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Sample records for accelerated cell cycle

  1. Cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. II - Accelerated cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A cycle life test of nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered-type nickel electrode were carried out at 23 C using a 45-min accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. Ten cells containing 21 to 36 percent KOH were tested. Since this accelerated test regime accelerated the cycle life roughly twice as fast as a typical LEO regime, the present results indicate that the cells with 26 percent KOH may last over 5 years in an 80 percent depth-of-discharge cycling in an LEO regime. Cells with lower KOH concentrations (21 to 23.5 percent) also showed longer cycle life than those with KOH concentrations of 31 percent or higher, although the life was shorter than those with 26 percent KOH.

  2. Results of accelerated thermal cycle tests of solar cells modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P.; Mueller, R.; Salama, M.; Yasui, R.

    1976-01-01

    Various candidate solar panel designs were evaluated, both theoretically and experimentally, with respect to their thermal cycling survival capability, and in particular with respect to an accelerated simulation of thermal cycles representative of Viking '75 mission requirements. The experimental results were obtained on 'mini-panels' thermally cycled in a newly installed automated test facility herein described. The resulting damage was analyzed physically and theoretically, and on the basis of these analyses the panel design was suitably modified to significantly improve its ability to withstand the thermal environment. These successful modifications demonstrate the value of the complementary theoretical-experimental approach adopted, and discussed in detail in this paper.

  3. Accelerated cycle life performance for ovonic nickel-metal hydride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otzinger, Burton M.

    1991-01-01

    Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) rechargeable batteries have emerged as the leading candidate for commercial replacement of nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries. An important incentive is that the Ni-MH cell provides approximately twice the capacity of a Ni-Cd cell for a given size. A six-cell battery was committed to an accelerated cycle life test to determine the effect of separation type on performance. Results of the test may also show the Ni-MH battery to be a replacement candidate for the aerospace Ni-Cd battery.

  4. RPRD1B promotes tumor growth by accelerating the cell cycle in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Qiu, Haifeng; Hu, Weixu; Li, Shaoru; Yu, Jinjin

    2014-03-01

    RPRD1B, the regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing 1B gene, functions as a cell cycle manipulator and has been found overexpressed in a small panel of endometrial cancer types. In the present study, we investigated the roles of RPRD1B in endometrial cancer using various in vitro and in vivo experiments. According to our results, RPRD1B mRNA was significantly upregulated in endometrial cancer tissues (P=0.0012). RPRD1B overexpression was correlated with tumor stage (P=0.0004), histology type (P=0.0146) and depth of myometrial invasion (P=0.024). In vitro, RPRD1B promoted cellular proliferation (P=0.032 for MTT assay and P=0.018 for colony formation assay), and accelerated the cell cycle (P=0.007) by upregulating cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6, while knockdown of RPRD1B suppressed cellular proliferation (P=0.02 for MTT assay and P=0.031 for colony formation assay), and led to G1 phase arrest (P=0.025) through downregulating cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6. Consistently, in the nude mice model, RPRD1B overexpression significantly accelerated the tumor xenograft growth (P=0.0012), accompanied by elevated Ki-67 and cyclin D1. In addition, we demonstrated that downregulating RPRD1B could sensitize Ishikawa cells to Raloxifene (P=0.01). In summary, we demonstrated that RPRD1B was frequently overexpressed in human endometrial cancer. Both in vitro and in vivo, over-abundant RPRD1B could promote tumor growth and accelerate cellular cell cycle. In addition, knockdown of RPRD1B also increased cell sensitivity to Raloxifene, making RPRD1B a potent therapeutic target for endometrial cancer, particularly in patients with resistance to the selective ER modulators. PMID:24452636

  5. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage-induced cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-04-15

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β-dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP-regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  6. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage–induced cell senescence

    PubMed Central

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A.; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase–regulated nuclear–cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage–induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β–dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP–regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  7. Tectonic 1 accelerates gastric cancer cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinbao; Yu, Qiming; Zhang, Yingli; Ling, Zhiqiang; Yu, Pengfei

    2015-10-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is important in development and cancer. Hh signaling is constitutively active in gastric cancer. Recently, tectonic 1 (TCTN1) was identified as one regulator of the Hh pathway. In the present study, the biological role of TCTN1 was examined in gastric cancer via an RNA interference lentivirus system. The constructed lentivirus efficiently suppressed TCTN1 expression in three gastric cancer cell lines. The proliferation of gastric cancer cells was significantly inhibited in TCTN1 knockdown cells, as determined by 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assays. Furthermore, in order to determine the underlying mechanism, the cell cycle progression of MGC80‑3 cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Knockdown of TCTN1 led to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, which contributed to inhibition of growth. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that TCTN1 was essential in the growth of gastric cancer cells in vitro, suggesting TCTN1 as a potential target candidate for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26252641

  8. Chloride-dependent acceleration of cell cycle via modulation of Rb and cdc2 in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Yamane, Junko; Niisato, Naomi; Morihara, Toru; Kubo, Toshikazu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2007-10-05

    In the present study, we investigated if Cl{sup -} regulates the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells was diminished by lowering the extracellular Cl{sup -} concentration ([Cl{sup -}]{sub o}) in the culture medium. The lowered in [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} increased the periods of the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} and the G{sub 2}/M phases in cell cycle. We further studied the effects of [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} on the key enzymes, Rb and cdc2, playing key roles in checking points of the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} and the G{sub 2}/M phases in cell cycle. The lowered in [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} diminished the active forms of enzymes, Rb and cdc2. We further found that the action of lowered [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} on the cell proliferation, the cell cycle, Rb and cdc2 was abolished by the presence of 2 mM glutamine, but not by that of pyruvate as another Krebs cycle substrate. Taken together, these observations indicate here for the first time that Cl{sup -} modulates Rb and cdc2, enhancing the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells.

  9. Recombinant growth factor mixtures induce cell cycle progression and the upregulation of type I collagen in human skin fibroblasts, resulting in the acceleration of wound healing processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Ha; Cho, Jae-We; Kim, So Young; Kwon, Tae Rin; Choi, Sun Young; Choi, Yoo Mi; Lee, Jay; Yoon, Ho Sang; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-05-01

    Application of growth factor mixtures has been used for wound healing and anti-wrinkles agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant growth factor mixtures (RGFM) on the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, type I collagen, and wound healing processes of acute animal wound models. The results showed that RGFM induced increased rates of cell proliferation and cell migration of human skin fibroblasts (HSF). In addition, expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)4, and Cdk2 proteins was markedly increased with a growth factor mixtures treatment in fibroblasts. Expression of type I collagen was also increased in growth factor mixtures-treated HSF. Moreover, growth factor mixtures-induced the upregulation of type I collagen was associated with the activation of Smad2/3. In the animal model, RGFM-treated mice showed accelerated wound closure, with the closure rate increasing as early as on day 7, as well as re-epithelization and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration than phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated mice. In conclusion, the results indicated that RGFM has the potential to accelerate wound healing through the upregulation of type I collagen, which is partly mediated by activation of Smad2/3-dependent signaling pathway as well as cell cycle progression in HSF. The topical application of growth factor mixtures to acute and chronic skin wound may accelerate the epithelization process through these molecular mechanisms. PMID:24626875

  10. The Chlamydomonas Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Frederick R.; Umen, James G.

    2015-01-01

    The position of Chlamydomonas within the eukaryotic phylogeny makes it a unique model in at least two important ways: as a representative of the critically important, early-diverging lineage leading to plants, and as a microbe retaining important features of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that have been lost in the highly studied yeast lineages. Its cell biology has been studied for many decades, and it has well-developed experimental genetic tools, both classical (Mendelian) and molecular. Unlike land plants, it is a haploid with very few gene duplicates, making it ideal for loss-of-function genetic studies. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle has a striking temporal and functional separation between cell growth and rapid cell divisions, probably connected to the interplay between diurnal cycles that drive photosynthetic cell growth with the cell division cycle; it also exhibits a highly choreographed interaction between the cell cycle and its centriole/basal body/flagellar cycle. Here we review the current status of studies of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. We begin with an overview of cell cycle control in the well-studied yeast and animal systems, which has yielded a canonical, well-supported model. We discuss briefly what is known about similarities and differences in plant cell cycle control compared to this model. We next review the cytology and cell biology of the multiple fission cell cycle of Chlamydomonas. Lastly we review recent genetic approaches and insights into Chlamydomonas cell cycle regulation that have been enabled by a new generation of genomics-based tools. PMID:25690512

  11. Alterations in mitosis and cell cycle progression caused by a mutant lamin A known to accelerate human aging.

    PubMed

    Dechat, Thomas; Shimi, Takeshi; Adam, Stephen A; Rusinol, Antonio E; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Sinensky, Michael S; Goldman, Robert D

    2007-03-20

    Mutations in the gene encoding nuclear lamin A (LA) cause the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome. The most common of these mutations results in the expression of a mutant LA, with a 50-aa deletion within its C terminus. In this study, we demonstrate that this deletion leads to a stable farnesylation and carboxymethylation of the mutant LA (LADelta50/progerin). These modifications cause an abnormal association of LADelta50/progerin with membranes during mitosis, which delays the onset and progression of cytokinesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the targeting of nuclear envelope/lamina components into daughter cell nuclei in early G(1) is impaired in cells expressing LADelta50/progerin. The mutant LA also appears to be responsible for defects in the retinoblastoma protein-mediated transition into S-phase, most likely by inhibiting the hyperphosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein by cyclin D1/cdk4. These results provide insights into the mechanisms responsible for premature aging and also shed light on the role of lamins in the normal process of human aging. PMID:17360326

  12. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hawkins, D. C.; Prince, J. L.; Walker, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an accelerated test schedule for terrestrial solar cells is described. This schedule, based on anticipated failure modes deduced from a consideration of IC failure mechanisms, involves bias-temperature testing, humidity testing (including both 85-85 and pressure cooker stress), and thermal-cycle thermal-shock testing. Results are described for 12 different unencapsulated cell types. Both gradual electrical degradation and sudden catastrophic mechanical change were observed. These effects can be used to discriminate between cell types and technologies relative to their reliability attributes. Consideration is given to identifying laboratory failure modes which might lead to severe degradation in the field through second quadrant operation. Test results indicate that the ability of most cell types to withstand accelerated stress testing depends more on the manufacturer's design, processing, and worksmanship than on the particular metallization system. Preliminary tests comparing accelerated test results on encapsulated and unencapsulated cells are described.

  13. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  14. Mir Cooperative Solar Array Project Accelerated Life Thermal Cycling Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint U.S./Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA will be used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station. The MCSA was brought to Mir by space shuttle Atlantis in November 1995. This report describes an accelerated thermal life cycle test which was performed on two samples of the MCSA. In eight months time, two MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles. There was no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early and removed from consideration. The nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell is briefly discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the U.S. solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit). This was considered a successful development test.

  15. Generating clock signals for a cycle accurate, cycle reproducible FPGA based hardware accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameth W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for generating clock signals for a cycle accurate FPGA based hardware accelerator used to simulate operations of a device-under-test (DUT). In one embodiment, the DUT includes multiple device clocks generating multiple device clock signals at multiple frequencies and at a defined frequency ratio; and the FPG hardware accelerator includes multiple accelerator clocks generating multiple accelerator clock signals to operate the FPGA hardware accelerator to simulate the operations of the DUT. In one embodiment, operations of the DUT are mapped to the FPGA hardware accelerator, and the accelerator clock signals are generated at multiple frequencies and at the defined frequency ratio of the frequencies of the multiple device clocks, to maintain cycle accuracy between the DUT and the FPGA hardware accelerator. In an embodiment, the FPGA hardware accelerator may be used to control the frequencies of the multiple device clocks.

  16. Cycle life test of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1980-04-01

    The results of the life cycling program on rechargeable calls are reported. Information on required data, the use of which the data will be put, application details, including orbital description, charge control methods, load rquirements, etc., are given. Cycle tests were performed on 660 sealed, nickel cadmium cells. The cells consisted of seven sample classifications ranging form 3.0 to 20 amp. hours. Nickel cadmium, silver cadmium, and silver zinc sealed cells, excluding synchronous orbit and accelerated test packs were added. The capacities of the nickel cadmium cells, the silver cadmium and the silver zinc cells differed in range of amp hrs. The cells were cylced under different load, charge control, and temperature conditions. All cell packs are recharged by use of a pack voltage limit. All charging is constant current until the voltage limit is reached.

  17. Cycle life test of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the life cycling program on rechargeable calls are reported. Information on required data, the use of which the data will be put, application details, including orbital description, charge control methods, load rquirements, etc., are given. Cycle tests were performed on 660 sealed, nickel cadmium cells. The cells consisted of seven sample classifications ranging form 3.0 to 20 amp. hours. Nickel cadmium, silver cadmium, and silver zinc sealed cells, excluding synchronous orbit and accelerated test packs were added. The capacities of the nickel cadmium cells, the silver cadmium and the silver zinc cells differed in range of amp hrs. The cells were cylced under different load, charge control, and temperature conditions. All cell packs are recharged by use of a pack voltage limit. All charging is constant current until the voltage limit is reached.

  18. The Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2009-01-01

    Plant cells have evolved a complex circuitry to regulate cell division. In many aspects, the plant cell cycle follows a basic strategy similar to other eukaryotes. However, several key issues are unique to plant cells. In this chapter, both the conserved and unique cellular and molecular properties of the plant cell cycle are reviewed. In addition to division of individual cells, the specific characteristic of plant organogenesis and development make that cell proliferation control is of primary importance during development. Therefore, special attention should be given to consider plant cell division control in a developmental context. Proper organogenesis depends on the formation of different cell types. In plants, many of the processes leading to cell differentiation rely on the occurrence of a different cycle, termed the endoreplication cycle, whereby cells undergo repeated full genome duplication events in the absence of mitosis and increase their ploidy. Recent findings are focusing on the relevance of changes in chromatin organization for a correct cell cycle progression and, conversely, in the relevance of a correct functioning of chromatin remodelling complexes to prevent alterations in both the cell cycle and the endocycle. PMID:22303246

  19. Space Launch System Accelerated Booster Development Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arockiam, Nicole; Whittecar, William; Edwards, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    , affordability is defined as lifecycle cost, which includes design, development, test, and engineering (DDT&E), production and operational costs (P&O). For this study, the system objectives include reducing DDT&E schedule by a factor of three, showing 99.9% reliability, flying up to four times per year, serving both crew and cargo missions, and evolving to a lift capability of 130 metric tons.3 After identifying gaps in the current system s capabilities, this study seeks to identify non-traditional and innovative technologies and processes that may improve performance in these areas and assess their impacts on booster system development. The DDT&E phase may be improved by incorporating incremental development testing and integrated demonstrations to mitigate risk. To further reduce DDT&E, this study will also consider how aspects of the booster system may have commonality with other users, such as the Department of Defense, commercial applications, or international partners; by sharing some of the risk and investment, the overall development cost may be reduced. Consideration is not limited to solid and liquid rocket boosters. A set of functional performance characteristics, such as engine thrust, specific impulse (Isp), mixture ratio, and throttle range are identified and their impacts on the system are evaluated. This study also identifies how such characteristics affect overall life cycle cost, including DDT&E and fixed and variable P&O.

  20. Cell cycle control in Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Collier, Justine

    2016-04-01

    Alphaproteobacteria include many medically and environmentally important organisms. Despite the diversity of their niches and lifestyles, from free-living to host-associated, they usually rely on very similar mechanisms to control their cell cycles. Studies on Caulobacter crescentus still lay the foundation for understanding the molecular details of pathways regulating DNA replication and cell division and coordinating these two processes with other events of the cell cycle. This review highlights recent discoveries on the regulation and the mode of action of conserved global regulators and small molecules like c-di-GMP and (p)ppGpp, which play key roles in cell cycle control. It also describes several newly identified mechanisms that modulate cell cycle progression in response to stresses or environmental conditions. PMID:26871482

  1. The cell cycle and pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher; Philpott, Anna

    2013-04-15

    PSCs (pluripotent stem cells) possess two key properties that have made them the focus of global research efforts in regenerative medicine: they have unlimited expansion potential under conditions which favour their preservation as PSCs and they have the ability to generate all somatic cell types upon differentiation (pluripotency). Conditions have been defined in vitro in which pluripotency is maintained, or else differentiation is favoured and is directed towards specific somatic cell types. However, an unanswered question is whether or not the core cell cycle machinery directly regulates the pluripotency and differentiation properties of PSCs. If so, then manipulation of the cell cycle may represent an additional tool by which in vitro maintenance or differentiation of PSCs may be controlled in regenerative medicine. The present review aims to summarize our current understanding of links between the core cell cycle machinery and the maintenance of pluripotency in ESCs (embryonic stem cells) and iPSCs (induced PSCs). PMID:23535166

  2. Metabolic cycle, cell cycle, and the finishing kick to Start

    PubMed Central

    Futcher, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Slowly growing budding yeast store carbohydrate, then liquidate it in late G1 phase of the cell cycle, superimposing a metabolic cycle on the cell cycle. This metabolic cycle may separate biochemically incompatible processes. Alternatively it may provide a burst of energy and material for commitment to the cell cycle. Stored carbohydrate could explain the size requirement for cells passing the Start point. PMID:16677426

  3. Cell Cycle Regulation by Checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J.; O’Connell, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that monitor the order, integrity, and fidelity of the major events of the cell cycle. These include growth to the appropriate cell size, the replication and integrity of the chromosomes, and their accurate segregation at mitosis. Many of these mechanisms are ancient in origin and highly conserved, and hence have been heavily informed by studies in simple organisms such as the yeasts. Others have evolved in higher organisms, and control alternative cell fates with significant impact on tumor suppression. Here, we consider these different checkpoint pathways and the consequences of their dysfunction on cell fate. PMID:24906307

  4. Myc and cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Bretones, Gabriel; Delgado, M Dolores; León, Javier

    2015-05-01

    Soon after the discovery of the Myc gene (c-Myc), it became clear that Myc expression levels tightly correlate to cell proliferation. The entry in cell cycle of quiescent cells upon Myc enforced expression has been described in many models. Also, the downregulation or inactivation of Myc results in the impairment of cell cycle progression. Given the frequent deregulation of Myc oncogene in human cancer it is important to dissect out the mechanisms underlying the role of Myc on cell cycle control. Several parallel mechanisms account for Myc-mediated stimulation of the cell cycle. First, most of the critical positive cell cycle regulators are encoded by genes induced by Myc. These Myc target genes include Cdks, cyclins and E2F transcription factors. Apart from its direct effects on the transcription, Myc is able to hyperactivate cyclin/Cdk complexes through the induction of Cdk activating kinase (CAK) and Cdc25 phosphatases. Moreover, Myc antagonizes the activity of cell cycle inhibitors as p21 and p27 through different mechanisms. Thus, Myc is able to block p21 transcription or to induce Skp2, a protein involved in p27 degradation. Finally, Myc induces DNA replication by binding to replication origins and by upregulating genes encoding proteins required for replication initiation. Myc also regulates genes involved in the mitotic control. A promising approach to treat tumors with deregulated Myc is the synthetic lethality based on the inhibition of Cdks. Thus, the knowledge of the Myc-dependent cell cycle regulatory mechanisms will help to discover new therapeutic approaches directed against malignancies with deregulated Myc. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Myc proteins in cell biology and pathology. PMID:24704206

  5. The role of accelerators in the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi.

    1990-01-01

    The use of neutrons produced by the medium energy proton accelerator (1 GeV--3 GeV) has considerable potential in reconstructing the nuclear fuel cycle. About 1.5 {approximately} 2.5 ton of fissile material can be produced annually by injecting a 450 MW proton beam directly into fertile materials. A source of neutrons, produced by a proton beam, to supply subcritical reactors could alleviate many of the safety problems associated with critical assemblies, such as positive reactivity coefficients due to coolant voiding. The transient power of the target can be swiftly controlled by controlling the power of the proton beam. Also, the use of a proton beam would allow more flexibility in the choice of fuel and structural materials which otherwise might reduce the reactivity of reactors. This paper discusses the rate of accelerators in the transmutation of radioactive wastes of the nuclear fuel cycles. 34 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Autoradiography and the Cell Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. Weldon

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the stages of a cell biology "pulse-chase" experiment in which the students apply autoradiography techniques to learn about the concept of the cell cycle. Includes (1) seed germination and plant growth; (2) radioactive labeling and fixation of root tips; (3) feulgen staining of root tips; (4) preparation of autoradiograms; and (5)…

  7. In-Situ Monitoring of Particle Growth at PEMFC Cathode under Accelerated Cycling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, Erin L.; Setzler, Brian P.; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Fuller, Thomas F.

    2012-10-25

    An in-situ method to measure changes in catalyst particle size at the cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is demonstrated. Synchrotron X-rays, 58 keV, were used to measure the pair distribution function on an operating fuel cell and observe the growth of catalyst particles under accelerated degradation conditions. The stability of Pt/C and PtCo/C with different initial particle sizes was monitored over 3000 potential cycles. The increase in particle size was fit to a linear trend as a function of cycles. The most stable electrocatalyst was found to be the alloyed PtCo with the larger initial particle size.

  8. Cell Cycle Regulation and Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; McArthur, Grant

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulation of cell cycle control is a hallmark of melanomagenesis. Agents targeting the G1-S and G2-M checkpoints, as well as direct anti-mitotic agents, have all shown promising preclinical activity in melanoma. However, in vivo, standalone single agents targeting cell cycle regulation have only demonstrated modest efficacy in unselected patients. The advent of specific CDK 4/6 inhibitors targeting the G1-S transition, with an improved therapeutic index, is a significant step forward. Potential synergy exists with the combination of CDK4/6 inhibitors with existing therapies targeting the MAPK pathway, particularly in subsets of metastatic melanomas such as NRAS and BRAF mutants. This reviews summaries of the latest developments in both preclinical and clinical data with cell cycle-targeted therapies in melanoma. PMID:27106898

  9. Temperature and the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Francis, D; Barlow, P W

    1988-01-01

    During the period between successive divisions, a cell traverses three stages of interphase: G1 (pre-synthetic interphase), S-phase (DNA synthetic interphase) and G2 (post-synthetic interphase). The time taken for all cells in a meristem to divide (the cell doubling time (cdt] decreases in response to an increase in temperature. For example, the cdt in root meristems of Zea mays decreases 21-fold as the temperature is increased from 3 to 25 degrees C. Whether all phases of the cell cycle alter proportionately with temperature has been ascertained by comparing data from the root meristem of five species: Pisum sativum, Helianthus annuus, Tradescantia paludosa, Allium cepa and Triticum aestivum. In three of the five species there is a disproportionate lengthening of the G1 phase at low temperatures. We suggest that arrest in G1 with the associated 2C amount of DNA, confers maximal protection on the genome of a somatic cell to the stress of low temperature. DNA replication has been studied at different temperatures for Helianthus annuus, Secale cereal and Oryza sativa. The rate of DNA replication, per single replication fork, increases when the temperature is raised, while the distance between initiation points (replicon size) remains constant. The temperature at which the cell cycle has a minimum duration is close to 30 degrees C in many species, and it seems that this optimum temperature is always near the upper temperature limit of the cell cycle. The rate of cell division determines the rates of organ and cell growth. Thus, temperature has a major effect on the way in which meristematic cells are deployed in organogenesis. The rate of organogenesis, in turn, determines the response of the plant to the growing season. We predict that species growing in sub-arctic conditions comprise cells with low DNA contents and hence have the potentialities for rapid cell cycles so that maximum advantage can be taken of a short growing season. Data from Triticum aestivum show

  10. KOH concentration effect on cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. III - Cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A cycle life test of Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered type nickel electrode was carried out at 23 C using a 45 min accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. One of three cells containing 26 percent KOH has achieved over 28,000 cycles, and the other two 19,000 cycles, without a sign of failure. Two other cells containing 31 percent KOH electrolyte, which is the concentration presently used in aerospace cells, failed after 2,979 and 3,620 cycles. This result indicates that the cycle life of the present type of Ni/H2 cells may be extended by a factor of 5 to 10 simply by lowering the KOH concentration. Long cycle life of a Ni/H2 battery at high depth-of-discharge operation is desired, particularly for an LEO spacecraft application. Typically, battery life of about 30,000 cycles is required for a five year mission in an LEO. Such a cycle life with presently available cells can be assured only at a very low depth-of-discharge operation. Results of testing already show that the cycle life of an Ni/H2 cell is tremendously improved by simply using an electrolyte of low KOH concentration.

  11. Cell heterogeneity during the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Darzynkiewicz, Z.; Crissman, H.; Traganos, F.; Steinkamp, J.

    1982-12-01

    Using flow cytometry, populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells, asynchronous and synchronized in the cycle, were measured with respect to cellular RNA- and protein-content, as well as cell light scatter properties. Heterogeneities of cell populations were expressed as coefficients of variation (c.v.) in percent of the respective mean values. Populations of cells immediately after mitosis have about 15% higher c.v. than mitotic cell populations, regardless of whether RNA, proteins, or light scatter are measured. These data indicate that cytoplasmic constituents are unequally distributed into the daughter cells during cytokinesis and that unequal cytokinesis generates intercellular metabolic variability during the cycle. An additional increase in heterogeneity, although of smaller degree, occurs during G/sub 2/ phase. Populations of S-phase cells are the most uniform, having 20-30% lower c.v. than the postmitotic cells. Cell progression through S does not involve any significant increase in intercellular variability with respect to RNA or protein content. In unperturbed exponentially growing cultures a critical RNA content is required for G/sub 1/ cells prior to their entrance into S. The cell residence times in the equalization compartments are exponentially distributed, which may reflect the randomness generated by the uneven division of metabolic constituents to daughter cells during cytokinesis. The cell heterogeneities were presently estimated at two metabolic levels, transcription (RNA content) and translation (proteins). The most uniform were populations stained for RNA and the highest variability was observed after staining of proteins. This suggests that the regulatory mechanisms equalizing cells in the cell cycle may operate primarily at the level of DNA transcription.

  12. Functional interplay between the cell cycle and cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chiang; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Phillip, Jude M; Khatau, Shyam B; Choi, Jae Min; Dallas, Matthew R; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Sun, Sean X; Lee, Jerry S H; Hodzic, Didier; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle distribution of adherent cells is typically assessed using flow cytometry, which precludes the measurements of many cell properties and their cycle phase in the same environment. Here we develop and validate a microscopy system to quantitatively analyze the cell-cycle phase of thousands of adherent cells and their associated cell properties simultaneously. This assay demonstrates that population-averaged cell phenotypes can be written as a linear combination of cell-cycle fractions and phase-dependent phenotypes. By perturbing the cell cycle through inhibition of cell-cycle regulators or changing nuclear morphology by depletion of structural proteins, our results reveal that cell cycle regulators and structural proteins can significantly interfere with each other's prima facie functions. This study introduces a high-throughput method to simultaneously measure the cell cycle and phenotypes at single-cell resolution, which reveals a complex functional interplay between the cell cycle and cell phenotypes. PMID:23319145

  13. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Hernandez, Michael

    2013-04-19

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  14. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, J. L.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A program to investigate the reliability characteristics of unencapsulated low-cost terrestrial solar cells using accelerated stress testing is described. Reliability (or parametric degradation) factors appropriate to the cell technologies and use conditions were studied and a series of accelerated stress tests was synthesized. An electrical measurement procedure and a data analysis and management system was derived, and stress test fixturing and material flow procedures were set up after consideration was given to the number of cells to be stress tested and measured and the nature of the information to be obtained from the process. Selected results and conclusions are presented.

  15. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  16. Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Kundu, M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Rajeev, R.; Ray, Krishanu; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications. PMID:25102948

  17. Analysis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M; Grallert, Agnes; Simanis, Viesturs

    2016-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells are rod shaped, and they grow by tip elongation. Growth ceases during mitosis and cell division; therefore, the length of a septated cell is a direct measure of the timing of mitotic commitment, and the length of a wild-type cell is an indicator of its position in the cell cycle. A large number of documented stage-specific changes can be used as landmarks to characterize cell cycle progression under specific experimental conditions. Conditional mutations can permanently or transiently block the cell cycle at almost any stage. Large, synchronously dividing cell populations, essential for the biochemical analysis of cell cycle events, can be generated by induction synchrony (arrest-release of a cell cycle mutant) or selection synchrony (centrifugal elutriation or lactose-gradient centrifugation). Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle studies routinely combine particular markers, mutants, and synchronization procedures to manipulate the cycle. We describe these techniques and list key landmarks in the fission yeast mitotic cell division cycle. PMID:27587785

  18. Development of an accelerated reliability test schedule for terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Prince, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    An accelerated test schedule using a minimum amount of tests and a minimum number of cells has been developed on the basis of stress test results obtained from more than 1500 cells of seven different cell types. The proposed tests, which include bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, power cycle, thermal cycle, and thermal shock tests, use as little as 10 and up to 25 cells, depending on the test type.

  19. Assaying Cell Cycle Status Using Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Ho; Sederstrom, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    In this unit, two protocols are described for analyzing cell cycle status using flow cytometry. The first is based on the simultaneous analysis of proliferation-specific marker (Ki-67) and cellular DNA content, which discriminate resting/quiescent cell populations (G0 cell) and quantify cell cycle distribution (G1, S, or G2/M), respectively. The second is based on differential staining of DNA and RNA through co-staining of Hoechst 33342 and Pyronin Y, which is also useful to identify G0 cells from G1 cells. Along with these methods for analyzing cell cycle status, two additional methods for cell proliferation assays with recent updates of newly developed fluorophores, which allow multiplex analysis of cell cycle status, cell proliferation, and a gene of interest using flow cytometry, are outlined. PMID:26131851

  20. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P < 0.05) compared with unliganded conditions. The alterations in cell cycle duration were observed in the S and G2/M phases, whereas the G1 phase was indistinguishable under liganded and unliganded conditions. In addition, ERα knockdown in MCF-7 cells accelerated mitotic exit, whereas transfection of ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with exogenous ERα significantly shortened the S and G2/M phases (by 9.1 hours, P < 0.05) compared with parental cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with antiestrogens revealed that tamoxifen yields a slower cell cycle progression through the S and G2/M phases than fulvestrant does, presumably because of the destabilizing effect of fulvestrant on ERα protein. Together, these results show that ERα modulates breast cancer cell proliferation by regulating events during the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen. PMID:27049344

  1. Fission Yeast Cell Cycle Synchronization Methods.

    PubMed

    Tormos-Pérez, Marta; Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; Moreno, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast cells can be synchronized by cell cycle arrest and release or by size selection. Cell cycle arrest synchronization is based on the block and release of temperature-sensitive cell cycle mutants or treatment with drugs. The most widely used approaches are cdc10-129 for G1; hydroxyurea (HU) for early S-phase; cdc25-22 for G2, and nda3-KM311 for mitosis. Cells can also be synchronized by size selection using centrifugal elutriation or a lactose gradient. Here we describe the methods most commonly used to synchronize fission yeast cells. PMID:26519320

  2. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  3. Cell cycle: proteomics gives it a spin.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Vincent

    2005-08-01

    The eukaryotic cell division cycle has been studied at the molecular level for over 30 years, most fruitfully in model organisms. In the past 5 years, developments in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have been applied to the study of protein interactions and post-translational modifications involving key cell cycle regulators such as cyclin-dependent kinases and the anaphase-promoting complex, as well as effectors such as centrosomes, the kinetochore and DNA replication forks. In addition, innovations in chemical biology, functional proteomics and bioinformatics have been employed to study the cell cycle at the proteome level. This review surveys the contributions of proteomics to cell cycle research. The near future should see the application of more quantitative proteomic approaches to probe the dynamic aspects of the molecular system that underlie the cell cycle in model organisms and in human cells. PMID:16097893

  4. Cell cycle control and seed development

    PubMed Central

    Dante, Ricardo A.; Larkins, Brian A.; Sabelli, Paolo A.

    2014-01-01

    Seed development is a complex process that requires coordinated integration of many genetic, metabolic, and physiological pathways and environmental cues. Different cell cycle types, such as asymmetric cell division, acytokinetic mitosis, mitotic cell division, and endoreduplication, frequently occur in sequential yet overlapping manner during the development of the embryo and the endosperm, seed structures that are both products of double fertilization. Asymmetric cell divisions in the embryo generate polarized daughter cells with different cell fates. While nuclear and cell division cycles play a key role in determining final seed cell numbers, endoreduplication is often associated with processes such as cell enlargement and accumulation of storage metabolites that underlie cell differentiation and growth of the different seed compartments. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of different cell cycle mechanisms operating during seed development and their impact on the growth, development, and function of seed tissues. Particularly, the roles of core cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent-kinases and their inhibitors, the Retinoblastoma-Related/E2F pathway and the proteasome-ubiquitin system, are discussed in the contexts of different cell cycle types that characterize seed development. The contributions of nuclear and cellular proliferative cycles and endoreduplication to cereal endosperm development are also discussed. PMID:25295050

  5. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  6. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  7. High-Cycle-Life Lithium Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Carter, B.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R.

    1985-01-01

    Lithium-anode electrochemical cell offers increased number of charge/ discharge cycles. Cell uses components selected for compatibility with electrolyte solvent: These materials are wettable and chemically stable. Low vapor pressure and high electrochemical stability of solvent improve cell packaging, handling, and safety. Cell operates at modest temperatures - less than 100 degrees C - and is well suited to automotive, communications, and other applications.

  8. Nucleosome architecture throughout the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Özgen; Flores, Oscar; Aldea, Martí; Soler-López, Montserrat; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes provide additional regulatory mechanisms to transcription and DNA replication by mediating the access of proteins to DNA. During the cell cycle chromatin undergoes several conformational changes, however the functional significance of these changes to cellular processes are largely unexplored. Here, we present the first comprehensive genome-wide study of nucleosome plasticity at single base-pair resolution along the cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We determined nucleosome organization with a specific focus on two regulatory regions: transcription start sites (TSSs) and replication origins (ORIs). During the cell cycle, nucleosomes around TSSs display rearrangements in a cyclic manner. In contrast to gap (G1 and G2) phases, nucleosomes have a fuzzier organization during S and M phases, Moreover, the choreography of nucleosome rearrangements correlate with changes in gene expression during the cell cycle, indicating a strong association between nucleosomes and cell cycle-dependent gene functionality. On the other hand, nucleosomes are more dynamic around ORIs along the cell cycle, albeit with tighter regulation in early firing origins, implying the functional role of nucleosomes on replication origins. Our study provides a dynamic picture of nucleosome organization throughout the cell cycle and highlights the subsequent impact on transcription and replication activity. PMID:26818620

  9. N2-fixing red alder indirectly accelerates ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Matkins, Joselin J.; Hibbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic N2-fixing tree species can accelerate ecosystem N dynamics through decomposition via direct pathways by producing readily decomposed leaf litter and increasing N supply to decomposers, as well as via indirect pathways by increasing tissue and detrital N in non-fixing vegetation. To evaluate the relative importance of these pathways, we compared three-year decomposition and N dynamics of N2-fixing red alder leaf litter (2.34 %N) to both low-N (0.68 %N) and high-N (1.21 %N) litter of non-fixing Douglas-fir, and decomposed each litter source in four forests dominated by either red alder or Douglas-fir. We also used experimental N fertilization of decomposition plots to assess elevated N availability as a potential mechanism of N2-fixer effects on litter mass loss and N dynamics. Direct effects of N2-fixing red alder on decomposition occurred primarily as faster N release from red alder than Douglas-fir litter, but direct increases in N supply to decomposers via fertilization did not stimulate decomposition of any litter. Fixed N indirectly influenced detrital dynamics by increasing Douglas-fir tissue and litter N concentrations, which accelerated litter N release without accelerating mass loss. By increasing soil N, tissue N, and the rate of N release from litter of non-fixers, we conclude that N2-fixing vegetation can indirectly foster plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to the persistence of elevated N availability in terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. Accelerated Thermal Cycling and Failure Mechanisms for BGA and CSP Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the accelerated thermal cycling test methods that are currently used by industry to characterize the interconnect reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ball grid array (BGA) and chip scale package (CSP) assemblies. Acceleration induced failure mechanisms varied from conventional surface mount (SM) failures for CSPs. Examples of unrealistic life projections for other CSPs are also presented. The cumulative cycles to failure for ceramic BGA assemblies performed under different conditions, including plots of their two Weibull parameters, are presented. The results are for cycles in the range of -30 C to 100 C, -55 C to 100 C, and -55 C to 125 C. Failure mechanisms as well as cycles to failure for thermal shock and thermal cycling conditions in the range of -55 C to 125 C were compared. Projection to other temperature cycling ranges using a modified Coffin-Manson relationship is also presented.

  11. Fuel cell and advanced turbine power cycle

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.J.

    1995-10-19

    Solar Turbines, Incorporated (Solar) has a vested interest in the integration of gas turbines and high temperature fuel cells and in particular, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Solar has identified a parallel path approach to the technology developments needed for future products. The primary approach is to move away from the simple cycle industrial machines of the past and develop as a first step more efficient recuperated engines. This move was prompted by the recognition that the simple cycle machines were rapidly approaching their efficiency limits. Improving the efficiency of simple cycle machines is and will become increasingly more costly. Each efficiency increment will be progressively more costly than the previous step.

  12. Retinal progenitor cells, differentiation, and barriers to cell cycle reentry.

    PubMed

    Davis, Denise M; Dyer, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the retina occurs via the coordination of proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation of retinal progenitor cells. Until recently, it was widely assumed that once a retinal progenitor cell produced a postmitotic neuron, there was no possibility for cell-cycle re-entry. However, recent studies have shown that mature differentiated horizontal neurons with reduced Rb pathway function can re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate while maintaining their differentiated features. This chapter will explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms that help to keep differentiated retinal neurons and glia postmitotic. We propose that there are cell-type specific barriers to cell-cycle re-entry by differentiated neurons and these may include apoptosis, chromatin/epigenetics mechanisms, cellular morphology and/or metabolic demands that are distinct across cell populations. Our data suggest that differentiated neurons span a continuum of cellular properties related to their ability to re-enter the cell cycle and undergo cytokinesis while maintaining their differentiated features. A deeper understanding of these processes may allow us to begin to explain the cell type specificity of neuronal cell death and tumor susceptibility. For example, neurons that have more barriers to cell-cycle re-entry may be less likely to form tumors but more likely to undergo degeneration. Conversely, neurons that have fewer barriers to cell-cycle re-entry may be more likely to form tumors but less likely to undergo degeneration. PMID:20959166

  13. Cell Cycle Synchronization in Xenopus Egg Extracts.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Peter J; Neusiedler, Julia; Creavin, Kevin; Chadha, Gaganmeet Singh; Blow, J Julian

    2016-01-01

    Many important discoveries in cell cycle research have been made using cell-free extracts prepared from the eggs of the South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. These extracts efficiently support the key nuclear functions of the eukaryotic cell cycle in vitro under apparently the same controls that exist in vivo. The Xenopus cell-free system is therefore uniquely suited to the study of the mechanisms, dynamics and integration of cell cycle regulated processes at a biochemical level. Here, we describe methods currently in use in our laboratory for the preparation of Xenopus egg extracts and demembranated sperm nuclei. We detail how these extracts can be used to study the key transitions of the eukaryotic cell cycle and describe conditions under which these transitions can be manipulated by addition of drugs that either retard or advance passage. In addition, we describe in detail essential techniques that provide a practical starting point for investigating the function of proteins involved in the operation of the eukaryotic cell cycle. PMID:26254920

  14. Plasma cell adaptation to enhance particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Ragheb, M. S.

    2008-06-15

    A plasma study is performed in order to construct a cell for plasma acceleration purpose. As well, a multicell design is introduced for the injection of beam driver application. The suggested idea is experimentally demonstrated for two plasma cell configuration. The preformed plasma is obtained by a symmetrically driven capacitive audio frequency discharge. It is featured by its moderate pressure of 0.1-0.2 Torr, low consumption power of 130 W maximum, low discharge voltage and frequency up to 950 V and 20 kHz, respectively, and high plasma density from 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. The electron temperature obtained by Langmuir double probe varies from 1 up to 16 eV. It is observed that the increases of the discharge voltage and frequency enlarge the plasma parameters to their maximum values. The plasma cell filled with different gases demonstrates that the Ar and He gases manifest the highest ionization efficiency exceeding 100% at 950 V and 20 kHz. The formed plasma is cold; its density is uniform and stable along the positive column for long competitive lifetime. Showing that it follows the conditions to enhance particle acceleration and in conjunction with its periphery devices form a plasma cell that could be extended to serve this purpose. Demonstrating that an injected electron beam into the extended preformed plasma could follow, to long distance, a continuous trajectory of uniform density. Such plasma generated by H{sub 2} or Ar gases is suggested to be used, respectively, for low-density or higher density beam driver.

  15. Phosphorus constrains accelerated nitrogen cycling in limed acidic forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, J. L.; Shaw, A. N.; Kluber, L. A.; Burke, D. J.; Carrino-Kyker, S. R.; Smemo, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic deposition can increase phosphorus (P) limitation by abiotic and biotic means. Soil acidification can remove P from available pools and nitrogen (N) deposition can increase the demand for P. We reason that chronic acidic deposition is promoting P limitation in acidic hardwood forests and thereby altering N cycling. The objectives of this study were to investigate the interactive influence of P availability and soil pH on N and P cycling and availability to determine if the response varies between two physiographic regions experiencing similar chronic acidic deposition. We addressed these objectives by experimentally manipulating soil pH, P, or both in strongly acidic glaciated and unglaciated hardwood forests in eastern Ohio, USA. Our results suggest complex interactions between P, soil pH, and the N cycle. Glaciated soils were found to be more N-saturated with nitrification rates 18 times greater than in unglaciated soils. Elevating pH, with or without added P, doubled nitrification rates in glaciated soils. For unglaciated soils, raising pH increased nitrification 10-fold, but increased nitrification only 5-fold in combination with P. This result suggests raising soil pH lowered the demand of soil N, or directly stimulated nitrifying activity, and that increasing P availability could limit N availability. To various degrees, readily available P was geochemically or biologically immobilized in all treatments, suggesting chronic P deficiency in these ecosystems. Phosphorus immobilization decreased as soil pH was elevated, but elevated P either had no effect (glaciated) or doubled P immobilization rates (unglaciated). These results suggest that raising soil pH reduces microbial P limitation for phosphate, whereas adding P appears to make phosphate scarcer. We suggest that P plays an important role in N transformations and cycling, but appears more important in unglaciated soils than in glaciated soils. Chronic soil acidification may have a greater

  16. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Tsakraklides, Vasiliki; Brevnova, Elena; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Shaw, A. Joe

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications. PMID:26192309

  17. Cell Cycle Regulation in the Developing Lens

    PubMed Central

    Griep, Anne E.

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of cell proliferation is a critical aspect of the development of multicellular organisms. The ocular lens is an excellent model system in which to unravel the mechanisms controlling cell proliferation during development. In recent years, several cell cycle regulators have been shown to be essential for maintaining normal patterns of lens cell proliferation. Additionally, many growth factor signaling pathways and cell adhesion factors have been shown to have the capacity to regulate lens cell proliferation. Given this complexity, understanding the cross talk between these many signaling pathways and how they are coordinated are important directions for the future. PMID:17218126

  18. Flavonoids: from cell cycle regulation to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Jeong, Byeong Ryong; Hawes, Martha C

    2005-03-01

    Flavonoids have been proposed to play diverse roles in plant growth and development, including defense, symbiosis, pollen development and male fertility, polar auxin transport, and protection against ultraviolet radiation. Recently, a new role in cell cycle regulation has emerged. Genetic alteration of glucuronide metabolism by altered expression of a Pisum sativum UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (PsUGT1) results in an altered cell cycle in pea, alfalfa, and Arabidopsis. In alfalfa, altered expression of PsUGT1 results in accumulation of a flavonoid-like compound that suppresses growth of cultured cells. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that PsUGT1 functions by controlling cellular levels of a factor controlling cell cycle (FCC). PMID:15834800

  19. Cell cycle-specific effects of lovastatin.

    PubMed Central

    Jakóbisiak, M; Bruno, S; Skierski, J S; Darzynkiewicz, Z

    1991-01-01

    Lovastatin (LOV), the drug recently introduced to treat hypercholesteremia, inhibits the synthesis of mevalonic acid. The effects of LOV on the cell cycle progression of the human bladder carcinoma T24 cell line expressing activated p21ras were investigated. At a concentration of 2-10 microM, LOV arrested cells in G1 and also prolonged--or arrested a minor fraction of cells in--the G2 phase of the cell cycle; at a concentration of 50 microM, LOV was cytotoxic. The cytostatic effects were reversed by addition of exogenous mevalonate. Cells arrested in the cycle by LOV were viable for up to 72 hr and did not show any changes in RNA or protein content or chromatin condensation, which would be typical of either unbalanced growth or deep quiescence. The expression of the proliferation-associated nuclear proteins Ki-67 and p105 in these cells was reduced by up to 72% and 74%, respectively, compared with exponentially growing control cells. After removal of LOV, the cells resumed progression through the cycle; they entered S phase asynchronously after a lag of approximately 6 hr. Because mevalonate is essential for the posttranslational modification (isoprenylation) of p21ras, which in turn allows this protein to become attached to the cell membrane, the data suggest that the LOV-induced G1 arrest may be a consequence of the loss of the signal transduction capacity of p21ras. Indeed, while exposure of cells to LOV had no effect on the cellular content of p21ras (detected immunocytochemically), it altered the intracellular location of this protein, causing its dissociation from the cell membrane and translocation toward the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, it is also possible that inhibition of isoprenylation of proteins other than p21ras (e.g., nuclear lamins) by LOV may be responsible for the observed suppression of growth of T24 cells. Images PMID:1673788

  20. Gold nanoparticle sensitize radiotherapy of prostate cancer cells by regulation of the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Wilson; Zhang, Xiaojing; Guo, Linghong; Shaw, Andrew; Hu, Xiuying; Xiong, Yeping; Gulavita, Sunil; Patel, Samir; Sun, Xuejun; Chen, Jie; Moore, Ronald; Xing, James Z.

    2009-09-01

    Glucose-capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-GNPs) have been used to improve cellular targeting and radio-sensitization. In this study, we explored the mechanism of Glu-GNP enhanced radiation sensitivity in radiation-resistant human prostate cancer cells. Cell survival and proliferation were measured using MTT and clonogenic assay. Flow cytometry with staining by propidium iodide (PI) was performed to study the cell cycle changes induced by Glu-GNPs, and western blotting was used to determine the expression of p53 and cyclin proteins that correlated to cell cycle regulation. With 2 Gy of ortho-voltage irradiation, Glu-GNP showed a 1.5-2.0 fold enhancement in growth inhibition when compared to x-rays alone. Comparing the cell cycle change, Glu-GNPs induced acceleration in the G0/G1 phase and accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase at 29.8% versus 18.4% for controls at 24 h. G2/M arrest was accompanied by decreased expression of p53 and cyclin A, and increased expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin E. In conclusion, Glu-GNPs trigger activation of the CDK kinases leading to cell cycle acceleration in the G0/G1 phase and accumulation in the G2/M phase. This activation is accompanied by a striking sensitization to ionizing radiation, which may have clinical implications.

  1. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  2. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  3. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  4. Proton acceleration by single-cycle laser pulses offers a novel monoenergetic and stable operating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. L.; Yan, X. Q.; Mourou, G.; Wheeler, J. A.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.

    2016-04-01

    Prompted by the possibility to produce high energy, single-cycle laser pulses with tens of Petawatt (PW) power, we have investigated laser-matter interactions in the few optical cycle and ultra relativistic intensity regimes. A particularly interesting instability-free regime for ion production was revealed leading to the efficient coherent generation of short (femtosecond; 10 - 15 s ) monoenergetic ion bunches with a peak energy greater than GeV. Of paramount importance, the interaction is absent of the Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities and hole boring that plague techniques such as target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration.

  5. Modeling of Sonos Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories (NVSMS) have many advantages. These memories are electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs). They utilize low programming voltages, endure extended erase/write cycles, are inherently resistant to radiation, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. The SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. The SONOS floating gate charge and voltage, tunneling current, threshold voltage, and drain current were characterized during an erase cycle. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental device data.

  6. K+ channels and cell cycle progression in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima; Ahidouch, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    K+ ions play a major role in many cellular processes. The deregulation of K+ signaling is associated with a variety of diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes. K+ ions are important for setting the membrane potential, the driving force for Ca2+ influx, and regulate volume of growing cells. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that K+ channels control cell proliferation through a novel signaling mechanisms triggered and modulated independently of ion fluxes. In cancer, aberrant expression, regulation and/or sublocalization of K+ channels can alter the downstream signals that converge on the cell cycle machinery. Various K+ channels are involved in cell cycle progression and are needed only at particular stages of the cell cycle. Consistent with this idea, the expression of Eag1 and HERG channels fluctuate along the cell cycle. Despite of acquired knowledge, our understanding of K+ channels functioning in cancer cells requires further studies. These include identifying the molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle machinery. By understanding how K+ channels regulate cell cycle progression in cancer cells, we will gain insights into how cancer cells subvert the need for K+ signal and its downstream targets to proliferate. PMID:23970866

  7. Natural flavonoids targeting deregulated cell cycle progression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana Pratap; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2006-03-01

    The prolonged duration requiring alteration of multi-genetic and epigenetic molecular events for cancer development provides a strong rationale for cancer prevention, which is developing as a potential strategy to arrest or reverse carcinogenic changes before the appearance of the malignant disease. Cell cycle progression is an important biological event having controlled regulation in normal cells, which almost universally becomes aberrant or deregulated in transformed and neoplastic cells. In this regard, targeting deregulated cell cycle progression and its modulation by various natural and synthetic agents are gaining widespread attention in recent years to control the unchecked growth and proliferation in cancer cells. In fact, a vast number of experimental studies convincingly show that many phytochemicals halt uncontrolled cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Among these phytochemicals, natural flavonoids have been identified as a one of the major classes of natural anticancer agents exerting antineoplastic activity via cell cycle arrest as a major mechanism in various types of cancer cells. This review is focused at the modulatory effects of natural flavonoids on cell cycle regulators including cyclin-dependent kinases and their inhibitors, cyclins, p53, retinoblastoma family of proteins, E2Fs, check-point kinases, ATM/ATR and survivin controlling G1/S and G2/M check-point transitions in cell cycle progression, and discusses how these molecular changes could contribute to the antineoplastic effects of natural flavonoids. PMID:16515531

  8. Cell Cycle Regulation of DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, R. A.; Holzen, T. M.

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is regulated to ensure all chromosomes replicate once and only once per cell cycle. Replication begins at many origins scattered along each chromosome. Except for budding yeast, origins are not defined DNA sequences and probably are inherited by epigenetic mechanisms. Initiation at origins occurs throughout the S phase according to a temporal program that is important in regulating gene expression during development. Most replication proteins are conserved in evolution in eukaryotes and archaea, but not in bacteria. However, the mechanism of initiation is conserved and consists of origin recognition, assembly of pre-replication (pre-RC) initiative complexes, helicase activation, and replisome loading. Cell cycle regulation by protein phosphorylation ensures that pre-RC assembly can only occur in G1 phase, whereas helicase activation and loading can only occur in S phase. Checkpoint regulation maintains high fidelity by stabilizing replication forks and preventing cell cycle progression during replication stress or damage. PMID:17630848

  9. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1. Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  10. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G₀-G₁ phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1). Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  11. Cell cycle checkpoint regulators reach a zillion

    PubMed Central

    Yasutis, Kimberly M.; Kozminski, Keith G.

    2013-01-01

    Entry into mitosis is regulated by a checkpoint at the boundary between the G2 and M phases of the cell cycle (G2/M). In many organisms, this checkpoint surveys DNA damage and cell size and is controlled by both the activation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and the inhibition of an opposing phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Misregulation of mitotic entry can often lead to oncogenesis or cell death. Recent research has focused on discovering the signaling pathways that feed into the core checkpoint control mechanisms dependent on Cdk and PP2A. Herein, we review the conserved mechanisms of the G2/M transition, including recently discovered upstream signaling pathways that link cell growth and DNA replication to cell cycle progression. Critical consideration of the human, frog and yeast models of mitotic entry frame unresolved and emerging questions in this field, providing a prediction of signaling molecules and pathways yet to be discovered. PMID:23598718

  12. Landscape and flux reveal a new global view and physical quantification of mammalian cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhe; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycles, essential for biological function, have been investigated extensively. However, enabling a global understanding and defining a physical quantification of the stability and function of the cell cycle remains challenging. Based upon a mammalian cell cycle gene network, we uncovered the underlying Mexican hat landscape of the cell cycle. We found the emergence of three local basins of attraction and two major potential barriers along the cell cycle trajectory. The three local basins of attraction characterize the G1, S/G2, and M phases. The barriers characterize the G1 and S/G2 checkpoints, respectively, of the cell cycle, thus providing an explanation of the checkpoint mechanism for the cell cycle from the physical perspective. We found that the progression of a cell cycle is determined by two driving forces: curl flux for acceleration and potential barriers for deceleration along the cycle path. Therefore, the cell cycle can be promoted (suppressed), either by enhancing (suppressing) the flux (representing the energy input) or by lowering (increasing) the barrier along the cell cycle path. We found that both the entropy production rate and energy per cell cycle increase as the growth factor increases. This reflects that cell growth and division are driven by energy or nutrition supply. More energy input increases flux and decreases barrier along the cell cycle path, leading to faster oscillations. We also identified certain key genes and regulations for stability and progression of the cell cycle. Some of these findings were evidenced from experiments whereas others lead to predictions and potential anticancer strategies. PMID:25228772

  13. Potassium channels in cell cycle and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Urrego, Diana; Tomczak, Adam P.; Zahed, Farrah; Stühmer, Walter; Pardo, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Normal cell-cycle progression is a crucial task for every multicellular organism, as it determines body size and shape, tissue renewal and senescence, and is also crucial for reproduction. On the other hand, dysregulation of the cell-cycle progression leading to uncontrolled cell proliferation is the hallmark of cancer. Therefore, it is not surprising that it is a tightly regulated process, with multifaceted and very complex control mechanisms. It is now well established that one of those mechanisms relies on ion channels, and in many cases specifically on potassium channels. Here, we summarize the possible mechanisms underlying the importance of potassium channels in cell-cycle control and briefly review some of the identified channels that illustrate the multiple ways in which this group of proteins can influence cell proliferation and modulate cell-cycle progression. PMID:24493742

  14. SAFT nickel hydrogen cell cycling status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borthomieu, Yannick; Duquesne, Didier

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NiH2 cell development is given. The NiH2 SAFT system is an electrochemical (single or dual) stack (IPV). The stack is mounted in an hydroformed Inconel 718 vessel operating at high pressure, equipped with 'rabbit ears' ceramic brazed electrical feedthroughs. The cell design is described: positive electrode, negative electrode, and stack configuration. Overviews of low earth orbit and geostationary earth orbit cyclings are provided. DPA results are also provided. The cycling and DPA results demonstrate that SAFT NiH2 is characterized by high reliability and very stable performances.

  15. TP508 accelerates fracture repair by promoting cell growth over cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xinmin; Wang Hali; Touma, Edward; Qi Yuchen; Rousseau, Emma; Quigg, Richard J.; Ryaby, James T.

    2007-12-07

    TP508 is a synthetic 23-amino acid peptide representing a receptor-binding domain of human thrombin. We have previously shown that a single injection of TP508 accelerates fracture healing in a rat femoral fracture model. To understand how TP508 acts at the protein level during fracture healing, we compared the translational profiles between saline-control and fractured femur at six time points after TP508 treatment using the second generation of BD Clontech{sup TM} Antibody Microarray. Here, we demonstrate that TP508 accelerates fracture healing by modulating expression levels of proteins primarily involved in the functional categories of cell cycle, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. The majority of those proteins are physically interrelated and functionally overlapped. The action of those proteins is highlighted by a central theme of promoting cell growth via balance of cell survival over cell death signals. This appears to occur through the stimulation of several bone healing pathways including cell cycle-G1/S checkpoint regulation, apoptosis, JAK/STAT, NF-{kappa}B, PDGF, PI3K/AKT, PTEN, and ERK/MAPK.

  16. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Price, Peter M.; Safirstein, Robert L.; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute kidney injury. PMID:19536080

  17. Control points within the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures.

  18. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM) communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution...

  19. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  20. Cycle accurate and cycle reproducible memory for an FPGA based hardware accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameh W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-03-15

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for using a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to simulate operations of a device under test (DUT). The DUT includes a device memory having a number of input ports, and the FPGA is associated with a target memory having a second number of input ports, the second number being less than the first number. In one embodiment, a given set of inputs is applied to the device memory at a frequency Fd and in a defined cycle of time, and the given set of inputs is applied to the target memory at a frequency Ft. Ft is greater than Fd and cycle accuracy is maintained between the device memory and the target memory. In an embodiment, a cycle accurate model of the DUT memory is created by separating the DUT memory interface protocol from the target memory storage array.

  1. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of KOH concentration on the cycle life of a sintered-type nickel electrode were studied in a boiler plate nickel-hydrogen cell at 23 C using an accelerated 45-min cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. The cycle life improved greatly as the KOH concentration decreased, although the initial capacity of the cell decreased slightly. The cycle life improved by a factor of two or more when the KOH concentration was reduced from 36 to 31 percent and by a similar factor from reductions of 31 to 26 percent. For many applications, this life improvement may outweigh the initial capacity decrease.

  2. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Sun, Yuejin

    2007-08-14

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  3. Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Sudhoff, F.A.

    1998-04-01

    The present invention relates generally to an integrated fuel cell power plant, and more specifically to a combination of cycles wherein a first fuel cell cycle tops an indirect-fired gas turbine cycle and a second fuel cell cycle bottoms the gas turbine cycle so that the cycles are thermally integrated in a tandem operating arrangement. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to the employer-employee relationship between the United States Department of Energy and the inventors.

  4. FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

    1999-12-01

    A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

  5. Cell shape dynamics during the staphylococcal cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, João M.; Fernandes, Pedro B.; Vaz, Filipa; Pereira, Ana R.; Tavares, Andreia C.; Ferreira, Maria T.; Pereira, Pedro M.; Veiga, Helena; Kuru, Erkin; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.; Filipe, Sérgio R.; Pinho, Mariana G.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an aggressive pathogen and a model organism to study cell division in sequential orthogonal planes in spherical bacteria. However, the small size of staphylococcal cells has impaired analysis of changes in morphology during the cell cycle. Here we use super-resolution microscopy and determine that S. aureus cells are not spherical throughout the cell cycle, but elongate during specific time windows, through peptidoglycan synthesis and remodelling. Both peptidoglycan hydrolysis and turgor pressure are required during division for reshaping the flat division septum into a curved surface. In this process, the septum generates less than one hemisphere of each daughter cell, a trait we show is common to other cocci. Therefore, cell surface scars of previous divisions do not divide the cells in quadrants, generating asymmetry in the daughter cells. Our results introduce a need to reassess the models for division plane selection in cocci. PMID:26278781

  6. Two wire wakefield measurements of the DARHT accelerator cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.; Vella, M.

    1998-05-01

    One of the characteristics specifying the performance of an accelerator cell as it relates to the electron beam, is the Wakefield impedance. The real part of the transverse wakefield impedance relates to offsets of the beam as it travels through the accelerator cell. To verify that the cell operates as expected, and that simulations and design predictions of the cell are within acceptable parameters (before building more cells) it is desirable to measure the wakefield impedance using the traditional two-wire technique. This technique benefits from its reproducibility and physical simplicity but is complicated by the need to fabricate a test fixture. But once the fixture is fabricated, it is simple to measure any number of accelerator cells. The following is a description of the two-wire measurement technique as performed at Lawrence Berkeley Lab (LBL) on a prototype DARHT accelerator cell.

  7. Solid oxide fuel cell combined cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Bevc, F.P.; Lundberg, W.L.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The integration of the solid oxide fuel cell and combustion turbine technologies can result in combined-cycle power plants, fueled with natural gas, that have high efficiencies and clean gaseous emissions. Results of a study are presented in which conceptual designs were developed for 3 power plants based upon such an integration, and ranging in rating from 3 to 10 MW net ac. The plant cycles are described and characteristics of key components summarized. Also, plant design-point efficiency estimates are presented as well as values of other plant performance parameters.

  8. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  9. BBU design of linear induction accelerator cells for radiography application

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C.C.; Chen, Y.J.; Gaporaso, G.J.; Houck, T.L.; Molau, N.E.; Focklen, J.; Gregory, S.

    1997-05-06

    There is an ongoing effort to develop accelerating modules for high-current electron accelerators for advanced radiography application. Accelerating modules with low beam-cavity coupling impedances along with gap designs with acceptable field stresses comprise a set of fundamental design criteria. We examine improved cell designs which have been developed for accelerator application in several radiographic operating regimes. We evaluate interaction impedances, analyze the effects of beam structure coupling on beam dynamics (beam break-up instability and corkscrew motion). We also provide estimates of coupling through interesting new high-gradient insulators and evaluate their potential future application in induction cells.

  10. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, J. L.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The results of accelerated stress testing of four different types of silicon terrestrial solar cells are discussed. The accelerated stress tests used included bias-temperature tests, bias-temperature-humidity tests, thermal cycle and thermal shock tests, and power cycle tests. Characterization of the cells was performed before stress testing and at periodic down-times, using electrical measurement, visual inspection, and metal adherence pull tests. Electrical parameters measured included short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, and output power, voltage, and current at the maximum power point. Incorporated in the report are the distributions of the prestress electrical data for all cell types. Data were also obtained on cell series and shunt resistance.

  11. Westinghouse fuel cell combined cycle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.

    1996-12-31

    Efficiency (voltage) of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) should increase with operating pressure, and a pressurized SOFC could function as the heat addition process in a Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) engine. An overall cycle efficiency of 70% should be possible. In cogeneration, half of the waste heat from a PSOFC/GT should be able to be captured in process steam and hot water, leading to a fuel effectiveness of about 85%. In order to make the PSOFC/GT a commercial reality, satisfactory operation of the SOFC at elevated pressure must be verified, a pressurized SOFC generator module must be designed, built, and tested, and the combined cycle and parameters must be optimized. A prototype must also be demonstrated. This paper describes progress toward making the PSOFC/GT a reality.

  12. KOH concentration effect on cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hong S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    A cycle life test of Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered type nickel electrode was carried out at 23 C using a 45 min accelerated low Earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. One of three cells containing 26 percent KOH has achieved over 28,000 cycles, and the other two 19,000 cycles, without a sign of failure. Two other cells containing 31 percent KOH electrolyte, which is the concentration presently used in aerospace cells, failed after 2,979 and 3,620 cycles. This result indicates that the cycle life of the present type of Ni/H2 cells may be extended by a factor of 5 to 10 simply by lowering the KOH concentration. Long cycle life of a Ni/H2 battery at high depth-of-discharge operation is desired, particularly for an LEO spacecraft application. Typically, battery life of about 30,000 cycles is required for a five year mission in an LEO. Such a cycle life with presently available cells can be assured only at a very low depth-of-discharge operation. Results of testing already show that the cycle life of an Ni/H2 cell is tremendously improved by simply using an electrolyte of low KOH concentration.

  13. 4D chromatin dynamics in cycling cells

    PubMed Central

    Strickfaden, Hilmar; Zunhammer, Andreas; van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Köhler, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    This live cell study of chromatin dynamics in four dimensions (space and time) in cycling human cells provides direct evidence for three hypotheses first proposed by Theodor Boveri in seminal studies of fixed blastomeres from Parascaris equorum embryos: (I) Chromosome territory (CT) arrangements are stably maintained during interphase. (II) Chromosome proximity patterns change profoundly during prometaphase. (III) Similar CT proximity patterns in pairs of daughter nuclei reflect symmetrical chromosomal movements during anaphase and telophase, but differ substantially from the arrangement in mother cell nucleus. Hypothesis I could be confirmed for the majority of interphase cells. A minority, however, showed complex, rotational movements of CT assemblies with large-scale changes of CT proximity patterns, while radial nuclear arrangements were maintained. A new model of chromatin dynamics is proposed. It suggests that long-range DNA-DNA interactions in cell nuclei may depend on a combination of rotational CT movements and locally constrained chromatin movements. PMID:21327076

  14. Analysis of cell cycle position in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Matthew J; Amiri, Mehdi; Dick, Frederick A

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of cell proliferation is central to tissue morphogenesis during the development of multicellular organisms. Furthermore, loss of control of cell proliferation underlies the pathology of diseases like cancer. As such there is great need to be able to investigate cell proliferation and quantitate the proportion of cells in each phase of the cell cycle. It is also of vital importance to indistinguishably identify cells that are replicating their DNA within a larger population. Since a cell's decision to proliferate is made in the G1 phase immediately before initiating DNA synthesis and progressing through the rest of the cell cycle, detection of DNA synthesis at this stage allows for an unambiguous determination of the status of growth regulation in cell culture experiments. DNA content in cells can be readily quantitated by flow cytometry of cells stained with propidium iodide, a fluorescent DNA intercalating dye. Similarly, active DNA synthesis can be quantitated by culturing cells in the presence of radioactive thymidine, harvesting the cells, and measuring the incorporation of radioactivity into an acid insoluble fraction. We have considerable expertise with cell cycle analysis and recommend a different approach. We Investigate cell proliferation using bromodeoxyuridine/fluorodeoxyuridine (abbreviated simply as BrdU) staining that detects the incorporation of these thymine analogs into recently synthesized DNA. Labeling and staining cells with BrdU, combined with total DNA staining by propidium iodide and analysis by flow cytometry offers the most accurate measure of cells in the various stages of the cell cycle. It is our preferred method because it combines the detection of active DNA synthesis, through antibody based staining of BrdU, with total DNA content from propidium iodide. This allows for the clear separation of cells in G1 from early S phase, or late S phase from G2/M. Furthermore, this approach can be utilized to investigate the effects

  15. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed. PMID:25914884

  16. Chemistry technology base and fuel cycle of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.A.

    1997-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system, a description of the pyrochemistry technology base and the fuel cycle for the system. The pyrochemistry technology base consists of four processes: direct oxide reduction, reductive extraction, electrorefining, and electrowinning. Each process and its utility is described. The fuel cycle is described for a liquid metal-based system with the focus being the conversion of commercial spent nuclear fuel to fuel for the transmutation system. Fission product separation and actinide recycle processes are also described.

  17. Temporal Organization of the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Novak, Bela

    2009-01-01

    Summary The coordination of growth, DNA replication and division in proliferating cells can be adequately explained by a ‘clock + checkpoint’ model. The clock is an underlying circular sequence of states; the checkpoints ensure that the cycle proceeds without mistakes. From the molecular complexities of the control system in modern eukaryotes, we isolate a simple network of positive and negative feedbacks that embodies a clock + checkpoints. The model accounts for the fundamental physiological properties of mitotic cell divisions, evokes a new view of the meiotic program, and suggests how the control system may have evolved in the first place. PMID:18786381

  18. Hubble Space Telescope solar cell module thermal cycle test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Alexander; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Douglas; Gerlach, Lothar

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array consists of two identical double roll-out wings designed after the Hughes flexible roll-up solar array (FRUSA) and was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to meet specified HST power output requirements at the end of 2 years, with a functional lifetime of 5 years. The requirement that the HST solar array remain functional both mechanically and electrically during its 5-year lifetime meant that the array must withstand 30,000 low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. In order to evaluate the ability of the array to meet this requirement, an accelerated thermal cycle test in vacuum was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), using two 128-cell solar array modules which duplicated the flight HST solar array. Several other tests were performed on the modules. The thermal cycle test was interrupted after 2,577 cycles, and a 'cold-roll' test was performed on one of the modules in order to evaluate the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit. A posttest static shadow test was performed on one of the modules in order to analyze temperature gradients across the module. Finally, current in-flight electrical performance data from the actual HST flight solar array will be tested.

  19. Cell cycle population effects in perturbation studies

    PubMed Central

    O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Lijnzaad, Philip; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian JA; Margaritis, Thanasis; Brok, Mariel O; Kemmeren, Patrick; Holstege, Frank CP

    2014-01-01

    Growth condition perturbation or gene function disruption are commonly used strategies to study cellular systems. Although it is widely appreciated that such experiments may involve indirect effects, these frequently remain uncharacterized. Here, analysis of functionally unrelated Saccharyomyces cerevisiae deletion strains reveals a common gene expression signature. One property shared by these strains is slower growth, with increased presence of the signature in more slowly growing strains. The slow growth signature is highly similar to the environmental stress response (ESR), an expression response common to diverse environmental perturbations. Both environmental and genetic perturbations result in growth rate changes. These are accompanied by a change in the distribution of cells over different cell cycle phases. Rather than representing a direct expression response in single cells, both the slow growth signature and ESR mainly reflect a redistribution of cells over different cell cycle phases, primarily characterized by an increase in the G1 population. The findings have implications for any study of perturbation that is accompanied by growth rate changes. Strategies to counter these effects are presented and discussed. PMID:24952590

  20. Elutriation for Cell Cycle Synchronization in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Cell synchronization is a powerful technique for studying the eukaryotic cell cycle events precisely. The fission yeast is a rod-shaped cell whose growth is coordinated with the cell cycle. Monitoring the cellular growth of fission yeast is a relatively simple way to measure the cell cycle stage of a cell. Here, we describe a detailed method of unperturbed cell synchronization, named centrifugal elutriation, for fission yeast. PMID:26254921

  1. Cell cycle regulation of Golgi membrane dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Danming; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2013-06-01

    The Golgi apparatus is a membranous organelle in the cell that plays essential roles in protein and lipid trafficking, sorting, processing, and modification. Its basic structure is a stack of closely aligned flattened cisternae. In mammalian cells, dozens of Golgi stacks are often laterally linked into a ribbon-like structure. Biogenesis of the Golgi during cell division occurs through a sophisticated disassembly and reassembly process that can be divided into three distinct but cooperative steps, including the deformation and reformation of the Golgi cisternae, stacks, and ribbon. Here, we review our current understanding of the protein machineries that control these three steps in the cycle of mammalian cell division: GRASP65 and GRASP55 in Golgi stack and ribbon formation; ubiquitin and AAA ATPases in postmitotic Golgi membrane fusion; and golgins and cytoskeleton in Golgi ribbon formation. PMID:23453991

  2. Cell cycle of globose basal cells in rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huard, J M; Schwob, J E

    1995-05-01

    The olfactory epithelium of adult mammals has the unique property of generating olfactory sensory neurons throughout life. Cells of the basal compartment, which include horizontal and globose basal cells, are responsible for the ongoing process of neurogenesis in this system. We report here that the globose basal cells in olfactory epithelium of rats, as in mice, are the predominant type of proliferating cell, and account for 97.6% of the actively dividing cells in the basal compartment of the normal epithelium. Globose basal cells have not been fully characterized in terms of their proliferative properties, and the dynamic aspects of neurogenesis are not well understood. As a consequence, it is uncertain whether cell kinetic properties are under any regulation that could affect the rate of neurogenesis. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have determined the duration of both the synthesis phase (S-phase) and the full cell cycle of globose basal cells in adult rats. The duration of the S-phase was found to be 9 hr in experiments utilizing sequential injections of either IdU followed by BrdU or 3H-thy followed by BrdU. The duration of the cell cycle was determined by varying the time interval between the injections of 3H-thy and BrdU and tracking the set of cells that exit S shortly after the first injection. With this paradigm, the interval required for these cells to traverse G2, M, G1, and a second S-phase, is equivalent to the duration of one mitotic cycle and equals 17 hr. These observations serve as the foundation to assess whether the cell cycle duration is subject to regulation in response to experimental injury, and whether such regulation is partly responsible for changes in the rate of neurogenesis in such settings. PMID:7647371

  3. Cell cycle-dependence of HL-60 cell deformability.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M A; Waugh, R E; Keng, P C

    1996-01-01

    In this study, the role of cytoskeleton in HL-60 deformability during the cell cycle was investigated. G1, S, and G2/M cell fractions were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Cell deformability was evaluated by pipette aspiration. Tested at the same aspiration pressures, S cells were found to be less deformable than G1 cells. Moreover, HL-60 cells exhibited power-law fluid behavior: mu = mu c(gamma m/ gamma c)-b, where mu is cytoplasmic viscosity, gamma m is mean shear rate, mu c is the characteristic viscosity at the characteristic shear rate gamma c, and b is a material constant. At a given shear rate, S cells (mu c = 276 +/- 14 Pa.s, b = 0.51 +/- 0.03) were more viscous than G1 cells (mu c = 197 +/- 25, b = 0.53 +/- 0.02). To evaluate the relative importance of different cytoskeletal components in these cell cycle-dependent properties, HL-60 cells were treated with 30 microM dihydrocytochalasin B (DHB) to disrupt F-actin or 100 microM colchicine to collapse microtubules. DHB dramatically softened both G1 and S cells, which reduced the material constants mu c by approximately 65% and b by 20-30%. Colchicine had a limited effect on G1 cells but significantly reduced mu c of S cells (approximately 25%). Thus, F-actin plays the predominate role in determining cell mechanical properties, but disruption of microtubules may also influence the behavior of proliferating cells in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8785361

  4. MicroRNAs and cell cycle of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qing; Xu, Lunshan; Cui, Hongjuan; Xu, Minhui; Yi, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The control of malignant glioma cell cycle by microRNAs (miRNAs) is well established. The deregulation of miRNAs in glioma may contribute to tumor proliferation by directly targeting the critical cell-cycle regulators. Tumor suppressive miRNAs inhibit cell cycle through repressing the expression of positive cell-cycle regulators. However, oncogenic miRNAs promote the cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle negative regulators. Recent studies have identified that transcription factors had involved in the expression of miRNAs. Transcription factors and miRNAs are implicated in regulatory network of glioma cell cycle, the deregulation of these transcription factors might be a cause of the deregulation of miRNAs. Abnormal versions of miRNAs have been implicated in the cell cycle of glioma. Based on those, miRNAs are excellent biomarker candidates and potential targets for therapeutic intervention in glioma. PMID:26000816

  5. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cell - Update II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in LEO cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles, compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The cycle regime was a stressful accelerated LEO, which consisted of a 27.5 min charge followed by a 17.5 min discharge (2X normal rate). The depth-of-discharge was 80 percent. Six 48-Ah Hughes recirculation design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells are being evaluated. Three of the cells contain 26 percent KOH (test cells), and three contain 31 percent KOH (control cells). They are undergoing real time LEO cycle life testing. The cycle regime is a 90-min LEO orbit consisting of a 54-min charge followed by a 36-min discharge. The depth-of-discharge is 80 percent. The cell temperature is maintained at 10 C. The three 31 percent KOH cells failed (cycles 3729, 4165, and 11355). One of the 26 percent KOH cells failed at cycle 15314. The other two 26 percent KOH cells were cycled for over 16,000 cycles during the continuing test.

  6. Exogenous endothelial cells as accelerators of hematopoietic reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite the successes of recombinant hematopoietic-stimulatory factors at accelerating bone marrow reconstitution and shortening the neutropenic period post-transplantation, significant challenges remain such as cost, inability to reconstitute thrombocytic lineages, and lack of efficacy in conditions such as aplastic anemia. A possible means of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution would be administration of cells capable of secreting hematopoietic growth factors. Advantages of this approach would include: a) ability to regulate secretion of cytokines based on biological need; b) long term, localized production of growth factors, alleviating need for systemic administration of factors that possess unintended adverse effects; and c) potential to actively repair the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Here we overview the field of hematopoietic growth factors, discuss previous experiences with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in accelerating hematopoiesis, and conclude by putting forth the rationale of utilizing exogenous endothelial cells as a novel cellular therapy for acceleration of hematopoietic recovery. PMID:23171397

  7. Mitochondrial Regulation of Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Antico Arciuch, Valeria Gabriela; Elguero, María Eugenia; Poderoso, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eukaryotic mitochondria resulted from symbiotic incorporation of α-proteobacteria into ancient archaea species. During evolution, mitochondria lost most of the prokaryotic bacterial genes and only conserved a small fraction including those encoding 13 proteins of the respiratory chain. In this process, many functions were transferred to the host cells, but mitochondria gained a central role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, and in the modulation of metabolism; accordingly, defective organelles contribute to cell transformation and cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most cell and transcriptional effects of mitochondria depend on the modulation of respiratory rate and on the production of hydrogen peroxide released into the cytosol. The mitochondrial oxidative rate has to remain depressed for cell proliferation; even in the presence of O2, energy is preferentially obtained from increased glycolysis (Warburg effect). In response to stress signals, traffic of pro- and antiapoptotic mitochondrial proteins in the intermembrane space (B-cell lymphoma-extra large, Bcl-2-associated death promoter, Bcl-2 associated X-protein and cytochrome c) is modulated by the redox condition determined by mitochondrial O2 utilization and mitochondrial nitric oxide metabolism. In this article, we highlight the traffic of the different canonical signaling pathways to mitochondria and the contributions of organelles to redox regulation of kinases. Finally, we analyze the dynamics of the mitochondrial population in cell cycle and apoptosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1150–1180. PMID:21967640

  8. [Cell cycle, mitosis and therapeutic applications].

    PubMed

    Levy, Antonin; Albiges-Sauvin, Laurence; Massard, Christophe; Soria, Jean-Charles; Deutsch, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Genomic DNA is constantly under stress of endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. Without proper care, the DNA damage causes an alteration of the genomic structure and can lead to cell death or the occurrence of mutations involved in tumorigenesis. During the process of evolution, organisms have acquired a series of response mechanisms and repair of DNA damage, thereby ensuring the maintenance of genome stability and faithful transmission of genetic information. The checkpoints are the major mechanisms by which a cell can respond to DNA damage, either by actively stopping the cell cycle or by induction of apoptosis. Two parallel signalling pathways, ATM and ATR respond to genotoxic stress by activating their downstream target proteins including the two effectors kinases CHK1 and CHK2. Promising preliminary data render these proteins potential targets for therapeutic development against cancer. PMID:21669563

  9. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    A breakthrough in the low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycle life of individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel hydrogen battery cells is reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The effect of KOH concentration on cycle life was studied. The cycle regime was a stressful accelerated LEO, which consisted of a 27.5 min charge followed by a 17.5 min charge (2 x normal rate). The depth of discharge (DOD) was 80 percent. The cell temperature was maintained at 23 C. The next step is to validate these results using flight hardware and real time LEO test. NASA Lewis has a contract with the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana to validate the boiler plate test results. Six 48 A-hr Hughes recirculation design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells are being evaluated. Three of the cells contain 26 percent KOH (test cells) and three contain 31 percent KOH (control cells). They are undergoing real time LEO cycle life testing. The cycle regime is a 90-min LEO orbit consisting of a 54-min charge followed by a 36-min discharge. The depth-of-discharge is 80 percent. The cell temperature is maintained at 10 C. The cells were cycled for over 8000 cycles in the continuing test. There were no failures for the cells containing 26 percent KOH. There were two failures, however, for the cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  10. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    A breakthrough in low earth orbit (LEO) cycle life of individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel hydrogen battery cells was reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The effect of KOH concentration on cycle life was studied. The cycle regime was a stressful accelerated LEO, which consisted of a 27.5 min charge followed by a 17.5 min charge (2 x normal rate). The depth of discharge (DOD) was 80 percent. The cell temperature was maintained at 23 C. The next step is to validate these results using flight hardware and a real time LEO test. NASA Lewis has a contract with the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana, to validate the boiler plate test results. Six 48 A-hr Hughes recirculation design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells are being evaluated. Three of the cells contain 26 percent KOH (test cells) and three contain 31 percent KOH (control cells). They are undergoing real time LEO cycle life testing. The cycle regime is a 90-min LEO orbit consisting of a 54-min charge followed by a 36-min discharge. The depth-of-discharge is 80 percent. The cell temperature is maintained at 10 C. The cells were cycled for over 8000 cycles in the continuing test. There were no failures for the cells containing 26 percent KOH. There was two failures, however, for the cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  11. Proposed second harmonic acceleration system for the intense pulsed neutron source rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.; Rauchas, A.

    1983-01-01

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2 to 2.5 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at approx.3 x 10/sup 12/ ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. With the present good performance in mind, accelerator improvements are being directed at: (1) increasing beam intensities for neutron science; (2) lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation; and (3) gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. On the basis of preliminary measurements, we are now proposing a third cavity for the RF systems which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses.

  12. Feedback and Modularity in Cell Cycle Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skotheim, Jan

    2009-03-01

    Underlying the wonderful diversity of natural forms is the ability of an organism to grow into its appropriate shape. Regulation ensures that cells grow, divide and differentiate so that the organism and its constitutive parts are properly proportioned and of suitable size. Although the size-control mechanism active in an individual cell is of fundamental importance to this process, it is difficult to isolate and study in complex multi-cellular systems and remains poorly understood. This motivates our use of the budding yeast model organism, whose Start checkpoint integrates multiple internal (e.g. cell size) and external signals into an irreversible decision to enter the cell cycle. We have endeavored to address the following two questions: What makes the Start transition irreversible? How does a cell compute its own size? I will report on the progress we have made. Our work is part of an emerging framework for understanding biological control circuits, which will allow us to discern the function of natural systems and aid us in engineering synthetic systems.

  13. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo; Isegawa, Naohisa; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  14. Testing pulse forming networks with DARHT accelerator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, E. A.; Dalmas, D. A.; Downing, J. N. , Jr.; Temple, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility [DARHT] at Los Alamos will use two induction linacs to produce high-energy electron beams. The electron beams will be used to generate x-rays from bremsstrahlung targets. The x-rays will be used to produce radiographs. The first accelerator is operational now, generating a 60-nanosecond electron beam. The second accelerator is under construction. It will generate a 2-microsecond electron beam. The 78 induction cells of the second axis accelerator will be driven by an equal number of pulse forming networks. Each pulse forming network [PFN] generates a nominal 200-kV, 2-microsecond pulse to drive an accelerator cell. Each pulse forming network consists of a set of four equal-capacitance sub-PFN's, stacked in a Marx configuration. The PFN Test Stand was configured to test newly constructed accelerator cells under conditions of full voltage and pulse duration. The PFN Test Stand also explored jitter, prefire and reliability issues for a pulse forming network operated into a purely resistive load. The PFN Test Stand provided experience operating a simple subsystem of the DARHT accelerator. This subsystem involved controls, diagnostics, data acquisition and archival, power supplies, trigger systems, core reset and a gas flow system for the spark gaps. Issues for the DARHT accelerator were investigated in this small-scale facility.

  15. TESTING PULSE FORMING NETWORKS WITH DARHT ACCELERATOR CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. ROSE; D.A. DALMAS; J.N. DOWNING; R.D. TEMPLE

    2001-06-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility [DARHT] at Los Alamos will use two induction linacs to produce high-energy electron beams. The electron beams will be used to generate x-rays from bremsstrahlung targets. The x-rays will be used to produce radiographs. The first accelerator is operational now, generating a 60- nanosecond electron beam. The second accelerator is under construction. It will generate a 2-microsecond electron beam. The 78 induction cells of the second axis accelerator will be driven by an equal number of pulse forming networks. Each pulse forming network [PFN] generates a nominal 200-kV, 2-microsecond pulse to drive an accelerator cell. Each pulse forming network consists of a set of four equal-capacitance sub-PFN's, stacked in a Marx configuration. The PFN Test Stand was configured to test newly constructed accelerator cells under conditions of full voltage and pulse duration. The PFN Test Stand also explored jitter, prefire and reliability issues for a pulse forming network operated into a purely resistive load. The PFN Test Stand provided experience operating a simple subsystem of the DARHT accelerator. This subsystem involved controls, diagnostics, data acquisition and archival, power supplies, trigger systems, core reset and a gas flow system for the spark gaps. Issues for the DARHT accelerator were investigated in this small-scale facility.

  16. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kianian, Penny M. A.; Kianian, Shahryar F.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM) communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility, and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution of this organelle into daughter cells. The genes that underlie these changes are beginning to be identified in model plants such as Arabidopsis. In animals disruption of the drp1 gene, a homolog to the plant drp3A and drp3B, delays mitochondrial division. This mutation results in increased aneuploidy due to chromosome mis-segregation. It remains to be discovered if a similar outcome is observed in plants. Alloplasmic lines provide an opportunity to understand the communication between the cytoplasmic organelles and the nucleus. Examples of studies in these lines, especially from the extensive collection in wheat, point to the role of mitochondria in chromosome movement, pollen fertility and other aspects of development. PMID:24904617

  17. PLK-1: Angel or devil for cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shiv; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Kim, Jaebong

    2016-04-01

    PLK-1 is a key player in the eukaryotic cell cycle. Cell cycle progression is precisely controlled by cell cycle regulatory kinases. PLK-1 is a mitotic kinase that actively regulates the G2/M transition, mitosis, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis. During cell cycle progression, PLK-1 controls various events related to the cell cycle maturation, directly and/or indirectly. On the contrary, aberrant expression of PLK-1 is strongly associated with tumorigenesis and its poor prognosis. The misexpression of PLK-1 causes the abnormalities including aneuploidy, mitotic defects, leading to tumorigenesis through inhibiting the p53 and pRB genes. Therefore, we reviewed the role of PLK-1 in the cell cycle progression and in the tumorigenesis either as a cell cycle regulator or on an attractive anti-cancer drug target. PMID:26899266

  18. A prediction model of the depth-of-discharge effect on the cycle life of a storge cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Lim, Hong S.

    Cycle life requirements are very high for batteries used in aerospace applications in low earth orbit. The data base required to establish confidence in a particular cell design is thus both extensive and expensive. Reliable accelerated cycle life testing and performance decay modeling represent attractive alternatives to real-time tests of cycle life. In light of certain long-term cycle life test results, this paper examines a very simple performance decay model developed earlier. Application of that model to available data demonstrates a rigid relationship between a battery's expected cycle life and the depth of discharge of cycling. Further, modeling analysis of the data suggests that a significantly improved cycle life can be obtained with advanced components, materials, and designs; and that cycle life can be reliably predicted from the results of accelerated testing.

  19. A prediction model of the depth-of-discharge effect on the cycle life of a storage cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Lim, Hong S.

    1987-01-01

    Cycle life requirements are very high for batteries used in aerospace applications in low Earth orbit. The data base required to establish confidence in a particular cell design is thus both extensive and expensive. Reliable accelerated cycle life testing and performance decay modeling represent attractive alternatives to real-time tests of cycle life. In light of certain long-term cycle life test results, this paper examines a very simple performance decay model developed earlier. Application of that model to available data demonstrates a rigid relationship between a battery's expected cycle life and the depth of discharge of cycling. Further, modeling analysis of the data suggests that a significantly improved cycle life can be obtained with advanced components, materials, and designs; and that cycle life can be reliably predicted from the results of accelerated testing.

  20. A prediction model of the depth-of-discharge effect on the cycle life of a storge cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Lim, Hong S.

    1987-01-01

    Cycle life requirements are very high for batteries used in aerospace applications in low earth orbit. The data base required to establish confidence in a particular cell design is thus both extensive and expensive. Reliable accelerated cycle life testing and performance decay modeling represent attractive alternatives to real-time tests of cycle life. In light of certain long-term cycle life test results, this paper examines a very simple performance decay model developed earlier. Application of that model to available data demonstrates a rigid relationship between a battery's expected cycle life and the depth of discharge of cycling. Further, modeling analysis of the data suggests that a significantly improved cycle life can be obtained with advanced components, materials, and designs; and that cycle life can be reliably predicted from the results of accelerated testing.

  1. Accelerated aging of GaAs concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, P.E.

    1982-04-01

    An accelerated aging study of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells has been completed. The purpose of the study was to identify the possible degradation mechanisms of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells in terrestrial applications. Thermal storage tests and accelerated AlGaAs corrosion studies were performed to provide an experimental basis for a statistical analysis of the estimated lifetime. Results of this study suggest that a properly designed and fabricated AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell can be mechanically rugged and environmentally stable with projected lifetimes exceeding 100 years.

  2. A high-duty-cycle long-pulse electron gun for electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim, N. A.; Thrasher, M. H.

    1990-11-01

    We describe the design and operation of a long-pulse (200-300 μs), high-duty-cycle (5%-6%), 8-mm-diam dispenser cathode, electrically isolated, modulating Wehnelt electron gun for applications in a high-average-power electron linear accelerator. The electron optics design was optimized with computer modeling of the electron trajectories and equipotentials. The gun performance was established in a series of experimental measurements in a test stand. Excellent pulse-to-pulse emission current reproducibility and electron-beam pulse profile stability were obtained.

  3. Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. Part I. Cycling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadass, P.; Haran, Bala; White, Ralph; Popov, Branko N.

    The capacity fade of Sony 18650 Li-ion cells increases with increase in temperature. After 800 cycles, the cells cycled at RT and 45 °C showed a capacity fade of 30 and 36%, respectively. The cell cycled at 55 °C showed a capacity loss of about 70% after 490 cycles. The rate capability of the cells continues to decrease with cycling. Impedance measurements showed an overall increase in the cell resistance with cycling and temperature. Impedance studies of the electrode materials showed an increased positive electrode resistance when compared to that of the negative electrode for cells cycled at RT and 45 °C. However, cells cycled at 50 and 55 °C exhibit higher negative electrode resistance. The increased capacity fade for the cells cycled at high temperatures can be explained by taking into account the repeated film formation over the surface of anode, which results in increased rate of lithium loss and also in a drastic increase in the negative electrode resistance with cycling.

  4. Ion acceleration by intense, few-cycle laser pulses with nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lucchio, Laura; Andreev, Alexander A.; Gibbon, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The energy distribution of electrons and ions emerging from the interaction of a few-cycle Gaussian laser pulse with spherical nanoclusters is investigated with the aim of determining prospects for accelerating ions in this regime. It is found that the direct conversion of laser energy into dense attosecond electron nanobunches results in rapid charge separation and early onset of Coulomb-explosion-dominated ion dynamics. The ion core of the cluster starts to expand soon after the laser has crossed the droplet, the fastest ions attaining 10 s of MeV at relativistic intensities. The current investigation should serve as a guide for contemporary experiments, i.e., using state-of-the-art few-cycle ultraintense lasers and nanoclusters of solid density.

  5. Ion acceleration by intense, few-cycle laser pulses with nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lucchio, Laura; Andreev, Alexander A.; Gibbon, Paul

    2015-05-15

    The energy distribution of electrons and ions emerging from the interaction of a few-cycle Gaussian laser pulse with spherical nanoclusters is investigated with the aim of determining prospects for accelerating ions in this regime. It is found that the direct conversion of laser energy into dense attosecond electron nanobunches results in rapid charge separation and early onset of Coulomb-explosion-dominated ion dynamics. The ion core of the cluster starts to expand soon after the laser has crossed the droplet, the fastest ions attaining 10 s of MeV at relativistic intensities. The current investigation should serve as a guide for contemporary experiments, i.e., using state-of-the-art few-cycle ultraintense lasers and nanoclusters of solid density.

  6. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors of terrestrial solar cells. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, J.W.; Prince, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    The work covered in this report represents the second year's effort of a continuing program to determine the reliability attributes of terrestrial solar cells. Three main tasks were undertaken during the reporting period: (1) a study of the electrical behavior of cells in the second (reverse) quadrant, (2) the accelerated stress testing of three new state of the art cells and (3) the continued bias-temperature testing of four Block II type silicon cells at 78/sup 0/C and 135/sup 0/C. Electrical characteristics measured in the second quadrant were determined to be a function of the cell's thermal behavior with breakdown depending on the initiation of localized heating. This implied that high breakdown cells may be more fault tolerant when forced to operate in the second quadrant - a result contrary to conventional thinking. The accelerated stress tests used in the first (power) quadrant were bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, temperature-humidity, thermal shock, and thermal cycle. The new type cells measured included an EFG cell, a polycrystalline cell, and a Czochralski cell. Electrical parameters measured included I/sub SC/, V/sub OC/, P/sub M/, and I/sub M/. Incorporated in the report are the distributions of prestress electrical data for all cell types. Significant differences in the response to the various stress tests were observed between cell types. A microprocessed controlled, short interval solar cell tester was designed and construction initiated on a prototype for use in the program.

  7. Spice modeling of a FET-switched induction accelerator cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ollis, C.W.; Cravey, W.R.; Hawkins, S.A.; Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.

    1993-06-11

    A PSpice model of an induction accelerator cell switched by field-effect transistors (FETS) has been developed to simulate the modulator`s circuit performance and induction core flux behavior. A FET switched induction cell has been built that generate 4-kV, 1 {mu}s pulses at pulse rates exceeding 100 kHz. The circuit architecture provides for core reset between pulses and produces bursts of pulses that are variable in amplitude, pulse width and prf. The transistor switching array, energy storage capacitors, reset circuit, and cell core are all combined into a compact, low-impedance package. This high-prf induction cell is being developed as the accelerating element for a proposed heavy-ion recirculator, which is an arrangement of many small induction mM in a 30m diameter circle. The recirculator will accept 10-MeV ions from a linear ion accelerator, under development at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and continue their acceleration to 60-MeV by repeatedly passing the ion beam through the many 5-kV cells. As the ions gain speed, the cell prf must also keep pace by increasing from 70 kHz to 200 kHz. Simple PSpice models have been used to predict B-H loop behavior in the magnetic core and to analyze circuit performance. Simulations of the induction cell will be presented and compared with experimental data.

  8. Post microtextures accelerate cell proliferation and osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jung; Boehm, Cynthia A; Mata, Alvaro; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George F; Roy, Shuvo

    2010-01-01

    The influence of surface microtexture on osteogenesis was investigated in vitro by examining the proliferation and differentiation characteristics of a class of adult stem cells and their progeny, collectively known as connective tissue progenitor cells (CTPs). Human bone marrow-derived CTPs were cultured for up to 60 days on smooth polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces and on PDMS with post microtextures that were 10 microm in diameter and 6 microm in height, with 10 microm separation. DNA quantification revealed that the numbers of CTPs initially attached to both substrates were similar. However, cells on microtextured PDMS transitioned from lag phase after 4 days of culture, in contrast to 6 days for cells on smooth surfaces. By day 9 cells on the smooth surfaces exhibited arbitrary flattened shapes and migrated without any preferred orientation. In contrast, cells on the microtextured PDMS grew along the array of posts in an orthogonal manner. By days 30 and 60 cells grew and covered all surfaces with extracellular matrix. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of integrin alpha5 was greater on the microtextured PDMS compared with smooth surfaces. Real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that gene expression of alkaline phosphatase had decreased by days 30 and 60, compared with that on day 9, for both substrates. Gene expression of collagen I and osteocalcin was consistently greater on post microtextures relative to smooth surfaces at all time points. PMID:19539062

  9. Post microtextures accelerate cell proliferation and osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Mata, Alvaro; Fleischman, Aaron J.; Muschler, George F.; Roy, Shuvo

    2013-01-01

    The influence of surface microtexture on osteogenesis was investigated in vitro by examining the proliferation and differentiation characteristics of a class of adult stem cells and their progeny, collectively known as connective tissue progenitor cells (CTPs). Human bone marrow-derived CTPs were cultured for up to 60 days on smooth polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces and on PDMS with post microtextures that were 10 µm in diameter and 6 µm in height, with 10 µm separation. DNA quantification revealed that the numbers of CTPs initially attached to both substrates were similar. However, cells on microtextured PDMS transitioned from lag phase after 4 days of culture, in contrast to 6 days for cells on smooth surfaces. By day 9 cells on the smooth surfaces exhibited arbitrary flattened shapes and migrated without any preferred orientation. In contrast, cells on the microtextured PDMS grew along the array of posts in an orthogonal manner. By days 30 and 60 cells grew and covered all surfaces with extracellular matrix. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of integrin α5 was greater on the microtextured PDMS compared with smooth surfaces. Real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that gene expression of alkaline phosphatase had decreased by days 30 and 60, compared with that on day 9, for both substrates. Gene expression of collagen I and osteocalcin was consistently greater on post microtextures relative to smooth surfaces at all time points. PMID:19539062

  10. The Cell Cycle Switch Computes Approximate Majority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, Luca; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2012-09-01

    Both computational and biological systems have to make decisions about switching from one state to another. The `Approximate Majority' computational algorithm provides the asymptotically fastest way to reach a common decision by all members of a population between two possible outcomes, where the decision approximately matches the initial relative majority. The network that regulates the mitotic entry of the cell-cycle in eukaryotes also makes a decision before it induces early mitotic processes. Here we show that the switch from inactive to active forms of the mitosis promoting Cyclin Dependent Kinases is driven by a system that is related to both the structure and the dynamics of the Approximate Majority computation. We investigate the behavior of these two switches by deterministic, stochastic and probabilistic methods and show that the steady states and temporal dynamics of the two systems are similar and they are exchangeable as components of oscillatory networks.

  11. SUMOylation-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation plays critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancers were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could potentially be exploited in anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26601932

  12. Accelerated discovery via a whole-cell model.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, Jayodita C; Regot, Sergi; Carrasco, Silvia; Karr, Jonathan R; Gutschow, Miriam V; Bolival, Benjamin; Covert, Markus W

    2013-12-01

    To test the promise of whole-cell modeling to facilitate scientific inquiry, we compared growth rates simulated in a whole-cell model with experimental measurements for all viable single-gene disruption Mycoplasma genitalium strains. Discrepancies between simulations and experiments led to predictions about kinetic parameters of specific enzymes that we subsequently validated. These findings represent, to our knowledge, the first application of whole-cell modeling to accelerate biological discovery. PMID:24185838

  13. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Prince, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Three tasks were undertaken to investigate reliability attributes of terrestrial solar cells: (1) a study of the electrical behavior of cells in the second (reverse) quadrant; (2) the accelerated stress testing of three new state-of-the-art cells; and (3) the continued bias-temperature testing of four block 2 type silicon cells at 78 C and 135 C. Electrical characteristics measured in the second quadrant were determined to be a function of the cell's thermal behavior with breakdown depending on the initiation of localized heating. This implied that high breakdown cells may be more fault tolerant when forced to operate in the second quadrant, a result contrary to conventional thinking. The accelerated stress tests used in the first (power) quadrant were bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, temperature-humidity, thermal shock, and thermal cycle. The new type cells measured included an EFG cell, a polycrystalline cell, and a Czochralski cell. Significant differences in the response to the various tests were observed between cell types. A microprocessed controlled, short interval solar cell tester was designed and construction initiated on a prototype.

  14. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Krynetskiy, Evgeny

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  15. Accelerated multiscale space-time finite element simulation and application to high cycle fatigue life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Wen, Lihua; Naboulsi, Sam; Eason, Thomas; Vasudevan, Vijay K.; Qian, Dong

    2016-05-01

    A multiscale space-time finite element method based on time-discontinuous Galerkin and enrichment approach is presented in this work with a focus on improving the computational efficiencies for high cycle fatigue simulations. While the robustness of the TDG-based space-time method has been extensively demonstrated, a critical barrier for the extensive application is the large computational cost due to the additional temporal dimension and enrichment that are introduced. The present implementation focuses on two aspects: firstly, a preconditioned iterative solver is developed along with techniques for optimizing the matrix storage and operations. Secondly, parallel algorithms based on multi-core graphics processing unit are established to accelerate the progressive damage model implementation. It is shown that the computing time and memory from the accelerated space-time implementation scale with the number of degree of freedom N through {˜ }{O}(N^{1.6}) and {˜ }{O}(N) , respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the accelerated space-time FEM simulation through benchmark problems.

  16. Accelerated multiscale space-time finite element simulation and application to high cycle fatigue life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Wen, Lihua; Naboulsi, Sam; Eason, Thomas; Vasudevan, Vijay K.; Qian, Dong

    2016-08-01

    A multiscale space-time finite element method based on time-discontinuous Galerkin and enrichment approach is presented in this work with a focus on improving the computational efficiencies for high cycle fatigue simulations. While the robustness of the TDG-based space-time method has been extensively demonstrated, a critical barrier for the extensive application is the large computational cost due to the additional temporal dimension and enrichment that are introduced. The present implementation focuses on two aspects: firstly, a preconditioned iterative solver is developed along with techniques for optimizing the matrix storage and operations. Secondly, parallel algorithms based on multi-core graphics processing unit are established to accelerate the progressive damage model implementation. It is shown that the computing time and memory from the accelerated space-time implementation scale with the number of degree of freedom N through ˜ O(N^{1.6}) and ˜ O(N), respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the accelerated space-time FEM simulation through benchmark problems.

  17. Performance Degradation of Encapsulated Monocrystalline-Si Solar Cells upon Accelerated Weathering Exposures: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S. H.; Pern, F. J.; Watson, G. L.; Tomek, D.; Raaff, J.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Performed accelerated exposures to study performance reliability/materials degradation of encapsulated c-Si cells using weathering protocols in 2 weatherometers. We have performed accelerated exposures to study performance reliability and materials degradation of a total of forty-one 3-cm x 3-cm monocrystalline-Si (c-Si) solar cells that were variously encapsulated using accelerated weathering protocols in two weatherometers (WOMs), with and without front specimen water sprays. Laminated cells (EVA/c-Si/EVA, ethylene vinyl acetate) with one of five superstrate/substrate variations and other features including with and without: (i) load resistance, (ii) Al foil light masks, and (iii) epoxy edge-sealing were studied. Three additional samples, omitting EVA, were exposed under a full-spectrum solar simulator, or heated in an oven, for comparison. After exposures, cell performance decreased irregularly, but to a relatively greater extent for samples exposed in WOM where light, heat, and humidity cycles were present (solar simulator or oven lacked such cycles). EVA laminates in the samples masked with aluminum (Al) foils were observed to retain moisture in WOM with water spray. Moisture effects caused substantial efficiency losses probably related in part to increasing series resistance.

  18. Physics design of the DARHT 2nd axis accelerator cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y J; Houck, T L; Reginato, L J; Shang, C C; Yu, S S

    1999-08-19

    The next generation of radiographic machines based on induction accelerators require very high brightness electron beams to realize the desired x-ray spot size and intensity. This high brightness must be maintained throughout the beam transport, from source to x-ray converter target. The accelerator for the second-axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility is being designed to accelerate a 4-kA, 2-{micro}s pulse of electrons to 20 MeV. After acceleration, the 2-{micro}s pulse will be chopped into a train of four 50-ns pulses with variable temporal spacing by rapidly deflecting the beam between a beam stop and the final transport section. The short beam pulses will be focused onto an x-ray converter target generating four radiographic pulses within the 2-{micro}s window. Beam instability due to interaction with the accelerator cells can very adversely effect the beam brightness and radiographic pulse quality. This paper describes the various issues considered in the design of the accelerator cell with emphasis on transverse impedance and minimizing beam instabilities.

  19. Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle

    DOEpatents

    Micheli, Paul L.; Williams, Mark C.; Sudhoff, Frederick A.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

  20. ELECTRON AND PROTON ACCELERATION DURING THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Sun, L. P.; Firoz, Kazi A.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    2013-06-10

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 {+-} 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 {+-} 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released {approx}10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of {approx}1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to {approx}3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  1. Electron and Proton Acceleration during the First Ground Level Enhancement Event of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Firoz, Kazi A.; Sun, L. P.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    2013-06-01

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 ± 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 ± 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released ~10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of ~1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to ~3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  2. Inhibitor of DNA binding 1 regulates cell cycle progression of endothelial progenitor cells through induction of Wnt2 expression.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xi; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Ma, Yang; Wang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Endothelial injury is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) proliferation contributes to vascular injury repair. Overexpression of inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (Id1) significantly promotes EPC proliferation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. The present study investigated the role of Id1 in cell cycle regulation of EPCs, which is closely associated with proliferation. Overexpression of Id1 increased the proportion of EPCs in the S/G2M phase and significantly increased cyclin D1 expression levels, while knockdown of Id1 arrested the cell cycle progression of EPCs in the G1 phase and inhibited cyclin D1 expression levels. In addition, it was demonstrated that Id1 upregulated wingless‑type mouse mammary tumor virus integration site family member 2 (Wnt2) expression levels and promoted β‑catenin accumulation and nuclear translocation. Furthermore, Wnt2 knockdown counteracted the effects of Id1 on cell cycle progression of EPCs. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that Id1 promoted Wnt2 expression, which accelerated cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. This suggests that Id1 may promote cell cycle progression of EPCs, and that Wnt2 may be important in Id1 regulation of the cell cycle of EPCs. PMID:27432753

  3. TESTING METGLAS FOR USE IN DARHT ACCELERATOR CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. ROSE; D.A. DALMAS; J.N. DOWNING; R.D. TEMPLE

    2001-06-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility [DARHT] at Los Alamos will use two induction linacs to produce high-energy electron beams. The electron beams will be used to generate x-rays from bremsstrahlung targets. The x-rays will be used to produce radiographs. The first accelerator is operational now, producing a 60-nanosecond electron beam. The second accelerator is under construction. It will produce a 2-microsecond electron beam. The 78 induction cells of the second axis accelerator require a total Metglas capacity of approximately 40 volt seconds of flux. Four Metglas cores are used in each of the 5-foot diameter accelerator cells. Each Metglas core weighs approximately 3000 pounds. This paper presents the measurement techniques and results of the Metglas tests. Routine automated analysis and archival of the pulse data provided hysteresis curves, energy loss curves and total flux swing in the operating regime. Results of the tests were used to help the manufacturer improve quality control and increase the average flux swing of the cores. Results of the tests were used to match Metglas cores and to assemble accelerator cells with equal volt-second ratings.

  4. Graded requirement for the spliceosome in cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Karamysheva, Zemfira; Díaz-Martínez, Laura A; Warrington, Ross; Yu, Hongtao

    2015-01-01

    Genome stability is ensured by multiple surveillance mechanisms that monitor the duplication, segregation, and integrity of the genome throughout the cell cycle. Depletion of components of the spliceosome, a macromolecular machine essential for mRNA maturation and gene expression, has been associated with increased DNA damage and cell cycle defects. However, the specific role for the spliceosome in these processes has remained elusive, as different cell cycle defects have been reported depending on the specific spliceosome subunit depleted. Through a detailed cell cycle analysis after spliceosome depletion, we demonstrate that the spliceosome is required for progression through multiple phases of the cell cycle. Strikingly, the specific cell cycle phenotype observed after spliceosome depletion correlates with the extent of depletion. Partial depletion of a core spliceosome component results in defects at later stages of the cell cycle (G2 and mitosis), whereas a more complete depletion of the same component elicits an early cell cycle arrest in G1. We propose a quantitative model in which different functional dosages of the spliceosome are required for different cell cycle transitions. PMID:25892155

  5. The Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Preferentially Interacts with Oral Epithelial Cells in S Phase of the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Al-Taweel, Firas B; Douglas, C W Ian; Whawell, Simon A

    2016-07-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a key periodontal pathogen, is capable of invading a variety of cells, including oral keratinocytes, by exploiting host cell receptors, including alpha-5 beta-1 (α5β1) integrin. Previous studies have shown that P. gingivalis accelerates the cell cycle and prevents apoptosis of host cells, but it is not known whether the cell cycle phases influence bacterium-cell interactions. The cell cycle distribution of oral keratinocytes was characterized by flow cytometry and BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) staining following synchronization of cultures by serum starvation. The effect of cell cycle phases on P. gingivalis invasion was measured by using antibiotic protection assays and flow cytometry, and these results were correlated with gene and surface expression levels of α5 integrin and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). There was a positive correlation (R = 0.98) between the number of cells in S phase and P. gingivalis invasion, the organism was more highly associated with cells in S phase than with cells in G2 and G1 phases, and S-phase cells contained 10 times more bacteria than did cells that were not in S phase. Our findings also show that α5 integrin, but not uPAR, was positively correlated with cells in S phase, which is consistent with previous reports indicating that P. gingivalis invasion of cells is mediated by α5 integrin. This study shows for the first time that P. gingivalis preferentially associates with and invades cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. The mechanism of targeting stable dividing cells may have implications for the treatment of periodontal diseases and may partly explain the persistence of this organism at subgingival sites. PMID:27091929

  6. Burn to cycle: energetics of cell-cycle control and stem cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Mans, Laurie D; Haramis, Anna-Pavlina G

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells have the unique ability to both maintain the stem cell population via self-renewal and give rise to differentiated cells. The balance between these options is very delicate and important for the short- and long-term maintenance of tissue homeostasis in an organism. Pathways involved in integrating environmental cues and in directing energy metabolism play an important role in the fate decisions of stem cells. In this review, we give an overview of the effects of cellular and systemic metabolic states on stem-cell fate in both embryonic and in adult stem cell populations, with a particular emphasis on cell-cycle regulation. We discuss the major pathways implicated in sensing energetic status and regulating metabolism, including: the mTOR pathway, Forkhead-box-O transcription factors (FoxOs), Sirtuins, reactive oxygen species (ROS), AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and LKB1, the mTOR pathway and hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). Given the importance of a correct balance between self-renewal and differentiation, understanding the mechanisms that drive stem-cell fate in different metabolic conditions will provide more insight in stem cell biology in both health and disease. PMID:24896332

  7. Gene Profiling Technique to Accelerate Stem Cell Therapies for Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... to accelerate stem cell therapies for eye diseases Gene profiling technique to accelerate stem cell therapies for ... The method simultaneously measures the expression of multiple genes, allowing scientists to quickly characterize cells according to ...

  8. Cell cycle control of polyomavirus-induced transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H H; Fluck, M M

    1993-01-01

    The cell cycle dependence of polyomavirus transformation was analyzed in infections of nonpermissive Fischer rat (FR3T3) cells released from G0. A 5- to 100-fold (average, ca. 20-fold) difference in relative frequency of transformation was found for cells infected in the early G1 phase of the cell cycle compared with cells infected in G2. Differences in the relative level of early viral gene expression in those two cell populations were equivalent to those obtained for transformation frequencies. The difference in transformation potential was accounted for only in part by a cell cycle control of viral adsorption (2- to 15-fold effect). Furthermore, in cells infected in the early G1 phase, viral gene expression was induced as a big synchronous burst of large transcripts of variable sizes, delayed till the G1 phase of the cell cycle after that in which infection took place. Thus, the results demonstrate that the abortive infection cycle of G0-released FR3T3 cells is cell cycle regulated at least at two steps: adsorption and another early step, nuclear transport, decapsidation, up to or including the transcription of the viral early genes. The cell cycle regulation of these steps results in a similar regulation of the abortive and stable transformation processes, although it is more pronounced for the latter. A model implicating c-fos and c-jun is proposed. Images PMID:8383223

  9. Basal p21 controls population heterogeneity in cycling and quiescent cell cycle states

    PubMed Central

    Overton, K. Wesley; Spencer, Sabrina L.; Noderer, William L.; Meyer, Tobias; Wang, Clifford L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity within a population of genetically identical cells is emerging as a common theme in multiple biological systems, including human cell biology and cancer. Using live-cell imaging, flow cytometry, and kinetic modeling, we showed that two states—quiescence and cell cycling—can coexist within an isogenic population of human cells and resulted from low basal expression levels of p21, a Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor (CKI). We attribute the p21-dependent heterogeneity in cell cycle activity to double-negative feedback regulation involving CDK2, p21, and E3 ubiquitin ligases. In support of this mechanism, analysis of cells at a point before cell cycle entry (i.e., before the G1/S transition) revealed a p21–CDK2 axis that determines quiescent and cycling cell states. Our findings suggest a mechanistic role for p21 in generating heterogeneity in both normal tissues and tumors. PMID:25267623

  10. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  11. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells-update 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in low earth orbit (LEO) cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel (IPV nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte was about 40 000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. This test was conducted at Hughes Aircraft Company under a NASA Lewis contract. The purpose was to investigate the effect of KOH concentration on cycle life. The cycle regime was a stressful accelerated LEO, which consisted of a 27.5 min charge followed by a 17.5 min discharge (2x normal rate). The depth of discharge (DOD) was 80 percent. The cell temperature was maintained at 23 C. The boiler plate test results are in the process of being validated using flight hardware and real time LEO test at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis Contract. Six 48 Ah Hughes recirculation design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells are being evaluated. Three of the cells contain 26 percent KOH (test cells), and three contain 31 percent KOH (control cells). They are undergoing real time LEO cycle life testing. The cycle regime is a 90-min LEO orbit consisting of a 54-min charge followed by a 36-min discharge. The depth-of-discharge is 80 percent. The cell temperature is maintained at 10 C. The three 31 percent KOH cells failed (cycles 3729, 4165, and 11355). One of the 26 percent KOH cells failed at cycle 15314. The other two 26 percent KOH cells were cycled for over 16600 cycles during the continuing test.

  12. From the cell cycle to population cycles in phytoplankton-nutrient interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pascual, M.; Caswell, H.

    1997-04-01

    The internal demographic structure of a population influences its dynamics and its response to the environment. Most models for phytoplankton ignore internal structure and group all cells in a single variable such as total biomass or density. However, a cell does have a life history, the cell division cycle. We investigate the significance of the cell cycle to phytoplankton population dynamics in a variable nutrient environment, using chemostate models. Following the transition point hypothesis, nutrient uptake affects cell development only within a limited segment of the cell cycle. Simulation results demonstrate oscillations in cell numbers and population structure generated by this interaction. When nutrient input is varied periodically, the population displays an aperiodic response with frequencies different from that of the forcing. These results also hold for a model that includes nutrient storage by the cells. These dynamics differ from those of traditional chemostate models and from cell cycle models driven by light cycles. Resource control of cell cycle progression may explain the time delays previously postulated to explain oscillatory transients in chemostate experiments. 78 refs., 22 figs.

  13. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi; Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer; Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  14. Magnetic Shielding Accelerates the Proliferation of Human Neuroblastoma Cell by Promoting G1-Phase Progression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  15. Magnetic shielding accelerates the proliferation of human neuroblastoma cell by promoting G1-phase progression.

    PubMed

    Mo, Wei-chuan; Zhang, Zi-jian; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  16. Molten salt considerations for accelerator-driven subcritical fission to close the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Baty, Austin; Gerity, James; McIntyre, Peter; Melconian, Karie; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Adams, Marvin; Tsevkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2013-04-19

    The host salt selection, molecular modeling, physical chemistry, and processing chemistry are presented here for an accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). The core is fueled solely with the transuranics (TRU) and long-lived fission products (LFP) from used nuclear fuel. The neutronics and salt composition are optimized to destroy the transuranics by fission and the long-lived fission products by transmutation. The cores are driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. One such ADSMS system can destroy the transuranics in the used nuclear fuel produced by a 1GWe conventional reactor. It uniquely provides a method to close the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy.

  17. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal stress cycling was performed on gallium arsenide solar cells to investigate their electrical, mechanical, and structural integrity. Cells were cycled under low Earth orbit (LEO) simulated temperature conditions in vacuum. Cell evaluations consisted of power output values, spectral response, optical microscopy and ion microprobe mass analysis, and depth profiles on both front surface inter-grid areas and metallization contact grid lines. Cells were examined for degradation after 500, 5,000, 10,000 and 15,245 thermal cycles. No indication of performance degradation was found for any vendor's cell lot.

  18. Long-term storage life of light source modules by temperature cycling accelerated life test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningning, Sun; Manqing, Tan; Ping, Li; Jian, Jiao; Xiaofeng, Guo; Wentao, Guo

    2014-05-01

    Light source modules are the most crucial and fragile devices that affect the life and reliability of the interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG). While the light emitting chips were stable in most cases, the module packaging proved to be less satisfactory. In long-term storage or the working environment, the ambient temperature changes constantly and thus the packaging and coupling performance of light source modules are more likely to degrade slowly due to different materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion in the bonding interface. A constant temperature accelerated life test cannot evaluate the impact of temperature variation on the performance of a module package, so the temperature cycling accelerated life test was studied. The main failure mechanism affecting light source modules is package failure due to solder fatigue failure including a fiber coupling shift, loss of cooling efficiency and thermal resistor degradation, so the Norris-Landzberg model was used to model solder fatigue life and determine the activation energy related to solder fatigue failure mechanism. By analyzing the test data, activation energy was determined and then the mean life of light source modules in different storage environments with a continuously changing temperature was simulated, which has provided direct reference data for the storage life prediction of IFOG.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  20. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  1. Regulation of the Embryonic Cell Cycle During Mammalian Preimplantation Development.

    PubMed

    Palmer, N; Kaldis, P

    2016-01-01

    The preimplantation development stage of mammalian embryogenesis consists of a series of highly conserved, regulated, and predictable cell divisions. This process is essential to allow the rapid expansion and differentiation of a single-cell zygote into a multicellular blastocyst containing cells of multiple developmental lineages. This period of development, also known as the germinal stage, encompasses several important developmental transitions, which are accompanied by dramatic changes in cell cycle profiles and dynamics. These changes are driven primarily by differences in the establishment and enforcement of cell cycle checkpoints, which must be bypassed to facilitate the completion of essential cell cycle events. Much of the current knowledge in this area has been amassed through the study of knockout models in mice. These mouse models are powerful experimental tools, which have allowed us to dissect the relative dependence of the early embryonic cell cycles on various aspects of the cell cycle machinery and highlight the extent of functional redundancy between members of the same gene family. This chapter will explore the ways in which the cell cycle machinery, their accessory proteins, and their stimuli operate during mammalian preimplantation using mouse models as a reference and how this allows for the usually well-defined stages of the cell cycle to be shaped and transformed during this unique and critical stage of development. PMID:27475848

  2. Capacity-cycle life behavior in secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Carter, B. J.; Shen, D.; Yen, S. P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The practical utilization of high energy density rechargeable lithium cells is dependent upon maintaining high capacity for the duration of the required cycle life. However, a critical, yet generic problem with room temperature lithium systems is that the capacity often declines considerably during the early stages of cycling. The results of our studies are reported on electrolyte degradation which is observed after cells have undergone 300 and 700 deep cycles with 3-methylsulfolane- and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran-LiAsF6 electrolytes, respectively.

  3. The ORC1 cycle in human cells: I. cell cycle-regulated oscillation of human ORC1.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Yasutoshi; Ohta, Satoshi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Obuse, Chikashi

    2003-10-17

    Components of ORC (the origin recognition complex) are highly conserved among eukaryotes and are thought to play an essential role in the initiation of DNA replication. The level of the largest subunit of human ORC (ORC1) during the cell cycle was studied in several human cell lines with a specific antibody. In all cell lines, ORC1 levels oscillate: ORC1 starts to accumulate in mid-G1 phase, reaches a peak at the G1/S boundary, and decreases to a basal level in S phase. In contrast, the levels of other ORC subunits (ORCs 2-5) remain constant throughout the cell cycle. The oscillation of ORC1, or the ORC1 cycle, also occurs in cells expressing ORC1 ectopically from a constitutive promoter. Furthermore, the 26 S proteasome inhibitor MG132 blocks the decrease in ORC1, suggesting that the ORC1 cycle is mainly due to 26 S proteasome-dependent degradation. Arrest of the cell cycle in early S phase by hydroxyurea, aphidicolin, or thymidine treatment is associated with basal levels of ORC1, indicating that ORC1 proteolysis starts in early S phase and is independent of S phase progression. These observations indicate that the ORC1 cycle in human cells is highly linked with cell cycle progression, allowing the initiation of replication to be coordinated with the cell cycle and preventing origins from refiring. PMID:12909627

  4. Accelerated stress testing of amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoddard, W. G.; Davis, C. W.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for performing accelerated stress tests of large-area thin a-Si solar cells is presented. A computer-controlled short-interval test system employing low-cost ac-powered ELH illumination and a simulated a-Si reference cell (seven individually bandpass-filtered zero-biased crystalline PIN photodiodes) calibrated to the response of an a-Si control cell is described and illustrated with flow diagrams, drawings, and graphs. Preliminary results indicate that while most tests of a program developed for c-Si cells are applicable to a-Si cells, spurious degradation may appear in a-Si cells tested at temperatures above 130 C.

  5. Analysis of Cell Cycle Phase Response Captures the Synchronization Phenomena and Reveals a Novel Cell Cycle Network Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Lin, Yihan; Scherer, Norbert; Dinner, Aaron

    2011-03-01

    Cell cycle progression requires a succession of temporally-regulated sub-processes, including chromosome replication and cell division, which are each controlled by their own regulatory modules. The modular design of cell cycle regulatory network allows robust environmental responses and evolutionary adaptations. It is emerging that some of the cell cycle modules involve their own autonomous periodic dynamics. As a consequence, the realization of robust coordination among these modules becomes challenging since each module could potentially run out of sync. We believe that an insight into this puzzle resides in the coupling between the contributing regulatory modules. Here, we measured the phase response curve (PRC) of the cell cycle oscillator by driving the expression of a master regulator of the cell cycle in a pulsatile manner and measuring the single cell phase response. We constructed a return map that quantitatively explains the synchronization phenomena that were caused by periodic chemical perturbation. To capture the measured phase response, we derived a minimalist coupled oscillator model that generalizes the basic topology of the cell cycle network. This diode-like coupling suggests that the cell is engineered to ensure complete coordination of constituent events with the cell cycle.

  6. Different cell cycle modulation by celecoxib at different concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mee; Pyo, Hongryull

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Different cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors were known to cause different cell cycle changes. We investigated whether this different effect on cell cycle change was due to concentration-dependent effect. We investigated the effects of celecoxib, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, on cell cycle regulation in irradiated cancer cells that express high or low levels of COX-2. Four stably COX-2 knocked-down or overexpressed cell lines were treated with various concentrations of celecoxib with or without radiation. Celecoxib differentially modulated the cell cycle according to the concentrations applied. G1 arrest was induced at lower concentrations, whereas G2/M arrest was induced at higher concentrations in each cell line tested. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was enhanced at lower concentrations but reduced at higher concentrations. The cutoff values to divide lower and higher concentrations were cell-type specific. Celecoxib treatment activated Cdc25C and inhibited p21 expression in both unirradiated and irradiated cells, regardless of COX-2 expression. Apoptosis was induced in irradiated cells 48 hours after treatment with celecoxib dependent of COX-2. These results imply that celecoxib deactivates the G2 checkpoint via both Cdc25C- and p21-dependent pathways in irradiated cells, which subsequently die by secondary apoptosis. Cell cycle modulating effects in irradiated cells resulting from treatment with celecoxib may have clinical importance with regard to the potential application of celecoxib in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:23268707

  7. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  8. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  9. Accelerated and real-time geosynchronous life cycling test performance of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    RCA Astro-Electronics currently has four nickel-hydrogen storage battery modules (11 cells each) on test in simulated geosynchronous life cycle regimes. These battery modules are of identical design to those used on the GSTAR (GTE Satellite Corp.) and Spacenet (GTE Spacenet Corp.) communications satellites. The batteries are being tested using an automated test station equipped with computer-controlled environmental chambers and recording equipment. The two battery types, 30 ampere-hours and 40 ampere-hours (GSTAR and Spacenet, respectively), are being electrically cycled using identical 44-day eclipse sequences at 5 C and vary with respect to depth of discharge, recharge ratio, duration of accumulated suntime, and the use of a reconditioning sequence. The test parameters are outlined and the preliminary test data and results are presented.

  10. New activators and inhibitors in the hair cycle clock: targeting stem cells' state of competence.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V

    2012-05-01

    The timing mechanism of the hair cycle remains poorly understood. However, it has become increasingly clear that the telogen-to-anagen transition is controlled jointly by at least the bone morphogenic protein (BMP), WNT, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathways. New research shows that Fgf18 signaling in hair follicle stem cells synergizes BMP-mediated refractivity, whereas Tgf-β2 signaling counterbalances it. Loss of Fgf18 signaling markedly accelerates anagen initiation, whereas loss of Tgf-β2 signaling significantly delays it, supporting key roles for these pathways in hair cycle timekeeping. PMID:22499035

  11. Cycle life test. [of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Statistical information concerning cell performance characteristics and limitations of secondary spacecraft cells is presented. Weaknesses in cell design as well as battery weaknesses encountered in various satellite programs are reported. Emphasis is placed on improving the reliability of space batteries.

  12. Cell cycle control, checkpoint mechanisms, and genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, R E; Kaufmann, W K; Paules, R S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cells to maintain genomic integrity is vital for cell survival and proliferation. Lack of fidelity in DNA replication and maintenance can result in deleterious mutations leading to cell death or, in multicellular organisms, cancer. The purpose of this review is to discuss the known signal transduction pathways that regulate cell cycle progression and the mechanisms cells employ to insure DNA stability in the face of genotoxic stress. In particular, we focus on mammalian cell cycle checkpoint functions, their role in maintaining DNA stability during the cell cycle following exposure to genotoxic agents, and the gene products that act in checkpoint function signal transduction cascades. Key transitions in the cell cycle are regulated by the activities of various protein kinase complexes composed of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) molecules. Surveillance control mechanisms that check to ensure proper completion of early events and cellular integrity before initiation of subsequent events in cell cycle progression are referred to as cell cycle checkpoints and can generate a transient delay that provides the cell more time to repair damage before progressing to the next phase of the cycle. A variety of cellular responses are elicited that function in checkpoint signaling to inhibit cyclin/Cdk activities. These responses include the p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of Cdk inhibitors and the p53-independent inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk molecules themselves. Eliciting proper G1, S, and G2 checkpoint responses to double-strand DNA breaks requires the function of the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene product. Several human heritable cancer-prone syndromes known to alter DNA stability have been found to have defects in checkpoint surveillance pathways. Exposures to several common sources of genotoxic stress, including oxidative stress, ionizing radiation, UV radiation, and the genotoxic compound benzo[a]pyrene, elicit cell cycle

  13. Thermal and Cycle-Life Behavior of Commercial Li-ion and Li-Polymer Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.; Quinzio, M. V.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerated and real-time LEO cycle-life test data will be presented for a range of commercial Li-ion and Li-polymer (gel type) cells indicating the ranges of performance that can be obtained, and the performance screening tests that must be done to assure long life. The data show large performance variability between cells, as well as a highly variable degradation signature during non-cycling periods within the life tests. High-resolution Dynamic Calorimetry data will be presented showing the complex series of reactions occurring within these Li cells as they are cycled. Data will also be presented for cells being tested using an Adaptive Charge Control Algorithm (ACCA) that continuously adapts itself to changes in cell performance, operation, or environment to both find and maintain the optimum recharge over life. The ACCA has been used to prevent all unneeded overcharge for Li cells, NiCd cells and NiH2 cells. While this is important for all these cell types, it is most critical for Li-ion cells, which are not designed with electrochemical tolerance for overcharge.

  14. Estimation of direct laser acceleration in laser wakefield accelerators using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. L.; Lemos, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2016-03-01

    Many current laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiments are carried out in a regime where the laser pulse length is on the order of or longer than the wake wavelength and where ionization injection is employed to inject electrons into the wake. In these experiments, the electrons can gain a significant amount of energy from the direct laser acceleration (DLA) mechanism as well as the usual LWFA mechanism. Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes are frequently used to discern the relative contribution of these two mechanisms. However, if the longitudinal resolution used in the PIC simulations is inadequate, it can produce numerical heating that can overestimate the transverse motion, which is important in determining the energy gain due to DLA. We have therefore carried out a systematic study of this LWFA regime by varying the longitudinal resolution of PIC simulations and then examining the energy gain characteristics of both the highest-energy electrons and the bulk electrons. By calculating the contribution of DLA to the final energies of the electrons produced from the LWFA, we find that even at the highest longitudinal resolutions, DLA contributes a significant portion of the energy gained by the highest-energy electrons and also contributes to accelerating the bulk of the charge in the electron beam produced by the LWFA.

  15. In situ cell cycle phase determination using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Takenaka, Tatsuji; Sato, Hidetoshi; Furihata, Chie

    2010-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analysis of the chemical composition in living tissue and cells without destructive processes such as fixation, immunostaining, and fluorescence labeling. Raman microspectroscopic technique enables us to obtain a high quality spectrum from a single living cell. We demonstrated in situ cell cycle analysis with Raman microspectroscopy with the excitation wavelength of 532 nm. Cell cycle phases, G0/G1 and G2/M were able to be identified in the present study. The result of in situ Raman analysis was evaluated with flow cytometry analysis. Although the Raman spectra of living cells showed complex patterns during cell cycle, several Raman bands could be useful as markers for the cell cycle identification. A single cell analysis using Raman microspectroscopy predicted a possibility to observe directly molecular dynamics intracellular molecules of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Our current study focused on cytoplasm region and resonant Raman signals of cytochrome c in mitochondrion, and discussed how the Raman signals from cellular components contribute to the Raman spectral changes in cell cycle change in the human living cell (lung cancer cell).

  16. Adenosine induces G2/M cell-cycle arrest by inhibiting cell mitosis progression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun-Zhi; Tang, Bo; Yu, Lu; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Jian-Fa; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2010-01-01

    Cellular adenosine accumulates under stress conditions. Few papers on adenosine are concerned with its function in the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the essential mechanism by which all living things reproduce and the target machinery when cells encounter stresses, so it is necessary to examine the relationship between adenosine and the cell cycle. In the present study, adenosine was found to induce G-2/M cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, adenosine was found to modulate the expression of some important proteins in the cell cycle, such as cyclin B and p21, and to inhibit the transition of metaphase to anaphase in mitosis. PMID:19947935

  17. Cell Cycle Regulates Nuclear Stability of AID and Determines the Cellular Response to AID

    PubMed Central

    Le, Quy; Maizels, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    AID (Activation Induced Deaminase) deaminates cytosines in DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification and to reprogram CpG methylation in early development. AID is potentially highly mutagenic, and it causes genomic instability evident as translocations in B cell malignancies. Here we show that AID is cell cycle regulated. By high content screening microscopy, we demonstrate that AID undergoes nuclear degradation more slowly in G1 phase than in S or G2-M phase, and that mutations that affect regulatory phosphorylation or catalytic activity can alter AID stability and abundance. We directly test the role of cell cycle regulation by fusing AID to tags that destabilize nuclear protein outside of G1 or S-G2/M phases. We show that enforced nuclear localization of AID in G1 phase accelerates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, and is well-tolerated; while nuclear AID compromises viability in S-G2/M phase cells. We identify AID derivatives that accelerate somatic hypermutation with minimal impact on viability, which will be useful tools for engineering genes and proteins by iterative mutagenesis and selection. Our results further suggest that use of cell cycle tags to regulate nuclear stability may be generally applicable to studying DNA repair and to engineering the genome. PMID:26355458

  18. 27-Hydroxycholesterol accelerates cellular senescence in human lung resident cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sugiura, Hisatoshi; Togo, Shinsaku; Koarai, Akira; Abe, Kyoko; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Numakura, Tadahisa; Onodera, Katsuhiro; Tanaka, Rie; Sato, Kei; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Tamada, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Okada, Yoshinori; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2016-06-01

    Cellular senescence is reportedly involved in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We previously showed that 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC) is elevated in the airways of COPD patients compared with those in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether lung fibroblasts of COPD patients are senescent and to determine the effects of 27-OHC on senescence of lung resident cells, including fibroblasts and airway epithelial cells. Localization of senescence-associated proteins and sterol 27-hydroxylase was investigated in the lungs of COPD patients by immunohistochemical staining. To evaluate whether 27-OHC accelerates cellular senescence, lung resident cells were exposed to 27-OHC. Senescence markers and fibroblast-mediated tissue repair were investigated in the 27-OHC-treated cells. Expression of senescence-associated proteins was significantly enhanced in lung fibroblasts of COPD patients. Similarly, expression of sterol 27-hydroxylase was significantly upregulated in lung fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages in these patients. Treatment with the concentration of 27-OHC detected in COPD airways significantly augmented expression of senescence-associated proteins and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, and delayed cell growth through the prostaglandin E2-reactive nitrogen species pathway. The 27-OHC-treated fibroblasts impaired tissue repair function. Fibroblasts from lungs of COPD patients showed accelerated senescence and were more susceptible to 27-OHC-induced cellular senescence compared with those of healthy subjects. In conclusion, 27-OHC accelerates cellular senescence in lung resident cells and may play a pivotal role in cellular senescence in COPD. PMID:27036870

  19. Subversion of cell cycle regulatory mechanisms by HIV

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Andrew P.; Kimata, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    To establish a productive infection, HIV-1 must counteract cellular innate immune mechanisms and redirect cellular process towards viral replication. Recent studies have discovered that HIV-1 and other primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to achieve these ends. The viral Vpr and Vpx proteins target cell cycle controls to counter innate immunity. The cell cycle-related protein Cyclin L2 is also utilized to counter innate immunity. The viral Tat protein utilizes Cyclin T1 to activated proviral transcription, and regulation of Cyclin T1 levels in CD4+ T cells has important consequences for viral replication and latency. This review will summarize this emerging evidence that primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to enhance replication. PMID:26067601

  20. Endothelial cell subpopulations in vitro: cell volume, cell cycle, and radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Bauer, K.D. )

    1989-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (EC) are important clinical targets of radiation and other forms of free radical/oxidant stresses. In this study, we found that the extent of endothelial damage may be determined by the different cytotoxic responses of EC subpopulations. The following characteristics of EC subpopulations were examined: (1) cell volume; (2) cell cycle position; and (3) cytotoxic indexes for both acute cell survival and proliferative capacity after irradiation (137Cs, gamma, 0-10 Gy). EC cultured from bovine aortas were separated by centrifugal elutriation into subpopulations of different cell volumes. Through flow cytometry, we found that cell volume was related to the cell cycle phase distribution. The smallest EC were distributed in G1 phase and the larger cells were distributed in either early S, middle S, or late S + G2M phases. Cell cycle phase at the time of irradiation was not associated with acute cell loss. However, distribution in the cell cycle did relate to cell survival based on proliferative capacity (P less than 0.01). The order of increasing radioresistance was cells in G1 (D0 = 110 cGy), early S (135 cGy), middle S (145 cGy), and late S + G2M phases (180 cGy). These findings (1) suggest an age-related response to radiation in a nonmalignant differentiated cell type and (2) demonstrate EC subpopulations in culture.

  1. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin O Exhibits Cell Cycle Modulating Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hodille, Elisabeth; Alekseeva, Ludmila; Berkova, Nadia; Serrier, Asma; Badiou, Cedric; Gilquin, Benoit; Brun, Virginie; Vandenesch, François; Terman, David S.; Lina, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of an intact epithelial barrier constitutes a pivotal defense mechanism against infections. Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile pathogen that produces multiple factors including exotoxins that promote tissue alterations. The aim of the present study is to investigate the cytopathic effect of staphylococcal exotoxins SEA, SEG, SEI, SElM, SElN and SElO on the cell cycle of various human cell lines. Among all tested exotoxins only SEIO inhibited the proliferation of a broad panel of human tumor cell lines in vitro. Evaluation of a LDH release and a DNA fragmentation of host cells exposed to SEIO revealed that the toxin does not induce necrosis or apoptosis. Analysis of the DNA content of tumor cells synchronized by serum starvation after exposure to SEIO showed G0/G1 cell cycle delay. The cell cycle modulating feature of SEIO was confirmed by the flow cytometry analysis of synchronized cells exposed to supernatants of isogenic S. aureus strains wherein only supernatant of the SElO producing strain induced G0/G1 phase delay. The results of yeast-two-hybrid analysis indicated that SEIO’s potential partner is cullin-3, involved in the transition from G1 to S phase. In conclusion, we provide evidence that SEIO inhibits cell proliferation without inducing cell death, by delaying host cell entry into the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. We speculate that this unique cell cycle modulating feature allows SEIO producing bacteria to gain advantage by arresting the cell cycle of target cells as part of a broader invasive strategy. PMID:27148168

  2. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin O Exhibits Cell Cycle Modulating Activity.

    PubMed

    Hodille, Elisabeth; Alekseeva, Ludmila; Berkova, Nadia; Serrier, Asma; Badiou, Cedric; Gilquin, Benoit; Brun, Virginie; Vandenesch, François; Terman, David S; Lina, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of an intact epithelial barrier constitutes a pivotal defense mechanism against infections. Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile pathogen that produces multiple factors including exotoxins that promote tissue alterations. The aim of the present study is to investigate the cytopathic effect of staphylococcal exotoxins SEA, SEG, SEI, SElM, SElN and SElO on the cell cycle of various human cell lines. Among all tested exotoxins only SEIO inhibited the proliferation of a broad panel of human tumor cell lines in vitro. Evaluation of a LDH release and a DNA fragmentation of host cells exposed to SEIO revealed that the toxin does not induce necrosis or apoptosis. Analysis of the DNA content of tumor cells synchronized by serum starvation after exposure to SEIO showed G0/G1 cell cycle delay. The cell cycle modulating feature of SEIO was confirmed by the flow cytometry analysis of synchronized cells exposed to supernatants of isogenic S. aureus strains wherein only supernatant of the SElO producing strain induced G0/G1 phase delay. The results of yeast-two-hybrid analysis indicated that SEIO's potential partner is cullin-3, involved in the transition from G1 to S phase. In conclusion, we provide evidence that SEIO inhibits cell proliferation without inducing cell death, by delaying host cell entry into the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. We speculate that this unique cell cycle modulating feature allows SEIO producing bacteria to gain advantage by arresting the cell cycle of target cells as part of a broader invasive strategy. PMID:27148168

  3. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  4. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  5. A revision of the Dictyostelium discoideum cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Weijer, C J; Duschl, G; David, C N

    1984-08-01

    We have investigated the Dictyostelium discoideum cell cycle using fluorometric determinations of cellular and nuclear DNA contents in exponentially growing cultures and in synchronized cultures. Almost all cells are in G2 during both growth and development. There is no G1 period, S phase is less than 0.5 h, and G2 has an average length of 6.5 h in axenically grown cells. Mitochondrial DNA, which constitutes about half of the total DNA, is replicated throughout the cell cycle. There is no difference in the nuclear DNA contents of axenically grown and bacterially grown cells. Thus the long cell cycle in axenically grown cells is due to a lengthening of the G2 phase. PMID:6389576

  6. Climate-change effects on soils: Accelerated weathering, soil carbon and elemental cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-04-01

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (≥400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2, and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils are the subject of active current investigations, with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries, identifies key research needs, and highlights opportunities offered by the climate-change effects on soils.

  7. Configuration and performance of fuel cell-combined cycle options

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, L.K.; Le, P.H.; Sudhoff, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    The natural gas, indirect-fired, carbonate fuel-cell-bottomed, combined cycle (NG-IFCFC) and the topping natural-gas/solid-oxide fuel-cell combined cycle (NG-SOFCCC) are introduced as novel power-plant systems for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20-200 mega-watt (MW) size range. The novel NG-IFCFC power-plant system configures the ambient pressure molten-carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger: The topping solid-oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) combined cycle is not new. The purpose of combining a gas turbine with a fuel cell was to inject pressurized air into a high-pressure fuel cell and to reduce the size, and thereby, to reduce the cost of the fuel cell. Today, the SOFC remains pressurized, but excess chemical energy is combusted and the thermal energy is utilized by the Carnot cycle heat engine to complete the system. ASPEN performance results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC or NG-SOFCCC are better than conventional fuel cell or gas turbine steam-bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components. Fuel cell and gas turbine systems should not be viewed as competitors, but as an opportunity to expand to markets where neither gas turbines nor fuel cells alone would be commercially viable. Non-attainment areas are the most likely markets.

  8. Adaptation to alkalosis induces cell cycle delay and apoptosis in cortical collecting duct cells: role of Aquaporin-2.

    PubMed

    Rivarola, Valeria; Flamenco, Pilar; Melamud, Luciana; Galizia, Luciano; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2010-08-01

    Collecting ducts (CD) not only constitute the final site for regulating urine concentration by increasing apical membrane Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression, but are also essential for the control of acid-base status. The aim of this work was to examine, in renal cells, the effects of chronic alkalosis on cell growth/death as well as to define whether AQP2 expression plays any role during this adaptation. Two CD cell lines were used: WT- (not expressing AQPs) and AQP2-RCCD(1) (expressing apical AQP2). Our results showed that AQP2 expression per se accelerates cell proliferation by an increase in cell cycle progression. Chronic alkalosis induced, in both cells lines, a time-dependent reduction in cell growth. Even more, cell cycle movement, assessed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase and propidium iodide analyses, revealed a G2/M phase cell accumulation associated with longer S- and G2/M-transit times. This G2/M arrest is paralleled with changes consistent with apoptosis. All these effects appeared 24 h before and were always more pronounced in cells expressing AQP2. Moreover, in AQP2-expressing cells, part of the observed alkalosis cell growth decrease is explained by AQP2 protein down-regulation. We conclude that in CD cells alkalosis causes a reduction in cell growth by cell cycle delay that triggers apoptosis as an adaptive reaction to this environment stress. Since cell volume changes are prerequisite for the initiation of cell proliferation or apoptosis, we propose that AQP2 expression facilitates cell swelling or shrinkage leading to the activation of channels necessary to the control of these processes. PMID:20432437

  9. Metal-accelerated oxidation in plant cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Czuba, M. )

    1993-05-01

    Cadmium and mercury toxicity is further enhanced by external oxidizing conditions O[sub 3] or inherent plant processes. Lepidium sativum L, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., or Phaseolus vulgaris L, were grown inpeat-lite to maturity under continuous cadmium exposure followed by one oxidant (O[sub 3]-6 hr. 30 pphm) exposure, with or without foliar calcium pretreatments. In comparison, Daucus carota, L and other species grown in a 71-V suspension, with or without 2,4-D were exposed continuously to low levels of methylmercury during exponential growth and analyzed in aggregates of distinct populations. Proteins were extracted and analyzed. Mechanisms of toxicity and eventual cell death are Ca-mediated and involve chloroplast, stomatal-water relations and changes in oxidant-anti-oxidant components in cells. Whether the metal-accelerated oxidative damage proceeds to cell death, depends on the species and its differential biotransformation system and cell association component.

  10. Immune Dysfunction Associated with Abnormal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stroma Cells in Senescence Accelerated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kequan; Adachi, Yasushi; Ikehara, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Senescence accelerated mice (SAM) are a group of mice that show aging-related diseases, and SAM prone 10 (SAMP10) show spontaneous brain atrophy and defects in learning and memory. Our previous report showed that the thymus and the percentage of T lymphocytes are abnormal in the SAMP10, but it was unclear whether the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stroma cells (BMMSCs) were abnormal, and whether they played an important role in regenerative medicine. We thus compared BMMSCs from SAMP10 and their control, SAM-resistant (SAMR1), in terms of cell cycle, oxidative stress, and the expression of PI3K and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Our cell cycle analysis showed that cell cycle arrest occurred in the G0/G1 phase in the SAMP10. We also found increased reactive oxygen stress and decreased PI3K and MAPK on the BMMSCs. These results suggested the BMMSCs were abnormal in SAMP10, and that this might be related to the immune system dysfunction in these mice. PMID:26840301

  11. Apicomplexan cell cycle flexibility: centrosome controls the clutch

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ti; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome serves as a central hub coordinating multiple cellular events in eukaryotes. A recent study in Toxoplasma gondii revealed a unique bipartite structure of the centrosome, which coordinates the nuclear cycle (S-phase and mitosis) and budding cycle (cytokinesis) of the parasite, and deciphers the principle behind flexible apicomplexan cell division modes. PMID:25899747

  12. Looking at plant cell cycle from the chromatin window

    PubMed Central

    Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Fernández-Marcos, María; Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Otero, Sofía; Vergara, Zaida; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle is defined by a series of complex events, finely coordinated through hormonal, developmental and environmental signals, which occur in a unidirectional manner and end up in producing two daughter cells. Accumulating evidence reveals that chromatin is not a static entity throughout the cell cycle. In fact, there are many changes that include nucleosome remodeling, histone modifications, deposition and exchange, among others. Interestingly, it is possible to correlate the occurrence of several of these chromatin-related events with specific processes necessary for cell cycle progression, e.g., licensing of DNA replication origins, the E2F-dependent transcriptional wave in G1, the activation of replication origins in S-phase, the G2-specific transcription of genes required for mitosis or the chromatin packaging occurring in mitosis. Therefore, an emerging view is that chromatin dynamics must be considered as an intrinsic part of cell cycle regulation. In this article, we review the main features of several key chromatin events that occur at defined times throughout the cell cycle and discuss whether they are actually controlling the transit through specific cell cycle stages. PMID:25120553

  13. Mathematical model of the cell division cycle of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Novak, Bela; Pataki, Zsuzsa; Ciliberto, Andrea; Tyson, John J.

    2001-03-01

    Much is known about the genes and proteins controlling the cell cycle of fission yeast. Can these molecular components be spun together into a consistent mechanism that accounts for the observed behavior of growth and division in fission yeast cells? To answer this question, we propose a mechanism for the control system, convert it into a set of 14 differential and algebraic equations, study these equations by numerical simulation and bifurcation theory, and compare our results to the physiology of wild-type and mutant cells. In wild-type cells, progress through the cell cycle (G1-->S-->G2-->M) is related to cyclic progression around a hysteresis loop, driven by cell growth and chromosome alignment on the metaphase plate. However, the control system operates much differently in double-mutant cells, wee1(-) cdc25Delta, which are defective in progress through the latter half of the cell cycle (G2 and M phases). These cells exhibit "quantized" cycles (interdivision times clustering around 90, 160, and 230 min). We show that these quantized cycles are associated with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the mechanism, when the wee1 and cdc25 genes are disabled. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779461

  14. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  15. The circadian clock and cell cycle: Interconnected biological circuits

    PubMed Central

    Masri, Selma; Cervantes, Marlene; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock governs biological timekeeping on a systemic level, helping to regulate and maintain physiological processes, including endocrine and metabolic pathways with a periodicity of 24-hours. Disruption within the circadian clock machinery has been linked to numerous pathological conditions, including cancer, suggesting that clock-dependent regulation of the cell cycle is an essential control mechanism. This review will highlight recent advances on the ‘gating’ controls of the circadian clock at various checkpoints of the cell cycle and also how the cell cycle can influence biological rhythms. The reciprocal influence that the circadian clock and cell cycle exert on each other suggests that these intertwined biological circuits are essential and multiple regulatory/control steps have been instated to ensure proper timekeeping. PMID:23969329

  16. A hybrid model of cell cycle in mammals.

    PubMed

    Behaegel, Jonathan; Comet, Jean-Paul; Bernot, Gilles; Cornillon, Emilien; Delaunay, Franck

    2016-02-01

    Time plays an essential role in many biological systems, especially in cell cycle. Many models of biological systems rely on differential equations, but parameter identification is an obstacle to use differential frameworks. In this paper, we present a new hybrid modeling framework that extends René Thomas' discrete modeling. The core idea is to associate with each qualitative state "celerities" allowing us to compute the time spent in each state. This hybrid framework is illustrated by building a 5-variable model of the mammalian cell cycle. Its parameters are determined by applying formal methods on the underlying discrete model and by constraining parameters using timing observations on the cell cycle. This first hybrid model presents the most important known behaviors of the cell cycle, including quiescent phase and endoreplication. PMID:26708052

  17. Cell Cycle Modulation in the Response of the Primary Root of Arabidopsis to Salt Stress1

    PubMed Central

    West, Gerrit; Inzé, Dirk; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Salt stress inhibits plant growth and development. We investigated the importance of cell cycle regulation in mediating the primary root growth response of Arabidopsis to salt stress. When seedlings were transferred to media with increasing concentrations of NaCl, root growth rate was progressively reduced. At day 3 after transfer of seedlings to growth medium containing 0.5% NaCl the primary roots grew at a constant rate well below that prior to the transfer, whereas those transferred to control medium kept accelerating. Kinematic analysis revealed that the growth reduction of the stressed roots was due to a decrease in cell production and a smaller mature cell length. Surprisingly, average cell cycle duration was not affected. Hence, the reduced cell production was due to a smaller number of dividing cells, i.e. a meristem size reduction. To analyze the mechanism of meristem size adaptation prior to day 3, we investigated the short-term cell cycle events following transfer to saline medium. Directly after transfer cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity and CYCB1;2 promoter activity were transiently reduced. Because protein levels of both CDKA;1 and CDKB1;1 were not affected, the temporary inhibition of mitotic activity that allows adaptation to the stress condition is most likely mediated by posttranslational control of CDK activity. Thus, the adaptation to salt stress involves two phases: first, a rapid transient inhibition of the cell cycle that results in fewer cells remaining in the meristem. When the meristem reaches the appropriate size for the given conditions, cell cycle duration returns to its default. PMID:15181207

  18. Large scale spontaneous synchronization of cell cycles in amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, Carl

    2014-03-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. We show that substrate-growtn cell populations spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state and provide opportunities for synchronization theories beyond classic Kuramoto models.

  19. Molecular markers and cell cycle inhibitors show the importance of cell cycle progression in nematode-induced galls and syncytia.

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Engler, J; De Vleesschauwer, V; Burssens, S; Celenza, J L; Inzé, D; Van Montagu, M; Engler, G; Gheysen, G

    1999-01-01

    Root knot and cyst nematodes induce large multinucleated cells, designated giant cells and syncytia, respectively, in plant roots. We have used molecular markers to study cell cycle progression in these specialized feeding cells. In situ hybridization with two cyclin-dependent kinases and two cyclins showed that these genes were induced very early in galls and syncytia and that the feeding cells progressed through the G2 phase. By using cell cycle blockers, DNA synthesis and progression through the G2 phase, or mitosis, were shown to be essential for gall and syncytium establishment. When mitosis was blocked, further gall development was arrested. This result demonstrates that cycles of endoreduplication or other methods of DNA amplification are insufficient to drive giant cell expansion. On the other hand, syncytium development was much less affected by a mitotic block; however, syncytium expansion was inhibited. PMID:10330466

  20. Instrumentation for accelerated life tests of concentrator solar cells.

    PubMed

    Núñez, N; Vázquez, M; González, J R; Jiménez, F J; Bautista, J

    2011-02-01

    Concentrator photovoltaic is an emergent technology that may be a good economical and efficient alternative for the generation of electricity at a competitive cost. However, the reliability of these new solar cells and systems is still an open issue due to the high-irradiation level they are subjected to as well as the electrical and thermal stresses that they are expected to endure. To evaluate the reliability in a short period of time, accelerated aging tests are essential. Thermal aging tests for concentrator photovoltaic solar cells and systems under illumination are not available because no technical solution to the problem of reaching the working concentration inside a climatic chamber has been available. This work presents an automatic instrumentation system that overcomes the aforementioned limitation. Working conditions have been simulated by forward biasing the solar cells to the current they would handle at the working concentration (in this case, 700 and 1050 times the irradiance at one standard sun). The instrumentation system has been deployed for more than 10 000 h in a thermal aging test for III-V concentrator solar cells, in which the generated power evolution at different temperatures has been monitored. As a result of this test, the acceleration factor has been calculated, thus allowing for the degradation evolution at any temperature in addition to normal working conditions to be obtained. PMID:21361622

  1. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy; Motupally, Sathya

    2012-06-01

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  2. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Yde, Pernille; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2009-06-01

    During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent α that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent α was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences in the subdiffusive exponents from granules measured in different stages of cell division. Also, our results for the exponent displayed no significant dependence on the position of the granule within the cell. The observation that the cytoplasm is more elastic during interphase than during mitotic cell division is consistent with the fact that elastic cytoskeletal elements such as microtubules are less abundantly present during cell division than during interphase.

  3. JAB1 accelerates odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Min; Zhang, Ye; Shen, Qijie; Xing, Jing; Lu, Xiaohui; Huang, Dan; Cao, Peipei; Shen, Shuling; Zheng, Ke; Zhang, Jinlong; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Feng, Xingmei

    2016-06-01

    Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in the control of cell proliferation and the stability of multiple proteins. JAB1 regulates several key proteins, and thereby produces varied effects on cell cycle progression, genome stability and cell survival. Some studies have shown that the loss of JAB1 in osteochondral progenitor cells severely impairs embryonic limb development in mice. However, the biological significance of JAB1 activity in the odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the role of JAB1, a key player in tooth development, in reparative dentin formation, especially odontogenic differentiation. We found that increased expression of JAB1 promoted odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The role of JAB1 in the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs was further confirmed by knocking down JAB1. Our findings provide novel insights on odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26989054

  4. Propranolol Promotes Accelerated and Dysregulated Adipogenesis in Hemangioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    England, Ryan W.; Hardy, Krista L.; Kitajewski, Alex M.; Wong, Alvin; Kitajewski, Jan K.; Shawber, Carrie J.; Wu, June K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infantile hemangiomas are the most common tumor of infancy, yet there are no FDA-approved therapeutics to date. Recently, the non-selective beta-adrenergic-blocker propranolol has been shown to be a safe and effective means of treating infantile hemangiomas, though its mechanism has yet to be elucidated. We have previously demonstrated that propranolol induces early and incomplete adipogenesis in stem cells derived from hemangiomas. We hypothesize that propranolol promotes dysregulated adipogenesis via the improper regulation of adipogenic genes. Methods Hemangioma stem cells isolated from resected infantile hemangioma specimens were treated with adipogenic medium for 1 or 4 days in either propranolol or vehicle. Cell death was measured by the incorporation of annexin V and propidium iodide by flow cytometry. Adipogenesis was assessed by visualizing lipid droplet formation by Oil Red O staining. Pro-adipogenic genes C/EBPβ, C/EBPβ, C/EBPδ, PPARδ, PPARγ, RXRα, and RXRγ were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction. Results Hemangioma stem cells treated with propranolol increased lipid droplet formation compared to vehicle-treated cells indicating increased adipogenesis. Cell death as measured by FACS analysis indicated that the propranolol-treated cells died due to necrosis and not apoptosis. During adipogenesis, transcript levels of PPARδ, PPARγ, C/EBPβ, and C/EBPδ were significantly increased (p < 0.01) in propranolol-treated cells relative to control cells. In contrast, RXRα and RXRγ levels were significantly decreased (p < 0.05), and C/EBPα, a gene required for terminal adipocyte differentiation, was strongly suppressed by propranolol when compared to vehicle-treated cells (p < 0.01). Conclusions In hemangioma stem cells, propranolol accelerated dysregulated adipogenic differentiation characterized by improper adipogenic gene expression. Consistent with accelerated adipogenesis, propranolol

  5. Bax alpha perturbs T cell development and affects cell cycle entry of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, H J; Gil-Gómez, G; Kirberg, J; Berns, A J

    1996-01-01

    Bax alpha can heterodimerize with Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), countering their effects, as well as promoting apoptosis on overexpression. We show that bax alpha transgenic mice have greatly reduced numbers of mature T cells, which results from an impaired positive selection in the thymus. This perturbation in positive selection is accompanied by an increase in the number of cycling thymocytes. Further to this, mature T cells overexpressing Bax alpha have lower levels of p27Kip1 and enter S phase more rapidly in response to interleukin-2 stimulation than do control T cells, while the converse is true of bcl-2 transgenic T cells. These data indicate that apoptotic regulatory proteins can modulate the level of cell cycle-controlling proteins and thereby directly impact on the cell cycle. Images PMID:9003775

  6. Cell cycle deregulation by methyl isocyanate: Implications in liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Hariom; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Jain, Deepika; Ahirwar, Alok K; Khan, Saba; Jain, Subodh K; Pathak, Neelam; Banerjee, Smita; Maudar, Kewal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2014-03-01

    Liver is often exposed to plethora of chemical toxins. Owing to its profound physiological role and central function in metabolism and homeostasis, pertinent succession of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells is of prime importance to maintain cellular proliferation. Although recent evidence has displayed a strong association between exposures to methyl isocyanate (MIC), one of the most toxic isocyanates, and neoplastic transformation, molecular characterization of the longitudinal effects of MIC on cell cycle regulation has never been performed. Here, we sequentially delineated the status of different proteins arbitrating the deregulation of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells treated with MIC. Our data reaffirms the oncogenic capability of MIC with elevated DNA damage response proteins pATM and γ-H2AX, deregulation of DNA damage check point genes CHK1 and CHK2, altered expression of p53 and p21 proteins involved in cell cycle arrest with perturbation in GADD-45 expression in the treated cells. Further, alterations in cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK2 levels along with overexpression of mitotic spindle checkpoints proteins Aurora A/B, centrosomal pericentrin protein, chromosomal aberrations, and loss of Pot1a was observed. Thus, MIC impacts key proteins involved in cell cycle regulation to trigger genomic instability as a possible mechanism of developmental basis of liver carcinogenesis. PMID:22223508

  7. Keith's MAGIC: Cloning and the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Professor Keith Campbell's critical contribution to the discovery that a somatic cell from an adult animal can be fully reprogrammed by oocyte factors to form a cloned individual following nuclear transfer (NT)(Wilmut et al., 1997 ) overturned a dogma concerning the reversibility of cell fate that many scientists had considered to be biologically impossible. This seminal experiment proved the totipotency of adult somatic nuclei and finally confirmed that adult cells could differentiate without irreversible changes to the genetic material. PMID:24020700

  8. An investigation of how radiation may cause accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and diurnal cycles of convective activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    Recent cloud-resolving numerical modeling results suggest that radiative forcing causes accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and early intensification. Furthermore, observational studies of tropical cyclones have found that oscillations of the cloud canopy areal extent often occur that are clearly related to the solar diurnal cycle. A theory is put forward to explain these findings. The primary mechanism that seems responsible can be considered a refinement of the mechanism proposed by Gray and Jacobson (1977) to explain diurnal variations of oceanic tropical deep cumulus convection. It is hypothesized that differential radiative cooling or heating between a relatively cloud-free environment and a developing tropical disturbance generates circulations that can have very significant influences on convective activity in the core of the system. It is further suggested that there are benefits to understanding this mechanism by viewing it in terms of the lateral propagation of thermally driven gravity wave circulations, also known as buoyancy bores. Numerical model experiments indicate that mean environmental radiative cooling outside the cloud system is playing an important role in causing a significant horizontal differential radiative forcing and accelerating the rate of tropical cyclogenesis. As an expansive stratiform cloud layer forms aloft within a developing system the mean low level radiative cooling is reduced while at mid levels small warming occurs. During the daytime there is not a very large differential radiative forcing between the environment and the cloud system, but at nighttime when there is strong radiative clear sky cooling of the environment it becomes significant. Thermally driven circulations develop, characterized by relatively weak subsidence in the environment but much stronger upward motion in the cloud system. This upward motion leads to a cooling tendency and increased relative humidity. The increased relative humidity at night

  9. An investigation of how radiation may cause accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and diurnal cycles of convective activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, M. E.

    2015-08-01

    Recent cloud-resolving numerical modeling results suggest that radiative forcing causes accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and early intensification. Furthermore, observational studies of tropical cyclones have found that oscillations of the cloud canopy areal extent often occur that are clearly related to the solar diurnal cycle. A theory is put forward to explain these findings. The primary mechanism that seems responsible can be considered a refinement of the mechanism proposed by Gray and Jacobson (1977) to explain diurnal variations of oceanic tropical deep cumulus convection. It is hypothesized that differential radiative cooling or heating between a relatively cloud-free environment and a developing tropical disturbance generates circulations that can have very significant influences on convective activity in the core of the system. It is further suggested that there are benefits to understanding this mechanism by viewing it in terms of the lateral propagation of thermally driven gravity wave circulations, also known as buoyancy bores. Numerical model experiments indicate that mean environmental radiative cooling outside the cloud system is playing an important role in causing a significant horizontal differential radiative forcing and accelerating the rate of tropical cyclogenesis. As an expansive stratiform cloud layer forms aloft within a developing system the mean low-level radiative cooling is reduced, while at mid levels small warming occurs. During the daytime there is not a very large differential radiative forcing between the environment and the cloud system, but at nighttime when there is strong radiative clear-sky cooling of the environment it becomes significant. Thermally driven circulations develop, characterized by relatively weak subsidence in the environment but much stronger upward motion in the cloud system. This upward motion leads to a cooling tendency and increased relative humidity. The increased relative humidity at night

  10. Ammonium Ion Requirement for the Cell Cycle of Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Charlotte

    1978-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium has a defined cell cycle in which small cells elongate to about five times their original length and then divide by fragmentation. The nitrogen requirement for production of maximal number of colony-forming units was assessed by varying concentrations and kinds of nitrogen source in the medium. Ferric ammonium citrate at a concentration in 7H10 medium of 0.17 μmol/ml or ammonium chloride at 0.25 μmol/ml as the nitrogen source permitted the cells to elongate and to undergo limited division, with the final culture at 4 × 107 colony-forming units per ml. Ammonium chloride at 2.5 μmol/ml or glutamine at 1.37 μmol/ml supported completion of the cell cycle with final colony-forming units at about 5 × 108/ml. Other amino acids, including glutamic acid, at 2.5 μmol/ml did not support completion of the cell cycle, although in most cases an intermediate number of colony-forming units per milliliter were formed. Limited uptake of [14C]glutamic acid and uptake of [14C]glutamine were not detectable until cell fission began. Cells not limited for nitrogen took up five times as much 35S during fission as limited cells did during the same time. The nonlimited cells contained 10 times as much sulfolipid as the nitrogen-limited cells at the end of the cell cycle. These results demonstrate that rapidly dividing cells of M. avium utilize amino acids and sulfur and also synthesize sulfolipids in events that are apparently separable from metabolic functions of elongating cells. The results are contrasted with those found for other mycobacteria in which no cell cycle has been demonstrated. Images PMID:624592

  11. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  12. p53 and Cell Cycle Effects After DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Senturk, Emir; Manfredi, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry, a valuable technique that employs the principles of light scattering, light excitation, and emission of fluorochrome molecules, can be used to assess the cell cycle position of individual cells based on DNA content. After the permeabilization of cells, the DNA can be stained with a fluorescent dye. Cells which have a 2N amount of DNA can be distinguished from cells with a 4N amount of DNA, making flow cytometry a very useful tool for the analysis of cell cycle checkpoints following DNA damage. A critical feature of the cellular response to DNA damage is the ability to pause and repair the damage so that consequential mutations are not passed along to daughter generations of cells. If cells arrest prior to DNA replication, they will contain a 2N amount of DNA, whereas arrest after replication but before mitosis will result in a 4N amount of DNA. Using this technique, the role that p53 plays in cell cycle checkpoints following DNA damage can be evaluated based on changes in the profile of the G1, S, and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. PMID:23150436

  13. Long life nickel electrodes for a nickel-hydrogen cell. III - Results of an accelerated test and failure analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen different designs of nickel electrodes were tested in Ni/H2 boiler plate cells in an accelerated low earth orbit cycle regime to the end of their life. The failure analyses of these cells showed that the major performance changes due to the cycling was a severe reduction of their high rate discharge capability rather than an absolute capacity reduction. Many physical changes of the nickel electrodes were observed after the cycling test. These changes include dimensional expansion, sinter rupture, loose black powdering of the active material, morphology changes, active material migration, increase of pore volume, change of pore distribution, and increase of surface area. All of these were caused by active material expansion with cycling. Among these changes, the morphology change which involves migration of active material away from the current collecting nickel sinter appears to be that most responsible for the reduction of the rate capability.

  14. NUTRIENT REGULATION OF CELL CYCLE PROGRESSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell replication is tightly controlled in normal tissues and aberrant during disease progression, such as in tumorigenesis. The replication of cells can be divided into four distinct phases: Gap 1 (G1), synthesis (S), gap 2 (G2), and mitosis (M). The progression from one phase to the next is intrica...

  15. Classic “broken cell” techniques and newer live cell methods for cell cycle assessment

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Lindsay; Bortone, Dante S.; Lim, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Many common, important diseases are either caused or exacerbated by hyperactivation (e.g., cancer) or inactivation (e.g., heart failure) of the cell division cycle. A better understanding of the cell cycle is critical for interpreting numerous types of physiological changes in cells. Moreover, new insights into how to control it will facilitate new therapeutics for a variety of diseases and new avenues in regenerative medicine. The progression of cells through the four main phases of their division cycle [G0/G1, S (DNA synthesis), G2, and M (mitosis)] is a highly conserved process orchestrated by several pathways (e.g., transcription, phosphorylation, nuclear import/export, and protein ubiquitination) that coordinate a core cell cycle pathway. This core pathway can also receive inputs that are cell type and cell niche dependent. “Broken cell” methods (e.g., use of labeled nucleotide analogs) to assess for cell cycle activity have revealed important insights regarding the cell cycle but lack the ability to assess living cells in real time (longitudinal studies) and with single-cell resolution. Moreover, such methods often require cell synchronization, which can perturb the pathway under study. Live cell cycle sensors can be used at single-cell resolution in living cells, intact tissue, and whole animals. Use of these more recently available sensors has the potential to reveal physiologically relevant insights regarding the normal and perturbed cell division cycle. PMID:23392113

  16. Targeting the cancer cell cycle by cold atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotskova, O.; Hawley, T. S.; Stepp, M. A.; Keidar, M.

    2012-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), a technology based on quasi-neutral ionized gas at low temperatures, is currently being evaluated as a new highly selective alternative addition to existing cancer therapies. Here, we present a first attempt to identify the mechanism of CAP action. CAP induced a robust ~2-fold G2/M increase in two different types of cancer cells with different degrees of tumorigenicity. We hypothesize that the increased sensitivity of cancer cells to CAP treatment is caused by differences in the distribution of cancer cells and normal cells within the cell cycle. The expression of γH2A.X (pSer139), an oxidative stress reporter indicating S-phase damage, is enhanced specifically within CAP treated cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Together with a significant decrease in EdU-incorporation after CAP, these data suggest that tumorigenic cancer cells are more susceptible to CAP treatment.

  17. The Timing of T Cell Priming and Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Obst, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of specific lymphocytes is the central tenet of the clonal selection paradigm. Antigen recognition by T cells triggers a series of events that produces expanded clones of differentiated effector cells. TCR signaling events are detectable within seconds and minutes and are likely to continue for hours and days in vivo. Here, I review the work done on the importance of TCR signals in the later part of the expansion phase of the primary T cell response, primarily regarding the regulation of the cell cycle in CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The results suggest a degree of programing by early signals for effector differentiation, particularly in the CD8+ T cell compartment, with optimal expansion supported by persistent antigen presentation later on. Differences to CD4+ T cell expansion and new avenues toward a molecular understanding of cell cycle regulation in lymphocytes are discussed. PMID:26594213

  18. The Dynamical Mechanisms of the Cell Cycle Size Checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shi-Fu; Yan, Jie; Liu, Zeng-Rong; Yang, Ling

    2012-10-01

    Cell division must be tightly coupled to cell growth in order to maintain cell size, whereas the mechanisms of how initialization of mitosis is regulated by cell size remain to be elucidated. We develop a mathematical model of the cell cycle, which incorporates cell growth to investigate the dynamical properties of the size checkpoint in embryos of Xenopus laevis. We show that the size checkpoint is naturally raised from a saddle-node bifurcation, and in a mutant case, the cell loses its size control ability due to the loss of this saddle-node point.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1−/− fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death. PMID:26405158

  20. PEA15 Regulates the DNA Damage-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoint and Oncogene-Directed Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Dogra, Shaillay Kumar; Liu, Alex Y.; Green, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of the DNA damage response and cell cycle progression is critical for maintaining genome integrity. Here, we report that in response to DNA damage, COPS5 deubiquitinates and stabilizes PEA15 in an ATM kinase-dependent manner. PEA15 expression oscillates throughout the cell cycle, and the loss of PEA15 accelerates cell cycle progression by activating CDK6 expression via the c-JUN transcription factor. Cells lacking PEA15 exhibit a DNA damage-induced G2/M checkpoint defect due to increased CDC25C activity and, consequentially, higher cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B activity, and accordingly they have an increased rate of spontaneous mutagenesis. We find that oncogenic RAS inhibits PEA15 expression and that ectopic PEA15 expression blocks RAS-mediated transformation, which can be partially rescued by ectopic expression of CDK6. Finally, we show that PEA15 expression is downregulated in colon, breast, and lung cancer samples. Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumor suppressor PEA15 is a regulator of genome integrity and is an integral component of the DNA damage response pathway that regulates cell cycle progression, the DNA-damage-induced G2/M checkpoint, and cellular transformation. PMID:24710276

  1. PEA15 regulates the DNA damage-induced cell cycle checkpoint and oncogene-directed transformation.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Dogra, Shaillay Kumar; Liu, Alex Y; Green, Michael R; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2014-06-01

    Regulation of the DNA damage response and cell cycle progression is critical for maintaining genome integrity. Here, we report that in response to DNA damage, COPS5 deubiquitinates and stabilizes PEA15 in an ATM kinase-dependent manner. PEA15 expression oscillates throughout the cell cycle, and the loss of PEA15 accelerates cell cycle progression by activating CDK6 expression via the c-JUN transcription factor. Cells lacking PEA15 exhibit a DNA damage-induced G2/M checkpoint defect due to increased CDC25C activity and, consequentially, higher cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B activity, and accordingly they have an increased rate of spontaneous mutagenesis. We find that oncogenic RAS inhibits PEA15 expression and that ectopic PEA15 expression blocks RAS-mediated transformation, which can be partially rescued by ectopic expression of CDK6. Finally, we show that PEA15 expression is downregulated in colon, breast, and lung cancer samples. Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumor suppressor PEA15 is a regulator of genome integrity and is an integral component of the DNA damage response pathway that regulates cell cycle progression, the DNA-damage-induced G2/M checkpoint, and cellular transformation. PMID:24710276

  2. Accelerated testing of solid oxide fuel cell stacks for micro combined heat and power application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Anke; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Barfod, Rasmus

    2015-12-01

    State-of-the-art (SoA) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks are tested using profiles relevant for use in micro combined heat and power (CHP) units. Such applications are characterised by dynamic load profiles. In order to shorten the needed testing time and to investigate potential acceleration of degradation, the profiles are executed faster than required for real applications. Operation with fast load cycling, both using hydrogen and methane/steam as fuels, does not accelerate degradation compared to constant operation, which demonstrates the maturity of SoA stacks and enables transferring knowledge from testing at constant conditions to dynamic operation. 7.5 times more cycles than required for 80,000 h lifetime as micro CHP are achieved on one-cell-stack level. The results also suggest that degradation mechanisms that proceed on a longer time-scale, such as creep, might have a more dominating effect for long life-times than regular short time changes of operation. In order to address lifetime testing it is suggested to build a testing program consisting of defined modules that represent different application profiles, such as one module at constant conditions, followed by modules at one set of dynamic conditions etc.

  3. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization. PMID:23267082

  4. Mutagenic effect of accelerated heavy ions on bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2011-11-01

    The heavy ion accelerators of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research were used to study the regularities and mechanisms of formation of different types of mutations in prokaryote cells. The induction of direct (lac-, ton B-, col B) mutations for Esherichia coli cells and reverse his- → His+ mutations of Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus subtilis cells under the action of radiation in a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) was studied. The regularities of formation of gene and structural (tonB trp-) mutations for Esherichia coli bacteria under the action of accelerated heavy ions were studied. It was demonstrated that the rate of gene mutations as a function of the dose under the action of Γ rays and accelerated heavy ions is described by linear-quadratic functions. For structural mutations, linear "dose-effect" dependences are typical. The quadratic character of mutagenesis dose curves is determined by the "interaction" of two independent "hitting" events in the course of SOS repair of genetic structures. The conclusion made was that gene mutations under the action of accelerated heavy ions are induced by δ electron regions of charged particle tracks. The methods of SOS chromotest, SOS lux test, and λ prophage induction were used to study the regularities of SOS response of cells under the action of radiations in a wide LET range. The following proposition was substantiated: the molecular basis for formation of gene mutations are cluster single-strand DNA breaks, and that for structural mutations, double-strand DNA breaks. It was found out that the LET dependence of the relative biological efficiency of accelerated ions is described by curves with a local maximum. It was demonstrated that the biological efficiency of ionizing radiations with different physical characteristics on cells with different genotype, estimated by the lethal action, induction of gene and deletion mutations, precision excision of transposons, is determined by the specific

  5. High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C.; Sanderson, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

  6. How the cell cycle impacts chromatin architecture and influences cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yiqin; Kanakousaki, Kiriaki; Buttitta, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Since the earliest observations of cells undergoing mitosis, it has been clear that there is an intimate relationship between the cell cycle and nuclear chromatin architecture. The nuclear envelope and chromatin undergo robust assembly and disassembly during the cell cycle, and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of histone biogenesis and chromatin modification is controlled in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Chromatin binding proteins and chromatin modifications in turn influence the expression of critical cell cycle regulators, the accessibility of origins for DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell fate. In this review we aim to provide an integrated discussion of how the cell cycle machinery impacts nuclear architecture and vice-versa. We highlight recent advances in understanding cell cycle-dependent histone biogenesis and histone modification deposition, how cell cycle regulators control histone modifier activities, the contribution of chromatin modifications to origin firing for DNA replication, and newly identified roles for nucleoporins in regulating cell cycle gene expression, gene expression memory and differentiation. We close with a discussion of how cell cycle status may impact chromatin to influence cell fate decisions, under normal contexts of differentiation as well as in instances of cell fate reprogramming. PMID:25691891

  7. Post-transcriptional RNA Regulons Affecting Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Blackinton, Jeff G.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular growth cycle is initiated and maintained by punctual, yet agile, regulatory events involving modifications of cell cycle proteins as well as coordinated gene expression to support cyclic checkpoint decisions. Recent evidence indicates that post-transcriptional partitioning of messenger RNA subsets by RNA-binding proteins help physically localize, temporally coordinate, and efficiently translate cell cycle proteins. This dynamic organization of mRNAs encoding cell cycle components contributes to the overall economy of the cell cycle consistent with the post-transcriptional RNA regulon model of gene expression. This review examines several recent studies demonstrating the coordination of mRNA subsets encoding cell cycle proteins during nuclear export and subsequent coupling to protein synthesis, and discusses evidence for mRNA coordination of p53 targets and the DNA damage response pathway. We consider how these observations may connect to upstream and downstream post-transcriptional coordination and coupling of splicing, export, localization, and translation. Published examples from yeast, nematode, insect, and mammalian systems are discussed, and we consider genetic evidence supporting the conclusion that dysregulation of RNA regulons may promote pathogenic states of growth such as carcinogenesis. PMID:24882724

  8. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  9. Creatine kinase in cell cycle regulation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong-Bin

    2016-08-01

    The phosphocreatine-creatine kinase (CK) shuttle system is increasingly recognized as a fundamental mechanism for ATP homeostasis in both excitable and non-excitable cells. Many intracellular processes are ATP dependent. Cell division is a process requiring a rapid rate of energy turnover. Cell cycle regulation is also a key point to understanding the mechanisms underlying cancer progression. It has been known for about 40 years that aberrant CK levels are associated with various cancers and for over 30 years that CK is involved in mitosis regulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been investigated sufficiently until recently. By maintaining ATP at sites of high-energy demand, CK can regulate cell cycle progression by affecting the intracellular energy status as well as by influencing signaling pathways that are essential to activate cell division and cytoskeleton reorganization. Aberrant CK levels may impair cell viability under normal or stressed conditions and induce cell death. The involvement of CK in cell cycle regulation and cellular energy metabolism makes it a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in cancer. To understand the multiple physiological/pathological functions of CK, it is necessary to identify CK-binding partners and regulators including proteins, non-coding RNAs and participating endogenous small molecular weight chemical compounds. This review will focus on molecular mechanisms of CK in cell cycle regulation and cancer progression. It will also discuss the implications of recent mechanistic studies, the emerging problems and future challenges of the multifunctional enzyme CK. PMID:27020776

  10. Analysis of variation of amplitudes in cell cycle gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Delong; Gaido, Kevin W; Wolfinger, Russ

    2005-01-01

    Background Variation in gene expression among cells in a population is often considered as noise produced from gene transcription and post-transcription processes and experimental artifacts. Most studies on noise in gene expression have emphasized a few well-characterized genes and proteins. We investigated whether different cell-arresting methods have impacts on the maximum expression levels (amplitudes) of a cell cycle related gene. Results By introducing random noise, modeled by a von Mises distribution, to the phase angle in a sinusoidal model in a cell population, we derived a relationship between amplitude and the distribution of noise in maximum transcription time (phase). We applied our analysis to Whitfield's HeLa cell cycle data. Our analysis suggests that among 47 cell cycle related genes common to the 2nd experiment (thymidine-thymidine method) and the 4th experiment (thymidine-nocodazole method): (i) the amplitudes of CDC6 and PCNA, which are expressed during G1/S phase, are smaller in the 2nd experiment than in the 4th, while the amplitude of CDC20, which is expressed during G2/M phase, is smaller in the 4th experiment; and (ii) the two cell-arresting methods had little impact on the amplitudes of the other 43 genes in the 2nd and 4th experiments. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that procedures that arrest cells in different stages of the cell cycle differentially affect expression of some cell cycle related genes once the cells are released from arrest. The impact of the cell-arresting method on expression of a cell cycle related gene can be quantitatively estimated from the ratio of two estimated amplitudes in two experiments. The ratio can be used to gauge the variation in the phase/peak expression time distribution involved in stochastic transcription and post-transcriptional processes for the gene. Further investigations are needed using normal, unperturbed and synchronized HeLa cells as a reference to compare how many cell cycle related genes

  11. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields and the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlke, Megan A.

    Exposure to nanosecond pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) can cause poration of external and internal cell membranes, DNA damage, and disassociation of cytoskeletal components, all of which are capable of disrupting a cell's ability to replicate. The phase of the cell cycle at the time of exposure is linked to differential sensitivities to nsPEFs across cell lines, as DNA structure, membrane elasticity, and cytoskeletal structure change dramatically during the cell cycle. Additionally, nsPEFs are capable of activating cell cycle checkpoints, which could lead to apoptosis or slow population growth. NsPEFs are emerging as a method for treating tumors via apoptotic induction; therefore, investigating the relevance of nsPEFs and the cell cycle could translate into improved efficacy in tumor treatment. Populations of Jurkat and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were examined post-exposure (10 ns pulse trains at 150kV/cm) by analysis of DNA content via propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis at various time points (1, 6, and 12h post-exposure) to determine population distribution in cell cycle phases. Additionally, CHO and Jurkat cells were synchronized in G1/S and G2/M phases, pulsed, and analyzed to evaluate the role of cell cycle phase in survival of nsPEFs. CHO populations appeared similar to sham populations post-nsPEFs but exhibited arrest in the G1 phase at 6h after exposure. Jurkat cells exhibited increased cell death after nsPEFs compared to CHO cells but did not exhibit checkpoint arrest at any observed time point. The G1/S phase checkpoint is partially controlled by the action of p53; the lack of an active p53 response in Jurkat cells could contribute to their ability to pass this checkpoint and resist cell cycle arrest. Both cell lines exhibited increased sensitivity to nsPEFs in G2/M phase. Live imaging of CHO cells after nsPEF exposure supports the theory of G1/S phase arrest, as a reduced number of cells undergo mitosis within 24 h when

  12. Cell cycle arrest is not yet senescence, which is not just cell cycle arrest: terminology for TOR-driven aging.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2012-03-01

    Cell cycle arrest is not yet senescence. When the cell cycle is arrested, an inappropriate growth-promotion converts an arrest into senescence (geroconversion). By inhibiting the growth-promoting mTOR pathway, rapamycin decelerates geroconversion of the arrested cells. And as a striking example, while causing arrest, p53 may decelerate or suppress geroconversion (in some conditions). Here I discuss the meaning of geroconversion and also the terms gerogenes, gerossuppressors, gerosuppressants, gerogenic pathways, gero-promoters, hyperfunction and feedback resistance, regenerative potential, hypertrophy and secondary atrophy, pro-gerogenic and gerogenic cells. PMID:22394614

  13. Cyclin and DNA Distributed Cell Cycle Model for GS-NS0 Cells

    PubMed Central

    García Münzer, David G.; Kostoglou, Margaritis; Georgiadis, Michael C.; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N.; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cell cultures are intrinsically heterogeneous at different scales (molecular to bioreactor). The cell cycle is at the centre of capturing heterogeneity since it plays a critical role in the growth, death, and productivity of mammalian cell cultures. Current cell cycle models use biological variables (mass/volume/age) that are non-mechanistic, and difficult to experimentally determine, to describe cell cycle transition and capture culture heterogeneity. To address this problem, cyclins—key molecules that regulate cell cycle transition—have been utilized. Herein, a novel integrated experimental-modelling platform is presented whereby experimental quantification of key cell cycle metrics (cell cycle timings, cell cycle fractions, and cyclin expression determined by flow cytometry) is used to develop a cyclin and DNA distributed model for the industrially relevant cell line, GS-NS0. Cyclins/DNA synthesis rates were linked to stimulatory/inhibitory factors in the culture medium, which ultimately affect cell growth. Cell antibody productivity was characterized using cell cycle-specific production rates. The solution method delivered fast computational time that renders the model’s use suitable for model-based applications. Model structure was studied by global sensitivity analysis (GSA), which identified parameters with a significant effect on the model output, followed by re-estimation of its significant parameters from a control set of batch experiments. A good model fit to the experimental data, both at the cell cycle and viable cell density levels, was observed. The cell population heterogeneity of disturbed (after cell arrest) and undisturbed cell growth was captured proving the versatility of the modelling approach. Cell cycle models able to capture population heterogeneity facilitate in depth understanding of these complex systems and enable systematic formulation of culture strategies to improve growth and productivity. It is envisaged that this

  14. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process. PMID:26265439

  15. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-09-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process. PMID:26265439

  16. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. 4: Results of failure analyse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of KOH concentrations on failure modes and mechanisms of nickel-hydrogen cells were studied using long cycled boiler plate cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations ranging 21 to 36 percent. Life of these cells were up to 40,000 cycles in an accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. An interim life test results were reported earlier in J. Power Sources, 22, 213-220, 1988. The results of final life test, end-of-life cell performance, and teardown analyses are discussed. These teardown analyses included visual observations, measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte-flooded cell, dimensional changes of cell components, SEM studies on cell cross section, BET surface area and pore volume distribution in cycled nickel electrodes, and chemical analyses. Cycle life of a nickel-hydrogen cell was improved tremendously as KOH concentration was decreased from 36 to 31 percent and from 31 to 26 percent while effect of further concentration decrease was complicated as described in our earlier report. Failure mode of high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells was gradual capacity decrease, while that of low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells was mainly formation of a soft short. Long cycled (25,000 to 40,000 cycles) nickel electrodes were expanded more than 50 percent of the initial value, but no correlation was found between this expansion and measured capacity. All electrodes cycled in low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells had higher capacity than those cycled in high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells.

  17. Accelerate Climate Models with the IBM Cell Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Duffy, D.; Clune, T.; Williams, S.; Suarez, M.; Halem, M.

    2008-12-01

    Ever increasing model resolutions and physical processes in climate models demand continual computing power increases. The IBM Cell processor's order-of- magnitude peak performance increase over conventional processors makes it very attractive for fulfilling this requirement. However, the Cell's characteristics: 256KB local memory per SPE and the new low-level communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. We selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics components (~50% total computation time), (2) has a high computational load relative to data traffic to/from main memory, and (3) performs independent calculations across multiple columns. We converted the baseline code (single-precision, Fortran code) to C and ported it to an IBM BladeCenter QS20, manually SIMDizing 4 independent columns, and found that a Cell with 8 SPEs can process more than 3000 columns per second. Compared with the baseline results, the Cell is ~6.76x, ~8.91x, ~9.85x faster than a core on Intel's Xeon Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2 respectively. Our analysis shows that the Cell could also speed up the dynamics component (~25% total computation time). We believe this dramatic performance improvement makes the Cell processor very competitive, at least as an accelerator. We will report our experience in porting both the C and Fortran codes and will discuss our work in porting other climate model components.

  18. Cell cycle regulation of the human cdc2 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, S

    1992-01-01

    Transcription of the human cdc2 gene is cell cycle regulated and restricted to proliferating cells. Nuclear run-on assays show that cdc2 transcription is high in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle but low in G1. To investigate transcriptional control further, genomic clones of the human cdc2 gene containing 5' flanking sequences were isolated and shown to function as a growth regulated promoter in vivo when fused to a CAT reporter gene. In primary human fibroblasts, the human cdc2 promoter is negatively regulated by arrest of cell growth in a similar fashion to the endogenous gene. This requires specific 5' flanking upstream negative control (UNC) sequences which mediate repression. The retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (Rb) specifically represses cdc2 transcription in cycling cells via 136 bp of 5' flanking sequence located between -245 and -109 within the UNC region. E2F binding sites in this region were shown to be essential for optimal repression. A model is proposed where Rb negatively regulates the cdc2 promoter in non-cycling and cycling G1 cells. Images PMID:1582409

  19. Effect of LEO cycling at shallow depths of discharge on MANTECH IPV nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.

    1988-01-01

    An individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen battery is being considered as an alternate for a nickel-cadmium battery on the Hubble Space Telescope. The space telescope battery will primarily be operating at a shallow depth of discharge (10 percent DOD) with an occasional 40 percent DOD. This shallow DOD raises several issues: (1) What is the cycle life. It is projected to be acceptable; however, there is no reported real time data base for validation. (2) The state of charge of the nickel electrode at the beginning of charge is 90 percent. Will this cause an acceleration of divergence in the battery individual cell voltages. (3) After prolonged cycling at 10 percent DOD, will there be enough capacity remaining to support the 40 percent DOD. (4) Is the state of charge really 90 percent during cycling. There is no reported real time data base at shallow depths of discharge. A data base to address the above issues was initiated.

  20. Cycle life characteristics of Li-TiS2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deligiannis, Frank; Shen, D.; Huang, C. K.; Surampudi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The development of lithium ambient temperature rechargeable cells is discussed. During the development process, we hope to gain a greater understanding of the materials and the properties of the Li-TiS2 cell and its components. The design will meet the requirements of 100 Wh/Kg and 1000 cycles, at 50 percent depth-of-discharge, by 1995.

  1. Cell cycle imaging with quantitative differential interference contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyk, Piotr; Phelan, Shelley; Xu, Min

    2013-02-01

    We report a microscopic approach for determining cell cycle stages by measuring the nuclear optical path length (OPL) with quantitative differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The approach is validated by the excellent agreement between the proportion of proliferating-to-quiescent cancerous breast epithelial cells obtained from DIC microscopy, and that from a standard immunofluorescence assay.

  2. Cell cycle regulators and their abnormalities in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, P L; Jares, P; Rey, M J; Campo, E; Cardesa, A

    1998-01-01

    One of the main properties of cancer cells is their increased and deregulated proliferative activity. It is now well known that abnormalities in many positive and negative modulators of the cell cycle are frequent in many cancer types, including breast carcinomas. Abnormalities such as defective function of the retinoblastoma gene and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (for example, p16, p21, and p27), as well as upregulation of cyclins, are often seen in breast tumours. These abnormalities are sometimes coincidental, and newly described interplays between them suggest the existence of a complex regulatory web in the cell cycle. PMID:10193510

  3. Degradation mechanisms and accelerated testing in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2010-01-01

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Although there has been recent progress in improving durability, further improvements are needed to meet the commercialization targets. Past improvements have largely been made possible because of the fundamental understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms. By investigating component and cell degradation modes; defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions new materials can be designed to improve durability. Various factors have been shown to affect the useful life of PEM fuel cells. Other issues arise from component optimization. Operational conditions (such as impurities in either the fuel and oxidant stream), cell environment, temperature (including subfreezing exposure), pressure, current, voltage, etc.; or transient versus continuous operation, including start-up and shutdown procedures, represent other factors that can affect cell performance and durability. The need for Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) can be quickly understood given the target lives for fuel cell systems: 5000 hours ({approx} 7 months) for automotive, and 40,000 hrs ({approx} 4.6 years) for stationary systems. Thus testing methods that enable more rapid screening of individual components to determine their durability characteristics, such as off-line environmental testing, are needed for evaluating new component durability in a reasonable turn-around time. This allows proposed improvements in a component to be evaluated rapidly and independently, subsequently allowing rapid advancement in PEM fuel cell durability. These tests are also crucial to developers in order to make sure that they do not sacrifice durability while making improvements in costs (e.g. lower platinum group metal [PGM] loading) and performance (e.g. thinner membrane or a GDL with better water management properties). To

  4. Cell cycling with the SEB: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Bryant, John

    2014-06-01

    This review, written from a personal perspective, traces firstly the development of plant cell cycle research from the 1970s onwards, with some focus on the work of the author and of Dr Dennis Francis. Secondly there is a discussion of the support for and discussion of plant cell cycle research in the SEB, especially through the activities of the Cell Cycle Group within the Society's Cell Biology Section. In the main part of the review, selected aspects of DNA replication that have of been of special interest to the author are discussed. These are DNA polymerases and associated proteins, pre-replication events, regulation of enzymes and other proteins, nature and activation of DNA replication origins, and DNA endoreduplication. For all these topics, there is mention of the author's own work, followed by a brief synthesis of current understanding and a look to possible future developments. PMID:24493805

  5. Cell cycle sibling rivalry: Cdc2 vs. Cdk2.

    PubMed

    Kaldis, Philipp; Aleem, Eiman

    2005-11-01

    It has been long believed that the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) binds to cyclin E or cyclin A and exclusively promotes the G1/S phase transition and that Cdc2/cyclin B complexes play a major role in mitosis. We now provide evidence that Cdc2 binds to cyclin E (in addition to cyclin A and B) and is able to promote the G1/S transition. This new concept indicates that both Cdk2 and/or Cdc2 can drive cells through G1/S phase in parallel. In this review we discuss the classic cell cycle model and how results from knockout mice provide new evidence that refute this model. We focus on the roles of Cdc2 and p27 in regulating the mammalian cell cycle and propose a new model for cell cycle regulation that accommodates these novel findings. PMID:16258277

  6. Overexpression of prothymosin alpha accelerates proliferation and retards differentiation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, P; Viñuela, J E; Alvarez-Fernández, L; Buceta, M; Vidal, A; Domínguez, F; Gómez-Márquez, J

    1998-01-01

    Prothymosin alpha (ProTalpha) is an acidic nuclear protein the expression of which is related to the proliferation and differentiation processes in mammalian cells. In the present study we have stably transfected HL-60 cells, a biological system that allows the study of both proliferation and differentiation, with recombinant vectors encoding sense and antisense ProTalpha mRNA. In the HL-60 cell clones overexpressing ProTalpha we observed an acceleration in the growth rate, whereas expression of the antisense orientation showed the opposite effect. Moreover, cell-cycle analysis demonstrated that the G1-phase was shortened in the cells expressing the sense construct. Before studying how ProTalpha affects differentiation, we showed that the down-regulation of ProTalpha gene during differentiation occurs in all mammalian cell lines (HL-60, K562, U937, MEL C88, N2A and PC12) analysed. The biological effect evoked by the induction of the ProTalpha sense vector was the retardation of cell differentiation, although expression of the antisense construct showed no effect on differentiation. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence that ProTalpha is directly implicated in cellular proliferation and that the maintenance of high levels of ProTalpha inside HL-60 cells is incompatible with their ability to differentiate. PMID:9560301

  7. Redox Control of the Cell Cycle in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarsour, Ehab H.; Kumar, Maneesh G.; Chaudhuri, Leena; Kalen, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The cellular oxidation and reduction (redox) environment is influenced by the production and removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In recent years, several reports support the hypothesis that cellular ROS levels could function as “second messengers” regulating numerous cellular processes, including proliferation. Periodic oscillations in the cellular redox environment, a redox cycle, regulate cell-cycle progression from quiescence (G0) to proliferation (G1, S, G2, and M) and back to quiescence. A loss in the redox control of the cell cycle could lead to aberrant proliferation, a hallmark of various human pathologies. This review discusses the literature that supports the concept of a redox cycle controlling the mammalian cell cycle, with an emphasis on how this control relates to proliferative disorders including cancer, wound healing, fibrosis, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. We hypothesize that reestablishing the redox control of the cell cycle by manipulating the cellular redox environment could improve many aspects of the proliferative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2985–3011. PMID:19505186

  8. ICME Shock Accelerated Seps Transport in 3-D Heliospheric Magnetic Fields: Simulations and Multi Spacecraft Observations in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, G.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In solar cycle 24, solar energetic particles (SEPs) are measured by multi-spacecraft at different locations, e.g., STEREO A and B, and ACE. Interplanetary observers located on the opposite sides of the Sun may or may not be connected to the ICME shock by the IMF. And the connected observers may also be connected to different parts of an ICME. In this work, we will numerically solve the Fokker-Planck transport equation to get the fluxes of SEPs accelerated by ICME shocks. In addition, we will compare our simulation results with SEP observations of different spacecraft, e.g., STEREO A and B, and ACE, during solar cycle 24. The simulation and data analysis together can improve our understanding of SEPs acceleration and transport mechanism.

  9. Effects of biodegradable Mg-6Zn alloy extracts on cell cycle of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhui; Yan, Jun; Zheng, Qi; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Jianan; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zhang, Shaoxiang

    2013-02-01

    In this study, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6 were cultured in different concentration extracts of Mg-6Zn alloys for different time periods. We studied the indirect effects of Mg-6Zn alloys on cell cycle of IEC-6 cells. The cell cycle of IEC-6 cells was measured using flow cytometry. And, the cell cycle of IEC-6 cells was evaluated by investigating the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, and P21 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting tests. It was found that the IEC-6 cells displayed better cell functions in 20% extract of the Mg-6Zn alloy extracts, compared to the 100% or 60% extract. The in vitro results indicated that the conspicuous alkaline environment that is a result of rapid corrosion of Mg-6Zn alloys is disadvantageous to cell cycle of IEC-6 cells. PMID:22071354

  10. Regulation of the Cell Division Cycle in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The cell division cycle is tightly regulated by the activation and inactivation of a series of proteins that control the replication and segregation of organelles to the daughter cells. During the past decade, we have witnessed significant advances in our understanding of the cell cycle in Trypanosoma brucei and how the cycle is regulated by various regulatory proteins. However, many other regulators, especially those unique to trypanosomes, remain to be identified, and we are just beginning to delineate the signaling pathways that drive the transitions through different cell cycle stages, such as the G1/S transition, G2/M transition, and mitosis-cytokinesis transition. Trypanosomes appear to employ both evolutionarily conserved and trypanosome-specific molecules to regulate the various stages of its cell cycle, including DNA replication initiation, spindle assembly, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis initiation and completion. Strikingly, trypanosomes lack some crucial regulators that are well conserved across evolution, such as Cdc6 and Cdt1, which are involved in DNA replication licensing, the spindle motor kinesin-5, which is required for spindle assembly, the central spindlin complex, which has been implicated in cytokinesis initiation, and the actomyosin contractile ring, which is located at the cleavage furrow. Conversely, trypanosomes possess certain regulators, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases, and mitotic centromere-associated kinesins, that are greatly expanded and likely play diverse cellular functions. Overall, trypanosomes apparently have integrated unique regulators into the evolutionarily conserved pathways to compensate for the absence of those conserved molecules and, additionally, have evolved certain cell cycle regulatory pathways that are either different from its human host or distinct between its own life cycle forms. PMID:22865501

  11. Tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis selectively in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Janmejai K.; Gupta, Sanjay . E-mail: sanjay.gupta@case.edu

    2006-07-28

    One of the requisite of cancer chemopreventive agent is elimination of damaged or malignant cells through cell cycle inhibition or induction of apoptosis without affecting normal cells. In this study, employing normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), virally transformed normal human prostate epithelial cells (PZ-HPV-7), and human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3), we evaluated the growth-inhibitory and apoptotic effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm oil. TRF treatment to PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 resulted in almost identical growth-inhibitory responses of low magnitude. In sharp contrast, TRF treatment resulted in significant decreases in cell viability and colony formation in all three prostate cancer cell lines. The IC{sub 5} values after 24 h TRF treatment in LNCaP, PC-3, and DU145 cells were in the order 16.5, 17.5, and 22.0 {mu}g/ml. TRF treatment resulted in significant apoptosis in all the cell lines as evident from (i) DNA fragmentation (ii) fluorescence microscopy, and (iii) cell death detection ELISA, whereas the PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 cells did not undergo apoptosis, but showed modestly decreased cell viability only at a high dose of 80 {mu}g/ml. In cell cycle analysis, TRF (10-40 {mu}g/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent G0/G1 phase arrest and sub G1 accumulation in all three cancer cell lines but not in PZ-HPV-7 cells. These results suggest that the palm oil derivative TRF is capable of selectively inhibiting cellular proliferation and accelerating apoptotic events in prostate cancer cells. TRF offers significant promise as a chemopreventive and/or therapeutic agent against prostate cancer.

  12. Neuronal cell cycle: the neuron itself and its circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Frade, José M; Ovejero-Benito, María C

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are usually regarded as postmitotic cells that undergo apoptosis in response to cell cycle reactivation. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates the existence of a defined developmental program that induces DNA replication in specific populations of neurons, which remain in a tetraploid state for the rest of their adult life. Similarly, de novo neuronal tetraploidization has also been described in the adult brain as an early hallmark of neurodegeneration. The aim of this review is to integrate these recent developments in the context of cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in neurons. We conclude that a variety of mechanisms exists in neuronal cells for G1/S and G2/M checkpoint regulation. These mechanisms, which are connected with the apoptotic machinery, can be modulated by environmental signals and the neuronal phenotype itself, thus resulting in a variety of outcomes ranging from cell death at the G1/S checkpoint to full proliferation of differentiated neurons. PMID:25590687

  13. Epithelial TRPV1 signaling accelerates gingival epithelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Matsuda, Y; Yamada, H; Tabeta, K; Nakajima, T; Murakami, S; Yamazaki, K

    2014-11-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), a member of the calcium-permeable thermosensitive transient receptor potential superfamily, is a sensor of thermal and chemical stimuli. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat (> 43°C), acidic conditions (pH < 6.6), capsaicin, and endovanilloids. This pain receptor was discovered on nociceptive fibers in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 was recently found to be expressed by non-neuronal cells, such as epithelial cells. The oral gingival epithelium is exposed to multiple noxious stimuli, including heat and acids derived from endogenous and exogenous substances; however, whether gingival epithelial cells (GECs) express TRPV1 is unknown. We show that both TRPV1 mRNA and protein are expressed by GECs. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels in the gingival epithelial cell line, epi 4. Moreover, TRPV1 activation in epi 4 cells accelerated proliferation. These responses to capsaicin were inhibited by a specific TRPV1 antagonist, SB-366791. We also observed GEC proliferation in capsaicin-treated mice in vivo. No effects were observed on GEC apoptosis by epithelial TRPV1 signaling. To examine the molecular mechanisms underlying this proliferative effect, we performed complementary (c)DNA microarray analysis of capsaicin-stimulated epi 4 cells. Compared with control conditions, 227 genes were up-regulated and 232 genes were down-regulated following capsaicin stimulation. Several proliferation-related genes were validated by independent experiments. Among them, fibroblast growth factor-17 and neuregulin 2 were significantly up-regulated in capsaicin-treated epi 4 cells. Our results suggest that functional TRPV1 is expressed by GECs and contributes to the regulation of cell proliferation. PMID:25266715

  14. Entrainability of cell cycle oscillator models with exponential growth of cell mass.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Mitsuyuki; Enkhkhudulmur, Tsog-Erdene; Katayama, Norihiro; Karashima, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Among various aspects of cell cycle, understanding synchronization mechanism of cell cycle is important because of the following reasons. (1)Cycles of cell assembly should synchronize to form an organ. (2) Synchronizing cell cycles are required to experimental analysis of regulatory mechanisms of cell cycles. (3) Cell cycle has a distinct phase relationship with the other biological rhythms such as circadian rhythm. However, forced as well as mutual entrainment mechanisms are not clearly known. In this study, we investigated entrainability of cell cycle models of yeast cell under the periodic forcing to both of the cell mass and molecular dynamics. Dynamics of models under study involve the cell mass growing exponentially. In our result, they are shown to allow only a limited frequency range for being entrained by the periodic forcing. In contrast, models with linear growth are shown to be entrained in a wider frequency range. It is concluded that if the cell mass is included in the cell cycle regulation, its entrainability is sensitive to a shape of growth curve assumed in the model. PMID:25571564

  15. Coordinating cell polarity and cell cycle progression: what can we learn from flies and worms?

    PubMed Central

    Noatynska, Anna; Tavernier, Nicolas; Gotta, Monica; Pintard, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Spatio-temporal coordination of events during cell division is crucial for animal development. In recent years, emerging data have strengthened the notion that tight coupling of cell cycle progression and cell polarity in dividing cells is crucial for asymmetric cell division and ultimately for metazoan development. Although it is acknowledged that such coupling exists, the molecular mechanisms linking the cell cycle and cell polarity machineries are still under investigation. Key cell cycle regulators control cell polarity, and thus influence cell fate determination and/or differentiation, whereas some factors involved in cell polarity regulate cell cycle timing and proliferation potential. The scope of this review is to discuss the data linking cell polarity and cell cycle progression, and the importance of such coupling for asymmetric cell division. Because studies in model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have started to reveal the molecular mechanisms of this coordination, we will concentrate on these two systems. We review examples of molecular mechanisms suggesting a coupling between cell polarity and cell cycle progression. PMID:23926048

  16. Life-cycle costs of high-performance cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R.; Burger, D.; Reiter, L.

    1985-01-01

    A life cycle cost analysis of high efficiency cells was presented. Although high efficiency cells produce more power, they also cost more to make and are more susceptible to array hot-spot heating. Three different computer analysis programs were used: SAMICS (solar array manufacturing industry costing standards), PVARRAY (an array failure mode/degradation simulator), and LCP (lifetime cost and performance). The high efficiency cell modules were found to be more economical in this study, but parallel redundancy is recommended.

  17. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P.; Cooper, Jacob C.; Frizzell, Kimberly A.; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A.; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Malik, Harmit S.

    2015-01-01

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and non-model systems. PMID:26680200

  18. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P; Cooper, Jacob C; Frizzell, Kimberly A; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O; Malik, Harmit S

    2015-12-18

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers, such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle-regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids resulting from a cross between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and nonmodel systems. PMID:26680200

  19. A role for homologous recombination proteins in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Bosshard, Sandra; Urban, Zuzanna; Mermod, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA breaks, especially double-stranded breaks (DSBs), by activating the DNA damage response (DDR), which encompasses DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint signaling. The DNA damage signal is transmitted to the checkpoint machinery by a network of specialized DNA damage-recognizing and signal-transducing molecules. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA repair proteins themselves may also directly contribute to the checkpoint control. Here, we investigated the role of homologous recombination (HR) proteins in normal cell cycle regulation in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. For this purpose, we used Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing the Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators (Fucci). Systematic siRNA-mediated knockdown of HR genes in these cells demonstrated that the lack of several of these factors alters cell cycle distribution, albeit differentially. The knock-down of MDC1, Rad51 and Brca1 caused the cells to arrest in the G2 phase, suggesting that they may be required for the G2/M transition. In contrast, inhibition of the other HR factors, including several Rad51 paralogs and Rad50, led to the arrest in the G1/G0 phase. Moreover, reduced expression of Rad51B, Rad51C, CtIP and Rad50 induced entry into a quiescent G0-like phase. In conclusion, the lack of many HR factors may lead to cell cycle checkpoint activation, even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, indicating that these proteins may play an essential role both in DNA repair and checkpoint signaling. PMID:26125600

  20. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling. PMID:1030938

  1. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janousek, B. K.; Francis, R. W.; Wendt, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal cycling experiment was performed on GaAs solar cells to establish the electrical and structural integrity of these cells under the temperature conditions of a simulated low-Earth orbit of 3-year duration. Thirty single junction GaAs cells were obtained and tests were performed to establish the beginning-of-life characteristics of these cells. The tests consisted of cell I-V power output curves, from which were obtained short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and cell efficiency, and optical micrographs, spectral response, and ion microprobe mass analysis (IMMA) depth profiles on both the front surfaces and the front metallic contacts of the cells. Following 5,000 thermal cycles, the performance of the cells was reexamined in addition to any factors which might contribute to performance degradation. It is established that, after 5,000 thermal cycles, the cells retain their power output with no loss of structural integrity or change in physical appearance.

  2. Identification of a novel EGF-sensitive cell cycle checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Francesca . E-mail: francesca.walker@ludwig.edu.au; Zhang Huihua; Burgess, Antony W.

    2007-02-01

    The site of action of growth factors on mammalian cell cycle has been assigned to the boundary between the G1 and S phases. We show here that Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) is also required for mitosis. BaF/3 cells expressing the EGFR (BaF/wtEGFR) synthesize DNA in response to EGF, but arrest in S-phase. We have generated a cell line (BaF/ERX) with defective downregulation of the EGFR and sustained activation of EGFR signalling pathways: these cells undergo mitosis in an EGF-dependent manner. The transit of BaF/ERX cells through G2/M strictly requires activation of EGFR and is abolished by AG1478. This phenotype is mimicked by co-expression of ErbB2 in BaF/wtEGFR cells, and abolished by inhibition of the EGFR kinase, suggesting that sustained signalling of the EGFR, through impaired downregulation of the EGFR or heterodimerization, is required for completion of the cycle. We have confirmed the role of EGFR signalling in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle using a human tumor cell line which overexpresses the EGFR and is dependent on EGFR signalling for growth. These findings unmask an EGF-sensitive checkpoint, helping to understand the link between sustained EGFR signalling, proliferation and the acquisition of a radioresistant phenotype in cancer cells.

  3. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  4. Modelling cell cycle synchronisation in networks of coupled radial glial cells.

    PubMed

    Barrack, Duncan S; Thul, Rüdiger; Owen, Markus R

    2015-07-21

    Radial glial cells play a crucial role in the embryonic mammalian brain. Their proliferation is thought to be controlled, in part, by ATP mediated calcium signals. It has been hypothesised that these signals act to locally synchronise cell cycles, so that clusters of cells proliferate together, shedding daughter cells in uniform sheets. In this paper we investigate this cell cycle synchronisation by taking an ordinary differential equation model that couples the dynamics of intracellular calcium and the cell cycle and extend it to populations of cells coupled via extracellular ATP signals. Through bifurcation analysis we show that although ATP mediated calcium release can lead to cell cycle synchronisation, a number of other asynchronous oscillatory solutions including torus solutions dominate the parameter space and cell cycle synchronisation is far from guaranteed. Despite this, numerical results indicate that the transient and not the asymptotic behaviour of the system is important in accounting for cell cycle synchronisation. In particular, quiescent cells can be entrained on to the cell cycle via ATP mediated calcium signals initiated by a driving cell and crucially will cycle in near synchrony with the driving cell for the duration of neurogenesis. This behaviour is highly sensitive to the timing of ATP release, with release at the G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle far more likely to lead to near synchrony than release during mid G1 phase. This result, which suggests that ATP release timing is critical to radial glia cell cycle synchronisation, may help us to understand normal and pathological brain development. PMID:25908204

  5. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  6. High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, H.

    1995-10-19

    An outline of the Westinghouse high-efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle is presented. The following topics are discussed: The Westinghouse SOFC pilot manufacturing facility, cell scale-up plan, pressure effects on SOFC power and efficiency, sureCell versus conventional gas turbine plants, sureCell product line for distributed power applications, 20 MW pressurized-SOFC/gas turbine power plant, 10 MW SOFC/CT power plant, sureCell plant concept design requirements, and Westinghouse SOFC market entry.

  7. Vertebrate Cell Cycle Modulates Infection by Protozoan Parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, James A.; Crane, Mark St. J.

    1981-11-01

    Synchronized HeLa cell populations were exposed to Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii, obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that cause Chagas' disease and toxoplasmosis, respectively, in humans. The ability of the two parasites to infect HeLa cells increased as the HeLa cells proceeded from the G1 phase to the S phase of their growth cycle and decreased as the cells entered G2-M. Characterization of the S-phase cell surface components responsible for this phenomenon could be beneficial in the development of vaccines against these parasitic diseases.

  8. Human Fucci Pancreatic Beta Cell Lines: New Tools to Study Beta Cell Cycle and Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Géraldine; Maugein, Alicia; Cordier, Corinne; Pechberty, Séverine; Garfa-Traoré, Meriem; Martin, Patrick; Scharfmann, Raphaël; Albagli, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cell cycle in beta cells is poorly understood, especially in humans. We exploited here the recently described human pancreatic beta cell line EndoC-βH2 to set up experimental systems for cell cycle studies. We derived 2 populations from EndoC-βH2 cells that stably harbor the 2 genes encoding the Fucci fluorescent indicators of cell cycle, either from two vectors, or from a unique bicistronic vector. In proliferating non-synchronized cells, the 2 Fucci indicators revealed cells in the expected phases of cell cycle, with orange and green cells being in G1 and S/G2/M cells, respectively, and allowed the sorting of cells in different substeps of G1. The Fucci indicators also faithfully red out alterations in human beta cell proliferative activity since a mitogen-rich medium decreased the proportion of orange cells and inflated the green population, while reciprocal changes were observed when cells were induced to cease proliferation and increased expression of some beta cell genes. In the last situation, acquisition of a more differentiated beta cell phenotype correlates with an increased intensity in orange fluorescence. Hence Fucci beta cell lines provide new tools to address important questions regarding human beta cell cycle and differentiation. PMID:25259951

  9. Cell cycle-specific replication of Escherichia coli minichromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A C; Helmstetter, C E

    1986-01-01

    The timing of Escherichia coli minichromosome replication in the cell division cycle was examined using an improved procedure for studying plasmid replication frequency. Cultures growing exponentially in glucose/Casamino acids minimal medium were pulse-labeled with [3H]thymidine, and the radioactivity incorporated into plasmid DNA in cells of different ages was analyzed. At the end of the labeling period the bacteria were bound to the surface of a nitrocellulose membrane filter, and the radioactivity in new daughter cells, which eluted continuously from the membrane, was quantitated following agarose gel electrophoresis. The minichromosomes replicated during a discrete interval in the cell division cycle that appeared to coincide with initiation of chromosome replication. In contrast, plasmid pBR322 replicated throughout the division cycle at a rate that increased gradually as a function of cell age. The difference in minichromosome and pBR322 replication was clearly discernible in cells harboring both plasmids. It was also found that the 16 kD gene adjacent to oriC was not a determinant of the timing of minichromosome replication during the division cycle. The results are consistent with the conclusion that minichromosome replication frequency is governed by the same mechanism that controls chromosome replication. Images PMID:3523483

  10. Emerging regulatory mechanisms in ubiquitin-dependent cell cycle control

    PubMed Central

    Mocciaro, Annamaria; Rape, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The covalent modification of proteins with ubiquitin is required for accurate cell division in all eukaryotes. Ubiquitylation depends on an enzymatic cascade, in which E3 enzymes recruit specific substrates for modification. Among ~600 human E3s, the SCF (Skp1–cullin1–F-box) and the APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) are known for driving the degradation of cell cycle regulators to accomplish irreversible cell cycle transitions. The cell cycle machinery reciprocally regulates the SCF and APC/C through various mechanisms, including the modification of these E3s or the binding of specific inhibitors. Recent studies have provided new insight into the intricate relationship between ubiquitylation and the cell division apparatus as they revealed roles for atypical ubiquitin chains, new mechanisms of substrate and E3 regulation, as well as extensive crosstalk between ubiquitylation enzymes. Here, we review these emerging regulatory mechanisms of ubiquitin-dependent cell cycle control and discuss how their manipulation might provide therapeutic benefits in the future. PMID:22357967

  11. Novel functions of core cell cycle regulators in neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Godin, Juliette D; Nguyen, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is one of the most intricate regions of the brain, which required elaborated cell migration patterns for its development. Experimental observations show that projection neurons migrate radially within the cortical wall, whereas interneurons migrate along multiple tangential paths to reach the developing cortex. Tight regulation of the cell migration processes ensures proper positioning and functional integration of neurons to specific cerebral cortical circuits. Disruption of neuronal migration often lead to cortical dysfunction and/or malformation associated with neurological disorders. Unveiling the molecular control of neuronal migration is thus fundamental to understand the physiological or pathological development of the cerebral cortex. Generation of functional cortical neurons is a complex and stratified process that relies on decision of neural progenitors to leave the cell cycle and generate neurons that migrate and differentiate to reach their final position in the cortical wall. Although accumulating work shed some light on the molecular control of neuronal migration, we currently do not have a comprehensive understanding of how cell cycle exit and migration/differentiation are coordinated at the molecular level. The current chapter tends to lift the veil on this issue by discussing how core cell cycle regulators, and in particular p27(Kip1) acts as a multifunctional protein to control critical steps of neuronal migration through activities that go far beyond cell cycle regulation. PMID:24243100

  12. The B-MYB Transcriptional Network Guides Cell Cycle Progression and Fate Decisions to Sustain Self-Renewal and the Identity of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Ming; Riordon, Daniel R.; Yan, Bin; Tarasova, Yelena S.; Bruweleit, Sarah; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Li, Ronald A.; Wersto, Robert P.; Boheler, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent and have unlimited self-renewal capacity. Although pluripotency and differentiation have been examined extensively, the mechanisms responsible for self-renewal are poorly understood and are believed to involve an unusual cell cycle, epigenetic regulators and pluripotency-promoting transcription factors. Here we show that B-MYB, a cell cycle regulated phosphoprotein and transcription factor critical to the formation of inner cell mass, is central to the transcriptional and co-regulatory networks that sustain normal cell cycle progression and self-renewal properties of ESCs. Phenotypically, B-MYB is robustly expressed in ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and it is present predominantly in a hypo-phosphorylated state. Knockdown of B-MYB results in functional cell cycle abnormalities that involve S, G2 and M phases, and reduced expression of critical cell cycle regulators like ccnb1 and plk1. By conducting gene expression profiling on control and B-MYB deficient cells, ChIP-chip experiments, and integrative computational analyses, we unraveled a highly complex B-MYB-mediated transcriptional network that guides ESC self-renewal. The network encompasses critical regulators of all cell cycle phases and epigenetic regulators, pluripotency transcription factors, and differentiation determinants. B-MYB along with E2F1 and c-MYC preferentially co-regulate cell cycle target genes. B-MYB also co-targets genes regulated by OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG that are significantly associated with stem cell differentiation, embryonic development, and epigenetic control. Moreover, loss of B-MYB leads to a breakdown of the transcriptional hierarchy present in ESCs. These results coupled with functional studies demonstrate that B-MYB not only controls and accelerates cell cycle progression in ESCs it contributes to fate decisions and maintenance of pluripotent stem cell identity. PMID:22936984

  13. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  14. α-Mangostin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun-Ho; Park, Bong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mangosteen has long been used as a traditional medicine and is known to have antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. Although the effects of α-mangostin, a natural compound extracted from the pericarp of mangosteen, have been investigated in many studies, there is limited data on the effects of the compound in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, α-mangostin was assessed as a potential anticancer agent against human OSCC cells. α-Mangostin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little to no effect on normal human PDLF cells. α-Mangostin treatment clearly showed apoptotic evidences such as nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of annexin V and PI-positive cells on OSCC cells. α-Mangostin treatment also caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and the translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. The expressions of the mitochondria-related proteins were activated by α-mangostin. Treatment with α-mangostin also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated cell cycle-related proteins (CDK/cyclin). Hence, α-mangostin specifically induces cell death and inhibits proliferation in OSCC cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, suggesting that α-mangostin may be an effective agent for the treatment of OSCC. PMID:27478478

  15. Glucocorticoids Play a Key Role in Circadian Cell Cycle Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Dickmeis, Thomas; Lahiri, Kajori; Nica, Gabriela; Vallone, Daniela; Santoriello, Cristina; Neumann, Carl J; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2007-01-01

    Clock output pathways play a pivotal role by relaying timing information from the circadian clock to a diversity of physiological systems. Both cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms have been implicated as clock outputs; however, the relative importance and interplay between these mechanisms are poorly understood. The cell cycle represents a highly conserved regulatory target of the circadian timing system. Previously, we have demonstrated that in zebrafish, the circadian clock has the capacity to generate daily rhythms of S phase by a cell-autonomous mechanism in vitro. Here, by studying a panel of zebrafish mutants, we reveal that the pituitary–adrenal axis also plays an essential role in establishing these rhythms in the whole animal. Mutants with a reduction or a complete absence of corticotrope pituitary cells show attenuated cell-proliferation rhythms, whereas expression of circadian clock genes is not affected. We show that the corticotrope deficiency is associated with reduced cortisol levels, implicating glucocorticoids as a component of a systemic signaling pathway required for circadian cell cycle rhythmicity. Strikingly, high-amplitude rhythms can be rescued by exposing mutant larvae to a tonic concentration of a glucocorticoid agonist. Our work suggests that cell-autonomous clock mechanisms are not sufficient to establish circadian cell cycle rhythms at the whole-animal level. Instead, they act in concert with a systemic signaling environment of which glucocorticoids are an essential part. PMID:17373855

  16. Does Arabidopsis thaliana DREAM of cell cycle control?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-08-01

    Strict temporal control of cell cycle gene expression is essential for all eukaryotes including animals and plants. DREAM complexes have been identified in worm, fly, and mammals, linking several distinct transcription factors to coordinate gene expression throughout the cell cycle. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Kobayashi et al (2015) identify distinct activator and repressor complexes for genes expressed during the G2 and M phases in Arabidopsis that can be temporarily separated during proliferating and post‐mitotic stages of development. The complexes incorporate specific activator and repressor MYB and E2F transcription factors and indicate the possibility of the existence of multiple DREAM complexes in plants. PMID:26089020

  17. Arginine starvation in colorectal carcinoma cells: Sensing, impact on translation control and cell cycle distribution.

    PubMed

    Vynnytska-Myronovska, Bozhena O; Kurlishchuk, Yuliya; Chen, Oleh; Bobak, Yaroslav; Dittfeld, Claudia; Hüther, Melanie; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Stasyk, Oleh V

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cells rely on a continued exogenous nutrient supply in order to maintain a high proliferative activity. Although a strong dependence of some tumor types on exogenous arginine sources has been reported, the mechanisms of arginine sensing by tumor cells and the impact of changes in arginine availability on translation and cell cycle regulation are not fully understood. The results presented herein state that human colorectal carcinoma cells rapidly exhaust the internal arginine sources in the absence of exogenous arginine and repress global translation by activation of the GCN2-mediated pathway and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Tumor suppressor protein p53 activation and G1/G0 cell cycle arrest support cell survival upon prolonged arginine starvation. Cells with the mutant or deleted TP53 fail to stop cell cycle progression at defined cell cycle checkpoints which appears to be associated with reduced recovery after durable metabolic stress triggered by arginine withdrawal. PMID:26751966

  18. Msi1 promotes tumor growth and cell proliferation by targeting cell cycle checkpoint proteins p21, p27 and p53 in cervical carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian; Yang, Wen-Ting; Zheng, Peng-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Musashi RNA-binding protein1 (Msi1), a member of the RNA-binding protein family, has been reported to be a diagnostic marker and potential therapeutic target in some cancers, its function in cervical cancer remains unknown. In this study, we found Msi1 was highly expressed in cervical cancer tissues, and over-expressing Msi1 in cervical cancer cells enhanced tumor formation and cell proliferation and accelerated cells into the S phase. Whereas, down-regulating Msi1 by shRNA in cervical cancer cells inhibited tumor formation and cell proliferation and slowed cell into the S phase, suggesting that Msi1 might act as cell cycle regulator. Immunohistochemistry assay showed the negative correlation between Msi1 and p21, p27 and p53, suggesting that Msi1 might regulate these cycle regulators in cervical cancer. Moreover, the expression of the p21, p27 and p53 proteins were down-regulated in Msi1 overexpressing cervical cancer cells and up-regulated in shMsi1 cervical cancer cells. Luciferase assays and RNA-protein binding assays confirmed that Msi1 could bind to the mRNA 3′UTRs of p21, p27 and p53 and suppress the translation of these proteins. Our findings provide new evidence that Msi1 might promote cell proliferation by accelerating the cell cycle by directly targeting p21, p27 and p53. PMID:25362645

  19. Lithium/disulfide cells capable of long cycle life

    SciTech Connect

    Kaun, T.D.; Holifield, T.F.; DeLuca, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The lithium-alloy/disulfide cell has undergone improvements to provide a very stable, high performance upper-plateau (UP) FeS/sub 2/ electrode. Prismatic UP FeS/sub 2/ cell tests (12--24 Ah capacity) with a LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte have demonstrated 1000 deep discharge cycles at 400/degree/C with less than a 20% drop in capacity and without reduced power capability. Previous lithium-alloy/disulfide cells, which were based on a two voltage-plateau FeS/sub 2/ electrode and LiCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte had a life expectancy of only 100 cycles. Both time- and cycle-related capacity loss mechanisms have been eliminated with the improved cell design. In addition, new cell design features of overcharge tolerance and overdischarge safeguarding enhance battery durability. The performance prospects of a Li-alloy/UP FeS/sub 2/ battery for an IDSEP van application are discussed. A specific energy of 150 Wh/kg for this battery after 1000 cycles of operation is projected. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Alteration of cell-cycle regulation in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nam, E J; Kim, Y T

    2008-01-01

    In spite of the clinical importance of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), little is known about the pathobiology of its precursor lesions and progression. Regulatory mechanisms of the cell cycle are mainly composed of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), and CDK inhibitors. Alteration of these mechanisms results in uncontrolled cell proliferation, which is a distinctive feature of human cancers. This review describes the current state of knowledge about the alterations of cell-cycle regulations in the context of p16-cyclin D1-CDK4/6-pRb pathway, p21-p27-cyclin E-CDK2 pathway, p14-MDM2-p53 pathway, and ATM-Chk2-CDC25 pathway, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that ovarian cancer is a heterogenous group of neoplasms with several different histologic types, each with its own underlying molecular genetic mechanism. Therefore, expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins should be tested separately according to each histologic type. In serous ovarian carcinoma, high expression of p16, p53, and p27 and low expression of p21 and cyclin E were shown. In addition, this review focuses on the prognostic significance of cell cycle-regulating proteins in EOC. However, it is difficult to compare the results from different groups due to diverse methodologies and interpretations. Accordingly, researchers should establish standardized criteria for the interpretation of immunohistochemical results. PMID:18298566

  1. The Effect of Spaceflight on Cartilage Cell Cycle and Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Stephen B.; Stiner, Dalina; Telford, William G.

    2000-01-01

    In vivo studies have shown that spaceflight results in loss of bone and muscle. In an effort to understand the mechanisms of these changes, cell cultures of cartilage, bone and muscle have been subjected to spaceflight to study the microgravity effects on differentiated cells. However it now seems possible that the cell differentiation process itself may be the event(s) most affected by spaceflight. For example, osteoblast-like cells have been shown to have reduced cellular activity in microgravity due to an underdifferentiated state (Carmeliet, et al, 1997). And reduced human lymphocyte growth in spaceflight was related to increased apoptosis (Lewis, et al, 1998). Which brings us to the question of whether reduced cellular activity in space is due to an effect on the differentiated cell, an effect on the cell cycle and cell proliferation, or an effect on cell death. This question has not been specifically addressed on previous flights and was the question behind die present study.

  2. Accelerated stem cell attachment to ultrafine grained titanium.

    PubMed

    Estrin, Yuri; Ivanova, Elena P; Michalska, Anna; Truong, Vi Khanh; Lapovok, Rimma; Boyd, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Commercial purity titanium with an average grain size in the low sub-micron range was produced by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). Attachment of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the surface of conventional coarse grained and ECAP-modified titanium was studied. It was demonstrated that the attachment and spreading of hMSCs in the initial stages (up to 24h) of culture was enhanced by grain refinement. Surface characterization by a range of techniques showed that the main factor responsible for the observed acceleration of hMSC attachment and spreading on titanium due to grain refinement in the bulk is the attendant changes in surface topography on the nanoscale. These results indicate that, in addition to its superior mechanical properties, ECAP-modified titanium possesses improved biocompatibility, which makes it to a potent candidate for applications in medical implants. PMID:20887818

  3. Accelerating particle-in-cell simulations using multilevel Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been an important tool in understanding plasmas since the dawn of the digital computer. Much more recently, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method has accelerated particle-based simulations of a variety of systems described by stochastic differential equations (SDEs), from financial portfolios to porous media flow. The fundamental idea of MLMC is to perform correlated particle simulations using a hierarchy of different time steps, and to use these correlations for variance reduction on the fine-step result. This framework is directly applicable to the Langevin formulation of Coulomb collisions, as demonstrated in previous work, but in order to apply to PIC simulations of realistic scenarios, MLMC must be generalized to incorporate self-consistent evolution of the electromagnetic fields. We present such a generalization, with rigorous results concerning its accuracy and efficiency. We present examples of the method in the collisionless, electrostatic context, and discuss applications and extensions for the future.

  4. Live Cell in Vitro and in Vivo Imaging Applications: Accelerating Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Isherwood, Beverley; Timpson, Paul; McGhee, Ewan J; Anderson, Kurt I; Canel, Marta; Serrels, Alan; Brunton, Valerie G; Carragher, Neil O

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of specific molecular processes and cellular phenotypes in live cell systems reveal unique insights into cell fate and drug pharmacology that are not gained from traditional fixed endpoint assays. Recent advances in microscopic imaging platform technology combined with the development of novel optical biosensors and sophisticated image analysis solutions have increased the scope of live cell imaging applications in drug discovery. We highlight recent literature examples where live cell imaging has uncovered novel insight into biological mechanism or drug mode-of-action. We survey distinct types of optical biosensors and associated analytical methods for monitoring molecular dynamics, in vitro and in vivo. We describe the recent expansion of live cell imaging into automated target validation and drug screening activities through the development of dedicated brightfield and fluorescence kinetic imaging platforms. We provide specific examples of how temporal profiling of phenotypic response signatures using such kinetic imaging platforms can increase the value of in vitro high-content screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of how further application and development of live cell imaging technology and reagents can accelerate preclinical lead optimization cycles and enhance the in vitro to in vivo translation of drug candidates. PMID:24310493

  5. Cell Cycle Phase-Specific Drug Resistance as an Escape Mechanism of Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Hill, David S; Daignault, Sheena M; Lui, Goldie Y L; Sharp, Danae M; Gabrielli, Brian; Weninger, Wolfgang; Haass, Nikolas K

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by cancer cell subpopulations with heterogeneous cell cycle profiles. For example, hypoxic tumor zones contain clusters of cancer cells that arrest in G1 phase. It is conceivable that neoplastic cells exhibit differential drug sensitivity based on their residence in specific cell cycle phases. In this study, we used two-dimensional and organotypic melanoma culture models in combination with fluorescent cell cycle indicators to investigate the effects of cell cycle phases on clinically used drugs. We demonstrate that G1-arrested melanoma cells, irrespective of the underlying cause mediating G1 arrest, are resistant to apoptosis induced by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib or the alkylating agent temozolomide. In contrast, G1-arrested cells were more sensitive to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor-induced cell death. Of clinical relevance, pretreatment of melanoma cells with a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor, which induced G1 arrest, resulted in resistance to temozolomide or bortezomib. On the other hand, pretreatment with temozolomide, which induced G2 arrest, did not result in resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitors. In summary, we established a model to study the effects of the cell cycle on drug sensitivity. Cell cycle phase-specific drug resistance is an escape mechanism of melanoma cells that has implications on the choice and timing of drug combination therapies. PMID:26970356

  6. DNA‐damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival

    PubMed Central

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B.; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life‐long by their unique abilities of self‐renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA‐damage‐inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA‐damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time‐lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A‐expressing HSCs failed to long‐term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ‐irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen‐activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic‐erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress‐induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system. Stem Cells 2016;34:699–710 PMID:26731607

  7. DNA-damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm; Rieger, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life-long by their unique abilities of self-renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA-damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time-lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A-expressing HSCs failed to long-term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ-irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic-erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress-induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system. Stem Cells 2016;34:699-710. PMID:26731607

  8. [Dynamics of the cell cycle in human endothelial cell culture infected with influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Prochukhanova, A R; Lyublinskaya, O G; Azarenok, A A; Nazarova, A V; Zenin, V V; Zhilinskaya, I N

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle in a culture of endothelial cells EAhy 926 infected with influenza virus was investigated. Cytometric analysis of culture, synchronized using contact inhibition, has shown that the exposure to the influenza virus in cells EAhy 926 lengthened S-phase of the cell cycle. This result has been tested and proven on culture EAhy 926 treated with nocodazole. Compared with lung carcinoma cells A549, in which influenza virus provokes the arrest of G0/G1 phase of the cycle, elongation of S-phase of cycle at a similar infection of endothelial culture EAhy 926 indicates that the influenza virus differently affects the dynamics of the cell cycle according to the origin of the infected culture. PMID:26021172

  9. Toward a mechanistic understanding of the damage evolution of SnAgCu solder joints in accelerated thermal cycling test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahin Shirazi, Sam

    Accelerated thermal cycling (ATC) tests are the most commonly used tests for the thermo-mechanical performance assessment of microelectronics assemblies. Currently used reliability models have failed to incorporate the microstructural dependency of lead free solder joint behavior and its microstructure evolution during cycling. Thus, it is essential to have a mechanistic understanding of the effect of cycling parameters on damage evolution and failure of lead free solder joints in ATC. Recrystallization has been identified as the damage rate controlling mechanism in ATC. Usually it takes 1/3 of life for completion of recrystallization regardless of cycling parameters. Thus, the life of the solder joints can be predicted by estimating global recrystallization. The objective of the first part of the study was to examine whether the damage scenario applies in service is the same as the harsh thermal cycling tests (i.e. 0/100 °C and -40/125 °C) commonly used in industry. Microstructure analysis results on a variety of lead free solder SnAgCu assemblies subjected to the both harsh (0/100 °C) and mild (20/80 °C) ATC confirmed similar failure mechanism under the both testing conditions. Sn grain morphology (interlaced versus beach ball) has a significant effect on the thermo-mechanical performance (and thus the model) of the lead free solder joints. The longer thermal cycling lifetime observed in the interlaced solder joints subjected to the ATC compared to the beach ball structure was correlated to the different initial microstructure and the microstructure evolution during cycling. For the modeling proposes, the present study was focused on Sn-Ag-Cu solder joints with either a single Sn grain or beach ball structure. Microstructural analysis results of the simulated thermal cycling experiment revealed that, the life can be approximated as determined by the accumulation of a certain amount of work during the high temperature dwells. Finally the effect of precipitates

  10. Cell cycle control of DNA joint molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Wild, Philipp; Matos, Joao

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of stable interactions between chromosomes underpins vital cellular processes such as recombinational DNA repair and bipolar chromosome segregation. On the other hand, timely disengagement of persistent connections is necessary to assure efficient partitioning of the replicated genome prior to cell division. Whereas great progress has been made in defining how cohesin-mediated chromosomal interactions are disengaged as cells prepare to undergo chromosome segregation, little is known about the metabolism of DNA joint molecules (JMs), generated during the repair of chromosomal lesions. Recent work on Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1, two conserved structure-selective endonucleases, revealed unforeseen links between JM-processing and cell cycle progression. Cell cycle kinases and phosphatases control Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1 to restrain deleterious JM-processing during S-phase, while safeguarding chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:26970388

  11. Cell Cycle Control by a Minimal Cdk Network

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Claude; Tyson, John J.; Coudreuse, Damien; Novák, Béla

    2015-01-01

    In present-day eukaryotes, the cell division cycle is controlled by a complex network of interacting proteins, including members of the cyclin and cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk) families, and the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC). Successful progression through the cell cycle depends on precise, temporally ordered regulation of the functions of these proteins. In light of this complexity, it is surprising that in fission yeast, a minimal Cdk network consisting of a single cyclin-Cdk fusion protein can control DNA synthesis and mitosis in a manner that is indistinguishable from wild type. To improve our understanding of the cell cycle regulatory network, we built and analysed a mathematical model of the molecular interactions controlling the G1/S and G2/M transitions in these minimal cells. The model accounts for all observed properties of yeast strains operating with the fusion protein. Importantly, coupling the model’s predictions with experimental analysis of alternative minimal cells, we uncover an explanation for the unexpected fact that elimination of inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk is benign in these strains while it strongly affects normal cells. Furthermore, in the strain without inhibitory phosphorylation of the fusion protein, the distribution of cell size at division is unusually broad, an observation that is accounted for by stochastic simulations of the model. Our approach provides novel insights into the organization and quantitative regulation of wild type cell cycle progression. In particular, it leads us to propose a new mechanistic model for the phenomenon of mitotic catastrophe, relying on a combination of unregulated, multi-cyclin-dependent Cdk activities. PMID:25658582

  12. Cycle life status of SAFT VOS nickel-cadmium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goualard, Jacques

    1993-02-01

    The SAFT prismatic VOS Ni-Cd cells have been flown in geosynchronous orbit since 1977 and in low earth orbit since 1983. Parallel cycling tests are performed by several space agencies in order to determine the cycle life for a wide range of temperature and depth of discharge (DOD). In low Earth orbit (LEO), the ELAN program is conducted on 24 Ah cells by CNES and ESA at the European Battery Test Center at temperatures ranging from 0 to 27 C and DOD from 10 to 40 percent. Data are presented up to 37,000 cycles. One pack (X-80) has achieved 49,000 cycles at 10 C and 23 percent DOD. The geosynchronous orbit simulation of a high DOD test is conducted by ESA on 3 batteries at 10 C and 70, 90, and 100 percent DOD. Thirty-one eclipse seasons are completed, and no signs of degradation have been found. The Air Force test at CRANE on 24 Ah and 40 Ah cells at 20 C and 80 percent DOD has achieved 19 shadow periods. Life expectancy is discussed. The VOS cell technology could be used for the following: (1) in geosynchronous conditions--15 yrs at 10-15 C and 80 percent DOD; and (2) in low earth orbit--10 yrs at 5-15 C and 25-30 percent DOD.

  13. Evaluation program for secondary spacecraft cells: Cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The service life and storage stability for several storage batteries were determined. The batteries included silver-zinc batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, and silver-cadmium batteries. The cell performance characteristics and limitations are to be used by spacecraft power systems planners and designers. A statistical analysis of the life cycle prediction and cause of failure versus test conditions is presented.

  14. Cycle life status of SAFT VOS nickel-cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goualard, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    The SAFT prismatic VOS Ni-Cd cells have been flown in geosynchronous orbit since 1977 and in low earth orbit since 1983. Parallel cycling tests are performed by several space agencies in order to determine the cycle life for a wide range of temperature and depth of discharge (DOD). In low Earth orbit (LEO), the ELAN program is conducted on 24 Ah cells by CNES and ESA at the European Battery Test Center at temperatures ranging from 0 to 27 C and DOD from 10 to 40 percent. Data are presented up to 37,000 cycles. One pack (X-80) has achieved 49,000 cycles at 10 C and 23 percent DOD. The geosynchronous orbit simulation of a high DOD test is conducted by ESA on 3 batteries at 10 C and 70, 90, and 100 percent DOD. Thirty-one eclipse seasons are completed, and no signs of degradation have been found. The Air Force test at CRANE on 24 Ah and 40 Ah cells at 20 C and 80 percent DOD has achieved 19 shadow periods. Life expectancy is discussed. The VOS cell technology could be used for the following: (1) in geosynchronous conditions--15 yrs at 10-15 C and 80 percent DOD; and (2) in low earth orbit--10 yrs at 5-15 C and 25-30 percent DOD.

  15. Irradiation-induced changes in nuclear shape and cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, M.; Sasaki, H.; Kishino, Y.; Tsuboi, T.; Sugishita, T.; Hosokawa, T.

    1982-03-01

    Using human uterine cervical carcinoma cells transplanted in nude mice and mice leukemia L5178Y cells, changes in the cell cycle following irradiation were observed by flow cytometry (FCM), and changes in the cell nuclei during the course of irradiation were measured by FCM. Experiments in vivo as well as in vitro caused accumulation of cells in the G2 to M populations, resulting in the so-called G2 block phenomenon as revealed by FCM analysis of DNA distributions. The radiation-induced changes of nuclear shapes were dependent on abnormal mitoses, which occurred more frequently in the G2 to M phases. Therefore it is suggested that the G2 block phenomenon plays an important role in radiation-induced cell death because the process of cell death by irradiation has been shown to proceed via these abnormal mitoses.

  16. Nephronophthisis-Associated CEP164 Regulates Cell Cycle Progression, Apoptosis and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Slaats, Gisela G.; Le Corre, Stéphanie; Shaltiel, Indra A.; van de Hoek, Glenn; Klasson, Timothy D.; Stokman, Marijn F.; Logister, Ive; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Goldschmeding, Roel; Nguyen, Tri Q.; Drummond, Iain A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Giles, Rachel H.

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that centrosomal protein 164 (CEP164) regulates both cilia and the DNA damage response in the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease nephronophthisis. Here we examine the functional role of CEP164 in nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies and concomitant fibrosis. Live cell imaging of RPE-FUCCI (fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) cells after siRNA knockdown of CEP164 revealed an overall quicker cell cycle than control cells, although early S-phase was significantly longer. Follow-up FACS experiments with renal IMCD3 cells confirm that Cep164 siRNA knockdown promotes cells to accumulate in S-phase. We demonstrate that this effect can be rescued by human wild-type CEP164, but not disease-associated mutants. siRNA of CEP164 revealed a proliferation defect over time, as measured by CyQuant assays. The discrepancy between accelerated cell cycle and inhibited overall proliferation could be explained by induction of apoptosis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Reduction of CEP164 levels induces apoptosis in immunofluorescence, FACS and RT-QPCR experiments. Furthermore, knockdown of Cep164 or overexpression of dominant negative mutant allele CEP164 Q525X induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and concomitant upregulation of genes associated with fibrosis. Zebrafish injected with cep164 morpholinos likewise manifest developmental abnormalities, impaired DNA damage signaling, apoptosis and a pro-fibrotic response in vivo. This study reveals a novel role for CEP164 in the pathogenesis of nephronophthisis, in which mutations cause ciliary defects coupled with DNA damage induced replicative stress, cell death, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and suggests that these events drive the characteristic fibrosis observed in nephronophthisis kidneys. PMID:25340510

  17. Cell Cycle Regulatory Functions of the KSHV Oncoprotein LANA

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang; Gan, Jin; Wang, Chong; Zhu, Caixia; Cai, Qiliang

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of cell cycle is a commonly employed strategy of viruses for achieving a favorable cellular environment during infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the primary etiological agent of several human malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma, and primary effusion lymphoma, encodes several oncoproteins that deregulate normal physiology of cell cycle machinery to persist with endothelial cells and B cells and subsequently establish a latent infection. During latency, only a small subset of viral proteins is expressed. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is one of the latent antigens shown to be essential for transformation of endothelial cells in vitro. It has been well demonstrated that LANA is critical for the maintenance of latency, episome DNA replication, segregation and gene transcription. In this review, we summarize recent studies and address how LANA functions as an oncoprotein to steer host cell cycle-related events including proliferation and apoptosis by interacting with various cellular and viral factors, and highlight the potential therapeutic strategy of disrupting LANA-dependent signaling as targets in KSHV-associated cancers. PMID:27065950

  18. Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycles from Isotopic Ratios of Waste Products Applicable to Measurement by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Buchholz, B

    2005-08-24

    An extensive study was conducted to determine isotopic ratios of nuclides in spent fuel that may be utilized to reveal historical characteristics of a nuclear reactor cycle. This forensic information is important to determine the origin of unknown nuclear waste. The distribution of isotopes in waste products provides information about a nuclear fuel cycle, even when the isotopes of uranium and plutonium are removed through chemical processing. Several different reactor cycles of the PWR, BWR, CANDU, and LMFBR were simulated for this work with the ORIGEN-ARP and ORIGEN 2.2 codes. The spent fuel nuclide concentrations of these reactors were analyzed to find the most informative isotopic ratios indicative of irradiation cycle length and reactor design. Special focus was given to long-lived and stable fission products that would be present many years after their creation. For such nuclides, mass spectrometry analysis methods often have better detection limits than classic gamma-ray spectroscopy. The isotopic ratios {sup 151}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, and {sup 244}Cm/{sup 246}Cm were found to be good indicators of fuel cycle length and are well suited for analysis by accelerator mass spectroscopy.

  19. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Geng-Hung; Chao, Wen-Ying; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Lim, Yun-Ping; Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Lai, Peng-Yeh; Chen, Hau-Ren; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL), a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells. PMID:27120594

  20. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Geng-Hung; Chao, Wen-Ying; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Lim, Yun-Ping; Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Lai, Peng-Yeh; Chen, Hau-Ren; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL), a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells. PMID:27120594

  1. NSA2, a novel nucleolus protein regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Heyu; Ma, Xi; Shi, Taiping; Song, Quansheng; Zhao, Hongshan; Ma, Dalong

    2010-01-01

    NSA2 (Nop seven-associated 2) was previously identified in a high throughput screen of novel human genes associated with cell proliferation, and the NSA2 protein is evolutionarily conserved across different species. In this study, we revealed that NSA2 is broadly expressed in human tissues and cultured cell lines, and located in the nucleolus of the cell. Both of the putative nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of NSA2, also overlapped with nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs), are capable of directing nucleolar accumulation. Moreover, over-expression of the NSA2 protein promoted cell growth in different cell lines and regulated the G1/S transition in the cell cycle. SiRNA silencing of the NSA2 transcript attenuated the cell growth and dramatically blocked the cell cycle in G1/S transition. Our results demonstrated that NSA2 is a nucleolar protein involved in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation.

  2. MYC accelerates p21CIP-induced megakaryocytic differentiation involving early mitosis arrest in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Alonso, María J; Ceballos, Laura; Bretones, Gabriel; Frade, Pilar; León, Javier; Gandarillas, Alberto

    2012-05-01

    p21(CIP) is a potent cell cycle inhibitor often up-regulated in differentiation. Protooncogene MYC induces cell growth and proliferation, inhibits differentiation and represses p21(CIP). However, both molecules are involved in processes of polyploidisation, cell size increase, differentiation and senescence. It is unclear why MYC has a dual role in differentiation. We have previously shown that overexpression of p21(CIP) in K562 myeloid cells induces megakaryocytic differentiation with polyploidy. We have now investigated the requirements for p21(CIP) to block mitosis and induce differentiation in the presence of overactivated MYC. Silencing and over-expression studies showed that p21(CIP) is required to induce differentiation. However, the expression of p21(CIP) needs to be transient to irreversibly inhibit mitosis but not DNA replication, what leads to polyploidy. Transient overexpression of p21(CIP) caused early down-regulation of mitotic Cyclins and up-regulation of G1/S Cyclins D and E, changes typical of endoreplication. Interestingly, over-activation of MYC did not release the proliferative block imposed by p21(CIP) and instead, accelerated cell size increase, megakaryocytic differentiation and polyploidisation. Our data suggests that in some systems p21(CIP) takes part in a mitosis control driving MYC-induced cellular growth into differentiation. PMID:21769863

  3. Proposed Few-optical Cycle Laser-driven ParticleAccelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Lu, P.; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2006-10-06

    We describe a transparent dielectric grating accelerator structure that is designed for ultra-short laser pulse operation. The structure is based on the principle of periodic field reversal to achieve phase synchronicity for relativistic particles, however to preserve ultra-short pulse operation it does not resonate the laser field in the vacuum channel. The geometry of the structure appears well suited for application with high average power lasers and high thermal loading. Finally, it shows potential for an unloaded gradient of 10 GeV/m with 10 fsec laser pulses and the possibility to accelerate 10{sup 6} electrons per bunch at an efficiency of 8%. The fabrication procedure and a proposed near term experiment with this accelerator structure are presented.

  4. Characterization of high-power lithium-ion cells during constant current cycling. Part I. Cycle performance and electrochemical diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2003-01-24

    Twelve-cm{sup 2} pouch type lithium-ion cells were assembled with graphite anodes, LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} cathodes and 1M LiPF{sub 6}/EC/DEC electrolyte. These pouch cells were cycled at different depths of discharge (100 percent and 70 percent DOD) at room temperature to investigate cycle performance and pulse power capability. The capacity loss and power fade of the cells cycled over 100 percent DOD was significantly faster than the cell cycled over 70 percent DOD. The overall cell impedance increased with cycling, although the ohmic resistance from the electrolyte was almost constant. From electrochemical analysis of each electrode after cycling, structural and/or impedance changes in the cathode are responsible for most of the capacity and power fade, not the consumption of cycleable Li from side-reactions.

  5. Human Physiological Responses to Cycle Ergometer Leg Exercise During +Gz Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, J. L.; Stad, N. J.; Barnes, P. R.; Leftheriotis, G. P. N.; Arndt, N. F.; Simonson, S.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    Spaceflight and bed-rest deconditioning decrease maximal oxygen uptake (aerobic power), strength, endurance capacity, and orthostatic tolerance. In addition to extensive use of muscular exercise conditioning as a countermeasure for the reduction in aerobic power (VO(sub 2max)), stimuli from some form of +Gz acceleration conditioning may be necessary to attenuate the orthostatic intolerance component of this deconditioning. Hypothesis: There will be no significant difference in the physiological responses (oxygen uptake, heart rate, ventilation, or respiratory exchange ratio) during supine exercise with moderate +Gz acceleration.

  6. Predicting stem cell fate changes by differential cell cycle progression patterns.

    PubMed

    Roccio, Marta; Schmitter, Daniel; Knobloch, Marlen; Okawa, Yuya; Sage, Daniel; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2013-01-15

    Stem cell self-renewal, commitment and reprogramming rely on a poorly understood coordination of cell cycle progression and execution of cell fate choices. Using existing experimental paradigms, it has not been possible to probe this relationship systematically in live stem cells in vitro or in vivo. Alterations in stem cell cycle kinetics probably occur long before changes in phenotypic markers are apparent and could be used as predictive parameters to reveal changes in stem cell fate. To explore this intriguing concept, we developed a single-cell tracking approach that enables automatic detection of cell cycle phases in live (stem) cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitylation-based cell-cycle indicator (FUCCI) probes. Using this tool, we have identified distinctive changes in lengths and fluorescence intensities of G1 (red fluorescence) and S/G2-M (green) that are associated with self-renewal and differentiation of single murine neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We further exploited these distinctive features using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to select for desired stem cell fates in two challenging cell culture settings. First, as G1 length was found to nearly double during NSC differentiation, resulting in progressively increasing red fluorescence intensity, we successfully purified stem cells from heterogeneous cell populations by their lower fluorescence. Second, as ESCs are almost exclusively marked by the green (S/G2-M) FUCCI probe due to their very short G1, we substantially augmented the proportion of reprogramming cells by sorting green cells early on during reprogramming from a NSC to an induced pluripotent stem cell state. Taken together, our studies begin to shed light on the crucial relationship between cell cycle progression and fate choice, and we are convinced that the presented approach can be exploited to predict and manipulate cell fate in a wealth of other mammalian cell systems. PMID:23193167

  7. CELL CYCLE SYNCHRONIZATION OF MOUSE LIVER EPITHELIAL CELLS BY ELUTRIATION CENTRIFUGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, Andrew L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1980-06-01

    Detailed methods are described for the sorting and cell cycle synchronization by means of centrifugal elutriation of an established mouse liver epithelial cell line(NMuLi). In a comparison between three different elutriation media and between two different temperatures(4° and 20° C), the NMuLi cells were found to be most reproducibly sorted in the cell cycle when run in growth medium in the absence of serum and at the lower temperature. Under these conditions. and using decrements of rotor speed calculated from an empirically derived algorithm as described in the text an initially asynchronous population (38% G{sub 1}, 36% S, and 28% G{sub 2}M) was sorted into fractions enriched to 60% G{sub 1}, 75% S, and 50% G{sub 2}M. Of the cells loaded into the rotor, 30% were lost in the elutriation process, and about 20% recovered as aggregates. The remainder appeared in the various synchronized fractions. Epithelial cells sorted in this manner demonstrated no loss of viability, and upon replating showed significant movement in the cell cycle by 6 hrs post elutriation. The degree of synchronous movement through the cell cycle achieved by elutriation depended on the part of the cell cycle from which the original elutriated fraction came. Cells collected as late S and G{sub 2}M moved through the cell cycle with the tightest sychrony.

  8. The Interplay between Cell Wall Mechanical Properties and the Cell Cycle in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard G.; Turner, Robert D.; Mullin, Nic; Clarke, Nigel; Foster, Simon J.; Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale mechanical properties of live Staphylococcus aureus cells during different phases of growth were studied by atomic force microscopy. Indentation to different depths provided access to both local cell wall mechanical properties and whole-cell properties, including a component related to cell turgor pressure. Local cell wall properties were found to change in a characteristic manner throughout the division cycle. Splitting of the cell into two daughter cells followed a local softening of the cell wall along the division circumference, with the cell wall on either side of the division circumference becoming stiffer. Once exposed, the newly formed septum was found to be stiffer than the surrounding, older cell wall. Deeper indentations, which were affected by cell turgor pressure, did not show a change in stiffness throughout the division cycle, implying that enzymatic cell wall remodeling and local variations in wall properties are responsible for the evolution of cell shape through division. PMID:25468333

  9. Cell cycle constraints on capsulation and bacteriophage susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Ardissone, Silvia; Fumeaux, Coralie; Bergé, Matthieu; Beaussart, Audrey; Théraulaz, Laurence; Radhakrishnan, Sunish Kumar; Dufrêne, Yves F; Viollier, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of bacterial capsules in pathogenesis, it is still unknown if systemic cues such as the cell cycle can control capsule biogenesis. In this study, we show that the capsule of the synchronizable model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is cell cycle regulated and we unearth a bacterial transglutaminase homolog, HvyA, as restriction factor that prevents capsulation in G1-phase cells. This capsule protects cells from infection by a generalized transducing Caulobacter phage (φCr30), and the loss of HvyA confers insensitivity towards φCr30. Control of capsulation during the cell cycle could serve as a simple means to prevent steric hindrance of flagellar motility or to ensure that phage-mediated genetic exchange happens before the onset of DNA replication. Moreover, the multi-layered regulatory circuitry directing HvyA expression to G1-phase is conserved during evolution, and HvyA orthologues from related Sinorhizobia can prevent capsulation in Caulobacter, indicating that alpha-proteobacteria have retained HvyA activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03587.001 PMID:25421297

  10. Possible roles of the endocytic cycle in cell motility.

    PubMed

    Traynor, David; Kay, Robert R

    2007-07-15

    Starving, highly motile Dictyostelium cells maintain an active endocytic cycle, taking up their surface about every 11 minutes. Cell motility depends on a functional NSF (N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor) protein--also essential for endocytosis and membrane trafficking generally--and we, therefore, investigated possible ways in which the endocytic cycle might be required for cell movement. First, NSF, and presumably membrane trafficking, are not required for the initial polarization of the leading edge in a cyclic-AMP gradient. Second, we can detect no evidence for membrane flow from the leading edge, as photobleached or photoactivated marks in the plasma membrane move forward roughly in step with the leading edge, rather than backwards from it. Third, we find that the surface area of a cell--measured from confocal reconstructions--constantly fluctuates during movement as it projects pseudopodia and otherwise changes shape; increases of 20-30% can often occur over a few minutes. These fluctuations cannot be explained by reciprocal changes in filopodial surface area and they substantially exceed the 2-3% by which membranes can stretch. We propose that the endocytic cycle has a key function in motility by allowing adjustment of cell surface area to match changes in shape and that, without this function, movement is severely impaired. PMID:17606987

  11. Phase Resetting Reveals Network Dynamics Underlying a Bacterial Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Li, Ying; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS). PMID:23209388

  12. Anticancer effect of arsenite on cell migration, cell cycle and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    HORIBE, YOHEI; ADACHI, SEIJI; YASUDA, ICHIRO; YAMAUCHI, TAKAHIRO; KAWAGUCHI, JUNJI; KOZAWA, OSAMU; SHIMIZU, MASAHITO; MORIWAKI, HISATAKA

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy, but its clinical outcome remains unsatisfactory. Therefore, the development of novel treatments for this malignancy is urgently required. In the present study, the anticancer effect of arsenite on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced migration, cell cycle and apoptosis was investigated in pancreatic cancer cells (AsPC-1 and BxPC-3), and compared with the effect on normal pancreatic epithelial (PE) cells. In the cell migration assay, arsenite clearly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced cell migration in AsPC-1 cells, but not in BxPC-3 or PE cells. Arsenite also caused cell apoptosis in AsPC-1 cells, but not in BxPC-3 or PE cells. In AsPC-1 cells, the levels of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein decreased following treatment with arsenite, but this was not observed in BxPC-3 cells. To further examine the differences between these two cell lines, the effect of arsenite on upstream p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt was investigated. PDGF-BB caused phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAPK and Akt in both cell lines. Pretreatment with arsenite significantly suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt, but not of p44/p42 MAPK in AsPC-1 cells. By contrast, arsenite did not affect these molecules in BxPC-3 cells. Since the inhibition of the Akt signaling pathway markedly reduced PDGF-BB-induced migration in AsPC-1 cells, the present results strongly suggest that arsenite inhibits PDGF-BB-induced migration by suppressing the Akt signaling pathway in AsPC-1 cells. Therefore, arsenite may be a useful tool for the treatment of patients with certain types of pancreatic cancer, without causing adverse effects on normal pancreatic cells. PMID:27347121

  13. Cell-Cycle Analyses Using Thymidine Analogues in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Anda, Silje; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) and 5-Chloro-2′-deoxyuridine (CldU) using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry. PMID:24551125

  14. Neuroligin-2 accelerates GABAergic synapse maturation in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhanyan; Vicini, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    Neuroligins (NLGs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are thought to function in synaptogenesis. To investigate the role of NLGs on synaptic transmission once the synapse is formed, we transfected neuroligin-2 (NLG-2) in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells (CGCs), and recorded GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptor mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). NLG-2 transfected cells had mIPSCs with faster decay than matching GFP expressing controls at young culture ages (days in vitro, DIV7-8). Down-regulation of NLG-2 by the isoform specific shRNA-NLG-2 resulted in an opposite effect. We and others have shown that the switch of alpha subunits of GABA(A)Rs from alpha2/3 to alpha1 underlies developmental speeding of the IPSC decay in various CNS regions, including the cerebellum. To assess whether the reduced decay time of mIPSCs by NLG-2 is due to the recruitment of more alpha1 containing GABA(A)Rs at the synapses, we examined the prolongation of current decay by the Zolpidem, which has been shown to preferentially enhance the activity of alpha1 subunit-containing GABA channel. The application of Zolpidem resulted in a significantly greater prolongation kinetics of synaptic currents in NLG-2 over-expressing cells than control cells, suggesting that NLG-2 over-expression accelerates synapse maturation by promoting incorporation of the alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs at postsynaptic sites in immature cells. In addition, the effect of NLG-2 on the speeding of decay time course of synaptic currents was abolished when we used CGC cultures from alpha1-/- mice. Lastly, to exclude the possibility that the fast decay of mIPSCs induced by NLG-2 could be also due to the impacts of NLG-2 on the GABA transient in synaptic cleft, we measured the sensitivity of mIPSCs to the fast-off competitive antagonists TPMPA. We found that TPMPA similarly inhibits mIPSCs in control and NLG-2 over-expressing CGCs both at young age (DIV8) and old age (DIV14) of

  15. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. Material/Methods MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. Results ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  16. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development

    PubMed Central

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAFV600E melanomas. PMID:25321469

  17. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. RESULTS ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  18. IARS2 silencing induces non-small cell lung cancer cells proliferation inhibition, cell cycle arrest and promotes cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, J; Liu, W; Li, R; Liu, J; Zhang, Y; Tang, W; Wang, K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential role of Ileucyl-tRNA synthetase (IARS2) silencing in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The silencing of IARS2 in H1299 cells and A549 cells were performed by lentivirus encoding shRNAs. The efficiency of IARS2 silencing was detected by quantitative real time PCR and western blot. The effects of IARS2 silencing on cell growth, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and cell colony formation ability were assessed by cells counting, MTT assay, flow cytometer analysis and soft agar colony formation assay, respectively. Compared with negative control group, IARS2 was significantly knockdown by transfection with lentivirus encoding shRNA of IARS2. The IARS2 silencing significantly inhibited the cells proliferation and cells colony formation ability, induced cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and promoted cell apoptosis. IARS2 silencing induced NSCLC cells growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and promoted cell apoptosis. These results suggest that IARS2 may be a novel target for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26639235

  19. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-01

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G1/G0 phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27183329

  20. High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1995-10-19

    Carbonate fuel cells developed by Energy Research Corporation, in commercial 2.85 MW size, have an efficiency of 57.9 percent. Studies of higher efficiency hybrid power cycles were conducted in cooperation with METC to identify an economically competitive system with an efficiency in excess of 65 percent. A hybrid power cycle was identified that includes a direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine and a steam cycle, which generates power at a LHV efficiency in excess of 70 percent. This new system is called a Tandem Technology Cycle (TTC). In a TTC operating on natural gas fuel, 95 percent of the fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for the reforming of the fuel, and flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell system which generates 72 percent of the power. The portion of the fuel cell anode exhaust which is not recycled, is burned and heat is transferred to the compressed air from a gas turbine, raising its temperature to 1800{degrees}F. The stream is then heated to 2000{degrees}F in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 13 percent of the power. Half the exhaust from the gas turbine flows to the anode exhaust burner, and the remainder flows to the fuel cell cathodes providing the O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the fuel cells flows to a steam system which includes a heat recovery steam generator and stages steam turbine which generates 15 percent of the TTC system power. Studies of the TTC for 200-MW and 20-MW size plants quantified performance, emissions and cost-of-electricity, and compared the characteristics of the TTC to gas turbine combined cycles. A 200-MW TTC plant has an efficiency of 72.6 percent, and is relatively insensitive to ambient temperature, but requires a heat exchanger capable of 2000{degrees}F. The estimated cost of electricity is 45.8 mills/kWhr which is not competitive with a combined cycle in installations where fuel cost is under $5.8/MMBtu.

  1. Mutation Induction in Mammalian Cells by Accelerated Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, I. M.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Rink, H.

    The deleterious effects of accelerated heavy ions on living cells are of increasing importance for long duration human space flight activities. An important aspect of this field is attributed to the type and quality of biological damage induced by these densely ionizing particles. To address this aspect, cell inactivation and mutation induction at the hprt locus (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyl-transferase) was investigated in cultured V79 Chinese Hamster Cells irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (8-O, 20-Ca, 79-Au, and 92-U) and X-rays. Specific energies of the ions ranged from 1.9 to 69.7 MeV/u and corresponding LET values were between 62 band 15,580 keV/μ m. 30 spontaneous and 196 heavy-ion induced 6-thioguanine resistant hprt mutant colonies were characterized by Southern technique using the restriction enzymes EcoRI, PstI and BglII and a full length hprt cDNA probe isolated from the plasmid pHpt12 (kindly provided by Dr. J. Thacker). While inactivation cross sections (σ i) rise over the whole LET range, mutation induction cross sections (σ m) increase up to approximately 300 keV/μ m (O-ions) but decline with heavier ions and more extreme LET values. A similar behaviour is seen with mutation frequency dependent on particle fluence. After irradiation with accelerated uranium ions (8.8 MeV/u, 15,580 keV/μ m) a significant decrease of mutation frequency was found with higher particle fluences (3× 106 particles cm-2). Nearly no mutants were recovered with 8× 106 particles cm-2. All restriction patterns of the spontaneous hprt mutants were indistinguishable from the wild type pattern. These mutants probably contain small deletions or point mutations in the hprt locus. In contrast, the overall spectrum of heavy ion induced mutations revealed a majority (67%) of partial or complete deletions of the hprt gene. With constant particle fluence (3× 106 particles cm-2) the quality of heavy ion induced mutations in the hprt locus depends on physical

  2. Cycle-powered short radius (1.9M) centrifuge: exercise vs. passive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Gundo, D. P.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Mulenburg, G. M.; Marchman, N.; Looft-Wilson, R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    A human-powered short-arm centrifuge is described. This centrifuge could be used during spaceflight to provide +Gz acceleration while subjects performed exercise, thus supplying two forms of weightlessness countermeasures. Results from a study of cardiovascular responses while using the centrifuge are presented.

  3. Tangeretin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through upregulation of PTEN expression in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Li; Wang, Da-Wei; Yu, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Yan-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Tangeretin (TANG), present in peel of citrus fruits, has been shown to various medicinal properties such as chemopreventive and neuroprotective. However, the chemopreventive effect of TANG on glioblastoma cells has not been examined. The present study was designed to explore the anticancer potential of TANG in glioblastoma cells and to investigate the related mechanism. Human glioblastoma U-87MG and LN-18 cells were treated with 45μM concentration of TANG and cell growth was measured by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution and cell death were measured by flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle and apoptosis related genes were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot. The cells treated with TANG were significantly increased cell growth suppression and cell death effects than vehicle treated cells. Further, TANG treatment increases G2/M arrest and apoptosis by modulating PTEN and cell-cycle regulated genes such as cyclin-D and cdc-2 mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, the ability of TANG to decrease cell growth and to induce cell death was compromised when PTEN was knockdown by siRNA. Taken together, the chemopreventive effect of TANG is associated with regulation of cell-cycle and apoptosis in glioblastoma, thereby attenuating glioblastoma cell growth. Hence, the present findings suggest that TANG may be a therapeutic agent for glioblastoma treatment. PMID:27261630

  4. Mutagenesis in human cells with accelerated H and Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy

    1994-01-01

    The overall goals of this research were to determine the risks of mutation induction and the spectra of mutations induced by energetic protons and iron ions at two loci in human lymphoid cells. During the three year grant period the research has focused in three major areas: (1) the acquisition of sufficient statistics for human TK6 cell mutation experiments using Fe ions (400 MeV/amu), Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and protons (250 MeV/amu); (2) collection of thymidine kinase- deficient (tk) mutants or hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient (hprt) mutants induced by either Fe 400 MeV/amu, Fe 600 MeV/amu, or H 250 MeV/amu for subsequent molecular analysis; and (3) molecular characterization of mutants isolated after exposure to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu). As a result of the shutdown of the BEVALAC heavy ion accelerator in December 1992, efforts were rearranged somewhat in time to complete our dose-response studies and to complete mutant collections in particular for the Fe ion beams prior to the shutdown. These goals have been achieved. A major effort was placed on collection, re-screening, and archiving of 3 different series of mutants for the various particle beam exposures: tk-ng mutants, tk-sg mutants, and hprt-deficient mutants. Where possible, groups of mutants were isolated for several particle fluences. Comparative analysis of mutation spectra has occured with characterization of the mutation spectrum for hprt-deficient mutants obtained after exposure of TK6 cells to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and a series of spontaneous mutants.

  5. Citral inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Chaouki, Wahid; Leger, David Y; Liagre, Bertrand; Beneytout, Jean-Louis; Hmamouchi, Mohamed

    2009-10-01

    Many natural components of plants extract are studied for their beneficial effects on health and particularly on carcinogenesis chemoprevention. In this study, we investigated the effect of citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal), a key component of essential oils extracted from several herbal plants, on the proliferation rate, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis of the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The effects of this compound were also tested on cyclo-oxygenase activity. Citral treatment caused inhibition of MCF-7 cell growth (IC(50)-48 h: 18 x 10(-5)m), with a cycle arrest in G(2)/M phase and apoptosis induction. Moreover, we observed a decrease in prostaglandin E(2) synthesis 48 h after citral treatment. These findings suggest that citral has a potential chemopreventive effect. PMID:19656204

  6. Polyamines and the Cell Cycle of Catharanthus roseus Cells in Culture 1

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Hisae; Ando, Satoshi; Kodama, Hiroaki; Komamine, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    Investigation was made on the effect of partial depletion of polyamines (PAs), induced by treatment with inhibitors of the biosynthesis of PAs, on the distribution of cells at each phase of the cell cycle in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. cells in suspension cultures, using flow cytometry. More cells treated with inhibitors of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were accumulated in the G1 phase than those in the control, while the treatment with an inhibitor of spermidine (SPD) synthase showed no effect on the distribution of cells. The endogenous levels of the PAs, putrescine (PUT), SPD, and spermine (SPM), were determined during the cell cycle in synchronous cultures of C. roseus. Two peaks of endogenous level of PAs, in particular, of PUT and SPD, were observed during the cell cycle. Levels of PAs increased markedly prior to synthesis of DNA in the S phase and prior to cytokinesis. Activities of ADC and ODC were also assayed during the cell cycle. Activities of ADC was much higher than that of ODC throughout the cell cycle, but both activities of ODC and ADC changed in concert with changes in levels of PAs. Therefore, it is suggested that these enzymes may regulate PA levels during the cell cycle. These results indicate that inhibitors of PUT biosynthesis caused the suppression of cell proliferation by prevention of the progression of the cell cycle, probably from the G1 to the S phase, and PUT may play more important roles in the progression of the cell cycle than other PAs. PMID:16668290

  7. Polydatin inhibits growth of lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and causing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yusong; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Meng, Qinghui; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Jiaying; Fan, Saijun

    2014-01-01

    Polydatin (PD), a small natural compound from Polygonum cuspidatum, has a number of biological functions. However, the anticancer activity of PD has been poorly investigated. In the present study, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of PD on cell growth. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. In addition, the expression of several proteins associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PD significantly inhibits the proliferation of A549 and NCI-H1975 lung cancer cell lines and causes dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PD induces S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of Bcl-2 decreased as that of Bax increased, and the expression of cyclin D1 was also suppressed. The results suggest that PD has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:24348867

  8. Lineage correlations of single cell division time as a probe of cell-cycle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Oded; Mizrahi, Sivan Pearl; Weiss, Noga; Agam, Oded; Simon, Itamar; Balaban, Nathalie Q

    2015-03-26

    Stochastic processes in cells are associated with fluctuations in mRNA, protein production and degradation, noisy partition of cellular components at division, and other cell processes. Variability within a clonal population of cells originates from such stochastic processes, which may be amplified or reduced by deterministic factors. Cell-to-cell variability, such as that seen in the heterogeneous response of bacteria to antibiotics, or of cancer cells to treatment, is understood as the inevitable consequence of stochasticity. Variability in cell-cycle duration was observed long ago; however, its sources are still unknown. A central question is whether the variance of the observed distribution originates from stochastic processes, or whether it arises mostly from a deterministic process that only appears to be random. A surprising feature of cell-cycle-duration inheritance is that it seems to be lost within one generation but to be still present in the next generation, generating poor correlation between mother and daughter cells but high correlation between cousin cells. This observation suggests the existence of underlying deterministic factors that determine the main part of cell-to-cell variability. We developed an experimental system that precisely measures the cell-cycle duration of thousands of mammalian cells along several generations and a mathematical framework that allows discrimination between stochastic and deterministic processes in lineages of cells. We show that the inter- and intra-generation correlations reveal complex inheritance of the cell-cycle duration. Finally, we build a deterministic nonlinear toy model for cell-cycle inheritance that reproduces the main features of our data. Our approach constitutes a general method to identify deterministic variability in lineages of cells or organisms, which may help to predict and, eventually, reduce cell-to-cell heterogeneity in various systems, such as cancer cells under treatment. PMID:25762143

  9. Accelerated test plan for nickel cadmium spacecraft batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated test matrix is outlined that includes acceptance, baseline and post-cycling tests, chemical and physical analyses, and the data analysis procedures to be used in determining the feasibility of an accelerated test for sealed, nickel cadmium cells.

  10. A temporarily distinct subpopulation of slow-cycling melanoma cells is required for continuous tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Alexander; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Schmidt, Elizabeth C.; Zabierowski, Susan E.; Brafford, Patricia A.; Vultur, Adina; Basu, Devraj; Gimotty, Phyllis; Vogt, Thomas; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2010-01-01

    Summary Melanomas are highly heterogeneous tumors, but the biological significance of their different subpopulations is not clear. Using the H3K4 demethylase JARID1B (KDM5B/PLU-1/RBP2-H1) as a biomarker, we have characterized a small subpopulation of slow-cycling melanoma cells that cycle with doubling times of >4 weeks within the rapidly proliferating main population. Isolated JARID1B-positive melanoma cells give rise to a highly proliferative progeny. Knock-down of JARID1B leads to an initial acceleration of tumor growth followed by exhaustion which suggests that the JARID1B-positive subpopulation is essential for continuous tumor growth. Expression of JARID1B is dynamically regulated and does not follow a hierarchical cancer stem cell model because JARID1B-negative cells can become positive and even single melanoma cells irrespective of selection are tumorigenic. These results suggest a new understanding of melanoma heterogeneity with tumor maintenance as a dynamic process mediated by a temporarily distinct subpopulation. PMID:20478252

  11. Sox4 Links Tumor Suppression to Accelerated Aging in Mice by Modulating Stem Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Foronda, Miguel; Martínez, Paula; Schoeftner, Stefan; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Schneider, Ralph; Flores, Juana M.; Pisano, David G.; Blasco, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sox4 expression is restricted in mammals to embryonic structures and some adult tissues, such as lymphoid organs, pancreas, intestine, and skin. During embryogenesis, Sox4 regulates mesenchymal and neural progenitor survival, as well as lymphocyte and myeloid differentiation, and contributes to pancreas, bone, and heart development. Aberrant Sox4 expression is linked to malignant transformation and metastasis in several types of cancer. To understand the role of Sox4 in the adult organism, we first generated mice with reduced whole-body Sox4 expression. These mice display accelerated aging and reduced cancer incidence. To specifically address a role for Sox4 in adult stem cells, we conditionally deleted Sox4 (Sox4cKO) in stratified epithelia. Sox4cKO mice show increased skin stem cell quiescence and resistance to chemical carcinogenesis concomitantly with downregulation of cell cycle, DNA repair, and activated hair follicle stem cell pathways. Altogether, these findings highlight the importance of Sox4 in regulating adult tissue homeostasis and cancer. PMID:25043184

  12. Bioelectrical regulation of cell cycle and the planarian model system.

    PubMed

    Barghouth, Paul G; Thiruvalluvan, Manish; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2015-10-01

    Cell cycle regulation through the manipulation of endogenous membrane potentials offers tremendous opportunities to control cellular processes during tissue repair and cancer formation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which biophysical signals modulate the cell cycle remain underappreciated and poorly understood. Cells in complex organisms generate and maintain a constant voltage gradient across the plasma membrane known as the transmembrane potential. This potential, generated through the combined efforts of various ion transporters, pumps and channels, is known to drive a wide range of cellular processes such as cellular proliferation, migration and tissue regeneration while its deregulation can lead to tumorigenesis. These cellular regulatory events, coordinated by ionic flow, correspond to a new and exciting field termed molecular bioelectricity. We aim to present a brief discussion on the biophysical machinery involving membrane potential and the mechanisms mediating cell cycle progression and cancer transformation. Furthermore, we present the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea as a tractable model system for understanding principles behind molecular bioelectricity at both the cellular and organismal level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25749155

  13. Size sensors in bacteria, cell cycle control, and size control

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria proliferate by repetitive cycles of cellular growth and division. The progression into the cell cycle is admitted to be under the control of cell size. However, the molecular basis of this regulation is still unclear. Here I will discuss which mechanisms could allow coupling growth and division by sensing size and transmitting this information to the division machinery. Size sensors could act at different stages of the cell cycle. During septum formation, mechanisms controlling the formation of the Z ring, such as MinCD inhibition or Nucleoid Occlusion (NO) could participate in the size-dependence of the division process. In addition or alternatively, the coupling of growth and division may occur indirectly through the control of DNA replication initiation. The relative importance of these different size-sensing mechanisms could depend on the environmental and genetic context. The recent demonstration of an incremental strategy of size control in bacteria, suggests that DnaA-dependent control of replication initiation could be the major size control mechanism limiting cell size variation. PMID:26074903

  14. Cell cycle regulation by the NEK family of protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Fry, Andrew M; O'Regan, Laura; Sabir, Sarah R; Bayliss, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Genetic screens for cell division cycle mutants in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans led to the discovery of never-in-mitosis A (NIMA), a serine/threonine kinase that is required for mitotic entry. Since that discovery, NIMA-related kinases, or NEKs, have been identified in most eukaryotes, including humans where eleven genetically distinct proteins named NEK1 to NEK11 are expressed. Although there is no evidence that human NEKs are essential for mitotic entry, it is clear that several NEK family members have important roles in cell cycle control. In particular, NEK2, NEK6, NEK7 and NEK9 contribute to the establishment of the microtubule-based mitotic spindle, whereas NEK1, NEK10 and NEK11 have been implicated in the DNA damage response. Roles for NEKs in other aspects of mitotic progression, such as chromatin condensation, nuclear envelope breakdown, spindle assembly checkpoint signalling and cytokinesis have also been proposed. Interestingly, NEK1 and NEK8 also function within cilia, the microtubule-based structures that are nucleated from basal bodies. This has led to the current hypothesis that NEKs have evolved to coordinate microtubule-dependent processes in both dividing and non-dividing cells. Here, we review the functions of the human NEKs, with particular emphasis on those family members that are involved in cell cycle control, and consider their potential as therapeutic targets in cancer. PMID:23132929

  15. Accelerated discovery of cathode materials with prolonged cycle life for lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Motoaki; Ootani, Takuya; Kamimura, Yuichi; Sueki, Toshitsugu; Esaki, Shogo; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Ohira, Koji; Koyama, Yukinori; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale battery systems are essential for efficiently utilizing renewable energy power sources from solar and wind, which can generate electricity only intermittently. The use of lithium-ion batteries to store the generated energy is one solution. A long cycle life is critical for lithium-ion battery when used in these applications; this is different from portable devices which require 1,000 cycles at most. Here we demonstrate a novel co-substituted lithium iron phosphate cathode with estimated 70%-capacity retention of 25,000 cycles. This is found by exploring a wide chemical compositional space using density functional theory calculations. Relative volume change of a compound between fully lithiated and delithiated conditions is used as the descriptor for the cycle life. On the basis of the results of the screening, synthesis of selected materials is targeted. Single-phase samples with the required chemical composition are successfully made by an epoxide-mediated sol-gel method. The optimized materials show excellent cycle-life performance as lithium-ion battery cathodes.

  16. Accelerated discovery of cathode materials with prolonged cycle life for lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Motoaki; Ootani, Takuya; Kamimura, Yuichi; Sueki, Toshitsugu; Esaki, Shogo; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Ohira, Koji; Koyama, Yukinori; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale battery systems are essential for efficiently utilizing renewable energy power sources from solar and wind, which can generate electricity only intermittently. The use of lithium-ion batteries to store the generated energy is one solution. A long cycle life is critical for lithium-ion battery when used in these applications; this is different from portable devices which require 1,000 cycles at most. Here we demonstrate a novel co-substituted lithium iron phosphate cathode with estimated 70%-capacity retention of 25,000 cycles. This is found by exploring a wide chemical compositional space using density functional theory calculations. Relative volume change of a compound between fully lithiated and delithiated conditions is used as the descriptor for the cycle life. On the basis of the results of the screening, synthesis of selected materials is targeted. Single-phase samples with the required chemical composition are successfully made by an epoxide-mediated sol-gel method. The optimized materials show excellent cycle-life performance as lithium-ion battery cathodes. PMID:25080933

  17. Analysis of relationship between programmed cell death and cell cycle in limb-bud.

    PubMed

    Toné, S; Tanaka, S

    1997-01-01

    Programmed cell death plays a crucial role in limb morphogenesis of amniote. In this paper, we showed that cell cycle and cell death in limb-buds were closely related events and there existed a critical S-phase, which corresponded to the most sensitive time for inhibition of cell death following administration of an excess dose of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). The use of microfluorometry of BrdU incorporation coupled with measurement of DNA amount of individual cells enabled us to consider that cells committed to die were withdrawn from cell cycle at G2-phase. Finally, we will summarize the nuclear events involved in apoptosis in limb morphogenesis in relation to cell cycle. PMID:9267810

  18. A Thorium/Uranium fuel cycle for an advanced accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste concept

    SciTech Connect

    Truebenbach, M.T.; Henderson, D.L.; Venneri, F.

    1993-12-31

    Utilizing the high thermal neutron flux of an accelerator driven transmuter to drive a Thorium-Uranium fuel production scheme, it is possible to produce enough energy in the transmuter not only to power the accelerator, but to have enough excess power available for commercial use. A parametric study has been initiated to determine the ``optimum`` equilibrium operation point in terms of the minimization of the equilibrium actinide inventory and the fuel {alpha} for various residence times in the High Flux Region (HFR) and in the Low Flux Region (LFR). For the cases considered, the ``optimum`` equilibrium operation point was achieved for a HFR residence time of 45 days and a LFR residence time of 60 days. For this case, the total actinide inventory in the system is about 20 tonnes and the fuel {alpha} approximately 1.46.

  19. Investigation of path dependence in commercial lithium-ion cells chosen for plug-in hybrid vehicle duty cycle protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Sazhin, Sergiy V.; Jamison, David K.; Michelbacher, Christopher J.; Liaw, Bor Yann; Dubarry, Matthieu; Cugnet, Mikael

    There is a growing need to explore path dependence of aging processes in batteries developed for long-term usage, such as lithium-ion cells used in hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) or plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) applications that may then be "retired" to be utilized in grid applications. To better understand the foremost influences on path dependence in the PHEV context, this work aims to bridge the gap between ideal laboratory test conditions and PHEV field conditions by isolating the predominant aging factors in PHEV service, which would include, for example, the nature and frequency of duty cycles, as well as the frequency and severity of thermal cycles. These factors are studied in controlled and repeatable laboratory conditions to facilitate mechanistic evaluation of aging processes. This work is a collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI). Commercial lithium-ion cells of the Sanyo Y type (18650 configuration) are used in this work covering two initial independent studies of path dependence issues. The first study considers how the magnitude of power pulses and charging rates affect the aging rate, while the second seeks to answer whether thermal cycling has an accelerating effect on cell aging. While this work is in early stages of testing, initial data trends show that cell aging is indeed accelerated under conditions of high discharge pulse power, higher charge rates, and thermal cycling. Such information is useful in developing accurate predictive models for estimating end-of-life conditions.

  20. Protein kinase C delta inhibits Caco-2 cell proliferation by selective changes in cell cycle and cell death regulators.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Mustafi, R; Little, H; Cohen, G; Khare, S; Moore, C; Majumder, P; Bissonnette, M

    2006-05-25

    PKC-delta is a serine/threonine kinase that mediates diverse signal transduction pathways. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of PKC-delta slowed the G1 progression of Caco-2 colon cancer cells, accelerated apoptosis, and induced cellular differentiation. In this study, we further characterized the PKC-delta dependent signaling pathways involved in these tumor suppressor actions in Caco-2 cells overexpressing PKC-delta using a Zn2+ inducible expression vector. Consistent with a G1 arrest, increased expression of PKC-delta caused rapid and significant downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E proteins (50% decreases, P<0.05), while mRNA levels remained unchanged. The PKC agonist, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA, 100 nM, 4 h), induced two-fold higher protein and mRNA levels of p21(Waf1), a cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor in PKC-delta transfectants compared with empty vector (EV) transfected cells, whereas the PKC-delta specific inhibitor rottlerin (3 microM) or knockdown of this isoenzyme with specific siRNA oligonucleotides blocked p21(Waf1) expression. Concomitantly, compared to EV control cells, PKC-delta upregulation decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin E proteins co-immunoprecipitating with cdk6 and cdk2, respectively. In addition, overexpression of PKC-delta increased binding of cdk inhibitor p27(Kip1) to cdk4. These alterations in cyclin-cdks and their inhibitors are predicted to decrease G1 cyclin kinase activity. As an independent confirmation of the direct role PKC-delta plays in cell growth and cell cycle regulation, we knocked down PKC-delta using specific siRNA oligonucleotides. PKC-delta specific siRNA oligonucleotides, but not irrelevant control oligonucleotides, inhibited PKC-delta protein by more than 80% in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, PKC-delta knockdown enhanced cell proliferation ( approximately 1.4-2-fold, P<0.05) and concomitantly increased cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression ( approximately 1.7-fold, P<0.05). This was a specific

  1. Cell Cycle Analysis of CML Stem Cells Using Hoechst 33342 and Propidium Iodide.

    PubMed

    DeSouza, Ngoc; Zhou, Megan; Shan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease with an expansion of white blood cells. The current treatments for CML are shown not to be long-term effective because of CML stem cells' insensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therefore, studying more about CML stem cells is essential to understand the pathways of CML stem cell development and proliferation and finally lead to effective treatments to eliminate CML stem cells and eradicate CML. This chapter describes two methods to analyze cell cycle of CML stem cells. The rare population of CML stem cells can be identified by staining with cell surface markers, and then DNA-binding dyes Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide (PI) are added to stain the DNA content which is changed when cells go through different phases of the cell cycle. Samples are run through the flow cytometer to be analyzed based on different absorbance and emission wavelengths of different florescent colors. PMID:27581138

  2. DNA methylation is stable during replication and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Vandiver, Amy R.; Idrizi, Adrian; Rizzardi, Lindsay; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Hansen, Kasper D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification with important functions in development. Large-scale loss of DNA methylation is a hallmark of cancer. Recent work has identified large genomic blocks of hypomethylation associated with cancer, EBV transformation and replicative senescence, all of which change the proportion of actively proliferating cells within the population measured. We asked if replication or cell-cycle arrest affects the global levels of methylation or leads to hypomethylated blocks as observed in other settings. We used fluorescence activated cell sorting to isolate primary dermal fibroblasts in G0, G1 and G2 based on DNA content and Ki67 staining. We additionally examined G0 cells arrested by contact inhibition for one week to determine the effects of extended arrest. We analyzed genome wide DNA methylation from sorted cells using whole genome bisulfite sequencing. This analysis demonstrated no global changes or large-scale hypomethylated blocks in any of the examined cell cycle phases, indicating that global levels of methylation are stable with replication and arrest. PMID:26648411

  3. Single Cell Mass Cytometry Adapted to Measurements of the Cell Cycle1

    PubMed Central

    Behbehani, Gregory K.; Bendall, Sean C.; Clutter, Matthew R.; Fantl, Wendy J.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2013-01-01

    Mass cytometry is a recently introduced technology that utilizes transition element isotope-tagged antibodies for protein detection on a single-cell basis. By circumventing the limitations of emission spectral overlap associated with fluorochromes utilized in traditional flow cytometry, mass cytometry currently allows measurement of up to 40 parameters per cell. Recently a comprehensive mass cytometry analysis was described for the hematopoietic differentiation program in human bone marrow from a healthy donor. The present study describes approaches to delineate cell cycle stages utilizing iododeoxyuridine (IdU) to mark cells in S phase, simultaneously with antibodies against cyclin B1, cyclin A, and phosphorylated histone H3 (S28) that characterize the other cell cycle phases. Protocols were developed in which an antibody against phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (Rb) at serines 807 and 811 was used to separate cells in G0 and G1 phases of the cell cycle. This mass cytometry method yielded cell cycle distributions of both normal and cancer cell populations that were equivalent to those obtained by traditional fluorescence cytometry techniques. We applied this to map the cell cycle phases of cells spanning the hematopoietic hierarchy in healthy human bone marrow as a prelude to later studies with cancers and other disorders of this lineage. PMID:22693166

  4. Local homogeneity of cell cycle length in developing mouse cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, L.; Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the amount of variation in the length of the cell cycle for cells in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) of the developing cortex of mice on embryonic day 14. Our measurements were made in three cortical regions (i.e., the neocortex, archicortex, and periarchicortex) using three different methods: the cumulative labeling method (CLM), the percent labeled mitoses (PLM) method, and a comparison of the time needed for the PLM to ascend from 0 to 100% with the time needed for the PLM to descend from 100 to 0%. These 3 different techniques provide different perspectives on the cytokinetic parameters. Theoretically, CLM gives an estimate for a maximum value of the total length of the cell cycle (TC), whereas PLM gives an estimate of a minimum value of TC. The difference between these two estimates indicates that the range for TC is +/-1% of the mean TC for periarchicortex, +/-7% for neocortex, and +/-8% for archicortex. This was confirmed by a lengthening of the PLM descent time in comparison with its ascent time. The sharpness of the transitions and the flatness of the plateau of the PLM curves indicate that 99% of the proliferating cells are within this narrow estimated range for TC; hence, only approximately 1% deviate outside of a relatively restricted range from the average TC of the population. In the context of the possible existence within the cortical PVE of two populations with markedly dissimilar cell cycle kinetics from the mean, one such population must comprise approximately 99% of the total population, and the other, if it exists, is only approximately 1% of the total. This seems to be true for all three cortical regions. The narrow range of TC indicates a homogeneity in the cell cycle length for proliferating cells in three different cortical regions, despite the fact that progenitor cells of different lineages may be present. It further predicts the existence of almost synchronous interkinetic nuclear movements of the

  5. Does Arabidopsis thaliana DREAM of cell cycle control?

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-01-01

    Strict temporal control of cell cycle gene expression is essential for all eukaryotes including animals and plants. DREAM complexes have been identified in worm, fly, and mammals, linking several distinct transcription factors to coordinate gene expression throughout the cell cycle. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Kobayashi et al (2015) identify distinct activator and repressor complexes for genes expressed during the G2 and M phases in Arabidopsis that can be temporarily separated during proliferating and post-mitotic stages of development. The complexes incorporate specific activator and repressor MYB and E2F transcription factors and indicate the possibility of the existence of multiple DREAM complexes in plants. PMID:26089020

  6. Influence of Accelerated Cooling Condition on Welding Thermal Cycle, Residual Stress, and Deformation in SM490A Steel ESW Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dean; Sun, Jiamin; Dai, Deping; Jiang, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Electro-slag welding (ESW) has been widely used to join the box column because of high productivity. The heat input of ESW is far larger than those of other fusion welding processes, so ESW usually results in a long holding time over certain elevated temperature (∆ t H time), a long cooling time from 800 to 500 °C (∆ t 8/5 time), and a wide heat-affected zone (HAZ). It can be foreseen that the mechanical properties especially fracture toughness of the fusion zone and HAZ will be inferior to those of base metal. As a fundamental research, a computational approach based on MSC.Marc code was developed to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviors in a typical SM490A steel ESW joint under different cooling conditions. Meanwhile, the thermal cycles computed by numerical model were compared with the experimental measurements. Moreover, the influence of accelerated cooling methods on welding residual stress and deformation was examined numerically. Simulation results show that accelerated cooling methods not only can largely shorten ∆ t H time as well as ∆ t 8/5 time and reduce the size of HAZ, but also can affect the residual stress distribution and deformation. It is believed that the accelerated cooling methods proposed by this study potentially improve the mechanical properties of ESW joint.

  7. Cell cycle arrest induced by MPPa-PDT in MDA-MB-231 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liming; Bi, Wenxiang; Tian, Yuanyuan

    2016-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a medical treatment using a photosensitizing agent and light source to treat cancers. Pyropheophorbidea methyl ester (MPPa), a derivative of chlorophyll, is a novel potent photosensitizer. To learn more about this photosensitizer, we examined the cell cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometer. Checkpoints of the cell cycle were measured by western blot. In this study, we found that the expression of Cyclin D1 was obviously decreased, while the expression of Chk2 and P21 was increased after PDT treatment. This study showed that MPPa-PDT affected the checkpoints of the cell cycle and led the cells to apoptosis.

  8. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Yin; Shieh, Den-En; Chen, Chung-Chi; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Dong, Huei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM) and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs) p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) activity. PMID:26703569

  9. The cost of transport of human running is not affected, as in walking, by wide acceleration/deceleration cycles.

    PubMed

    Minetti, Alberto E; Gaudino, Paolo; Seminati, Elena; Cazzola, Dario

    2013-02-15

    Although most of the literature on locomotion energetics and biomechanics is about constant-speed experiments, humans and animals tend to move at variable speeds in their daily life. This study addresses the following questions: 1) how much extra metabolic energy is associated with traveling a unit distance by adopting acceleration/deceleration cycles in walking and running, with respect to constant speed, and 2) how can biomechanics explain those metabolic findings. Ten males and ten females walked and ran at fluctuating speeds (5 ± 0, ± 1, ± 1.5, ± 2, ± 2.5 km/h for treadmill walking, 11 ± 0, ± 1, ± 2, ± 3, ± 4 km/h for treadmill and field running) in cycles lasting 6 s. Field experiments, consisting of subjects following a laser spot projected from a computer-controlled astronomic telescope, were necessary to check the noninertial bias of the oscillating-speed treadmill. Metabolic cost of transport was found to be almost constant at all speed oscillations for running and up to ±2 km/h for walking, with no remarkable differences between laboratory and field results. The substantial constancy of the metabolic cost is not explained by the predicted cost of pure acceleration/deceleration. As for walking, results from speed-oscillation running suggest that the inherent within-stride, elastic energy-free accelerations/decelerations when moving at constant speed work as a mechanical buffer for among-stride speed fluctuations, with no extra metabolic cost. Also, a recent theory about the analogy between sprint (level) running and constant-speed running on gradients, together with the mechanical determinants of gradient locomotion, helps to interpret the present findings. PMID:23221963

  10. Tracking of Normal and Malignant Progenitor Cell Cycle Transit in a Defined Niche

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Gabriel; Lennon, Kathleen M.; Delos Santos, Nathaniel P.; Lambert-Fliszar, Florence; Riso, Gennarina L.; Lazzari, Elisa; Marra, Marco A.; Morris, Sheldon; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.

    2016-01-01

    While implicated in therapeutic resistance, malignant progenitor cell cycle kinetics have been difficult to quantify in real-time. We developed an efficient lentiviral bicistronic fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator reporter (Fucci2BL) to image live single progenitors on a defined niche coupled with cell cycle gene expression analysis. We have identified key differences in cell cycle regulatory gene expression and transit times between normal and chronic myeloid leukemia progenitors that may inform cancer stem cell eradication strategies. PMID:27041210

  11. ACCELERATED AGING OF AGRICULTURAL SOILS AND THE COUPLING OF THE NITROGEN AND PROTON CYCLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroecosystems currently utilize about one third of the soils of the world and, in these soils, crop management introduces new variables to the biogeochemical cycles governing soil development. N fixation related to human activities now accounts for about half of the global N budget and has greatly...

  12. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research. PMID:26132923

  13. Cell cycle and centromere FISH studies in premature centromere division

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Salamanca-Gomez, Fabio; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Palomino-Cueva, Cesar; Garcia-Cobian, Teresa A; Corona-Rivera, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    Background Mitotic configurations consistent in split centromeres and splayed chromatids in all or most of the chromosomes or premature centromere division (PCD) have been described in three categories. (1) Low frequency of PCD observed in colchicines-treated lymphocyte cultures from normal individuals. (2) High frequency of PCD with mosaic variegated aneuploidy. (3) High frequency of PCD as a sole chromosome abnormality observed in individuals with no recognizable clinical pattern. We report four members of a family with the third category of PCD. Methods Cell cycle duration assessed by average generation time using differential sister chromatid stain analysis and FISH studies of DNA centromere sequences in PCD individuals, are included and compared with previously reported PCD individuals from 9 families. Results We observed PCD in colchicine-treated cultures from the propositus, his father, and two paternal aunts but not in his mother and four other paternal and maternal family members, as well as in untreated cultures from the propositus and his father. We observed cytological evidence of active centromeres by Cd stain. Significative cell cycle time reduction in anaphases of PCD individuals (average generation time of 21.8 h;SD 0.4) with respect to individuals without PCD (average generation time of 31.8 h;SD 3.9) was observed (P < 0.005, Student t-test for independent samples). Increased cell proliferation kinetics was observed in anaphasic cells of individuals with PCD, by differential sister chromatid stain analysis. FISH studies revealed the presence of alpha satellite DNA from chromosomes 1, 13, 21/18, X, all centromeres, and CENP-B box sequences in metaphasic and anaphasic cells from PCD individuals. Conclusion This report examines evidences of a functional relationship between PCD and cell cycle impairment. It seems that essential centromere integrity is present in these cases. PMID:16174301

  14. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research. PMID:26132923

  15. Cycle reset in a melanoma cell line caused by cooling.

    PubMed

    Dewey, D L

    1987-11-01

    When cells in culture are released from G0 into cycle by diluting into fresh medium there is a delay of many hours before they re-enter the cycle and start DNA synthesis. A mouse melanoma cell line designated HP2 has been used to investigate the effects of non-standard temperatures between the time of plating and DNA synthesis. When the cells were incubated in a 5% CO2 box at 8 degrees C for periods during the G0-G1 transition there was an extra delay before the start of S, approximately equal to the time that the cells were held at 8 degrees C and independent of the time when the cold pulse was administered. When the cells were cooled to 25 degrees C the delay was longer than the time for which the cells had been kept at 25 degrees C, and this extra delay was also dependent on the point in G0-G1 when the cells were cooled, as though the cells could be reset to an earlier time by this treatment. It is suggested that a labile substance required for progression is destroyed faster than it is made at 25 degrees C but at 8 degrees C the rate of destruction is very low. Another phenomenon noted during these cooling experiments was that the peak height of the S phase profile, as measured by frequent pulse-thymidine incorporation experiments, was substantially higher for cells which had been cooled at a later stage in the G0-G1 transition, even though the overall times at 37 degrees C and at the colder temperature were identical. By varying the temperature of the cold pulse it was possible to separate the change in the peak height and the delay as separate entities. PMID:3502929

  16. Cycle ageing analysis of a LiFePO4/graphite cell with dynamic model validations: Towards realistic lifetime predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarasketa-Zabala, E.; Gandiaga, I.; Martinez-Laserna, E.; Rodriguez-Martinez, L. M.; Villarreal, I.

    2015-02-01

    The present investigation work compares cycling ageing behaviour upon constant operation conditions (static tests) with degradation under non-constant schemes (dynamic tests), through a novel methodology for ageing model dynamic validation. A LFP-based Li-ion cell performance loss is analysed using a DOD and C-rate stress factors Ah-throughput-domain characterisation method, and represented using a semi-empirical model. The proposed stepwise validation approach enables assessing the static ageing tests acceleration factor and systematically improving the ageing model. The result is a simple but comprehensive model. The predictions root-mean-square error, under dynamic cycling operation conditions, is just 1.75%.

  17. Effects of mimosine on Wolbachia in mosquito cells: cell cycle suppression reduces bacterial abundance

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    The plant allelochemical l-mimosine (β-[N-(3-hydroxy-4-pyridone)]-α-aminopropionic acid; leucenol) resembles the nonessential amino acid, tyrosine. Because the obligate intracellular alphaproteobacterium, Wolbachia pipientis, metabolizes amino acids derived from host cells, the effects of mimosine on infected and uninfected mosquito cells were investigated. The EC50 for mimosine was 6–7 μM with Aedes albopictus C7-10 and C/wStr cell lines, and was not influenced by infection status. Mosquito cells responded to concentrations of mimosine substantially lower than those used to synchronize the mammalian cell cycle; at concentrations of 30–35 μM, mimosine reversibly arrested the mosquito cell cycle at the G1/S boundary and inhibited growth of Wolbachia strain wStr. Although lower concentrations of mimosine slightly increased wStr abundance, concentrations that suppressed the cell cycle reduced Wolbachia levels. PMID:26019119

  18. Soaking RNAi in Bombyx mori BmN4-SID1 cells arrests cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Mon, Hiroaki; Li, Zhiqing; Kobayashi, Isao; Tomita, Shuichiro; Lee, JaeMan; Sezutsu, Hideki; Tamura, Toshiki; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Previously, the BmN4-SID1 cell expressing Caenorhabditis ele gans SID-1 was established, in which soaking RNAi could induce effective gene silencing. To establish its utility, 6 cell cycle progression related cDNAs, CDK1, MYC, MYB, RNRS, CDT1, and GEMININ, were isolated from the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), and their expressions were further silenced by soaking RNAi in the BmN4-SID1 cells. The cell cycle progression analysis using flow cytometer demonstrated that the small amount of double stranded RNA was enough to arrest cell cycle progression at the specific cell phases. These data suggest that RNAi in the BmN4-SID1 cells can be used as a powerful tool for loss-of-function analysis of B. mori genes. PMID:24773378

  19. A DNA-damage-induced cell cycle checkpoint in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, S B; Britt, A B

    2003-01-01

    Although it is well established that plant seeds treated with high doses of gamma radiation arrest development as seedlings, the cause of this arrest is unknown. The uvh1 mutant of Arabidopsis is defective in a homolog of the human repair endonuclease XPF, and uvh1 mutants are sensitive to both the toxic effects of UV and the cytostatic effects of gamma radiation. Here we find that gamma irradiation of uvh1 plants specifically triggers a G(2)-phase cell cycle arrest. Mutants, termed suppressor of gamma (sog), that suppress this radiation-induced arrest and proceed through the cell cycle unimpeded were recovered in the uvh1 background; the resulting irradiated plants are genetically unstable. The sog mutations fall into two complementation groups. They are second-site suppressors of the uvh1 mutant's sensitivity to gamma radiation but do not affect the susceptibility of the plant to UV radiation. In addition to rendering the plants resistant to the growth inhibitory effects of gamma radiation, the sog1 mutation affects the proper development of the pollen tetrad, suggesting that SOG1 might also play a role in the regulation of cell cycle progression during meiosis. PMID:12750343

  20. Development of cell-cycle checkpoint therapy for solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Cellular proliferation is tightly controlled by several cell-cycle checkpoint proteins. In cancer, the genes encoding these proteins are often disrupted and cause unrestrained cancer growth. The proteins are over-expressed in many malignancies; thus, they are potential targets for anti-cancer therapies. These proteins include cyclin-dependent kinase, checkpoint kinase, WEE1 kinase, aurora kinase and polo-like kinase. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors are the most advanced cell-cycle checkpoint therapeutics available. For instance, palbociclib (PD0332991) is a first-in-class, oral, highly selective inhibitor of CDK4/6 and, in combination with letrozole (Phase II; PALOMA-1) or with fulvestrant (Phase III; PALOMA-3), it has significantly prolonged progression-free survival, in patients with metastatic estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, in comparison with that observed in patients using letrozole, or fulvestrant alone, respectively. In this review, we provide an overview of the current compounds available for cell-cycle checkpoint protein-directed therapy for solid tumors. PMID:26486823

  1. Stochastic Polynomial Dynamic Models of the Yeast Cell Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Indranil; Dimitrova, Elena; Jarrah, Abdul S.

    2010-03-01

    In the last decade a new holistic approach for tackling biological problems, systems biology, which takes into account the study of the interactions between the components of a biological system to predict function and behavior has emerged. The reverse-engineering of biochemical networks from experimental data have increasingly become important in systems biology. Based on Boolean networks, we propose a time-discrete stochastic framework for the reverse engineering of the yeast cell cycle regulatory network from experimental data. With a suitable choice of state set, we have used powerful tools from computational algebra, that underlie the reverse-engineering algorithm, avoiding costly enumeration strategies. Stochasticity is introduced by choosing at each update step a random coordinate function for each variable, chosen from a probability space of update functions. The algorithm is based on a combinatorial structure known as the Gr"obner fans of a polynomial ideal which identifies the underlying network structure and dynamics. The model depicts a correct dynamics of the yeast cell cycle network and reproduces the time sequence of expression patterns along the biological cell cycle. Our findings indicate that the methodolgy has high chance of success when applied to large and complex systems to determine the dynamical properties of corresponding networks.

  2. Complete and limited proteolysis in cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Brigitte; Nepveu, Alain

    2004-08-01

    An important mechanism of regulation that controls progression through the cell cycle involves the timely degradation of specific regulatory proteins. In parallel to the main degradative pathways, it appears that the function of certain proteins may also be modulated by a process called limited proteolysis. We have recently shown that the CDP/Cux transcription factor is proteolytically processed at the G(1)/S transition by the cathepsin L protease. Two aspects of these findings are discussed in the context of the cell cycle. Firstly, together with the cohesin subunit Scc1 and the HCF-1 factor, CDP/Cux represents a third example whereby the process of "limited proteolysis" plays a role in the control of cell cycle progression. Secondly, our findings provides compelling evidence that the cathepsin L protease, which was believed to be obligatorily targeted through the endoplasmic reticulum to the lysosomes or the extra-cellular milieu, could also be present in the nucleus and modulate the function of transcription factors. PMID:15254406

  3. The ORC1 cycle in human cells: II. Dynamic changes in the human ORC complex during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Satoshi; Tatsumi, Yasutoshi; Fujita, Masatoshi; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Obuse, Chikashi

    2003-10-17

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) plays a central role in regulating the initiation of DNA replication in eukaryotes. The level of the ORC1 subunit oscillates throughout the cell cycle, defining an ORC1 cycle. ORC1 accumulates in G1 and is degraded in S phase, although other ORC subunits (ORCs 2-5) remain at almost constant levels. The behavior of ORC components in human cell nuclei with respect to the ORC1 cycle demonstrates that ORCs 2-5 form a complex that is present throughout the cell cycle and that associates with ORC1 when it accumulates in G1 nuclei. ORCs 2-5 are found in both nuclease-insoluble and -soluble fractions. The appearance of nuclease-insoluble ORCs 2-5 parallels the increase in the level of ORC1 associating with nuclease-insoluble, non-chromatin nuclear structures. Thus, ORCs 2-5 are temporally recruited to nuclease-insoluble structures by formation of the ORC1-5 complex. An artificial reduction in the level of ORC1 in human cells by RNA interference results in a shift of ORC2 to the nuclease-soluble fraction, and the association of MCM proteins with chromatin fractions is also blocked by this treatment. These results indicate that ORC1 regulates the status of the ORC complex in human nuclei by tethering ORCs 2-5 to nuclear structures. This dynamic shift is further required for the loading of MCM proteins onto chromatin. Thus, the pre-replication complex in human cells may be regulated by the temporal accumulation of ORC1 in G1 nuclei. PMID:12909626

  4. Apoptosis in male germ cells in response to cyclin A1-deficiency and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Glicella; Liu, Dong; Liao, Ching; Batkiewicz, Leah; Arbing, Rachel; Chung, Sanny S W; Lele, Karen; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2003-10-15

    Male mice homozygous for a mutated allele of the cyclin A1 gene (Ccna1) are sterile due to a block in cell cycle progression before the first meiotic division. Meiosis arrest in Ccna1(-/-) spermatocytes is associated with desynapsis abnormalities, lowered MPF activity, and apoptosis as evidenced by TUNEL-positive staining. With time, adult testicular tubules exhibit severe degeneration: some tubules in the older animals are almost devoid of germ cells at various stages of spermatogenesis. The mechanisms by which the cells sense the cell cycle arrest and the regulation of the decision to undergo cell death are under investigation. PMID:14555236

  5. Exosomes Secreted by Toxoplasma gondii-Infected L6 Cells: Their Effects on Host Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jae; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Cho, Jaeeun; Song, Hyemi; Pyo, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Min-Kyung; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection induces alteration of the host cell cycle and cell proliferation. These changes are not only seen in directly invaded host cells but also in neighboring cells. We tried to identify whether this alteration can be mediated by exosomes secreted by T. gondii-infected host cells. L6 cells, a rat myoblast cell line, and RH strain of T. gondii were selected for this study. L6 cells were infected with or without T. gondii to isolate exosomes. The cellular growth patterns were identified by cell counting with trypan blue under confocal microscopy, and cell cycle changes were investigated by flow cytometry. L6 cells infected with T. gondii showed decreased proliferation compared to uninfected L6 cells and revealed a tendency to stay at S or G2/M cell phase. The treatment of exosomes isolated from T. gondii-infected cells showed attenuation of cell proliferation and slight enhancement of S phase in L6 cells. The cell cycle alteration was not as obvious as reduction of the cell proliferation by the exosome treatment. These changes were transient and disappeared at 48 hr after the exosome treatment. Microarray analysis and web-based tools indicated that various exosomal miRNAs were crucial for the regulation of target genes related to cell proliferation. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the exosomes originating from T. gondii could change the host cell proliferation and alter the host cell cycle. PMID:27180572

  6. Cell Division and Targeted Cell Cycle Arrest Opens and Stabilizes Basement Membrane Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Matus, David Q.; Chang, Emily; Makohon-Moore, Sasha C.; Hagedorn, Mary A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Large gaps in basement membrane (BM) occur during organ remodeling and cancer cell invasion. Whether dividing cells, which temporarily reduce their attachment to BM, influence these breaches is unknown. Here we analyse uterine-vulval attachment during development across 21 species of rhabditid nematodes and find that the BM gap that forms between these organs is always bounded by a non-dividing vulval cell. Through cell cycle manipulation and live cell imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that actively dividing vulval cells facilitate enlargement of this breach by promoting BM movement. In contrast, targeted cell-cycle arrest halts BM movement and limits gap opening. Further, we demonstrate that the BM component laminin accumulates at the BM gap edge and promotes increased integrin levels in non-dividing vulval cells, stabilizing gap position. Together, these studies reveal that cell division can be used as a mechanism to regulate BM breaches, thus controlling the exchange of cells between tissues. PMID:24924309

  7. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Itaba, Noriko; Matsumi, Yoshiaki; Okinaka, Kaori; Ashla, An Afida; Kono, Yohei; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Morimoto, Minoru; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Shiota, Goshi

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hexachlorophene rapidly induced hepatic differentiation of human MSCs judging from expression of liver-specific genes and proteins, PAS staining, and urea production. The effect of orthotopic transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets against acute liver injury was examined in one-layered to three-layered cell sheets system. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets enhanced liver regeneration and suppressed liver injury. The survival rates of the mice were significantly improved. High expression of complement C3 and its downstream signals including C5a, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT-3 pathway was observed in hepatic cell sheets-grafted tissues. Expression of phosphorylated EGFR and thioredoxin is enhanced, resulting in reduction of oxidative stress. These findings suggest that orthotopic transplantation of hepatic cell sheets manufactured from MSCs accelerates liver regeneration through complement C3, EGFR and thioredoxin. PMID:26553591

  8. Preparative electrophoresis of cultured human cells: Effect of cell cycle phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.; Goolsby, C. L.; Walker, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Human epithelioid T-1E cells were cultured in suspension and subjected to density gradient electrophoresis upward in a vertical column. It is indicated that the most rapidly migrating cells were at the beginning of the cell cycle and the most slowly migrating cells were at the end of the cell cycle. The fastest migrating cells divided 24 hr later than the slowest migrating cells. Colonies developing from slowly migrating cells had twice as many cells during exponential growth as did the most rapidly migrating cells, and the numbers of cells per colony at any time was inversely related to the electrophoretic migration rate. The DNA measurements by fluorescence flow cytometry indicates that the slowest migrating cell populations are enriched in cells that have twice as much DNA as the fastest migrating cells. It is concluded that electrophoretic mobility of these cultured human cells declines steadily through the cell cycle and that the mobility is lowest at the end of G sub 2 phase and highest at the beginning of G sub 1 phase.

  9. A genetic interaction map of cell cycle regulators.

    PubMed

    Billmann, Maximilian; Horn, Thomas; Fischer, Bernd; Sandmann, Thomas; Huber, Wolfgang; Boutros, Michael

    2016-04-15

    Cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach to screen for modulators of many cellular processes. However, resulting candidate gene lists from cell-based assays comprise diverse effectors, both direct and indirect, and further dissecting their functions can be challenging. Here we screened a genome-wide RNAi library for modulators of mitosis and cytokinesis inDrosophilaS2 cells. The screen identified many previously known genes as well as modulators that have previously not been connected to cell cycle control. We then characterized ∼300 candidate modifiers further by genetic interaction analysis using double RNAi and a multiparametric, imaging-based assay. We found that analyzing cell cycle-relevant phenotypes increased the sensitivity for associating novel gene function. Genetic interaction maps based on mitotic index and nuclear size grouped candidates into known regulatory complexes of mitosis or cytokinesis, respectively, and predicted previously uncharacterized components of known processes. For example, we confirmed a role for theDrosophilaCCR4 mRNA processing complex componentl(2)NC136during the mitotic exit. Our results show that the combination of genome-scale RNAi screening and genetic interaction analysis using process-directed phenotypes provides a powerful two-step approach to assigning components to specific pathways and complexes. PMID:26912791

  10. Cell-cycle research with synchronous cultures: an evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.; Thornton, M.; Grover, N. B.

    2001-01-01

    The baby-machine system, which produces new-born Escherichia coli cells from cultures immobilized on a membrane, was developed many years ago in an attempt to attain optimal synchrony with minimal disturbance of steady-state growth. In the present article, we put forward a model to describe the behaviour of cells produced by this method, and provide quantitative evaluation of the parameters involved, at each of four different growth rates. Considering the high level of selection achievable with this technique and the natural dispersion in interdivision times, we believe that the output of the baby machine is probably close to optimal in terms of both quality and persistence of synchrony. We show that considerable information on events in the cell cycle can be obtained from populations with age distributions very much broader than those achieved with the baby machine and differing only modestly from steady state. The data presented here, together with the long and fruitful history of findings employing the baby-machine technique, suggest that minimisation of stress on cells is the single most important factor for successful cell-cycle analysis.

  11. Allyl isothiocyanate affects the cell cycle of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Åsberg, Signe E.; Bones, Atle M.; Øverby, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are degradation products of glucosinolates present in members of the Brassicaceae family acting as herbivore repellents and antimicrobial compounds. Recent results indicate that allyl ITC (AITC) has a role in defense responses such as glutathione depletion, ROS generation and stomatal closure. In this study we show that exposure to non-lethal concentrations of AITC causes a shift in the cell cycle distribution of Arabidopsis thaliana leading to accumulation of cells in S-phases and a reduced number of cells in non-replicating phases. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis revealed an AITC-induced up-regulation of the gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase A while several genes encoding mitotic proteins were down-regulated, suggesting an inhibition of mitotic processes. Interestingly, visualization of DNA synthesis indicated that exposure to AITC reduced the rate of DNA replication. Taken together, these results indicate that non-lethal concentrations of AITC induce cells of A. thaliana to enter the cell cycle and accumulate in S-phases, presumably as a part of a defensive response. Thus, this study suggests that AITC has several roles in plant defense and add evidence to the growing data supporting a multifunctional role of glucosinolates and their degradation products in plants. PMID:26042144

  12. Selective cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells by a polyphenol-rich extract of Solanum nigrum

    PubMed Central

    NAWAB, AKBAR; THAKUR, VIJAY S.; YUNUS, MOHAMMAD; MAHDI, ABBAS ALI; GUPTA, SANJAY

    2012-01-01

    Progression of prostate cancer is associated with escape of tumor cells from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Agents capable of selectively eliminating cancer cells by cell cycle arrest and/or induction of apoptosis offer a highly desirable approach. Here we demonstrate that a polyphenolic extract derived from ripe berries of Solanum nigrum (SN) differentially causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various human prostate cancer cells without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. Virally transformed normal human prostate epithelial PZ-HPV-7 cells and their cancer counterpart CA-HPV-10 cells, were used to evaluate the growth-inhibitory effects of the SN extract. SN treatment (5–20 μg/ml) of PZ-HPV-7 cells resulted in growth inhibitory responses of low magnitude. In sharp contrast, SN treatment of CA-HPV-10 cells increased cytotoxicity, decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. Similar results were noted in the human prostate cancer LNCaP, 22Rv1, DU145 and PC-3 cell lines, where significant reductions in cell viability and induction of apoptosis was observed in all these cells, an effect independent of disease stage and androgen association. Cell cycle analysis revealed that SN treatment (5–20 μg/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent G2/M phase arrest and subG1 accumulation in the CA-HPV-10 but not in the PZ-HPV-7 cell line. Our results, for the first time, demonstrate that the SN extract is capable of selectively inhibiting cellular proliferation and accelerating apoptotic events in prostate cancer cells. SN may be developed as a promising therapeutic and/or preventive agent against prostate cancer. PMID:22076244

  13. Selective cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells by a polyphenol-rich extract of Solanum nigrum.

    PubMed

    Nawab, Akbar; Thakur, Vijay S; Yunus, Mohammad; Ali Mahdi, Abbas; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-02-01

    Progression of prostate cancer is associated with escape of tumor cells from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Agents capable of selectively eliminating cancer cells by cell cycle arrest and/or induction of apoptosis offer a highly desirable approach. Here we demonstrate that a polyphenolic extract derived from ripe berries of Solanum nigrum (SN) differentially causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various human prostate cancer cells without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. Virally transformed normal human prostate epithelial PZ-HPV-7 cells and their cancer counterpart CA-HPV-10 cells, were used to evaluate the growth-inhibitory effects of the SN extract. SN treatment (5-20 µg/ml) of PZ-HPV-7 cells resulted in growth inhibitory responses of low magnitude. In sharp contrast, SN treatment of CA-HPV-10 cells increased cytotoxicity, decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. Similar results were noted in the human prostate cancer LNCaP, 22Rv1, DU145 and PC-3 cell lines, where significant reductions in cell viability and induction of apoptosis was observed in all these cells, an effect independent of disease stage and androgen association. Cell cycle analysis revealed that SN treatment (5-20 µg/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent G2/M phase arrest and subG1 accumulation in the CA-HPV-10 but not in the PZ-HPV-7 cell line. Our results, for the first time, demonstrate that the SN extract is capable of selectively inhibiting cellular proliferation and accelerating apoptotic events in prostate cancer cells. SN may be developed as a promising therapeutic and/or preventive agent against prostate cancer. PMID:22076244

  14. Cell cycle regulated transcription: from yeast to cancer

    PubMed Central

    McInerny, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed exciting new functions for forkhead transcription factors in cell proliferation and development. Cell proliferation is a fundamental process controlled by multiple overlapping mechanisms, and the control of gene expression plays a major role in the orderly and timely division of cells. This occurs through transcription factors regulating the expression of groups of genes at particular phases of the cell division cycle. In this way, the encoded gene products are present when they are required. This review outlines recent advances in our understanding of this process in yeast model systems and describes how this knowledge has informed analysis in more developmentally complex eukaryotes, particularly where it is relevant to human disease. PMID:27239285

  15. Association of luteinizing hormone receptor gene expression with cell cycle progression in granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jennifer D.; Seekallu, Srinivas V.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.; Chaffin, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    During hormonally induced ovarian follicle growth, granulosa cell proliferation increases and returns to baseline prior to the administration of an ovulatory stimulus. Several key genes appear to follow a similar pattern, including the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR), suggesting an association between cell cycle progression and gene expression. The expression of LHCGR mRNA in granulosa cells isolated from immature rats and treated in culture with FSH increased in a time-dependent manner, whereas administration of the cell cycle inhibitor mimosine completely suppressed expression. Although forskolin was able to induce luteinization in cells treated with mimosine, human chorionic gonadotropin had no effect, indicating the functional loss of LHCGR. The effects of mimosine on cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression were reversible within 24 h of mimosine removal. Cell cycle inhibition did not alter the stability of LHCGR mRNA, indicating that the primary effect was at the transcriptional level. To determine whether the relationship between LHCGR expression and cell cycle were relevant in vivo, immature rats were given a bolus of PMSG, followed by a second injection of either saline or PMSG 24 h later to augment levels of proliferation. The expression of LHCGR mRNA was elevated in the ovaries of animals receiving a supplement of PMSG. Mimosine also blocked cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression in macaque granulosa cells isolated following controlled ovarian stimulation cycles and in two different mouse Leydig tumor lines. These data collectively indicate that LHCGR mRNA is expressed as a function of the passage of cells across the G1-S phase boundary. PMID:19293332

  16. The cell-in-series method: A technique for accelerated electrode degradation in redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Sacci, Robert L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2015-11-21

    Here, we demonstrate a novel method to accelerate electrode degradation in redox flow batteries and apply this method to the all-vanadium chemistry. Electrode performance degradation occurred seven times faster than in a typical cycling experiment, enabling rapid evaluation of materials. This method also enables the steady-state study of electrodes. In this manner, it is possible to delineate whether specific operating conditions induce performance degradation; we found that both aggressively charging and discharging result in performance loss. Post-mortem x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the degraded electrodes was used to resolve the effects of state of charge (SoC) and current on the electrodemore » surface chemistry. For the electrode material tested in this work, we found evidence that a loss of oxygen content on the negative electrode cannot explain decreased cell performance. Furthermore, the effects of decreased electrode and membrane performance on capacity fade in a typical cycling battery were decoupled from crossover; electrode and membrane performance decay were responsible for a 22% fade in capacity, while crossover caused a 12% fade.« less

  17. The cell-in-series method: A technique for accelerated electrode degradation in redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Sacci, Robert L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2015-11-21

    Here, we demonstrate a novel method to accelerate electrode degradation in redox flow batteries and apply this method to the all-vanadium chemistry. Electrode performance degradation occurred seven times faster than in a typical cycling experiment, enabling rapid evaluation of materials. This method also enables the steady-state study of electrodes. In this manner, it is possible to delineate whether specific operating conditions induce performance degradation; we found that both aggressively charging and discharging result in performance loss. Post-mortem x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the degraded electrodes was used to resolve the effects of state of charge (SoC) and current on the electrode surface chemistry. For the electrode material tested in this work, we found evidence that a loss of oxygen content on the negative electrode cannot explain decreased cell performance. Furthermore, the effects of decreased electrode and membrane performance on capacity fade in a typical cycling battery were decoupled from crossover; electrode and membrane performance decay were responsible for a 22% fade in capacity, while crossover caused a 12% fade.

  18. The Arabidopsis CDC25 induces a short cell length when overexpressed in fission yeast: evidence for cell cycle function.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, D A; Chrimes, D; Dickinson, J R; Rogers, H J; Francis, D

    2005-02-01

    The putative mitotic inducer gene, Arath;CDC25 cloned in Arabidopsis thaliana, was screened for cell cycle function by overexpressing it in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The expression pattern of Arath;CDC25 was also examined in different tissues of A. thaliana. Fission yeast was transformed with plasmids pREP1 and pREP81 with the Arath;CDC25 gene under the control of the thiamine-repressible nmt promoter. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the expression of Arath;CDC25 was examined in seedlings, flower buds, mature leaves and stems of A. thaliana; actin (ACT2) was used as a control. In three independent transformants of fission yeast, cultured in the absence of thiamine (T), pREP1::Arath;CDC25 induced a highly significant reduction in mitotic cell length compared with wild type, pREP::Arath;CDC25 +T, and empty vector (pREP1 +/- T). The extent of cell shortening was greater using the stronger pREP1 compared with the weaker pREP81. However, Arath;CDC25 was expressed at low levels in all tissues examined. The data indicate that Arath;CDC25 can function as a mitotic accelerator in fission yeast. However, unlike other plant cell cycle genes, expression of Arath;CDC25 was not enhanced in rapidly dividing compared with non-proliferative Arabidopsis tissues. PMID:15720653

  19. Regulation of Sp1 by cell cycle related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tapias, Alicia; Ciudad, Carlos J.; Roninson, Igor B.; Noé, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Sp1 transcription factor regulates the expression of multiple genes, including the Sp1 gene itself. We analyzed the ability of different cell cycle regulatory proteins to interact with Sp1 and to affect Sp1 promoter activity. Using an antibody array, we observed that CDK4, SKP2, Rad51, BRCA2 and p21 could interact with Sp1 and we confirmed these interactions by co-immunoprecipitation. CDK4, SKP2, Rad51, BRCA2 and p21 also activated the Sp1 promoter. Among the known Sp1-interacting proteins, E2F-DP1, Cyclin D1, Stat3 and Rb activated the Sp1 promoter, whereas p53 and NFκB inhibited it. The proteins that regulated Sp1 gene expression were shown by positive chromatin immunoprecipitation to be bound to the Sp1 promoter. Moreover, SKP2, BRCA2, p21, E2F-DP1, Stat3, Rb, p53 and NFκB had similar effects on an artificial promoter containing only Sp1 binding sites. Transient transfections of CDK4, Rad51, E2F-DP1, p21 and Stat3 increased mRNA expression from the endogenous Sp1 gene in HeLa cells whereas overexpression of NFκB, and p53 decreased Sp1 mRNA levels. p21 expression from a stably integrated inducible promoter in HT1080 cells activated Sp1 expression at the promoter and mRNA levels, but at the same time it decreased Sp1 protein levels due to the activation of Sp1 degradation. The observed multiple effects of cell cycle regulators on Sp1 suggest that Sp1 may be a key mediator of cell cycle associated changes in gene expression. PMID:18769160

  20. Cell cycle control in isoproterenol-induced murine salivary acinar cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, T; Yamamoto, H; Bowen, E; Broverman, R L; Nguyen, K H; Humphreys-Beher, M G

    1996-11-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle is a summary of a complex network of signal transduction pathways resulting in both DNA replication and cell division. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the cell cycle in all eukaryotes, whereas other proteins, known as cyclins, act as their regulatory subunits. Chronic injection with isoproterenol (ISO) can induce acinar cell proliferation in rodent salivary glands. Cyclins and CDK proteins from control and ISO-treated murine parotid acinar cells were detected by using Western blotting techniques. By comparing the expression of these cell cycle regulatory kinases in the parotid acinar cell transition from a quiescent state to a hypertrophic state, we found rapid increases in the protein levels of all CDKs, cyclin D and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The highest protein levels for CDKs and cyclins appeared at about 72 hr of ISO stimulation and were coincident with the highest rate of increase in gland wet weight. After 72 hr, the increase of both cell cycle protein and gland wet weight began to subside. By using a co-immunoprecipitation method, the following cell cycle regulators (CDK-cyclin complexes) were detected, CDK4-cyclin D, CDK2-cyclin E, CDK2-cyclin A, and cdc2-cyclin B, along with an increase in kinase activity over control untreated animals. Additionally, we detected significant decreases in the newly isolated CDK inhibitor (CKI) p27kip but not Wee 1 kinase. The increased levels of CKI correlated with a decrease in kinase activity of CDK/cyclin complexes by 144 hr of chronic isoproterenol treatment. Our data suggest that the holoenzymes for cell cycle control (cyclin-CDK complexes) function as a final regulatory mechanism leading to salivary gland acinar cell proliferation. The gradual decline in protein levels of the CDKs and cyclins after 3 days of chronic treatment further indicates that ISO-induced proliferation of parotid acinar cells is self-limiting and non-tumorigenic. PMID:9375366

  1. Human Pancreatic β-Cell G1/S Molecule Cell Cycle Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M.; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W.; Salim, Fatimah G.; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E.; Takane, Karen K.; Scott, Donald K.; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of pancreatic β-cells is a key goal of diabetes research, yet induction of adult human β-cell replication has proven frustratingly difficult. In part, this reflects a lack of understanding of cell cycle control in the human β-cell. Here, we provide a comprehensive immunocytochemical “atlas” of G1/S control molecules in the human β-cell. This atlas reveals that the majority of these molecules, previously known to be present in islets, are actually present in the β-cell. More importantly, and in contrast to anticipated results, the human β-cell G1/S atlas reveals that almost all of the critical G1/S cell cycle control molecules are located in the cytoplasm of the quiescent human β-cell. Indeed, the only nuclear G1/S molecules are the cell cycle inhibitors, pRb, p57, and variably, p21: none of the cyclins or cdks necessary to drive human β-cell proliferation are present in the nuclear compartment. This observation may provide an explanation for the refractoriness of human β-cells to proliferation. Thus, in addition to known obstacles to human β-cell proliferation, restriction of G1/S molecules to the cytoplasm of the human β-cell represents an unanticipated obstacle to therapeutic human β-cell expansion. PMID:23493570

  2. Inhibition of the proteasome induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in mantle cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Christian; Ringshausen, Ingo; Schneller, Folker; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Häcker, Georg; Goetze, Katharina; Oostendorp, Robert; Peschel, Christian; Decker, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a distinctive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtype, characterized by overexpression of cyclin D1 as a consequence of the chromosomal translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32). MCL remains an incurable disease, combining the unfavourable clinical features of aggressive and indolent lymphomas. The blastic variant of MCL, which is often associated with additional cytogenetic alterations, has an even worse prognosis and new treatment options are clearly needed. The present study investigated the effect of a specific proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin, on cell cycle progression and apoptosis in two lymphoma cell lines harbouring the t(11;14)(q13;q32) and additional cytogenetic alterations, including p53 mutation (NCEB) and p16 deletion (Granta 519). Granta cells were more susceptible to inhibition of the proteasome with respect to inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis induction. No changes were observed in the expression levels of the G1 regulatory molecules cyclin D1 and cdk4, but cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction was accompanied by accumulation of the cdk inhibitor p21 in both cell lines. Increased p53 expression was only observed in Granta cells with wild-type p53. Cleavage of procaspase-3 and -9 was observed but cleavage of procaspase-8 was not involved in apoptosis induction. The proapoptotic effect of lactacystin was reversed by pretreatment with the pancaspase inhibitor zVAD.fmk. Lactacystin was also effective in inducing apoptosis in lymphoma cells from MCL patients. We conclude that inhibition of the proteasome might be a promising therapeutic approach for this incurable disease. PMID:12846895

  3. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of extra-adrenal glucocorticoid synthesis in murine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Atanas G; Leiser, Dominic; Roesselet, Corinne; Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are anti-inflammatory steroids with important applications in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Endogenous glucocorticoids are mainly produced by the adrenal glands, although there is increasing evidence for extra-adrenal sources. Recent findings show that intestinal crypt cells produce glucocorticoids, which contribute to the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis. Intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis is critically regulated by the transcription factor liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1). As expression of steroidogenic enzymes and LRH-1 is restricted to the proliferating cells of the crypts, we aimed to investigate the role of the cell cycle in the regulation of LRH-1 activity and intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. We here show that either pharmacological or molecular modulation of cell cycle progression significantly inhibited expression of steroidogenic enzymes and synthesis of glucocorticoids in intestinal epithelial cells. Synchronization of intestinal epithelial cells in the cell cycle revealed that expression of steroidogenic enzymes is preferentially induced at the G(1)/S stage. Differentiation of immature intestinal epithelial cells to mature nonproliferating cells also resulted in reduced expression of steroidogenic enzymes. This cell cycle-related effect on intestinal steroidogenesis was found to be mediated through the regulation of LRH-1 transcriptional activity. This mechanism may restrict intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis to the proliferating cells of the crypts. PMID:18711026

  4. Effects of simulated microgravity on cell cycle in human endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskaya, Alisa A.; Ignashkova, Tatiana I.; Bochenkova, Anna V.; Moskovtsev, Aleksey A.; Baranov, Victor M.; Kubatiev, Aslan A.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate effects of simulated microgravity on the cell cycle of endothelial cells. We analyze changes in the cell cycle after exposure of endothelial-like EA.hy 926 cells to simulated microgravity using a Desktop random positioning machine (RPM). Cell cycle profiles determined by flow cytometry show, that the percentage of the cells in the G0/G1 phase after 24 and 96 h of RPM-simulated microgravity is significantly increased as compared to the control group. However, no significant difference is observed after 120 h of RPM-simulated microgravity. In regard to S phase, the percentage of cells is significantly decreased after 24 and 96 h of RPM, respectively; whereas 120 h later, the number of S-phase cells is comparable to the control group. Thus, we show that simulated microgravity inhibits cell cycle progression of human EA.hy 926 cells from the G0/G1 phase to the S phase. We observe an effect of a hibernation-like state, when the growth of the cells in the RPM group slows down, but does not stop. Our results further show that simulated microgravity can affect adhesion of endothelial cells, and alpha-tubulin expression, as most cells begin to detach from the surface of OptiCell unit after 24 h, form aggregates after 48 h, and exhibit accumulation of alpha-tubulin around the nucleus after 48 h of exposure to simulated microgravity conditions. Our results demonstrate a chance in the cell cycle in a low gravitational field.

  5. Reliability of transcriptional cycles and the yeast cell-cycle oscillator.

    PubMed

    Sevim, Volkan; Gong, Xinwei; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2010-01-01

    A recently published transcriptional oscillator associated with the yeast cell cycle provides clues and raises questions about the mechanisms underlying autonomous cyclic processes in cells. Unlike other biological and synthetic oscillatory networks in the literature, this one does not seem to rely on a constitutive signal or positive auto-regulation, but rather to operate through stable transmission of a pulse on a slow positive feedback loop that determines its period. We construct a continuous-time Boolean model of this network, which permits the modeling of noise through small fluctuations in the timing of events, and show that it can sustain stable oscillations. Analysis of simpler network models shows how a few building blocks can be arranged to provide stability against fluctuations. Our findings suggest that the transcriptional oscillator in yeast belongs to a new class of biological oscillators. PMID:20628620

  6. Modeling cell-cycle synchronization during embryogenesis in Xenopus laevis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIsaac, R. Scott; Huang, K. C.; Sengupta, Anirvan; Wingreen, Ned

    2010-03-01

    A widely conserved aspect of embryogenesis is the ability to synchronize nuclear divisions post-fertilization. How is synchronization achieved? Given a typical protein diffusion constant of 10 μm^2sec, and an embryo length of 1mm, it would take diffusion many hours to propagate a signal across the embryo. Therefore, synchrony cannot be attained by diffusion alone. We hypothesize that known autocatalytic reactions of cell-cycle components make the embryo an ``active medium'' in which waves propagate much faster than diffusion, enforcing synchrony. We report on robust spatial synchronization of components of the core cell cycle circuit based on a mathematical model previously determined by in vitro experiments. In vivo, synchronized divisions are preceded by a rapid calcium wave that sweeps across the embryo. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that increases in transient calcium levels lead to derepression of a negative feedback loop, allowing cell divisions to start. Preliminary results indicate a novel relationship between the speed of the initial calcium wave and the ability to achieve synchronous cell divisions.

  7. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P; Chow, Vincent T K

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  8. (p)ppGpp and the bacterial cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Aanisa; Harinarayanan, Rajendran

    2016-06-01

    Genes of the Rel/Spo homolog (RSH) superfamily synthesize and/or hydrolyse the modified nucleotides pppGpp/ ppGpp (collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp) and are prevalent across diverse bacteria and in plant chloroplasts. Bacteria accumulate (p)ppGpp in response to nutrient deprivation (generically called the stringent response) and elicit appropriate adaptive responses mainly through the regulation of transcription. Although at different concentrations (p)ppGpp affect the expression of distinct set of genes, the two well-characterized responses are reduction in expression of the protein synthesis machinery and increase in the expression of genes coding for amino acid biosynthesis. In Escherichia coli, the cellular (p)ppGpp level inversely correlates with the growth rate and increasing its concentration decreases the steady state growth rate in a defined growth medium. Since change in growth rate must be accompanied by changes in cell cycle parameters set through the activities of the DNA replication and cell division apparatus, (p)ppGpp could coordinate protein synthesis (cell mass increase) with these processes. Here we review the role of (p)ppGpp in bacterial cell cycle regulation. PMID:27240988

  9. Photosynthetic Apparatus Formation during the Cell Cycle of Chlorella

    PubMed Central

    Venediktov, Pavel S.; Chemeris, Yuree K.; Grishina, Natalia A.

    1981-01-01

    Synchronous cell division in cultures of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck was induced by intermittent illumination: 9 hours light, 6 hours darkness. The rate of photosynthetic O2 evolution per cell increases 4-fold in a one-step manner at the beginning of the light period, to the same extent as the increase in cell number. Over the division cycle, the following accumulation times during the light period were found: chlorophyll a, between 2 and 8 hours, chlorophyll b, between 5 and 8 hours, reaction centers of photosystems I and II, between 2 and 6 hours; and cytochrome f, between 2.5 and 5 hours. Cytochrome f accumulation is closely followed by an increase in amplitude of the rapid phase in light-induced absorption increase at 520 nanometers and in intensity of the delayed light emission. Enhancement of the delayed fluorescence yield per flash under continuous illumination (caused by the establishment of the pH difference across the thylakoid membrane) is maximal by the first hour of the light period. These findings, and others described in the text, suggested that the 4-fold growth of photosynthetic apparatus in the course of the cell cycle cannot be the result of gradual rise of electron-transport chain number. Rather, it is the result of a series of successive syntheses of its individual components. The rate-limiting step of electron transport is probably located between plastoquinone and cytochrome f. PMID:16661795

  10. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P.; Chow, Vincent T.K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  11. Selection of mammalian cells based on their cell-cycle phase using dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Unyoung; Shu, Chih-Wen; Dane, Karen Y.; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Wang, Jean Y. J.; Soh, H. T.

    2007-01-01

    An effective, noninvasive means of selecting cells based on their phase within the cell cycle is an important capability for biological research. Current methods of producing synchronous cell populations, however, tend to disrupt the natural physiology of the cell or suffer from low synchronization yields. In this work, we report a microfluidic device that utilizes the dielectrophoresis phenomenon to synchronize cells by exploiting the relationship between the cell's volume and its phase in the cell cycle. The dielectrophoresis activated cell synchronizer (DACSync) device accepts an asynchronous mixture of cells at the inlet, fractionates the cell populations according to the cell-cycle phase (G1/S and G2/M), and elutes them through different outlets. The device is gentle and efficient; it utilizes electric fields that are 1–2 orders of magnitude below those used in electroporation and enriches asynchronous tumor cells in the G1 phase to 96% in one round of sorting, in a continuous flow manner at a throughput of 2 × 105 cells per hour per microchannel. This work illustrates the feasibility of using laminar flow and electrokinetic forces for the efficient, noninvasive separation of living cells. PMID:18093921

  12. Effects of cell cycle on the uptake of water soluble quantum dots by cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shen; Chen, Ji-Yao; Wang, Jun-Yong; Zhou, Lu-Wei; Peng, Qian

    2011-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) with excellent optical properties have become powerful candidates for cell imaging. Although numerous reports have studied the uptake of QDs by cells, little information exists on the effects of cell cycle on the cellular QD uptake. In this report, the effects of cell cycle on the uptake of water soluble thiol-capped CdTe QDs by the human cervical carcinoma Hela cell line, human hepatocellular carcinoma QGY7701 cell line, and human embryonic kidney 293T cell line were studied by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. All three cell lines show to take up CdTe QDs via endocytosis. After arresting cells at specific phases with pharmacological agents, the cells in G2/M phase take up the most CdTe QDs, probably due to an increased membrane expansion during mitosis; whereas the cells in G1 phase do the least. A mathematical physics model was built to calculate the relative uptake rates of CdTe QDs by cells in different phases of the cell cycle, with the result as the uptake rate in G2/M phase is 2-4 times higher than that in G1 phase for these three cell lines. The results obtained from this study may provide the information useful for intracellular delivery of QDs.

  13. Systematic characterization of cell cycle phase-dependent protein dynamics and pathway activities by high-content microscopy-assisted cell cycle phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Christopher; Kroll, Torsten; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2014-12-01

    Cell cycle progression is coordinated with metabolism, signaling and other complex cellular functions. The investigation of cellular processes in a cell cycle stage-dependent manner is often the subject of modern molecular and cell biological research. Cell cycle synchronization and immunostaining of cell cycle markers facilitate such analysis, but are limited in use due to unphysiological experimental stress, cell type dependence and often low flexibility. Here, we describe high-content microscopy-assisted cell cycle phenotyping (hiMAC), which integrates high-resolution cell cycle profiling of asynchronous cell populations with immunofluorescence microscopy. hiMAC is compatible with cell types from any species and allows for statistically powerful, unbiased, simultaneous analysis of protein interactions, modifications and subcellular localization at all cell cycle stages within a single sample. For illustration, we provide a hiMAC analysis pipeline tailored to study DNA damage response and genomic instability using a 3-4-day protocol, which can be adjusted to any other cell cycle stage-dependent analysis. PMID:25458086

  14. Coupling between the Circadian Clock and Cell Cycle Oscillators: Implication for Healthy Cells and Malignant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Feillet, Celine; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Levi, Francis; Rand, David A.; Delaunay, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumor growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer. PMID:26029155

  15. Follicular Dendritic Cells Retain Infectious HIV in Cycling Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Heesters, Balthasar A.; Lindqvist, Madelene; Vagefi, Parsia A.; Scully, Eileen P.; Schildberg, Frank A.; Altfeld, Marcus; Walker, Bruce D.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Carroll, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), it does not cure Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and discontinuation results in viral rebound. Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are in direct contact with CD4+ T cells and they retain intact antigen for prolonged periods. We found that human FDC isolated from patients on ART retain infectious HIV within a non-degradative cycling compartment and transmit infectious virus to uninfected CD4 T cells in vitro. Importantly, treatment of the HIV+ FDC with a soluble complement receptor 2 purges the FDC of HIV virions and prevents viral transmission in vitro. Our results provide an explanation for how FDC can retain infectious HIV for extended periods and suggest a therapeutic strategy to achieve cure in HIV-infected humans. PMID:26623655

  16. p53 Promotes Cell Survival Due to the Reversibility of its Cell Cycle Checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Lukin, Dana J.; Carvajal, Luis A.; Liu, Wen-jun; Resnick-Silverman, Lois; Manfredi, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 (TP53) has a well-studied role in triggering cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage. Previous studies have suggested that functional p53 enhances chemosensitivity. In contrast, data are presented to show that p53 can be required for cell survival following DNA damage due to activation of reversible cell cycle checkpoints. The cellular outcome to DNA damage is determined by the duration and extent of the stimulus in a p53-dependent manner. In response to transient or low levels of DNA damage, p53 triggers a reversible G2 arrest whereas a sustained p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and senescence follows prolonged or high levels of DNA damage. Regardless of the length of treatment, p53-null cells arrest in G2, but ultimately adapt and proceed into mitosis. Interestingly, they fail to undergo cytokinesis, become multinucleated, and then die from apoptosis. Upon transient treatment with DNA damaging agents, wild-type p53 cells reversibly arrest and repair the damage, whereas p53-null cells fail to do so and die. These data indicate that p53 can promote cell survival by inducing reversible cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing for DNA repair. Thus, transient treatments may exploit differences between wild-type p53 and p53-null cells. PMID:25158956

  17. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xianqi; Qiu, Shuifeng; Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  18. Effects of distal cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Carlos; Martín, Miguel; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2005-05-01

    Cholesterol is a major lipid component of the plasma membrane in animal cells. In addition to its structural requirement, cholesterol is essential in cell proliferation and other cell processes. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the stringency of the requirement for cholesterol as a regulator of proliferation and cell cycle progression, compared with other sterols of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Human promyelocytic HL-60 cells were cultured in cholesterol-free medium and treated with different distal inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis (zaragozic acid, SKF 104976, SR 31747, BM 15766, and AY 9944), which allow the synthesis of isoprenoid derivatives and different sets of sterol intermediates, but not cholesterol. The results showed that only the inhibition of sterol Delta7-reductase was compatible with cell proliferation. Blocking cholesterol biosynthesis upstream of this enzyme resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest selectively in G2/M phase. PMID:15687348

  19. Lamina-associated polypeptide 2α regulates cell cycle progression and differentiation via the retinoblastoma–E2F pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dorner, Daniela; Vlcek, Sylvia; Foeger, Nicole; Gajewski, Andreas; Makolm, Christian; Gotzmann, Josef; Hutchison, Christopher J.; Foisner, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Lamina-associated polypeptide (LAP) 2α is a nonmembrane-bound LAP2 isoform that forms complexes with nucleoplasmic A-type lamins. In this study, we show that the overexpression of LAP2α in fibroblasts reduced proliferation and delayed entry into the cell cycle from a G0 arrest. In contrast, stable down-regulation of LAP2α by RNA interference accelerated proliferation and interfered with cell cycle exit upon serum starvation. The LAP2α-linked cell cycle phenotype is mediated by the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein because the LAP2α COOH terminus directly bound Rb, and overexpressed LAP2α inhibited E2F/Rb-dependent reporter gene activity in G1 phase in an Rb-dependent manner. Furthermore, LAP2α associated with promoter sequences in endogenous E2F/Rb-dependent target genes in vivo and negatively affected their expression. In addition, the expression of LAP2α in proliferating preadipocytes caused the accumulation of hypophosphorylated Rb, which is reminiscent of noncycling cells, and initiated partial differentiation into adipocytes. The effects of LAP2α on cell cycle progression and differentiation may be highly relevant for the cell- and tissue-specific phenotypes observed in laminopathic diseases. PMID:16606692

  20. MYC-repressed long noncoding RNAs antagonize MYC-induced cell proliferation and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Jun; Fadda, Paolo; Alder, Hansjuerg; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC is a proto-oncogene regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and metabolism. The recent identification of MYC-regulated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) expands our knowledge of the role of lncRNAs in MYC functions. Here, we identify MYC-repressed lncRNAs named MYCLo-4, -5 and -6 by comparing 3 categories of lncRNAs (downregulated in highly MYC-expressing colorectal cancer, up-regulated by MYC knockdown in HCT116, upregulated by MYC knockdown in RKO). The MYC-repressed MYCLos are implicated in MYC-modulated cell proliferation through cell cycle regulation. By screening cell cycle-related genes regulated by MYC and the MYC-repressed MYCLos, we identified the MYC-repressed gene GADD45A as a target gene of the MYC-repressed MYCLos such as MYCLo-4 and MYCLo-6. PMID:26003165

  1. Cell cycle progression in irradiated endothelial cells cultured from bovine aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Ward, W.F.; Bauer, K.D.

    1988-11-01

    Logarithmically growing endothelial cells from bovine aortas were exposed to single doses of 0-10 Gy of 60Co gamma rays, and cell cycle phase distribution and progression were examined by flow cytometry and autoradiography. In some experiments, cells were synchronized in the cell cycle with hydroxyurea (1 mM). Cell number in sham-irradiated control cultures doubled in approximately 24 h. Estimated cycle stage times for control cells were 14.4 h for G1 phase, 7.2 h for S phase, and 2.4 h for G2 + M phase. Irradiated cells demonstrated a reduced distribution at the G1/S phase border at 4 h, and an increased distribution in G2 + M phase at 24 h postirradiation. Autoradiographs of irradiated cells after continuous (3H)thymidine labeling indicated a block in G1 phase or at the G1/S-phase border. The duration of the block was dose dependent (2-3 min/cGy). Progression of the endothelial cells through S phase after removal of the hydroxyurea block also was retarded by irradiation, as demonstrated by increased distribution in early S phase and decreased distribution in late S phase. These results indicate that progression of asynchronous cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells through the DNA synthetic cycle is susceptible to radiation inhibition at specific sites in the cycle, resulting in redistribution and partial synchronization of the population. Thus aortic endothelial cells, diploid cells from a normal tissue, resemble many immortal cell types that have been examined in this regard in vitro.

  2. Cell Cycle Synchronization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Lactose Gradient Centrifugation to Isolate Small Cells.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M; Grallert, Agnes; Simanis, Viesturs

    2016-01-01

    Size selection of small cells from an asynchronous Schizosaccharomyces pombe culture offers a simple way to generate cultures in which progression through the mitotic cell division cycle is synchronized throughout the population. Here, we describe how density centrifugation of cells from asynchronous cultures through lactose gradients selects small G2 cells to generate synchronized cultures as large as 500 mL. The ease and simplicity of this approach makes it an accessible and attractive method for generating synchronous cultures. PMID:27250945

  3. Integrative analysis of cell cycle control in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Katherine C; Calzone, Laurence; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Cross, Frederick R; Novak, Bela; Tyson, John J

    2004-08-01

    The adaptive responses of a living cell to internal and external signals are controlled by networks of proteins whose interactions are so complex that the functional integration of the network cannot be comprehended by intuitive reasoning alone. Mathematical modeling, based on biochemical rate equations, provides a rigorous and reliable tool for unraveling the complexities of molecular regulatory networks. The budding yeast cell cycle is a challenging test case for this approach, because the control system is known in exquisite detail and its function is constrained by the phenotypic properties of >100 genetically engineered strains. We show that a mathematical model built on a consensus picture of this control system is largely successful in explaining the phenotypes of mutants described so far. A few inconsistencies between the model and experiments indicate aspects of the mechanism that require revision. In addition, the model allows one to frame and critique hypotheses about how the division cycle is regulated in wild-type and mutant cells, to predict the phenotypes of new mutant combinations, and to estimate the effective values of biochemical rate constants that are difficult to measure directly in vivo. PMID:15169868

  4. Cell Cycle Synchronization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Centrifugal Elutriation of Small Cells.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M; Grallert, Agnes; Simanis, Viesturs

    2016-01-01

    Division of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by medial fission produces identically sized daughter cells that grow by tip extension until their own division is prompted by reaching the same critical size for division as the parental cell. The fidelity of this size control in the absence of perturbation means that cells of the same size are at the same point in the cell cycle. Size selection of small cells from an asynchronous culture by centrifugal elutriation permits generation of synchronous cultures large enough for biochemical analysis. The changes observed in the synchronized cell cycle progression of such cultures are representative of those that accompany cell cycle progression of individual cells. Here, we describe how size selection with the Beckman Coulter JE-5.0 rotor can be used to generate synchronized cultures. Because of the continuous passage of medium through the rotor throughout the procedure, elutriation is considered to have less impact on the integrity of the cell cycle than other approaches. Two protocols are presented here: The first generates a 2-L culture ideal for detailed biochemical analysis, whereas the second allows rapid generation and simultaneous analysis of three smaller (200-mL) cultures. PMID:27250944

  5. Coupling of the cell cycle and apoptotic machineries in developing T cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ling; Sun, Yuefang; Chiang, Leslie; He, Bo; Kang, Chulho; Nolla, Hector; Winoto, Astar

    2010-03-01

    Proliferation and apoptosis are diametrically opposite processes. Expression of certain genes like c-Myc, however, can induce both, pointing to a possible linkage between them. Developing CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes are intrinsically sensitive to apoptosis, but the molecular basis is not known. We have found that these noncycling cells surprisingly express many cell cycle proteins. We generated transgenic mice expressing a CDK2 kinase-dead (CDK2-DN) protein in the T cell compartment. Analysis of these mice showed that the CDK2-DN protein acts as a dominant negative mutant in mature T cells as expected, but surprisingly, it acts as a dominant active protein in CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes. The levels of CDK2 kinase activity, cyclin E, cyclin A, and other cell cycle proteins in transgenic CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes are increased. Concurrently, caspase levels are elevated, and apoptosis is significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo. E2F-1, the unique E2F member capable of inducing apoptosis when overexpressed, is specifically up-regulated in transgenic CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes but not in other T cell populations. These results demonstrate that the cell cycle and apoptotic machineries are normally linked, and expression of cell cycle proteins in developing T cells contributes to their inherent 1sensitivity to apoptosis. PMID:20068041

  6. Metformin impairs growth of endometrial cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and concomitant autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective therapies for early endometrial cancer usually involve surgical excision and consequent infertility Therefore, new treatment approaches that preserve fertility should be developed. Metformin, a well-tolerated anti-diabetic drug, can inhibit cancer cell growth. However, the mechanism of metformin action is not well understood. Here we investigate the roles of autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer effects of metformin on endometrial cancer cells. Methods Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells were treated with metformin. WST-8 assays, colony formation assays, flow cytometry, caspase luminescence measurement, immunofluorescence, and western blots were used to assess the effects of metformin on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and autophagy. Results Metformin-treated cells exhibited significantly lower viability and proliferation and significantly more cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2/M than control cells. These cells also exhibited significantly more apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In addition, metformin treatment induced autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy, either by Beclin1 knockdown or by 3-methyladenine-mediated inhibition of caspase-3/7, suppressed the anti-proliferative effects of metformin on endometrial cancer cells. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis caused by metformin are partially or completely dependent on autophagy. Conclusions We showed that metformin suppresses endometrial cancer cell growth via cell cycle arrest and concomitant autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:24966801

  7. Transit of normal rat uterine stromal cells through G1 phase of the cell cycle requires progesterone-growth factor interactions.

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Kimler, B F; Justice, W M; Rider, V

    2000-02-01

    Understanding of cell cycle regulation in hormonally responsive cells lags behind studies in other systems because few models have been available to identify the role of steroid hormones and their receptors in this process. This study investigates progesterone-dependent effects on the progression of normal uterine stromal cells through early G1 phase of the cell cycle. Quiescent rat uterine stromal cells were stimulated to reenter the cell cycle by adding serum-free medium containing medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF). [3H]thymidine incorporation increased significantly (P = 0.025) in cells stimulated with both FGF alone and MPA plus FGF compared with the control cells. Moreover, cells stimulated with MPA plus FGF incorporated significantly more (P = 0.01) [3H]thymidine than cells treated with FGF alone, suggesting requisite interactions between progesterone and FGF for stromal cell entry into S phase. Flow cytometric analysis of stimulated stromal cells showed FGF alone and MPA plus FGF increased significantly (P = 0.002) the percentage of cells in S phase at 12 h. Incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into stromal cell nuclei indicated that FGF alone and MPA plus FGF increased the percentage of cells entering S phase at 18 and 24 h compared with the control cells. In addition, MPA plus FGF increased significantly (P = 0.001) the number of cells entering S phase at 24 h compared with FGF alone and sustained S phase entry compared with FGF alone, MPA alone, or the control cells. Stromal cells inhibited from G1 reentry by inhibition of mitosis showed accelerated entry into S phase in response to MPA plus FGF compared with FGF alone. Cyclin D1 messenger RNA increased in stromal cells treated with MPA plus FGF at 9, 12, and 15 h. Addition of RU 486 to cells stimulated with MPA plus FGF for 9 h reduced cyclin D1 messenger RNA accumulation by 40%. Western blot analysis of cyclin D1 immunoprecipitates indicated complex formation with

  8. CCND1–CDK4–mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E.; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1–CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1–CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1–CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. PMID:26150472

  9. Sonoporation induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenjing; Sit, Wai Hung; Wan, Jennifer M F; Yu, Alfred C H

    2011-12-01

    Despite being a transient biophysical phenomenon, sonoporation is known to disturb the homeostasis of living cells. This work presents new evidence on how sonoporation may lead to antiproliferation effects including cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis through disrupting various cell signaling pathways. Our findings were obtained from sonoporation experiments conducted on HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells (with 1% v/v microbubbles; 1 MHz ultrasound; 0.3 or 0.5MPa peak negative pressure; 10% duty cycle; 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency; 1 min exposure period). Membrane resealing in these sonoporated cells was first verified using scanning electron microscopy. Time-lapse flow cytometry analysis of cellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contents was then performed at four post-sonoporation time points (4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h). Results indicate that an increasing trend in the apoptotic cell population can be observed for at least 12 h after sonoporation, whilst viable sonoporated cells are found to temporarily accumulate in the G(2)/M (gap-2/mitosis) phase of the cell cycle. Further analysis using western blotting reveals that sonoporation-induced apoptosis involves cleavage of poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) proteins: a pro-apoptotic hallmark related to loss of DNA repair functionality. Also, mitochondrial signaling seems to have taken part in triggering this cellular event as the expression of two complementary regulators for mitochondrial release of pro-apoptotic molecules, Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) and Bax (Bcl-2-associated X), are seen to be imbalanced in sonoporated cells. Furthermore, sonoporation is found to induce cell-cycle arrest through perturbing the expression of various cyclin and Cdk (cyclin-dependent kinase) checkpoint proteins that play an enabling role in cell-cycle progression. These bioeffects should be taken into account when using sonoporation for therapeutic purposes. PMID:22033133

  10. Forty-five years of cell-cycle genetics

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Brian J.; Culotti, Joseph G.; Nash, Robert S.; Pringle, John R.

    2015-01-01

    In the early 1970s, studies in Leland Hartwell’s laboratory at the University of Washington launched the genetic analysis of the eukaryotic cell cycle and set the path that has led to our modern understanding of this centrally important process. This 45th-anniversary Retrospective reviews the steps by which the project took shape, the atmosphere in which this happened, and the possible morals for modern times. It also provides an up-to-date look at the 35 original CDC genes and their human homologues. PMID:26628751

  11. ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 suppresses mitochondrial oxidative bursts and modulates cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Venkataramani, Sujatha; Hortensteiner, Stefan; Kunz, Lukas; Christ, Bastien; Moulin, Michael; Smith, Alison G.; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 2 (ACD2) protein protects cells from programmed cell death (PCD) caused by endogenous porphyrin-related molecules like red chlorophyll catabolite or exogenous protoporphyrin IX. We previously found that during bacterial infection, ACD2, a chlorophyll breakdown enzyme, localizes to both chloroplasts and mitochondria in leaves. Additionally, acd2 cells show mitochondrial dysfunctions. In plants with acd2 and ACD2+ sectors, ACD2 functions cell autonomously, implicating a pro-death ACD2 substrate as cell non-autonomous in promoting spreading PCD. ACD2 targeted solely to mitochondria can reduce the accumulation of an ACD2 substrate that originates in chloroplasts, indicating that ACD2 substrate molecules are likely mobile within cells. Two different light-dependent reactive oxygen bursts in mitochondria play prominent and causal roles in the acd2 PCD phenotype. Finally, ACD2 can complement acd2 when targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, respectively, as long as it is catalytically active; the ability to bind substrate is not sufficient for ACD2 to function in vitro or in vivo. Together the data suggest that ACD2 localizes dynamically during infection to protect cells from pro-death mobile substrate molecules, some of which may originate in chloroplasts, but have major effects on mitochondria. PMID:21988537

  12. INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    FuelCell Energy

    2005-05-16

    With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water

  13. Centrosome/Cell Cycle Uncoupling and Elimination in the Endoreduplicating Intestinal Cells of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Roy, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The centrosome cycle is most often coordinated with mitotic cell division through the activity of various essential cell cycle regulators, consequently ensuring that the centriole is duplicated once, and only once, per cell cycle. However, this coupling can be altered in specific developmental contexts; for example, multi-ciliated cells generate hundreds of centrioles without any S-phase requirement for their biogenesis, while Drosophila follicle cells eliminate their centrosomes as they begin to endoreduplicate. In order to better understand how the centrosome cycle and the cell cycle are coordinated in a developmental context we use the endoreduplicating intestinal cell lineage of C. elegans to address how novel variations of the cell cycle impact this important process. In C. elegans, the larval intestinal cells undergo one nuclear division without subsequent cytokinesis, followed by four endocycles that are characterized by successive rounds of S-phase. We monitored the levels of centriolar/centrosomal markers and found that centrosomes lose their pericentriolar material following the nuclear division that occurs during the L1 stage and is thereafter never re-gained. The centrioles then become refractory to S phase regulators that would normally promote duplication during the first endocycle, after which they are eliminated during the L2 stage. Furthermore, we show that SPD-2 plays a central role in the numeral regulation of centrioles as a potential target of CDK activity. On the other hand, the phosphorylation on SPD-2 by Polo-like kinase, the transcriptional regulation of genes that affect centriole biogenesis, and the ubiquitin/proteasome degradation pathway, contribute collectively to the final elimination of the centrioles during the L2 stage. PMID:25360893

  14. Load cycle durability of a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst in polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Chikara; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Tashiro, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    We focus on Pt degradation occurring during fuel cell vehicle (FCV) combined drive cycles involving load and open circuit voltage (OCV) just after startup and during idling. Load cycle durability is evaluated as a function of OCV/load holding time, load rate and relative humidity (RH) with a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst (Pt/GCB) in the cathode. The degradation of Pt/GCB is suppressed for shorter OCV holding times, lower load rates and lower RH. Scanning ion microscopy (SIM) images of membrane cross-sections indicate that the amount of Pt deposited in the membrane decreases during drive cycles involving load with short OCV holding times. Investigations of the Pt distribution in the cathode catalyst layer (CL) by using scanning TEM-EDX show that the dissolution of Pt is suppressed on the membrane side in the CL. The Pt dissolution is accelerated by the high Pt oxidation due to the long OCV holding time. A load cycle with both long OCV holding time and low load inhibits the Pt2+ migration into the membrane but accelerates the Pt particle growth due to electrochemical Ostwald ripening; meanwhile, a load cycle with long OCV holding time at lower RH prevents both the Pt dissolution and particle growth.

  15. Guttiferone K impedes cell cycle re-entry of quiescent prostate cancer cells via stabilization of FBXW7 and subsequent c-MYC degradation.

    PubMed

    Xi, Z; Yao, M; Li, Y; Xie, C; Holst, J; Liu, T; Cai, S; Lao, Y; Tan, H; Xu, H-X; Dong, Q

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle re-entry by quiescent cancer cells is an important mechanism for cancer progression. While high levels of c-MYC expression are sufficient for cell cycle re-entry, the modality to block c-MYC expression, and subsequent cell cycle re-entry, is limited. Using reversible quiescence rendered by serum withdrawal or contact inhibition in PTEN(null)/p53(WT) (LNCaP) or PTEN(null)/p53(mut) (PC-3) prostate cancer cells, we have identified a compound that is able to impede cell cycle re-entry through c-MYC. Guttiferone K (GUTK) blocked resumption of DNA synthesis and preserved the cell cycle phase characteristics of quiescent cells after release from the quiescence. In vehicle-treated cells, there was a rapid increase in c-MYC protein levels upon release from the quiescence. However, this increase was inhibited in the presence of GUTK with an associated acceleration in c-MYC protein degradation. The inhibitory effect of GUTK on cell cycle re-entry was significantly reduced in cells overexpressing c-MYC. The protein level of FBXW7, a subunit of E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for degradation of c-MYC, was reduced upon the release from the quiescence. In contrast, GUTK stabilized FBXW7 protein levels during release from the quiescence. The critical role of FBXW7 was confirmed using siRNA knockdown, which impaired the inhibitory effect of GUTK on c-MYC protein levels and cell cycle re-entry. Administration of GUTK, either in vitro prior to transplantation or in vivo, suppressed the growth of quiescent prostate cancer cell xenografts. Furthermore, elevation of FBXW7 protein levels and reduction of c-MYC protein levels were found in the xenografts of GUTK-treated compared with vehicle-treated mice. Hence, we have identified a compound that is capable of impeding cell cycle re-entry by quiescent PTEN(null)/p53(WT) and PTEN(null)/p53(mut) prostate cancer cells likely by promoting c-MYC protein degradation through stabilization of FBXW7. Its usage as a clinical modality to

  16. FETAL DEXAMETHASONE EXPOSURE ACCELERATES DEVELOPMENT OF RENAL FUNCTION: RELATIONSHIP TO DOSE, CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND GROWTH INHIBITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fetal exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids slows cellular development and impairs organ performance, in association with growth retardation. evertheless, low doses of glucocorticoids may enhance cell differentiation and accelerate specific functions. he current study examine...

  17. Accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Plans for the development of amorphous cell accelerated test measurement instrumentation are outlined. Diagrams for an 11-lamp ELH solar simulator and ac light source instrumentation are given. Examples of ac and dc analysis graphs are also provided.

  18. Evaluation of effect of triterpenes and limonoids on cell growth, cell cycle and apoptosis in human tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Cazal, Cristiane M; Choosang, Kantima; Severino, Vanessa Gisele P; Soares, Marcio S; Sarria, Andre Lucio F; Fernandes, Joao B; Silva, Maria Fatima G F; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Pakkong, Pannee; Almeida, Gabriela M; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Nascimento, Maria S J; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2010-12-01

    Six triterpenes and eight limonoids were evaluated for their capacity to inhibit the growth of three human tumour cell lines, breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460) and melanoma (A375-C5). The mechanisms involved in the observed cell growth arrest of the four most potent compounds were carried out by studying their effect in cell cycle profile and programmed cell death. The results showed that one triterpene (odoratol) and two limonoids (gedunin and cedrelone) caused cell cycle arrest while only the limonoids gedunin and cedrelone were found to be very potent inducers of apoptosis. PMID:21269253

  19. Robust synchronization of coupled circadian and cell cycle oscillators in single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bieler, Jonathan; Cannavo, Rosamaria; Gustafson, Kyle; Gobet, Cedric; Gatfield, David; Naef, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Circadian cycles and cell cycles are two fundamental periodic processes with a period in the range of 1 day. Consequently, coupling between such cycles can lead to synchronization. Here, we estimated the mutual interactions between the two oscillators by time-lapse imaging of single mammalian NIH3T3 fibroblasts during several days. The analysis of thousands of circadian cycles in dividing cells clearly indicated that both oscillators tick in a 1:1 mode-locked state, with cell divisions occurring tightly 5 h before the peak in circadian Rev-Erbα-YFP reporter expression. In principle, such synchrony may be caused by either unidirectional or bidirectional coupling. While gating of cell division by the circadian cycle has been most studied, our data combined with stochastic modeling unambiguously show that the reverse coupling is predominant in NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, temperature, genetic, and pharmacological perturbations showed that the two interacting cellular oscillators adopt a synchronized state that is highly robust over a wide range of parameters. These findings have implications for circadian function in proliferative tissues, including epidermis, immune cells, and cancer. PMID:25028488

  20. Robust synchronization of coupled circadian and cell cycle oscillators in single mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Bieler, Jonathan; Cannavo, Rosamaria; Gustafson, Kyle; Gobet, Cedric; Gatfield, David; Naef, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Circadian cycles and cell cycles are two fundamental periodic processes with a period in the range of 1 day. Consequently, coupling between such cycles can lead to synchronization. Here, we estimated the mutual interactions between the two oscillators by time-lapse imaging of single mammalian NIH3T3 fibroblasts during several days. The analysis of thousands of circadian cycles in dividing cells clearly indicated that both oscillators tick in a 1:1 mode-locked state, with cell divisions occurring tightly 5 h before the peak in circadian Rev-Erbα-YFP reporter expression. In principle, such synchrony may be caused by either unidirectional or bidirectional coupling. While gating of cell division by the circadian cycle has been most studied, our data combined with stochastic modeling unambiguously show that the reverse coupling is predominant in NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, temperature, genetic, and pharmacological perturbations showed that the two interacting cellular oscillators adopt a synchronized state that is highly robust over a wide range of parameters. These findings have implications for circadian function in proliferative tissues, including epidermis, immune cells, and cancer. PMID:25028488

  1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 influences cell cycle progression in muscle satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Mathieu; Figeac, Nicolas; White, Robert B.; Knopp, Paul; Zammit, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle retains a resident stem cell population called satellite cells, which are mitotically quiescent in mature muscle, but can be activated to produce myoblast progeny for muscle homeostasis, hypertrophy and repair. We have previously shown that satellite cell activation is partially controlled by the bioactive phospholipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and that S1P biosynthesis is required for muscle regeneration. Here we investigate the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) in regulating murine satellite cell function. S1PR3 levels were high in quiescent myogenic cells before falling during entry into cell cycle. Retrovirally-mediated constitutive expression of S1PR3 led to suppressed cell cycle progression in satellite cells, but did not overtly affect the myogenic program. Conversely, satellite cells isolated from S1PR3-null mice exhibited enhanced proliferation ex-vivo. In vivo, acute cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration was enhanced in S1PR3-null mice, with bigger muscle fibres compared to control mice. Importantly, genetically deleting S1PR3 in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy produced a less severe muscle dystrophic phenotype, than when signalling though S1PR3 was operational. In conclusion, signalling though S1PR3 suppresses cell cycle progression to regulate function in muscle satellite cells. PMID:23911934

  2. Induction of cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells by the dietary compound isoliquiritigenin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeo Myeong; Lim, Do Young; Choi, Hyun Ju; Jung, Jae In; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-02-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid chalcone that is present in licorice, shallot, and bean sprouts, is known to have antitumorigenic activities. The present study examined whether ISL alters prostate cancer cell cycle progression. DU145 human and MatLyLu (MLL) rat prostate cancer cells were cultured with various concentrations of ISL. In both DU145 and MLL cells treated with ISL, the percentage of cells in the G1 phase increased, and the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine decreased. ISL decreased the protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, whereas cyclin A and CDK2 expressions were unaltered in cells treated with ISL. The expression of the CDK inhibitor p27(KIP1) was increased in cells treated with 20 micromol/L ISL. In addition, treatment of cells with 20 micromol/L ISL for 24 hours led to G2/M cell cycle arrest. Cell division control (CDC) 2 protein levels remained unchanged. The protein levels of phospho-CDC2 (Tyr15) and cyclin B1 were increased, and the CDC25C level was decreased by ISL dose-dependently. We demonstrate that ISL promotes cell cycle arrest in DU145 and MLL cells, thereby providing insights into the mechanisms underlying its antitumorigenic activities. PMID:19298190

  3. Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid on Cell Cycle Pathways in Breast Cell Lines With Different Transformation Degree.

    PubMed

    Rescigno, Tania; Capasso, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice

    2016-06-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), abundant in fish, have been shown to affect development and progression of some types of cancer, including breast cancer. The aim of our study was to further analyze and clarify the effects of these nutrients on the molecular mechanisms underlying breast cancer. Following treatments with DHA we examined cell viability, death, cell cycle, and some molecular effects in breast cell lines with different transformation, phenotypic, and biochemical characteristics (MCF-10A, MCF-7, SK-BR-3, ZR-75-1). These investigations showed that DHA is able to affect cell viability, proliferation, and cell cycle progression in a different way in each assayed breast cell line. The activation of ERK1/2 and STAT3 pathways and the expression and/or activation of molecules involved in cell cycle regulation such as p21(Waf1/Cip1) and p53, are very differently regulated by DHA treatments in each cell model. DHA selectively: (i) arrests non tumoral MCF-10A breast cells in G0 /G1 cycle phase, activating p21(Waf1/Cip1) , and p53, (ii) induces to death highly transformed breast cells SK-BR-3, reducing ERK1/2 and STAT3 phosphorylation and (iii) only slightly affects each analyzed process in MCF-7 breast cell line with transformation degree lower than SK-BR-3 cells. These findings suggest a more relevant inhibitory role of DHA within early development and late progression of breast cancer cell transformation and a variable effect in the other phases, depending on individual molecular properties and degree of malignancy of each clinical case. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1226-1236, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26480024

  4. 5-ASA Affects Cell Cycle Progression in Colorectal Cells by Reversibly Activating a Replication Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANI, M. GLORIA; CAMPREGHER, CHRISTOPH; FORTUNE, JOHN M.; KUNKEL, THOMAS A.; GASCHE, CHRISTOPH

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease are at risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiologic, animal, and laboratory studies suggest that 5-amino-salicylic acid (5-ASA) protects from the development of CRC by altering cell cycle progression and by inducing apoptosis. Our previous results indicate that 5-ASA improves replication fidelity in colorectal cells, an effect that is active in reducing mutations. In this study, we hypothesized that 5-ASA restrains cell cycle progression by activating checkpoint pathways in colorectal cell lines, which would prevent tumor development and improve genomic stability. Methods CRC cells with different genetic backgrounds such as HT29, HCT116, HCT116p53−/−, HCT116+chr3, and LoVo were treated with 5-ASA for 2–96 hours. Cell cycle progression, phosphorylation, and DNA binding of cell cycle checkpoint proteins were analyzed. Results We found that 5-ASA at concentrations between 10 and 40 mmol/L affects cell cycle progression by inducing cells to accumulate in the S phase. This effect was independent of the hMLH1, hMSH2, and p53 status because it was observed to a similar extent in all cell lines under investigation. Moreover, wash-out experiments demonstrated reversibility within 48 hours. Although p53 did not have a causative role, p53 Ser15 was strongly phosphorylated. Proteins involved in the ATM-and-Rad3-related kinase (ATR)-dependent S-phase checkpoint response (Chk1 and Rad17) were also phosphorylated but not ataxia telengectasia mutated kinase. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that 5-ASA causes cells to reversibly accumulate in S phase and activate an ATR-dependent checkpoint. The activation of replication checkpoint may slow down DNA replication and improve DNA replication fidelity, which increases the maintenance of genomic stability and counteracts carcinogenesis. PMID:17241873

  5. Ghrelin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in cultured hippocampal neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyunju; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates the cellular proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which ghrelin regulates cell cycle progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ghrelin on cell cycle regulatory molecules in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Ghrelin treatment increased proliferation assessed by CCK-8 proliferation assay. The expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell division control 2, well-known cell-proliferating markers, were also increased by ghrelin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ghrelin promoted progression of cell cycle from G0/G1 to S phase, whereas this progression was attenuated by the pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Ghrelin-induced proliferative effect was associated with increased expression of E2F1 transcription factor in the nucleus, as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We also found that ghrelin caused an increase in protein levels of positive regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) protein levels were reduced when cell were exposed to ghrelin, suggesting downregulation of CDK inhibitors may contribute to proliferative effect of ghrelin. Our data suggest that ghrelin targets both cell cycle positive and negative regulators to stimulate proliferation of cultured hippocampal NSCs. PMID:27325242

  6. The cell cycle: A critical therapeutic target to prevent vascular proliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Thierry; Nili, Nafiseh; Strauss, Bradley H

    2006-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is the preferred revascularization approach for most patients with coronary artery disease. However, this strategy is limited by renarrowing of the vessel by neointimal hyperplasia within the stent lumen (in-stent restenosis). Vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation is a major component in this healing process. This process is mediated by multiple cytokines and growth factors, which share a common pathway in inducing cell proliferation: the cell cycle. The cell cycle is highly regulated by numerous mechanisms ensuring orderly and coordinated cell division. The present review discusses current concepts related to regulation of the cell cycle and new therapeutic options that target aspects of the cell cycle. PMID:16498512

  7. A genetic interaction map of cell cycle regulators

    PubMed Central

    Billmann, Maximilian; Horn, Thomas; Fischer, Bernd; Sandmann, Thomas; Huber, Wolfgang; Boutros, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach to screen for modulators of many cellular processes. However, resulting candidate gene lists from cell-based assays comprise diverse effectors, both direct and indirect, and further dissecting their functions can be challenging. Here we screened a genome-wide RNAi library for modulators of mitosis and cytokinesis in Drosophila S2 cells. The screen identified many previously known genes as well as modulators that have previously not been connected to cell cycle control. We then characterized ∼300 candidate modifiers further by genetic interaction analysis using double RNAi and a multiparametric, imaging-based assay. We found that analyzing cell cycle–relevant phenotypes increased the sensitivity for associating novel gene function. Genetic interaction maps based on mitotic index and nuclear size grouped candidates into known regulatory complexes of mitosis or cytokinesis, respectively, and predicted previously uncharacterized components of known processes. For example, we confirmed a role for the Drosophila CCR4 mRNA processing complex component l(2)NC136 during the mitotic exit. Our results show that the combination of genome-scale RNAi screening and genetic interaction analysis using process-directed phenotypes provides a powerful two-step approach to assigning components to specific pathways and complexes. PMID:26912791

  8. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE NUCLEOLUS DURING THE CHINESE HAMSTER CELL CYCLE

    PubMed Central

    Noel, J. S.; Dewey, W. C.; Abel, J. H.; Thompson, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Changes in the structure of the nucleolus during the cell cycle of the Chinese hamster cell in vitro were studied. Quantitative electron microscopic techniques were used to establish the size and volume changes in nucleolar structures. In mitosis, nucleolar remnants, "persistent nucleoli," consisting predominantly of ribosome-like granular material, and a granular coating on the chromosomes were observed. Persistent nucleoli were also observed in some daughter nuclei as they were leaving telophase and entering G1. During very early G1, a dense, fibrous material characteristic of interphase nucleoli was noted in the nucleoplasm of the cells. As the cells progressed through G1, a granular component appeared which was intimately associated with the fibrous material. By the middle of G1, complete, mature nucleoli were present. The nucleolar volume enlarged by a factor of two from the beginning of G1 to the middle of S primarily due to the accumulation of the granular component. During the G2 period, there was a dissolution or breakdown of the nucleolus prior to the entry of the cells into mitosis. Correlations between the quantitative aspects of this study and biochemical and cytochemical data available in the literature suggest the following: nucleolar reformation following division results from the activation of the nucleolar organizer regions which transcribe for RNA first appearing in association with protein as a fibrous component (45S RNA) and then later as a granular component (28S and 32S RNA). PMID:4933472

  9. Loratadine dysregulates cell cycle progression and enhances the effect of radiation in human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The histamine receptor-1 (H1)-antagonist, loratadine has been shown to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenografts in part due to cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Since this is a radiation sensitive phase of the cell cycle, we sought to determine if loratadine modifies radiosensitivity in several human tumor cell lines with emphasis on human colon carcinoma (HT29). Methods Cells were treated with several doses of loratadine at several time points before and after exposure to radiation. Radiation dose modifying factors (DMF) were determined using full radiation dose response survival curves. Cell cycle phase was determined by flow cytometry and the expression of the cell cycle-associated proteins Chk1, pChk1ser345, and Cyclin B was analyzed by western blot. Results Loratadine pre-treatment of exponentially growing cells (75 μM, 24 hours) increased radiation-induced cytotoxicity yielding a radiation DMF of 1.95. However, treatment of plateau phase cells also yielded a DMF of 1.3 suggesting that mechanisms other than cell cycle arrest also contribute to loratadine-mediated radiation modification. Like irradiation, loratadine initially induced G2/M arrest and activation of the cell-cycle associated protein Chk1 to pChk1ser345, however a subsequent decrease in expression of total Chk1 and Cyclin B correlated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint. Analysis of DNA repair enzyme expression and DNA fragmentation revealed a distinct pattern of DNA damage in loratadine-treated cells in addition to enhanced radiation-induced damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the observed effects of loratadine are multifactorial in that loratadine 1) directly damages DNA, 2) activates Chk1 thereby promoting G2/M arrest making cells more susceptible to radiation-induced DNA damage and, 3) downregulates total Chk1 and Cyclin B abrogating the radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint and allowing cells to re-enter the cell cycle despite the persistence of damaged DNA. Conclusions

  10. Cell death in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of senescence accelerated mouse (SAMP(8)).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yonghong; Lee, Cleo C L; Lam, W P; Wai, Maria S M; Rudd, John A; Yew, David T

    2007-10-01

    The cerebella of SAMP(8) (accelerated aging mouse) and SAMR(1) controls were analyzed by Western Blotting of tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase, as well as by TUNEL and histological silver staining. Both tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase levels were higher in SAMR(1) than in SAMP(8). There was also an age-related decrease in enzyme levels in SAMP(8), with the reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase being more apparent. Concomitantly, there was an age-related increase of apoptosis in the medial neocerebellum and the vermis as revealed by TUNEL, with changes being significant in the SAMP(8) strain. Histologically, some Purkinje cells appeared to disappear during aging. Taken together, the data suggests that the aging SAMP(8) strain displays differential Purkinje cell death in the medial cerebellum and that some of the dying cells are likely to be catecholaminergic. PMID:17415677

  11. CHD1L Regulates Cell Cycle, Apoptosis, and Migration in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaojun; Chen, Wenjuan; Wang, Donglin; Ban, Na; Fan, Shaochen; Shen, Chaoyan; Xia, Xiaojie; Ji, Bin; Wang, Yuchan

    2016-05-01

    Chromodomain helicase/ATPase DNA binding protein 1-like (CHD1L) gene is a newly identified oncogene located at Chr1q21 and it is amplified in many solid tumors. In this study, we intended to investigate the clinical significance of CHD1L expression in human glioma and its biological function in glioma cells. Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that CHD1L was overexpressed in glioma tissues and glioma cell lines. In addition, the expression level of CHD1L was positively correlated with glioma pathological grade and Ki-67 expression. Kaplan-Meier curve indicated that high expression of CHD1L may result in poor prognosis of glioma patients. Accordingly, suppression of CHD1L in glioma cells was shown to induce cell cycle arrest and increase apoptosis. In addition, knockdown of CHD1L significantly accelerated migration and invasion ability of glioma cells. Together our findings suggest that CHD1L is involved in the progression of glioma and may be a novel target for further therapy. PMID:26162969

  12. Eye Selector Logic for a Coordinated Cell Cycle Exit

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carla S.; Casares, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Organ-selector transcription factors control simultaneously cell differentiation and proliferation, ensuring the development of functional organs and their homeostasis. How this is achieved at the molecular level is still unclear. Here we have investigated how the transcriptional pulse of string/cdc25 (stg), the universal mitotic trigger, is regulated during Drosophila retina development as an example of coordinated deployment of differentiation and proliferation programs. We identify the eye specific stg enhancer, stg-FMW, and show that Pax6 selector genes, in cooperation with Eya and So, two members of the retinal determination network, activate stg-FMW, establishing a positive feed-forward loop. This loop is negatively modulated by the Meis1 protein, Hth. This regulatory logic is reminiscent of that controlling the expression of differentiation transcription factors. Our work shows that subjecting transcription factors and key cell cycle regulators to the same regulatory logic ensures the coupling between differentiation and proliferation programs during organ development. PMID:25695251

  13. Accelerated test program for sealed nickel-cadmium spacecraft batteries/cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was examined of inducing an accelerated test on sealed Nickel-Cadmium batteries or cells as a tool for spacecraft projects and battery users to determine: (1) the prediction of life capability; (2) a method of evaluating the effect of design and component changes in cells; and (3) a means of reducing time and cost of cell testing.

  14. Large Ground Level events in solar cycle 22 and some peculiarities of relativistic proton acceleration.

    PubMed

    Vashenyuk, E V; Miroshnichenko, L I; Sorokin, M O; Perez-Peraza, J; Gallegos, A

    1994-10-01

    Some of the Ground Level Enhancements of Solar Cosmic Rays (SCR) recorded by neutron monitors during solar cycle 22 are analyzed. The events appeared in series, and their occurrence rate in 1989-1991 was a factor of 4 larger than the average value (approximately equal to 1/yr) for the total observation interval (since 1942). The events of Sept. 29 and Oct. 24, 1989 proved to be the more intensive. The analyzed events show no peculiarities as to the distribution of the T1/2 parameter, whereas the shape of the profile of some events is notable for a two peak structure. The latter implies the possibility of a two component SCR ejection from two different sources in the solar atmosphere. For the event of Sep. 29 we have estimated the ejection rigidity spectrum of protons to be D solar (R) = (1-2) 10(32)R(-2.9) Gv-1 at R greater than or equal to 1 Gv. As to its proton flux, this event proved to be by 1-2 orders less intensive than the well known event of Feb. 23 1956. PMID:11540014

  15. Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 Modulates Programmed Cell DeathW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nan; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 (ACD2) modulates the amount of programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by Pseudomonas syringae and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) treatment. In vitro, ACD2 can reduce red chlorophyll catabolite, a chlorophyll derivative. We find that ACD2 shields root protoplasts that lack chlorophyll from light- and PPIX-induced PCD. Thus, chlorophyll catabolism is not obligatory for ACD2 anti-PCD function. Upon P. syringae infection, ACD2 levels and localization change in cells undergoing PCD and in their close neighbors. Thus, ACD2 shifts from being largely in chloroplasts to partitioning to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and, to a small extent, cytosol. ACD2 protects cells from PCD that requires the early mitochondrial oxidative burst. Later, the chloroplasts of dying cells generate NO, which only slightly affects cell viability. Finally, the mitochondria in dying cells have dramatically altered movements and cellular distribution. Overproduction of both ACD2 (localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts) and ascorbate peroxidase (localized to chloroplasts) greatly reduces P. syringae–induced PCD, suggesting a pro-PCD role for mitochondrial and chloroplast events. During infection, ACD2 may bind to and/or reduce PCD-inducing porphyrin-related molecules in mitochondria and possibly chloroplasts that generate reactive oxygen species, cause altered organelle behavior, and activate a cascade of PCD-inducing events. PMID:16387834

  16. Host cell kinases and the hepatitis C virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Lupberger, Joachim; Doerig, Christian; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection relies on virus-host interactions with human hepatocytes, a context in which host cell kinases play critical roles in every step of the HCV life cycle. During viral entry, cellular kinases, including EGFR, EphA2 and PKA, regulate the localization of host HCV entry factors and induce receptor complex assembly. Following virion internalization, viral genomes replicate on endoplasmic reticulum-derived membranous webs. The formation of membranous webs depends on interactions between the HCV NS5a protein and PI4KIIIα. The phosphorylation status of NS5a, regulated by PI4KIIIα, CKI and other kinases, also acts as a molecular switch to virion assembly, which takes place on lipid droplets. The formation of lipid droplets is enhanced by HCV activation of IKKα. In view of the multiple crucial steps in the viral life cycle that are mediated by host cell kinases, these enzymes also represent complementary targets for antiviral therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25896387

  17. Control of sleep by a network of cell cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Dinis J S; Machado, Daniel R; Koh, Kyunghee

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is essential for health and cognition, but the molecular and neural mechanisms of sleep regulation are not well understood. We recently reported the identification of TARANIS (TARA) as a sleep-promoting factor that acts in a previously unknown arousal center in Drosophila. tara mutants exhibit a dose-dependent reduction in sleep amount of up to ∼60%. TARA and its mammalian homologs, the Trip-Br (Transcriptional Regulators Interacting with PHD zinc fingers and/or Bromodomains) family of proteins, are primarily known as transcriptional coregulators involved in cell cycle progression, and contain a conserved Cyclin-A (CycA) binding homology domain. We found that tara and CycA synergistically promote sleep, and CycA levels are reduced in tara mutants. Additional data demonstrated that Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) antagonizes tara and CycA to promote wakefulness. Moreover, we identified a subset of CycA expressing neurons in the pars lateralis, a brain region proposed to be analogous to the mammalian hypothalamus, as an arousal center. In this Extra View article, we report further characterization of tara mutants and provide an extended discussion of our findings and future directions within the framework of a working model, in which a network of cell cycle genes, tara, CycA, and Cdk1, interact in an arousal center to regulate sleep. PMID:26925838

  18. Cell cycle regulation of a Xenopus Wee1-like kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, P R; Coleman, T R; Dunphy, W G

    1995-01-01

    Using a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy, we have isolated a gene encoding a Wee1-like kinase from Xenopus eggs. The recombinant Xenopus Wee1 protein efficiently phosphorylates Cdc2 exclusively on Tyr-15 in a cyclin-dependent manner. The addition of exogenous Wee1 protein to Xenopus cell cycle extracts results in a dose-dependent delay of mitotic initiation that is accompanied by enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of Cdc2. The activity of the Wee1 protein is highly regulated during the cell cycle: the interphase, underphosphorylated form of Wee1 (68 kDa) phosphorylates Cdc2 very efficiently, whereas the mitotic, hyperphosphorylated version (75 kDa) is weakly active as a Cdc2-specific tyrosine kinase. The down-modulation of Wee1 at mitosis is directly attributable to phosphorylation, since dephosphorylation with protein phosphatase 2A restores its kinase activity. During interphase, the activity of this Wee1 homolog does not vary in response to the presence of unreplicated DNA. The mitosis-specific phosphorylation of Wee1 is due to at least two distinct kinases: the Cdc2 protein and another activity (kinase X) that may correspond to an MPM-2 epitope kinase. These studies indicate that the down-regulation of Wee1-like kinase activity at mitosis is a multistep process that occurs after other biochemical reactions have signaled the successful completion of S phase. Images PMID:7749193

  19. Design considerations of a pair of power leads for fast-cycling superconducting accelerator magnets operating at 2 Tesla and 100 kA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuenian; Hays, Steven; Piekarz, Henryk; de Rijk, Gijsbert; Rossi, L.; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-08-01

    Recently proposed injector accelerator, Low Energy Ring (LER) for the LHC and fast cycling accelerators for the proton drivers (SF-SPS at CERN and DSF-MR at Fermilab) require that a new magnet technology be developed. In support of this accelerator program, a pair of power leads needs to be developed to close the loop between the power supply and accelerator system. The magnet proposed to be used will be a modified transmission line magnet technology that would allow for accelerator quality magnetic field sweep of 2 T/s. The transmission line conductor will be using HTS technology and cooled with supercritical helium at 5 K. The power leads consist of two sections; upper one is a copper and lower section will be using HTS tapes. The accelerator magnet will be ramped to 100 kA in a second and almost immediately ramped down to zero in one second. This paper outlines the design considerations for the power leads to meet the operational requirements for the accelerator system. The power leads thermal analysis during the magnet powering cycle will be included.

  20. RACK1 inhibits colonic cell growth by regulating Src activity at cell cycle checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Mamidipudi, V; Dhillon, N K; Parman, T; Miller, L D; Lee, K C; Cartwright, C A

    2007-05-01

    Previously, we showed that Src tyrosine kinases are activated early in the development of human colon cancer and are suppressed as intestinal cells differentiate. We identified RACK1 as an endogenous substrate, binding partner and inhibitor of Src. Here we show (by overexpressing RACK1, depleting Src or RACK1 and utilizing cell-permeable peptides that perturb RACK1's interaction with Src) that RACK1 regulates growth of colon cells by suppressing Src activity at G(1) and mitotic checkpoints, and consequently delaying cell cycle progression. Activated Src rescues RACK1-inhibited growth of HT-29 cells. Conversely, inhibiting Src abolishes growth promoted by RACK1 depletion in normal cells. Two potential mechanisms whereby RACK1 regulates mitotic exit are identified: suppression of Src-mediated Sam68 phosphorylation and maintenance of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 1-cyclin B complex in an active state. Our results reveal novel mechanisms of cell cycle control in G(1) and mitosis of colon cells. The significance of this work lies in the discovery of a mechanism by which the growth of colon cancer cells can be slowed, by RACK1 suppression of an oncogenic kinase at critical cell cycle checkpoints. Small molecules that mimic RACK1 function may provide a powerful new approach to the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:17072338

  1. The Analysis of Cell Cycle, Proliferation, and Asymmetric Cell Division by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Filby, Andrew; Day, William; Purewal, Sukhveer; Martinez-Martin, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Measuring cellular DNA content by conventional flow cytometry (CFC) and fluorescent DNA-binding dyes is a highly robust method for analysing cell cycle distributions within heterogeneous populations. However, any conclusions drawn from single-parameter DNA analysis alone can often be confounded by the asynchronous nature of cell proliferation. We have shown that by combining fluorescent DNA stains with proliferation tracking dyes and antigenic staining for mitotic cells one can elucidate the division history and cell cycle position of any cell within an asynchronously dividing population. Furthermore if one applies this panel to an imaging flow cytometry (IFC) system then the spatial information allows resolution of the four main mitotic phases and the ability to study molecular distributions within these populations. We have employed such an approach to study the prevalence of asymmetric cell division (ACD) within activated immune cells by measuring the distribution of key fate determining molecules across the plane of cytokinesis in a high-throughput, objective, and internally controlled manner. Moreover the ability to perform high-resolution, temporal dissection of the cell division process lends itself perfectly to investigating the influence chemotherapeutic agents exert on the proliferative capacity of transformed cell lines. Here we describe the method in detail and its application to both ACD and general cell cycle analysis. PMID:27460238

  2. GATA-3 regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and cell-cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chia-Jui; Hosoya, Tomonori; Maillard, Ivan; Engel, James Douglas

    2012-03-01

    Maintaining hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence is a critical property for the life-long generation of blood cells. Approximately 75% of cells in a highly enriched long-term repopulating HSC (LT-HSC) pool (Lin(-)Sca1(+)c-Kit(hi)CD150(+)CD48(-)) are quiescent, with only a small percentage of the LT-HSCs in cycle. Transcription factor GATA-3 is known to be vital for the development of T cells at multiple stages in the thymus and for Th2 differentiation in the peripheral organs. Although it is well documented that GATA-3 is expressed in HSCs, a role for GATA-3 in any prethymic progenitor cell has not been established. In the present study, we show that Gata3-null mutant mice generate fewer LT-HSCs and that fewer Gata3-null LT-HSCs are in cycle. Furthermore, Gata3 mutant hematopoietic progenitor cells fail to be recruited into an increased cycling state after 5-fluorouracil-induced myelosuppression. Therefore, GATA-3 is required for the maintenance of a normal number of LT-HSCs and for their entry into the cell cycle. PMID:22267605

  3. GATA-3 regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and cell-cycle entry

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chia-Jui; Hosoya, Tomonori; Maillard, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence is a critical property for the life-long generation of blood cells. Approximately 75% of cells in a highly enriched long-term repopulating HSC (LT-HSC) pool (Lin−Sca1+c-KithiCD150+CD48−) are quiescent, with only a small percentage of the LT-HSCs in cycle. Transcription factor GATA-3 is known to be vital for the development of T cells at multiple stages in the thymus and for Th2 differentiation in the peripheral organs. Although it is well documented that GATA-3 is expressed in HSCs, a role for GATA-3 in any prethymic progenitor cell has not been established. In the present study, we show that Gata3-null mutant mice generate fewer LT-HSCs and that fewer Gata3-null LT-HSCs are in cycle. Furthermore, Gata3 mutant hematopoietic progenitor cells fail to be recruited into an increased cycling state after 5-fluorouracil–induced myelosuppression. Therefore, GATA-3 is required for the maintenance of a normal number of LT-HSCs and for their entry into the cell cycle. PMID:22267605

  4. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs. PMID:25173649

  5. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J.; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth’s nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a−1 of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a−1 of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate. PMID:26621714

  6. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bettina; Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-12-15

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth's nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a(-1) of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a(-1) of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate. PMID:26621714

  7. [Variability of the duration of the cell cycle in pig embryo kidney cells in monolayer culture and correlation of the cycle duration in sister cells].

    PubMed

    Blokhin, A V; Voronkova, L N; Sakharov, V N

    1985-07-01

    The distribution of generation time of sister cells for the exponentially proliferating monolayer SPEV culture was obtained with time lapse cinemicrographic technique. The distribution is characterized by the average generation time equal to 24.3 hour, with the variation coefficient, asymmetry coefficient and correlation coefficient for sister pair cell being, respectively, 17%, 0.2 and 0.78. The results obtained are compared with the prediction of "a random transition" in the cell cycle. PMID:3901449

  8. Sparstolonin B Inhibits Pro-Angiogenic Functions and Blocks Cell Cycle Progression in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Henry R.; Liang, Qiaoli; Fan, Daping; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lessner, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Sparstolonin B (SsnB) is a novel bioactive compound isolated from Sparganium stoloniferum, an herb historically used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an anti-tumor agent. Angiogenesis, the process of new capillary formation from existing blood vessels, is dysregulated in many pathological disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, tumor growth, and atherosclerosis. In functional assays, SsnB inhibited endothelial cell tube formation (Matrigel method) and cell migration (Transwell method) in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) demonstrated differential expression of several hundred genes in response to SsnB exposure (916 and 356 genes, respectively, with fold change ≥2, p<0.05, unpaired t-test). Microarray data from both cell types showed significant overlap, including genes associated with cell proliferation and cell cycle. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis of HUVECs treated with SsnB showed an increase of cells in the G1 phase and a decrease of cells in the S phase. Cyclin E2 (CCNE2) and Cell division cycle 6 (CDC6) are regulatory proteins that control cell cycle progression through the G1/S checkpoint. Both CCNE2 and CDC6 were downregulated in the microarray data. Real Time quantitative PCR confirmed that gene expression of CCNE2 and CDC6 in HUVECs was downregulated after SsnB exposure, to 64% and 35% of controls, respectively. The data suggest that SsnB may exert its anti-angiogenic properties in part by downregulating CCNE2 and CDC6, halting progression through the G1/S checkpoint. In the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, SsnB caused significant reduction in capillary length and branching number relative to the vehicle control group. Overall, SsnB caused a significant reduction in angiogenesis (ANOVA, p<0.05), demonstrating its ex vivo efficacy. PMID:23940584

  9. Helicobacter pylori interferes with an embryonic stem cell micro RNA cluster to block cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs, post-transcriptional regulators of eukaryotic gene expression, are implicated in host defense against pathogens. Viruses and bacteria have evolved strategies that suppress microRNA functions, resulting in a sustainable infection. In this work we report that Helicobacter pylori, a human stomach-colonizing bacterium responsible for severe gastric inflammatory diseases and gastric cancers, downregulates an embryonic stem cell microRNA cluster in proliferating gastric epithelial cells to achieve cell cycle arrest. Results Using a deep sequencing approach in the AGS cell line, a widely used cell culture model to recapitulate early events of H. pylori infection of gastric mucosa, we reveal that hsa-miR-372 is the most abundant microRNA expressed in this cell line, where, together with hsa-miR-373, it promotes cell proliferation by silencing large tumor suppressor homolog 2 (LATS2) gene expression. Shortly after H. pylori infection, miR-372 and miR-373 synthesis is highly inhibited, leading to the post-transcriptional release of LATS2 expression and thus, to a cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition. This downregulation of a specific cell-cycle-regulating microRNA is dependent on the translocation of the bacterial effector CagA into the host cells, a mechanism highly associated with the development of severe atrophic gastritis and intestinal-type gastric carcinoma. Conclusions These data constitute a novel example of host-pathogen interplay involving microRNAs, and unveil the couple LATS2/miR-372 and miR-373 as an unexpected mechanism in infection-induced cell cycle arrest in proliferating gastric cells, which may be relevant in inhibition of gastric epithelium renewal, a major host defense mechanism against bacterial infections. PMID:22027184

  10. Sparstolonin B inhibits pro-angiogenic functions and blocks cell cycle progression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Henry R; Liang, Qiaoli; Fan, Daping; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lessner, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Sparstolonin B (SsnB) is a novel bioactive compound isolated from Sparganium stoloniferum, an herb historically used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an anti-tumor agent. Angiogenesis, the process of new capillary formation from existing blood vessels, is dysregulated in many pathological disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, tumor growth, and atherosclerosis. In functional assays, SsnB inhibited endothelial cell tube formation (Matrigel method) and cell migration (Transwell method) in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) demonstrated differential expression of several hundred genes in response to SsnB exposure (916 and 356 genes, respectively, with fold change ≥2, p<0.05, unpaired t-test). Microarray data from both cell types showed significant overlap, including genes associated with cell proliferation and cell cycle. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis of HUVECs treated with SsnB showed an increase of cells in the G1 phase and a decrease of cells in the S phase. Cyclin E2 (CCNE2) and Cell division cycle 6 (CDC6) are regulatory proteins that control cell cycle progression through the G1/S checkpoint. Both CCNE2 and CDC6 were downregulated in the microarray data. Real Time quantitative PCR confirmed that gene expression of CCNE2 and CDC6 in HUVECs was downregulated after SsnB exposure, to 64% and 35% of controls, respectively. The data suggest that SsnB may exert its anti-angiogenic properties in part by downregulating CCNE2 and CDC6, halting progression through the G1/S checkpoint. In the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, SsnB caused significant reduction in capillary length and branching number relative to the vehicle control group. Overall, SsnB caused a significant reduction in angiogenesis (ANOVA, p<0.05), demonstrating its ex vivo efficacy. PMID:23940584

  11. Monoterpenes inhibit cell growth, cell cycle progression, and cyclin D1 gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bardon, S; Picard, K; Martel, P

    1998-01-01

    Monoterpenes are found in the essential oils of many commonly consumed fruits and vegetables. These compounds have been shown to exert chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities in mammary tumor models and represent a new class of breast cancer therapeutic agents. In this study, we investigated the effects of limonene and limonene-related monoterpenes, perillyl alcohol and perillic acid, on cell growth, cell cycle progression, and expression of cyclin D1 cell cycle-regulatory gene in T-47D, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Our results revealed that limonene-related monoterpenes caused a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Of the three monoterpenes tested, perillyl alcohol was the most potent and limonene was the least potent inhibitor of cell growth. The enantiomeric composition of limonene and perillyl alcohol did not interfere with their effect on cell growth. Sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to monoterpenes was in the following order: T-47D > MCF-7 > MDA-MB-231. Growth inhibition induced by perillyl alcohol and perillic acid was associated with a fall in the proportion of cells in the S phase and an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Finally, we showed that the effects of limonene-related monoterpenes on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were preceded by a decrease in cyclin D1 mRNA levels. PMID:9824849

  12. Effects of flavonoids on the growth and cell cycle of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, S U; Ryu, S Y; Yoon, S K; Jung, N P; Park, S H; Kim, K H; Choi, E J; Lee, C O

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicities of flavone (F01), 3-hydroxyflavone (F02), 6- hydroxyflavone (F03), 7-hydroxyflavone (F04), 3,6-dihydroxyflavone (F05), 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (F06) and 5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone (F07) to human cancer cells including P- glycoprotein (Pgp)-expressing HCT15 cells and its multidrug resistant subline, HCT15/CL02 cells. We also examined the effects of those flavonoids on the cell cycle of these cancer cells. HCT15/CL02 cells did not reveal resistance to all the flavonoids tested in comparison with HCT15 cells. In cell cycle analysis, all the flavonoids tested, except F01 and F04, reduced the G0/G1 population of SF295 cells at growth inhibitory concentrations, and increased G2/M (F02, F03 and F06) or S (F05 and F07) populations. In addition, F02 and F03 decreased the G2/M and G0/G1 population, and increased the S and G2/M population in HCT15 cells, respectively. Meanwhile, in HCT15/CL02 cells, F02 and F03 decreased the G0/G1 populations and increased the S population. In conclusion, we deemed that the flavonoids tested had diverse cytotoxic mechanisms, and exerted their cell growth inhibitory or killing activity by distinctive ways in different cells. PMID:10697540

  13. Cycle life test and failure model of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six ampere hour individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were charge/discharge cycled to failure. Failure as used here is defined to occur when the end of discharge voltage degraded to 0.9 volts. They were cycled under a low earth orbit cycle regime to a deep depth of discharge (80 percent of rated ampere hour capacity). Both cell designs were fabricated by the same manufacturer and represent current state of the art. A failure model was advanced which suggests both cell designs have inadequate volume tolerance characteristics. The limited existing data base at a deep depth of discharge (DOD) was expanded. Two cells of each design were cycled. One COMSAT cell failed at cycle 1712 and the other failed at cycle 1875. For the Air Force/Hughes cells, one cell failed at cycle 2250 and the other failed at cycle 2638. All cells, of both designs, failed due to low end of discharge voltage (0.9 volts). No cell failed due to electrical shorts. After cell failure, three different reconditioning tests (deep discharge, physical reorientation, and open circuit voltage stand) were conducted on all cells of each design. A fourth reconditioning test (electrolyte addition) was conducted on one cell of each design. In addition post cycle cell teardown and failure analysis were performed on the one cell of each design which did not have electrolyte added after failure.

  14. Cycle life test and failure model of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six ampere hour individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were charge/discharge cycled to failure. Failure as used here is defined to occur when the end of discharge voltage degraded to 0.9 volts. They were cycled under a low earth orbit cycle regime to a deep depth of discharge (80 percent of rated ampere hour capacity). Both cell designs were fabricated by the same manufacturer and represent current state of the art. A failure model was advanced which suggests both cell designs have inadequate volume tolerance characteristics. The limited existing data base at a deep depth of discharge (DOD) was expanded. Two cells of each design were cycled. One COMSAT cell failed at cycle 1712 and the other failed at cycle 1875. For the Air Force/Hughes cells, one cell failed at cycle 2250 and the other failed at cycle 2638. All cells, of both designs, failed due to low end of discharge voltage (0.9 volts). No cell failed due to electrical shorts. After cell failure, three different reconditioning tests (deep discharge, physical reorientation, and open circuit voltage stand) were conducted on all cells of each design. A fourth reconditioning test (electrolyte addition) was conducted on one cell of each design. In addition post cycle cell teardown and failure analysis were performed on the one cell of each design which did not have electrolyte added after failure. Previously announced in STAR as N83-25038

  15. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or

  16. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Chandramu; Dontula, Ranadheer; Gujrati, Meena; Lakka, Sajani S.

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  17. Effects of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts Iscador on cell cycle and survival of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Harmsma, Marjan; Ummelen, Monique; Dignef, Wendy; Tusenius, Karel Jan; Ramaekers, Frans C S

    2006-06-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms by which mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts exert cytotoxic and immunomodulatory anti-tumoral effects are largely unknown. In this study the hypothesis that Iscador preparations induce tumor regression by cell cycle inhibition and/or interference with apoptotic signaling pathways in cancer cells was investigated. Also a possible effect on angiogenesis, which is a prerequisite for tumor growth in vivo, is studied in endothelial cell cultures. Furthermore, it was examined which apoptotic signaling route(s) is (are) activated by Iscador by studying specific pro-apoptotic proteins in cultured cells. To characterize these properties, 9 human cancer cell lines of different origin, one epidermis derived cell line and 2 endothelial cell cultures were incubated with different concentrations of Iscador Quercus Spezial and Iscador Malus Spezial. Cell cycle kinetic parameters were measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse labeling and tubulin staining. Apoptotic responses were detected by M30 Cyto-Death or Annexin V/propidium iodide assays. Characterization of the apoptotic pathway(s) was performed by staining cells for amongst others active caspase 3 and cytochrome C (mitochondrial pathway), as well as active caspase 8 (death receptor pathway). The sensitivity to Iscador treatment varies strongly between different cell lines and also ing those derived from small cell lung cancer, and adenocarcinoma of the lung and breast, as well as endothelial cell cultures, Iscador caused early cell cycle inhibition followed by apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Amongst the low responders are cell lines derived from colorectal carcinoma. In general Iscador Malus exerted a stronger response than Iscador Quercus. Apoptosis was induced by activating the mitochondrial but not the death receptor dependent pathway, at least in case of Iscador Quercus. Iscador Malus also seemed to induce apoptosis via the death receptor route, which may explain the

  18. Cell cycling and patterned cell proliferation in the Drosophila wing during metamorphosis.

    PubMed Central

    Milán, M; Campuzano, S; García-Bellido, A

    1996-01-01

    In metamorphosing wing discs, progression through the cell cycle takes place, as in larval discs, in nonclonally derived clusters of cells synchronized in the same cell cycle stage. Contrary to early discs, there are temporal and spatial heterogeneities in cell proliferation associated with wing margin, vein, intervein, and middle intervein territories. Within these territories, there are no indications of a wave progression of the cell cycle. Mitotic orientations are, as in early discs, at random but there is a preferential allocation of postmitotic cells along the proximodistal axis, thus explaining the elongated shape of the resulting clones along this axis. Shapes of clones in mature discs and in evaginated wings are similar, thus excluding major morphogenetic movements during evagination. After the proliferative period, all the cells are arrested in G1 phase. The final number of cells of the wing is fixed independently of experimental perturbations that alter the cell division schedule. These results are discussed in the context of a model of wing morphogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8876197

  19. Cell cycle progression in glioblastoma cells is unaffected by pathophysiological levels of hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Rosalie; Jenkinson, Michael D.; Haylock, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is associated with the increased malignancy of a broad range of solid tumours. While very severe hypoxia has been widely shown to induce cell cycle arrest, the impact of pathophysiological hypoxia on tumour cell proliferation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different oxygen levels on glioblastoma (GBM) cell proliferation and survival. GBM is an extremely aggressive brain tumour with a heterogeneous oxygenation pattern. The effects of a range of oxygen tensions on GBM cell lines and primary cells were assessed using flow cytometry. Results indicate that cell cycle distribution and viability are unaffected by long term exposure (24–96 h) to pathophysiological levels of oxygen (1–8% O2). Both transient cell cycle arrest and small amounts of cell death could only be detected when cells were exposed to severe hypoxia (0.1% O2). No significant changes in p21 protein expression levels were detected. These findings reinforce the importance of using physiologically relevant oxygen tensions when investigating tumour hypoxia, and help to explain how solid tumours can be both hypoxic and highly proliferative, as is the case with GBM. PMID:26966676

  20. Cell-cycle quiescence maintains Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells independent of GLP-1/Notch

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Hannah S; Kimble, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Many types of adult stem cells exist in a state of cell-cycle quiescence, yet it has remained unclear whether quiescence plays a role in maintaining the stem cell fate. Here we establish the adult germline of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for facultative stem cell quiescence. We find that mitotically dividing germ cells—including germline stem cells—become quiescent in the absence of food. This quiescence is characterized by a slowing of S phase, a block to M-phase entry, and the ability to re-enter M phase rapidly in response to re-feeding. Further, we demonstrate that cell-cycle quiescence alters the genetic requirements for stem cell maintenance: The signaling pathway required for stem cell maintenance under fed conditions—GLP-1/Notch signaling—becomes dispensable under conditions of quiescence. Thus, cell-cycle quiescence can itself maintain stem cells, independent of the signaling pathway otherwise essential for such maintenance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10832.001 PMID:26551561

  1. Effect of mouse Sim2 gene on the cell cycle of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianfang; Shi, Jing; Peng, Bin; Zou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Chun

    2006-04-01

    Sim2 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome (DS). To observe the effect of mouse Sim2 (mSim2) on the cell cycle of PC12 cells in vitro and explore the role of Sim2 in the pathogenesis of DS, we cloned the full open reading frame of mSim2 into the pcDNA3 vector and transfected it into PC12 cells, before analysing the effect of mSim2 on the cell cycle. A eukaryotic expression vector of mSim2 (pcDNA3-mSim2) was successfully constructed. There was notable expression of mSim2 mRNA in the cells transfected with pcDNA3-Sim2. Flow cytometry showed that there were more cells in G(0)/G(1) phase in the Sim2-transfected cells than that in the controls (P < 0.01), and significantly fewer in G(2)/M phase (P < 0.01). The mRNA and protein expressions of cyclin E decreased in the Sim2-transfected cells, while p27 expression increased significantly (P < 0.01). It is concluded that Sim2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of DS by inhibiting the cell cycle, which is related to the decreased expression of cyclin E and increased expression of p27. PMID:16530433

  2. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    SciTech Connect

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  3. The Yeast Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Routes Carbon Fluxes to Fuel Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Jennifer C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-05-19

    Cell division entails a sequence of processes whose specific demands for biosynthetic precursors and energy place dynamic requirements on metabolism. However, little is known about how metabolic fluxes are coordinated with the cell division cycle. Here, we examine budding yeast to show that more than half of all measured metabolites change significantly through the cell division cycle. Cell cycle-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism are controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), a major cell cycle regulator, and the metabolic regulator protein kinase A. At the G1/S transition, Cdk1 phosphorylates and activates the enzyme Nth1, which funnels the storage carbohydrate trehalose into central carbon metabolism. Trehalose utilization fuels anabolic processes required to reliably complete cell division. Thus, the cell cycle entrains carbon metabolism to fuel biosynthesis. Because the oscillation of Cdk activity is a conserved feature of the eukaryotic cell cycle, we anticipate its frequent use in dynamically regulating metabolism for efficient proliferation. PMID:27203178

  4. Characterization of cell cycle events during the onset of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, P M; Errington, J

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the process of asymmetric division during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis, we have measured changes in cell cycle parameters during the transition from vegetative growth to sporulation. Because the propensity of B. subtilis to grow in chains of cells precludes the use of automated cell-scanning devices, we have developed a fluorescence microscopic method for analyzing cell cycle parameters in individual cells. From the results obtained, and measurements of DNA replication fork elongation rates and the escape time of sporulation from the inhibition of DNA replication, we have derived a detailed time scale for the early morphological events of sporulation which is mainly consistent with the cell cycle changes expected following nutritional downshift. The previously postulated sensitive stage in the DNA replication cycle, beyond which the cell is unable to sporulate without a new cell cycle, could represent a point in the division cycle at which the starved cell cannot avoid attaining the initiation mass for DNA replication and thus embarking on another round of the cell cycle. The final cell cycle event, formation of the asymmetric spore septum, occurs at about the time in the cell cycle at which the uninduced cell would have divided centrally, in keeping with the view that spore septation is a modified version of vegetative division. PMID:7608062

  5. Niclosamide inhibits the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cell lines by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Li, Zonghuan; Yu, Yifeng; Sun, Shaoxing; Qi, Baiwen; Wang, Weiyang; Yu, Aixi

    2015-04-01

    Niclosamide, used as an antihelminthic, has demonstrated some properties of anticancer effects. However, its role in osteosarcoma remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of niclosamide on human osteosarcoma cell lines. The human MG-63 and U2OS osteosarcoma cell lines were treated with different concentrations of niclosamide. The cell inhibitory rate was calculated by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. Cell apoptosis was determined by Hoechst 33324 staining, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscope, respectively. The expression of bcl-2, bax and pro-caspase-3 were measured by western blotting. Niclosamide exerted an inhibitory effect on the two cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Niclosamide was found to induce the arrest of S and G2/M phase in U2OS cells and G2/M in MG-63 cells. Moreover, niclosamide induced apoptosis in MG-63 and U2OS cells. The bax/bcl-2 ratio increased while the expression of pro‑caspase-3 decreased significantly in the two cell lines. The results indicated that niclosamide inhibits proliferation, and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human osteosarcoma cell lines. PMID:25634333

  6. Human-chimpanzee differences in a FZD8 enhancer alter cell-cycle dynamics in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Boyd, J Lomax; Skove, Stephanie L; Rouanet, Jeremy P; Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Bepler, Tristan; Gordân, Raluca; Wray, Gregory A; Silver, Debra L

    2015-03-16

    The human neocortex differs from that of other great apes in several notable regards, including altered cell cycle, prolonged corticogenesis, and increased size [1-5]. Although these evolutionary changes most likely contributed to the origin of distinctively human cognitive faculties, their genetic basis remains almost entirely unknown. Highly conserved non-coding regions showing rapid sequence changes along the human lineage are candidate loci for the development and evolution of uniquely human traits. Several studies have identified human-accelerated enhancers [6-14], but none have linked an expression difference to a specific organismal trait. Here we report the discovery of a human-accelerated regulatory enhancer (HARE5) of FZD8, a receptor of the Wnt pathway implicated in brain development and size [15, 16]. Using transgenic mice, we demonstrate dramatic differences in human and chimpanzee HARE5 activity, with human HARE5 driving early and robust expression at the onset of corticogenesis. Similar to HARE5 activity, FZD8 is expressed in neural progenitors of the developing neocortex [17-19]. Chromosome conformation capture assays reveal that HARE5 physically and specifically contacts the core Fzd8 promoter in the mouse embryonic neocortex. To assess the phenotypic consequences of HARE5 activity, we generated transgenic mice in which Fzd8 expression is under control of orthologous enhancers (Pt-HARE5::Fzd8 and Hs-HARE5::Fzd8). In comparison to Pt-HARE5::Fzd8, Hs-HARE5::Fzd8 mice showed marked acceleration of neural progenitor cell cycle and increased brain size. Changes in HARE5 function unique to humans thus alter the cell-cycle dynamics of a critical population of stem cells during corticogenesis and may underlie some distinctive anatomical features of the human brain. PMID:25702574

  7. Cellulose Synthesis Is Coupled to Cell Cycle Progression at G1 in the Dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Alvin C.M.; Wong, Joseph T.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Cellulosic deposition in alveolar vesicles forms the “internal cell wall” in thecated dinoflagellates. The availability of synchronized single cells, the lack of secondary deposition, and the absence of cellulosic cell plates at division facilitate investigation of the possible roles of cellulose synthesis (CS) in the entire cell cycle. Flow cytograms of cellulosic contents revealed a stepwise process of CS in the dinoflagellate cell cycle, with the highest rate occurring at G1. A cell cycle delay in G1, but not G2/M, was observed after inhibition of CS. A cell cycle inhibitor of G1/S, but not G2/M, was able to delay cell cycle progression with a corresponding reduction of CS. The increase of cellulose content in the cell cycle corresponded well to the expected increase of surface area. No differences were observed in the cellulose to surface area ratio between normal and fast-growing G1 cells, implicating the significance of surface area in linking CS to the coupling of cell growth with cell cycle progression. The coupling of CS to G1 implicates a novel link between CS and cell cycle control, and we postulate that the coupling mechanism might integrate cell wall integrity to the cell size checkpoint. PMID:12692327

  8. PGC-1α regulates the cell cycle through ATP and ROS in CH1 cells* #

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xu-feng; Yao, Kun; Du, Xing; Li, Yan; Yang, Xiu-yu; Yu, Min; Li, Mei-zhang; Cui, Qing-hua

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional co-activator involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, respiratory capacity, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). PGC-1α plays an important role in cellular metabolism and is associated with tumorigenesis, suggesting an involvement in cell cycle progression. However, the underlying mechanisms mediating its involvement in these processes remain unclear. To elucidate the signaling pathways involved in PGC-1α function, we established a cell line, CH1 PGC-1α, which stably overexpresses PGC-1α. Using this cell line, we found that over-expression of PGC-1α stimulated extra adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These effects were accompanied by up-regulation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulators CyclinD1 and CyclinB1. We hypothesized that ATP and ROS function as cellular signals to regulate cyclins and control cell cycle progression. Indeed, we found that reduction of ATP levels down-regulated CyclinD1 but not CyclinB1, whereas elevation of ROS levels down-regulated CyclinB1 but not CyclinD1. Furthermore, both low ATP levels and elevated ROS levels inhibited cell growth, but PGC-1α was maintained at a constant level. Together, these results demonstrate that PGC-1α regulates cell cycle progression through modulation of CyclinD1 and CyclinB1 by ATP and ROS. These findings suggest that PGC-1α potentially coordinates energy metabolism together with the cell cycle. PMID:26834014

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. Methods The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. Results The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Conclusions Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma. PMID:23915425

  10. Initiation of stem cell differentiation involves