cavitation tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, T. G.; Farhat, M.; Field, J. E.; Avellan, F.

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes a photon-counting study of the cavitation luminescence produced by flow over a hydrofoil. This has previously been identified in water saturated with xenon. The four objectives of this study are: to determine whether luminescence can be obtained using air-saturated water; to quantify this emission, if it is present, as a function of flow parameters; to determine whether the photon arrivals occur with random timing, or in ‘bursts’; to put limits on the rates associated with any bursts. The flow experiments were performed in a cavitation tunnel capable of achieving flow velocities of up to about 50 m s(-1) in the test section. The experimental hydrofoil was a NACA 009 blade. Parameters varied were the flow velocity, the incident angle of the hydrofoil and the cavitation index. The results show that significant photon counts are recorded when leading-edge cavitation takes place and U-shaped vortices (cavities) are shed from the main cavity. The photon count increases dramatically as the flow velocity increases or the cavitation index is reduced. Departures from a Poisson distribution in the arrival times of photons at the detector suggest the presence of ‘bursts’. These may be related to the way vortices are shed from the main cavity. Limits are inferred on the detection rates associated with bursts.

  2. PIV Analysis of Cavitation Flow Characteristics of He II

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Murakami, M.

    2006-04-27

    In the present experimental study cavitation phenomena in both He I and He II flows were investigated through the application of the PIV technique and visual observation under the saturated vapor pressure condition. The cavitation flow was generated in the downstream regions of a Venturi channel and a converging jet nozzle driven by a contracting metal bellows. It is seen that cavitation inception is a kind of stochastic process and has definite temperature dependence. The spatial distribution of the cavitation bubble velocity is measured by using the PIV technique. Some differences in the cavitating flow pattern and the void fraction are found between He II and He I cavitating flows. The PIV result indicates that the void fraction for He II flow is larger than that for He I flow.

  3. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Du, X. Z.; Xian, H. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary of effects of cavitation on the heat and mass transfer are given. The fundamental studies of cavitation bubbles, including its nonlinearity, rectified heat and mass diffusion, are initially introduced. Then selected topics of cavitation enhanced heat and mass transfer were discussed in details including whales stranding caused by active sonar activity, pool boiling heat transfer, oscillating heat pipe and high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

  4. L-Area Cavitation Tests Final Analysis - Limits Application

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.C.

    2001-06-26

    The L-Area cavitation test was designed to better define the onset of cavitation in the reactor system. The onset of gas evolution in the effluent piping and pump cavitation was measured using state-of-the-art equipment to provide data with a high confidence and low uncertainty level. The limits calculated from the new data will allow an approximate two percent increase in reactor power if the reactor is effluent temperature-limited with no compromise in reactor safety.

  5. High-harmonic generation in cavitated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Comier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-05-15

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using ultraintense lasers interacting with highly stripped ions in cavitated plasmas. This method relies on plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense drive beam (laser or electron beam) to produce an ion cavity. An ultrashort pulse laser propagating in the plasma-electron-free ion cavity generates laser harmonics. The longitudinal electron motion, which inhibits high-harmonic generation at high laser intensities, can be suppressed by the space-charge field in the ion cavity or by using a counterpropagating laser pulse. Periodic suppression of the longitudinal electron motion may also be used to quasi-phase-match. This method enables harmonic generation to be extended to the sub-A regime.

  6. Preventing cavitation in high energy centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Garbers, A.W.F.; Wasfi, A.K. Ltd. )

    1990-07-01

    Large-eye impellers for high energy centrifugal pumps were developed to meet the specification of reduced NPSH{sub r} at rated flow conditions. Unfortunately, this improved NPSH performance was not without adverse tradeoffs because an abnormal increase in noise, vibration and cavitation erosion were experienced at low flows. Centrifugal pumps are often used under widely varying and adverse conditions, and in the case of high energy and large-eye impeller pumps, these conditions should be evaluated very carefully. At petrochemical complexes in Secunda in the Republic of South Africa, a centrifugal pump application for lean carbonate solution experienced frequent failures. An investigation and literature survey indicated the cause was low flow cavitation. The purpose of this article is but to give design guidelines as obtained from literature and experience.

  7. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 3: Ogives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results for three, scaled, quarter-caliber ogives are given. Both desinent and developed cavity data, using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen, are reported. The desinent data do not exhibit a consistent ogive size effect, but the developed cavity data were consistently influenced by ogive size; B-factor increases with increasing ogive diameter. The developed cavity data indicated that stable thermodynamic equilibrium exists throughout the vaporous cavities. These data were correlated by using the extended theory derived in NASA-CR-2156 (volume II of this report series). The new correlating parameter MTWO, improves data correlation for the ogives, hydrofoil, and venturi and appears attractive for future predictive applications. The cavitation coefficient and equipment size effects are shown to vary with specific equipment-fluid combinations. A method of estimating cavitation coefficient from knowledge of the noncavitating pressure coefficient is suggested.

  8. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  9. Damage of Elastomeric Matrix Composites (EMC-rubbers) Under Static Loading Conditions: Experimental and Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayari, F.; Bayraktar, E.; Zghal, A.

    2011-01-01

    Elastomeric matrix composites (EMC-rubbers) are considered as isotropic hyper elastic incompressible materials under static loading conditions. As a rubber material element cannot be extended to an infinite stretch ratio, a damage mechanism at large strain is considered. The phenomenon of cavitation plays an important role in the damage of EMCs and influences the toughening mechanism of rubber-modified plastics. Indeed, cavitation in elastomers is thought to be initiated from flaws, which grow primarily due to a hydrostatic tensile stress and ahead of the crack; there will not only be a high stress perpendicular to the plane of the crack but also significant stress components in the other direction. However, there exists historically much discussion on the evolution of the cavitation in elastomers under monotonic and/or static solicitation. Mainly, cavitation instability occurs when the stress levels are sufficiently high so that the void expansion rate becomes infinitely large. Many research works have been performed to understand the effects of rubber cavitation on toughening of plastics. In fact, the cavitation phenomenon is not well known in detail. The most popular idea states that the cavitation is related to the existence of the gas bubbles trapped in the material during the production stage and the growing of the cavities would then be the result of the growing gas bubbles. Further, instable failure mechanism at the end of the cavitation is not well known too.

  10. Damage of Elastomeric Matrix Composites (EMC-rubbers) Under Static Loading Conditions: Experimental and Numerical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ayari, F.

    2011-01-17

    Elastomeric matrix composites (EMC-rubbers) are considered as isotropic hyper elastic incompressible materials under static loading conditions. As a rubber material element cannot be extended to an infinite stretch ratio, a damage mechanism at large strain is considered. The phenomenon of cavitation plays an important role in the damage of EMCs and influences the toughening mechanism of rubber-modified plastics. Indeed, cavitation in elastomers is thought to be initiated from flaws, which grow primarily due to a hydrostatic tensile stress and ahead of the crack; there will not only be a high stress perpendicular to the plane of the crack but also significant stress components in the other direction. However, there exists historically much discussion on the evolution of the cavitation in elastomers under monotonic and/or static solicitation. Mainly, cavitation instability occurs when the stress levels are sufficiently high so that the void expansion rate becomes infinitely large. Many research works have been performed to understand the effects of rubber cavitation on toughening of plastics. In fact, the cavitation phenomenon is not well known in detail. The most popular idea states that the cavitation is related to the existence of the gas bubbles trapped in the material during the production stage and the growing of the cavities would then be the result of the growing gas bubbles. Further, instable failure mechanism at the end of the cavitation is not well known too.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Induced Feedline Instability from an Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Frederick, Robert A,

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the results of an experimental investigation into the cavitation instabilities created by a circular orifice conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville Propulsion Research Center. This experiment was conducted in concert with a computational simulation to serve as a reference point for the simulation. Testing was conducted using liquid nitrogen as a cryogenic propellant simulant. A 1.06 cm diameter thin orifice with a rounded inlet was tested in an approximately 1.25 kg/s flow with inlet pressures ranging from 504.1 kPa to 829.3 kPa. Pressure fluctuations generated by the orifice were measured using a high frequency pressure sensor located 0.64 tube diameters downstream of the orifice. Fast Fourier Transforms were performed on the high frequency data to determine the instability frequency. Shedding resulted in a primary frequency with a cavitation related subharmonic frequency. For this experiment, the cavitation instability ranged from 153 Hz to 275 Hz. Additionally, the strength of the cavitation occur red as a function of cavitation number. At lower cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 2.4 % to 7 % of the inlet pressure. However, at higher cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 0.6 % to 1 % of the inlet pressure.

  12. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L.; Wang, Qianxi X.; Leppinen, David M.; Walmsley, A. Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  13. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L; Wang, Qianxi X; Leppinen, David M; Walmsley, A Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  14. Numerical simulation on the cavitation of waterjet propulsion pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C. Z.; Cheng, L.; Shang, Y. N.; Zhou, J. R.; Yang, F.; Jin, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Waterjet propulsion system is widely used in high speed vessels with advantages of simple transmission mechanism, low noise underwater and good manoeuvrability. Compared with the propeller, waterjet propulsion can be used flow stamping to increasing cavitation resistance at high speed. But under certain conditions, such as low ship speed or high ship speed, cavitation problem still exists. If water-jet propulsion pump is run in cavitation condition for a long time, then the cavitation will cause a great deal of noise CFD is applied to analysis and predict the process of production and development of cavitation in waterjet propulsion pump. Based on the cavitation model of Zwart-Gerber-Belamri and a mixture of homogeneous flow model, commercial CFD software CFX was taken for characteristics of cavitation under the three operating conditions. Commercial software ANSYS 14.0 is used to build entity model, mesh and numerical simulation. The grid independence analysis determine the grid number of mixed flow pump model is about 1.6 million and the grid number of water-jet pump system unit is about 2.7 million. The cavitation characteristics of waterjet pump under three operating conditions are studied. The results show that the cavitation development trend is similar design and small rate of flow condition .Under the design conditions Cavitation bubbles are mainly gathered in suction surface of blade near the inlet side of the hub under the primary stage, and gradually extended to the water side in the direction of the rim with the loss of the inlet total pressure. Cavitation appears in hub before the blade rim, but the maximum value of gas content in blade rim is bigger than that in hub. Under large flow conditions, bubble along the direction of wheel hub extends to the rim gradually. Cavitation is found in the pressure surface of blade near the hub region under the critical point of cavitation nearby. When NPSHa is lower than critical point, the area covering by bubbles

  15. Calcium Is a Major Determinant of Xylem Vulnerability to Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Herbette, Stephane; Cochard, Herve

    2010-01-01

    Xylem vulnerability to cavitation is a key parameter in the drought tolerance of trees, but little is known about the control mechanisms involved. Cavitation is thought to occur when an air bubble penetrates through a pit wall, and would hence be influenced by the wall's porosity. We first tested the role of wall-bound calcium in vulnerability to cavitation in Fagus sylvatica. Stems perfused with solutions of oxalic acid, EGTA, or sodium phosphate (NaPO4) were found to be more vulnerable to cavitation. The NaPO4-induced increase in vulnerability to cavitation was linked to calcium removal from the wall. In contrast, xylem hydraulic conductance was unaffected by the chemical treatments, demonstrating that the mechanisms controlling vulnerability to cavitation and hydraulic resistance are uncoupled. The NaPO4 solution was then perfused into stems from 13 tree species possessing highly contrasted vulnerability to cavitation. Calcium was found to be a major determinant of between-species differences in vulnerability to cavitation. This was evidenced in angiosperms as well as conifer species, thus supporting the hypothesis of a common mechanism in drought-induced cavitation. PMID:20547703

  16. Propeller sheet cavitation noise source modeling and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keunhwa; Lee, Jaehyuk; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Kyungseop; Seong, Woojae

    2014-02-01

    Propeller sheet cavitation is the main contributor to high level of noise and vibration in the after body of a ship. Full measurement of the cavitation-induced hull pressure over the entire surface of the affected area is desired but not practical. Therefore, using a few measurements on the outer hull above the propeller in a cavitation tunnel, empirical or semi-empirical techniques based on physical model have been used to predict the hull-induced pressure (or hull-induced force). In this paper, with the analytic source model for sheet cavitation, a multi-parameter inversion scheme to find the positions of noise sources and their strengths is suggested. The inversion is posed as a nonlinear optimization problem, which is solved by the optimization algorithm based on the adaptive simplex simulated annealing algorithm. Then, the resulting hull pressure can be modeled with boundary element method from the inverted cavitation noise sources. The suggested approach is applied to the hull pressure data measured in a cavitation tunnel of the Samsung Heavy Industry. Two monopole sources are adequate to model the propeller sheet cavitation noise. The inverted source information is reasonable with the cavitation dynamics of the propeller and the modeled hull pressure shows good agreement with cavitation tunnel experimental data.

  17. Photoacoustic cavitation for theranostics: mechanism, current progress and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Qin, D.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging cavitation technology, photoacoustic cavitation (PAC) means the formation of bubbles in liquids using focused laser and pre-established ultrasound synchronously. Its significant advantages include the decreased threshold of each modality and the precise location of cavitation determined by the focused laser. In this paper, a brief review of PAC is presented, including the physical mechanism description, the classic experimental technology, the representative results in variety of media, and its applications in biomedical imaging and therapy. Moreover, some preliminary results of PAC in perfluoropentane (PFP) liquid and PFP droplets investigated by passive cavitation detection (PCD) in our group are also presented.

  18. Acoustic methods for cavitation mapping in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Xu, S.; Ding, T.; Hu, H.; Liu, R.; Bai, C.; Lu, S.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, cavitation is increasingly utilized in a wide range of applications in biomedical field. Monitoring the spatial-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles is of great significance for efficiency and safety in biomedical applications. In this paper, several acoustic methods for cavitation mapping proposed or modified on the basis of existing work will be presented. The proposed novel ultrasound line-by-line/plane-by-plane method can depict cavitation bubbles distribution with high spatial and temporal resolution and may be developed as a potential standard 2D/3D cavitation field mapping method. The modified ultrafast active cavitation mapping based upon plane wave transmission and reception as well as bubble wavelet and pulse inversion technique can apparently enhance the cavitation to tissue ratio in tissue and further assist in monitoring the cavitation mediated therapy with good spatial and temporal resolution. The methods presented in this paper will be a foundation to promote the research and development of cavitation imaging in non-transparent medium.

  19. Numerical investigation of cavitation performance on bulb tubular turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. G.; Guo, P. C.; Zheng, X. B.; Luo, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    The cavitation flow phenomena may occur in the bulb tubular turbine at some certain operation conditions, which even decrease the performance of units and causes insatiably noise and vibration when it goes worse. A steady cavitating flow numerical simulations study is carried out on the bulb tubular unit with the same blade pitch angle and different guide vane openings by using the commercial code ANSYS CFX in this paper. The phenomena of cavitation induction areas and development process are obtained and draws cavitation performance curves. The numerical results show that the travelling bubble cavity is the main types of cavitation development over a wide operating range of discharge and this type of cavitation begins to sensitive to the value of cavitation number when the discharge exceeding a certain valve, in this condition, it can lead to a severe free bubble formation with the gradually decrement of cavitation number. The reported cavitation performance curves results indicate that the flow blockage incident would happen because of a mount of free bubble formation in the flow passage when the cavity developed to certain extend, which caused head drop behavior and power broken dramatically and influenced the output power.

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Cavitating Bubbly Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Hsiao, C.-T.; Chahine, G. L.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of cavitating bubbly flows is challenging due to the wide range of characteristic lengths of the physics at play: from micrometers (e.g., bubble nuclei radius) to meters (e.g., propeller diameter or sheet cavity length). To address this, we present here a multiscale approach which integrates a Discrete Bubble Model for dispersed microbubbles and a level set N-S solver for macro cavities, along with a mesoscale transition model to bridge the two. This approach was implemented in 3DYNAFScopyright and used to simulate sheet-to-cloud cavitation over a hydrofoil. The hybrid model captures well the full cavitation process starting from free field nuclei and nucleation from solid surfaces. In low pressure region of the foil small nuclei are seen to grow large and eventually merge to form a large scale sheet cavity. A reentrant jet forms under the cavity, travels upstream, and breaks it, resulting in a bubble cloud of a large amount of microbubbles as the broken pockets shrink and travel downstream. This is in good agreement with experimental observations based of sheet lengths and frequency of lift force oscillation. DOE-SBIR, ONR (monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim)

  1. Dynamics of Isolated Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennings, Pepijn; Bosschers, Johan; van Terwisga, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Performance of ship propellers and comfort levels in the surroundings are limited by various forms of cavitation. Amongst these forms tip vortex cavitation is one of the first appearing forms and is expected to be mainly responsible for the emission of broadband pressure fluctuations typically occurring between the 4th to the 7th blade passing frequency (approx. 40--70 Hz). These radiated pressure pulses are likely to excite parts of the hull structure resulting in a design compromise between efficiency and comfort. Insight is needed in the mechanism of acoustic emission from the oscillations by a tip vortex cavity. In the current experimental study the tip vortex cavity from a blade with an elliptic planform and sections based on NACA 662 - 415 with meanline a = 0 . 8 is observed using high speed shadowgraphy in combination with blade force and acoustic measurements. An analytic model describing three main cavity deformation modes is verified and used to explain the origin of a cavity eigenfrequency or ``vortex singing'' phenomenon observed by Maines and Arndt (1997) on the tip vortex cavity originating from the same blade. As no hydrodynamic sound originating from the tip vortex cavity was observed it is posed that a tip flow instability is essential for ``vortex singing.'' This research was funded by the Lloyd's Register Foundation as part of the International Institute for Cavitation Research.

  2. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  3. Discrete Bubble Modeling for Cavitation Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2007-03-01

    Dynaflow, Inc. has conducted extensive studies on non-spherical bubble dynamics and interactions with solid and free boundaries, vortical flow structures, and other bubbles. From these studies, emerged a simplified Surface Averaged Pressure (SAP) spherical bubble dynamics model and a Lagrangian bubble tracking scheme. In this SAP scheme, the pressure and velocity of the surrounding flow field are averaged on the bubble surface, and then used for the bubble motion and volume dynamics calculations. This model is implemented using the Fluent User Defined Function (UDF) as Discrete Bubble Model (DBM). The Bubble dynamics portion can be solved using an incompressible liquid modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation or a compressible liquid modified Gilmore equation. The Discrete Bubble Model is a very suitable tool for the studies on cavitation inception of foils and turbo machinery, bubble nuclei effects, noise from the bubbles, and can be used in many practical problems in industrial and naval applications associated with flows in pipes, jets, pumps, propellers, ships, and the ocean. Applications to propeller cavitation, wake signatures of waterjet propelled ships, bubble-wake interactions, modeling of cavitating jets, and bubble entrainments around a ship will be presented.

  4. Intensely oscillating cavitation bubble in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siew-Wan, Ohl; Tandiono; Klaseboer, Evert; Dave, Ow; Choo, Andre; Claus-Dieter, Ohl

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the technical breakthrough in generating intense ultrasonic cavitation in the confinement of a microfluidics channel [1], and applications that has been developed on this platform for the past few years [2,3,4,5]. Our system consists of circular disc transducers (10-20 mm in diameter), the microfluidics channels on PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and a driving circuitry. The cavitation bubbles are created at the gas- water interface due to strong capillary waves which are generated when the system is driven at its natural frequency (around 100 kHz) [1]. These bubbles oscillate and collapse within the channel. The bubbles are useful for sonochemistry and the generation of sonoluminescence [2]. When we add bacteria (Escherichia coli), and yeast cells (Pichia pastoris) into the microfluidics channels, the oscillating and collapsing bubbles stretch and lyse these cells [3]. Furthermore, the system is effective (DNA of the harvested intracellular content remains largely intact), and efficient (yield reaches saturation in less than 1 second). In another application, human red blood cells are added to a microchamber. Cell stretching and rapture are observed when a laser generated cavitation bubble expands and collapses next to the cell [4]. A numerical model of a liquid pocket surrounded by a membrane with surface tension which was placed next to an oscillating bubble was developed using the Boundary Element Method. The simulation results showed that the stretching of the liquid pocket occurs only when the surface tension is within a certain range.

  5. Metformin and the ATM DNA damage response (DDR): accelerating the onset of stress-induced senescence to boost protection against cancer.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Cufí, Sílvia; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Vellon, Luciano; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro

    2011-11-01

    By activating the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA Damage Response (DDR), the AMPK agonist metformin might sensitize cells against further damage, thus mimicking the precancerous stimulus that induces an intrinsic barrier against carcinogenesis. Herein, we present the new hypothesis that metformin might function as a tissue sweeper of pre-malignant cells before they gain stem cell/tumor initiating properties. Because enhanced glycolysis (the Warburg effect) plays a causal role in the gain of stem-like properties of tumor-initiating cells by protecting them from the pro-senescent effects of mitochondrial respiration-induced oxidative stress, metformin's ability to disrupt the glycolytic metabotype may generate a cellular phenotype that is metabolically protected against immortalization. The bioenergetic crisis imposed by metformin, which may involve enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative stress, can lower the threshold for cellular senescence by pre-activating an ATM-dependent pseudo-DDR. This allows an accelerated onset of cellular senescence in response to additional oncogenic stresses. By pushing cancer cells to use oxidative phosphorylation instead of glycolysis, metformin can rescue cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression that is downregulated by oncogenic transformation, a crucial adaptation of tumor cells to avoid the adaptive immune response by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). Aside from restoration of tumor immunosurveillance at the cell-autonomous level, metformin can activate a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) to reinforce senescence growth arrest, which might trigger an immune-mediated clearance of the senescent cells in a non-cell-autonomous manner. By diminishing the probability of escape from the senescence anti-tumor barrier, the net effect of metformin should be a significant decrease in the accumulation of dysfunctional, pre-malignant cells in tissues, including those with the

  6. Influence of shieldings or antioxidants on DNA damage and early and delyed cell death induced in human fibroblasts by accelerated 595 MeV/u Fe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Dini, Valentina; Belli, Mauro; Campa, Alessandro; Sorrentino, Eugenio; Antonella Tabocchini, Maria; Lobascio, Cesare; Berra, Bruno

    HZE particles from space radiation raise an important protection concern during long-term astronauts' travels. As high charge, high energy particles interact with a shield, both projec-tile and target fragmentation may occurs, so that the biological properties of the emerging radiation field depend on the nature and energy of the incident particles, and on the nature and thickness of the shield. We have studied the influence of PMMA and Kevlar shielding as well as the antioxidant compounds Rosmarinic acid or Resveratrol on DNA damage induction and processing (as evaluated by the g-H2AX phosphorylation assay) and on early and delayed cell death in AG01522 human fibroblasts irradiated with Fe ions of 595 MeV/u at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, USA). Insertion of PMMA or Kevlar shields (10 g/cm2 thick) gave no substantial change in the bio-logical effect per unit dose on the sample for all the end points studied. When irradiation was performed in the presence of 300 mM Rosmarinic acid or Resveratrol no difference were found for both early and delayed cell death, while a slight protective effect was observed for the initial and residual DNA damage. For both early and delayed cell death, Fe-ions are more effective than g-rays. The number of Fe-ion induced g-H2AX foci is instead lower than that induced by g-rays, due to the presence of multiple DSB within a single focus induced by Fe-ions. From a comparison of the g-H2AX data with the results on DNA fragmentation obtained with 414 MeV/u Fe ions at the Heavy Ions Medical Accelerator (HIMAC, Chiba, Japan) and with 1 GeV/u Fe ions at BNL, in the absence or in the presence of PMMA shields (Esposito et al, Advance in Space Research 2004) we speculate that the overall effect of the shield is a balance between the contributions due to the slowing down of the primary particles and that due to the nuclear fragmentation. Acknowledgment: Financial support from ASI project

  7. Surface modification by gas nitriding for improving cavitation erosion resistance of CP-Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haibin; Cui, Zhenduo; Li, Zhaoyang; Zhu, Shengli; Yang, Xianjin

    2014-04-01

    Gas nitriding process has been used to increase the surface hardness of titanium, in this study we used this technique to improve the cavitation erosion resistance (Rce) of commercial purity titanium (CP-Ti). We also studied microstructure, phase constituents, hardness and the effect of processing parameters on Rce of the treated samples. The results indicated that the Rce of the treated samples was related to the processing parameters. The sample treated at 850 °C for 4 h has the highest Rce, which was attributed to the compound layer (CL) with a hard, dense and free-defects microstructure. With increasing the nitriding temperature and duration, the Rce of the treated samples decreased due to the excessive oxide and defects formed in the CL. When the CL was removed, the treated sample exhibited an excellent cavitation erosion behavior. It was supposed to be due to the existence of the residual compressive stresses field in the nitrogen diffusion zone, which played an important role in preventing microcracks initiation and propagation to interior for cavitation damage.

  8. The role of cavitation in the interaction of ultrasound with V79 Chinese hamster cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, K. I.; ter Haar, G. R.; Stratford, I. J.; Hill, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Suspensions of V79 cells have been irradiated with 1 MHz ultrasound at spatial average intensities up to 0.25 W cm-2. The effects seen are described in this paper. Acoustic emissions at the first subharmonic of the drive frequency (0.5 MHz) were monitored during irradiation. Subharmonic emission is characteristic of cavitation activity within the sample. A strong correlation was found between cell damage and a measure of the total emitted subharmonic energy. Damage was assayed in terms of cell lysis, the ability of the cells to take up the vital dye trypan blue and loss of reproductive integrity. It is concluded from these data that cavitation can play an important part in the interaction of ultrasound with biological systems in vitro, and that subharmonic emission may provide a non-invasive and somewhat quantitative means of predicting the magnitude of such interactions. PMID:6950750

  9. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  10. Examples of oil cavitation erosion in positive displacement pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halat, J. A.; Ellis, G. O.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of cavitation flow on piston type, positive displacement, hydraulic pumps are discussed. The operating principles of the pump and the components which are most subject to erosion effects are described. The mechanisms of cavitation phenomena are identified from photographic records. Curves are developed to show the solubility of air in water, oil-water emulsion, and industrial hydraulic oil.

  11. A comprehensive analysis of cavitation and liquid impingement erosion data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    Cavitation-erosion experimental data previously covering several materials tested in a rotating disk device and a magnetostriction apparatus were analyzed using new normalization and curve-fitting techniques. From this process a universal approach is derived which can include data from cavitation and liquid impingement studies for specific materials from different test devices.

  12. FINAL REPORT. CAVITATIONAL HYDROTHERMAL OXIDATION: A NEW REMEDIATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past year, we have continued to make substantial scientific progress on our understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Our efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of ...

  13. Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, D. A.; Riemer, B. W.; Ferguson, P. D.; Carroll, A. J.; Dayton, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions fully prototypic to the SNS. Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the mercury vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

  14. Pressure measurements and high speed visualizations of the cavitation phenomena at deep part load condition in a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Müller, A.; Favrel, A.; Landry, C.; Avellan, F.

    2014-03-01

    In a hydraulic power plant, it is essential to provide a reliable, sustainable and flexible energy supply. In recent years, in order to cover the variations of the renewable electricity production, hydraulic power plants are demanded to operate with more extended operating range. Under these off-design conditions, a hydraulic turbine is subject to cavitating swirl flow at the runner outlet. It is well-known that the helically/symmetrically shaped cavitation develops at the runner outlet in part load/full load condition, and it gives severe damage to the hydraulic systems under certain conditions. Although there have been many studies about partial and full load conditions, contributions reporting the deep part load condition are limited, and the cavitation behaviour at this condition is not yet understood. This study aims to unveil the cavitation phenomena at deep part load condition by high speed visualizations focusing on the draft tube cone as well as the runner blade channel, and pressure fluctuations associated with the phenomena were also investigated.

  15. Researches upon cavitation erosion behavior of some duplex steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Mitelea, I.; Micu, L. M.; Bordeasu, C.; Ghera, C.; Iosif, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the cavitation erosion behavior of two stainless steels having a duplex structure formed by austenite and ferrite. The conclusions were obtained by using both the cavitation erosion characteristic curves and the pictures of the eroded surfaces obtained with performing optic microscopes. The researches were focused upon the optimal correlation between the cavitation erosion resistance and the rate of the two structural constituents. The tests were done with T2 facility, with ceramic crystals, which integrally respects the ASTM G32-2010 Standard. The obtained results present the cumulative effect upon cavitation erosion of the chemical composition, mechanical properties and the structural constituents. The results of the researches are of importance for the specialists which establishes the composition of the stainless steels used for manufacturing hydraulic machineries or other devices subjected to cavitation erosion.

  16. Application of Hydrodynamic Cavitation for Food and Bioprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogate, Parag R.

    Hydrodynamic cavitation can be simply generated by the alterations in the flow field in high speed/high pressure devices and also by passage of the liquid through a constriction such as orifice plate, venturi, or throttling valve. Hydrodynamic cavitation results in the formation of local hot spots, release of highly reactive free radicals, and enhanced mass transfer rates due to turbulence generated as a result of liquid circulation currents. These conditions can be suitably applied for intensification of different bioprocessing applications in an energy-efficient manner as compared to conventionally used ultrasound-based reactors. The current chapter aims at highlighting different aspects related to hydrodynamic cavitation, including the theoretical aspects for optimization of operating parameters, reactor designs, and overview of applications relevant to food and bioprocessing. Some case studies highlighting the comparison of hydrodynamic cavitation and acoustic cavitation reactors will also be discussed.

  17. Observation of Microhollows Produced by Bubble Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Miwa, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    When an ultrasonic wave with sound pressure less than the threshold level of bubble destruction irradiates microbubbles, the microbubbles aggregate by an acoustic radiation force and form bubble clouds. The cavitation of bubble clouds produces a large number of microhollows (microdips) on the flow channel wall. In this study, microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation is evaluated using a blood vessel phantom made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel. Microbubble dynamics in bubble cloud cavitation is observed by a microscope with a short pulse light emitted diode (LED) light source. Microhollows produced on the flow channel wall are evaluated by a confocal laser microscope with a water immersion objective. It is observed that a mass of low-density bubbles (bubble mist) is formed by bubble cloud cavitation. The spatial correlation between the bubble mist and the microhollows shows the importance of the bubble mist in microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation.

  18. AN EFFICIENT TREATMENT STRATEGY FOR HISTOTRIPSY BY REMOVING CAVITATION MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation memory effects occur when remnants of cavitation bubbles (nuclei) persist in the host medium and act as seeds for subsequent events. In pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy, this effect may cause cavitation to repeatedly occur at these seeded locations within a target volume, producing inhomogeneous tissue fractionation or requiring an excess number of pulses to completely homogenize the target volume. We hypothesized that by removing the cavitation memory, i.e., the persistent nuclei, the cavitation bubbles could be induced at random locations in response to each pulse; therefore, complete disruption of a tissue volume may be achieved with fewer pulses. To test the hypothesis, the cavitation memory was passively removed by increasing the intervals between successive pulses, Δt, from 2, 10, 20, 50 and 100, to 200 ms. Histotripsy treatments were performed in red blood cell tissue phantoms and ex vivo livers using 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 10 cycles at P−/P+ pressure of 21/59 MPa. The phantom study allowed for direct visualization of the cavitation patterns and the lesion development process in real time using high-speed photography; the ex vivo tissue study provided validation of the memory effect in real tissues. Results of the phantom study showed an exponential decrease in the correlation coefficient between cavitation patterns in successive pulses from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 0.1 ± 0.1 as Δt increased from 2–200 ms; correspondingly, the lesion was completely fractionated with significantly fewer pulses for longer Δts. In the tissue study, given the same number of therapy pulses, complete and homogeneous tissue fractionation with well-defined lesion boundaries was achieved only for Δt ≥ 100 ms. These results indicated that the removal of the cavitation memory resulted in more efficient treatments and homogeneous lesions. PMID:22402025

  19. Effect of cavitation on spherical blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.

    1984-09-01

    For spherical blast waves propagating through a self-gravitating gas with an energy input Eα = E0tβ, where Eα is the energy released up to time t, E0 is a functional constant, and β is a constant, kinetic, internal heat, and gravitational potential energies have been computed. Taking the parameter A2, which characterises the gravitational field, equal to 2, variations of the percentages of these energies for β = 0, 1/2, 4/3, and 3 with shock strength have been presented. For β = 3, the effect of cavitation on the percentages of kinetic energy and internal heat energies has been explored.

  20. A creep model for austenitic stainless steels incorporating cavitation and wedge cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, S.; Alur, K. C.; Mathew, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    A model of damage evolution in austenitic stainless steels under creep loading at elevated temperatures is proposed. The initial microstructure is idealized as a space-tiling aggregate of identical rhombic dodecahedral grains, which undergo power-law creep deformation. Damage evolution in the form of cavitation and wedge cracking on grain-boundary facets is considered. Both diffusion- and deformation-driven grain-boundary cavity growth are treated. Cavity and wedge-crack length evolution are derived from an energy balance argument that combines and extends the models of Cottrell (1961 Trans. AIME 212 191-203), Williams (1967 Phil. Mag. 15 1289-91) and Evans (1971 Phil Mag. 23 1101-12). The time to rupture predicted by the model is in good agreement with published experimental data for a type 316 austenitic stainless steel under uniaxial creep loading. Deformation and damage evolution at the microscale predicted by the present model are also discussed.

  1. The Role of cavitation on Initiating Mercury-Steel Wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    2001-11-14

    In accelerator-driven neutron sources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) with powers in the 2 MW range (time-averaged), the interaction of the energetic proton beam with the mercury target can lead to very high heating rates in the target. Although the resulting temperature rise is relatively small (a few degrees C), the rate of temperature rise is enormous (-10{sup 7} C/s) during the very brief beam pulse (-0.58 {micro}s). The resulting thermal-shock induced compression of the mercury leads to the production of large amplitude pressure waves in the mercury that interact with the walls of the mercury target and the bulk flow field. Understanding and predicting propagation of pressure pulses in the target are considered critical for establishing the feasibility of constructing and safely operating such devices. Safety-related operational concerns exist in two main areas, viz., (1) possible target enclosure failure from impact of thermal shocks on the wall due to its direct heating from the proton beam and the loads transferred from the mercury compression waves, and (2) impact of the compression-cum-rarefaction wave-induced effects such as cavitation bubble emanation and their impact on mercury-steel interfacial phenomena (such as wetting, mass transfer and erosion).

  2. The efficiency of a new hydrodynamic cavitation pilot system on Artemia salina cysts and natural population of copepods and bacteria under controlled mesocosm conditions.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Martina; Grego, Mateja; Turk, Valentina

    2016-04-15

    A study of the efficiency of hydrodynamic cavitation and separation was carried out to evaluate an innovative, environmentally safe and acceptable system for ballast water treatment for reducing the risk of introducing non-native species worldwide. Mesocosm experiments were performed to assess the morphological changes and viability of zooplankton (copepods), Artemia salina cysts, and the growth potential of marine bacteria after the hydrodynamic cavitation treatment with a different number of cycles. Our preliminary results confirmed the significant efficiency of the treatment since more than 98% of the copepods and A. salina cysts were damaged, in comparison with the initial population. The efficiency increased with the number of the hydrodynamic cavitation cycles, or in combination with a separation technique for cysts. There was also a significant decrease in bacterial abundance and growth rate, compared to the initial number and growth potential. PMID:26902683

  3. Wetting and cavitation pathways on nanodecorated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Amabili, Matteo; Lisi, Emanuele; Giacomello, Alberto; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2016-03-28

    In this contribution we study the wetting and nucleation of vapor bubbles on nanodecorated surfaces via free energy molecular dynamics simulations. The results shed light on the stability of superhydrophobicity in submerged surfaces with nanoscale corrugations. The re-entrant geometry of the cavities under investigation is capable of sustaining a confined vapor phase within the surface roughness (Cassie state) both for hydrophobic and hydrophilic combinations of liquid and solid. The atomistic system is of nanometric size; on this scale thermally activated events can play an important role ultimately determining the lifetime of the Cassie state. Such a superhydrophobic state can break down by full wetting of the texture at large pressures (Cassie-Wenzel transition) or by nucleating a vapor bubble at negative pressures (cavitation). Specialized rare event techniques show that several pathways for wetting and cavitation are possible, due to the complex surface geometry. The related free energy barriers are of the order of 100kBT and vary with pressure. The atomistic results are found to be in semi-quantitative accord with macroscopic capillarity theory. However, the latter is not capable of capturing the density fluctuations, which determine the destabilization of the confined liquid phase at negative pressures (liquid spinodal). PMID:26905783

  4. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays

    PubMed Central

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh–Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed. PMID:20000921

  5. Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound: An in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huizhong; Zhang, Ti; Yang, Xinmai

    2013-04-01

    Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was studied in vivo using a small animal model. Laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. The in vivo measurements were made under different combinations of HIFU treatment depths, laser wavelengths, and HIFU durations. The results demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to enhance cavitation effect by reducing cavitation threshold in vivo.

  6. Effect of Spray Particle Velocity on Cavitation Erosion Resistance Characteristics of HVOF and HVAF Processed 86WC-10Co4Cr Hydro Turbine Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. K.; Kamaraj, M.; Seetharamu, S.; Pramod, T.; Sampathkumaran, P.

    2016-06-01

    The hydro plants utilizing silt-laden water for power generation suffer from severe metal wastage due to particle-induced erosion and cavitation. High-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF)-based coatings is widely applied to improve the erosion life. The process parameters such as particle velocity, size, powder feed rate, temperature, affect their mechanical properties. The high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) technology, with higher particle velocities and lower spray temperatures, gives dense and substantially nonoxidized coating. In the present study, the cavitation resistance of 86WC-10Co4Cr-type HVOF coating processed at 680 m/s spray particle velocity was compared with HVAF coatings made at 895, 960, and 1010 m/s. The properties such as porosity, hardness, indentation toughness, and cavitation resistance were investigated. The surface damage morphology has been analyzed in SEM. The cohesion between different layers has been examined qualitatively through scratch depth measurements across the cross section. The HVAF coatings have shown a lower porosity, higher hardness, and superior cavitation resistance. Delamination, extensive cracking of the matrix interface, and detachment of the WC grains were observed in HVOF coating. The rate of metal loss is low in HVAF coatings implying that process parameters play a vital role in achieving improved cavitation resistance.

  7. Effect of Spray Particle Velocity on Cavitation Erosion Resistance Characteristics of HVOF and HVAF Processed 86WC-10Co4Cr Hydro Turbine Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. K.; Kamaraj, M.; Seetharamu, S.; Pramod, T.; Sampathkumaran, P.

    2016-08-01

    The hydro plants utilizing silt-laden water for power generation suffer from severe metal wastage due to particle-induced erosion and cavitation. High-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF)-based coatings is widely applied to improve the erosion life. The process parameters such as particle velocity, size, powder feed rate, temperature, affect their mechanical properties. The high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) technology, with higher particle velocities and lower spray temperatures, gives dense and substantially nonoxidized coating. In the present study, the cavitation resistance of 86WC-10Co4Cr-type HVOF coating processed at 680 m/s spray particle velocity was compared with HVAF coatings made at 895, 960, and 1010 m/s. The properties such as porosity, hardness, indentation toughness, and cavitation resistance were investigated. The surface damage morphology has been analyzed in SEM. The cohesion between different layers has been examined qualitatively through scratch depth measurements across the cross section. The HVAF coatings have shown a lower porosity, higher hardness, and superior cavitation resistance. Delamination, extensive cracking of the matrix interface, and detachment of the WC grains were observed in HVOF coating. The rate of metal loss is low in HVAF coatings implying that process parameters play a vital role in achieving improved cavitation resistance.

  8. Use of hydrodynamic cavitation in (waste)water treatment.

    PubMed

    Dular, Matevž; Griessler-Bulc, Tjaša; Gutierrez-Aguirre, Ion; Heath, Ester; Kosjek, Tina; Krivograd Klemenčič, Aleksandra; Oder, Martina; Petkovšek, Martin; Rački, Nejc; Ravnikar, Maja; Šarc, Andrej; Širok, Brane; Zupanc, Mojca; Žitnik, Miha; Kompare, Boris

    2016-03-01

    The use of acoustic cavitation for water and wastewater treatment (cleaning) is a well known procedure. Yet, the use of hydrodynamic cavitation as a sole technique or in combination with other techniques such as ultrasound has only recently been suggested and employed. In the first part of this paper a general overview of techniques that employ hydrodynamic cavitation for cleaning of water and wastewater is presented. In the second part of the paper the focus is on our own most recent work using hydrodynamic cavitation for removal of pharmaceuticals (clofibric acid, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, carbamazepine), toxic cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa), green microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris), bacteria (Legionella pneumophila) and viruses (Rotavirus) from water and wastewater. As will be shown, hydrodynamic cavitation, like acoustic, can manifest itself in many different forms each having its own distinctive properties and mechanisms. This was until now neglected, which eventually led to poor performance of the technique. We will show that a different type of hydrodynamic cavitation (different removal mechanism) is required for successful removal of different pollutants. The path to use hydrodynamic cavitation as a routine water cleaning method is still long, but recent results have already shown great potential for optimisation, which could lead to a low energy tool for water and wastewater cleaning. PMID:26515938

  9. Cavitation Erosion Resistance of Fe-Based Amorphous/Nanocrystal Coatings Prepared by High-Velocity Arc Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zehua; Zhang, Xuan; Cheng, Jiangbo; Lin, Jinran; Zhou, Zehua

    2014-04-01

    Two kinds of amorphous/nanocrystal coating (FeCrNiBSiNb and FeCrBSiWNb) were prepared by high-velocity arc spraying. The microhardness, bonding strength, and cavitation erosion resistance of the coatings were measured. The microstructure, amorphous content, and nanocrystal size were checked and the surface morphologies were investigated after cavitation erosion testing. The results indicated that both the FeCrNiBSiNb and FeCrBSiWNb coating consisted of amorphous/nanocrystal and Fe-based solid solution, with amorphous content of 73.6 and 57.2 vol.%, respectively. The Ni-Cr-Fe solid solution of the FeCrNiBSiNb coating had an average grain size of 19.8 nm, whereas the Fe-Cr solid solution of the FeCrBSiWNb coating had an average grain size of 29.4 nm. Moreover, both the FeCrNiBSiNb and FeCrBSiWNb coating exhibited good bonding strength, high hardness, and excellent cavitation erosion resistance. After 180 min of cavitation erosion, the cumulative weight loss of the FeCrNiBSiNb and FeCrBSiWNb coating was 21.3 and 24.0 mg, whereas the weight loss of a 0Cr18Ni9 coating was up to 62.6 mg. This investigation revealed that the cavitation damage to the thermally sprayed amorphous/nanocrystal coatings was mainly in the form of layer detachment, whereas for the conventional coating it took the form of particle breakage.

  10. Cavitation-enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation of rabbit tumors in vivo using phase shift nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A; Park, Eun-Joo; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia I; McDannold, Nathan J; Porter, Tyrone M

    2014-01-01

    Advanced tumors are often inoperable due to their size and proximity to critical vascular structures. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed to non-invasively thermally ablate inoperable solid tumors. However, the clinical feasibility of HIFU ablation therapy has been limited by the long treatment times (on the order of hours) and high acoustic intensities required. Studies have shown that inertial cavitation can enhance HIFU-mediated heating by generating broadband acoustic emissions that increase tissue absorption and accelerate HIFU-induced heating. Unfortunately, initiating inertial cavitation in tumors requires high intensities and can be unpredictable. To address this need, phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) have been developed. PSNE consist of lipid-coated liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that are less than 200 nm in diameter, thereby allowing passive accumulation in tumors through leaky tumor vasculature. PSNE can be vaporized into microbubbles in tumors in order to nucleate cavitation activity and enhance HIFU-mediated heating. In this study, MR-guided HIFU treatments were performed on intramuscular rabbit VX2 tumors in vivo to assess the effect of vaporized PSNE on acoustic cavitation and HIFU-mediated heating. HIFU pulses were delivered for 30 seconds using a 1.5 MHz, MR-compatible transducer, and cavitation emissions were recorded with a 650-kHz ring hydrophone while temperature was monitored using MR thermometry. Cavitation emissions were significantly higher (P<0.05) after PSNE injection and this was well correlated with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. The peak temperature rise induced by sonication was significantly higher (P<0.05) after PSNE injection. For example, the mean percent change in temperature achieved at 5.2 W of acoustic power was 46 ± 22% with PSNE injection. The results indicate that PSNE nucleates cavitation which correlates with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. This suggests that PSNE could

  11. Cavitation-enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation of rabbit tumors in vivo using phase shift nanoemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Park, Eun-Joo; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia I.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2014-07-01

    Advanced tumors are often inoperable due to their size and proximity to critical vascular structures. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed to non-invasively thermally ablate inoperable solid tumors. However, the clinical feasibility of HIFU ablation therapy has been limited by the long treatment times (on the order of hours) and high acoustic intensities required. Studies have shown that inertial cavitation can enhance HIFU-mediated heating by generating broadband acoustic emissions that increase tissue absorption and accelerate HIFU-induced heating. Unfortunately, initiating inertial cavitation in tumors requires high intensities and can be unpredictable. To address this need, phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) have been developed. PSNE consist of lipid-coated liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that are less than 200 nm in diameter, thereby allowing passive accumulation in tumors through leaky tumor vasculature. PSNE can be vaporized into microbubbles in tumors in order to nucleate cavitation activity and enhance HIFU-mediated heating. In this study, MR-guided HIFU treatments were performed on intramuscular rabbit VX2 tumors in vivo to assess the effect of vaporized PSNE on acoustic cavitation and HIFU-mediated heating. HIFU pulses were delivered for 30 s using a 1.5 MHz, MR-compatible transducer, and cavitation emissions were recorded with a 650 kHz ring hydrophone while temperature was monitored using MR thermometry. Cavitation emissions were significantly higher (P < 0.05) after PSNE injection and this was well correlated with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. The peak temperature rise induced by sonication was significantly higher (P < 0.05) after PSNE injection. For example, the mean per cent change in temperature achieved at 5.2 W of acoustic power was 46 ± 22% with PSNE injection. The results indicate that PSNE nucleates cavitation which correlates with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. This suggests that PSNE could

  12. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Gulec, K.; West, C.D.; Haines, J.

    1998-09-01

    It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.

  13. Cavitation-enhanced nonthermal ablation in deep brain targets: feasibility in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Jolesz, Ferenc; Livingstone, Margaret; McDannold, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) is an emerging noninvasive alternative to surgery and radiosurgery that is undergoing testing for tumor ablation and functional neurosurgery. The method is currently limited to central brain targets due to skull heating and other factors. An alternative ablative approach combines very low intensity ultrasound bursts and an intravenously administered microbubble agent to locally destroy the vasculature. The objective of this work was to investigate whether it is feasible to use this approach at deep brain targets near the skull base in nonhuman primates. METHODS In 4 rhesus macaques, targets near the skull base were ablated using a clinical TcMRgFUS system operating at 220 kHz. Low-duty-cycle ultrasound exposures (sonications) were applied for 5 minutes in conjunction with the ultrasound contrast agent Definity, which was administered as a bolus injection or continuous infusion. The acoustic power level was set to be near the inertial cavitation threshold, which was measured using passive monitoring of the acoustic emissions. The resulting tissue effects were investigated with MRI and with histological analysis performed 3 hours to 1 week after sonication. RESULTS Thirteen targets were sonicated in regions next to the optic tract in the 4 animals. Inertial cavitation, indicated by broadband acoustic emissions, occurred at acoustic pressure amplitudes ranging from 340 to 540 kPa. MRI analysis suggested that the lesions had a central region containing red blood cell extravasations that was surrounded by edema. Blood-brain barrier disruption was observed on contrast-enhanced MRI in the lesions and in a surrounding region corresponding to the prefocal area of the FUS system. In histology, lesions consisting of tissue undergoing ischemic necrosis were found in all regions that were sonicated above the inertial cavitation threshold. Tissue damage in prefocal areas was found in several cases, suggesting that in

  14. Counterbalancing the use of ultrasound contrast agents by a cavitation-regulated system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, C; Fouqueray, M; Lo, C W; Muleki Seya, P; Lee, J L; Bera, J C; Chen, W S; Inserra, C

    2015-09-01

    The stochastic behavior of cavitation can lead to major problems of initiation and maintenance of cavitation during sonication, responsible of poor reproducibility of US-induced bioeffects in the context of sonoporation for instance. To overcome these disadvantages, the injection of ultrasound contrast agents as cavitation nuclei ensures fast initiation and lower acoustic intensities required for cavitation activity. More recently, regulated-cavitation devices based on the real-time modulation of the applied acoustic intensity have shown their potential to maintain a stable cavitation state during an ultrasonic shot, in continuous or pulsed wave conditions. In this paper is investigated the interest, in terms of cavitation activity, of using such regulated-cavitation device or injecting ultrasound contrast agents in the sonicated medium. When using fixed applied acoustic intensity, results showed that introducing ultrasound contrast agents increases reproducibility of cavitation activity (coefficient of variation 62% and 22% without and with UCA, respectively). Moreover, the use of the regulated-cavitation device ensures a given cavitation activity (coefficient of variation less 0.4% in presence of UCAs or not). This highlights the interest of controlling cavitation over time to free cavitation-based application from the use of UCAs. Interestingly, during a one minute sonication, while ultrasound contrast agents progressively disappear, the regulated-cavitation device counterbalance their destruction to sustain a stable inertial cavitation activity. PMID:25682465

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Cavitation in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.

    1945-01-01

    The cavitation in nozzles on airfoils of various shape and on a sphere are experimentally investigated. The limits of cavitation and the extension of the zone of the bubbles in different stages of cavitation are photographically established. The pressure in the bubble area is constant and very low, jumping to high values at the end of the area. The analogy with the gas compression shock is adduced and discussed. The collapse of the bubbles under compression shock produces very high pressures internally, which must be contributory factors to corrosion. The pressure required for purely mechanical corrosion is also discussed.

  16. Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation from gas-stabilizing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, J. J.; Graham, S.; Myers, R.; Carlisle, R.; Stride, E.; Coussios, C. C.

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of cavitation from nanoparticles has been hindered by the inability to control nanobubble size. We present a method to manufacture nanoparticles with a tunable single hemispherical depression (nanocups) of mean diameter 90, 260, or 650 nm entrapping a nanobubble. A modified Rayleigh-Plesset crevice model predicts the inertial cavitation threshold as a function of cavity size and frequency, and is verified experimentally. The ability to tune cavitation nanonuclei and predict their behavior will be useful for applications ranging from cancer therapy to ultrasonic cleaning.

  17. Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation from gas-stabilizing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J J; Graham, S; Myers, R; Carlisle, R; Stride, E; Coussios, C C

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of cavitation from nanoparticles has been hindered by the inability to control nanobubble size. We present a method to manufacture nanoparticles with a tunable single hemispherical depression (nanocups) of mean diameter 90, 260, or 650 nm entrapping a nanobubble. A modified Rayleigh-Plesset crevice model predicts the inertial cavitation threshold as a function of cavity size and frequency, and is verified experimentally. The ability to tune cavitation nanonuclei and predict their behavior will be useful for applications ranging from cancer therapy to ultrasonic cleaning. PMID:26382515

  18. Effect of cavitation in high-pressure direct injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulhasanzadeh, Bahman; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-11-01

    As we move toward higher pressures for Gasoline Direct Injection and Diesel Direct Injection, cavitation has become an important issue. To better understand the effect of cavitation on the nozzle flow and primary atomization, we use a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin approach using multi-GPU parallelism to simulate the compressible flow inside and outside the nozzle. Phase change is included using the six-equations model. We investigate the effect of nozzle geometry on cavitation inside the injector and on primary atomization outside the nozzle.

  19. Report on research of calculus fragmentation by HIFU-induced cavitation in Tsinghua University: 2. Thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. H.; Zuo, Z. G.

    2012-11-01

    Thermal effects in the research of breaking kidney stones using HIFU-induced cavitation were studied. Damages to the phantom could be observed after an acting period of HIFU. It was shown that temperature rise is much greater in phantom than in water. Greatest changes occur near the focal region of HIFU transducer. Distinct temperature changes can be observed with input of continuous signals, while modest changes appear with input of pulsed signals. The fact that pulsed signals generate less damage, indicate the favourable acting patterns of HIFU. More tests are being done at the moment.

  20. Investigations Concerning Cavitation and Frost Fatigue in Clonal 84K Poplar Using High-Resolution Cavitron Measurements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Feng; Ding, Fei; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    Both drought and freezing-thawing of stems induce a loss of hydraulic conductivity (percentage loss of conductivity [PLC]) in woody plants. Drought-induced PLC is often accompanied by physical damage to pit membranes, causing a shift in vulnerability curves (cavitation fatigue). Hence, if cavitated stems are flushed to remove embolisms, the next vulnerability curve is different (shifted to lower tensions). The 84K poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) clone has small vessels that should be immune from frost-induced PLC, but results demonstrated that freezing-thawing in combination with tension synergistically increased PLC. Frost fatigue has already been defined, which is similar to cavitation fatigue but induced by freezing. Frost fatigue caused a transition from a single to a dual Weibull curve, but drought-fatigued stems had single Weibull curves shifted to lower tensions. Studying the combined impact of tension plus freezing on fatigue provided evidence that the mechanism of frost fatigue may be the extra water tension induced by freezing or thawing while spinning stems in a centrifuge rather than direct ice damage. A hypothesis is advanced that tension is enhanced as ice crystals grow or melt during the freeze or thaw event, respectively, causing a nearly identical fatigue event to that induced by drought. PMID:25786827

  1. Investigations concerning cavitation and frost fatigue in clonal 84K poplar using high-resolution cavitron measurements.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Ding, Fei; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-05-01

    Both drought and freezing-thawing of stems induce a loss of hydraulic conductivity (percentage loss of conductivity [PLC]) in woody plants. Drought-induced PLC is often accompanied by physical damage to pit membranes, causing a shift in vulnerability curves (cavitation fatigue). Hence, if cavitated stems are flushed to remove embolisms, the next vulnerability curve is different (shifted to lower tensions). The 84K poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) clone has small vessels that should be immune from frost-induced PLC, but results demonstrated that freezing-thawing in combination with tension synergistically increased PLC. Frost fatigue has already been defined, which is similar to cavitation fatigue but induced by freezing. Frost fatigue caused a transition from a single to a dual Weibull curve, but drought-fatigued stems had single Weibull curves shifted to lower tensions. Studying the combined impact of tension plus freezing on fatigue provided evidence that the mechanism of frost fatigue may be the extra water tension induced by freezing or thawing while spinning stems in a centrifuge rather than direct ice damage. A hypothesis is advanced that tension is enhanced as ice crystals grow or melt during the freeze or thaw event, respectively, causing a nearly identical fatigue event to that induced by drought. PMID:25786827

  2. Molecular dynamics investigation of nanoscale cavitation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-12-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the cavitation dynamics around intensely heated solid nanoparticles immersed in a model Lennard-Jones fluid. Specifically, we study the temporal evolution of vapor nanobubbles that form around the solid nanoparticles heated over ps time scale and provide a detail description of the following vapor formation and collapse. For 8 nm diameter nanoparticles we observe the formation of vapor bubbles when the liquid temperature 0.5-1 nm away from the nanoparticle surface reaches ˜90% of the critical temperature, which is consistent with the onset of spinodal decomposition. The peak heat flux from the hot solid to the surrounding liquid at the bubble formation threshold is ˜20 times higher than the corresponding steady state critical heat flux. Detailed analysis of the bubble dynamics indicates adiabatic formation followed by an isothermal final stage of growth and isothermal collapse.

  3. Cavitation microstreaming and material transport around microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manasseh, Richard; Tho, Paul; Ooi, Andrew; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Zhu, Yonggang

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that cavitation microstreaming plays a role in the therapeutic action of microbubbles driven by ultrasound, such as the sonothrombolytic and sonoporative phenomena. Microscopic particle-image velocimetry experiments are presented, showing that many different microstreaming patterns are possible around a microbubble when it is on a surface. Each pattern is associated with a particular oscillation mode of the bubble and generates a different shear stress distribution. It was found that it is possible to change the flow pattern by changing the sound frequency. Microstreaming flows around bubbles could be responsible for mixing therapeutic agents into the surrounding blood, as well as assisting sonoporative delivery of molecules across cell membranes. Appropriate tuning of the driving frequency may benefit therapies.

  4. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 2: Hydrofoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.

    1973-01-01

    Boundary layer principles, along with two-phase concepts, are used to improve existing correlative theory for developed cavity data. Details concerning cavity instrumentation, data analysis, correlative techniques, and experimental and theoretical aspects of a cavitating hydrofoil are given. Both desinent and thermodynamic data, using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen, are reported. The thermodynamic data indicated that stable thermodynamic equilibrium exists throughout the vaporous cryogen cavities. The improved correlative formulas were used to evaluate these data. A new correlating parameter based on consideration of mass limiting two-phase flow flux across the cavity interface, is proposed. This correlating parameter appears attractive for future correlative and predictive applications. Agreement between theory and experiment is discussed, and directions for future analysis are suggested. The front half of the cavities, developed on the hydrofoil, may be considered as parabolically shaped.

  5. Hign-speed penetration of projectile with cavitator into sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurskikh, Anna; Veldanov, Vladislav

    2011-06-01

    Cavitators are used in underwater projectiles design to form a cavern in which projectile could move with no or significantly reduced drag. An investigation of possible application of this structural element for penetration into porous media was conducted. High-speed impact of a conical-shaped head projectile with cavitator was studied in terms of its influence on penetration capacity and projectile stability in sand for impact velocity about 1500 m/s. Cavitators were manufactured of steel with different strength moduli, and thus two penetration regimes (with eroding/non-eroding cavitator) were compared. Numerical simulations showing wave propagation in target and projectile were performed in AUTODYN with Johnson-Cook model for projectile and granular model for sand.

  6. Cavitation Performance of a Centrifugal Pump with Water and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammitt, F. G.; Barton, R. K.; Cramer, V. F.; Robinson, M. J.

    1961-01-01

    The cavitation performance of a given centrifugal pump with water (hot and cold) and mercury is compared. It is found that there are significant scale effects with all fluids tested, with the Thoma cavitation parameter decreasing in all cases for increased pump speed or fluid Reynolds' number. The data for a fixed flow coefficient fall into a single curve when plotted against pump speed (or fluid velocity), rather than against Reynolds' number. Conversely, the Thoma parameter for a given Reynolds' number is approximately twice as large for mercury as for water. The direction of this variation is as predicted from consideration of the cavitation thermodynamic parameters which vary by a factor of 10(exp 7) between these fluids. No difference in cavitation performance between hot and cold water (approximately 160 F and 80 F) was observed, However, the thermodynamic parameters vary only by a factor of 5.

  7. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Ning, C.; Zhao, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG κ-epsilon model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head.

  8. Influence of cavitation on near nozzle exit spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshahi, M.; Yan, Y.; Nouri, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of cavitation inside multi-hole injectors for direct injection internal combustion (IC) engineshas been addressed in many previous investigations. Still, the effect of cavitation on jet spray, its stability and liquid breakup and atomisation is not yet fully understood. The current experimental work aims to address some of these issues. It focuses on the initiation and development of cavitation inside a 7× enlarged transparent model of a symmetric 6-hole spark ignition direct injection (SIDI) injector and quantifies the effect of cavitation on near-nozzle spray cone angle and stability utilising high speed Mie scattering visualisation. The regions studied include the full length of the nozzle and its exitjet spray wherethe primary breakup takes place.

  9. Design method of water jet pump towards high cavitation performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L. L.; Che, B. X.; Hu, L. J.; Wu, D. Z.

    2016-05-01

    As one of the crucial components for power supply, the propulsion system is of great significance to the advance speed, noise performances, stabilities and other associated critical performances of underwater vehicles. Developing towards much higher advance speed, the underwater vehicles make more critical demands on the performances of the propulsion system. Basically, the increased advance speed requires the significantly raised rotation speed of the propulsion system, which would result in the deteriorated cavitation performances and consequently limit the thrust and efficiency of the whole system. Compared with the traditional propeller, the water jet pump offers more favourite cavitation, propulsion efficiency and other associated performances. The present research focuses on the cavitation performances of the waterjet pump blade profile in expectation of enlarging its advantages in high-speed vehicle propulsion. Based on the specifications of a certain underwater vehicle, the design method of the waterjet blade with high cavitation performances was investigated in terms of numerical simulation.

  10. Freezing of Xylem Sap Without Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, H. T.

    1967-01-01

    Freezing of stem sections and entire twigs of hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) has been demonstrated to occur without increasing the resistance to the movement of water through the frozen part after rewarming. This was interpreted to mean that freezing did not produce cavitation in the xylem sap even though A) the sap was unquestionably frozen; B) it contained dissolved gases; and C) it was under tension before freezing and after. Freezing stem sections of some other evergreen gymnosperms during the summer again produced no evidence for cavitation of the xylem sap. On the other hand, freezing stem sections of some angiosperms invariably increased the resistance to sap flow leading to wilting and death in a few hours when the sap tension was at normal daytime values at the time of freezing. These results were interpreted to mean that the bordered pits on the tracheids of gymnosperms function to isolate the freezing sap in each tracheid so that the expansion of water upon freezing not only eliminates any existing tension but also develops positive pressure in the sap. Dissolved gases frozen out of solution may then be redissolved under this positive pressure as melting occurs. As the bubbles are reduced in size by this ice pressure developed in an isolated tracheid, further pressure is applied by the surface tension of the water against air. If the bubbles are redissolved or are reduced to sufficient small size by the time the tension returns to the sap as the last ice crystals melt, then the internal pressure from surface tension in any existing small bubbles may exceed the hydrostatic tension of the melted sap and the bubbles cannot expand and will continue to dissolve. PMID:16656485

  11. Modelling on cavitation in a diffuser with vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonská, J.

    2013-04-01

    Based on cavitation modelling in Laval nozzle results and experience, problem with the diffuser with vortex generator was defined. The problem describes unsteady multiphase flow of water. Different cavitation models were used when modelling in Fluent, flow condition is inlet and pressure condition is outlet. Boundary conditions were specified by Energy Institute, Victor Kaplan's Department of Fluid Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology. Numerical modelling is compared with experiment.

  12. Effect of cavitation on flow structure of a tip vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthieu, Dreyer; Reclari, Martino; Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Tip vortices, which may develop in axial turbines and marine propellers, are often associated with the occurrence of cavitation because of the low pressure in their core. Although this issue has received a great deal of attention, it is still unclear how the phase transition affects the flow structure of such a vortex. In the present work, we investigate the change of the vortex structure due to cavitation incipience. The measurement of the velocity field is performed in the case of a tip vortex generated by an elliptical hydrofoil placed in the test section of EPFL high speed cavitation tunnel. To this end, a 3D stereo PIV is used with fluorescent seeding particles. A cost effective method is developed to produce in-house fluorescent seeding material, based on polyamide particles and Rhodamine-B dye. The amount of cavitation in the vortex core is controlled by the inlet pressure in the test section, starting with the non-cavitating case. We present an extensive analysis of the vorticity distribution, the vortex intensity and core size for various cavitation developments. This research is supported by CCEM and swisselectric research.

  13. Researches upon the cavitation erosion behaviour of austenite steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Mitelea, I.; Salcianu, L. C.; Bordeasu, D.; Duma, S. T.; Iosif, A.

    2016-02-01

    Paper analyzes the cavitation erosion behavior of two stainless steels with 100% austenitic structure but differing by the chemical composition and the values of mechanical properties. The research is based on the MDE(t) and MDER(t) characteristic curves. We studied supplementary the aspect of the eroded areas by other to different means: observations with performing optical microscopes and roughness measurements. The tests were done in the T2 vibratory facility in the Cavitation Laboratory of the Timisoara Polytechnic University. The principal purpose of the study is the identification of the elements influencing significantly the cavitation erosion resistance. It was established the effect of the principal chemical components (determining the proportion of the structural components in conformity the Schaffler diagram) upon the cavitation erosion resistance. The results of the researches present the influence of the proportion of unstable austenite upon cavitation erosion resistance. The stainless steel with the great proportion of unstable austenite has the best behavior. The obtained conclusion are important for the metallurgists which realizes the stainless steels used for manufacturing the runners of hydraulic machineries (turbines and pumps) with increased resistance to cavitation attack.

  14. Computing Thermal Effects of Cavitation in Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Dash, Sanford M.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program implements a numerical model of thermal effects of cavitation in cryogenic fluids. The model and program were developed for use in designing and predicting the performances of turbopumps for cryogenic fluids. Prior numerical models used for this purpose do not account for either the variability of properties of cryogenic fluids or the thermal effects (especially, evaporative cooling) involved in cavitation. It is important to account for both because in a cryogenic fluid, the thermal effects of cavitation are substantial, and the cavitation characteristics are altered by coupling between the variable fluid properties and the phase changes involved in cavitation. The present model accounts for both thermal effects and variability of properties by incorporating a generalized representation of the properties of cryogenic fluids into a generalized compressible-fluid formulation for a cavitating pump. The model has been extensively validated for liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Using the available data on the properties of these fluids, the model has been shown to predict accurate temperature-depression values.

  15. Experimental investigation of a cavitating backward-facing step flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, G.; Djeridi, H.; Barre, S.

    2014-03-01

    The present study is the first part of global experimental work which is intended to produce a refined database of liquid and vapor phases and to improve CFD modeling of turbulent cavitating flows which can occur in rocket engine turbo-pump inducers. The purpose of the present experimental study is to get a better understanding of the dynamics of the liquid phase in a cavitating backward facing step flow and provide a refined database for the physical analysis of interaction between turbulence and cavitation. The backward facing step flow provides us a well-known test case to compare vortex dynamics and a realistic industrial configuration such as backflow in turbo machinery. Experiments were conducted in the hydrodynamic tunnel of CREMHyG at Grenoble,which was especially designed to study cavitating shear flows at high Reynolds numbers. To highlight the liquid phase topology and dynamics such as large vortex structures, free shear layer instability, reattachment wall interaction and reverse flow, the flow is characterized by Laser Induced Fluoresence Particles Image Velocimetry (PIV-LIF) measurements techniques and by Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) techniques using spectral analysis to characterize the vortex shedding dynamics. The liquid phase was analyzed at different cavitation levels corresponding to 1% to 45% of void ratio range inside the shear layer, recirculation area and reattachment zone. The mean and fluctuating liquid velocities are clearly modified by the vapor phase and the scale of the vortical structures tends to be smaller inducing a destructuration of turbulence by cavitation.

  16. A piezoelectric polymer cavitation sensor installed in an emulsion generation microchannel device and an evaluation of cavitation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Takefumi; Yabumoto, Masaki; Suzumori, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    In previous works, ultrasonic emulsification was realized using small microchannel devices oscillated by piezoelectric transducers. By using the devices, the emulsification in the flow process was also realized. In these devices, the driving frequency was higher than 2 MHz. This value is higher than the maximum audible field. On the other hand, the frequency is too high to utilize the cavitation effect. This is because the cavitation threshold depends on the frequency. The aim of this study is to confirm the cavitation state in the microchannel device using a piezoelectric polymer sensor. A micropatterned cavitation detection sensor has been fabricated by a photolithography technique and evaluated in a high-intensity ultrasound field. The emulsification state in the microchannel device has been evaluated using the fabricated sensor.

  17. Predicting the Inception Cavitation of a Reversible Pump- Turbine in Pump Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ran; Xiao, Ruofu; Zhu, Di; Liu, Weichao

    2015-12-01

    Inception cavitation is a crucial indicator for reversible pump-turbines especially in pump mode. In actual applications, it is difficult to use CFD for the inception cavitation character. In this study, CFD simulation is conducted to find a proper way to evaluate the inception cavitation, different levels of vapor volume fraction in the impeller is predicted based on the tested results. Results show that the prediction of the location and scale of cavitation is accurate. The predicted cavitation number also matches the experimental data well. The vapor volume fraction levels from 0.0001% to 0.001% are recommended as the criterion of inception cavitation.

  18. Evaluation of Turbulence Models Performance in Predicting Incipient Cavitation in an Enlarged Step-Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseri, H.; Koukouvinis, P.; Gavaises, M.

    2015-12-01

    Predictive capability of RANS and LES models to calculate incipient cavitation of water in a step nozzle is assessed. The RANS models namely, Realizable k-ε, SST k-ω and Reynolds Stress Model did not predict any cavitation, due to the limitation of RANS models to predict the low pressure vortex cores. LES WALE model was able to predict the cavitation by capturing the shear layer instability and vortex shedding. The performance of a barotropic cavitation model and Rayleigh-Plesset-based cavitation models was compared using WALE model. Although the phase change formulation is different in these models, the predicted cavitation and flow field were not significantly different.

  19. Accelerating into the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Cherry

    2009-05-01

    Accelerator science has traditionally been associated with high-energy physics and nuclear physics. But the use of accelerators in other areas of science, as well as in medicine and industry, is steadily growing. Accelerators are now, for example, used to treat cancer using proton therapy, which can deposit radiation onto a tumour while causing much less damage to surrounding healthy tissue than with other treatment techniques.

  20. Experimental investigation on noise of cavitation nozzle and its chaotic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Haifeng; Xu, Junchao; Tang, Chuanlin

    2013-07-01

    The researches of cavitation noise mainly focus on the incipiency and developing of cavitation to prevent the cavititation erosion in the hydraulic machinery, while there is few report about the collapse strength of cavitation bubbles produced by water jet through the cavitation nozzle to utilize efficiently the collapse energy of cavitation bubbles. The cavitation noise signals are collected with hydrophones for the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position and the nozzle exit separately in the conditions of different standoff distance. The features of signal's frequency spectrum and power spectrum are analyzed for various nozzles by way of classical methods. Meanwhile, based on chaotic theory, phase space reconstruction is processed and the maximum Lyapunov index is calculated separately for each cavitation signal's time series. The results of chaotic analysis are compared with the one of conventional analysis. The analyzed data show that there are the marked differences at the spectrum between the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position while the standoff distance is 35 mm, which mainly displays at the high frequency segment (60-120 kHz). The maximum Lyapunov index calculated appear at standoff distance 35 mm, which is an optimum standoff distance for the most bubbles to collapse at the target. At the nozzle exit, the noise signal of cavitation nozzle is different from the general nozzle, which also displays at the high frequency segment. The results demonstrate that the water jet modulated by the cavitation nozzle can produce effectually cavitation, and at the target position the amplitude and energy of noise spectrum in high frequency segment for cavitation nozzle are higher than conventional nozzle and the Lyapunov index of cavitation nozzle is larger than conventional nozzle as the standoff distance is less than 55 mm. The proposed research reveals that the cavitation noise produced by collapse of cavitation bubbles

  1. On thermonuclear processes in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.; Taleyarkhan, R. P.; West, C. D.; Block, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental foundations of so-called bubble nuclear fusion are reviewed. In the nuclear fusion process, a spherical cavitation cluster ˜ 10-2 m in diameter is produced of spherical bubbles at the center of a cylindrical chamber filled with deuterated acetone using a focused acoustic field having a resonant frequency of about 20 kHz. The acoustically-forced bubbles effectuate volume oscillations with sharp collapses during the compression stage. At the final stages of collapse, the bubble cluster emits 2.5 MeV D-D fusion neutron pulses at a rate of ˜ 2000 per second. The neutron yield is ˜ 10^5 s -1. In parallel, tritium nuclei are produced at the same yield. It is shown numerically that, for bubbles having sufficient molecular mass, spherical shock waves develop in the center of the cluster and that these spherical shock waves (microshocks) produce converging shocks within the interior bubbles, which focus energy on the centers of the bubbles. When these shock waves reflect from the centers of the bubbles, extreme conditions of temperature ( ˜ 10^8 K) and density ( ˜ 10^4 kg m -3) arise in a (nano)spherical region ( ˜ 10-7 m in size) that last for ˜ 10-12 s, during which time about ten D-D fusion neutrons and tritium nuclei are produced in the region. A paradoxical result in our experiments is that it is bubble cluster (not streamer) cavitation and the sufficiently high molecular mass of (and hence the low sound speed in) D-acetone ( C3D6O) vapor (as compared, for example, to deuterated water D2O) which are necessary conditions for the formation of convergent spherical microshock waves in central cluster bubbles. It is these waves that allow the energy to be sufficiently focused in the nanospherical regions near the bubble centers for fusion events to occur. The criticism to which the concept of 'bubble fusion' has been subjected in the literature, in particular, most recently in Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Physics - Uspekhi) journal, is

  2. Modelling of flow with cavitation in centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, D.; Wróblewski, W.

    2014-08-01

    The paper concerns flow modelling in centrifugal pump with special consideration of cavitation phenomena. Cavitation occurs when local pressure drops below the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. Vapour bubbles are created and then they flow through the areas with higher pressure. The bubbles collapse rapidly generating pressure wave, noise and vibration. Working under cavitation condition is very dangerous to a pump and can significantly shorten its lifetime. The investigated centrifugal pump consists of three two-flow rotors and stators working on a single shaft. The modelling process started with grid independence study. When the grid was chosen, the pump performance curve was obtained using the single phase fluid model. Next, using the results from pump performance curve calculations, the cavitation characteristic was obtained. The constant capacity was held when the pressure at the inlet was reduced. The two - phase model was used with Zwart cavitation model. The results indicate that the pump work in safe range of parameters. The analysis also provides wide range of information about the areas of vapour appearance. The most endangered regions are leading edges of rotor. When pressure at the inlet drops to about one third of pressure that calculations started from the cavitation cloud appears in whole rotor. The intense of vapour bubbles creation is greater near the shroud of the pump, rather than near the hub. As cavitation is strongly unsteady phenomena, the transient calculations were performed to check if the results are close to those obtained using the steady state type. The differences are not significant.

  3. Numerical calculation of thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Suguo; Wang, Guoyu

    2012-11-01

    A key design issue related to the turbopump of the rocket engine is that cavitation occurs in cryogenic fluids when the fluid pressure is lower than the vapor pressure at a local thermodynamic state. Cavitation in cryogenic fluids generates substantial thermal effects and strong variations in fluid properties, which in turn alter the cavity characteristics. To date, fewer investigate the thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluids clearly by the numerical methods due to the difficulty of the heat transfer in the phase change process. In order to study the thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluid, computations are conducted around a 2D quarter caliber hydrofoil in liquid nitrogen and hydrogen respectively by implementing modified Merkle cavitation model, which accounts for the energy balance and variable thermodynamic properties of the fluid. The numerical results show that with the thermal effect, the vapour content in constant location decreases, the cavity becomes more porous and the interface becomes less distinct which shows increased spreading while getting shorter in length. In the cavity region, the temperature around the cavity depresses due to absorb the evaporation latent heat and the saturation pressure drops. When the vapour volume fraction is higher, the temperature depression and pressure depression becomes larger. It is also observed that a slight temperature rise is found above the reference fluid temperature at the cavity rear end attributed to the release of latent heat during the condensation process. When the fluid is operating close to its critical temperature, thermal effects on cavitation are more obviously in both the liquid nitrogen and hydrogen. The thermal effect on cavitation in liquid hydrogen is more distinctly compared with that in liquid nitrogen due to the density ratio, vapour pressure and other variable properties of the fluid. The investigation provides aid for the design of the cryogenic pump of the liquid rocket.

  4. High-speed motion picture camera experiments of cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A high-speed camera was used to investigate cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length-diameter ratio of the bearing, the speeds of the shaft and bearing, the surface material of the shaft, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. The results reveal not only the appearance of gas cavitation, but also the development of previously unsuspected vapor cavitation. It was found that gas cavitation increases with time until, after many hundreds of pressure cycles, there is a constant amount of gas kept in the cavitation zone of the bearing. The gas can have pressures of many times the atmospheric pressure. Vapor cavitation bubbles, on the other hand, collapse at pressures lower than the atmospheric pressure and cannot be transported through a high-pressure zone, nor does the amount of vapor cavitation in a bearing increase with time. Analysis is given to support the experimental findings for both gas and vapor cavitation.

  5. Brain injury after gunshot wounding: morphometric analysis of cell destruction caused by temporary cavitation.

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, M; Meissner, C; König, H G

    2000-02-01

    In addition to the primary destruction of brain tissue readily visible at autopsy (permanent track), gunshot wounding to the brain creates a pulsating temporary cavity due to radial expansion along the bullet's track. To determine the maximum extent of this temporary cavitation in brains of victims of gunshots from weapons with low muzzle velocity, we carried out morphometric studies on 20 cases of death from gunshot wounding to the head from bullets with a muzzle energy <500 J and a survival time of <90 min. The brains were fixed in formalin, examine macroscopically and microscopically, and subjected to morphometric analyses. Surrounding the permanent track, a narrow mantle-like zone of astrocyte destruction was found within an area of hemorrhagic extravasation. Axons near the permanent track had been broken into tiny fragments. The axonal damage lessened with increasing distance from the permanent track, although axons continued to be fragmented and to exhibit varicose changes and clumping until assuming their normal structure beyond 18 mm. Nerve cells were extremely shrunken close to the permanent track but gradually took on their normal shape with increasing distance. We also assessed the loss of glial fibrillary acid protein expression by astrocytes in the white matter, the extent of traumatic bleeding, and damage to axons and neurons as measured radially from the permanent track. Axonal and neuronal damage were found to extend about 18 mm radially from the permanent track, tapering gradually along the track from entry point to exit point. The destruction was probably produced by the temporary cavitation and accords with theoretical considerations and experimental observations. PMID:10709873

  6. An experiment system for testing synergetic erosion caused by sand abrasion and cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, L.; Liu, J.; Zhang, J. G.; Zhu, L.; Xu, H. Q.; Meng, X. C.; Yu, J. C.; Ma, S. P.; Wang, K.

    2014-03-01

    An advanced comprehensive test system, designed for testing synergetic erosion due to cavitation and sand abrasion in hydraulic machinery, is presented in this paper. This system includes an integrated test rig, control platform, and state-of-the-art measurement etc. For the integrated test system, there are three test modes, Venturi-section water tunnel, rotating disc and rotating disc with jet nozzle. The maximum velocity is 45 m/s for Venturi-section water tunnel test mode, and 85 m/s for rotating disc test mode. The pressure range for those two test modes can be regulated within -0.09 MPa~0.6 MPa. The highest flow relative velocity is 120 m/s for rotating disc with jet nozzle test mode. All key parameters measured from the test rig, such as flow discharge, pressure, sand concentration, temperature etc, can be displayed online and processed in the control platform. This new test system provides researchers with the possibility to measure cavitation erosion, sand abrasion and the synergetic damage in hydraulic machinery. Further, flow visualization analysis, weight loss measurements and erosion outline measurements are available using the system.

  7. Simulation of the effects of cavitation and anatomy in the shock path of model lithotripters

    PubMed Central

    Krimmel, Jeff; Colonius, Tim; Tanguay, Michel

    2011-01-01

    We report on recent efforts to develop predictive models for the pressure and other flow variables in the focal region of shock wave lithotripters. Baseline simulations of three representative lithotripters (electrohydraulic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric) compare favorably with in vitro experiments (in a water bath). We proceed to model and investigate how shock focusing is altered by the presence of material interfaces associated with different types of tissue encountered along the shock path, and by the presence of cavitation bubbles that are excited by tensile pressures associated with the focused shock wave. We use human anatomical data, but simplify the description by assuming that the tissue behaves as a fluid, and by assuming cylindrical symmetry along the shock path. Scattering by material interfaces is significant, and regions of high pressure amplitudes (both compressive and tensile) are generated almost 4 cm postfocus. Bubble dynamics generate secondary shocks whose strength depends on the density of bubbles and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF). At sufficiently large densities, the bubbles also attenuate the shock. Together with experimental evidence, the simulations suggest that high PRF may be counter-productive for stone comminution. Finally, we discuss how the lithotripter simulations can be used as input to more detailed physical models that attempt to characterize the mechanisms by which collapsing cavitation models erode stones, and by which shock waves and bubbles may damage tissue. PMID:21063697

  8. Nobody’s perfect: can irregularities in pit structure influence vulnerability to cavitation?

    PubMed Central

    Plavcová, Lenka; Jansen, Steven; Klepsch, Matthias; Hacke, Uwe G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that species-specific pit properties such as pit membrane thickness, pit membrane porosity, torus-to-aperture diameter ratio and pit chamber depth influence xylem vulnerability to cavitation. Despite the indisputable importance of using mean pit characteristics, considerable variability in pit structure within a single species or even within a single pit field should be acknowledged. According to the rare pit hypothesis, a single pit that is more air-permeable than many neighboring pits is sufficient to allow air-seeding. Therefore, any irregularities or morphological abnormalities in pit structure allowing air-seeding should be associated with increased vulnerability to cavitation. Considering the currently proposed models of air-seeding, pit features such as rare, large pores in the pit membrane, torus extensions, and plasmodesmatal pores in a torus can represent potential glitches. These aberrations in pit structure could either result from inherent developmental flaws, or from damage caused to the pit membrane by chemical and physical agents. This suggests the existence of interesting feedbacks between abiotic and biotic stresses in xylem physiology. PMID:24273549

  9. Optimum Injection Pressure of a Cavitating Jet for Introducing Compressive Residual Stress into Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyama, Hitoshi; Nagasaka, Kazuya; Takakuwa, Osamu; Naito, Akima

    Introducing compressive residual stress by a cavitating jet into the sub-surface of components used in nuclear power plants can mitigate stress corrosion cracking in these components. Although applying the jet is an effective method for this purpose, it should be used without causing damage to the surface from water jet droplets arising from high-pressure injection of the water jet. Thus, in introducing compressive residual stress, the injection pressure needs to be optimized. In this paper, in order to determine the optimum injection pressure, the residual stress of stainless steel treated by a jet at various injection pressures was measured using an X-ray diffraction method. The injection pressure of the jet was varied from 5 MPa to 300 MPa, and the diameter of the nozzle throat of the jet was varied from 0.35 mm to 2.0 mm. The variation of residual stress with depth was measured by alternating X-ray diffraction measurements with electropolishing. It was revealed that a cavitating jet at an injection pressure of 10 MPa with a nozzle diameter of 2.0 mm can introduce higher compressive residual stress to deeper into stainless steel compared with a jet at 300 MPa with a nozzle diameter of 0.35 mm when the downstream pressure of the nozzle was constant.

  10. Laser acceleration with open waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1999-03-01

    A unified framework based on solid-state open waveguides is developed to overcome all three major limitations on acceleration distance and hence on the feasibility of two classes of laser acceleration. The three limitations are due to laser diffraction, acceleration phase slippage, and damage of waveguide structure by high power laser. The two classes of laser acceleration are direct-field acceleration and ponderomotive-driven acceleration. Thus the solutions provided here encompass all mainstream approaches for laser acceleration, either in vacuum, gases or plasmas.

  11. Electromagnetic acoustic source (EMAS) for generating shock waves and cavitation in mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi

    In the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory a vessel of liquid mercury is subjected to a proton beam. The resulting nuclear interaction produces neutrons that can be used for materials research, among other things, but also launches acoustic waves with pressures in excess of 10 MPa. The acoustic waves have high enough tensile stress to generate cavitation in the mercury which results in erosion to the steel walls of the vessel. In order to study the cavitation erosion and develop mitigation schemes it would be convenient to have a way of generating similar pressures and cavitation in mercury, without the radiation concerns associated with a proton beam. Here an electromagnetic acoustic source (EMAS) has been developed which consisted of a coil placed close to a metal plate which is in turn is in contact with a fluid. The source is driven by discharging a capacitor through the coil and results in a repulsive force on the plate launching acoustic waves in the fluid. A theoretical model is presented to predict the acoustic field from the EMAS and compares favorably with measurements made in water. The pressure from the EMAS was reported as a function of capacitance, charging voltage, number of coils, mylar thickness, and properties of the plates. The properties that resulted in the highest pressure were employed for experiments in mercury and a maximum pressure recorded was 7.1 MPa. Cavitation was assessed in water and mercury by high speed camera and by detecting acoustic emissions. Bubble clouds with lifetimes on the order of 100 µs were observed in water and on the order of 600 µs in mercury. Based on acoustic emissions the bubble radius in mercury was estimated to be 0.98 mm. Experiments to produce damage to a stainless steel plate in mercury resulted in a minimal effect after 2000 shock waves at a rate of 0.33 Hz - likely because the pressure amplitude was not high enough. In order to replicate the conditions in the SNS it is

  12. Attached cavitation at a small diameter ultrasonic horn tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidarčič, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Dular, Matevž

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids, for instance, for cell disruption or sonochemical reactions. They are operated typically in the frequency range up to about 50 kHz and have tip diameters from some mm to several cm. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e., below the acoustic driving frequency. Here, we present a systematic study of the cavitation dynamics in water at a 20 kHz horn tip of 3 mm diameter. The system was investigated by high-speed imaging with simultaneous recording of the acoustic emissions. Measurements were performed under variation of acoustic power, air saturation, viscosity, surface tension, and temperature of the liquid. Our findings show that the liquid properties play no significant role in the dynamics of the attached cavitation at the small ultrasonic horn. Also the variation of the experimental geometry, within a certain range, did not change the dynamics. We believe that the main two reasons for the peculiar dynamics of cavitation on a small ultrasonic horn are the higher energy density on a small tip and the inability of the big tip to "wash" away the gaseous bubbles. Calculation of the somewhat adapted Strouhal number revealed that, similar to the hydrodynamic cavitation, values which are relatively low characterize slow cavitation structure dynamics. In cases where the cavitation follows the driving frequency this value lies much higher - probably at Str > 20. In the spirit to distinguish the observed phenomenon with other cavitation dynamics at ultrasonic transducer surfaces, we suggest to term the observed phenomenon of attached cavities partly covering the full horn

  13. Development of anticavitation hydrophone using a titanium front plate: Effect of the titanium front plate in high-intensity acoustic field with generation of acoustic cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiiba, Michihisa; Okada, Nagaya; Kurosawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Novel anticavitation hydrophones were fabricated by depositing a hydrothermally synthesized lead zirconate titanate polycrystalline film at the back of a titanium front plate. These anticavitation hydrophones were not damaged by the measurement of the acoustic field formed by a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device. Their sensitivity was improved by approximately 20 dB over that of the conventional anticavitation hydrophone by modifying their basic structure and materials. The durability of the anticavitation hydrophone that we fabricated was compared by exposing it to a high-intensity acoustic field at the focal point of the HIFU field and in the water tank of an ultrasound cleaner. Therefore, the effect of the surface of the titanium front plate on acoustic cavitation was investigated by exposing such a surface to the high-intensity acoustic field. We found that the fabricated anticavitation hydrophone was robust and was not damaged easily, even in the focused acoustic field where acoustic cavitation occurs.

  14. Accelerated processing of solitary and clustered abasic site DNA damage lesions by APE1 in the presence of aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Bhavini; DAS, Prolay; Kumari, Rekha

    2016-06-01

    The stimulatory effect of the aqueous extract of G. lucidum, a basidiomycetes class fungus in the APE1-enzyme-mediated processing of solitary and bistranded clustered abasic sites DNA damages is presented. Abasic sites are considered the most common type of DNA damage lesions. Our study shows enhanced activity of APE1 in the processing of abasic sites in the presence of the polysaccharides fraction of G. lucidum. Remarkable increase in the amount of single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) from solitary and bistranded clustered abasic sites respectively with APE1 in the presence of the extract was found. This trend is maintained when abasic sites in DNA oligomers are exposed to fibroblast cell extracts in the presence of the extract. While DNA conformational alteration is negligible, APE1 enzyme shows characteristic changes in the alpha helix and beta strand ratio after incubation with G. lucidum extract. The enhanced reactivity of APE1 at the molecular level in the presence of G. lucidium is attributed to this effect. This study potentially amplifies the scope of the use of G. lucidum, which was earlier shown to have only reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging properties with regards to DNA damage inhibition. PMID:27240987

  15. Some remarks on in-situ studies using TEM-heavy-ion accelerator link from the stand point of extracting radiation damage caused by fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Sekimura, Naoto; Murakami, Kenta; Abe, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    Radiation damage of materials for fission and fusion reactors has been scaled in terms of the number of displacements per atoms (dpa). The method of evaluating the dpa has been established and standardized. However, it has become obvious that more detailed analyses are required, particularly for the nature and spatial distribution of the introduced point defects and their clusters. Such detailed nature of the defects introduced is thought to be governed by the primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectrum, A number of trials to elucidate the PKA dependent radiation effects by choosing the mass and energy of the incident ions have been explored. In some cases, defect formation by a single impinging ion has been observed. However, it has also been recognized that there are a number of artefacts arising from energy deposition distributions, existence of surface sinks together with radiation induced surface modifications and so on. In this paper, discussion will be made on how to establish irradiation correlation between neutron and heavy ion irradiations in a cascade damage formation regime. For the past fifty years, the correlation between neutron and ion irradiations from the view point of simulating the neutron radiation damage by ion irradiations has been discussed many times. However, the correlation itself has not been fully discussed separately. This is the major objective of this paper.

  16. Observation of pressure variation in the cavitation region of submerged journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.; Ludwig, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    Visual observations and pressure measurements in the cavitation zone of a submerged journal bearing are described. Tests were performed at various shaft speeds and ambient pressure levels. Some photographs of the cavitation region are presented showing strong reverse flow at the downstream end of the region. Pressure profiles are presented showing significant pressure variations inside the cavitation zone, contrary to common assumptions of constant cavitation pressure.

  17. Cavitation assisted delignification of wheat straw: a review.

    PubMed

    Iskalieva, Asylzat; Yimmou, Bob Mbouyem; Gogate, Parag R; Horvath, Miklos; Horvath, Peter G; Csoka, Levente

    2012-09-01

    Wheat is grown in most of the Indian and Chinese regions and after harvesting, the remaining straw offers considerable promise as a renewable source most suitable for papermaking and as a pulping resource. Delignification of wheat straw offers ample scope for energy conservation by way of the application of the process intensification principles. The present work reviews the pretreatment techniques available for improving the effectiveness of the conventional approach for polysaccharide component separation, softening and delignification. A detailed overview of the cavitation assisted delignification process has been presented based on the earlier literature illustrations and important operational guidelines have been presented for overall low-cost and amenable energy utilization in the processes. The effectiveness of the methods has been evaluated according to yield and properties of the isolated fibers in comparison to the conventional treatment. Also the experimental results of one such non-conventional treatment scheme based on the use of hydrodynamic cavitation have been presented for the pulping of wheat straw. The effect of hydrodynamically induced cavitation on cell wall matrix and its components have been characterized using FT-IR analysis with an objective of understanding the cavitation assisted digestion mechanism on straws. It has been observed that the use of hydrodynamic cavitation does not degrade the fibrillar structure of cellulose but causes relocalisation and partial removal of lignin. Overall it appears that considerable improvement can be obtained due to the use of pretreatment or alternate techniques for delignification, which is an energy intensive step in the paper making industries. PMID:22410399

  18. Hydrodynamic cavitation in microsystems. II. Simulations and optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, M.; Pellone, C.; Zermatten, P. J.; Ayela, F.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical calculations in the single liquid phase and optical observations in the two-phase cavitating flow regime have been performed on microdiaphragms and microventuris fed with deionized water. Simulations have confirmed the influence of the shape of the shrinkage upon the contraction of the jet, and so on the localisation of possible cavitating area downstream. Observations of cavitating flow patterns through hybrid silicon-pyrex microdevices have been performed either via a laser excitation with a pulse duration of 6 ns, or with the help of a high-speed camera. Recorded snapshots and movies are presented. Concerning microdiaphragms, it is confirmed that very high shear rates downstream the diaphragms are the cause of bubbly flows. Concerning microventuris, a gaseous cavity forms on a boundary downstream the throat. As a consequence of a microsystem instability, the cavity displays a high frequency pulsation. Low values Strouhal numbers are associated to such a sheet cavitation. Moreover, when the intensity of the cavitating flow is reduced, there is a mismatch between the frequency of the pulsation of the cavity and the frequency of shedded clouds downstream the channel. That may be the consequence of viscous effects limiting the impingement of a re-entrant liquid jet on the attached cavity.

  19. Research of the cavitation performance of the condensate pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. F.; Pan, Z. B.; He, M. H.; Ji, K.; Zhou, W. C.; Min, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Condensate pump is an important part of power plant circulation systems, which is used to pump condensate water. Because the condensate water pressure is very low, the first impeller of the condensate pump must have a good cavitation performance. Numerical simulation was employed to study the first impeller cavitation performance. The first impeller was set in the condensate pump barrel, and the double suction casing was kept, the parts after the double suction casing was simplified as tube. The simplicity can guarantee the inlet and outlet conditions of the impeller. Based on the RANS and SST k - ω turbulence model, CFD software was used to simulate the condensate pump at different working conditions. The numerical simulation shows that cavitation occurred at the suction side of the blades closing to the leading edge. The cavitation performance of the impeller was predicted based on the numerical calculation. Comparing with the experimental results, the numerical simulation result is smaller than that of the experiment in small flux, and the cavitation performance trend is agreed with that of the experiments.

  20. Quantitative observations of cavitation activity in a viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Collin, Jamie R T; Coussios, Constantin C

    2011-11-01

    Quantitative experimental observations of single-bubble cavitation in viscoelastic media that would enable validation of existing models are presently lacking. In the present work, single bubble cavitation is induced in an agar gel using a 1.15 MHz high intensity focused ultrasound transducer, and observed using a focused single-element passive cavitation detection (PCD) transducer. To enable quantitative observations, a full receive calibration is carried out of a spherically focused PCD system by a bistatic scattering substitution technique that uses an embedded spherical scatterer and a hydrophone. Adjusting the simulated pressure received by the PCD by the transfer function on receive and the frequency-dependent attenuation of agar gel enables direct comparison of the measured acoustic emissions with those predicted by numerical modeling of single-bubble cavitation using a modified Keller-Miksis approach that accounts for viscoelasticity of the surrounding medium. At an incident peak rarefactional pressure near the cavitation threshold, period multiplying is observed in both experiment and numerical model. By comparing the two sets of results, an estimate of the equilibrium bubble radius in the experimental observations can be made, with potential for extension to material parameter estimation. Use of these estimates yields good agreement between model and experiment. PMID:22088001

  1. Numerical analysis for cavitation flow of marine propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauviqirrahman, Mohammad; Muchammad, Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2015-12-01

    Concerning the environmental issue and the increase of fuel price, optimizing the fuel consumption has been recently an important subject in all industries. In marine industries one of the ways to decrease the energy consumption was by reducing the presence of cavitation on marine propeller blades. This will give a higher propulsive efficiency. This paper provides an investigation into the influence of the cavitation on a hydrodynamic performance around the propeller based on numerical method. Hydrofoil representing the blade form of propeller was of particular of interest. Two types of cavitation model were investigated with respect to the accuracy of the result and the effectiveness of the method. The results include the hydrodynamic characteristics of cavitation phenomenon like lift/drag variation with respect to the cavity extent. It was found that a high accuracy and low computational time is achieved when the cavitation model of Zwart-Gerber-Belamri is used. The interesting outcome of this study is that the results can be used as a good evaluation tool for high marine propeller performance.

  2. Cavitation performance simulation of turbine meter under different temperature water condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. Z.; Zhang, B. S.; Chen, G.; Zhu, B. L.

    2015-01-01

    A cavitation thermodynamics model based on phase change, which is suitable for prediction of cavitation with thermal effects is developed. The cavitation characteristic at different temperature and cavitation number is investigated and analyzed. The initial cavitation of turbine flow meter generally occurs in the blade suction side. With the development of cavitation, the cavitation zone will appear on the front and the back end of the conditioner. In order to avoid the gather of cavitation, the design of the optimizing the blade structure should be adapted, and at the same time, the back pressure should be limited on the installation requirements. Expanding the measurement range and preventing cavitation occurs are the goal of the design and installation. The temperature effects on the cavitation of turbine flow meter is quite obvious and the increase of the temperature will delay the occurrence of cavitation. Pressure difference and the impeller torque will change obviously with the decrease of the cavitation number, which will cause the measurement error of the turbine meter.

  3. An algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations using homogeneous mixture approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidarčič, A.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.; Marquillie, M.; Dular, M.

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations is developed. The algorithm is based on Kim and Moin projection method form. Homogeneous mixture approach with transport equation for vapour volume fraction is used to model cavitation and various cavitation models can be used. Influence matrix and matrix diagonalisation technique enable fast parallel computations.

  4. Removal of nutrient limitations in forest gaps enhances growth rate and resistance to cavitation in subtropical canopy tree species differing in shade tolerance.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Mariana; Campanello, Paula I; Montti, Lia; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-03-01

    A 4-year fertilization experiment with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) was carried out in natural gaps of a subtropical forest in northeastern Argentina. Saplings of six dominant canopy species differing in shade tolerance were grown in five control and five N + P fertilized gaps. Hydraulic architectural traits such as wood density, the leaf area to sapwood area ratio (LA : SA), vulnerability to cavitation (P50) and specific and leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity were measured, as well as the relative growth rate, specific leaf area (SLA) and percentage of leaf damage by insect herbivores. Plant growth rates and resistance to drought-induced embolisms increased when nutrient limitations were removed. On average, the P50 of control plants was -1.1 MPa, while the P50 of fertilized plants was -1.6 MPa. Wood density and LA : SA decreased with N + P additions. A trade-off between vulnerability to cavitation and efficiency of water transport was not observed. The relative growth rate was positively related to the total leaf surface area per plant and negatively related to LA : SA, while P50 was positively related to SLA across species and treatments. Plants with higher growth rates and higher total leaf area in fertilized plots were able to avoid hydraulic dysfunction by becoming less vulnerable to cavitation (more negative P50). Two high-light-requiring species exhibited relatively low growth rates due to heavy herbivore damage. Contrary to expectations, shade-tolerant plants with relatively high resistance to hydraulic dysfunction and reduced herbivory damage were able to grow faster. These results suggest that during the initial phase of sapling establishment in gaps, species that were less vulnerable to cavitation and exhibited reduced herbivory damage had faster realized growth rates than less shade-tolerant species with higher potential growth rates. Finally, functional relationships between hydraulic traits and growth rate across species and treatments

  5. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-05-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  6. Investigation of noninertial cavitation produced by an ultrasonic horn.

    PubMed

    Birkin, Peter R; Offin, Douglas G; Vian, Christopher J B; Leighton, Timothy G; Maksimov, Alexey O

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports on noninertial cavitation that occurs beyond the zone close to the horn tip to which the inertial cavitation is confined. The noninertial cavitation is characterized by collating the data from a range of measurements of bubbles trapped on a solid surface in this noninertial zone. Specifically, the electrochemical measurement of mass transfer to an electrode is compared with high-speed video of the bubble oscillation. This gas bubble is shown to be a "noninertial" event by electrochemical surface erosion measurements and "ring-down" experiments showing the activity and motion of the bubble as the sound excitation was terminated. These measurements enable characterization of the complex environment produced below an operating ultrasonic horn outside of the region where inertial collapse can be detected. The extent to which solid boundaries in the liquid cause the frequencies and shapes of oscillatory modes on the bubble wall to differ from their free field values is discussed. PMID:22088002

  7. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-04-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle and jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örley, F.; Trummler, T.; Hickel, S.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present implicit large-eddy simulations (LES) to study the primary breakup of cavitating liquid jets. The considered configuration, which consists of a rectangular nozzle geometry, adopts the setup of a reference experiment for validation. The setup is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up automotive fuel injector. Modelling of all components (i.e. gas, liquid, and vapor) is based on a barotropic two-fluid two-phase model and employs a homogenous mixture approach. The cavitating liquid model assumes thermodynamic- equilibrium. Compressibility of all phases is considered in order to capture pressure wave dynamics of collapse events. Since development of cavitation significantly affects jet break-up characteristics, we study three different operating points. We identify three main mechanisms which induce primary jet break-up: amplification of turbulent fluctuations, gas entrainment, and collapse events near the liquid-gas interface.

  9. Acoustic Shielding by Cavitation Bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2006-05-01

    Lithotripter pulses (˜7-10 μs) initiate the growth of cavitation bubbles, which collapse hundreds of microseconds later. Since the bubble growth-collapse cycle trails passage of the pulse, and is ˜1000 times shorter than the pulse interval at clinically relevant firing rates, it is not expected that cavitation will affect pulse propagation. However, pressure measurements with a fiber-optic hydrophone (FOPH-500) indicate that bubbles generated by a pulse can, indeed, shield the propagation of the negative tail. Shielding was detected within 1 μs of arrival of the negative wave, contemporaneous with the first observation of expanding bubbles by high-speed camera. Reduced negative pressure was observed at 2 Hz compared to 0.5 Hz firing rate, and in water with a higher content of dissolved gas. We propose that shielding of the negative tail can be attributed to loss of acoustic energy into the expansion of cavitation bubbles.

  10. Cavitation erosion of duplex and super duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.T.; Man, H.C.; Cheng, F.T.

    1998-10-05

    Owing to their excellent corrosion resistance, stainless steels are widely used both in the marine, urban water, chemical and food industries. In addition to the corrosive environment, high fluid flow speeds are always encountered for components used in these industries. The cavitation characteristics of S30400 and S31600 austenitic stainless steels and duplex stainless steels were studied in detail by a number of authors. It was generally agreed that S30400 has higher cavitation erosion resistance than that of S31600 due to higher tendency of strain induced martensitic transformation under high impulse of stress. A considerable number of results on stress corrosion cracking characteristics of SDSS and duplex stainless steels have been published but data concerning their cavitation erosion property are extremely rare.

  11. Multiple pulmonary metastases with cavitation from gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, K; Ishii, Y; Hironaka, M; Kitamura, S

    1998-03-01

    We report a rare case of multiple pulmonary metastases with cavitation from gallbladder cancer. A 77-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of productive cough and exertional dyspnea. Chest X-ray film showed multiple nodular shadows with some cavitation. Computed tomography showed multiple cavities, up to 2 cm in diameter, as well as nodules, in bilateral lung fields. Under a survey of primary focus, the ultrasonographic test of the abdomen revealed a hypoechoic mass in the hepatic hilum. The patient died of respiratory failure. Autopsy findings revealed that that multiple lung tumors had metastasized from papillary adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder and that cavitation of the lung was formed by bronchioloectasis. PMID:9617865

  12. Nonlinear Elasticity and Cavitation of a Triblock Copolymer Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Santanu; Hashemnejad, Seyed Meysam; Zabet, Mahla; Mishra, Satish

    2015-03-01

    Polymer gels are subjected to large-strain deformation during their applications. The gel deformation at large-strain is non-linear and can often lead to failure of the material. Here, we report the large-strain deformation behavior of a physically cross-linked, swollen polymer gel, which displays unique strain-stiffening response at large-strain. Investigations were performed using large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) and custom developed cavitation rheology techniques. Gent constitutive model, which considers finite extensibility of midblock, was fitted with the LAOS data, therefore, linking the estimated parameters from LAOS analysis to the structure of the gel. Cavitation experiments were conducted as a function of temperature. Both analytical method and finite-element based modeling have been implemented to capture the pressure response in cavitation experiments. Our results provide a critical understanding of gel failure mechanism at large-strain.

  13. Analysis of cavitation inception and desinence behind surface irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    Cavities behind a surface irregularity appear in vortices drifting downstream of it. Cavitation can occur there substantially earlier than over smooth surfaces of the same bodies. Cavitation inception and desinence behind surface irregularities have been intensively studied in the course of water tunnel experiments several decades ago, but no corresponding quantitative theoretical (numerical) analysis was reported. This numerical study is aimed at elaboration of a general approach to the prediction of cavitation desinence numbers for various irregularities over various surfaces and on determination of the major factors influencing these numbers in both computations and experiments. The developed multi-level computational method employs diverse models for flow zones of diverse scale. The viscous-inviscid interaction approach is used for the flow around irregularities submerged (or partially submerged) in the turbulent boundary layer. Combinations of the semi-empirical and asymptotic analyses are used for vortices and cavities in their cores. The computational method is validated with various known experimental data.

  14. Drying-induced cavitation in a constrained hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiming; Cai, Shengqiang

    2015-02-14

    Cavitation can be often observed in soft materials. Most previous studies were focused on cavitation in an elastomer, which is under different mechanical loadings. In this paper, we investigate cavitation in a constrained hydrogel induced by drying. Taking account of surface tension and chemo-mechanics of gels, we calculate the free energy of the system as a function of cavity size. The free energy landscape shows a double-well structure, analogous to first-order phase transition. Above the critical humidity, a cavity inside the gel is tiny. Below the critical humidity, the size of the cavity is large. At the critical humidity, the cavity size grows suddenly and discontinuously. We further show that local large stretches can be induced in the gel during the drying process, which may result in fractures. PMID:25592184

  15. The recreation of a unique shrimp's mechanically induced cavitation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ryan; Dougherty, Christopher; Eliasson, Veronica; Khanolkar, Gauri

    2014-11-01

    The Alpheus heterochaelis, appropriately nicknamed the ``pistol shrimp,'' possesses an oversized claw that creates a cavitation bubble upon rapid closure. The implosion of this bubble results in a shock wave that can stun or even kill the shrimp's prey (Versluis et al., 2000). Additionally, the implosion is so violent that sonoluminescence may occur. This light implies extreme temperatures, which have been recorded to reach as high as 10,000 K (Roach, 2001). By developing an analogous mechanism to the oversized claw, the goal of this experiment is to verify that cavitation can be produced similar to that of the pistol shrimp in nature as well as to analyze the resulting shock wave and sonoluminescence. High-speed schlieren imaging was used to observe the shock dynamics. Furthermore, results on cavitation collapse and light emission will be presented. USC Provost Undergraduate Research Fellowship/Rose Hills Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

  16. Numerical simulation of cavitating turbulent flow through a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, J. T.; Wu, Y. L.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady cavitating turbulent flow in a Francis turbine is simulated based on governing equations of the mixture model for cavity-liquid two-phase flows with the RNG k-epsilon turbulence model in the present paper. An improved mass transfer expression in the mixture model is obtained based on evaporation and condensation mechanics with considering the effects of the non-dissolved gas, the turbulence, the tension of interface at cavity and the effect of phase change rate and so on. The governing equations of the mixture model for the unsteady cavitating-liquid flow is solved by a direct coupling method numerically with the finite volume method (FVM) using the unstructured tetrahedron grid and the structured hexahedral grid system. This direct coupling simulation was successfully applied to simulate the cavitating two-phase turbulent flow through a Francis turbine. The simulated external results agreed well with the experimental results.

  17. The dynamic transfer function for a cavitating inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C.; Acosta, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Knowledge of the dynamic performance of pumps is essential for the prediction of transient behavior and instabilities in hydraulic systems; the necessary information is in the form of a transfer function which relates the instantaneous or fluctuating pressure and mass flow rate at inlet to the same quantities in the discharge from the pump. The presence of cavitation within the pump can have a major effect on this transfer function since dynamical changes in the volume of cavitation contribute to the difference in the instantaneous inlet and discharge mass flow rates. The present paper utilizes results from free streamline cascade theory to evaluate the elements in the transfer function for a cavitating inducer and shows that the numerical results are consistent with the characteristics observed in some dynamic tests on rocket engine turbopumps.

  18. Influence of ultrasonic cavitation on passive film of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Cheng; Zhu, Jin-hua

    2008-03-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of passive film of stainless steel 0Cr13Ni5Mo under the condition of static state (quiescence) and ultrasonic cavitation in the HCl solution have been studied by means of polarization curve, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and capacitance potential measurement. The results indicate that the passive film shows a multi layer structure distribution, and presents a p-type semiconductor property under the condition of quiescence. The stability of passive film decreases, the semiconducting property changes to an n-type semiconductor in the presence of cavitation. The amount of transition electrons from valence band because of cavitation is related to the height of Fermi level of passive film semiconductor. PMID:17584517

  19. Possibility of Metal Processing Using Ultrasonic Cavitation Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Ryoji; Fujiwara, Ryuichi; Niita, Tokuo

    2001-05-01

    Utilizing a high-intensity ultrasonic cavitation, a processing experiment was conducted with the aim of performing volumetric flow adjustment of a fuel jet nozzle to be used for a small engine, which cannot be carried out by a method such as machining. At the bottom of the nozzle used for the experiment, which is in the shape of a cup, a nozzle hole with a diameter of 0.15 mm is drilled. In this experiment, we make adjustments in the volumetric flow by grinding and removing the machining burr with the aid of the processing power of ultrasonic cavitation. The processing effect is highly dependent on the ultrasonic cavitation intensity. In the experiment, the processing reservoir was filled with pressurized highly deaerated water to increase the processing force by allowing cavitation with high intensity to be generated. The processing principle is to utilize the effect of a cavitation jet flow passing through the nozzle hole. To restrain the intake of the bubbles into the flow circuits during the pressure reduction cycle of the vibrator, the water flow was discharged into a pressure reduction reservoir. By allowing the horn tip with a diameter of 6 mm at a frequency of 28 kHz to approach the sample, followed by high-intensity ultrasonic irradiation, powerful cavitation was generated. As a result of the evaluation of the processing efficiency made based on the volumetric flow increase and microscopic observation of the nozzle, burrs smaller than 10 μm were almost entirely removed within 15 min of initial irradiation, resulting in a volumetric flow increase of more than 0.4%/min. However, in the case of burrs of more than 10 μm, no force that could remove the burrs was found. It was surprising for the burrs to generate deformation rather than to be removed.

  20. PREFACE: 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, M.; Müller, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is our pleasure and privilege to welcome all the participants of the 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015) to Lausanne. Since its initiation in 1986 in Sendai, Japan, the CAV symposium has grown to become the world's foremost event dedicated to cavitation. Hosted by EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) and staged at the SwissTech Convention Center, CAV2015 is a unique opportunity to exchange with leading scientists and industry experts about the latest advances in theoretical modelling, numerical simulation and experimentation related to cavitation phenomena with a special emphasis on practical applications. The topics covered by CAV2015 include cavitation in ¬fluid machinery and fuel systems, bubble dynamics, cavitation erosion, advanced numerical simulation, sonochemistery, biomedicine and experimental techniques. CAV2015 will also host an exhibition of leading providers of state of the art measurement equipment, including high-speed imaging systems, non-intrusive velocimetry, pressure sensors, as well as numerical solvers. We have accepted over 190 papers, which will be presented in four parallel sessions. The proceedings will appear in the open access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All published papers are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download in perpetuity. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their great help during the selection process. We will also propose six plenary speakers to highlight cavitation issues in different fields. Finally, we would like to warmly thank our sponsors for their valuable support and the local Organizing Committee for the efforts in setting up this important event. We look forward to seeing you in Lausanne!

  1. Cavitation erosion: Using the target material as a pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Samir Chandra; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Fivel, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Numerical prediction of mass loss due to cavitation erosion requires the knowledge of the hydrodynamic impact loads generated by cavitation bubble collapses. Experimental measurements of such impact loads using conventional pressure sensors are not reliable (if not impossible) due to the micron size and the very small duration of the loading. In this paper, a new method to estimate these loading conditions is proposed based on cavitation pitting tests and an iterative inverse finite element modeling. The principle of the method is as follows. First, numerous pits corresponding to localized plastically deformed regions are identified from a cavitation test performed in a dedicated tunnel. Then each pit is numerically reproduced by finite element simulations of the material response to a representative Gaussian pressure field supposed to mimic a single bubble collapse. This gives the size and pressure distribution of the bubble impacts. The prime objective of this study is to find out if the target material itself could be used as a pressure sensor or not, i.e., if the cavitation pits left on the surface of the tested specimen could provide the characteristics of the cavitating flow in terms of pressure fields independently of the target material. Pitting tests were done on three materials, namely, 7075 Aluminum alloy (Al-7075), 2205 duplex stainless steel (A-2205), and Nickel-Aluminum Bronze (NAB) at three different flow conditions and the impact loads have been estimated for each identified pit. Very interestingly, a statistical analysis shows that the estimated impact loads are material independent at all flow conditions, provided the material properties are characterized properly. It is also shown that for some materials, the constitutive parameters obtained from compression tests are not satisfactory.

  2. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  3. Characterization of Axial Inducer Cavitation Instabilities via High Speed Video Recordings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arellano, Patrick; Peneda, Marinelle; Ferguson, Thomas; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Sub-scale water tests were undertaken to assess the viability of utilizing high resolution, high frame-rate digital video recordings of a liquid rocket engine turbopump axial inducer to characterize cavitation instabilities. These high speed video (HSV) images of various cavitation phenomena, including higher order cavitation, rotating cavitation, alternating blade cavitation, and asymmetric cavitation, as well as non-cavitating flows for comparison, were recorded from various orientations through an acrylic tunnel using one and two cameras at digital recording rates ranging from 6,000 to 15,700 frames per second. The physical characteristics of these cavitation forms, including the mechanisms that define the cavitation frequency, were identified. Additionally, these images showed how the cavitation forms changed and transitioned from one type (tip vortex) to another (sheet cavitation) as the inducer boundary conditions (inlet pressures) were changed. Image processing techniques were developed which tracked the formation and collapse of cavitating fluid in a specified target area, both in the temporal and frequency domains, in order to characterize the cavitation instability frequency. The accuracy of the analysis techniques was found to be very dependent on target size for higher order cavitation, but much less so for the other phenomena. Tunnel-mounted piezoelectric, dynamic pressure transducers were present throughout these tests and were used as references in correlating the results obtained by image processing. Results showed good agreement between image processing and dynamic pressure spectral data. The test set-up, test program, and test results including H-Q and suction performance, dynamic environment and cavitation characterization, and image processing techniques and results will be discussed.

  4. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 μs for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 μs for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 μs for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the

  5. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  6. The cavitation induced by a rapid change of velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olšiak, Róbert; Csuka, Zoltán; Fuszko, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the theory of cavitation flow near the high-speed rotary surface. For this purpose, a spatial model of two cylindrical surfaces imposed concentrically was designed. In the narrow gap between two cylindrical surfaces the temperature, density and viscosity of liquid are constant. Shear stress is induced by the high-speed rotary motion of the inner cylinder. In this case: velocity and pressure fields are changed. Due to the pressure drop between the cylinders there is a precondition to the formation of cavitation zones at the point of the lowest static pressure. This phenomenon is simulated via CFD methods.

  7. Experimental studies on thermodynamic effects of developed cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    A method for predicting thermodynamic effects of cavitation (changes in cavity pressure relative to stream vapor pressure) is presented. The prediction method accounts for changes in liquid, liquid temperature, flow velocity, and body scale. Both theoretical and experimental studies used in formulating the method are discussed. The prediction method provided good agreement between predicted and experimental results for geometrically scaled venturis handling four different liquids of widely diverse physical properties. Use of the method requires geometric similarity of the body and cavitated region and a known reference cavity-pressure depression at one operating condition.

  8. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  9. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Yang, K; Cui, J; Ye, J Y; Deng, C X

    2012-01-10

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustical, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency ultrasound (7.44MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40μs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d=0.75. The maximum mean

  10. Prediction of Performance of a Cavitating Propeller in Oblique Inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Kinnas, Spyros A.

    2015-12-01

    A cavitating propeller subject to an oblique inflow in a cavitating tunnel is simulated using potential flow methods coupled with a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver. The propeller is mainly modelled using a panel method, while the inflow to the propeller is evaluated by coupling a Vortex-Lattice Method (VLM) with the RANS solver. The effects of the tunnel wall are incorporated into the calculated effective inflow to the propeller. The predicted propeller forces and cavity pattern are correlated with experiment. The fully wetted open water characteristics of the propeller predicted by the panel method are presented as well.

  11. Mapping of cavitational activity in a pilot plant dyeing equipment.

    PubMed

    Actis Grande, G; Giansetti, M; Pezzin, A; Rovero, G; Sicardi, S

    2015-11-01

    A large number of papers of the literature quote dyeing intensification based on the application of ultrasound (US) in the dyeing liquor. Mass transfer mechanisms are described and quantified, nevertheless these experimental results in general refer to small laboratory apparatuses with a capacity of a few hundred millilitres and extremely high volumetric energy intensity. With the strategy of overcoming the scale-up inaccuracy consequent to the technological application of ultrasounds, a dyeing pilot-plant prototype of suitable liquor capacity (about 40 L) and properly simulating several liquor to textile hydraulic relationships was designed by including US transducers with different geometries. Optimal dyeing may be obtained by optimising the distance between transducer and textile material, the liquid height being a non-negligible operating parameter. Hence, mapping the cavitation energy in the machinery is expected to provide basic data on the intensity and distribution of the ultrasonic field in the aqueous liquor. A flat ultrasonic transducer (absorbed electrical power of 600 W), equipped with eight devices emitting at 25 kHz, was mounted horizontally at the equipment bottom. Considering industrial scale dyeing, liquor and textile substrate are reciprocally displaced to achieve a uniform colouration. In this technology a non uniform US field could affect the dyeing evenness to a large extent; hence, mapping the cavitation energy distribution in the machinery is expected to provide fundamental data and define optimal operating conditions. Local values of the cavitation intensity were recorded by using a carefully calibrated Ultrasonic Energy Meter, which is able to measure the power per unit surface generated by the cavitation implosion of bubbles. More than 200 measurements were recorded to define the map at each horizontal plane positioned at a different distance from the US transducer; tap water was heated at the same temperature used for dyeing tests (60

  12. Controlling cavitation in the 1990s: Contours, materials, monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, E.

    1996-10-01

    Case studies of cavitation control methods at hydroelectric power plants are presented in the article. The control methods described include contouring of turbine blades, stainless steel runners and overlays (including 309L) and super-resistant alloys (Hydroloy 914), and cavitation monitoring equipment. Hydroelectric plants highlighted in the article include Central Maine Power Company`s Hiram Unit 2, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers` Dworshak Dam, Transalta Utilities` Spray Station, and Tennessee Valley Authority`s Raccoon Mountain. The development and testing of new materials is also highlighted.

  13. Multidetector CT of pulmonary cavitation: filling in the holes.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, K H; Babar, J L; Balan, A

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary cavitation causes significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis of the presence and aetiology of a cavity is therefore crucial in order to avoid further demise in both the localized pulmonary and systemic disorders that may manifest with pulmonary cavity formation. Multidetector CT has become the principal diagnostic technique for detecting pulmonary cavitation and its complications. This review provides an overview of the aetiologies and their imaging findings using this technique. Combining a literature review with case illustration, a synopsis of the different imaging features and constellations is provided, which may suggest a particular cause and aid the differentiation from diseases with similar findings. PMID:25623513

  14. Mechanism of noise generation by cavitation in hydraulic relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Kataoka, T.; Takagi, S.; Kato, H.

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of noise generation in a hydraulic relief valve, oil cavitating flows in a half cut model of the valve were observed by means of a high-speed camera and were simulated numerically. As the result of image analysis, the fluctuation of cavitation volume is corresponding to the pressure fluctuation of downstream, and the both fluctuations take peaks at frequencies from 1.5 to 2.5 kHz depending on the back pressure. In addition, as the back pressure increases, the frequency of the pressure fluctuation increases and the peak value decreases. These phenomena were also qualitatively reproduced in the numerical simulation.

  15. Evaluation of ultrasonic cavitation of metallic and non-metallic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Narinder K.

    1992-01-01

    1,1,2 trichloro-1,2,2 trifluoro ethane (CFC-113) commercially known as Freon-113 is the primary test solvent used for validating the cleaned hardware at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Due to the ozone depletion problem, the current United States policy calls for the phase out of Freons by 1995. NASAs chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement group at KSC has opted to use water as a replacement fluid for the validation process since water is non-toxic, inexpensive, and is environmentally friendly. The replacement validation method calls for the ultrasonification of the small parts with water at 52 C for a cycle or two of 10 min duration wash using commercial ultrasonic baths. In this project, experimental data was obtained to assess the applicability of the proposed validation method for any damage of the metallic and non-metallic surfaces resulting from ultrasonic cavitation.

  16. Cavitation erosion characteristics of poly(methyl methacrylate) in a rotating disk device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veerabhadra Rao, P.; Rao, N. S. L.; Rao, B. C. S.

    1983-01-01

    The cavitation erosion behavior including the initiation, dynamics and mechanism of damage process on perspex and epoxy resin specimens tested in a rotating disk device were discussed with respect to exposure time. The inception of erosion always took place at the location nearest to the center of rotation of the disk. Subsequently, as exposure time increased, erosion initiated at other locations as well. Light optical photographs and scanning electron micrographs clearly indicate that most of the material loss appears to occur form the networks of cracks due to their interaction and pits indicate particle debris. The optical degradation (loss of transmittance) on perspex was observed to be more on the rear side than on the front side. Previously announced in STAR as N83-11329

  17. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen species generation by cavitation incepted efficiently using nonlinear propagation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a treatment method that uses chemical bio-effect of cavitation bubbles. Reactive oxygen species that can kill cancerous tissue is induced by such chemical effect of cavitation bubbles and it is important to generate them efficiently for effective sonodynamic treatment. Cavitation cloud can be formed by an effect of nonlinear propagation and focus and in this study, it was experimentally investigated if cavitation cloud was useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species. As a result, it was demonstrated that cavitation cloud would be useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species.

  18. Cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump with inlet guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Zha, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Gui, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of prewhirl regulation by inlet guide vanes (IGVs) on cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump is investigated. At the impeller inlet, the streamlines are regulated by the IGVs, and the axial velocity distribution is also influenced by the IGVs. Due to the total pressure loss on the IGVs, the cavitation performance of the centrifugal pump degrades. The cavitation area in impeller with IGVs is larger than one without IGVs. The specify values of total pressure loss between the suction pipe inlet and impeller inlet for three cavitation conditions show that the IGVs will generate additional pressure loss, which is related to the IGVs angles and cavitation conditions.

  19. Research on axial thrust of the waterjet pump based on CFD under cavitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. H.; Pan, Z. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Based on RANS equations, performance of a contra-rotating axial-flow waterjet pump without hydrodynamic cavitation state had been obtained combined with shear stress transport turbulence model. Its cavitation hydrodynamic performance was calculated and analysed with mixture homogeneous flow cavitation model based on Rayleigh-Plesset equations. The results shows that the cavitation causes axial thrust of waterjet pump to drop. Furthermore, axial thrust and head cavitation characteristic curve is similar. However, the drop point of the axial thrust is postponed by 5.1% comparing with one of head, and the critical point of the axial thrust is postponed by 2.6%.

  20. Damage mechanisms in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a 'non-invasive' therapy for treating kidney stones. Focused shock waves fragment stones to a size that can be passed naturally. There is, however, considerable tissue injury, and the mechanisms of stone fragmentation and tissue injury are not well understood. This work investigates potential tissue damage mechanisms, with an aim towards enhancing stone fragmentation and minimizing tissue damage. Lysis of red blood cells (RBC's) due to in vitro exposure to shock waves was investigated. Fluid flow-fields induced by a non-uniform shock wave, as well as radial expansion/implosion of a bubble was hypothesized to cause cell lysis. Both the above flow-fields constitute an unsteady extensional flow, exerting inertial as well as viscous forces on the RBC membrane. The resultant membrane tension and the membrane areal strain due to the above flow-fields were estimated. Both were found to exert a significantly higher inertial force (50--100 mN/m) than the critical membrane tension (10 mN/m). Bubble-induced flow-field was estimated to last for a longer duration (˜1 microsec) compared to the shock-induced flow (˜1 ns) and hence, was predicted to be lytically more effective, in typical in vitro experimental conditions. However, in vivo conditions severely constrain bubble growth, and cell lysis due to shock-induced shear could be dominant. Hemolysis due to shock-induced shear, in absence of cavitation, was experimentally investigated. The lithotripter-generated shock wave was refocused by a parabolic reflector. This refocused wave-field had a tighter focus (smaller beam-width and a higher amplitude) than the lithotripter wave-field. Cavitation was eliminated by applying overpressure to the fluid. Acoustic emissions due to bubble activity were monitored by a novel passive cavitation detector (HP-PCD). Aluminum foils were also used to differentiate cavitational from non-cavitational mode of damage. RBC's were exposed to the reflected wave-field from

  1. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  2. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  3. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached eddy simulations (DES) are made for cavitating flows on three tip- modified propellers, of which one is a reference propeller having an experimental result from a cavitation tunnel test with a hull model, and the other two are modified from the reference propeller by altering the blade tip loading. DES results have been validated against the experiment in terms of sheet and cloud cavitation. In DES, non-uniform hull wake is modelled by using the inlet flow and momentum sources instead of including a hull model. A 4-bladed Kappel propeller with a smooth tip bending towards the suction side is used as the reference propeller. For the reference propeller, sheet cavitation extends over a whole chord length in the hull wake peak. As the blade gets out of the wake peak, the rear part of sheet cavity is detached in a form of cloud cavitation. For the reference propeller, the tip pitch reduction from the maximum is about 35%. When decreasing the tip pitch reduction to 10%, tip vortex cavitation is formed and cloud cavitation is significantly weakened. When increasing the tip pitch reduction to 60%, sheet cavitation slightly moves to inner radii and cloud cavitation grows larger.

  4. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  5. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary goal is to develop a quantitative understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and the development of applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. This report summarizes work after one year of a three year project. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  6. Precise spatial control of cavitation erosion in a vessel phantom by using an ultrasonic standing wave.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aiwei; Huang, Peixuan; Guo, Shifang; Zhao, Lu; Jia, Yingjie; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    In atherosclerotic inducement in animal models, the conventionally used balloon injury is invasive, produces excessive vessel injuries at unpredictable locations and is inconvenient in arterioles. Fortunately, cavitation erosion, which plays an important role in therapeutic ultrasound in blood vessels, has the potential to induce atherosclerosis noninvasively at predictable sites. In this study, precise spatial control of cavitation erosion for superficial lesions in a vessel phantom was realised by using an ultrasonic standing wave (USW) with the participation of cavitation nuclei and medium-intensity ultrasound pulses. The superficial vessel erosions were restricted between adjacent pressure nodes, which were 0.87 mm apart in the USW field of 1 MHz. The erosion positions could be shifted along the vessel by nodal modulation under a submillimetre-scale accuracy without moving the ultrasound transducers. Moreover, the cavitation erosion of the proximal or distal wall could be determined by the types of cavitation nuclei and their corresponding cavitation pulses, i.e., phase-change microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 5 MHz and SonoVue microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 1 MHz. Effects of acoustic parameters of the cavitation pulses on the cavitation erosions were investigated. The flow conditions in the experiments were considered and discussed. Compared to only using travelling waves, the proposed method in this paper improves the controllability of the cavitation erosion and reduces the erosion depth, providing a more suitable approach for vessel endothelial injury while avoiding haemorrhage. PMID:26964937

  7. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, 2-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex-vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (Pcav) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p−) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching 1 when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as Pcav = 0.5) was between p− = 26.0–30.0 MPa in all samples with a high water content, but varied between p− = 13.7 to > 36 MPa for other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p− = 28.2 MPa was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at different pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  8. Numerical simulation and experimental visualization of the separated cavitating boundary layer over NACA2412

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozák, Jiří; Rudolf, Pavel; Sedlář, Milan; Habán, Vladimír; Hudec, Martin; Huzlík, Rostislav

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation is physical phenomenon of crucial impact on the operation range and service lifetime of the hydraulic machines (pumps, turbines, valves etc.). Experimental measurement of cavitation is expensive and time consuming process, while some important characteristic of the flow are difficult to measure due to the nature of the phenomenon. Current possibilities of computational fluid dynamics provide a way for deeper understanding of cavitation which is important for many applications in the hydraulic machines industry such as expanding operation range or extending lifetime of the hydraulic machines. Simplified model consists of NACA 2412 hydrofoil with 8 degrees angle of attack fixed in between the walls of cavitation tunnel. Present investigation focuses on comparison of vapor volume fractions obtained by 3D CFD simulations and high speed visualization of the real cavitation phenomena. Several operating regimes corresponding to different cavitation numbers are studied with aim to assess the dynamics of the separated cavitating sheets/clouds

  9. Numerical simulation of high-speed cavitating flows in submerged water jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G.; Shimizu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Properties of existing cavitation models are discussed and a compressible mixture flow method based a simplified estimation of bubble cavitation is then presented for numerical simulation of high-speed water jets accompanied by intensive cavitation. Two-phase fluid media of cavitating flow are treated as a mixture of liquid and bubbles, and the mean flow is computed by solving RANS equations for compressible fluids considering the effect of bubble expansion a/o contraction. The intensity of cavitation is evaluated by the gas volume fraction, which is governed by the compressibility of bubble-liquid mixture corresponding to the status of mean flow field. Numerical results of cavitating water jet issuing from a submerged nozzle are presented and its applicability to intensively cavitating jets is demonstrated.

  10. A numerical model for the evolution of internal structure of cavitation cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tezhuan; Wang, Yiwei; Liao, Lijuan; Huang, Chenguang

    2016-07-01

    Bubble size distributions in cloud cavitation are important in cavitating flows. In this study, a numerical model was developed to study the evolution of the internal structure of cloud cavitation. The model includes (1) an evolution equation of bubble number density, which considers the bubble breakup effect and (2) the multiphase Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a modified cavitation model for background cavitating flows. The proposed model was validated with a flow over a projectile. Results show that the numerical model can predict the evolution of the internal structure of cloud cavitation. Comparisons of the proposed model and Singhal model were discussed. The effects of re-entrant jet and bubble number density on cavitating flows were also investigated.

  11. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of gas nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloys.

    PubMed

    Mitelea, I; Dimian, E; Bordeaşu, I; Crăciunescu, C

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments were performed on Ti-6Al-4V alloys samples in annealed, nitrided and nitrided and subsequently heat treated state. The protective oxide layer formed as a result of annealing and heat treatment after nitriding is eliminated after less than 30 min cavitation time, while the nitride layer lasts up to 90 min cavitation time. Once the protective layer is removed, the cavitation process develops by grain boundary erosion, leading to the expulsion of grains from the surface. The gas nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloy, forming a TixN surface layer, proved to be a better solution to improve the cavitation erosion resistance, compared to the annealed and nitrided and heat treated state, respectively. The analysis of the mean depth of erosion rate at 165 min cavitation time showed an improvement of the cavitation erosion resistance of the nitrided samples of up to 77% higher compared to the one of the annealed samples. PMID:24500067

  12. Numerical investigation of the cavitational behaviour into a storage pump at off design operating points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuparu, A.; Susan-Resiga, R.; Anton, L. E.; Muntean, S.

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents a new method for the analysis of the cavitational behaviour of hydraulic turbomachines. This new method allows determining the coefficient of the cavitation inception and the cavitation sensitivity of the turbomachines. We apply this method to study the cavitational behaviour of a large storage pump. By plotting in semi-logarithmic coordinates the vapour volume versus the cavitation coefficient, we show that all numerical data collapse in an exponential manner. This storage pump is located in a power plant and operating without the presence of the developed cavitation is vital. We investigate the behaviour of the pump from the cavitational point of view while the pump is operating for variable discharge. A distribution of the vapour volume upon the blade of the impeller is presented for all the four operating points. It can be seen how the volume of vapour evolves from one operating point to another. In order to study the influence of the cavitation phenomena upon the pump, the evolution of the pumping head against the cavitation coefficient is presented. That will show how the pumping head drops while the cavitation coefficient decreases. From analysing the data obtained from the numerical simulation it results that the cavitation phenomena is present for all the investigated operating points. By analysis of the slope of the curve describing the evolution of the vapour volume against the cavitation coefficient we determine the cavitation sensitivity of the pump for each operating point. It is showed that the cavitation sensitivity of the investigated storage pump increases while the flow rate decreases.

  13. Untreated cavitated dentine lesions: impact on children's quality of life.

    PubMed

    Leal, S C; Bronkhorst, E M; Fan, M; Frencken, J E

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to assess the impact of dental caries prevalence and the consequences of untreated cavitated dentine lesions on quality of life of 6- and 7-year-old Brazilian children. A total of 826 schoolchildren were assessed using ICDAS and pufa (to score consequences of dental caries on soft tissues) indices. History of extraction and toothache was recorded. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed using the Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (B-ECOHIS). A multiple logistic regression model was used to analyze the relationship between the prevalence of dentine carious lesions, pufa, history of extraction and toothache with the B-ECOHIS scores. A total of 587 questionnaires were analyzed. The prevalence of cavitated dentine lesions and pufa was 74.8 and 26.2%, respectively. Some 21.8% of children reported toothache and 9.2% had had at least one tooth extraction. The chance (OR) for children with cavitated dentine lesions, pufa ≥1, history of extraction and toothache of having higher B-ECOHIS scores than those not affected was 1.90 (95% CI: 1.18-3.06), 6.26 (95% CI: 3.63-10.83), 6.87 (95% CI: 2.75-17.16) and 3.68 (95% CI: 2.12-6.39), respectively. Children's quality of life was negatively influenced by untreated cavitated dentine lesions and their consequences. PMID:22398411

  14. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  15. Relating xylem cavitation to gas exchange in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic emissions (AEs) from xylem cavitation events are characteristic of transpiration processes. Though a body of work using AE exists with a large number of species, cotton and other agronomically important crops have either not been investigated, or limited information exists. The objective of...

  16. Analysis of cavitation effect for water purifier using electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Ko, Han Seo; Lee, Seung Ho

    2015-11-01

    Water is a limited and vital resource, so it should not be wasted by pollution. A development of new water purification technology is urgent nowadays since the original and biological treatments are not sufficient. The microbubble-aided method was investigated for removal of algal in this study since it overcomes demerits of the existing purification technologies. Thus, the cavitation effect in a venturi-type tube using the electrolysis was analyzed. Ruthenium-coated titanium plates were used as electrodes. Optimum electrode interval and applied power were determined for the electrolysis. Then, the optimized electrodes were installed in the venturi-type tube for generating cavitation. The cavitation effect could be enhanced without any byproduct by the bubbly flow induced by the electrolysis. The optimum mass flow rate and current were determined for the cavitation with the electrolysis. Finally, the visualization techniques were used to count the cell number of algal and microbubbles for the confirmation of the performance. As a result, the energy saving and high efficient water purifier was fabricated in this study. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Korean government (MEST) (No. 2013R1A2A2A01068653).

  17. Numerical Investigation of Cavitation Improvement for a Francis Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhifeng; Xiao, Ruofu; Wang, Fujun; Yang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation in hydraulic machine is undesired due to its negative effects on performances. To improve cavitation performance of a Francis turbine without the change of the best efficiency point, a model runner geometry optimization was carried out. Firstly, the runner outlet diameter was appropriately increased to reduce the flow velocity at runner outlet region. Then, to avoid the change of the flow rate at the best efficiency point, the blade shapes were carefully adjusted by decreasing the blade outlet angles and increasing the blade wrap angles. A large number of the modified runners were tested by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. Finally the most appropriate one was selected, which has the runner outlet diameter 10% larger, the blade outlet angles 3 degrees smaller and the blade wrap angles 5 degrees larger. The results showed that the critical cavitation coefficient of the model runner decreased at every unit rotational speed after the optimization, and the effect was much remarkable at relative high flow rate. Besides, by analysing the internal flow field, it was found that the zone of the low pressure on pressure surface of the optimized turbine blades was reduced, the backflow and vortex rope in draft tube were reduced, and the cavitation zone was reduced obviously.

  18. Experimental research of multiphase flow with cavitation in the nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozubkova, Milada; Bojko, Marian; Jablonska, Jana; Homa, Dorota; Tůma, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with the problems of cavitation in water flow in the nozzle. The area of research is divided into two directions (experimental and numerical research). During the experimental research the equipment with the nozzle is under the measurement and basic physical quantities such as pressure and volume flow rate are recorded. In the following phase measuring of noise which is generated during flow through the nozzle in the area of cavitation is measured at various operating conditions of the pump. In the second part the appropriate multiphase mathematical model including the consideration of cavitation is defined. Boundary conditions for numerical simulation are defined on the basis of experimental measurements. Undissolved air in the flow is taken into account to obtain pressure distribution in accordance to measured one. Results of the numerical simulation are presented by means of basic current quantities such as pressure, velocity and volume fractions of each phase. The conclusions obtained from experimental research of cavitation were applied to modify the multiphase mathematical model.

  19. Bilateral and multiple cavitation sounds during upper cervical thrust manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The popping produced during high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation is a common sound; however to our knowledge, no study has previously investigated the location of cavitation sounds during manipulation of the upper cervical spine. The primary purpose was to determine which side of the spine cavitates during C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation. Secondary aims were to calculate the average number of pops, the duration of upper cervical thrust manipulation, and the duration of a single cavitation. Methods Nineteen asymptomatic participants received two upper cervical thrust manipulations targeting the right and left C1-2 articulation, respectively. Skin mounted microphones were secured bilaterally over the transverse process of C1, and sound wave signals were recorded. Identification of the side, duration, and number of popping sounds were determined by simultaneous analysis of spectrograms with audio feedback using custom software developed in Matlab. Results Bilateral popping sounds were detected in 34 (91.9%) of 37 manipulations while unilateral popping sounds were detected in just 3 (8.1%) manipulations; that is, cavitation was significantly (P < 0.001) more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally. Of the 132 total cavitations, 72 occurred ipsilateral and 60 occurred contralateral to the targeted C1-2 articulation. In other words, cavitation was no more likely to occur on the ipsilateral than the contralateral side (P = 0.294). The mean number of pops per C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation was 3.57 (95% CI: 3.19, 3.94) and the mean number of pops per subject following both right and left C1-2 thrust manipulations was 6.95 (95% CI: 6.11, 7.79). The mean duration of a single audible pop was 5.66 ms (95% CI: 5.36, 5.96) and the mean duration of a single manipulation was 96.95 ms (95% CI: 57.20, 136.71). Conclusions Cavitation was significantly more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally during upper cervical HVLA

  20. Modeling Unsteady Cavitation and Dynamic Loads in Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald; Dash, Sanford M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that includes representations of effects of unsteady cavitation and associated dynamic loads has been developed to increase the accuracy of simulations of the performances of turbopumps. Although the model was originally intended to serve as a means of analyzing preliminary designs of turbopumps that supply cryogenic propellant liquids to rocket engines, the model could also be applied to turbopumping of other liquids: this can be considered to have been already demonstrated, in that the validation of the model was performed by comparing results of simulations performed by use of the model with results of sub-scale experiments in water. The need for this or a similar model arises as follows: Cavitation instabilities in a turbopump are generated as inlet pressure drops and vapor cavities grow on inducer blades, eventually becoming unsteady. The unsteady vapor cavities lead to rotation cavitation, in which the cavities detach from the blades and become part of a fluid mass that rotates relative to the inducer, thereby generating a fluctuating load. Other instabilities (e.g., surge instabilities) can couple with cavitation instabilities, thereby compounding the deleterious effects of unsteadiness on other components of the fluid-handling system of which the turbopump is a part and thereby, further, adversely affecting the mechanical integrity and safety of the system. Therefore, an ability to predict cavitation- instability-induced dynamic pressure loads on the blades, the shaft, and other pump parts would be valuable in helping to quantify safe margins of inducer operation and in contributing to understanding of design compromises. Prior CFD models do not afford this ability. Heretofore, the primary parameter used in quantifying cavitation performance of a turbopump inducer has been the critical suction specific speed at which head breakdown occurs. This parameter is a mean quantity calculated on the basis of assumed steady

  1. Inertial cavitation initiated by polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles under pulsed ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale gas bubbles residing on a macroscale hydrophobic surface have a surprising long lifetime (on the order of days) and can serve as cavitation nuclei for initiating inertial cavitation (IC). Whether interfacial nanobubbles (NBs) reside on the infinite surface of a hydrophobic nanoparticle (NP) and could serve as cavitation nuclei is unknown, but this would be very meaningful for the development of sonosensitive NPs. To address this problem, we investigated the IC activity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) NPs, which are regarded as benchmark superhydrophobic NPs due to their low surface energy caused by the presence of fluorocarbon. Both a passive cavitation detection system and terephthalic dosimetry was applied to quantify the intensity of IC. The IC intensities of the suspension with PTFE NPs were 10.30 and 48.41 times stronger than those of deionized water for peak negative pressures of 2 and 5MPa, respectively. However, the IC activities were nearly completely inhibited when the suspension was degassed or ethanol was used to suspend PTFE NPs, and they were recovered when suspended in saturated water, which may indicates the presence of interfacial NBs on PTFE NPs surfaces. Importantly, these PTFE NPs could sustainably initiate IC for excitation by a sequence of at least 6000 pulses, whereas lipid microbubbles were completely depleted after the application of no more than 50 pulses under the same conditions. The terephthalic dosimetry has shown that much higher hydroxyl yields were achieved when PTFE NPs were present as cavitation nuclei when using ultrasound parameters that otherwise did not produce significant amounts of free radicals. These results show that superhydrophobic NPs may be an outstanding candidate for use in IC-related applications. PMID:27150739

  2. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  4. Comparative CFD Investigation on the Performance of a New Family of Super-Cavitating Hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizzolara, S.; Bonfiglio, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a CFD characterization of a new type of super-cavitating hydrofoil section designed to have optimal performance both in super-cavitating conditions and in sub-cavitating conditions (including transitional regime). The basic concepts of the new profile family are first introduced. Lift, drag and cavity shapes at different cavitation numbers are calculated for a new foil and compared with those of conventional sub-cavitating and super-cavitating profiles. Numerical calculations confirm the superior characteristics of the new hydrofoil family, which is able to attain high lift and efficiency both in sub-cavitating and super-cavitating conditions. Numerical calculations are based on a multi-phase fully turbulent URANSE solver with a bubble dynamic cavitation model to follow the generation and evaporation of the vapor phase. The new profile family, initially devised for ultra-high speed hydrofoil crafts, may result useful for diverse applications such as super-cavitating or surface-piercing propellers or high-speed sailing boats.

  5. Determination of sulfuric acid concentration for anti-cavitation characteristics of Al alloy by two step anodizing process to forming nano porous.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Seong-Kweon; Jeong, Jae-Yong; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2014-12-01

    Al alloy is a highly active metal but forms a protective oxide film having high corrosion resistance in atmosphere environment. However, the oxide film is not suitable for practical use, since the thickness of the film is not uniform and it is severly altered with formation conditions. This study focused on developing an aluminum anodizing layer having hardness, corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance equivalent to a commercial grade protective layer. Aluminum anodizing layer was produced by two-step aluminum anodizing oxide (AAO) process with different sulfuric acid concentrations, and the cavitation characteristics of the anodized coating layer was investigated. In hardness measurement, the anodized coating layer produced with 15 vol.% of sulfuric acid condition had the highest value of hardness but exhibited poor cavitation resistance due to being more brittle than those with other conditions. The 10 vol.% of sulfuric acid condition was thus considered to be the optimum condition as it had the lowest weight loss and damage depth. PMID:25971100

  6. The constitutive representation of high-temperature creep damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    The elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations of Bodner-Partom were applied to modeling creep damage in a high temperature Ni-alloy, B1900 + Hf. Both tertiary creep in bulk materials and creep crack growth in flawed materials were considered. In the latter case, the energy rate line integral was used for characterizing the crack driving force, and the rate of crack extension was computed using a local damage formulation that assumed fracture was controlled by cavitation occurring within the crack-tip process zone. The results of this investigation were used to assess the evolution equation for isotropic damage utilized in the Bodner-Partom constitutive equations.

  7. Rational Design of Plasmonic Nanoparticles for Enhanced Cavitation and Cell Perforation.

    PubMed

    Lachaine, Rémi; Boutopoulos, Christos; Lajoie, Pierre-Yves; Boulais, Étienne; Meunier, Michel

    2016-05-11

    Metallic nanoparticles are routinely used as nanoscale antenna capable of absorbing and converting photon energy with subwavelength resolution. Many applications, notably in nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology, benefit from the enhanced optical properties of these materials, which can be exploited to image, damage, or destroy targeted cells and subcellular structures with unprecedented precision. Modern inorganic chemistry enables the synthesis of a large library of nanoparticles with an increasing variety of shapes, composition, and optical characteristic. However, identifying and tailoring nanoparticles morphology to specific applications remains challenging and limits the development of efficient nanoplasmonic technologies. In this work, we report a strategy for the rational design of gold plasmonic nanoshells (AuNS) for the efficient ultrafast laser-based nanoscale bubble generation and cell membrane perforation, which constitute one of the most crucial challenges toward the development of effective gene therapy treatments. We design an in silico rational design framework that we use to tune AuNS morphology to simultaneously optimize for the reduction of the cavitation threshold while preserving the particle structural integrity. Our optimization procedure yields optimal AuNS that are slightly detuned compared to their plasmonic resonance conditions with an optical breakdown threshold 30% lower than randomly selected AuNS and 13% lower compared to similarly optimized gold nanoparticles (AuNP). This design strategy is validated using time-resolved bubble spectroscopy, shadowgraphy imaging and electron microscopy that confirm the particle structural integrity and a reduction of 51% of the cavitation threshold relative to optimal AuNP. Rationally designed AuNS are finally used to perforate cancer cells with an efficiency of 61%, using 33% less energy compared to AuNP, which demonstrate that our rational design framework is readily transferable to a cell environment

  8. Laser beam treatment effect on AMPCO M4 bronze cavitation erosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Micu, L. M.; Oanca, O. V.; Bordeasu, D.; Pugna, A.; Bordeasu, C.

    2015-06-01

    Ship propellers must resist simultaneously to ocean water corrosion and cavitation erosion. Until now, the best material used is the bronze with great copper content. These materials are expensive and there is the tendency to reduce the copper content while maintaining good properties. Such a material is AMPCO M4 used for manufacturing details for aircraft retractable landing assemblies. As a consequence we undertake cavitation erosion tests upon this bronze. In natural state (cast or even extruded) the cavitation resistance is not acceptable so, we improved the specimens by treating them with laser beams at three different impulse powers (160, 180 and 220 W). The cavitation erosion resistance was tested in the Cavitation Laboratory of Timisoara “Politehnica” University using a vibratory device respecting the conditions imposed by ASTM G32-2010 Standard. The comparisons with the genuine material (without any treatments) show that the applied procedure increased the hardness of the melted layer as well as the cavitation erosion behavior.

  9. DNA acts as a nucleation site for transient cavitation in the ultrasonic nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Y K; Anchordoquy, T J; Lengsfeld, C S

    2006-03-01

    Several new technologies based upon ultrasound technology have been proposed as a method to enhance the delivery of genetic therapeutics. Using ultrasonic nebulization and a well-established method to quantitatively monitor transient cavitation, this study investigates the extent and factors influencing the degradation of DNA. Results from our studies show that the presence of DNA greatly enhances cavitation, and that the number of transient cavitation events also increases with the hydrodynamic diameter and number of DNA molecules in solution. More importantly, removing saturated gases from the plasmid DNA solutions resulted in a decrease in transient cavitation events but not degradation rate, suggesting that the cavitation event responsible for degradation occurs locally at the DNA molecule. Finally, complexing plasmid DNA with the cationic polymer polyethylenimine protected the native structure by reducing the molecule's potential to act as a heterogeneous nucleation site for transient cavitation. PMID:16432878

  10. Unraveling the Geometry Dependence of In-Nozzle Cavitation in High-Pressure Injectors

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kyoung-Su; Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Powell, Christopher F.; Lai, Ming-chia D.; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Cavitation is an intricate multiphase phenomenon that interplays with turbulence in fluid flows. It exhibits clear duality in characteristics, being both destructive and beneficial in our daily lives and industrial processes. Despite the multitude of occurrences of this phenomenon, highly dynamic and multiphase cavitating flows have not been fundamentally well understood in guiding the effort to harness the transient and localized power generated by this process. In a microscale, multiphase flow liquid injection system, we synergistically combined experiments using time-resolved x-radiography and a novel simulation method to reveal the relationship between the injector geometry and the in-nozzle cavitation quantitatively. We demonstrate that a slight alteration of the geometry on the micrometer scale can induce distinct laminar-like or cavitating flows, validating the multiphase computational fluid dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the simulation identifies a critical geometric parameter with which the high-speed flow undergoes an intriguing transition from non-cavitating to cavitating. PMID:23797665

  11. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-09-01

    Cavitation bubbles have been recognized as being essential to many applications of ultrasound. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds induced by a focused ultrasound transducer of 1.2 MHz center frequency are investigated by high-speed photography. It is revealed that at a total acoustic power of 72 W the cavitation bubble cloud first emerges in the focal region where cavitation bubbles are observed to generate, grow, merge and collapse during the initial 600 micros. The bubble cloud then grows upward to the post-focal region, and finally becomes visible in the pre-focal region. The structure of the final bubble cloud is characterized by regional distribution of cavitation bubbles in the ultrasound field. The cavitation bubble cloud structure remains stable when the acoustic power is increased from 25 W to 107 W, but it changes to a more violent form when the acoustic power is further increased to 175 W. PMID:16571378

  12. Unraveling the Geometry Dependence of In-Nozzle Cavitation in High-Pressure Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Kyoung-Su; Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Powell, Christopher F.; Lai, Ming-Chia D.; Wang, Jin

    2013-06-01

    Cavitation is an intricate multiphase phenomenon that interplays with turbulence in fluid flows. It exhibits clear duality in characteristics, being both destructive and beneficial in our daily lives and industrial processes. Despite the multitude of occurrences of this phenomenon, highly dynamic and multiphase cavitating flows have not been fundamentally well understood in guiding the effort to harness the transient and localized power generated by this process. In a microscale, multiphase flow liquid injection system, we synergistically combined experiments using time-resolved x-radiography and a novel simulation method to reveal the relationship between the injector geometry and the in-nozzle cavitation quantitatively. We demonstrate that a slight alteration of the geometry on the micrometer scale can induce distinct laminar-like or cavitating flows, validating the multiphase computational fluid dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the simulation identifies a critical geometric parameter with which the high-speed flow undergoes an intriguing transition from non-cavitating to cavitating.

  13. Localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using ray based matched field inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongho; Seong, Woojae; Choo, Youngmin; Lee, Jeunghoon

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation of marine propeller is one of the main contributing factors of broadband radiated ship noise. In this research, an algorithm for the source localization of incipient vortex cavitation is suggested. Incipient cavitation is modeled as monopole type source and matched-field inversion method is applied to find the source position by comparing the spatial correlation between measured and replicated pressure fields at the receiver array. The accuracy of source localization is improved by broadband matched-field inversion technique that enhances correlation by incoherently averaging correlations of individual frequencies. Suggested localization algorithm is verified through known virtual source and model test conducted in Samsung ship model basin cavitation tunnel. It is found that suggested localization algorithm enables efficient localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using a few pressure data measured on the outer hull above the propeller and practically applicable to the typically performed model scale experiment in a cavitation tunnel at the early design stage.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Cavitation Phenomena for Hybrid Contra-Rotating Shaft Propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Hoon; Choo, Sung-Han; Park, Jeong-Yong; Choi, Gil-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with a numerical simulation of cavitation flow around a hybrid contra-rotating shaft propeller operating in wake field. The simulation for the cavitating flow is performed for straight operating and turning condition of podded propeller located behind the main propeller using unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes. The behavior of the main propeller is almost similar regardless of the turning angle. In contrast, the cavitation behavior of the podded propeller depending on the turning angle appears to be entirely different due to the change of the load distribution on the podded propeller. At the large angle of the turning condition, the unstable cavity flow due to the large amount of cavitation and the hub vortex separated from the forward propeller as well as face cavitation is observed. Thus, a great caution on the cavitation phenomena is needed when designing and operating the HCRSP.

  15. Observation of a cavitation cloud in tissue using correlation between ultrafast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan; Souchon, Rémi; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-07-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup in which two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short excitation bursts, the evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. The frame rate of the system is several thousands of images per second, which provides several tens of images between consecutive excitation bursts. Using the correlation between consecutive images for speckle tracking, a decorrelation of the imaging signal appears due to the creation, fast movement, and dissolution of the bubbles in the cavitation cloud. By analyzing this area of decorrelation, the cavitation cloud can be localized and the spatial extent of the cavitation activity characterized. PMID:26168172

  16. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 4: Combined correlations for venturi, hydrofoil, ogives, and pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a series of experimental and analytical cavitation studies are presented. Cross-correlation is performed of the developed cavity data for a venturi, a hydrofoil and three scaled ogives. The new correlating parameter, MTWO, improves data correlation for these stationary bodies and for pumping equipment. Existing techniques for predicting the cavitating performance of pumping machinery were extended to include variations in flow coefficient, cavitation parameter, and equipment geometry. The new predictive formulations hold promise as a design tool and universal method for correlating pumping machinery performance. Application of these predictive formulas requires prescribed cavitation test data or an independent method of estimating the cavitation parameter for each pump. The latter would permit prediction of performance without testing; potential methods for evaluating the cavitation parameter prior to testing are suggested.

  17. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, David E.; Abel, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurrence and nonoccurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1) for the submerged journal bearing, cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2) for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  18. Optimization in design of scientific products for purposes of cavitation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modorskii, V. Ya.; Gaynutdinova, D. F.; Gergel, V. P.; Barkalov, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an optimized computer simulation of cavitation phenomena that occurs when a piston moves in a closed liquid-filled pipe. We have developed physical and mathematical models in a three-dimensional dynamic setting, found out a dependence of cavitation parameters on vibration parameters and constructed a domain of vibration influence on concentration of air cavitation bubbles. We also detected a maximum that corresponds to a certain combination of vibration kinematic parameters.

  19. Memory effect and redistribution of cavitation nuclei in a thin liquid layer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lixin; Lin, Weijun; Wu, Pengfei; Deng, Jingjun; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Wang, Dong; Chen, Lishuo

    2016-09-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of acoustic cavitation structures in a thin liquid layer were investigated experimentally with high-speed photography. The inception and disappearance processes of cavitation bubble cloud revealed that the metastable cavitaton structures formed in the thin liquid layer caused a long-term "memory effect". A factor which weakens the memory effect was identified. The distribution of cavitation nuclei was investigated by changing the temporal decay of the memory effect. PMID:27150763

  20. On the creep constrained diffusive cavitation of grain boundary facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    CREEP rupture in a polycrystalline metal at a high temperature, by cavity growth on a number of grain boundary facets, is studied numerically. An axisymmetric model problem is analysed, in which a cavitating facet is represented as disk-shaped, and the model dimensions are taken to represent spacings between neighbouring cavitating facets. For the grains both power law creep and elastic deformations are taken into account, and the description of cavity growth is based on an approximate expression that incorporates the coupled influence of grain boundary diffusion and power law creep. The cases considered include creep-constrained cavity growth at low stresses, where the voids link up to form grain boundary cracks at relatively small overall strains, as well as the power law creep dominated behaviour at higher stress levels, where rupture occurs at large overall strains. The numerical results are compared with results based on various simplified analyses.

  1. [A Patient with Cavitated Pulmonary Metastases Treated with Regorafenib].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masatake; Mori, Misuzu; Sata, Naohiro; Fujii, Hirofumi

    2016-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman underwent surgical resection of rectal cancer(SI, N3, Stage IIIb)and received 12 courses of adjuvant mFOLFOX6 chemotherapy. Six months after completion of adjuvant chemotherapy, she was found to have pulmonarymetastases, and was treated with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. After 6 courses of chemotherapy, the pulmonarynodules showed central cavitation without anychange in size. After 6 additional courses of chemotherapy, pulmonarylesions increased in and had consolidated. She was treated with regorafenib as second-line chemotherapyfor recurrent disease. After 6 courses of regorafenib, the pulmonarynodules became cavitated. According to the RECIST criteria, the tumor response was stable disease. However, the morphologywas significantlychanged and tumor growth had been controlled for a long time. Assessment of tumor response depends not onlyon size according to the RECIST criteria, but also on the morphologic response when we assess tumor response to molecular targeted drugs. PMID:27306815

  2. Partial Averaged Navier-Stokes approach for cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y. N.

    2015-01-01

    Partial Averaged Navier Stokes (PANS) is a numerical approach developed for studying practical engineering problems (e.g. cavitating flow inside hydroturbines) with a resonance cost and accuracy. One of the advantages of PANS is that it is suitable for any filter width, leading a bridging method from traditional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) to direct numerical simulations by choosing appropriate parameters. Comparing with RANS, the PANS model will inherit many physical nature from parent RANS but further resolve more scales of motion in great details, leading to PANS superior to RANS. As an important step for PANS approach, one need to identify appropriate physical filter-width control parameters e.g. ratios of unresolved-to-total kinetic energy and dissipation. In present paper, recent studies of cavitating flow based on PANS approach are introduced with a focus on the influences of filter-width control parameters on the simulation results.

  3. An efficient numerical procedure for thermohydrodynamic analysis of cavitating bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayaraghavan, D.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient and accurate numerical procedure to determine the thermo-hydrodynamic performance of cavitating bearings is described. This procedure is based on the earlier development of Elrod for lubricating films, in which the properties across the film thickness are determined at Lobatto points and their distributions are expressed by collocated polynomials. The cavitated regions and their boundaries are rigorously treated. Thermal boundary conditions at the surfaces, including heat dissipation through the metal to the ambient, are incorporated. Numerical examples are presented comparing the predictions using this procedure with earlier theoretical predictions and experimental data. With a few points across the film thickness and across the journal and the bearing in the radial direction, the temperature profile is very well predicted.

  4. Cavitation bubble dynamics in microfluidic gaps of variable height.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A; Lim, Kang Y; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2009-10-01

    We study experimentally the dynamics of laser-induced cavitation bubbles created inside a narrow gap. The gap height, h , is varied from 15 to 400 microm and the resulting bubble dynamics is compared to a semiunbounded fluid. The cavitation bubbles are created with pulsed laser light at constant laser energy and are imaged with a high-speed camera. The bubble lifetime increases with decreasing gap height by up to 50% whereas the maximum projected bubble radius remains constant. Comparing the radial dynamics to potential flow models, we find that with smaller gaps, the bubble-induced flow becomes essentially planar, thus slower flows with reduced shear. These findings might have important consequences for microfluidic applications where it is desirable to tune the strength and range of the interactions such as in the case of cell lysis and cell membrane poration. PMID:19905487

  5. Empirical relations for cavitation and liquid impingement erosion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    A unified power-law relationship between average erosion rate and cumulative erosion is presented. Extensive data analyses from venturi, magnetostriction (stationary and oscillating specimens), liquid drop, and jet impact devices appear to conform to this relation. A normalization technique using cavitation and liquid impingement erosion data is also presented to facilitate prediction. Attempts are made to understand the relationship between the coefficients in the power-law relationships and the material properties.

  6. The fern cavitation catapult: mechanism and design principles.

    PubMed

    Llorens, C; Argentina, M; Rojas, N; Westbrook, J; Dumais, J; Noblin, X

    2016-01-01

    Leptosporangiate ferns have evolved an ingenious cavitation catapult to disperse their spores. The mechanism relies almost entirely on the annulus, a row of 12-25 cells, which successively: (i) stores energy by evaporation of the cells' content, (ii) triggers the catapult by internal cavitation, and (iii) controls the time scales of energy release to ensure efficient spore ejection. The confluence of these three biomechanical functions within the confines of a single structure suggests a level of sophistication that goes beyond most man-made devices where specific structures or parts rarely serve more than one function. Here, we study in detail the three phases of spore ejection in the sporangia of the fern Polypodium aureum. For each of these phases, we have written the governing equations and measured the key parameters. For the opening of the sporangium, we show that the structural design of the annulus is particularly well suited to inducing bending deformations in response to osmotic volume changes. Moreover, the measured parameters for the osmoelastic design lead to a near-optimal speed of spore ejection (approx. 10 m s(-1)). Our analysis of the trigger mechanism by cavitation points to a critical cavitation pressure of approximately -100 ± 14 bar, a value that matches the most negative pressures recorded in the xylem of plants. Finally, using high-speed imaging, we elucidated the physics leading to the sharp separation of time scales (30 versus 5000 µs) in the closing dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of the precise tuning of the parameters without which the function of the leptosporangium as a catapult would be severely compromised. PMID:26763327

  7. Numerical Optimization of converging diverging miniature cavitating nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Kanchan; Bhingole, B.; Raut, J.; Pandit, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The work focuses on the numerical optimization of converging diverging cavitating nozzles through nozzle dimensions and wall shape. The objective is to develop design rules for the geometry of cavitating nozzles for desired end-use. Two main aspects of nozzle design which affects the cavitation have been studied i.e. end dimensions of the geometry (i.e. angle and/or curvature of the inlet, outlet and the throat and the lengths of the converging and diverging sections) and wall curvatures(concave or convex). Angle of convergence at the inlet was found to control the cavity growth whereas angle of divergence of the exit controls the collapse of cavity. CFD simulations were carried out for the straight line converging and diverging sections by varying converging and diverging angles to study its effect on the collapse pressure generated by the cavity. Optimized geometry configurations were obtained on the basis of maximum Cavitational Efficacy Ratio (CER)i.e. cavity collapse pressure generated for a given permanent pressure drop across the system. With increasing capabilities in machining and fabrication, it is possible to exploit the effect of wall curvature to create nozzles with further increase in the CER. Effect of wall curvature has been studied for the straight, concave and convex shapes. Curvature has been varied and effect of concave and convex wall curvatures vis-à-vis straight walls studied for fixed converging and diverging angles.It is concluded that concave converging-diverging nozzles with converging angle of 20° and diverging angle of 5° with the radius of curvature 0.03 m and 0.1530 m respectively gives maximum CER. Preliminary experiments using optimized geometry are indicating similar trends and are currently being carried out. Refinements of the CFD technique using two phase flow simulations are planned.

  8. Aspergillus infection in pulmonary cavitating lesions with right atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divyesh; Dorgan, Eileen; Douglas, Hannah; Trouton, Tom; McMullan, Ronan; Parissis, Haralabos

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare primary tumors with varied clinical presentations that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Here, we describe the case of a 21-year-old man with multiple cavitating lung lesions with aspergillosis and underlying right atrial myxoma, who presented with hemoptysis and weight loss. He was successfully treated with right atrial myxoma resection and antifungal agents, with no recurrence or complications after one year of follow-up. PMID:24887845

  9. Grain boundary structure effects on creep cavitation susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Adams, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    Grain boundary structure plays an important role in creep cavitation. A function called the misorientation distribution function (MDF) defined in Euler space has been used to statistically characterize the boundary structure of polycrystalline materials. The theoretical developmet of the MDF is presented here. Experimental results showed that ..sigma..3 and ..sigma..9 special boundaries occur with high frequency in 304 stainless steel and the data also suggested a possible directional dependence of the grain boundary structure.

  10. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    PubMed

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet. PMID:26442141

  11. Study about the influence of cavitation on the dynamic characteristics for the sliding bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, L. M.; Luo, Y. Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sliding bearings are employed to support the rotor system and limit the vibration amplitude. In high speed rotor system, cavitation often occurs in the oil film and affects the dynamic characteristics of the sliding bearing greatly. In this paper, numerical method is adopted to simulate the cavitation in the oil film with homogeneous two-phase mixture flow using Singhal-et-al cavitation model in the commercial code FLUENT-solver. Cases without cavitation model were also calculated at the same time. Many computations with different frequency ratios were conducted. Then the rotor dynamic characteristics of the sliding bearing were retrieved. The results show that the cavitation has great influences on the pressure distribution in the oil film. As the rotational speed or whirling speed of the journal increases, the cavitation will become prominent. The dynamic coefficients of the bearing such as stiffness and damping with cavitation model considered are quite different from that without cavitation. So it is worth to pay attention to and do further study about the cavitation in the sliding bearing in the high speed rotor system.

  12. A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, C M; Liszka, E G; Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1994-11-01

    A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve has been developed. Cavitation of four blood analog fluids (distilled water, aqueous glycerin, aqueous polyacrylamide, and aqueous xanthan gum) has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve. This method employed a Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device in a mock circulatory loop that was operated in a partial filling mode associated with reduced atrial filling pressure. The observations were made on a valve that was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure on every cycle. Stroboscopic videography was used to document the cavity life cycle. Bubble cavitation was observed on the valve occluder face. Vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. For each fluid, cavity growth and collapse occurred in less than one millisecond, which provides strong evidence that the cavitation is vaporous rather than gaseous. The cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing atrial pressure at constant aortic pressure and beat rate. The area of cavitation was found to decrease with increasing delay time at a constant aortic pressure, atrial pressure, and beat rate. Cavitation was found to occur in each of the fluids, with the most cavitation seen in the Newtonian fluids (distilled water and aqueous glycerin). PMID:7869722

  13. Effect of dilute polymer additives on the acoustic cavitation threshold of water

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, L.A.; Brosey, J.E.

    1984-02-01

    Measurements are presented of the variation of the acoustic cavitation threshold of water with concentration of the polymer additives polyethylene oxide and guar gum. It was found that small amounts of these additives could significantly increase the cavitation threshold. A theoretical model, based upon nucleation of a gas bubble from a Harvey-type crevice in a mote or solid particle, is developed that gives good agreement with the measurements. The applicability of this approach to an explanation of cavitation index reduction in flow-generated or confined jet cavitation, when polymer additives are introduced, is discussed.

  14. Study on cavitation influence for pump head in an axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, K.; Kajie, Y.; Saito, S.; Miyagawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    The size of axial flow pumps used in drainage pump stations has recently decreased, and their rotation speeds have increased, causing an increase in the risk of cavitation. Therefore, to provide highly reliable pumps, it is important to understand the internal flow of pumps under cavitating conditions. In this study, high-speed camera measurements and computational fluid dynamics analysis were performed to understand the cavitation performance of an axial flow pump. The mechanism that causes the head to change as a result of cavitation under low net positive suction head values is shown to be the balance between the increasing angular momentum and the loss indicated by the changing streamlines.

  15. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, R Glynn; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 muC will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 muC by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 mus after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 muC and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber ( approximately 300 mus), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles. PMID:20370004

  16. A numerical study on the effects of cavitation on orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, S.; Sirignano, W. A.; Joseph, D. D.

    2010-04-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown better atomization of sprays generated by high-pressure liquid injectors when cavitation occurs inside the nozzle. It has been proposed that the collapse of traveling cavitation bubbles increases the disturbances inside the liquid flow. These disturbances will later trigger the instabilities in the emerged jet and cause a shorter breakup distance. In this paper, effects of cavitation on increasing the disturbances in the flow through the orifice of an atomizer are studied. In previous cavitation models, spherical cavitation bubbles are considered. Here, the cavitation bubbles are allowed to deform as they travel through the orifice. Dynamics of the cavitation bubble, traveling in the separated shear layer in the orifice, is analyzed through a one-way coupling between the orifice flow and bubble dynamics. Effects of shear strain, normal strain, and pressure variation are examined. Three mechanisms are suggested that could be responsible for the increase in disturbances in the flow due to cavitation. These mechanisms are monopole, quadrupole, and vorticities generated during growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles. The effects of these mechanisms are estimated by postprocessing of the solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations to identify monopole and quadrupole behaviors.

  17. Temperature and Pressure Measurements and Visualization of He II Cavitation Flow through Venturi Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Murakami, M.; Harada, K.

    2004-06-23

    He II cavitation flow through a Venturi channel was experimentally investigated through temperature and pressure measurements and optical visualization. So far some distinctive features of cavitation between He II and He I flows were clarified. Then, detailed measurements were added for further investigation, such as the measurements of the temperature drop distribution throughout the flow channel and the void fraction. Further considerations were given on the cavitation inception with emphasis on the superheating of liquid helium, and the effect of the flow separation on cavitation.

  18. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of erosive cavitation pressure field from pits in material: fact or myth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.-K.; Chahine, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    Material pitting in a cavitating flow has been used for a long time as an indicator of the vague ‘cavitation intensity’ concept. Periodically, some researchers suggest pitting tests as a “simple” means to provide quantitative measurements of the amplitude of the impulsive pressures in the cavitation field, especially when combined with Tabor's formula or with simple finite element computations with static loads. This paper examines the viability of such a method using fully coupled bubble dynamics and material response, and strongly concludes that the commonly accepted idea is a myth, as different loading scenarios with the same amplitude of the cavitation impulsive pressure result in different pit aspect ratios.

  20. The Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Cavitation Evolution Induced by Pressure Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, B. C.; Zheng, J. G.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is focused on the numerical simulation of pressure wave propagation through the cavitating compressible liquid flow, its interaction with cavitation bubble and the resulting unsteady cavitation evolution. The compressibility effects of liquid water are taken into account and the cavitating flow is governed by one-fluid cavitation model which is based on the compressible Euler equations with the assumption that the cavitation is the homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapour which are locally under both kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. Several aspects of the method employed to solve the governing equations are outlined. The unsteady features of cavitating flow due to the external perturbation, such as the cavitation deformation and collapse and consequent pressure increase are resolved numerically and discussed in detail. It is observed that the cavitation bubble collapse is accompanied by the huge pressure surge of order of 100 bar, which is thought to be responsible for the material erosion, noise, vibration and loss of efficiency of operating underwater devices.

  1. Photodistruptive laser nucleation of ultrasonic cavitation for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Doug L.; Spooner, Greg J.; Williams, Alun R.

    2001-07-01

    Pulses of high intensity laser light, when focused into transparent materials, may produce localized electron-ion plasmas through optical breakdown. By simultaneously incorporating the resulting volume of vaporized material within the focal volume of a high intensity ultrasound source, the photodisruption (1.05 micrometers wavelength) void served as a nucleation site for ultrasonic cavitation. Dilute suspensions of canine erythrocytes in phosphate buffered saline were exposed in a flow-through exposure chamber and the percentage of lysed cells was used as a measure of the biologically effective cavitation activity produced in the chamber. Brief (about 30 microsecond(s) ) acoustic emissions were detected from the photodisruption alone (indicating laser nucleation of bubbles), but the cell lysis produced was undetectable against the background. However, combined exposure greatly increased both the duration of the acoustic emissions (up to 1.5 ms) and the amount of cell lysis above an ultrasonic pressure amplitude threshold of about 4.3 MPa at 2.5 MHz. The amount of cell lysis (sometimes approaching 100%) increased with increasing ultrasonic intensity, laser pulse energy and laser PRF. Addition of 5% serum albumin enhanced the effect, apparently by stabilizing bubbles and nuclei. Photodisruptive laser nucleation of ultrasonic cavitation can provide controlled and synergistic enhancement of bioeffects.

  2. Secondary shock wave emissions from cavitation in lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    We investigate the role of secondary shock waves (SSWs) generated by cavitation in lithotripsy. Acoustic pressure was measured with a fiber optic probe hydrophone and cavitation using a dual passive cavitation detector (PCD) consisting of two confocal transducers. An artificial stone (~7 mm diameter and ~9 mm length) was placed at the focus of an electrohydraulic lithotripter. The fiber was inserted through a hole drilled through the stone so that the tip was at the proximal surface. SSWs were identified by matching the time of arrival to that of the inertial collapse signature acquired by the PCD. Measurements of SSWs were obtained for 50% of SWs fired at 20 kV and 1 Hz. The peak positive pressure for the SSW was p+=33.7+/-14.8 MPa, which was comparable to the pressure induced by the incident SW (p+=42.6+/-6 MPa). The peak pressure in water was p+=23.2+/-4.4 MPa. The PCD also recorded acoustic emissions from forced collapse of pre-existing bubbles caused by the incident SW. We propose that both the reflection from the semi-rigid stone boundary and SSW from the forced collapse contribute to the observed increase in the peak pressure of the incident SW in presence of a stone. [Work supported by NIH.

  3. Transient cavitation and acoustic emission produced by different laser lithotripters.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Tong, H L; Cocks, F H; Pearle, M S; Preminger, G M

    1998-08-01

    Transient cavitation and shockwave generation produced by pulsed-dye and holmium:YAG laser lithotripters were studied using high-speed photography and acoustic emission measurements. In addition, stone phantoms were used to compare the fragmentation efficiency of various laser and electrohydraulic lithotripters. The pulsed-dye laser, with a wavelength (504 nm) strongly absorbed by most stone materials but not by water, and a short pulse duration of approximately 1 microsec, induces plasma formation on the surface of the target calculi. Subsequently, the rapid expansion of the plasma forms a cavitation bubble, which expands spherically to a maximum size and then collapses violently, leading to strong shockwave generation and microjet impingement, which comprises the primary mechanism for stone fragmentation with short-pulse lasers. In contrast, the holmium laser, with a wavelength (2100 nm) most strongly absorbed by water as well as by all stone materials and a long pulse duration of 250 to 350 microsec, produces an elongated, pear-shaped cavitation bubble at the tip of the optical fiber that forms a vapor channel to conduct the ensuing laser energy to the target stone (Moss effect). The expansion and subsequent collapse of the elongated bubble is asymmetric, resulting in weak shockwave generation and microjet impingement. Thus, stone fragmentation in holmium laser lithotripsy is caused primarily by thermal ablation (drilling effect). PMID:9726407

  4. Cavitation Inside High-Pressure Optically Transparent Fuel Injector Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgout, Z.; Linne, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nozzle-orifice flow and cavitation have an important effect on primary breakup of sprays. For this reason, a number of studies in recent years have used injectors with optically transparent nozzles so that orifice flow cavitation can be examined directly. Many of these studies use injection pressures scaled down from realistic injection pressures used in modern fuel injectors, and so the geometry must be scaled up so that the Reynolds number can be matched with the industrial applications of interest. A relatively small number of studies have shown results at or near the injection pressures used in real systems. Unfortunately, neither the specifics of the design of the optical nozzle nor the design methodology used is explained in detail in these papers. Here, a methodology demonstrating how to prevent failure of a finished design made from commonly used optically transparent materials will be explained in detail, and a description of a new design for transparent nozzles which minimizes size and cost will be shown. The design methodology combines Finite Element Analysis with relevant materials science to evaluate the potential for failure of the finished assembly. Finally, test results imaging a cavitating flow at elevated pressures are presented.

  5. X-ray Diagnostics for Cavitating Nozzle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Daniel J.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation plays a critical role in the internal flow of nozzles such as those used in direct fuel injection systems. However, quantifying the vapor fraction in the nozzle is difficult. The gas-liquid interfaces refract and multiply scatter visible light, making quantitative extinction measurements difficult. X-rays offer a solution to this problem, as they refract and scatter only weakly. In this paper, we report on current progress in the development of several x-ray diagnostics for cavitating nozzle flows. X-ray radiography experiments undertaken at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory have provided measurements of total projected void fraction in a 500 μm submerged nozzle, which have been directly compared with numerical simulations. From this work, it has been shown that dissolved gases in the liquid also result in the formation of vapor regions, and it is difficult to separate these multiple phenomena. To address this problem, the liquid was doped with an x-ray fluorescent bromine tracer, and the dissolved air substituted with krypton. The fluorescent emission of Br and Kr at x-ray wavelengths provide a novel measurement of both the total void fraction and the dissolved gas component, allowing both cavitation and dissolved gas contributions to be measured independently. [199/200 words

  6. Performance and cavitation characteristics of bi-directional hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Wosnik, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Tidal turbines extract energy from flows which reverse direction. One way to address this bi-directionality in horizontal axis turbines that avoid the use of complex and maintenance-intensive yaw or blade pitch mechanisms, is to design bi-directional blades which perform (equally) well in either flow direction. A large number of proposed hydrofoil designs were investigated using numerical simulations. Selected candidate foils were also tested (at various speeds and angles of attack) in the High-Speed Cavitation Tunnel (HICaT) at the University of New Hampshire. Lift and drag were measured using a force balance, and cavitation inception and desinence were recorded. Experimental and numerical results were compared, and the foils were compared to each other and to reference foils. Bi-directional hydrofoils may provide a feasible solution to the problem of reversing flow direction, when their performance and cavitation characteristics are comparable to those for unidirectional foils, and the penalty in decreased energy production is outweighed by the cost reduction due to lower complexity and respectively lower installation and maintenance costs.

  7. A Study of Cavitation-Ignition Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Jacqmin, David A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental and computational study of the physics and chemistry of cavitation-ignition bubble combustion (CIBC), a process that occurs when combustible gaseous mixtures are ignited by the high temperatures found inside a rapidly collapsing bubble. The CIBC process was modeled using a time-dependent compressible fluid-dynamics code that includes finite-rate chemistry. The model predicts that gas-phase reactions within the bubble produce CO and other gaseous by-products of combustion. In addition, heat and mechanical energy release through a bubble volume-expansion phase are also predicted by the model. We experimentally demonstrate the CIBC process using an ultrasonically excited cavitation flow reactor with various hydrocarbon-air mixtures in liquid water. Low concentrations (< 160 ppm) of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from the ultrasonic reactor were measured, and found to be proportional to the acoustic excitation power. The results of the model were consistent with the measured experimental results. Based on the experimental findings, the computational model, and previous reports of the "micro-diesel effect" in industrial hydraulic systems, we conclude that CIBC is indeed possible and exists in ultrasonically- and hydrodynamically-induced cavitation. Finally, estimates of the utility of CIBC process as a means of powering an idealized heat engine are also presented.

  8. Cavitating Jet Method and System for Oxygenation of Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Georges L.

    2012-01-01

    Reclamation and re-use of water is critical for space-based life support systems. A number of functions must be performed by any such system including removal of various contaminants and oxygenation. For long-duration space missions, this must be done with a compact, reliable system that requires little or no use of expendables and minimal power. DynaJets cavitating jets can oxidize selected organic compounds with much greater energy efficiency than ultrasonic devices typically used in sonochemistry. The focus of this work was to develop cavitating jets to simultaneously accomplish the functions of oxygenation and removal of contaminants of importance to space-structured water reclamation systems. The innovation is a method to increase the concentration of dissolved oxygen or other gasses in a liquid. It utilizes a particular form of novel cavitating jet operating at low to moderate pressures to achieve a high-efficiency means of transporting and mixing the gas into the liquid. When such a jet is utilized to simultaneously oxygenate the liquid and to oxidize organic compounds within the liquid, such as those in waste water, the rates of contaminant removal are increased. The invention is directed toward an increase in the dissolved gas content of a liquid, in general, and the dissolved oxygen content of a liquid in particular.

  9. A Non-catalytic Deep Desulphurization Process using Hydrodynamic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Nalinee B.; Bhandari, Vinay M.; Sorokhaibam, Laxmi Gayatri; Ranade, Vivek V.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach is developed for desulphurization of fuels or organics without use of catalyst. In this process, organic and aqueous phases are mixed in a predefined manner under ambient conditions and passed through a cavitating device. Vapor cavities formed in the cavitating device are then collapsed which generate (in-situ) oxidizing species which react with the sulphur moiety resulting in the removal of sulphur from the organic phase. In this work, vortex diode was used as a cavitating device. Three organic solvents (n-octane, toluene and n-octanol) containing known amount of a model sulphur compound (thiophene) up to initial concentrations of 500 ppm were used to verify the proposed method. A very high removal of sulphur content to the extent of 100% was demonstrated. The nature of organic phase and the ratio of aqueous to organic phase were found to be the most important process parameters. The results were also verified and substantiated using commercial diesel as a solvent. The developed process has great potential for deep of various organics, in general, and for transportation fuels, in particular. PMID:27605492

  10. Cavitation in confined water: ultra-fast bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In the hydraulic vessels of trees, water can be found at negative pressure. This metastable state, corresponding to mechanical tension, is achieved by evaporation through a porous medium. It can be relaxed by cavitation, i.e. the sudden nucleation of vapor bubbles. Harmful for the tree due to the subsequent emboli of sap vessels, cavitation is on the contrary used by ferns to eject spores very swiftly. We will focus here on the dynamics of the cavitation bubble, which is of primary importance to explain the previously cited natural phenomena. We use the recently developed method of artificial tress, using transparent hydrogels as the porous medium. Our experiments, on water confined in micrometric hydrogel cavities, show an extremely fast dynamics: bubbles are nucleated at the microsecond timescale. For cavities larger than 100 microns, the bubble ``rings'' with damped oscillations at MHz frequencies, whereas for smaller cavities the oscillations become overdamped. This rich dynamics can be accounted for by a model we developed, leading to a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Interestingly, this model predicts the impossibility to nucleate bubbles above a critical confinement that depends on liquid negative pressure and corresponds to approximately 100 nm for 20 MPa tensions.

  11. A Non-catalytic Deep Desulphurization Process using Hydrodynamic Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Nalinee B; Bhandari, Vinay M; Sorokhaibam, Laxmi Gayatri; Ranade, Vivek V

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach is developed for desulphurization of fuels or organics without use of catalyst. In this process, organic and aqueous phases are mixed in a predefined manner under ambient conditions and passed through a cavitating device. Vapor cavities formed in the cavitating device are then collapsed which generate (in-situ) oxidizing species which react with the sulphur moiety resulting in the removal of sulphur from the organic phase. In this work, vortex diode was used as a cavitating device. Three organic solvents (n-octane, toluene and n-octanol) containing known amount of a model sulphur compound (thiophene) up to initial concentrations of 500 ppm were used to verify the proposed method. A very high removal of sulphur content to the extent of 100% was demonstrated. The nature of organic phase and the ratio of aqueous to organic phase were found to be the most important process parameters. The results were also verified and substantiated using commercial diesel as a solvent. The developed process has great potential for deep of various organics, in general, and for transportation fuels, in particular. PMID:27605492

  12. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  13. Investigation of nozzle flow and cavitation characteristics in a diesel injector.

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Ramirez, A.; Aggarwal, S.; El-Hannouny, E.; Longman, D.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Illinois

    2010-04-01

    Cavitation and turbulence inside a diesel injector play a critical role in primary spray breakup and development processes. The study of cavitation in realistic injectors is challenging, both theoretically and experimentally, since the associated two-phase flow field is turbulent and highly complex, characterized by large pressure gradients and small orifice geometries. We report herein a computational investigation of the internal nozzle flow and cavitation characteristics in a diesel injector. A mixture based model in FLUENT V6.2 software is employed for simulations. In addition, a new criterion for cavitation inception based on the total stress is implemented, and its effectiveness in predicting cavitation is evaluated. Results indicate that under realistic diesel engine conditions, cavitation patterns inside the orifice are influenced by the new cavitation criterion. Simulations are validated using the available two-phase nozzle flow data and the rate of injection measurements at various injection pressures (800-1600 bar) from the present study. The computational model is then used to characterize the effects of important injector parameters on the internal nozzle flow and cavitation behavior, as well as on flow properties at the nozzle exit. The parameters include injection pressure, needle lift position, and fuel type. The propensity of cavitation for different on-fleet diesel fuels is compared with that for n-dodecane, a diesel fuel surrogate. Results indicate that the cavitation characteristics of n-dodecane are significantly different from those of the other three fuels investigated. The effect of needle movement on cavitation is investigated by performing simulations at different needle lift positions. Cavitation patterns are seen to shift dramatically as the needle lift position is changed during an injection event. The region of significant cavitation shifts from top of the orifice to bottom of the orifice as the needle position is changed from fully

  14. Effect of geometrical parameters on submerged cavitation jet discharged from profiled central-body nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minguan; Xiao, Shengnan; Kang, Can; Wang, Yuli

    2013-05-01

    The flow characteristics of cavitation jets are essential issues among relevant studies. The physical properties of the jet are largely determined by the geometrical parameters of the nozzle. The structure and cavitation jets characteristics of the angular-nozzle and the self-resonating cavitation nozzle have been extensively studied, but little research is conducted in the central-body cavitation nozzle mainly because of its hard processing and the cavitation jet effect not satisfactory. In this paper, a novel central-body nozzle (a non-plunger central-body nozzle with square outlet) is studied to solve above problems. Submerged jets discharged from the novel central-body nozzle are simulated, employing the full cavitation model. The impact of nozzle configuration on jet properties is analyzed. The analysis results indicate that when central-body relative diameter keeps constant, there is an optimal contraction degree of nozzle's outlet, which can induce intense cavitation in the jet. The central-body relative diameter also affects jet profiles. In the case of large central-body relative diameter, most of the bubbles settle in the jet core. On the contrary, a smaller relative diameter makes bubbles concentrate in the interface between the jet and its surrounding fluid. Moreover, the shorter outlet part allows the cavitation zone further extend in both the axial and racial directions. The research results further consummate the study on the central-body nozzles and the correlation between cavitation jet and the structure, and elementarily reveal the mechanism of cavitation jet produced in a non-plunger novel central-body nozzle and the effect of the structure parameters on the cavitation jet, moreover, provide the theoretical basis for the optimal design of the nozzle.

  15. Assessment of End-of-Life Behavior of the Surface Modification to Improve Cavitation-Erosion Resistance in the Mercury Target at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2007-06-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer on annealed or cold-worked substrates of 316LN stainless steel has been examined in mercury using a vibratory horn technique and extended exposure periods intended to expose 'end-of-life' performance characteristics. The Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer tends to remain protective--as evidenced by modest steady-state weight loss and surface roughness increases, only isolated pitting, and limited wetting by mercury--until the protective layer has been thinned by general erosion to about 15-20 {micro}m. Prior to that amount of erosion, the cavitation-erosion resistance of both types of specimens appears defined by the properties of the protective layer. However, after thinning to such a degree, initial breakdown of the protective layer is characterized by increases in both the surface roughness and the number/depth of individual pits across the surface at a rate that is strongly dependent on the substrate condition, with annealed substrates significantly more prone to damage. However, even as the protective properties of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer decrease, both weight change and profile development as a function of sonication time suggest a gradual reversion to cavitation-erosion behavior similar to that of untreated substrates.

  16. Water Droplet and Cavitation Erosion Behavior of Laser-Treated Stainless Steel and Titanium Alloy: Their Similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    This article deals with water droplet and cavitation erosion behavior of diode laser-treated X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and Ti6Al4V alloy. After laser surface treatment, the water droplet and cavitation erosion resistance (WDER and CER) of these materials improved significantly. The main reason for the improvement is the increased surface hardness and formation of fine-grained microstructures after laser surface treatment. It is observed that there is a similarity in both the phenomena. The WDER and CER can be correlated with a single mechanical property based on modified ultimate resilience (MUR) provided the laser-treated layers are free from microcracks and interface defects. The CER and WDER behavior of HPDL-treated X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and Ti6Al4V alloy samples using different test equipment as per ASTM G32-2003 and ASTM G73-1978, their correlation with MUR, and their damage mechanism compared on the basis of XRD analyses, optical and scanning electron micrographs are discussed and reported in this article.

  17. Exploitation of sub-micron cavitation nuclei to enhance ultrasound-mediated transdermal transport and penetration of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sunali; Kwan, James J; Shah, Apurva R; Coussios, Constantin-C; Carlisle, Robert C

    2016-09-28

    Inertial cavitation mediated by ultrasound has been previously shown to enable skin permeabilisation for transdermal drug and vaccine delivery, by sequentially applying the ultrasound then the therapeutic in liquid form on the skin surface. Using a novel hydrogel dosage form, we demonstrate that the use of sub-micron gas-stabilising polymeric nanoparticles (nanocups) to sustain and promote cavitation activity during simultaneous application of both drug and vaccine results in a significant enhancement of both the dose and penetration of a model vaccine, Ovalbumin (OVA), to depths of 500μm into porcine skin. The nanocups themselves exceeded the penetration depth of the vaccine (up to 700μm) due to their small size and capacity to 'self-propel'. In vivo murine studies indicated that nanocup-assisted ultrasound transdermal vaccination achieved significantly (p<0.05) higher delivery doses without visible skin damage compared to the use of a chemical penetration enhancer. Transdermal OVA doses of up to 1μg were achieved in a single 90-second treatment, which was sufficient to trigger an antigen-specific immune response. Furthermore, ultrasound-assisted vaccine delivery in the presence of nanocups demonstrated substantially higher specific anti-OVA IgG antibody levels compared to other transdermal methods. Further optimisation can lead to a viable, safe and non-invasive delivery platform for vaccines with potential use in a primary care setting or personalized self-vaccination at home. PMID:27417040

  18. Relationship between loss of echogenicity and cavitation emissions from echogenic liposomes insonified by spectral Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability in the United States and worldwide. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are theragonistic ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) being developed for the early detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Stability of the echogenicity of ELIP in physiologic conditions is crucial to their successful translation to clinical use. The stability of ELIP echogenicity was determined in vitro under physiologic conditions of total dissolved gas concentration, temperature, and hydrodynamic pressure in porcine plasma and whole blood. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Previous studies have also demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of ELIP as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of ELIP would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the on-screen echogenicity in clinical applications. ELIP were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations and four PRFs in a static fluid and in a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a single-element passive cavitation detection (PCD) system and a passive cavitation imaging (PCI) system. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. Stable cavitation thresholds were found to be lower than inertial

  19. Modeling cavitation in a rapidly changing pressure field - application to a small ultrasonic horn.

    PubMed

    Žnidarčič, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Dular, Matevž

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e. below the acoustic driving frequency. The term "acoustic supercavitation" was proposed for this type of cavitation Žnidarčič et al. (2014) [1]. We tested several established hydrodynamic cavitation models on this problem, but none of them was able to correctly predict the flow features. As a specific characteristic of such acoustic cavitation problems lies in the rapidly changing driving pressures, we present an improved approach to cavitation modeling, which does not neglect the second derivatives in the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Comparison with measurements of acoustic supercavitation at an ultrasonic horn of 20kHz frequency revealed a good agreement in terms of cavity dynamics, cavity volume and emitted pressure pulsations. The newly developed cavitation model is particularly suited for simulation of cavitating flow in highly fluctuating driving pressure fields. PMID:24889548

  20. Cavitation pitting and erosion of Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The authors are currently carrying out a study of the cavitation erosion of different bearing metals and alloys in mineral oils were studied. The variations of weight loss, the pit diameter and depth due to cavitation erosion on Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water are presented.

  1. Application of cavitational reactors for water disinfection: current status and path forward.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R

    2007-12-01

    Cavitational reactors are a novel and promising form of multiphase reactors, based on the principle of release of large magnitude of energy due to the violent collapse of the cavities. An overview of cavitational reactors in the specific area of water disinfection, in terms of the basic mechanism, different reactor designs including recommendations for optimum operating parameters and applicability of the cavitation phenomena for disinfection of different micro-organisms have been presented. A design of a pilot scale sonochemical reactor has been presented, which forms the basis for development of industrial scale reactors. Economic analysis for comparison of cavitation phenomena with other conventional techniques of disinfection has been discussed. It appears that though cavitation is quite successful in treatment of water at laboratory scale operations, comparatively higher cost of treatment as compared to the conventional chemical methods is a hindrance in its industrial scale application. Intensification of cavitational activity and efficient design of industrial scale hydrodynamic cavitation reactors is required for ensuring successful application of cavitational reactors at industrial scale operation. PMID:17714855

  2. Effect of a cavitation treatment of coals on their physicochemical properties and ability for thermal dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yu. F. Patrakov; N.I. Fedorova; S.A. Semenova

    2007-08-15

    It was found that the cavitation treatment of low-metamorphized coals from the Kuznetsk Basin resulted in not only their mechanical degradation but also changes in the chemical composition of the surface layers of coal particles due to the occurrence of oxidation-hydrolysis reactions with water in a supercritical state under cavitation conditions.

  3. High-speed motion picture camera experiments of cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Jacobson, B. O.

    1983-01-01

    A high-speed camera was used to investigate cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length-diameter ratio of the bearing, the speeds of the shaft and bearing, the surface material of the shaft, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. The results reveal not only the appearance of gas cavitation, but also the development of previously unsuspected vapor cavitation. It was found that gas cavitation increases with time until, after many hundreds of pressure cycles, there is a constant amount of gas kept in the cavitation zone of the bearing. The gas can have pressures of many times the atmospheric pressure. Vapor cavitation bubbles, on the other hand, collapse at pressures lower than the atmospheric pressure and cannot be transported through a high-pressure zone, nor does the amount of vapor cavitation in a bearing increase with time. Analysis is given to support the experimental findings for both gas and vapor cavitation. Previously announced in STAR as N82-20543

  4. Using acoustic cavitation to enhance chemotherapy of DOX liposomes: experiment in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Dai, Dan-Dan; Lu, Cui-Tao; Lv, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xing; Li, Wen-Feng; Wu, Yan; Jiang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Kun; Huang, Pin-Tong; Chen, Li-Juan; Lin, Min

    2012-09-01

    Experiments in vitro and in vivo were designed to investigate tumor growth inhibition of chemotherapeutics-loaded liposomes enhanced by acoustic cavitation. Doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (DOX liposomes) were used in experiments to investigate acoustic cavitation mediated effects on cell viability and chemotherapeutic function. The influence of lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation on tumor inhibition was also investigated. Animal experiment was carried out to verify the practicability of this technique in vivo. From experiment results, blank phospholipid-based microbubbles (PBM) combined with ultrasound (US) at intensity below 0.3 W/cm² could produce acoustic cavitation which maintained cell viability at high level. Compared with DOX solution, DOX liposomes combined with acoustic cavitation exerted effective tumor inhibition in vitro and in vivo. The lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation could also enhance the susceptibility of tumor to chemotherapeutic drugs. DOX liposomes could also exert certain tumor inhibition under preliminary acoustic cavitation. Acoustic cavitation could enhance the absorption efficiency of DOX liposomes, which could be used to reduce DOX adverse effect on normal organs in clinical chemotherapy. PMID:22188116

  5. Application of two turbulence models for computation of cavitating flows in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    To seek a better numerical method to simulate the cavitating flow field in a centrifugal pump, the applications between RNG k- ε and LES turbulence model were compared by using the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model. It was found that both the models give almost the same results with respect to pump performance and cavitation evolutions including growth, local contraction, stability and separation in the impeller passage. But the LES model can not only capture the pump suction recirculation and the low frequency fluctuation caused by it, but also combine the changes of the shaft frequency amplitude acting on the impeller with the cavitation unstable characteristics. Thus the LES model has more advantages than RNG k- ε model in calculating the unsteady cavitating flow in a centrifugal pump.

  6. Influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Meng, G.; Qu, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps is analysed in the present paper. Three sets of blade angle distribution along leading edge for three blade inlet angles are chosen to design nine centrifugal pump impellers. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model are employed to simulate the cavitation flows in centrifugal pumps with different impellers and the same volute. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data, and the comparison proves that the numerical simulation can accurately predict the cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps. On the basis of the numerical simulations, the pump head variations with pump inlet pressure, and the flow details in centrifugal pump are revealed to demonstrate the influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performances of centrifugal pumps.

  7. DES Prediction of Cavitation Erosion and Its Validation for a Ship Scale Propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponkratov, Dmitriy, Dr

    2015-12-01

    Lloyd's Register Technical Investigation Department (LR TID) have developed numerical functions for the prediction of cavitation erosion aggressiveness within Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. These functions were previously validated for a model scale hydrofoil and ship scale rudder [1]. For the current study the functions were applied to a cargo ship's full scale propeller, on which the severe cavitation erosion was reported. The performed Detach Eddy Simulation (DES) required a fine computational mesh (approximately 22 million cells), together with a very small time step (2.0E-4 s). As the cavitation for this type of vessel is primarily caused by a highly non-uniform wake, the hull was also included in the simulation. The applied method under predicted the cavitation extent and did not fully resolve the tip vortex; however, the areas of cavitation collapse were captured successfully. Consequently, the developed functions showed a very good prediction of erosion areas, as confirmed by comparison with underwater propeller inspection results.

  8. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of nodular cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure.

    PubMed

    Mitelea, Ion; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Pelle, Marius; Crăciunescu, Corneliu

    2015-03-01

    The cavitation erosion of ductile cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure was analyzed based on ultrasonic experiments performed according to ASTM G32-2010 and the resistance was compared to the C45 steel with similar hardness. The microstructural observation of the surface for different exposure times to the ultrasonic cavitation reveals the fact that the process initiates at the nodular graphite-ferrite interface and is controlled by micro-galvanic activities and mechanical factors. The cavitation erosion resistance was evaluated based on the evolution of the mean depth erosion and the mean depth erosion rate as a function of the cavitation time. The cavitation erosion rate of the cast iron is up to 1.32 times higher than the one of the C 45 steel with similar hardness. This is explained by the occurrence of stress concentrators due to the expulsion of the graphite from the metallic matrix. PMID:25465881

  9. The inception of cavitation bubble clouds induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-12-22

    In many therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) the appearance of cavitation bubbles is unavoidable, whereas the dynamics of the bubbles induced by HIFU have not been clarified. The objective of the present work is to observe the inception process of cavitation bubble clouds generated by HIFU transducer in water using high-speed photography. Sequential images captured within 600 micros after the onset of ultrasound transmission show the dynamics of cavitation bubbles' generation, growth, deformation, expansion and collapse in the focal region. However, when the observation time is narrowed to the initial 145 micros, both the still and streak images reveal that the cavitation bubbles astonishingly stay stable in the focal region for at least 60 micros. The results imply that through adjusting the HIFU exposure time while other physical parameters are appropriately chosen, it might be possible to control the generation of stable cavitation bubbles locally in the focal region. PMID:16782158

  10. Cavitation and two-phase flow characteristics of SRPR (Savannah River Plant Reactor) pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The possible head degradation of the SRPR pumps may be attributable to two independent phenomena, one due to the inception of cavitation and the other due to the two-phase flow phenomena. The head degradation due to the appearance of cavitation on the pump blade is hardly likely in the conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) since the coolant circulating line is highly pressurized so that the cavitation is difficult to occur even at LOCA (loss of coolant accident) conditions. On the other hand, the suction pressure of SRPR pump is order-of-magnitude smaller than that of PWR so that the cavitation phenomena, may prevail, should LOCA occur, depending on the extent of LOCA condition. In this study, therefore, both cavitation phenomena and two-phase flow phenomena were investigated for the SRPR pump by using various analytical tools and the numerical results are presented herein.

  11. Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration Technique in Cavitation Research and Comparison to Phase-Doppler Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Eric; Kröger, Willfried; Damaschke, Nils

    2015-12-01

    Small particles, especially bubbles in the micro-meter range, influence the cavitation of the propellers. The prediction of cavitation inception and water quality measurements are important in cavitation research. The Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration (HDNC) technique can be used for reliable bubble concentration measurements in fluid flows. The HDNC technique bases on the analysis of scattered light from the cavitation nuclei in the water. The HDNC technique can distinguish between bubbles and solid particles. The particle type classification is important, because the number concentration of solid particles is often much higher than the nuclei concentration in cavitation tunnels and in seawater. Verification experiments show, that the HDNC technique reaches similar capabilities in number concentration estimation as Phase Doppler (PD) technique in much shorter acquisition time.

  12. Experiment and numerical simulation of cavitation performance on a pressure-regulating valve with different openings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. S.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Xu, Y.; Huang, J.; Xu, Q. H.

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of widely used device in pipe system for pressure and flow rate regulating, the valve would experience cavitation in the case when a sharp pressure drop occurs, which will induce the energy loss, noise and vibration of pipeline system, and even operational accidents. The experiment on flow resistance coefficient of a DN600 pressure-regulating valve under operation conditions from 0% to 100% openings is conducted. Based on the RNG k-e turbulence model and the Rayleigh-Plesset cavitation equation, a set of computational model is developed to simulate the turbulent flow in the valve under operational conditions from 0% to 100% openings. The computational results of flow resistance coefficient are compared to the experimental data. And the numerical simulation is employed to predict the cavitation performance of the valve at different inlet flow conditions. The transient cavitating flow is calculated to reveal the time evolution of cavitation in the valve.

  13. Cavitation-free buckets of YS-920 and NACA 66 (MOD) foil sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y. T.

    1982-07-01

    Based on a wing section design theory and boundary layer calculations, a new series of hydrofoil sections with improved cavitation inception characteristics were theoretically developed and presented in previous papers. To verify these theoretical results experimentally, two hydrofoil models, one a newly developed profile designated YS-920 and the other an NACA-66 (MOD) wing section, were tested in high-speed water tunnel. The measurements included force and moment data, flow visualization, cavitation characteristics, and surface roughness effect on cavitation. In this report, the measured cavitation-free buckets of YS-920 and NACA-66 (MOD) foil sections are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. The ability to achieve a significant delay in cavitation inception with a newly designed profile is clearly demonstrated experimentally.

  14. Cavitation and primary atomization in real injectors at low injection pressure condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumouchel, Christophe; Leboucher, Nicolas; Lisiecki, Denis

    2013-06-01

    This experimental work investigates the influence of the geometry of GDI devices on primary atomization processes under low injection pressure and reduced back pressure. These pressure conditions ensure cavitating flows and observable atomization processes. Measurements include mass flux, structure velocity from high-speed visualizations and spray characterization with a laser diffraction technique. Super-cavitation regime and cavitation string, which have their own influence on the mass flux, develop independently in different injector regions. These regimes impact the flow pattern in the orifice and the subsequent atomization process. A possible interaction between cavitation string and super-cavitation is found to promote a hydraulic-flip-like regime and to deteriorate atomization quality. As far as the geometry of the injector is concerned, the profile of the orifice inlet and the roughness of the sac volume region are found to be important geometrical characteristics.

  15. Experimental investigation on dynamic characteristics and strengthening mechanism of laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; He, H; Tong, Y Q; Ren, Y P; Yuan, S Q; Liu, R; Zuo, C Y; Wu, K; Sui, S; Wang, D S

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic features of nanosecond laser-induced cavitation bubbles near the light alloy boundary were investigated with the high-speed photography. The shock-waves and the dynamic characteristics of the cavitation bubbles generated by the laser were detected using the hydrophone. The dynamic features and strengthening mechanism of cavitation bubbles were studied. The strengthening mechanisms of cavitation bubble were discussed when the relative distance parameter γ was within the range of 0.5-2.5. It showed that the strengthening mechanisms caused by liquid jet or shock-waves depended on γ much. The research results provided a new strengthening method based on laser-induced cavitation shotless peening (CSP). PMID:27150764

  16. Relationship between thrombolysis efficiency induced by pulsed focused ultrasound and cavitation bubble size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Liu, X.; Wang, S.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles has been studied. Firstly, the thrombolysis efficiency, evaluated by degree of mechanical fragmentation was investigated with varying duty cycle. Secondly, the size distribution of cavitation bubbles after the 1st, 103th and 105th pulse during experiments for various duty cycles was studied. It was revealed that the thrombolysis efficiency was highest when the cavitation bubble size distribution was centred around linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer. Therefore, in cavitation enhanced therapeutic applications, the essential of using a pulsed FUS may be controlling the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range so as to increase the treatment efficiency.

  17. Positron annihilation study of the micro-defects induced by cavitation in mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong; Hao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Baoyi

    2008-08-01

    Cavitation-induced micro-defects in mild steel after cavitation experiment in the fluid field have been studied by positron Doppler broadening measurement and positron annihilation lifetime spectra (PALS). Depth-resolved positron Doppler S-parameter (DPDS) results showed that S-parameter increased and micro-defects between the surface and the bulk has obvious variation with depth during the cavitation process. From the positron lifetime results, it was found that the size and number of micro-defects increase with the development of cavitation. These results suggest that more micro-defects are generated in mild steel bulk during the cavitation process than those in the mild steel surface layer region, although more mico-defects seen in the mild steel surface layer. Moreover, the size of micro-defects in mild steel bulk increases remarkably owing to their transfer and aggregation.

  18. Numerical simulation of cavitation bubble dynamics induced by ultrasound waves in a high frequency reactor.

    PubMed

    Servant, G; Caltagirone, J P; Gérard, A; Laborde, J L; Hita, A

    2000-10-01

    The use of high frequency ultrasound in chemical systems is of major interest to optimize chemical procedures. Characterization of an open air 477 kHz ultrasound reactor shows that, because of the collapse of transient cavitation bubbles and pulsation of stable cavitation bubbles, chemical reactions are enhanced. Numerical modelling is undertaken to determine the spatio-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles. The calculus of the emergence of cavitation bubbles due to the acoustic driving (by taking into account interactions between the sound field and bubbles' distribution) gives a cartography of bubbles' emergence within the reactor. Computation of their motion induced by the pressure gradients occurring in the reactor show that they migrate to the pressure nodes. Computed bubbles levitation sites gives a cartography of the chemical activity of ultrasound. Modelling of stable cavitation bubbles' motion induced by the motion of the liquid gives some insight on degassing phenomena. PMID:11062879

  19. On Rayleigh-Plesset based cavitation modelling of fluid film bearings using the Reynolds equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Troy A.; Braun, Minel J.; Pierson, Kristopher

    2015-12-01

    In the ‘universe’ of the general cavitation phenomena the issue of cavitation in bearings, due to its particular application and the mostly non-homogeneous working fluids associated with it, has presented a rather specialized challenge. The present paper models the phenomenon of pseudo-cavitation in fluid film bearings and offers a physics-based approach that conserves mass while solving the Reynolds (RE) and Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equations in a coupled, fully transient environment. The RP solution calculates a time dependent void fraction synchronized with the RE transient solution, where density and viscosity are (re)calculated at every grid point of this homogeneous two-phase fluid. The growth and evolution of the cavitation zone expanse is physics-based and thus can accommodate evaporation, diffusion, or pseudocavitation as separate processes. This is a step beyond the present available cavitation models both for the RE and the Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. Nanosecond laser micro- and nanotexturing for the design of a superhydrophobic coating robust against long-term contact with water, cavitation, and abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanenko, Alexandre M.; Shagieva, Farida M.; Domantovsky, Alexandr G.; Boinovich, Ludmila B.

    2015-03-01

    Existing and emerging applications of laser-driven methods make an important contribution to advancement in nanotechnological approaches for the design of superhydrophobic surfaces. In this study, we describe a superhydrophobic coating on stainless steel, designed by nanosecond IR laser treatment with subsequent chemisorption of fluorooxysilane for use in heavily loaded hydraulic systems. Coating characterization reveals extreme water repellency, chemical stability on long-term contact with water, and excellent durability of functional properties under prolonged abrasive wear and cavitation loads. The coating also demonstrates self-healing properties after mechanical damage.