Science.gov

Sample records for accelerated cleanup plan

  1. Development and Use of Life-Cycle Analysis Capabilites To Evaluate, Select, and Implement Plans to Accelerate Hanford Site Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, Michael R.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Frey, Jeffrey A.

    2004-02-28

    Over the past year the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made significant progress in developing and executing plans to transform and accelerate cleanup of the Hanford Site. Notable progress has been in the cleanup of the River Corridor, including the relocation of spent nuclear fuel to the Central Plateau, and the stabilization of plutonium materials. However, difficult work still remains. DOE has already accelerated the completion of the Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission from 2070 to 2035 and believes its completion can be achieved even sooner by reducing excess conservatism, substantively changing technical strategy and management approach, and making new front-end investments. Work is well under way in the detailed planning, analyses and decision making required to implement and support the execution of the accelerated cleanup program at Hanford. Various cleanup, contract, and regulatory approaches are being explored. DOE has instituted a process that allows DOE to efficiently explore and test alternative cleanup approaches using a life-cycle model. This paper provides a means to share the planning approach and the life-cycle modeling and analysis tools used with other sites and interested parties. This paper will be of particular interest to analysts performing similar planning and evaluations at other sites as well as provide insight into the current status of Hanford’s cleanup program and DOE’s plans for the future.

  2. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.

    1998-06-30

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

  3. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

  4. Accelerated cleanup risk reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.B.; Aines, R.M.; Blake, R.G.; Copeland, A.B.; Newmark, R.L.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1998-02-01

    There is no proven technology for remediating contaminant plume source regions in a heterogeneous subsurface. This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop the requisite new technologies so that will be rapidly accepted by the remediation community. Our technology focus is hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) which is a novel in situ thermal technique. We have expanded this core technology to leverage the action of steam injection and place an in situ microbial filter downstream to intercept and destroy the accelerated movement of contaminated groundwater. Most contaminant plume source regions, including the chlorinated solvent plume at LLNL, are in subsurface media characterized by a wide range in hydraulic conductivity. At LLNL, the main conduits for contaminant transport are buried stream channels composed of gravels and sands; these have a hydraulic conductivity in the range of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -2} cm/s. Clay and silt units with a hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -6} cm/s bound these buried channels; these are barriers to groundwater movement and contain the highest contaminant concentrations in the source region. New remediation technologies are required because the current ones preferentially access the high conductivity units. HPO is an innovative process for the in situ destruction of contaminants in the entire subsurface. It operates by the injection of steam. We have demonstrated in laboratory experiments that many contaminants rapidly oxidize to harmless compounds at temperatures easily achieved by injecting steam, provided sufficient dissolved oxygen is present. One important challenge in a heterogeneous source region is getting heat, contaminants, and an oxidizing agent in the same place at the same time. We have used the NUFT computer program to simulate the cyclic injection of steam into a contaminated aquifer for design of a field demonstration. We used an 8 hour, steam/oxygen injection cycle followed by a 56 hour relaxation

  5. Army Environmental Cleanup Strategic Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Serves an enduring document to guide future strategic plans – Establishes ISO 14001 framework for cleanup; complies w/GPRA  Army Environmental...follow ISO 14001 – Plan - Complete the FY10-11 Strategic Plan – Do - Implement Activities According to the Plan – Check - Evaluate Progress Against the

  6. EPA proposes St. Regis Paper Co. Cleanup Plan, accepting comments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For Immediate Release No.16-OPA006 EPA proposes St. Regis Paper Co. Cleanup Plan; accepting comments CHICAGO (March 30, 2016) -- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is issuing a proposed plan to clean up soil contamin

  7. Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites

    SciTech Connect

    S. J. Nacht

    2000-02-01

    The Sectored Clean-up Work Plan (SCWP) replaces the Housekeeping Category Corrective Action Unit Work Plan and provides a strategy to be used for conducting housekeeping activities using a sectored clean-up approach. This work plan provides a process by which one or more existing housekeeping category Corrective Action Sites (CASS) from the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and/or non-FFACO designated waste site(s) are grouped into a sector for simultaneous remediation and cleanup. This increases effectiveness and efficiencies in labor, materials, equipment, cost, and time. This plan is an effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to expedite work in a more organized and efficient approach. The objectives of this plan are to: Group housekeeping FFACO CASS and non-FFACO housekeeping sites into sectors and remediate during the same field visit; Provide consistent documentation on FFACO CAS and non-FFACO clean-up activities; Perform similar activities under one approved document; Remediate areas inside the Deactivation and Decommissioning facilities and compounds in a campaign-style remediation; and Increase efficiencies and cost-effectiveness, accelerate cleanups, reduce mobilization, demobilization, and remediation costs.

  8. Preparing a base realignment and closure cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect

    Diecidue, A.M.; Bandrowsky, M.; Wooldridge, P.

    1994-12-31

    Every Department of Defense (DoD) installation subject to closure or realignment is evaluating and implementing strategies for environmental response actions to facilitate the transfer of real property at the installation. The closure and realignment process is conducted pursuant to the Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-526, 102 Stat. 2623) (BRAC 88) or the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-510, 104 Stat. 1808) (BRAC 91, 93, and 95). On July 2, 1993, the President announced a five-part program to speed the economic recovery of communities where military bases are slated to close. DoD subsequently issued a policy memorandum on September 9, 1993 that provides guidance on implementing ``fast-track`` cleanup initiatives at those bases. The guidance introduces the use of BRAC cleanup teams (BCT) and the development of BRAC cleanup plans (BCP) as part of fast-track cleanup. The BCT is responsible for developing the BCP. The BCP serves as the road map for expeditious cleanup. This paper will focus on two areas: forming and working with the BCT and preparing the BCP. The paper will discuss the make-up of the BCT and how to build trust and achieve early consensus on the many issues to be addressed by the BCT. The paper also will discuss tips for forming the BCT and preparing the BCP based on the authors` experiences.

  9. NRC plan for cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, R.; Snyder, B.

    1982-02-01

    This NRC Plan, which defines NRC's functional role in cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 and outlines NRC's regulatory responsibilities in fulfilling this role, is the first revision to the initial plan issued in July 1980 (NUREG-0698). Since 1980, a number of policy developments have occurred which will have an impact on the course of cleanup operations. This revision reflects these developments in the area of NRC's review and approval process with regard to cleanup operations as well as NRC's interface with the Department of Energy's involvement in the cleanup and waste disposal. This revision is also intended to update the cleanup schedule by presenting the cleanup progress that has taken place and NRC's role in ongoing and future cleanup activities.

  10. NRC plan for cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2. Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Masnik, M.T.; Snyder, B.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report updates a plan that defines NRC's role in cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) and outlines NRC's regulatory responsibilities in fulfilling this role. These responsibilities include reviewing and approving General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation (the licensee) proposals for cleanup actions, overseeing the licensee's implementation of approved activities, coordinating wih other federal and state governmental agencies on their activities in the cleanup, and informing local officials and the public about the status of the cleanup. Since the initial issuance of this NRC Plan in July 1980, this office has issued the Final NRC Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) related to the entire TMI-2 cleanup and a draft Supplement to the PEIS related to occupational radiation exposure. Additionally, a number of developments have occurred which will have an impact on the course of cleanup operations. This revision provides a discussion of these developments, specifically in the areas of the functinal role of the NRC in cleanup operations, the cleanup schedule, and the current status of the cleanup. The plan also discusses NRC's perceived role in future cleanup activities.

  11. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  12. From Cleanup to Stewardship. A companion report to Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure and background information to support the scoping process required for the 1998 PEIS Settlement Study

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-10-01

    Long-term stewardship is expected to be needed at more than 100 DOE sites after DOE's Environmental Management program completes disposal, stabilization, and restoration operations to address waste and contamination resulting from nuclear research and nuclear weapons production conducted over the past 50 years. From Cleanup to stewardship provides background information on the Department of Energy (DOE) long-term stewardship obligations and activities. This document begins to examine the transition from cleanup to long-term stewardship, and it fulfills the Secretary's commitment to the President in the 1999 Performance Agreement to provide a companion report to the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure report. It also provides background information to support the scoping process required for a study on long-term stewardship required by a 1998 Settlement Agreement.

  13. Integrated Planning for Cleanup of Bethel Valley and Revitalization of the ORNL Main Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S. D.; Myrick, T. E.; Eidam, G. R.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the efforts currently underway to integrate the planning for, and performance of, the cleanup and modernization of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). UT-Battelle, LLC, is the DOE Office of Science (SC) contractor responsible for ORNL Operations and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, is the DOE Environmental Management (EM) contractor responsible for cleanup of the ORNL site. The two companies are working together to address the 50+ year old ORNL contamination legacy while new facilities for the next 50 years of ORNL operation are being built. These joint efforts have accomplished a number of ''early cleanup actions'' that have significantly reduced the current risk from legacy contamination, are securing approval for cleanup of the ORNL main plant area, and, at the same time, have launched the ORNL modernization efforts.

  14. EPA Revises Final Cleanup Plan for Ringwood Mines Superfund Site in Ringwood, New Jersey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has determined that the Borough of Ringwood has satisfied the criteria specified in EPA's June 30, 2014 final cleanup plan for the Ringwood Mines Superfund site that allows for a recycling center to

  15. EPA Issues Final Cleanup Plan for the Housatonic River Rest of River Project in Western Mass. and Conn.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued its final decision on its Rest of River permit, which outlines a final cleanup plan for a 125 mile stretch of the Housatonic River from Pittsfield, Mass. through Connecticut.

  16. EPA Finalizes $9 Million Interim Cleanup Plan for Expanded Area at CTS of Asheville Inc. Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has selected an interim cleanup plan to address contamination beneath the former plant at the CTS of Asheville Inc. Superfund Site. The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality concurred w

  17. EPA Finalizes $4 Million Cleanup Plan for Fulton Avenue Superfund Site in Hempstead and North Hempstead, N.Y.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has finalized its decision to modify an interim cleanup plan originally issued in 2007 to address a portion of the contaminated groundwater at the Fulton Avenue Superfund site in the Towns of North

  18. EPA issues cleanup plan for former McClellan Air Force Base

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today issued a cleanup decision for a large area of the McClellan Air Force Base Superfund site in Sacramento, California. EPA's Record of Decision selects cleanup actions for contaminated soils acro

  19. Improvement Plans of Fermilab's Proton Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The flagship of Fermilab's long term research program is the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), located Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, which will study neutrino oscillations with a baseline of 1300 km. The neutrinos will be produced in the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a proposed new beam line from Fermilab's Main Injector. The physics goals of the DUNE require a proton beam with a power of some 2.4 MW at 120 GeV, which is roughly four times the current maximum power. Here I discuss current performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex, our plans for construction of the SRF proton linac as key part of the Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II), outline the main challenges toward multi-MW beam power operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex and the staged plan to achieve the required performance over the next 15 years.

  20. HARVESTING EMSP RESEARCH RESULTS FOR WASTE CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, Donna Post; Nielson, R. Bruce; Phillips, Ann Marie; Lebow, Scott

    2003-02-27

    The extent of environmental contamination created by the nuclear weapons legacy combined with expensive, ineffective waste cleanup strategies at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites prompted Congress to pass the FY96 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which directed the DOE to: ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research, which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs'', ''develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and'' ''seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective.'' In response, the DOE initiated the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP)-a targeted, long-term research program intended to produce solutions to DOE's most pressing environmental problems. EMSP funds basic research to lower cleanup cost and reduce risk to workers, the public, and the environment; direct the nation's scientific infrastructure towards cleanup of contaminated waste sites; and bridge the gap between fundamental research and technology development activities. EMSP research projects are competitively awarded based on the project's scientific, merit coupled with relevance to addressing DOE site needs. This paper describes selected EMSP research projects with long, mid, and short-term deployment potential and discusses the impacts, focus, and results of the research. Results of EMSP research are intended to accelerate cleanup schedules, reduce cost or risk for current baselines, provide alternatives for contingency planning, or provide solutions to problems where no solutions exist.

  1. Achieving Accelerated Cleanup of Cesium Contaminated Stream at the Savannah River Site; Collaboration between Stakeholders, Regulators, and the Federal Government - 13182

    SciTech Connect

    Bergren, Chris; Flora, Mary; Socha, Ron; Burch, Joseph; Freeman, Candice; Hennessey, Brian

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina that contains six primary stream/river systems. The Lower Three Runs Stream (LTR) is one of the primary streams within the site that is located in the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site and is a large black water stream system that originates in the northeast portion of SRS and follows a southerly direction before it enters the Savannah River. During reactor operations, secondary reactor cooling water, storm sewer discharges, and miscellaneous wastewater was discharged and contaminated a 36 kilometer stretch of Lower Three Runs Stream that narrows providing a limited buffer of US DOE property along the stream and flood plain. Based on data collected during 2009 and 2010 under Recover Act Funding, the stream was determined to be contaminated with cesium-137 at levels that exceeded acceptable risk based limits. As efficiencies were realized within the SRS Recovery Act Program, funding was made available to design, permit and execute remediation of the LTR. This accelerated Project allowed for the remediation of 36 kilometers of LTR in only nine months from inception to completion, contributing significantly to the Foot Print Reduction of SRS. The scope consisted of excavation and disposal of more than 2064 cubic meters of contaminated soil, and installing 11 kilometers of fence and 2,000 signs at 1000 locations. Confirmatory sampling and analysis, and radiological surveying were performed demonstrating that soil concentrations met the cleanup goals. The project completed with a very good safety record considering the harsh conditions including, excessive rain in the early stages of the project, high summer temperatures, swampy terrain, snakes, wild boar, insects and dense vegetation. The regulatory approval process was compressed by over 75% and required significant efforts from SRS

  2. Project X Accelerator R&D Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-01-31

    Project X is a high intensity proton facility conceived to support a world-leading program in neutrino and flavor physics over the next two decades at Fermilab. Project X is an integral part of the Fermilab Roadmap as described in the Fermilab Steering Group Report. Project X is based on an 8 GeV superconducting H-linac, paired with the existing (but modified) Main Injector and Recycler Ring, to provide in excess of 2 MW of beam power throughout the energy range 60-120 GeV, simultaneous with at least 100 kW of beam power at 8 GeV. The linac utilizes technology in common with the ILC over the energy range 0.6-8.0 GeV. Beam current parameters can be made identical to ILC resulting in identical rf generation and distribution systems. This alignment of ILC and Project X technologies allows for a shared development effort. The initial 0.6 GeV of the linac draws heavily on technology developed by Argonne National Laboratory for a facility for rare isotope beams. It is anticipated that the exact configuration and operating parameters of the linac will be defined through the R&D program and will retain alignment with the ILC plan as it evolves over this period. Utilization of the Recycler Ring as an H{sup -} stripper and accumulator ring is the key element that provides the flexibility to operate the linac with the same beam parameters as the ILC. The linac operates at 5 Hz with a total of 5.6 x 10{sup 13} H{sup -} ions delivered per pulse. H{sup -} are stripped at injection into the Recycler in a manner that 'paints' the beam both transversely and longitudinally to reduce space charge forces. Following the 1 ms injection, the orbit moves off the stripping foil and circulates for 200 msec, awaiting the next injection. Following three such injections a total of 1.7 x 10{sup 14} protons are transferred in a single turn to the Main Injector. These protons are then accelerated to 120 GeV and fast extracted to a neutrino target. The Main Injector cycle takes 1.4 seconds

  3. EPA Encourages the Public to Comment on Revisions to Cleanup Plan for Fulton Avenue Superfund Site in Nassau County, New York

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y. - April 24, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to modify an interim cleanup plan originally issued in 2007 to address a portion of the contaminated groundwater at the Fulton Avenue Superfund site in the Towns of Nor

  4. Musings: "Hasten Slowly:" Thoughtfully Planned Acceleration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Miraca U. M.

    2008-01-01

    Acceleration is one of the best researched interventions for gifted students. The author is an advocate of acceleration. However, advocating for the thoughtful, carefully judged employment of a procedure with well researched effectiveness does not imply approval of cases where the procedure is used without sufficient thought--especially where it…

  5. Public comments and responses to the 1993 Hanford cleanup five-year plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    In March 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) published its annual Site-Specific Five-Year Plan. The Site-Specific Plan is published to inform the public about the background, status, and plans for Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) activities at the Hanford site. It is the only document that seeks to bring all ER and WM elements together in one document. The Site-Specific Plan is a companion document to the National Five-Year Plan that deals with all the sites within the DOE complex on a summary level. This Response to Comments document does not try to address every question or concern raised during the public comment period. Some questions were outside the scope of the Five-Year Plan, some we could not decipher, others were variations of the same question. The initial round of public meetings was held in Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Pasco, and Olympia, Washington. At the request of the Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), a second round of meetings was held in Portland and Olympia. Both agencies felt that the first two meetings were held with too little advance notice, and before the Plan could be distributed. Once the public meetings were over and the comment period closed, we then compiled the public comments, largely from audio tapes of the meetings. Individual functions within Hanford were asked to consider and respond to the comments.

  6. Regional Planning Commission of Southeast Louisiana Receives EPA Brownfields Cleanup Grant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (May 28, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced the Regional Planning Commission of Southeast La. as a recipient of $400,000 grant to assess, clean and redevelop contaminated properties in the local communit

  7. EPA Finalizes Cleanup Plan for the Nuclear Metals Site in Concord, Mass.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has completed the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Nuclear Metals, Inc. Superfund Site, located in Concord, Mass. The ROD outlines a detailed plan for cleaning up contaminated soil, sediment and groundwater at the Site.

  8. U.S. EPA proposes Allied Landfill Cleanup Plan, accepting comments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For Immediate Release No. 14-OPA152 Chicago (Sept. 22) -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is issuing a proposed plan to clean up the Allied Paper Landfill in Kalamazoo, Michigan, a part of the Allied Paper/Portage Creek/Kalamazoo Rive

  9. EPA Finalizes Cleanup Plan for Pesticides Storage Facility in Manati, P.R.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has finalized a plan to address contaminated soil at a 2-acre former pesticide facility located in the municipality of Manatí, Puerto Rico. The Pesticide Warehouse III Superfund Site has soil and

  10. Plan for increasing public participation in cleanup decisions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This document describes a plan for involving the public in decisions related to cleaning up sites suspected of being contaminated with chemicals or radioactivity at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In this section we describe the purpose of the Environmental Remediation Project, our past efforts to communicate with the northern New Mexico community, and the events that brought about our realization that less traditional, more innovative approaches to public involvement are needed.

  11. Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Cleanup Plan, Ford Ord, Monterey, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-25

    Installation Restoration Program LTM Long-Term Monitoring NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NFA No Further Action NFRAP No Further Response Action...Planned NMS Nuclear Medical Services NPDES National Pollution Discharge Elimination System NPL National Priorities List NRC Nuclear Regulatory Commission... meet the requirements for property disposal and reuse activities associated with the closure of the installation. The scope of the BCP considers the

  12. Natural and accelerated bioremediation research program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This draft plan describes a ten-year program to develop the scientific understanding needed to harness and develop natural and enhanced biogeochemical processes to bioremediate contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater at DOE facilities. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) developed this program plan, with advice and assistance from DOE`s Office of Environmental Management (EM). The program builds on OHER`s tradition of sponsoring fundamental research in the life and environmental sciences and was motivated by OHER`s and Office of Energy Research`s (OER`s) commitment to supporting DOE`s environmental management mission and the belief that bioremediation is an important part of the solution to DOE`s environmental problems.

  13. Continuing Clean-up at Oak Ridge, Portsmouth and Paducah-Successes and Near-Term Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, L. L.; Houser, S. M.; Starling, D. A.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the complexities and challenges associated with the Oak Ridge Environmental Management (EM) cleanup program and the steps that DOE and Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (the Oak Ridge EM team) have collaboratively taken to make significant physical progress and get the job done. Maintaining significant environmental cleanup progress is a daunting challenge for the Oak Ridge EM Team. The scale and span of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) cleanup is immense-five major half-century-old installations in three states (three installations are complete gaseous diffusion plants), with concurrent cleanup at the fully operational Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Y-12 National Security Complex, and with regulatory oversight from three states and two United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regions. Potential distractions arising from funding fluctuations and color-of-money constraints, regulatory negotiations, stakeholder issues, or any one of a number of other potential delay phenomena can not reduce the focus on safely achieving project objectives to maintain cleanup momentum.

  14. Accelerated solvent extraction by using an 'in-line' clean-up approach for multiresidue analysis of pesticides in organic honey.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Luca Maria; Labella, Giuseppe Federico; Panseri, Sara; Britti, Domenico; Galbiati, Fabrizio; Villa, Roberto; Arioli, Francesco

    2017-02-22

    The worldwide loss of honeybee colonies may be due to their exposure to several contaminants (i.e., pesticides); such contamination may also have impacts on consumers' health. Therefore, it is essential to develop quick and new methods to detect several pesticide residues in honey samples. In this study, the effectiveness of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) was compared with QuEChERS methods for the analysis of 53 pesticides in organic honey by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Two simple and rapid ASE methods with 'in-line' clean-up were optimised and then compared with QuEChERS. Hexane-ethyl acetate (Hex:EtAc) and Florisil were chosen as extraction solvent and retainer for the first ASE method respectively; acetonitrile and a primary-secondary amine phase (ACN-PSA) were selected for the second ASE method. The methods were validated according to the European Union SANTE/11945/2015 guidelines. The validation parameters showed that QuEChERS and ASE with PSA as retainer had better repeatability than ASE with Hex:EtAc and Florisil. In particular, QuEChERS and ASE (ACN-PSA) showed good recovery, according to the SANTE criteria, for the majority of investigated pesticides. Conversely, when ASE with Hex:EtAc and Florisil was used as the retainer, several compounds showed recoveries lower than the acceptable value of 70%. The ASE in-line method was finally applied to evaluate pesticide concentration in organic honey samples.

  15. Fermilab's Proton Accelerator Complex : World Record Performance and Upgrade Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The flagship of Fermilab's long term research program is the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), located Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, which will study neutrino oscillations with a baseline of 1300 km. The neutrinos will be produced in the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a proposed new beam line from Fermilab's Main Injector. The physics goals of the DUNE require a proton beam with a power of some 2.4 MW at 120 GeV, which is roughly four times the current maximum power. Here I discuss current performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex, our plans for construction of the SRF proton linac as key part of the Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II), outline the main challenges toward multi-MW beam power operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex and the staged plan to achieve the required performance over the next 15 years.

  16. Performance Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas, NV

    2002-08-21

    This Performance Management Plan describes the approach for accelerating cleanup activities of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) Environmental Management (EM) Program. This approach accelerates the reduction of risk at NNSA/NV sites while performing the work responsibly, effectively, and more efficiently. In May 2002, NNSA/NV EM and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection signed a Letter of Intent formalizing an agreement to pursue accelerated risk reduction and cleanup for activities within the State of Nevada. This Performance Management Plan provides the strategic direction for implementing the Letter of Intent.

  17. Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities

  18. Accelerators for heavy ion inertial fusion: Progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.; Friedman, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1994-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Program is the principal part of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program in the Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The emphasis of the Heavy Ion Program is the development of accelerators for fusion power production. Target physics research and some elements of fusion chamber development are supported in the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, a dual purpose (defense and energy) program in the Defense Programs part of the Department of Energy. The accelerator research program will establish feasibility through a sequence of scaled experiments that will demonstrate key physics and engineering issues at low cost compared to other fusion programs. This paper discusses progress in the accelerator program and outlines how the planned research will address the key economic issues of inertial fusion energy.

  19. Hanford Cleanup... Restore the Columbia River Corridor Transition the Central Plateau Prepare and Plan for the End State

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Keith A.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State was established during World War II to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons as part of the top-secret Manhattan Project. In 1989, Hanford's mission changed to cleanup and closure; today the site is engaged in one of the world's largest and most aggressive programs to clean up radioactive and hazardous wastes. The size and complexity of Hanford's environmental problems are made even more challenging by the overlapping technical, political, regulatory, financial and cultural issues associated with the cleanup. The physical challenges at the Hanford Site are daunting. More than 50 million gallons of liquid radioactive waste in 177 underground storage tanks; 2,300 tons of spent nuclear fuel;12 tons of plutonium in various forms; 25 million cubic feet of buried or stored solid waste; 270 billion gallons of groundwater contaminated above drinking-water standards spread out over about 80 square miles; more than 1,700 waste sites; and approximately 500 contaminated facilities. With a workforce of approximately 7,000 and a budget of about $1.8 billion dollars this fiscal year, Hanford cleanup operations are expected to be complete by 2035, at a cost of $60 billion dollars. (authors)

  20. Three-dimensional acceleration planning for atmospheric entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David Teh-Han

    The next generation of reusable launch vehicles will benefit from an improved entry guidance algorithm. Improvements have been made to the current Space Shuttle entry guidance algorithm that will provide an ability to handle aborts, reach large crossranges, and provide complete onboard planning capability. Building on the entry guidance algorithm for the Space Shuttle, three versions of a three-dimensional acceleration based entry guidance algorithm have been created and tested. The Space Shuttle entry guidance algorithm is extended to three dimensions by planning the drag profile and the occurrence of bank reversals. The three versions of the planning algorithm that have been developed are a single bank reversal planner, a two bank reversal planner, and a single bank reversal update planner. Tests of the single and two bank reversal versions show that the planning algorithms are capable of producing feasible trajectories for a wide range of various entry conditions. Integration and testing of the update planning algorithm with a feedback linearizing control law in a high fidelity simulation developed by NASA Marshall has demonstrated the algorithm's ability to handle a variety of entry conditions in an onboard environment.

  1. Processing Plan for Potentially Reactive/Ignitable Remote Handled Transuranic Waste at the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12090

    SciTech Connect

    Troescher, Patrick D.; Hobbes, Tammy L.; Anderson, Scott A.

    2012-07-01

    Remote Handle Transuranic (RH-TRU) Waste generated at Argonne National Laboratory - East, from the examination of irradiated and un-irradiated fuel pins and other reactor materials requires a detailed processing plan to ensure reactive/ignitable material is absent to meet WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria prior to shipping and disposal. The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) approach to repackaging Lot 2 waste and how we ensure prohibited materials are not present in waste intended for disposal at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 'WIPP' uses an Argon Repackaging Station (ARS), which provides an inert gas blanket. Opening of the Lot 2 containers under an argon gas blanket is proposed to be completed in the ARS. The ARS is an interim transition repackaging station that provides a mitigation technique to reduce the chances of a reoccurrence of a thermal event prior to rendering the waste 'Safe'. The consequences, should another thermal event be encountered, (which is likely) is to package the waste, apply the reactive and or ignitable codes to the container, and store until the future treatment permit and process are available. This is the same disposition that the two earlier containers in the 'Thermal Events' were assigned. By performing the initial handling under an inert gas blanket, the waste can sorted and segregate the fines and add the Met-L-X to minimize risk before it is exposed to air. The 1-gal cans that are inside the ANL-E canister will be removed and each can is moved to the ARS for repackaging. In the ARS, the 1-gal can is opened in the inerted environment. The contained waste is sorted, weighed, and visually examined for non compliant items such as unvented aerosol cans and liquids. The contents of the paint cans are transferred into a sieve and manipulated to allow the fines, if any, to be separated into the tray below. The fines are weighed and then blended with a minimum 5:1 mix of Met-L-X. Other debris materials found are segregated from the cans into containers

  2. Streamlining Site Cleanup in New York City

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This joint effort, supported by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC), advances the environmental cleanup goals of PlaNYC 2030, the city's comprehensive sustainability plan.

  3. A strategic plan to accelerate development of acute stroke treatments.

    PubMed

    Marler, John R

    2012-09-01

    In order to reenergize acute stroke research and accelerate the development of new treatments, we need to transform the usual design and conduct of clinical trials to test for small but significant improvements in effectiveness, and treat patients as soon as possible after stroke onset when treatment effects are most detectable. This requires trials that include thousands of acute stroke patients. A plan to make these trials possible is proposed. There are four components: (1) free access to the electronic medical record; (2) a large stroke emergency network and clinical trial coordinating center connected in real time to hundreds of emergency departments; (3) a clinical trial technology development center; and (4) strategic leadership to raise funds, motivate clinicians to participate, and interact with politicians, insurers, legislators, and other national and international organizations working to advance the quality of stroke care.

  4. Site Contamination Problems in the Republic of Latvia: Ongoing Clean-up Activities and Future Pollution Prevention Plans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    and Future Pollution Prevention Plans Ilgonis Strauss*, Ivan Semyoniv, Una Blumberga * Ministry of Environmental Protection and Regional Development of...Ministry of Environmental Protection and Regional Development have started to incorporate environmentally sound approaches in practice of military...Plans Ilgonis Strauss, Ivan Semyoniv, Una Blumberga Ministry of Environmental Protection and Regional Development of the Republic of Latvia

  5. The Use of the Hanford Onsite Packaging and Transportation Safety Program to Meet Cleanup Milestones Under the Hanford Site Cleanup 2015 Vision and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 - 12403

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, John C.; Edwards, W. Scott; Macbeth, Paul J.; Self, Richard J.; West, Lori D.

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Site presents unique challenges in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) 2015 Cleanup Vision. CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), its subcontractors, and DOE-RL were challenged to retrieve, transport and remediate a wide range of waste materials. Through a collaborative effort by all Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members, disposition pathways for diverse and seemingly impossible to ship wastes were developed under a DOE Order 460.1C-compliant Hanford Onsite Transportation Safety Program. The team determined an effective method for transporting oversized compliant waste payloads to processing and disposition facilities. The use of the onsite TSD packaging authorizations proved to be vital to safely transporting these materials for processing and eventual final disposition. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) provided additional resources to expedite planning and execution of these important cleanup milestones. Through the innovative and creative use of the TSD, the Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members have developed and are executing an integrated project plan that enables the safe and compliant transport of a wide variety of difficult-to-transport waste items, accelerating previous cleanup schedules to meet cleanup milestones. (authors)

  6. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1991-01-01

    A residual acceleration data analysis plan is developed that will allow principal investigators of low-gravity experiments to efficiently process their experimental results in conjunction with accelerometer data. The basic approach consisted of the following program of research: (1) identification of sensitive experiments and sensitivity ranges by order of magnitude estimates, numerical modelling, and investigator input; (2) research and development towards reduction, supplementation, and dissemination of residual acceleration data; and (3) implementation of the plan on existing acceleration data bases.

  7. Accelerated test plan for nickel cadmium spacecraft batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated test matrix is outlined that includes acceptance, baseline and post-cycling tests, chemical and physical analyses, and the data analysis procedures to be used in determining the feasibility of an accelerated test for sealed, nickel cadmium cells.

  8. China action of "Cleanup Plan for Polychlorinated Biphenyls Burial Sites": emissions during excavation and thermal desorption of a capacitor-burial site.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Zhou, Lingli; Xue, Nandong; Li, Fasheng; Wu, Guanglong; Ding, Qiong; Yan, Yunzhong; Liu, Bo

    2013-10-01

    Scarce data are available so far on emissions in a given scenario for excavation and thermal desorption, a common practice, of soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). As part of China action of "Cleanup Plan for PCBs Burial Sites", this study roughly estimated PCBs emissions in the scenario for a capacitor-burial site. The concentrations of total PCBs (22 congeners) in soils were in the range of 2.1-16,000μg/g with a mean of 2300μg/g, among the same order of magnitude as the highest values obtained in various PCBs-contaminated sites. Only six congeners belonging to Di-, Tri-, and Tetra-CBs were observed above limits of detection in air samples in the scenario, partially which can be estimated by the USEPA air emission model. Comparing concentrations and composition profiles of PCBs in the soil and air samples further indicated a leaked source of commercial PCBs formulations of trichlorobiphenyl (China PCB no. 1). The measures taken if any to mitigate the volatilization and movement of PCBs and to minimize worker exposure were discussed for improvements of the excavation practice.

  9. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    The research performed consisted of three stages: (1) identification of sensitive IML-1 experiments and sensitivity ranges by order of magnitude estimates, numerical modeling, and investigator input; (2) research and development towards reduction, supplementation, and dissemination of residual acceleration data; and (3) implementation of the plan on existing acceleration databases.

  10. Accelerated Plan for Closing the Gaps by 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Texas launched its ambitious strategic plan for higher education, "Closing the Gaps by 2015," in the year 2000 to create a statewide vision for closing the higher education gaps within Texas and between Texas and other leading states. The plan focuses on bringing Texas to national parity in four critical areas of higher education:…

  11. Mold: Cleanup and Remediation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New National Center for Environmental ... prevention ... more Fact Sheet: Flood Cleanup - Avoiding Indoor Air Quality Problems Flooding in a home or building can ...

  12. Cleanup and Prevention Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA takes strides to prevent and cleanup contamination and contaminated sites located on or near Tribal lands. Our programs work hand-in-hand with tribes to ensure we protect their health and the environment.

  13. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  14. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  15. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Taft, William E.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  16. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  17. Upton bill offers clean-up incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.

    1994-07-01

    Like castor oil, the Superfund law can be difficult medicine to swallow, and no one wants to volunteer for a dose. Indeed, the law`s harsh and unbending liability scheme sometimes hinders the cleanup of contaminated property. Confronted with the choice of redeveloping an old {open_quotes}brownfield{close_quotes} urban industrial site or building at a pristine new {open_quotes}greenfield{close_quotes} location, most companies opt for the latter. The brownfield problem is especially troubling because the law often prevents voluntary cleanups at relatively low priority sites that usually don`t get caught up in the Superfund program. This paper describes the Upton Bill which would require the US EPA to establish cleanup standards for hazrdous substances, allow for public comment on a proposed response plan, and require a voluntary party to submit detailed annual reports and maintain records.

  18. Environmental compliance and cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the roles of the principal agencies, organizations, and public in environmental compliance and cleanup of the Hanford Site. Regulatory oversight, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the role of Indian tribes, public participation, and CERCLA Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Activities are all discussed.

  19. Risk-based cleanup standards

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The problems encountered during facility or land cleanup operations will provide challenges both to technology and regulatory agencies. Inevitably, the decisions of the federal agencies regulating cleanup activities have been controversial. The major dilemma facing government and industry is how to accomplish cleanup in a cost-effective manner while minimizing the risks to workers and the public.

  20. Removal Action Plan for the Accelerated Retrieval Project for a Described Area within Pit 4

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Tyson

    2006-08-01

    This Removal Action Plan documents the plan for implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compenstion, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action to be performed by the Accelerated Retrieval Project. The focus of the action is the limited excavation and retrieval of selected waste streams from a designated portion of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Subsurface Disposal Area that are contaminated with volatile organic compounds, isotopes of uranium, or transuranic radionuclides. The selected retrieval area is approximately 0.2 ha (1/2 acre) and is located in the eastern portion of Pit 4. The proposed project is referred to as the Accelerated Retrieval Project. This Removal Action Plan details the major work elements, operations approach, and schedule, and summarizes the environmental, safety and health, and waste management considerations associated with the project.

  1. Fast online Monte Carlo-based IMRT planning for the MRI linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol, G. H.; Hissoiny, S.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2012-03-01

    The MRI accelerator, a combination of a 6 MV linear accelerator with a 1.5 T MRI, facilitates continuous patient anatomy updates regarding translations, rotations and deformations of targets and organs at risk. Accounting for these demands high speed, online intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) re-optimization. In this paper, a fast IMRT optimization system is described which combines a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engine for online beamlet generation and a fast inverse dose optimization algorithm. Tightly conformal IMRT plans are generated for four phantom cases and two clinical cases (cervix and kidney) in the presence of the magnetic fields of 0 and 1.5 T. We show that for the presented cases the beamlet generation and optimization routines are fast enough for online IMRT planning. Furthermore, there is no influence of the magnetic field on plan quality and complexity, and equal optimization constraints at 0 and 1.5 T lead to almost identical dose distributions.

  2. Louisiana's statewide beach cleanup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindstedt, Dianne M.; Holmes, Joseph C.

    1989-01-01

    Litter along Lousiana's beaches has become a well-recognized problem. In September 1987, Louisiana's first statewide beach cleanup attracted about 3300 volunteers who filled 16,000 bags with trash collected along 15 beaches. An estimated 800,173 items were gathered. Forty percent of the items were made of plastic and 11% were of polystyrene. Of all the litter collected, 37% was beverage-related. Litter from the oil and gas, commercial fishing, and maritime shipping industries was found, as well as that left by recreational users. Although beach cleanups temporarily rid Louisiana beaches of litter, the real value of the effort is in public participation and education. Civic groups, school children, and individuals have benefited by increasing their awareness of the problems of trash disposal.

  3. Accelerating Cleanup: Focus on 2006. Discussion draft

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This executive summary addresses the activities associated with the National Transuranic (TRU) Program managed by the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO). The CAO programmatically reports to the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management and receives administrative support through the Albuquerque Operations Office. The mission of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for site disposal of TRU waste and by establishing an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. It includes personnel assigned to the CAO, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site operations, and other activities associated with the National TRU Program. The CAO develops and directs implementation of the program, while the DOE Headquarters establishes policy and guidelines. The CAO assesses compliance with the program guidance, as well as the commonality of activities and assumptions among all the sites. Since the development of the February 28, 1997, database used to develop this Discussion Draft, the opening of the WIPP facility for receipt of Contact Handled waste has been delayed from November 1997 to May 1998. This slippage is significant enough to require a change in the milestones and volumes included in the documents to be reviewed by our stakeholders. Changes have been incorporated into this Discussion Draft and its supporting Project Baseline Summaries (PBSs).

  4. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  5. US nuclear cleanup shows signs of progress

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, R.

    1997-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s program for dealing with the radioactive and hazardous wastes at its former nuclear weapons production sites and at the national laboratories has been criticized for its expense and slow pace of cleanup. The largest environmental restoration and waste management program in the world faces formidable technical and scientific problems and these, according to numerous investigative committees and commissions, have been compounded by poor management, misuse of technology, and failure to appreciate the need for new basic scientific knowledge to solve many of the cleanup problems. In the past three years, DOE`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), often spurred by congressional action, has begun to trim costs and accomplish more. New measures have been introduced to improve contract efficiency, better utilize existing remediation technologies, renegotiate compliance agreements, and begin basic research. Environmental Management Assistant Undersecretary Alvin Alm, appointed in May 1996, is seeking to solidify these changes into an ambitious plan to clean up most of DOE`s 130 sites by 2006. But there are widespread doubts that EM has the money, skill, and will to turn itself around. There are also concerns that, in the name of efficiency and economy, EM may be negotiating lower cleanup standards and postponing some difficult cleanup tasks. This article discusses these issues. 7 refs.

  6. Transuranium-element-contaminated soil cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlitt, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    Johnston Atoll (JA) is a small (270-ha), but strategic, US possession in the Pacific Ocean, which was previously used in nuclear weapons testing. Nuclear devices were launched by missile for detonations at very high altitudes. In 1962, one missile failed on the launch pad and two failed overhead. The devices were destructed without nuclear yield, but transuranium (TRU) elements were dispersed. Cleanup was swift and incomplete. A 2-ha area was placed under radiological controls and restricted from use due to residual contamination. Planning was begun in 1983 for a total JA cleanup to provide additional (unrestricted) land to meet future requirements. A TRUe soil cleanup is programmed to begin at JA in 1988 utilizing a full-scale mining plant. The plant should be able to process all contaminated soil by 1992 and produce less than approx. 2000 m/sup 3/ of concentrated waste. This cleanup will increase the amount of land available for unrestricted use and provide a source of usable soil, which presently must be imported to JA.

  7. Federal panel taps sites, technologies for cleanup tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-02-03

    In a major federal-state effort to speed federal facility cleanup, a federal advisory panel has picked 13 sites in Western states to test innovative environmental technologies and new government regulatory and procurement procedures. The panel, composed of four Western governors and top officials from four federal agencies, voted unanimously Jan. 31 to proceed with the technology demonstrations, which are aimed at cutting red tape and accelerating the use of new cleanup methods at contaminated federal sites. The sites chosen include three Energy Department facilities and 10 Defense Department military bases. The panel also selected 20 innovative technologies or cleanup methods to be tested, ranging from new mixed waste treatment processes to improved groundwater cleanup techniques to methods for addressing unexploded ordinance buried in soils.

  8. 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan: Protecting National, Energy, and Economic Security with Advanced Science and Technology and Ensuring Environmental Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    2003-09-30

    The Department of Energy contributes to the future of the Nation by ensuring energy security, maintaining the safety, security and reliability of the nuclear weapons stockpile, cleaning up the environment from the legacy of the Cold War, and developing innovations in science and technology. After 25 years in existence, the Department now operates 24 preeminent research laboratories and facilities and four power marketing administrations, and manages the environmental cleanup from 50 years of nuclear defense activities that impacted two million acres in communities across the country. The Department has an annual budget of about $23 billion and employs about 14,500 Federal and 100,000 contractor employees. The Department of Energy is principally a national security agency and all of its missions flow from this core mission to support national security. That is true not just today, but throughout the history of the agency. The origins of the Department can be traced to the Manhattan Project and the race to develop the atomic bomb during World War II. Following the war, Congress engaged in a vigorous and contentious debate over civilian versus military control of the atom. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 settled the debate by creating the Atomic Energy Commission, which took over the Manhattan Project’s sprawling scientific and industrial complex.

  9. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. Methods: The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and

  10. Gas stream cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, S.J.; Cicero, D.C.; Zeh, C.M.; Bedick, R.C.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of gas stream cleanup (GSCU) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Gas Stream Cleanup Program is to develop contaminant control strategies that meet environmental regulations and protect equipment in advanced coal conversion systems. Contaminant control systems are being developed for integration into seven advanced coal conversion processes: Pressurized fludized-bed combustion (PFBC), Direct coal-fueled turbine (DCFT), Intergrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), Gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), Gasification/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), Coal-fueled diesel (CFD), and Mild gasification (MG). These advanced coal conversion systems present a significant challenge for development of contaminant control systems because they generate multi-contaminant gas streams at high-pressures and high temperatures. Each of the seven advanced coal conversion systems incorporates distinct contaminant control strategies because each has different contaminant tolerance limits and operating conditions. 59 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Hazardous Waste: Cleanup and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandas, Steve; Cronin, Nancy L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses hazardous waste, waste disposal, unsafe exposure, movement of hazardous waste, and the Superfund clean-up process that consists of site discovery, site assessment, clean-up method selection, site clean up, and site maintenance. Argues that proper disposal of hazardous waste is everybody's responsibility. (JRH)

  12. Texas Coastal Cleanup Report, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Kathryn; And Others

    During the 1986 Coastweek, a national event dedicated to improvement of the marine environment, a large beach cleanup was organized on the Texas coast. The goals of the cleanup were to create public awareness of the problems caused by marine debris, and to collect data on the types and quantities of debris found on the Texas coastline. The…

  13. Hierarchical incremental path planning and situation-dependent optimized dynamic motion planning considering accelerations.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xue-Cheng; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2007-12-01

    This paper studies a hierarchical approach for incrementally driving a nonholonomic mobile robot to its destination in unknown environments. The A* algorithm is modified to handle a map containing unknown information. Based on it, optimal (discrete) paths are incrementally generated with a periodically updated map. Next, accelerations in varying velocities are taken into account in predicting the robot pose and the robot trajectory resulting from a motion command. Obstacle constraints are transformed to suitable velocity limits so that the robot can move as fast as possible while avoiding collisions when needed. Then, to trace the discrete path, the system searches for a waypoint-directed optimized motion in a reduced 1-D translation or rotation velocity space. Various situations of navigation are dealt with by using different strategies rather than a single objective function. Extensive simulations and experiments verified the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  14. Central Plateau Cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site - 12504

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Jonathan

    2012-07-01

    The discussion of Hanford's Central Plateau includes significant work in and around the center of the Hanford Site - located about 7 miles from the Columbia River. The Central Plateau is the area to which operations will be shrunk in 2015 when River Corridor cleanup is complete. This work includes retrieval and disposal of buried waste from miles of trenches; the cleanup and closure of massive processing canyons; the clean-out and demolition to 'slab on grade' of the high-hazard Plutonium Finishing Plant; installation of key groundwater treatment facilities to contain and shrink plumes of contaminated groundwater; demolition of all other unneeded facilities; and the completion of decisions about remaining Central Plateau waste sites. A stated goal of EM has been to shrink the footprint of active cleanup to less than 10 square miles by 2020. By the end of FY2011, Hanford will have reduced the active footprint of cleanup by 64 percent exceeding the goal of 49 percent. By 2015, Hanford will reduce the active footprint of cleanup by more than 90 percent. The remaining footprint reduction will occur between 2015 and 2020. The Central Plateau is a 75-square-mile region near the center of the Hanford Site including the area designated in the Hanford Comprehensive Land Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (DOE 1999) and Record of Decision (64 FR 61615) as the Industrial-Exclusive Area, a rectangular area of about 20 square miles in the center of the Central Plateau. The Industrial-Exclusive Area contains the 200 East and 200 West Areas that have been used primarily for Hanford's nuclear fuel processing and waste management and disposal activities. The Central Plateau also encompasses the 200 Area CERCLA National Priorities List site. The Central Plateau has a large physical inventory of chemical processing and support facilities, tank systems, liquid and solid waste disposal and storage facilities, utility systems, administrative facilities, and groundwater monitoring

  15. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  16. EPA Proposes Plan to Remove Pollutants from Former Sherwin-Williams Plant in Gibbsboro, New Jersey, $14 Million Cleanup to Address Lead, Arsenic, and Volatile Organic Compounds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a plan to clean up contaminated soil from residential properties at the Sherwin-Williams/Hilliards Creek Superfund site in Gibbsboro and Voorhees, New Jersey. The site includes a former

  17. EPA Invites Public Comment on Interim Cleanup Plan for CTS of Asheville Inc. Superfund Site, Public Meeting Set for October 13

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a plan to address contamination beneath the former plant at the CTS of Asheville Inc. Superfund Site in Asheville, N.C. A key step in moving forward is receiving the public's feedback.

  18. SUPERFUND CLEANUPS AND INFANT HEALTH.

    PubMed

    Currie, Janet; Greenstone, Michael; Moretti, Enrico

    2011-05-01

    We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989-2003 in five large states. Our "difference in differences" approach compares birth outcomes before and after a site clean-up for mothers who live within 2,000 meters of the site and those who live between 2,000- 5,000 meters of a site. We find that proximity to a Superfund site before cleanup is associated with a 20 to 25% increase in the risk of congenital anomalies.

  19. Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator mitigation action plan annual report for 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Tomei, T.; Haagenstad, T.

    1999-01-15

    This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of implementing the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator Facility (LEDA) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP). This MAPAR primarily provides a status on specific LEDA facility construction- and operations-related mitigation actions that have been implemented during 1998. The mitigation actions are implemented in order to comply with regulatory requirements under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) by fulfilling DOE`s commitments under the LEDA MAP. This report contains the following three main sections: Introduction; LEDA MAP scope, schedule and status; and Summary and Recommendations. The Introduction section provides a background regarding the origin and purpose of the LEDA MAP. The LEDA MAP scope, schedule, and status section provides a more detailed description of each mitigation action commitment and the current status of each associated action plan. Finally, the Summary and Recommendations section provides DOE`s recommendation regarding future implementation based on the status of each commitment action plan.

  20. Design studies and commissioning plans for plasma acceleration research station experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Mete, O.; Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J.; Smith, J.

    2015-10-15

    Plasma acceleration research station is an electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration test stand proposed for CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the interaction between the electron beam and the plasma is numerically characterised via 2D numerical studies by using VSIM code. The wakefields induced by a single bunch travelling through the plasma were found to vary from 200 MV/m to 3 GV/m for a range of bunch length, bunch radius, and plasma densities. Energy gain for the particles populating the bunch tail through the wakefields driven by the head of the bunch was demonstrated. After determining the achievable field for various beams and plasma configurations, a reference setting was determined for further studies. Considering this reference setting, the beam quality studies were performed for a two-bunch acceleration case. The maximum energy gain as well as the energy spread mitigation by benefiting from the beam loading was investigated by positioning the witness and driver bunches with respect to each other. Emittance growth mechanisms were studied considering the beam-plasma and beam-wakefield interactions. Eventually, regarding the findings, the initial commissioning plans and the aims for the later stages were summarised.

  1. Hazardous Waste: Cleanup and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandas, Steve; Cronin, Nancy L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Superfund, a federal cleanup program created in response to growing public concern over the health and environmental risks posed by hazardous waste sites. Discusses sources, disposal, and movement and risk of hazardous waste. (JRH)

  2. EEG activity during movement planning encodes upcoming peak speed and acceleration and improves the accuracy in predicting hand kinematics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lingling; Leung, Howard; Plank, Markus; Snider, Joe; Poizner, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between movement kinematics and human brain activity is an important and fundamental question for the development of neural prosthesis. The peak velocity and the peak acceleration could best reflect the feedforward-type movement; thus, it is worthwhile to investigate them further. Most related studies focused on the correlation between kinematics and brain activity during the movement execution or imagery. However, human movement is the result of the motor planning phase as well as the execution phase and researchers have demonstrated that statistical correlations exist between EEG activity during the motor planning and the peak velocity and the peak acceleration using grand-average analysis. In this paper, we examined whether the correlations were concealed in trial-to-trial decoding from the low signal-to-noise ratio of EEG activity. The alpha and beta powers from the movement planning phase were combined with the alpha and beta powers from the movement execution phase to predict the peak tangential speed and acceleration. The results showed that EEG activity from the motor planning phase could also predict the peak speed and the peak acceleration with a reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, the decoding accuracy of the peak speed and the peak acceleration could both be improved by combining band powers from the motor planning phase with the band powers from the movement execution.

  3. Draft safety review plan for accelerator production of tritium (APT) project

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this ``living`` Safety Review Plan (SRP) is to describe the products and processes that will be followed to conduct a systematic review of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Facility Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), and subsequently to prepare a draft Safety Evaluation Report (SER) on the PSAR. This plan is prepared for and will be implemented by the APT Independent Safety Review Committee (ISRC) over the period July 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998, in accordance with provisions established in DOE-STD-1104-96. A core team of DOE, INEEL, and AMPARO Corporation engineers and scientists will prepare the initial draft SER with assistance from other ISRC team members on an as needed basis. Guidelines for preparing the draft SER are presented in Section 7 of this SRP. The PSAR reviews will focus exclusively on safety. The ever-present two-part question will be: Does the subject matter have safety significance? If so, does the APT structural, system, component, and/or process engineering design ensure an acceptable margin of safety? The APT mission, efficiency, and cost are not considerations of this plan. A more detailed discussion of the review philosophy is presented in Section 5 of this SRP.

  4. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-07-21

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at Hanford.

  5. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  6. Innovative technologies for soil cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    These notes provide a broad overview of current developments in innovative technologies for soil cleanup. In this context, soil cleanup technologies include site remediation methods that deal primarily with the vadose zone and with relatively shallow, near-surface contamination of soil or rock materials. This discussion attempts to emphasize approaches that may be able to achieve significant improvements in soil cleanup cost or effectiveness. However, since data for quantitative performance and cost comparisons of new cleanup methods are scarce, preliminary comparisons must be based on the scientific approach used by each method and on the sits-specific technical challenges presented by each sold contamination situation. A large number of technical alternatives that are now in research, development, and testing can be categorized by the scientific phenomena that they employ and by the site contamination situations that they treat. After cataloging a representative selection of these technologies, one of the new technologies, Dynamic Underground Stripping, is discussed in more detail to highlight a promising soil cleanup technology that is now being field tested.

  7. On Comparing the Quality of Head and Neck Imrt Plans Delivered with Two Different Linear Accelerator Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect

    Basran, Parminder S.; Balogh, Judith; Poon, Ian; MacKenzie, Robert; Chan, Timothy

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine whether 2 different types of linear accelerators manufacturers with similar MLC leaf widths deliver equivalent IMRT distributions for head and neck radiotherapy patients. In this study, plans delivered with Siemens linacs were re-optimized with an Elekta linac and vice versa. To test for significance, paired t-tests were computed to examine differences in target and normal tissue doses and monitor units. Dose distributions, dose-volume histograms, and dose to targets and normal tissues were found to be equivalent irrespective of the linac type. However, approximately 15% more monitor units were delivered when planned on the Elekta machine (p < 0.002). Both linear accelerators provide plans of comparable dosimetric quality; however, Elekta machines deliver slightly more monitor units than Siemens machines. This increase is likely due differences in geometric properties of the machine head designs, as modeled in the treatment planning system.

  8. SUPERFUND CLEANUPS AND INFANT HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Janet; Greenstone, Michael; Moretti, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989–2003 in five large states. Our “difference in differences” approach compares birth outcomes before and after a site clean-up for mothers who live within 2,000 meters of the site and those who live between 2,000– 5,000 meters of a site. We find that proximity to a Superfund site before cleanup is associated with a 20 to 25% increase in the risk of congenital anomalies. PMID:25152535

  9. An Overview of Project Planning for Hot-Isostatic Pressure Treatment of High-Level Waste Calcine for the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12289

    SciTech Connect

    Nenni, Joseph A.; Thompson, Theron J.

    2012-07-01

    , maintainability, and inspectability analysis were incorporated into a time and motion model to validate and verify the capability to complete treatment of the calcine within the required schedule. The Calcine Disposition Project systems engineering approach, including use of industry-proven design-for-quality tools and quantitative assessment techniques, has strengthened the project's design capability to meet its intended mission in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Use of these tools has been particularly helpful to the project in early design planning to manage variation; improve requirements and high-consequence risk management; and more effectively apply alternative, interface, failure mode, RAMI, and time and motion analyses at the earliest possible stages of design when their application is most efficient and cost effective. The project is using these tools to design and develop HIP treatment of highly radioactive calcine to produce a volume-reduced, monolithic waste form with immobilization of hazardous and radioactive constituents. (authors)

  10. Startup is cleanup, says energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.

    1993-12-01

    The 42-year-old plutonium finishing plant (PFP) at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation was put on stand-by in 1989 after reports of numerous safety violations. Energy Department official John Hunter said the plant was shut down simply because it ran out of plutonium to process. His statement is ironic considering that since 1989 the Energy Department has wanted to restart the plant to process the reactive plutonium left inside. This article describes the safety concerns at the PFP. Cleanup options are also discussed. The opinions of several Hanford watchdog groups concerning PFP safety and cleanup possibilities are reviewed.

  11. Experimental Plans to Explore Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration in the THZ Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Elsen, E.; Flottmann, K.; Gerth, C.; Kube, G.; Schmidt, B.; Osterhoff, J.; Stoltz, P.

    2011-09-07

    Dielectric wakefield accelerators have shown great promise toward high-gradient acceleration. We investigate the performances of a possible experiment under consideration at the FLASH facility in DESY to explore wakefield acceleration with an enhanced transformer ratio. The experiment capitalizes on a unique pulse shaping capability recently demonstrated at this facility. In addition, the facility incorporates a superconducting linear accelerator that could generate bunch trains with closely spaced bunches thereby opening the exploration of potential dynamical effects in dielectric wakefield accelerators.

  12. Voluntary Guidelines for Methamphetamine Laboratory Cleanup - Document

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    provides technical guidance for state and local personnel responsible for meth lab cleanup, based on an extensive review of the best available science and practices, and addresses general cleanup activities, specific items/materials, sampling.

  13. Gas cleanup for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, R.M.

    1984-08-01

    Visual aids are presented describing various classes of primary gas cleanup. These are: (1) amine systems (MDEA Process); (2) alkali salt systems; (3) physical absorption systems (Selexol Process, Stretford Process); (4) mixed solvent systems; and (5) Claus Sulfur Recovery System. Flowsheets are also presented for the MDEA, Selexol and Stretford processes.

  14. Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Cleanup Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    intentionally left blank. 0422TOC Cameron Station, Virginia - January 1995 Page ES-6 CHAPTER 1I P INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY • The purpose of this Base...intentionally left blank. 0422.sl Cameron Station, Virginia - January 1995 Page 1-10 UT P 00 CO Cameron Station UT ID 00 EXPLANATION Surrounding Puli Open o pac...generated on-site are managed in accordance with all o422.sl Cameron Station, Virginia - January 1995 Page 1-16 TABLE 1-4. HAZARDOUS SUSTANcE ACTIVITY

  15. Cleanup at Los Alamos National Laboratory - the challenges - 9493

    SciTech Connect

    Stiger, Susan G; Hargis, Kenneth M; Graham, Michael J; Rael, George J

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of environmental cleanup at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and some of the unique aspects and challenges. Cleanup of the 65-year old Department of Energy Laboratory is being conducted under a RCRA Consent Order with the State of New Mexico. This agreement is one of the most recent cleanup agreements signed in the DOE complex and was based on lessons learned at other DOE sites. A number of attributes create unique challenges for LANL cleanup -- the proximity to the community and pueblos, the site's topography and geology, and the nature of LANL's on-going missions. This overview paper will set the stage for other papers in this session, including papers that present: Plans to retrieve buried waste at Material Disposal Area B, across the street from oen of Los Alamos' commercial districts and the local newspaper; Progress to date and joint plans with WIPP for disposal of the remaining inventory of legacy transuranic waste; Reviews of both groundwater and surface water contamination and the factors complicating both characterization and remediation; Optimizing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from ongoing LANL missions; A stakeholder environmental data transparency project (RACER), with full public access to all available information on contamination at LANL, and A description of the approach to waste processing cost recovery from the programs that generate hazardous and radioactive waste at LANL.

  16. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Daniel L; Paliwal, Bhudatt R; Bayouth, John E

    2014-04-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and volume receiving <20% of prescription dose (DRx) were calculated to assess the plans. The 95% confidence intervals were recorded for all measurements and presented with the associated bars in graphs. The homogeneity index (D5/D95) had a 1-5% inhomogeneity increase for head and neck, 3-8% for lung, and 4-16% for prostate. CI revealed a modest conformity increase for lung. The volume receiving 20% of the prescription dose increased 2-8% for head and neck and up to 4% for lung and prostate. Overall, for head and neck Co-60 ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system.

  17. Estimation of cleanup time in layered soils by vapor extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleris, Vassilios; Croisé, Jean

    1999-02-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a standard remediation technique for cleaning up soils contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A key parameter for planning SVE operations is the time required to reach the desired cleanup standard. In this paper, an approximate analytical solution is developed, which allows the fast estimation of cleanup times in layered unsaturated zones. The contaminants are assumed to be dissolved in the pore water, sorbed on the soil matrix and mixed with the soil air. Liquid organic phase is absent. For partitioning between gas and water and water and solid, local-equilibrium is assumed. The analytical solution is based on the well mixed reservoir model and on the plug flow model. It is shown that, for a number of scenario cases, the results of the analytical solution are, for practical purposes, in reasonable agreement with a numerical solution of the partial differential equations for the local-equilibrium advection-dispersion model of mass transport in porous media by Fickian diffusion and Darcian air flow. The results are displayed in terms of Peclet number of molecular diffusion (PNMD). In the analytical solution three different approximations are used. The PNMD range is divided into three intervals, representing different transport regimes. At low PNMD, molecular diffusion dominates transport in both layers. In this interval cleanup time is estimated by the average of the plug flow time for one pore volume through the layer of higher permeability, and the cleanup time estimated by the mixed reservoir model. At intermediate PNMD values, advective transport dominates in the more permeable layer and molecular diffusion in the less permeable. Consequently, cleanup time is limited by diffusive mass transfer from the less to the more permeable layer. In this interval, the estimation of cleanup time is entirely based on the mixed reservoir model. At high PNMD values, transport is governed in both layers by advection. Here, cleanup time

  18. NASA's Spaceflight Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension Research Plan: An accelerated Research Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, Christian; Fogarty, J.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J.

    2010-01-01

    To date six long duration astronauts have experienced in flight visual changes and post flight signs of optic disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, hyperoptic shifts and or raised intracranial pressure. In some cases the changes were transient while in others they are persistent with varying degrees of visual impairment. Given that all astronauts exposed to microgravity experience a cephalad fluid shift, and that both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients have exhibited optic nerve sheath edema on MRI, there is a high probability that all astronauts develop in-flight idiopathic intracranial hypertension to some degree. Those who are susceptible, have an increased likelihood of developing treatment resistant papilledema resulting in visual impairment and possible long-term vision loss. Such an acquired disability would have a profound mission impact and would be detrimental to the long term health of the astronaut. The visual impairment and increased intracranial pressure phenomenon appears to have multiple contributing factors. Consequently, the working "physiological fault bush" with elevated intracranial pressure at its center, is divided into ocular effects, and CNS and other effects. Some of these variables have been documented and or measured through operational data gathering, while others are unknown, undocumented and or hypothetical. Both the complexity of the problem and the urgency to find a solution require that a unique, non-traditional research model be employed such as the Accelerated Research Collaboration(TM) (ARC) model that has been pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. In the ARC model a single entity facilitates and manages all aspects of the basic, translational, and clinical research, providing expert oversight for both scientific and managerial efforts. The result is a comprehensive research plan executed by a multidisciplinary team and the elimination of stove-piped research. The ARC model emphasizes efficient and effective

  19. Combined modulated electron and photon beams planned by a Monte-Carlo-based optimization procedure for accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    PubMed

    Palma, Bianey Atriana; Sánchez, Ana Ureba; Salguero, Francisco Javier; Arráns, Rafael; Sánchez, Carlos Míguez; Zurita, Amadeo Walls; Hermida, María Isabel Romero; Leal, Antonio

    2012-03-07

    The purpose of this study was to present a Monte-Carlo (MC)-based optimization procedure to improve conventional treatment plans for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using modulated electron beams alone or combined with modulated photon beams, to be delivered by a single collimation device, i.e. a photon multi-leaf collimator (xMLC) already installed in a standard hospital. Five left-sided breast cases were retrospectively planned using modulated photon and/or electron beams with an in-house treatment planning system (TPS), called CARMEN, and based on MC simulations. For comparison, the same cases were also planned by a PINNACLE TPS using conventional inverse intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Normal tissue complication probability for pericarditis, pneumonitis and breast fibrosis was calculated. CARMEN plans showed similar acceptable planning target volume (PTV) coverage as conventional IMRT plans with 90% of PTV volume covered by the prescribed dose (D(p)). Heart and ipsilateral lung receiving 5% D(p) and 15% D(p), respectively, was 3.2-3.6 times lower for CARMEN plans. Ipsilateral breast receiving 50% D(p) and 100% D(p) was an average of 1.4-1.7 times lower for CARMEN plans. Skin and whole body low-dose volume was also reduced. Modulated photon and/or electron beams planned by the CARMEN TPS improve APBI treatments by increasing normal tissue sparing maintaining the same PTV coverage achieved by other techniques. The use of the xMLC, already installed in the linac, to collimate photon and electron beams favors the clinical implementation of APBI with the highest efficiency.

  20. HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN TB

    2011-01-14

    Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by

  1. Reagan's TMI cleanup: a smoke and mirror trick

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    Little federal money will actually be sent to help relieve the cleanup burden of General Public Utilities despite the administration's public support of a cost/share plan. The $100 million was not new money, but existing DOE research and development money already in hand and earmarked for Three Mile Island-related research. Pennsylvania congressmen and officials were quick to point out the deceptive nature of Reagan's approval of the plan to share the costs. The administration feels that federal participation should not be open-ended, but should be limited to research on safe nuclear waste disposal of general benefit. (DCK)

  2. The coast guard's cleanup of hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Rezendes, V.S.

    1989-11-01

    GAO concluded that the Coast Guard still has most of its major hazardous waste cleanup work to do - an effort that will cost millions and will take decades to complete. Yet the Coast Guard cannot confidently estimate long-term cleanup costs until it assesses and investigates potential hazardous waste locations. While Coast Guard data suggest that it is complying with hazardous waste regulations, this GAO report maintains that the Coast Guard may not be collecting the type of information needed to support long-term budget requests. The Coast Guard is planning to reissue reporting instructions in order to stress the importance of reporting violations and related costs. If successful, this effort could help ensure that the Coast Guard has the information necessary to estimate future funding needs.

  3. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1992-01-01

    The main thrust of our work in the third year of contract NAG8-759 was the development and analysis of various data processing techniques that may be applicable to residual acceleration data. Our goal is the development of a data processing guide that low gravity principal investigators can use to assess their need for accelerometer data and then formulate an acceleration data analysis strategy. The work focused on the flight of the first International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) mission. We are also developing a data base management system to handle large quantities of residual acceleration data. This type of system should be an integral tool in the detailed analysis of accelerometer data. The system will manage a large graphics data base in the support of supervised and unsupervised pattern recognition. The goal of the pattern recognition phase is to identify specific classes of accelerations so that these classes can be easily recognized in any data base. The data base management system is being tested on the Spacelab 3 (SL3) residual acceleration data.

  4. Bioavailability: implications for science/cleanup policy

    SciTech Connect

    Denit, Jeffery; Planicka, J. Gregory

    1998-12-01

    This paper examines the role of bioavailability in risk assessment and cleanup decisions. Bioavailability refers to how chemicals ''behave'' and their ''availability'' to interact with living organisms. Bioavailability has significant implications for exposure risks, cleanup goals, and site costs. Risk to human health and the environment is directly tied to the bioavailability of the chemicals of concern.

  5. Pre-Implementation and Performance Plan for the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroga, Marcelo

    2007-03-30

    This report discusses the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center (Center) and its innovative economic development program. The chapters describe the organization and the operations of a two-pillar model for training and business acceleration and how the program focuses on the economic development of a disadvantaged Chicago, Illinois, Hispanic community located in Humboldt Park. The Humboldt Park community is located 3 miles west of Chicago's affluent downtown. Humboldt Park residents have income levels below the poverty line and unemployment rates twice the national average.

  6. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC) Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.B.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Field Research Center (FRC) to support the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the DOE Headquarters Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Office of Science.

  7. Education for Dynamic Economies: Action Plan To Accelerate Progress towards Education for All (EFA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    The World Bank's development committee met and reviewed the paper, "Education for Dynamic Economies." The paper assessed progress and identified key issues and challenges in meeting the goals of universal primary education. It concluded that these goals were unlikely to be attained without accelerated action at the country level and a…

  8. PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-26

    This quarterly report describes technical activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under Task 1 of this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This report includes a description of a device developed to harden a filter cake on a filter element so that the element and cake can subsequently be encapsulated in epoxy and studied in detail. This report also reviews the status of the HGCU data base of ash and char characteristics. Task 1 plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy/Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), encapsulation of an intact filter cake from the PSDF, and completion and delivery of the HGCU data bank. Task 2 of this project concerns the testing and failure analyses of new and used filter elements and filter materials. Task 2 work during the past quarter consisted of hoop tensile and axial compressive stress-strain responses of McDermott ceramic composite and hoop tensile testing of Techniweave candle filters as-manufactured and after exposure to the gasification environment.

  9. Report: Progress Made, but Improvements Needed at CTS of Asheville Superfund Site in North Carolina to Advance Cleanup Pace and Reduce Potential Exposure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #16-P-0296, August 31, 2016. EPA Region 4 can accelerate the cleanup and completeness of work, and improve public communications, to better control human exposure to unsafe industrial contamination at the CTS site.

  10. SU-E-T-190: First Integration of Steriotactic Radiotherapy Planning System Iplan with Elekta Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biplab, S; Soumya, R; Paul, S; Jassal, K; Munshi, A; Giri, U; Kumar, V; Roy, S; Ganesh, T; Mohanti, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For the first time in the world, BrainLAB has integrated its iPlan treatment planning system for clinical use with Elekta linear accelerator (Axesse with a Beam Modulator). The purpose of this study was to compare the calculated and measured doses with different chambers to establish the calculation accuracy of iPlan system. Methods: The iPlan has both Pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms. Beam data include depth doses, profiles and output measurements for different field sizes. Collected data was verified by vendor and beam modelling was done. Further QA tests were carried out in our clinic. Dose calculation accuracy verified point, volumetric dose measurement using ion chambers of different volumes (0.01cc and 0.125cc). Planner dose verification was done using diode array. Plans were generated in iPlan and irradiated in Elekta Axesse linear accelerator. Results: Dose calculation accuracies verified using ion chamber for 6 and 10 MV beam were 3.5+/-0.33(PB), 1.7%+/-0.7(MC) and 3.9%+/-0.6(PB), 3.4%+/-0.6(MC) respectively. Using a pin point chamber, dose calculation accuracy for 6MV and 10MV was 3.8%+/-0.06(PB), 1.21%+/-0.2(MC) and 4.2%+/-0.6(PB), 3.1%+/-0.7(MC) respectively. The calculated planar dose distribution for 10.4×10.4 cm2 was verified using a diode array and the gamma analysis for 2%-2mm criteria yielded pass rates of 88 %(PB) and 98.8%(MC) respectively. 3mm-3% yields 100% passing for both MC and PB algorithm. Conclusion: Dose calculation accuracy was found to be within acceptable limits for MC for 6MV beam. PB for both beams and MC for 10 MV beam were found to be outside acceptable limits. The output measurements were done twice for conformation. The lower gamma matching was attributed to meager number of measured profiles (only two profiles for PB) and coarse measurement resolution for diagonal profile measurement (5mm). Based on these measurements we concluded that 6 MV MC algorithm is suitable for patient treatment.

  11. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der; Bol, G H; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developed GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire treatment

  12. Project Work Plan: Hanford 100-D Area Treatability Demonstration - In Situ Biostimulation for Reducing Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-05-31

    This work plan supports a new, integrated approach to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This new approach will provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the ISRM barrier by directly treating chromium and other oxidizing species in groundwater (i.e., nitrate and dissolved oxygen), thereby increasing the longevity of the ISRM barrier and protecting the ecological receptors and human health at the river boundary.

  13. Bioventing reduces soil cleanup costs

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, M.C.; Erickson, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    An offshoot technology from soil venting, bioventing offers a win-win solution for soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nonvolatile contaminants such as diesel and fuel oil. Using low air flowrates through permeable soils, bioventing injects sufficient oxygen to support naturally-occurring bacteria, which biodegraded the VOCs and other contaminants into benign byproducts. Waste gas can be directly discharged to atmosphere without further treatment. This results in no offgas treatment required. Bioventing is a cost-effective alternative to traditional soil-venting techniques. Soil venting uses air to volatilize organic-compound contamination from the vadose zone, the unsaturated soil layer above groundwater. Unfortunately, this simple-and-fast approach creates a waste offgas that requires further treatment before discharge, thus adding significantly to overall project costs. In contrast, bioventing uses low air flowrates, which require lower capital and operating costs. No offgas treatment further reduces equipment and operating costs and often eliminates air permitting. As in all treatment strategies, the process must meet the cleanup objectives. Bioventing is an alternative technique making inroads into refining and petrochemical soil-remediation applications.

  14. The Great Oil Spill Cleanup Contest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Elaine

    1993-01-01

    Presents an exciting way to acquaint students with current methods to clean up oil spills. Students also have the freedom to create new clean-up methods as they think through the problem and experiment to find effective solutions. (PR)

  15. Wetland PCB Remediation Cleanup Proposal | Parker Street ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    In the following documents available on this page, EPA is providing the City's wetlands cleanup proposal to ensure that residents of New Bedford and other interested parties have the opportunity to access this information.

  16. Cleanup MAC and MBA code ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.K.

    1994-10-17

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) and Material Balance (MBA) database system had some minor code cleanup performed to its code. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness.

  17. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Cancer.gov

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  18. Online Hazardous Waste Cleanup Technical Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This issue paper is intended to give the reader examples of some online technical resources that can assist with hazardous waste cleanups in the Superfund, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and Brownfields programs.

  19. A Citizen's Guide to Drycleaner Cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The State Coalition for Remediation of Drycleaners (SCRD) has prepared an easy-to-read guide explaining the drycleaner cleanup process and describing the technologies that are most commonly used to clean up contaminated drycleaner sites.

  20. Intergenerational equity and environmental restoration cleanup levels.

    SciTech Connect

    Hocking, E. K.; Environmental Assessment

    2001-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy environmental restoration program faces difficult decisions about the levels of cleanup to be achieved at its many contaminated sites and has acknowledged the need for considering intergenerational equity in its decision making. Intergenerational equity refers to the fairness of access to resources across generations. Environmental restoration cleanup levels can have unintended and unfair consequences for future generations access to resources. The potentially higher costs associated with using low, non-risk-based cleanup levels for remediation may divert funding from other activities that could have a greater beneficial impact on future generations. Low, non-risk-based cleanup levels could also result in more damage to the nation's resources than would occur if a higher cleanup level were used. The loss or impairment of these resources could have an inequitable effect on future generations. However, intergenerational inequity could arise if sites are not completely restored and if access to and use of natural and cultural resources are unfairly limited as a result of residual contamination. In addition to concerns about creating possible intergenerational inequities related to selected cleanup levels, the tremendous uncertainties associated with sites and their restoration can lead site planners to rely on stewardship by default. An ill-conceived stewardship program can contribute to intergenerational inequity by limiting access to resources while passing on risks to future generations and not preparing them for those risks. This paper presents a basic model and process for designing stewardship programs that can achieve equity among generations.

  1. Toward a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy: residential/commercial buildings market sector workbook

    SciTech Connect

    Taul, Jr., J. W.; de Jong, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    This workbook contains preliminary data and assumptions used during the preparation of inputs to a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy (NPAC). The workbook indicates the market potential, competitive position, market penetration, and technological characteristics of solar technologies for this market sector over the next twenty years. The workbook also presents projections of the mix of solar technologies by US Census Regions. In some cases, data have been aggregated to the national level. Emphasis of the workbook is on a mid-price fuel scenario, Option II, that meets about a 20% solar goal by the year 2000. The energy demand for the mid-price scenario is projected at 115 quads in the year 2000. The workbook, prepared in April 1979, represents government policies and programs anticipated at that time.

  2. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1992-01-01

    The need to record some measure of the low-gravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle was recognized at an early stage of the U.S. Space Program. Such information was considered important for both the assessment of an astronaut's physical condition during and after space missions and the analysis of the fluid physics, materials processing, and biological sciences experiments run in space. Various measurement systems were developed and flown on space platforms beginning in the early 1970's. Similar in concept to land based seismometers that measure vibrations caused by earthquakes and explosions, accelerometers mounted on orbiting space vehicles measure vibrations in and of the vehicle due to internal and external sources, as well as vibrations in a sensor's relative acceleration with respect to the vehicle to which it is attached. The data collected over the years have helped to alter the perception of gravity on-board a space vehicle from the public's early concept of zero-gravity to the science community's evolution of thought from microgravity to milligravity to g-jitter or vibrational environment. Since the advent of the Shuttle Orbiter Program, especially since the start of Spacelab flights dedicated to scientific investigations, the interest in measuring the low-gravity environment in which experiments are run has increased. This interest led to the development and flight of numerous accelerometer systems dedicated to specific experiments. It also prompted the development of the NASA MSAD-sponsored Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). The first SAMS units flew in the Spacelab on STS-40 in June 1991 in support of the first Spacelab Life Sciences mission (SLS-1). SAMS is currently manifested to fly on all future Spacelab missions.

  3. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1992-09-01

    The need to record some measure of the low-gravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle was recognized at an early stage of the U.S. Space Program. Such information was considered important for both the assessment of an astronaut's physical condition during and after space missions and the analysis of the fluid physics, materials processing, and biological sciences experiments run in space. Various measurement systems were developed and flown on space platforms beginning in the early 1970's. Similar in concept to land based seismometers that measure vibrations caused by earthquakes and explosions, accelerometers mounted on orbiting space vehicles measure vibrations in and of the vehicle due to internal and external sources, as well as vibrations in a sensor's relative acceleration with respect to the vehicle to which it is attached. The data collected over the years have helped to alter the perception of gravity on-board a space vehicle from the public's early concept of zero-gravity to the science community's evolution of thought from microgravity to milligravity to g-jitter or vibrational environment. Since the advent of the Shuttle Orbiter Program, especially since the start of Spacelab flights dedicated to scientific investigations, the interest in measuring the low-gravity environment in which experiments are run has increased. This interest led to the development and flight of numerous accelerometer systems dedicated to specific experiments. It also prompted the development of the NASA MSAD-sponsored Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). The first SAMS units flew in the Spacelab on STS-40 in June 1991 in support of the first Spacelab Life Sciences mission (SLS-1). SAMS is currently manifested to fly on all future Spacelab missions.

  4. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-10-26

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the 100 Areas at the Hanford Site. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at the Hanford Site.

  5. Archaeological site protection: An integral component of the Exxon Valdez shoreline cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Wooley, C.B.; Haggarty, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A major cultural site identification and protection program in Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska was conducted as part of the Exxon Valdez spill response. In cooperation with state and federal agencies and Native corporations with historic preservation mandates, the four-year program was designed to identify archaeological sites in the area of the spill, determine the effect of planned cleanup on them, and mitigate impacts to sites during cleanup. Archaeological site protection constraints, augmented by an extensive cultural resource training program, were an integral part of each shoreline-specific cleanup plan. As a result, impacts attributable to the cleanup were limited to minor disturbances and two vandalism incidents. Impacts from oiling were minimal largely because most intertidal cultural sites had lost their fragile constituents and contextual integrity as a result of prespill erosion. State and federal studies confirmed the efficacy of the site identification and protection program, finding negligible impacts attributable to either direct oiling or the cleanup at intact sites. The Cultural Resource Program also developed innovative management strategies with implications for future emergency responses involving complex land management and site protection issues. The program greatly enhanced the knowledge of the area`s history by collecting and synthesizing considerable new archaeological information. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Document image cleanup and binarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Victor; Manmatha, Raghaven

    1998-04-01

    Image binarization is a difficult task for documents with text over textured or shaded backgrounds, poor contrast, and/or considerable noise. Current optical character recognition (OCR) and document analysis technology do not handle such documents well. We have developed a simple yet effective algorithm for document image clean-up and binarization. The algorithm consists of two basic steps. In the first step, the input image is smoothed using a low-pass filter. The smoothing operation enhances the text relative to any background texture. This is because background texture normally has higher frequency than text does. The smoothing operation also removes speckle noise. In the second step, the intensity histogram of the smoothed image is computed and a threshold automatically selected as follows. For black text, the first peak of the histogram corresponds to text. Thresholding the image at the value of the valley between the first and second peaks of the histogram binarizes the image well. In order to reliably identify the valley, the histogram is smoothed by a low-pass filter before the threshold is computed. The algorithm has been applied to some 50 images from a wide variety of source: digitized video frames, photos, newspapers, advertisements in magazines or sales flyers, personal checks, etc. There are 21820 characters and 4406 words in these images. 91 percent of the characters and 86 percent of the words are successfully cleaned up and binarized. A commercial OCR was applied to the binarized text when it consisted of fonts which were OCR recognizable. The recognition rate was 84 percent for the characters and 77 percent for the words.

  7. Fernald restoration: ecologists and engineers integrate restoration and cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Eric; Homer, John

    2002-07-15

    As cleanup workers excavate pits and tear down buildings at the Fernald site in southwest Ohio, site ecologists are working side-by-side to create thriving wetlands and develop the early stages of forest, prairie, and savanna ecosystems to restore natural resources that were impacted by years of site operations. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy-Fernald Office (DOE-FN) and its cleanup contractor, Fluor Fernald, Inc., initiated several ecological restoration projects in perimeter areas of the site (e.g., areas not used for or impacted by uranium processing or waste management). The projects are part of Fernald's final land use plan to restore natural resources over 904 acres of the 1,050-acre site. Pete Yerace, the DOE-FN Natural Resource Trustee representative is working with the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees in an oversight role to resolve the state of Ohio's 1986 claim against DOE for injuries to natural resources. Fluor Fernald, Inc., and DOE-FN developed the ''Natural Resource Restoration Plan'', which outlines 15 major restoration projects for the site and will restore injured natural resources at the site. In general, Fernald's plan includes grading to maximize the formation of wetlands or expanded floodplain, amending soil where topsoil has been removed during excavation, and establishing native vegetation throughout the site. Today, with cleanup over 35 percent complete and site closure targeted for 2006, Fernald is entering a new phase of restoration that involves heavily remediated areas. By working closely with engineers and cleanup crews, site ecologists can take advantage of remediation fieldwork (e.g., convert an excavated depression into a wetland) and avoid unnecessary costs and duplication. This collaboration has also created opportunities for relatively simple and inexpensive restoration of areas that were discovered during ongoing remediation. To ensure the survival of the plant material in heavily disturbed soils, Fernald will use

  8. GPU-accelerated ray-tracing for real-time treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, H.; Ziegenhein, P.; Kamerling, C. P.; Froening, H.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    Dose calculation methods in radiotherapy treatment planning require the radiological depth information of the voxels that represent the patient volume to correct for tissue inhomogeneities. This information is acquired by time consuming ray-tracing-based calculations. For treatment planning scenarios with changing geometries and real-time constraints this is a severe bottleneck. We implemented an algorithm for the graphics processing unit (GPU) which implements a ray-matrix approach to reduce the number of rays to trace. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of different strategies of accessing memory in kernel implementations as well as strategies for rapid data transfers between main memory and memory of the graphics device. Our study included the overlapping of computations and memory transfers to reduce the overall runtime using Hyper-Q. We tested our approach on a prostate case (9 beams, coplanar). The measured execution times for a complete ray-tracing range from 28 msec for the computations on the GPU to 99 msec when considering data transfers to and from the graphics device. Our GPU-based algorithm performed the ray-tracing in real-time. The strategies efficiently reduce the time consumption of memory accesses and data transfer overhead. The achieved runtimes demonstrate the viability of this approach and allow improved real-time performance for dose calculation methods in clinical routine.

  9. Notification: Enbridge Cleanup Hotline Complaint

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    September 14, 2012. The purpose of this memorandum is to notify you that the Office of Inspector General (OIG) plans to conduct a review of EPA’s use of Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund (OSLTF) money.

  10. SU-E-T-03: 3D GPU-Accelerated Secondary Checks of Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, F; Perez, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Redundant treatment verifications in conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques are traditionally performed with single point calculations. New solutions can replace these checks with 3D treatment plan verifications. This work describes a software tool (Mobius3D, Mobius Medical Systems) that uses a GPU-accelerated collapsed cone algorithm to perform 3D independent verifications of TPS calculations. Methods: Mobius3D comes with reference beam models for common linear accelerators. The system uses an independently developed collapsed cone algorithm updated with recent enhancements. 144 isotropically-spaced cones are used for each voxel for calculations. These complex calculations can be sped up by using GPUs. Mobius3D calculate dose using DICOM information coming from TPS (CT, RT Struct, RT Plan RT Dose). DVH-metrics and 3D gamma tests can be used to compare both TPS and secondary calculations. 170 patients treated with all common techniques as 3DCFRT (including wedged), static and dynamic IMRT and VMAT have been successfully verified with this solution. Results: Calculation times are between 3–5 minutes for 3DCFRT treatments and 15–20 for most complex dMLC and VMAT plans. For all PTVs mean dose and 90% coverage differences are (1.12±0.97)% and (0.68±1.19)%, respectively. Mean dose discrepancies for all OARs is (0.64±1.00)%. 3D gamma (global, 3%/3 mm) analysis shows a mean passing rate of (97.8 ± 3.0)% for PTVs and (99.0±3.0)% for OARs. 3D gamma pasing rate for all voxels in CT has a mean value of (98.5±1.6)%. Conclusion: Mobius3D is a powerful tool to verify all modalities of radiation therapy treatments. Dose discrepancies calculated by this system are in good agreement with TPS. The use of reference beam data results in time savings and can be used to avoid the propagation of errors in original beam data into our QA system. GPU calculations permit enhanced collapsed cone calculations with reasonable calculation times.

  11. Continuous Arc Rotation of the Couch Therapy for the Delivery of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Treatment Planning Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Kim, Leonard H.; Yan Di; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.; Grills, Inga S.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We present a novel form of arc therapy: continuous arc rotation of the couch (C-ARC) and compare its dosimetry with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). C-ARC, like VMAT, uses a modulated beam aperture and dose rate, but with the couch, not the gantry, rotating. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients previously treated with APBI using 3D-CRT were replanned with (1) C-ARC, (2) IMRT, and (3) VMAT. C-ARC plans were designed with one medial and one lateral arc through which the couch rotated while the gantry was held stationary at a tangent angle. Target dose coverage was normalized to the 3D-CRT plan. Comparative endpoints were dose to normal breast tissue, lungs, and heart and monitor units prescribed. Results: Compared with 3D-CRT, C-ARC, IMRT, and VMAT all significantly reduced the ipsilateral breast V50% by the same amount (mean, 7.8%). Only C-ARC and IMRT plans significantly reduced the contralateral breast maximum dose, the ipsilateral lung V5Gy, and the heart V5%. C-ARC used on average 40%, 30%, and 10% fewer monitor units compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: C-ARC provides improved dosimetry and treatment efficiency, which should reduce the risks of toxicity and secondary malignancy. Its tangent geometry avoids irradiation of critical structures that is unavoidable using the en face geometry of VMAT.

  12. Problems and limitations of voluntary cleanup programs

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.F.

    1995-12-31

    At least a dozen states have already implemented voluntary cleanup programs (VCPs). Provisions to promote state VCPs were prominent in the EPA`s 1994 proposed revisions to CERCLA and in current legislative initiatives. Under the VCP, property owners voluntarily enroll to investigate and remediate contaminated sites with the aegis of a state agency and thus avoid involvement with the federal Superfund program. When the state agency is satisfied with the condition of the site, it issues a certificate to the owner. The VCP is meant to mitigate unintended consequences of CERCLA such as the economic abandonment of urban industrial sites in favor of unpolluted suburban sites. The VCP concept has been combined with other reforms including cleanup standards, financial incentives, and independent action. The effectiveness of voluntary cleanup programs is limited by the costs of investigation and cleanup relative to the value of the property in question. It is also limited when property has environmental problems outside the traditional focus of state Superfund agencies on soil and groundwater contamination. VCPs also have potential unintended consequences of their own. The VCP concept is consistent with a 15 year trend of increasing government attention and involvement with sites of diminishing health and environmental significance. VCP may reinforce the perception of liability and unwittingly raise the standard of due diligence in property assessments, especially if combined with generic cleanup standard.

  13. Accelerated evaluation of the robustness of treatment plans against geometric uncertainties by Gaussian processes.

    PubMed

    Sobotta, B; Söhn, M; Alber, M

    2012-12-07

    In order to provide a consistently high quality treatment, it is of great interest to assess the robustness of a treatment plan under the influence of geometric uncertainties. One possible method to implement this is to run treatment simulations for all scenarios that may arise from these uncertainties. These simulations may be evaluated in terms of the statistical distribution of the outcomes (as given by various dosimetric quality metrics) or statistical moments thereof, e.g. mean and/or variance. This paper introduces a method to compute the outcome distribution and all associated values of interest in a very efficient manner. This is accomplished by substituting the original patient model with a surrogate provided by a machine learning algorithm. This Gaussian process (GP) is trained to mimic the behavior of the patient model based on only very few samples. Once trained, the GP surrogate takes the place of the patient model in all subsequent calculations.The approach is demonstrated on two examples. The achieved computational speedup is more than one order of magnitude.

  14. Status of Environmental Management Initiatives to Accelerate the Reduction of Environmental Risks and Challenges Posed by the Legacy of the Cold War

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    maintaining safety at each site while negotiating state and Federal environmental compliance agreements. The program also concentrated on characterizing waste and nuclear materials and assessing the magnitude and extent of environmental contamination. By the late 1990s, EM had made significant progress in identifying and characterizing the extent of contamination and cleanup required and began transitioning from primarily a characterization and stabilization program to an active cleanup and closure program. During that time, EM formulated multi-year cleanup and closure plans, which contributed to cleanup progress; however, reducing the overall environmental risk associated with the cleanup program remained a challenge. In response, the Secretary of Energy directed a review of the EM program be undertaken. The resulting 'Top-to Bottom Review' re-directed the program focus from managing risks to accelerating the reduction of these risks.

  15. The National LUST Cleanup Backlog: A Study of Opportunities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To understand the makeup of UST releases remaining and why the pace of cleanups is slowing, EPA undertook a two-phase, data-driven analysis of the cleanups remaining as of 2006 (Phase 1) and 2009 (Phase 2).

  16. Hantavirus Prevention: Cleanup of Rodent Contamination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Hantaviruses in the Americas may cause human disease involving the lungs, hence the name " hantavirus pulmonary syndrome" (HPS). Since May 1993, a...humans are also found in other rodents, but the number of cases stemming from these hantaviruses is small when compared to SNV. Hantavirus is shed in... HANTAVIRUS PREVENTION: CLEANUP OF RODENT CONTAMINATION Technical Information Paper 18-001-0306

  17. Environmental Cleanup: Defense Indemnification for Contractor Operations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-25

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act ( CERCLA ) as amended, commonly known as Superfund (42 U.S.C. 9601-75), imposes liability... CERCLA , DoD is included among parties responsible for environmental cleanup of its facilities. If DoD pays cleaup costs related to a contractor’s

  18. Assessment of synfuel spill cleanup options

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, S.E.; Wakamiya, W.; English, C.J.; Strand, J.A.; Mahlum, D.D.

    1982-04-01

    Existing petroleum-spill cleanup technologies are reviewed and their limitations, should they be used to mitigate the effects of synfuels spills, are discussed. The six subsections of this report address the following program goals: synfuels production estimates to the year 2000; possible sources of synfuel spills and volumes of spilled fuel to the year 2000; hazards of synfuels spills; assessment of existing spill cleanup technologies for oil spills; assessment of cleanup technologies for synfuel spills; and disposal of residue from synfuel spill cleanup operations. The first goal of the program was to obtain the most current estimates on synfuel production. These estimates were then used to determine the amount of synfuels and synfuel products likely to be spilled, by location and by method of transportation. A review of existing toxicological studies and existing spill mitigation technologies was then completed to determine the potential impacts of synthetic fuel spills on the environment. Data are presented in the four appendixes on the following subjects: synfuel production estimates; acute toxicity of synfuel; acute toxicity of alcohols.

  19. Flood Cleanup to Protect Indoor Air Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    During a flood cleanup, the indoor air quality in your home or office may appear to be the least of your problems. However, failure to remove contaminated materials and to reduce moisture and humidity can present serious long-term health risks.

  20. Fast-Track Cleanup at Closing DoD Installations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Fast-Track Cleanup program strives to make parcels available for reuse as quickly as possible by the transfer of uncontaminated or remediated parcels, the lease of contaminated parcels where cleanup is underway, or the 'early transfer' of contaminated property undergoing cleanup.

  1. SU-E-T-194: Commissioning of Monaco Treatment Planning System On An Elekta VersaHD Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanasamy, G; Bosse, C; Saenz, D; Cruz, W; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S; Mavroidis, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Monaco treatment planning system (TPS) uses a Monte-Carlo algorithm based dose computation engine to model the photon beams of a linear accelerator. The aim is to perform verification of Monaco TPS beam modeling of a Elekta VersaHD linac with 6MV, 6MV FFF, 10 MV, 10MV FFF, 18MV photon beams and 160 multileaf collimators (MLC) with a projected width of 5-mm at the isocenter. Methods: A series of dosimetric tests were performed to validate Monaco calculated beams including point dose measurement in water with and without heterogeneity and 2-dimensional dose distributions on a Delta4 bi-planar diode dosimeter array (Scandidos, Uppsala, Sweden). 3D conformal beams of different field sizes, source-to-surface distances, wedges, and gantry angles were delivered onto a phantom consisting of several plastic water and Styrofoam slabs. Point dose measurements were verified with a PTW 31013 Semiflex 0.3 cc ionization chamber (PTW, Freiburg, Germany). In addition, 8 step and shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) beams included in the Monaco TPS commissioning suite were verified against measurements on Delta4 to test and fine tune parameters in the beam model. IMRT verification was computed using gamma analysis with dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria of 3%/3mm with a dose threshold of 10%. Results: Point dose measurements agreed within 2% in the homogeneous phantom and within 3% in the heterogeneous phantom for all photon energies. IMRT beams yielded a passing percentage of 99.1±1.1% in the gamma analysis which is well above the institutional passing threshold of 90%. Conclusion: Monaco TPS commissioning was successfully performed for all the photon energies on the Elekta VersaHD linac prior to clinical usage.

  2. Groundwater cleanup demonstrations at Complex 34, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At Launch Complex 34, Cape Canaveral Air Station, several studies are under way for groundwater cleanup of trichloroethylene at the site. Shown here is monitoring equipment for one of the methods, potassium permanganate oxidation. Concentrations of trichloroethylene solvent have been identified in the soil at the complex as a result of cleaning methods for rocket parts during the Apollo Program in the 60s. The environmental research project involves the Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and NASA, who formed the Interagency NDAPL Consortium (IDC), to study three contamination cleanup technologies: Six Phase Soil Heating, Steam Injection and In Situ Oxidation with Potassium Permanganate. All three methods may offer a way to remove the contaminants in months instead of decades. KSC hosted a two-day conference that presented information and demonstrations of the three technologies for representatives from environmental and federal agencies.

  3. Groundwater cleanup demonstrations at Complex 34, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At Launch Complex 34, the Six-Phase Soil Heating site that is involved in a groundwater cleanup project can be seen. The project involves the Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and NASA. Concentrations of trichloroethylene solvent have been identified in the soil at the complex as a result of cleaning methods for rocket parts during the Apollo Program, which used the complex, in the 60s. The group formed the Interagency NDAPL Consortium (IDC) to study three contamination cleanup technologies: Six-Phase Soil Heating, Steam Injection and In Situ Oxidation with Potassium Permanganate. All three methods may offer a way to remove the contaminants in months instead of decades. In the background is the block house for the complex. KSC hosted a two-day conference that presented information and demonstrations of the three technologies being tested at the site.

  4. Groundwater cleanup demonstrations at Complex 34, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At Launch Complex 34, representatives from environmental and Federal agencies head for the block house during presentations about the environmental research project that involves the Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and NASA in a groundwater cleanup effort. Concentrations of trichloroethylene solvent have been identified in the soil at the complex as a result of cleaning methods for rocket parts during the Apollo Program, which used the complex, in the 60s. The group formed the Interagency NDAPL Consortium (IDC) to study three contamination cleanup technologies: Six Phase Soil Heating, Steam Injection and In Situ Oxidation with Potassium Permanganate. All three methods may offer a way to remove the contaminants in months instead of decades. KSC hosted a two-day conference that presented information and demonstrations of the three technologies being tested at the site.

  5. Groundwater cleanup demonstrations at Complex 34, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At Launch Complex 34, Greg Beyke, with Current Environmental Solutions, talks to representatives from environmental and federal agencies about the environmental research project that involves the Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and NASA in a groundwater cleanup effort. Concentrations of trichloroethylene solvent have been identified in the soil at the complex as a result of cleaning methods for rocket parts during the Apollo Program, which used the complex, in the 60s. The group formed the Interagency NDAPL Consortium (IDC) to study three contamination cleanup technologies: Six Phase Soil Heating, Steam Injection and In Situ Oxidation with Potassium Permanganate. All three methods may offer a way to remove the contaminants in months instead of decades. KSC hosted a two-day conference that presented information and demonstrations of the three technologies being tested at the site.

  6. Sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Boneyard/Burnyard Accelerated Action Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    In the Bear Creek Valley Watershed Remedial Investigation, the Boneyard/Burnyard was identified as the source of the largest releases of uranium into groundwater and surface water in Bear Creek Valley. The proposed action for remediation of this site is selective excavation and removal of source material and capping of the remainder of the site. The schedule for this action has been accelerated so that this is the first remedial action planned to be implemented in the Bear Creek Valley Record of Decision. Additional data needs to support design of the remedial action were identified at a data quality objectives meeting held for this project. Sampling at the Boneyard/Burnyard will be conducted through the use of a phased approach. Initial or primary samples will be used to make in-the-field decisions about where to locate follow-up or secondary samples. On the basis of the results of surface water, soil, and groundwater analysis, up to six test pits will be dug. The test pits will be used to provide detailed descriptions of source materials and bulk samples. This document sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in this project. This document also contains the health and safety plan, quality assurance project plan, waste management plan, data management plan, implementation plan, and best management practices plan for this project as appendices.

  7. Community Involvement Plan Presentation in Western Agency

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Region 9 will host a Community Involvement Plan presentation in the Western Agency chapter to discuss EPA’s outreach plans with community members in uranium impacted areas and answer questions about mine cleanup progress.

  8. Determining Cleanup Standards for Hazardous Waste Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    CERCLA ) 8 was designed to deal with so-called Superfund sites like Love Canal. Among other things, Section 121 of that Act 9 describes, the cleanup...the "big stick" for cleaning up dangerous environmental sites falls under the broad 17 scope of CERCLA and the Superfund . The fundamental difference...as wastes under RCRA but are still 43 considered "hazardous" for CERCLA regulation. Furthermore, CERCLA , as amended by the Superfund Amendment and

  9. Cleanup standards and pathways analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Devgun, J.S.

    1993-09-01

    Remediation of a radioactively contaminated site requires that certain regulatory criteria be met before the site can be released for unrestricted future use. Since the ultimate objective of remediation is to protect the public health and safety, residual radioactivity levels remaining at a site after cleanup must be below certain preset limits or meet acceptable dose or risk criteria. Release of a decontaminated site requires proof that the radiological data obtained from the site meet the regulatory criteria for such a release. Typically release criteria consist of a composite of acceptance limits that depend on the radionuclides, the media in which they are present, and federal and local regulations. In recent years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a pathways analysis model to determine site-specific soil activity concentration guidelines for radionuclides that do not have established generic acceptance limits. The DOE pathways analysis computer code (developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the DOE) is called RESRAD (Gilbert et al. 1989). Similar efforts have been initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop and use dose-related criteria based on genetic pathways analyses rather than simplistic numerical limits on residual radioactivity. The focus of this paper is radionuclide contaminated soil. Cleanup standards are reviewed, pathways analysis methods are described, and an example is presented in which RESRAD was used to derive cleanup guidelines.

  10. Studies of Plutonium Aerosol Resuspension at the Time of the Maralinga Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J

    2003-08-01

    At the former nuclear test site at Maralinga, South Australia, soil cleanup began in October 1996 with the objective to remove the potential for residual plutonium (Pu) exposures to the public. In this case the cleanup was to restore access to the closed test site. The proposed long-term land use was primarily to be a hunting area for Pitjantjatjara (Aboriginal) people, but also presumably to be available to the public who might have an interest in the history of the site. The long-term management objective for the site was to allow casual use, but to prohibit habitation. The goal of this study is to provide an evaluation of the Maralinga soil cleanup in terms of potential long-term public inhalation exposures to particulate Pu, and in terms of a contribution to planning and conducting any such soil Pu-cleanup. Such cleanups might be carried out for example, on the Nevada Test Site in the United States. For Pu that has been deposited on the soil by atmospheric sources of finely divided particles, the dominant exposure pathway to humans is by inhalation. Other exposure pathways are less important because the Pu particles become oxidized into a nearly insoluble form, do not easily enter into the food chain, nor are they significantly transferred through the intestine to the bloodstream should Pu become ingested. The purpose of this report is to provide results of the Pu resuspension measurements made before, during, and after the Pu cleanup at Maralinga, to compare these against similar measurements made elsewhere, and to interpret the results as they relate to potential long-term public exposures. (Exposures to Pu in dust plumes produced by mechanical disturbance during cleanup are considered short-term, unlikely to be significant for purposes of this report, and are not included). A considerable amount of research had been conducted at Maralinga by the Australian Radiation Laboratory, now the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA

  11. Cleanup of Nuclear Licensed Facility 57

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanjacques, Michel; Bremond, Marie Pierre; Marchand, Carole; Poyau, Cecile; Viallefont, Cecile; Gautier, Laurent; Masure, Frederic

    2008-01-15

    necessary methods of analysis for monitoring it were also developed. The research and development program finally ended on 30 June 1995. The NLF 57 cleanup program was intended to reduce the nuclear and conventional hazards and minimize the quantities of HLW and MLW during the subsequent dismantling work. To facilitate the organization of the cleanup work, it was divided into categories by type: - treatment and removal of nuclear material, - removal of radioactive sources, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste, - treatment and removal of organic effluents, - treatment and removal of solid waste, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank, - flushing and decontamination of the tanks, - cleanup of Buildings 18 and 91/54. To estimate the cost of the operations and to monitor the progress of the work, an indicator system was put in place based on work units representative of the operation. The values of the work units were periodically updated on the basis of experience feedback. The cleanup progress is now 92% complete (06/12/31): - treatment and removal of nuclear material: 100%, - removal of radioactive sources: 100%, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste: 64%, - treatment and removal of organic effluents: 87%, - treatment and removal of solid waste: 99%, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank: 69%, - flushing and decontamination of tank: 75%, - section cleaning of Buildings 18 and 91/: 90%. The DRSN/SAFAR is the delegated Project Owner for cleanup and dismantling operations. It is also the prime contractor for the cleanup and dismantling operations. SAFAR itself is responsible for operations relating to the CEA activity and those with technical risks (Removal of nuclear materials, Removal of radioactive sources, Pumping out plutonium and transuranic contaminated solvent and Flushing and decontamination of tanks and pipes). All other operations are sub-contracted to specialist companies. The NLF57 cleanup program as executed is capable of attaining activity levels

  12. Systems engineering product description report for the Hanford Cleanup Mission: First issue

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.J.; Bailey, K.B.; Collings, J.L.; Hubbard, A.B.; Niepke, T.M.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes the upper level physical and administrative (nonphysical) products that, when delivered, complete the Hanford Cleanup Mission. Development of product descriptions is a continuation of the Sitewide Systems Engineering work described in the Sitewide functional analysis, the architecture synthesis, and is consistent with guidance contained in the mission plan. This document provides a bridge between all three documents and the products required to complete the mission of cleaning up the Hanford Site.

  13. Waste Cleanup: Status and Implications of DOE’s Compliance Agreements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    Ridge, Tennessee; the Nevada Test Site, Nevada; and Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico . Many other stakeholders are involved in the cleanup...requirement to transport a portion of its transuranic waste to New Mexico , allowing instead for disposal on-site. While these options could reduce treatment...treat, and dispose of covered mixed wastes at the laboratory (incorporates Site Treatment Plan) DOE; New Mexico Environment Department

  14. Successes and lessons learned: How to accelerate the base closure process

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, V.C.; Stoll, R.

    1994-12-31

    Naval Station Puget Sound, Seattle, was nominated for closure by the Base Closure Commission in 1991 (BRAC II) and will be transferred in September of 1995. Historic activities have resulted in petroleum-related environmental issues. Unlike many bases being closed, the politically sensitive issues are not the economics of job losses. Because homeless housing is expected to be included in the selected reuse plan, the primary concerns of the public are reduced real estate values and public safety. In addition to a reuse plan adopted by the Seattle City Council, the Muckleshoot Indian tribe has also submitted an alternative reuse plan to the Navy. Acceleration methods described in this paper include methods for beginning the environmental impact statement (EIS) process before reuse plans are finalized; tracking development of engineering alternatives in parallel with environmental investigations; using field screening data to begin developing plans and specifications for remediation, instead of waiting 6 weeks for analytical results and data validation; using efficient communication techniques to facilitate accelerated review of technical documents by the BCT; expediting removal actions and performing ``cleanups incidental to investigation``; and effectively facilitating members of the Restoration Advisory Board with divergent points of view. This paper will describe acceleration methods that proved to be effective and methods that could be modified to be more effective at other sites.

  15. Technologies for environmental cleanup: Soil and ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1992-07-01

    This is the first of a series of four EUROCOURSES that will be conducted under the title of ``Technologies for Envirommental Cleanup.`` This first course will address the needs of today`s environmental protection managers who must deal with the cleanup of soil and ground water contamination. It focuses on recent developments in the areas of policies and regulations, characterization. of.contaminants, subsurface transport and fate of contaminants, cleanup technologies, contaminant risk analysis, and cleanup strategies. Until the goal of acceptable cleanup is achieved, dissemination of information about available cleanup techniques is essential - through courses such as these developed by experts in the US and Europe especially for governmental and industrial managers throughout the world.

  16. Technologies for environmental cleanup: Soil and ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1992-07-01

    This is the first of a series of four EUROCOURSES that will be conducted under the title of Technologies for Envirommental Cleanup.'' This first course will address the needs of today's environmental protection managers who must deal with the cleanup of soil and ground water contamination. It focuses on recent developments in the areas of policies and regulations, characterization. of.contaminants, subsurface transport and fate of contaminants, cleanup technologies, contaminant risk analysis, and cleanup strategies. Until the goal of acceptable cleanup is achieved, dissemination of information about available cleanup techniques is essential - through courses such as these developed by experts in the US and Europe especially for governmental and industrial managers throughout the world.

  17. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Public information report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The document presents answers to frequently asked questions about plans for cleanup and decontamination activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Answers to the questions asked are based on information in the NRC 'Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2,' NUREG-0683.

  18. An evaluation of public preferences for Superfund site cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, W.

    1995-12-31

    This study evaluates public preferences for cleanup of NPL sites. The National Priority List (NPL) was created to allocate use of Superfund monies. In spite of the expert view that NPL sites pose little immediate threat, substantial evidence suggests that people living near such sites believe they are at risk. The seriousness of the public view is captured by the large losses in property values that have occurred near such sites. Complete sit cleanup would presumably restore property values, thus property losses can approximate public willingness to pay for complete cleanup. Since complete cleanup is extremely expensive, a key question is, what level of cleanup would be acceptable to the public? A pilot market research study was used in an attempt to develop a methodology to answer this question. A survey instrument was developed that presented a hypothetical NPL site with a large population in close proximity, informed respondents of expert assessments of risk and the potential environmental effects of the site, and provided detailed information on cleanup options. Respondents selected their most preferred option. Implications of the research were further explored by examining potential aggregate benefits for cleanup of non-Federal NPL sites. Some preliminary conclusions emerged. (1) NPL listing of a site appears to exacerbate the fears of nearby citizens. (2) Results suggest that many people are satisfied with options other than complete cleanup, particularly when there are risks associated with complete cleanup. (3) Values for cleanup estimated in the pilot study are consistent with estimates from property value evidence. (4) High priority should be placed on expedited cleanup of sites with large enough nearby populations to pass a benefit-cost test based on public preferences. (5) Public preferrences should be incorporated into decisions regarding the extent of cleanup at NPL sites.

  19. Landfill gas cleanup for fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    EPRI is to test the feasibility of using a carbonate fuel cell to generate electricity from landfill gas. Landfills produce a substantial quantity of methane gas, a natural by-product of decaying organic wastes. Landfill gas, however, contains sulfur and halogen compounds, which are known contaminants to fuel cells and their fuel processing equipment. The objective of this project is to clean the landfill gas well enough to be used by the fuel cell without making the process prohibitively expensive. The cleanup system tested in this effort could also be adapted for use with other fuel cells (e.g., solid oxide, phosphoric acid) running on landfill gas.

  20. Harnessing microbial activities for environmental cleanup.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Frank E; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2006-06-01

    Human activities have released large amounts of toxic organic and inorganic chemicals into the environment. Toxic waste streams threaten dwindling drinking water supplies and impact terrestrial, estuarine and marine ecosystems. Cleanup is technically challenging and the costs based on traditional technologies are exceeding the economic capabilities of even the richest countries. Recent advances in our understanding of the microbiology contributing to contaminant transformation and detoxification has led to successful field demonstrations. Hence, harnessing the activity of naturally occurring bacteria, particularly the power of anaerobic reductive processes, is a promising approach to restore contaminated subsurface environments, protect drinking water reservoirs and to safeguard ecosystem health.

  1. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

    1999-09-30

    The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

  2. Using geostatistics to evaluate cleanup goals

    SciTech Connect

    Marcon, M.F.; Hopkins, L.P.

    1995-12-01

    Geostatistical analysis is a powerful predictive tool typically used to define spatial variability in environmental data. The information from a geostatistical analysis using kriging, a geostatistical. tool, can be taken a step further to optimize sampling location and frequency and help quantify sampling uncertainty in both the remedial investigation and remedial design at a hazardous waste site. Geostatistics were used to quantify sampling uncertainty in attainment of a risk-based cleanup goal and determine the optimal sampling frequency necessary to delineate the horizontal extent of impacted soils at a Gulf Coast waste site.

  3. 40 CFR 761.125 - Requirements for PCB spill cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... required. (2) Disposal of cleanup debris and materials. All concentrated soils, solvents, rags, and other...) General. Unless expressly limited, the reporting, disposal, and precleanup sampling requirements...

  4. 40 CFR 761.125 - Requirements for PCB spill cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... required. (2) Disposal of cleanup debris and materials. All concentrated soils, solvents, rags, and other...) General. Unless expressly limited, the reporting, disposal, and precleanup sampling requirements...

  5. 40 CFR 761.125 - Requirements for PCB spill cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... required. (2) Disposal of cleanup debris and materials. All concentrated soils, solvents, rags, and other...) General. Unless expressly limited, the reporting, disposal, and precleanup sampling requirements...

  6. 40 CFR 761.125 - Requirements for PCB spill cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... required. (2) Disposal of cleanup debris and materials. All concentrated soils, solvents, rags, and other...) General. Unless expressly limited, the reporting, disposal, and precleanup sampling requirements...

  7. 40 CFR 761.125 - Requirements for PCB spill cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... required. (2) Disposal of cleanup debris and materials. All concentrated soils, solvents, rags, and other...) General. Unless expressly limited, the reporting, disposal, and precleanup sampling requirements...

  8. Proposed framework for cleanup and site restoration following a terrorist incident involving radioactive material.

    PubMed

    Conklin, W Craig

    2005-11-01

    Cleanup following a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or improvised nuclear device (IND) is likely to be technically challenging, costly, and politically charged. Lessons learned from the Top Officials 2 exercise and the increased threat of terrorist use of an RDD or IND have driven federal officials to push for an agreed-upon process for determining appropriate cleanup levels. State and local authorities generally have the ultimate responsibility for final public health decisions in their jurisdictions. In response to terrorist attacks, local authorities are likely to request federal assistance in assessing the risk and establishing appropriate cleanup levels. It is realistic to expect local and state requests for significant federal assistance in planning and implementing recovery operations. State and local authorities may desire "shared accountability" with the federal government in setting the appropriate cleanup levels. Government officials at all levels will face pressure to say how clean is clean enough and how quickly people can re-enter affected areas. Issues arising include (1) the nature of the relationship between the federal, state, and local leadership involved in the recovery efforts and (2) where the funding for recovery comes from. Many agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have long been involved in cleanup activities involving radioactive materials. These agencies have recognized the need for a participatory process and realize the need to remain flexible when faced with possible unprecedented environmental challenges following a terrorist attack. Currently, the Department of Homeland Security has a committee process underway, with participation of the EPA, NRC, DOE, and other federal agencies, to try to resolve these issues and to begin engaging state, local, and tribal governments, and others as

  9. Groundwater cleanup demonstrations at Complex 34, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On top of the block house at Launch Complex 34, representatives from environmental and Federal agencies hear from Laymon Gray, with Florida State University, about the environmental research project that involves the Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and NASA in a groundwater cleanup effort. Concentrations of trichloroethylene solvent have been identified in the soil at the complex as a result of cleaning methods for rocket parts during the Apollo Program, which used the complex, in the 60s. The group formed the Interagency NDAPL Consortium (IDC) to study three contamination cleanup technologies: Six Phase Soil Heating, Steam Injection and In Situ Oxidation with Potassium Permanganate. All three methods may offer a way to remove the contaminants in months instead of decades. In the background (left) can be seen the cement platform and walkway from the block house to the pad. Beyond it is the Atlantic Ocean. KSC hosted a two-day conference that presented information and demonstrations of the three technologies being tested at the site.

  10. Toward a national plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy: the implications of a national commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennington, G.; Bohannon, M.; Gerstein, R.; Hartzler, R.; Kannan, N.; Miller, G.; Rebibo, K.; Shulman, M.; Spewak, P.; Taul, J.

    1980-01-01

    This report analyzes the expected benefits, costs, and implications of three levels of federal commitment and subsidy for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy. It includes estimates of potential solar use representing 16 to 23 percent of the nation's energy supply in the year 2000. Projections are based on data available as of early 1979.

  11. Monte Carlo evaluation of the AAA treatment planning algorithm in a heterogeneous multilayer phantom and IMRT clinical treatments for an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E.; Tomsej, M.; Smedt, B. de; Reynaert, N.; Vynckier, S.

    2007-05-15

    The Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) is a new pencil beam convolution/superposition algorithm proposed by Varian for photon dose calculations. The configuration of AAA depends on linear accelerator design and specifications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of AAA for an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator for small fields and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments in inhomogeneous media. The accuracy of AAA was evaluated in two studies. First, AAA was compared both with Monte Carlo (MC) and the measurements in an inhomogeneous phantom simulating lung equivalent tissues and bone ribs. The algorithm was tested under lateral electronic disequilibrium conditions, using small fields (2x2 cm{sup 2}). Good agreement was generally achieved for depth dose and profiles, with deviations generally below 3% in lung inhomogeneities and below 5% at interfaces. However, the effects of attenuation and scattering close to the bone ribs were not fully taken into account by AAA, and small inhomogeneities may lead to planning errors. Second, AAA and MC were compared for IMRT plans in clinical conditions, i.e., dose calculations in a computed tomography scan of a patient. One ethmoid tumor, one orophaxynx and two lung tumors are presented in this paper. Small differences were found between the dose volume histograms. For instance, a 1.7% difference for the mean planning target volume dose was obtained for the ethmoid case. Since better agreement was achieved for the same plans but in homogeneous conditions, these differences must be attributed to the handling of inhomogeneities by AAA. Therefore, inherent assumptions of the algorithm, principally the assumption of independent depth and lateral directions in the scaling of the kernels, were slightly influencing AAA's validity in inhomogeneities. However, AAA showed a good accuracy overall and a great ability to handle small fields in inhomogeneous media compared to other pencil beam convolution

  12. Monte carlo evaluation of the AAA treatment planning algorithm in a heterogeneous multilayer phantom and IMRT clinical treatments for an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sterpin, E; Tomsej, M; De Smedt, B; Reynaert, N; Vynckier, S

    2007-05-01

    The Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) is a new pencil beam convolution/superposition algorithm proposed by Varian for photon dose calculations. The configuration of AAA depends on linear accelerator design and specifications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of AAA for an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator for small fields and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments in inhomogeneous media. The accuracy of AAA was evaluated in two studies. First, AAA was compared both with Monte Carlo (MC) and the measurements in an inhomogeneous phantom simulating lung equivalent tissues and bone ribs. The algorithm was tested under lateral electronic disequilibrium conditions, using small fields (2 x 2 cm(2)). Good agreement was generally achieved for depth dose and profiles, with deviations generally below 3% in lung inhomogeneities and below 5% at interfaces. However, the effects of attenuation and scattering close to the bone ribs were not fully taken into account by AAA, and small inhomogeneities may lead to planning errors. Second, AAA and MC were compared for IMRT plans in clinical conditions, i.e., dose calculations in a computed tomography scan of a patient. One ethmoid tumor, one orophaxynx and two lung tumors are presented in this paper. Small differences were found between the dose volume histograms. For instance, a 1.7% difference for the mean planning target volume dose was obtained for the ethmoid case. Since better agreement was achieved for the same plans but in homogeneous conditions, these differences must be attributed to the handling of inhomogeneities by AAA. Therefore, inherent assumptions of the algorithm, principally the assumption of independent depth and lateral directions in the scaling of the kernels, were slightly influencing AAA's validity in inhomogeneities. However, AAA showed a good accuracy overall and a great ability to handle small fields in inhomogeneous media compared to other pencil beam convolution

  13. 48 CFR 49.105-4 - Cleanup of construction site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cleanup of construction site. 49.105-4 Section 49.105-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 49.105-4 Cleanup of construction site....

  14. Community Cleanup. Youth in Action Bulletin, Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Every community has areas--public parks, schoolyards, sidewalks--that are neglected, vandalized, or just plain run down. Young people can help clean up those places by getting involved in a community cleanup project. As explained in this bulletin, a community cleanup is a project in which volunteers of all ages work together to spruce up a chosen…

  15. Review of State Soil Cleanup Levels for Dioxin (December 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report summarizes a survey of state soil cleanup levels for dioxin and characterizes the science underlying these values. The objective of this project was to summarize existing state cleanup levels for dioxin in soil, together with their scientific bases where availa...

  16. Architecture synthesis basis for the Hanford Cleanup system: First issue

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.J.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes a set of candidate alternatives proposed to accomplish the Hanford Cleanup system functions defined in a previous work. Development of alternatives is part of a sequence of system engineering activities which lead to definition of all the products which, when completed, accomplish the cleanup mission. The alternative set is developed to functional level four or higher depending on need.

  17. Mercury incident at Banks, Oregon home requires EPA emergency cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle-April 17, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has completed an emergency cleanup of elemental mercury at a residential home in Banks, Oregon. EPA worked closely with state and local authorities to complete the cleanup and ensure that pu

  18. Risk management: Reducing brownfield cleanup costs

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, N.

    1997-08-01

    Balancing environmental protection with economic vitality is crucial to maintaining competitiveness in world markets. One key initiative that has been identified as important to both environmental protection and the economy is the redevelopment of brownfields. Brownfield redevelopment can stimulate local economies that have been devastated by lost jobs and can recycle industrial land use, thereby preserving undeveloped lands. Many existing brownfield sites appear on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priority List (NPL), which designates over 1200 sites and is expected to grow to more than 2000 by the end of the decade. EPA estimates the cost of remediating the sites on the current list will approach $30 billion, with the average cost of remediating a site close to $25 million. Thousands of additional brownfield sites that do not appear on the NPL are listed under state cleanup programs.

  19. All-quad meshing without cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Rushdi, Ahmad A.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Mahmoud, Ahmed H.; Bajaj, Chandrajit C.; Ebeida, Mohamed S.

    2016-08-22

    Here, we present an all-quad meshing algorithm for general domains. We start with a strongly balanced quadtree. In contrast to snapping the quadtree corners onto the geometric domain boundaries, we move them away from the geometry. Then we intersect the moved grid with the geometry. The resulting polygons are converted into quads with midpoint subdivision. Moving away avoids creating any flat angles, either at a quadtree corner or at a geometry–quadtree intersection. We are able to handle two-sided domains, and more complex topologies than prior methods. The algorithm is provably correct and robust in practice. It is cleanup-free, meaning we have angle and edge length bounds without the use of any pillowing, swapping, or smoothing. Thus, our simple algorithm is fast and predictable. This paper has better quality bounds, and the algorithm is demonstrated over more complex domains, than our prior version.

  20. Saudis map $450 million gulf spill cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-18

    This paper reports on Saudi Arabia which has earmarked about $450 million to clean up Persian Gulf beaches polluted by history's worst oil spills, created during the Persian Gulf crisis. Details of the proposed cleanup measures were outlined by Saudi environmental officials at a seminar on the environment in Dubai, OPEC News Agency reported. The seminar was sponsored by the Gulf Area Oil Companies Mutual Aid Organization, an environmental cooperative agency set up by Persian Gulf governments. Meantime, a Saudi government report has outlined early efforts designed to contain the massive oil spills that hit the Saudi coast before oil could contaminate water intakes at the huge desalination plants serving Riyadh and cooling water facilities at Al Jubail.

  1. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Dorchak, T.P.; Pontiu, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    The nature of the collected ash has been identified as an issue creating barriers to the commercialization of advanced particle control technologies. Since most of the emphasis and extended operation of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) facilities have been with ceramic candle filters, problems with ash characteristics can be understood in terms of their effects on these control devices. This project is designed to identify the ways ash characteristics affect advanced particle control technologies, to construct and maintain a data base of HGCU ashes and their measured characteristics, and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these facilities. The key characteristics of the collected ash are the morphology of the overall ash aggregate (porosity, geometry of the pores, specific surface area, etc.), and the cohesivity of the aggregate. Our data base currently comprises 242 ash samples from 12 combustion and gasification (HGCU) sources.

  2. All-quad meshing without cleanup

    DOE PAGES

    Rushdi, Ahmad A.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Mahmoud, Ahmed H.; ...

    2016-08-22

    Here, we present an all-quad meshing algorithm for general domains. We start with a strongly balanced quadtree. In contrast to snapping the quadtree corners onto the geometric domain boundaries, we move them away from the geometry. Then we intersect the moved grid with the geometry. The resulting polygons are converted into quads with midpoint subdivision. Moving away avoids creating any flat angles, either at a quadtree corner or at a geometry–quadtree intersection. We are able to handle two-sided domains, and more complex topologies than prior methods. The algorithm is provably correct and robust in practice. It is cleanup-free, meaning wemore » have angle and edge length bounds without the use of any pillowing, swapping, or smoothing. Thus, our simple algorithm is fast and predictable. This paper has better quality bounds, and the algorithm is demonstrated over more complex domains, than our prior version.« less

  3. Data quality objectives for surface-soil cleanup operation using in situ gamma spectrometry for concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Fong, S H; Alvarez, J L

    1997-02-01

    In situ gamma spectrometry is an efficient method for monitoring the progress of cleanup activities for radioactive contaminants in surface soil and for evaluating the attainment of cleanup standards. However, desired data precision and accuracy must be specified for such a detection system prior to the operation to ensure that the level of uncertainty associated with the concentration measurements is acceptable. A method for developing data quality objectives is described in this paper for in situ gamma spectrometry to achieve numerical goals for data precision and accuracy for cleanup operations. Concentration measurement for a radionuclide at its cleanup level must have a precision commensurate with the importance of cleanup decisions. The 95% lower limit of detection of the system is suggested to be about one tenth the expected system response at the cleanup level. The count time required to achieve the preferred 95% lower limit of detection, and hence the desired precision, can then be determined. The accuracy error arises from the overall calibration factor, which relates the detector responses (e.g., count rate) to physical quantities of interest (e.g., radionuclide soil concentration). The major source of error for the calibration factor using in situ gamma spectrometry is the misidentification of the type of the depth profile of radionuclide concentration in soil. If surrogate radionuclides are used, such as 241Am for plutonium, the variation in the concentration ratio would be another significant source of error. Soil sampling programs performed prior to a cleanup operation will greatly reduce the accuracy error for an in situ detection system, and the analysis of system errors may determine the degree of sampling required. The planning of such a program is discussed in the study. Uncertainty analysis using a Latin Hypercube sampling technique for the calibration factor is also demonstrated. The quantitative result of the uncertainty analysis is useful

  4. Environmental cleanup of oil production sites in southern Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Vendl, K.A.; Basso, T.C.; Bengal, L.E.

    1996-12-31

    On January 2, 1988, a 4 million gallon aboveground oil storage tank collapsed in Pennsylvania, resulting in a spill of approximately 3.8 million gallons of diesel fuel. Of that amount, approximately 750,000 gallons entered the Monongahela River. On March 23, 1989, the Exxon Valdez, loaded with 1.26 million barrels (54 million gallons) of crude oil struck the rocks of Bligh Reef near Valdez, Alaska. As a result, more than 11 million gallons of crude oil was released into Prince William Sound within 5 hours of the event. The environmental damage and massive cleanup efforts were the most visible effects of these spills. However, one of the most important, but least discussed outcomes was the enactment of the Oil Pollution Act (OPA), which George Bush signed into law on August 18, 1990. The Oil Pollution Act contains many provisions; one of them is the strengthening of the national response system by providing better coordination of spill contingency planning among federal, state, and local authorities. Another provision is the increase in liability for parties responsible for costs and damages resulting from oil spills. In situations where there is no responsible party, OPA provides funding for the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. In this fund, there is $50 million in an emergency appropriation which can be used to contain and remove oil discharges that affect or threaten to affect the surface waters of the United States.

  5. Assessment of fuel-gas-cleanup systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, F.L.; Blecher, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the performance, economics and emission characteristics of low-, medium-, and high-temperature fuel gas cleanup processes for use in coal gasification combined-cycle power plants based on high-temperature gas turbines. Processes considered were the Allied Chemical low-temperature Selexol process, METC medium-temperature iron oxide process and Conoco high-temperature half-calcined dolomite process. Process evaluations were carried out for twenty-four combinations of gasifiers and cleanup processes. Based upon the process evaluations, five combinations of gasifiers and cleanup process were selected for integration with an advanced, 2600 F gas turbine into an overall power system. Heat and mass balances and process schematics for these plants were prepared and the cost of electricity estimated. The results of the study indicate that medium- or high-temperature cleanup systems in combined-cycle power plants could meet or exceed EPA New Source Performance Standards. Performance and cost of the systems studied can be improved by high- and intermediate-temperature cleanup systems or by integration of developmental hot gas heat exchangers with suitable commercially available low-temperature cleanup systems. Unresolved problems in the use of medium- and high-temperature cleanup are efficient regeneration of iron oxide, particulate removal at high temperature and the fate of fuel bound nitrogen and trace metals that may appear in the hot fuel gas.

  6. Building organizational technical capabilities: a new approach to address the office of environmental management cleanup challenges in the 21. century

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, J.J.; Rizkalla, E.I.

    2007-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the nations nuclear weapons program legacy wastes cleanup. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term, and a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. Several cleanup projects continued to experience schedule delays and cost growth. The schedule delays and cost growth have been attributed to several factors such as changes in technical scope, regulatory and safety considerations, inadequacy of acquisition approach and project management. This article will briefly review the background and schools of thought on strategic management and organizational change practiced in the United States over the last few decades to improve an organisation's competitive edge and cost performance. The article will briefly review examples such as the change at General Electric, and the recent experience obtained from the nuclear industry, namely the long-term response to the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The long-term response to Chernobyl, though not a case of organizational change, could provide some insight in the strategic management approaches used to address people issues. The article will discuss briefly EM attempts to accelerate cleanup over the past few years, and the subsequent paradigm shift. The paradigm shift targets enhancing and/or creating organizational capabilities to achieve cost savings. To improve its ability to address the 21. century environmental cleanup challenges and achieve cost savings, EM has initiated new corporate changes to develop new and enhance existing capabilities. These new and enhanced organizational capabilities include a renewed emphasis on basics, especially technical capabilities including safety, project management

  7. Tritium research laboratory cleanup and transition project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    This Tritium Research Laboratory Cleanup and Transition Project Final Report provides a high-level summary of this project`s multidimensional accomplishments. Throughout this report references are provided for in-depth information concerning the various topical areas. Project related records also offer solutions to many of the technical and or administrative challenges that such a cleanup effort requires. These documents and the experience obtained during this effort are valuable resources to the DOE, which has more than 1200 other process contaminated facilities awaiting cleanup and reapplication or demolition.

  8. Strategy & Action Plan For Accelerating Technology Transfer (T2) and Commercialization of Federal Research in Support of High Growth Businesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-04

    industry consortia , economic development entities, and State and local governments.” Specifically, increased efforts to facilitate commercialization...both the DoD and industry . Accurate and relevant data are essential in supporting analysis based on actual versus planned outcomes relative to...and industrial innovation are critical to the U.S economic, environmental, and social well-being. Establishes national authorities for T2 across the

  9. Poster — Thur Eve — 28: Enabling trajectory-based radiotherapy on a TrueBeam accelerator with the Eclipse treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, J; Asiev, K; DeBlois, F; Morcos, M; Seuntjens, J; Syme, A

    2014-08-15

    The TrueBeam linear accelerator platform has a developer's mode which permits the user dynamic control over many of the machine's mechanical and radiation systems. Using this research tool, synchronous couch and gantry motion can be programmed to simulate isocentric treatment with a shortened SAD, with benefits such as smaller projected MLC leaf widths and an increased dose rate. In this work, water tank measurements were used to commission a virtual linear accelerator with an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, from which several arc-based radiotherapy treatments were generated, including an inverse optimized VMAT delivery. For each plan, the pertinent treatment delivery information was extracted from control points specified in the Eclipse-exported DICOM files using the pydicom package in Python, allowing construction of an XML control file. The dimensions of the jaws and MLC positions, defined for an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, were scaled for delivery on a conventional SAD linear accelerator, and translational couch motion was added as a function of gantry angle to simulate delivery at 85 cm SAD. Ionization chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were used to compare the radiation delivery to dose calculations in Eclipse. With the exception of the VMAT delivery, ionization chamber measurements agreed within 3.3% of the Eclipse calculations. For the VMAT delivery, the ionization chamber was located in an inhomogeneous region, but gamma evaluation of the Gafchromic film plane resulted in a 94.5% passing rate using criteria of 3 mm/3%. The results indicate that Eclipse calculation infrastructure can be used.

  10. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  11. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-29

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?.

  12. Private-Sector Social Franchising to Accelerate Family Planning Access, Choice, and Quality: Results From Marie Stopes International

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Erik; Hayes, Brendan; Taft, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background: To achieve the global Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) goal of reaching 120 million more women with voluntary family planning services, rapid scale-up of services is needed. Clinical social franchising, a service delivery approach used by Marie Stopes International (MSI) in which small, independent health care businesses are organized into quality-assured networks, provides an opportunity to engage the private sector in improving access to family planning and other health services. Methods: We analyzed MSI’s social franchising program against the 4 intended outputs of access, efficiency, quality, and equity. The analysis used routine service data from social franchising programs in 17 African and Asian countries (2008–2014) to estimate number of clients reached, couple-years of protection (CYPs) provided, and efficiency of services; clinical quality audits of 636 social franchisees from a subset of the 17 countries (2011–2014); and exit interviews with 4,844 clients in 14 countries (2013) to examine client satisfaction, demographics (age and poverty), and prior contraceptive use. The MSI “Impact 2” model was used to estimate population-level outcomes by converting service data into estimated health outcomes. Results: Between 2008 and 2014, an estimated 3,753,065 women cumulatively received voluntary family planning services via 17 national social franchise programs, with a sizable 68% choosing long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs). While the number of social franchisee outlets increased over time, efficiency also significantly improved over time, with each outlet delivering, on average, 178 CYPs in 2008 compared with 941 CYPs in 2014 (P = .02). Clinical quality audit scores also significantly improved; 39.8% of social franchisee outlets scored over 80% in 2011 compared with 84.1% in 2014. In 2013, 40.7% of the clients reported they had not been using a modern method during the 3 months prior to their visit (95% CI = 37.4, 44

  13. Cleanup of TMI-2 demineralizer resins

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W.D.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Thompson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocesium is being removed from Demineralizers A and B (DA and DB by a process that was developed from laboratory tests on small samples of resin from the demineralizers. The process was designed to elute the radiocesium from the demineralizer resins and then to resorb it onto the zeolite ion exchangers contained in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS). The process was also required to limit the maximum cesium activities in the resin eluates (SDS feeds) so that the radiation field surrounding the pipelines would not be excessive. The process consists of 17 stages of batch elution. In the initial stage, the resin is contacted with 0.18 M boric acid. Subsequent stages subject the resin to increasing concentrations of sodium in NaH/sub 2/BO/sub 3/-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ solution (total B = 0.35 M) and then 1 M sodium hydroxide in the final stages. Results on the performance of the process in the cleanup of the demineralizers at TMI-2 are compared to those obtained from laboratory tests with small samples of the DA and DB resins. To date, 15 stages of batch elution have been completed on the demineralizers at TMI-2 which resulted in the removal of about 750 Ci of radiocesium from DA and about 3300 Ci from DB.

  14. Cleanup of a jet fuel spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesko, Steve

    1996-11-01

    Eaton operates a corporate aircraft hanger facility in Battle Creek, Michigan. Tests showed that two underground storage tanks leaked. Investigation confirmed this release discharged several hundred gallons of Jet A kerosene into the soil and groundwater. The oil moved downward approximately 30 feet and spread laterally onto the water table. Test results showed kerosene in the adsorbed, free and dissolved states. Eaton researched and investigated three clean-up options. They included pump and treat, dig and haul and bioremediation. Jet fuel is composed of readily biodegradable hydrocarbon chains. This fact coupled with the depth to groundwater and geologic setting made bioremediation the low cost and most effective alternative. A recovery well was installed at the leading edge of the dissolved contamination. A pump moved water from this well into a nutrient addition system. Nutrients added included nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Additionally, air was sparged into the water. The water was discharged into an infiltration gallery installed when the underground storage tanks were removed. Water circulated between the pump and the infiltration basin in a closed loop fashion. This oxygenated, nutrient rich water actively and aggressively treated the soils between the bottom of the gallery and the top of the groundwater and the groundwater. The system began operating in August of 1993 and reduced jet fuel to below detection levels. In August of 1995 The State of Michigan issued a clean closure declaration to the site.

  15. Composite filter aids for cleanup of additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, L.I.; Sklyar, V.Y.

    1984-03-01

    This article examines the properties of composite filter aids in additive cleanup using two- and three-component filter aid composites based on perlite, kieselguhr, diatomite, asbestos, and wood flour. Filtration tests were run on naphtha solutions of the additive zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. The laboratory studies indicate that composites of perlite and kieselguhr with fibrous materials (wood flour or asbestos) show great promise for the removal of solid contaminants from the zinc disalkydithiophosphate additive. The advantages of the filter aid composite based on perlite, kieselguhr, and wood flour in comparison with the two-component composites are the higher filtration rate (by 26%) and the smaller losses of additive (by a factor of 2.1) and isobutyl alcohol (by a factor of 1.6). It is demonstrated that the filtration rate with the three components is 50-60% higher than with the composite of perlite with kieselguhr. The filtration of the zinc dialkyldithiophosphate additive using the composite filter aid based on perlite, kieselguhr, and wood flour, has been adopted at the Volgograd Petroleum Refinery. Includes 2 tables.

  16. Central cortical cleanup and zonular deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Antonios, Rafic S; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2016-01-01

    Background Complete removal of the cortex has been advocated to prevent posterior capsular opacification but carries the risk of zonular dehiscence, hence there is a need for a safe maximal cortical cleanup technique in eyes with severe diffuse zonulopathy in subjects above age 90. Methods We used bimanual central cortical cleaning by elevating central fibers and aspirating them toward the periphery. Peripheral cortical fibers were removed passively only when they became loose due to copious irrigation. A one-piece foldable implant was inserted without a capsular tension ring. Postoperative corticosteroid drops were used. Results This technique was safely performed in a dozen eyes with severe pseudo-exfoliation or brunescent cataract with weak zonules. Posterior capsular rupture, iritis, vitreous loss, and lens subluxation were not observed. Moderate capsular phimosis occurred but with maintained central vision. Conclusion The dogma of “complete cortical cleanup” in severe zonulopathy needs to be revisited in favor of a clear visual axis with maximal preservation of the damaged zonules. This technique is ideal in patients above age 90 where posterior capsular opacification and late dislocation of intraocular lens–capsule bag complex are unlikely to occur until several years postoperatively. PMID:27784979

  17. Accelerating tomorrow's opto-electronic technologies: a comprehensive introduction to advanced optoelectronic materials and devices in the National Hi-Tech R&D Plan (863-Plan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan; Chen, Haoming; Ren, Xiaomin; Wang, Zhigong; Qian, Longsheng; Zhang, Rong; Feng, Songlin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ningsheng

    2004-05-01

    The National Hi-Tech R&D Program (the 863-Program) is to enhance China's international competitiveness and improve China's overall capability of R&D in high technology and to bridge the gap between the laboratory and the marketplace. Advanced Optoelectronic Materials and Devices are one of the technology areas strategically important to China's information industry. It has been one of the major priority research fields funded by the 863 Program even since 1987 when the plan was first initiated. From the viewpoint of Priority Expert Group (PEG), this paper will give a comprehensive introduction to advanced optoelectronic materials and devices in the national 863-Program during the current five years period (up to 2005) which includes the main aims and goals and especially the main content of each subject.

  18. Cleanup Verification Package for the 300-8 Waste Site

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2005-11-07

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 300-8 waste site. This waste site was formerly used to stage scrap metal from the 300 Area in support of a program to recycle aluminum.

  19. EPA Settlement Ensures Groundwater Cleanup of Concord, Mass. Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A recent settlement agreement between EPA and Whittaker Corp., Textron Inc., U.S Army, and U.S Department of Energy addresses the cleanup of contaminated groundwater at the Nuclear Metals, Inc. Superfund Site in Concord, Mass.

  20. Engineering Forum Issue Paper: Online Hazardous Waste Cleanup Technical Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This issue paper is intended to give the reader examples of some online technical resources that can assist with hazardous waste cleanups in the Superfund, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and Brownfields programs.

  1. Report: EPA Needs to Track Compliance with Superfund Cleanup Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #08-P-0141, April 28, 2008. According to EPA’s Superfund information system, there were 3,397 active Superfund enforcement instruments to ensure cleanups at National Priorities List sites as of September 30, 2007.

  2. Introduction to Energy Conservation and Production at Waste Cleanup Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This issue paper, prepared by EPA's Engineering Forum under the Technical Support Project, provides an overview on the considerations for energy conservation and production during the design and (O&M) phases of waste cleanup projects.

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 300-18 Waste Site

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2005-08-26

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 300-18 waste site. This site was identified as containing radiologically contaminated soil, metal shavings, nuts, bolts, and concrete.

  4. Systems engineering product breakdown structure for the Hanford Cleanup Mission: First issue

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.J.; Bailey, K.B.; Collings, J.L.; Hubbard, A.B.; Niepke, T.M.

    1994-08-01

    This document provides the product breakdown structure (PBS) for the upper level physical products that, when delivered, complete the Hanford Site Cleanup Mission. Development of the PBS is a continuation of the sitewide systems engineering work described in the sitewide functional analysis, the architecture synthesis, and the product description report and is generally consistent with guidance contained in the Hanford Mission Plan. The PBS presents the interrelationship of products produced by the functions that are necessary to perform the clean up mission from their initial source through interim products to final product disposition.

  5. Action Memorandum for General Decommissioning Activities under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Reno

    2006-10-26

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative to perform general decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). Preparation of this Action Memorandum has been performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the "Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986", and in accordance with the "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan". An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was prepared and released for public comment and evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of excess buildings and structures whose missions havve been completed.

  6. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  7. Cleanup Verification Package for the118-F-2 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron and K. A. Anselm

    2008-02-21

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-2 Burial Ground. This burial ground, formerly called Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 1, was the original solid waste disposal site for the 100-F Area. Eight trenches contained miscellaneous solid waste from the 105-F Reactor and one trench contained solid waste from the biology facilities.

  8. Solvent degradation and cleanup: a survey and recent ORNL studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper surveys the mechanisms for degradation of the tributyl phosphate and diluent components of Purex solvent by acid and radiation, reviews the problems encountered in plant operations resulting from the presence of these degradation products, and discusses methods for minimizing the formation of degradation products and accomplishing their removal. Scrubbing solutions containing sodium carbonate or hydroxylamine salts and secondary cleanup of solvents using solid sorbents are evaluated. Finally, recommendations for improved solvent cleanup are presented. 50 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Risk based analysis: A rational approach to site cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Arulanatham, R.; So, E.

    1994-12-31

    Soil and groundwater pollution in urban areas often can pose a threat to either human health or water quality or both. This soil and groundwater cleanup can be a very lengthy process and requires significant economic resources. The cleanup levels or requirements required by one agency sometimes do not match that required by the other agency, especially those for soil pollution. The involvement of several agencies at different times during the reclamation process has often diminished the cost-effectiveness of the reclamation efforts. In an attempt to bring some solutions to minimize this kind of problem (which has been experienced by both the authors) the staff of the Alameda County Department of Environmental Health and the Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region, has jointly developed some workable guidelines to self-assist the responsible parties in deriving target cleanup goals that are both human health (or other ecological receptor) and water quality protective. The following is a 6-step summary of the methodology to assist the responsible parties in properly managing their pollution problem. These guidelines include: (1) site characterization; (2) initial risk-based screening of contaminants; (3) derivation of health and/or ecological risk-based cleanup goals; (4) derivation of groundwater quality-based cleanup goals; (5) site cleanup goals and site remediation; and (6) risk management decisions.

  10. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  11. Clean Slate 1 revegetation and monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document is a reclamation plan for short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with interim cleanup of radionuclide-contaminated surface soil at the Clean Slate 1 site (located on the Tonopah Test Range). This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. Reclamation demonstration plots were established near the Double Tracks cleanup site in the fall of 1994 to evaluate the performance of several native plant species and to evaluate different irrigation strategies. Results of that study, and the results from numerous other studies conducted at other sites (Area 11 and Area 19 of the Nevada Test Site), have been summarized and incorporated into this final reclamation plan for the cleanup of the Clean Slate 1 site. The plan also contains procedures for monitoring both short-term and long-term reclamation.

  12. Cove Mines Cleanup: Assessments and Reports

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This factsheet contains assessments and reports concerning planned construction activities to mitigate surface erosion at the former transfer area located in the Cove/Red Valley Chapter of the Navajo Nation in eastern Arizona.

  13. Taking the bureaucracy out of cleanup: Beyond partnering

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, S.; Hubbard, J.A.; Rastatter, C.L.; Weld, R.

    1996-12-31

    One year ago, the Air Combat Command in association with an External Review Group (ERG) comprised of EPA, several states, public interest groups, and others published a guidance document entitled Moving Sights Faster Through Streamlined Oversight. The focus of this guidance is to utilize the trust relationships that build with partnering to streamline the bureaucratic processes associated with the structure of the predominantly paper driven cleanup programs. At last year`s Superfund conference, the authors spoke of the ideas behind this effort, and of the ongoing demonstration at Langley Air Force Base. One year later, the authors have substantially more experience with the concept they called Variable Oversight. They also have documented the power of the Variable Oversight process in saving time and money, and some of the impediments to achieving the full gains they would hope to achieve in this process. Savings at Langley AFB due to Variable Oversight implementation have been substantial--exceeding $2 million and eight months time from the front end of the investigation process. As work plans move into the next phase, savings will continue to grow. Partnering, five basewide documents, ten consensus agreements, standard report formats, and alternative deliverables have provided the framework for alternative approaches to the review of large documents. Despite initial successes, a number of impediments remain before Langley can expect to achieve the full benefits of Variable Oversight. The purpose of this paper is to outline the experiences at Langley AFB, the evolving understanding of the power of Variable Oversight, and lessons learned from the Langley demonstration.

  14. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  15. Monte Carlo modeling of HD120 multileaf collimator on Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator for verification of 6X and 6X FFF VMAT SABR treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Alanah M; Gete, Ermias; Duzenli, Cheryl; Teke, Tony

    2014-05-08

    A Monte Carlo (MC) validation of the vendor-supplied Varian TrueBeam 6 MV flattened (6X) phase-space file and the first implementation of the Siebers-Keall MC MLC model as applied to the HD120 MLC (for 6X flat and 6X flattening filter-free (6X FFF) beams) are described. The MC model is validated in the context of VMAT patient-specific quality assurance. The Monte Carlo commissioning process involves: 1) validating the calculated open-field percentage depth doses (PDDs), profiles, and output factors (OF), 2) adapting the Siebers-Keall MLC model to match the new HD120-MLC geometry and material composition, 3) determining the absolute dose conversion factor for the MC calculation, and 4) validating this entire linac/MLC in the context of dose calculation verification for clinical VMAT plans. MC PDDs for the 6X beams agree with the measured data to within 2.0% for field sizes ranging from 2 × 2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Measured and MC profiles show agreement in the 50% field width and the 80%-20% penumbra region to within 1.3 mm for all square field sizes. MC OFs for the 2 to 40 cm2 square fields agree with measurement to within 1.6%. Verification of VMAT SABR lung, liver, and vertebra plans demonstrate that measured and MC ion chamber doses agree within 0.6% for the 6X beam and within 2.0% for the 6X FFF beam. A 3D gamma factor analysis demonstrates that for the 6X beam, > 99% of voxels meet the pass criteria (3%/3 mm). For the 6X FFF beam, > 94% of voxels meet this criteria. The TrueBeam accelerator delivering 6X and 6X FFF beams with the HD120 MLC can be modeled in Monte Carlo to provide an independent 3D dose calculation for clinical VMAT plans. This quality assurance tool has been used clinically to verify over 140 6X and 16 6X FFF TrueBeam treatment plans.

  16. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  17. Outcome-Based Planning-Hanford's Shift Towards Closure and Shrinking the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W. W.; Holten, R.; Johnson, W.; Reichmuth, B.; White, M.; Wood, T.

    2002-02-26

    Over the past two years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has formulated a focused, outcomes-based vision for accelerated cleanup of the Hanford Site. The primary elements, or outcomes, of this vision are to (1) accelerate restoration of the Columbia River Corridor, (2) transition the Central Plateau to long-term waste management, thereby shrinking the footprint of active site cleanup and operations, and (3) prepare for the future. The third outcome includes operation of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a key element of the foundation for Hanford's future; leveraging DOE's assets; and working with the community to understand their vision and reflect it as appropriate in the execution of the Hanford 2012 Vision. The purpose of these three outcomes is to provide a near term focus, aimed at achieving definitive end points over the next decade, while not precluding any long-term end-state associated with the completion of the Environmental Management (EM) mission at Hanford. The sheer expanse of the Hanford Site, the inherent hazards associated with the significant inventory of nuclear materials and wastes, the large number of aging contaminated facilities, the diverse nature and extent of environmental contamination, and the proximity to the Columbia River make the Hanford Site arguably the world's largest and most complex environmental cleanup project. Current projections are that it will cost over $80 billion and take over four decades to complete the cleanup at Hanford. Accelerated cleanup of the River Corridor portion of the Site will allow the remediation effort to focus on specific, near-term outcomes. Hanford's success in achieving these outcomes will reduce urgent risk, shrink the Site, remove contamination and wastes from the proximity of the river, and consolidate waste management activities on the Central Plateau. Hanford has begun implementation of this vision. Performance-based contracts are being

  18. Consolidating federal facility cleanup: Some pros and cons

    SciTech Connect

    Raynes, D.B.; Boss, G.R. )

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that Congress establish a permanent, full-time, independent national commission for radioactive waste management activities at DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex. DOE regulates certain aspects of its treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive waste by orders that are not promulgated by notice and comment'' or other procedures in the Administration Procedures Act. Because many agencies are not legally and technologically structured to handle their own cleanup problems, these activities might be conducted by one entity that can share information and staff among these agencies. There are rational arguments for both sides of this issue. Some of the advantages of such an organization include: focusing Congress's attention on an integrated federal facility cleanup instead of a fragmented, agency by agency approach, and an ability to prioritize cleanup decisions among agencies. Some significant obstacles include: reluctance by Congress and the executive branch to create any new bureaucracy at a time of budget deficits, and a loss of momentum from the progress already being made by the agencies. Given that more than $9 billion was proposed for FY 93 alone for federal facilities' cleanup programs and that decades will pass before all problems are addressed, it is appropriate to consider new approaches to environmental cleanup. This paper begins the dialogue about new ways to improve decision-making and government spending.

  19. TH-C-12A-09: Planning and Delivery of the Fully Dynamic Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J; Atwood, T; Fahimian, B; Chin, E; Hristov, D; Otto, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) system was developed that uses source motion trajectory involving synchronized gantry rotation with translational and rotational couch movement. MLC motion and dose rate were fully optimized for dynamic beam delivery. This work presents a platform for planning deliverable TMAT on a collision free coronal trajectory and evaluates its benefit for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a prone position. Methods: The TMAT algorithm was built on VMAT with modifications (physical properties on couch movement were defined) and enhancements (pencil beam dose calculation engine to support extended SSDs) to make it feasible for TMAT delivery. A Matlab software environment for TMAT optimization and dose calculation was created to allow any user specified motion axis. TMAT delivery was implemented on Varian TrueBeamTM STx via XML scripts. 10 prone breast irradiation cases were evaluated in VMAT and compared with a 6- field non-coplanar IMRT plan. Patient selection/exclusion criteria and structure contouring followed the guidelines of NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Results: TMAT delivery time was ∼4.5 minutes. 251.5°±7.88° of non-isocentric couch arc was achieved by the optimized trajectory with 180– 210 control points at 1°–2° couch increments. The improved dose distribution by TMAT was most clearly observed by the marked reduction in the volume of irradiated normal breast tissue in the high dose region. The ratios of the normal breast tissue volume receiving more than 50%, 80% and 100% of the prescription dose for TMAT versus IMRT were: V50%(TMAT/IMRT) = 78.38%±13.03%, V80%(TMAT/IMRT) = 44.19%±9.04% and V100% (TMAT/IMRT) = 9.96%±7.55%, all p≤0.01. Conclusion: The study is the first demonstration of planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT system with continuous couch motion. TMAT achieved significantly improved dosimetry over noncoplanar IMRT on dose volume parameters

  20. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  1. Implications of the KONVERGENCE Model for Difficult Cleanup Decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Piet, Steven James; Dakins, Maxine Ellen; Gibson, Patrick Lavern; Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Kerr, Thomas A; Nitschke, Robert Leon

    2002-08-04

    Abstract—Some cleanup decisions, such as cleanup of intractable contaminated sites or disposal of spent nuclear fuel, have proven difficult to make. Such decisions face high resistance to agreement from stakeholders possibly because they do not trust the decision makers, view the consequences of being wrong as too high, etc. Our project’s goal is to improve sciencebased cleanup decision-making. This includes diagnosing intractable situations, as a step to identifying a path toward sustainable solutions. Companion papers describe the underlying philosophy of the KONVERGENCE Model for Sustainable Decisions,1 and the overall framework and process steps.2 Where knowledge, values, and resources converge (the K, V, and R in KONVERGENCE), you will find a sustainable decision – a decision that works over time. For intractable cases, serious consideration of the adaptable class of alternatives is warranted – if properly implemented and packaged.

  2. Environmental cleanup privatization, products and services directory, January 1997. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has undertaken an ambitious ``Ten Year Plan`` for the Weapons Complex, an initiative to complete cleanup at most nuclear sites within a decade. This Second Edition of the Directory is designed to facilitate privatization which is key to the success of the Plan. The Directory is patterned after the telephone Yellow Pages. Like the Yellow Pages, it provides the user with points of contact for inquiring further into the capabilities of the listed companies. This edition retains the original format of three major sections under the broad headings: Treatment, Characterization, and Extraction/Deliver/Materials Handling. Within each section, companies are listed alphabetically. Also, ``company name`` and ``process type`` indices are provided at the beginning of each section to allow the user quick access to listings of particular interest.

  3. Cleanup/stimulation of a horizontal wellbore using propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Rougeot, J.E.; Lauterbach, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the stimulation/cleanup of a horizontal well bore (Wilson 25) using propellants. The Wilson 25 is a Bartlesville Sand well located in the Flatrock Field, Osage County, Oklahoma. The Wilson 25 was drilled to determine if horizontal drilling could be used as a means to economically recover primary oil that had been left in place in a mostly abandoned oil field because of the adverse effects of water coning. Pump testing of the Wilson 25 horizontal well bore before cleanup or stimulation produced 6 barrels of oil and .84 barrels of water per day. The high percentage of daily oil production to total daily fluid production indicated that the horizontal well bore had accessed potentially economical oil reserves if the fluid production rate could be increased by performing a cleanup/stimulation treatment. Propellants were selected as an inexpensive means to stimulate and cleanup the near well bore area in a uniform manner. The ignition of a propellant creates a large volume of gas which penetrates the formation, creating numerous short cracks through which hydrocarbons can travel into the well bore. More conventional stimulation/cleanup techniques were either significantly more expensive, less likely to treat uniformly, or could not be confined to the near well bore area. Three different propellant torpedo designs were tested with a total of 304' of horizontal well bore being shot and producible. The initial test shot caused 400' of the horizontal well bore to become plugged off, and subsequently it could not be production tested. The second and third test shots were production tested, with the oil production being increased 458% and 349%, respectively, on a per foot basis. The Wilson 25 results indicate that a propellant shot treatment is an economically viable means to cleanup/stimulate a horizontal well bore.

  4. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated

  5. UTILIZING THE RIGHT MIX OF ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergren, C; Wade Whitaker, W; Mary Flora, M

    2007-05-25

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Figure 1 is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina. During operations, which started in 1951, hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) were released to the environment. The releases occurred as a result of inadvertent spills and waste disposal in unlined pits and basins which was common practice before environmental regulations existed. The hazardous substances have migrated to the vadose zone and groundwater in many areas of the SRS, resulting in 515 waste units that are required by environmental regulations, to undergo characterization and, if needed, remediation. In the initial years of the SRS environmental cleanup program (early 1990s), the focus was to use common technologies (such as pump and treat, air stripping, excavation and removal) that actively and tangibly removed contamination. Exclusive use of these technologies required continued and significant funding while often failing to meet acceptable clean-up goals and objectives. Recognizing that a more cost-effective approach was needed, SRS implemented new and complementary remediation methods focused on active and passive technologies targeted to solve specific remediation problems. Today, SRS uses technologies such as chemical/pH-adjusting injection, phytoremediation, underground cutoff walls, dynamic underground stripping, soil fracturing, microbial degradation, baroballs, electrical resistance heating, soil vapor extraction, and microblowers to more effectively treat contamination at lower costs. Additionally, SRS's remediation approach cost effectively maximizes cleanup as SRS works proactively with multiple regulatory agencies. Using GIS, video, animation, and graphics, SRS is able to provide an accurate depiction of the evolution of SRS groundwater and vadose zone cleanup activities to convince stakeholders and regulators of the effectiveness of various cleanup

  6. Optimized planning of in-service inspections of local flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based units at the Novovoronezh NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Budanov, V. A.; Golubeva, T. N.

    2015-03-01

    Matters concerned with making efficient use of the information-analytical system on the flow-accelerated corrosion problem in setting up in-service examination of the metal of pipeline elements operating in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered. The principles used to select samples of pipeline elements in planning ultrasonic thickness measurements for timely revealing metal thinning due to flow-accelerated corrosion along with reducing the total amount of measurements in the condensate-feedwater path are discussed.

  7. HANDBOOK ON THE BENEFITS, COSTS, AND IMPACTS OF LAND CLEANUP AND REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summarizes the theoretical and empirical literature addressing benefit-cost and impact assessment of the land cleanup and reuse scenario. When possible, recommendations are provided for conducting economic analysis of land cleanup and reuse sites and programs. The knowledge base ...

  8. Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base. (ACR)

  9. Quality Assurance Plan for Field Activities at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.C.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program Field Research Center (FRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The FRC is located in Bear Creek Valley within the Y-12 Plant area of responsibility on DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The NABIR program is a long-term effort designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. The FRC provides a site for investigators in the NABIR program to conduct research and obtain samples related to in situ bioremediation. The FRC is integrated with existing and future laboratory and field research and provides a means of examining the biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) documents the quality assurance protocols for field and laboratory activities performed by the FRC staff. It supplements the requirements in the ORNL Nuclear Quality Assurance Program and the ESD Quality Assurance Program. The QAP addresses the requirements in Title 10 CFR, Part 830 Subpart A, ''Quality Assurance Requirements'', using a graded approach appropriate for Research and Development projects based on guidance from ''Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research'' (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92). It also supports the NABIR FRC Management Plan (Watson and Quarles 2000a) which outlines the overall procedures, roles and responsibilities for conducting research at the FRC. The QAP summarizes the organization, work activities, and qualify assurance and quality control protocols that will be used to generate scientifically defensible data at the FRC. The QAP pertains to field measurements and sample collection conducted by the

  10. Guidelines for Developing an Academic Acceleration Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colangelo, Nicholas; Assouline, Susan G.; Marron, Maureen A.; Castellano, Jaime A.; Clinkenbeard, Pamela R.; Rogers, Karen; Calvert, Eric; Malek, Rosanne; Smith, Donnajo

    2010-01-01

    As an educational intervention, acceleration is decidedly effective for high-ability students. The research support for acceleration that has accumulated over many decades is robust and consistent and allows us to confidently state that carefully planned acceleration decisions are successful. Both grade-based and content-based acceleration are…

  11. 18. VIEW OF A CANYON IN THE CLEANUP PHASE. CANYONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF A CANYON IN THE CLEANUP PHASE. CANYONS WERE PROCESSING ROOMS USED TO HOUSE PLUTONIUM HANDLING OPERATIONS THAT WERE NOT CONTAINED WITHIN GLOVE BOXES. CANYONS WERE DESIGNED TO BECOME CONTAMINATED. (5/10/88) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 30 CFR 75.400-2 - Cleanup program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cleanup program. 75.400-2 Section 75.400-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.400-2...

  13. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-2 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    W. S. Thompson

    2006-12-28

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-2 Burial Ground, also referred to as Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2; Burial Ground No. 2; 318-2; and Dry Waste Burial Site No. 2. This waste site was used primarily for the disposal of contaminated equipment, materials and laboratory waste from the 300 Area Facilities.

  14. Marine Debris Clean-Ups as Meaningful Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.; Bacon, Joseph Scott

    2010-01-01

    This seven to eight week hands-on Marine Debris Clean-up Project used a service project to provide an introduction of marine science ecology, watershed interrelationships, the scientific method, and environmental stewardship to 8th grade middle school students. It utilized inquiry based learning to introduce marine debris sources and impacts to…

  15. A risk-based approach to cleanup: Problems and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.

    1995-10-01

    This paper details information dealing with the meetings of the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU). Topics discussed include: Radtest program to summarize all data on radiation doses resulting from nuclear weapons testing; current status of US cleanup strategies; development of new milestones for the project due to reduced budgets; health hazards; and risk reduction.

  16. Enewetak fact book (a resume of pre-cleanup information)

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, W.

    1982-09-01

    The book contains a group of short treatises on the precleanup condition of the islands in Enewetak Atoll. Their purpose was to provide brief guidance to the radiological history and radiological condition of the islands for use in cleanup of the atoll. (ACR)

  17. 30 CFR 75.400-2 - Cleanup program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cleanup program. 75.400-2 Section 75.400-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.400-2...

  18. 30 CFR 75.400-2 - Cleanup program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cleanup program. 75.400-2 Section 75.400-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.400-2...

  19. 30 CFR 75.400-2 - Cleanup program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cleanup program. 75.400-2 Section 75.400-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.400-2...

  20. 30 CFR 75.400-2 - Cleanup program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cleanup program. 75.400-2 Section 75.400-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.400-2...

  1. Cleanup Verification Package for the 300 VTS Waste Site

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Clark and T. H. Mitchell

    2006-03-13

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 300 Area Vitrification Test Site, also known as the 300 VTS site. The site was used by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a field demonstration site for in situ vitrification of soils containing simulated waste.

  2. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    H. M. Sulloway

    2008-10-02

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

  3. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s particulate cleanup program

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) power systems has made it possible to use coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems significantly reduce the pollutants associated with coal-fired plants built before the 1970s. This superior environmental performance and related high system efficiency is possible, in part, because particulate gas-stream cleanup is conducted at high-temperature and high-pressure process conditions. A main objective of the Particulate Cleanup Program at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to ensure the success of the CCT demonstration projects. METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program supports research, development, and demonstration in three areas: (1) filter-system development, (2) barrier-filter component development, and (3) ash and char characterization. The support is through contracted research, cooperative agreements, Cooperative Research And Development Agreements (CRADAs), and METC`s own in-house research. This paper describes METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program.

  4. Buying time: Franchising hazardous and nuclear waste cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D.R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a private franchise approach to long-term custodial care, monitoring and eventual cleanup of hazardous and nuclear waste sites. The franchise concept could be applied to Superfund sites, decommissioning commercial reactors and safeguarding their wastes and to Department of Energy sites. Privatization would reduce costs by enforcing efficient operations and capital investments during the containment period, by providing incentives for successful innovation and by sustaining containment until the cleanup`s net benefits exceed its costs. The franchise system would also permit local governments and citizens to demand and pay for more risk reduction than provided by the federal government. In principle, they would have the option of taking over site management. The major political drawback of the idea is that it requires society to be explicit about what it is willing to pay for now to protect current and future generations. Hazardous waste sites are enduring legacies of energy development. Abandoned mines, closed refineries, underground storage tanks and nuclear facilities have often become threats to human health and water quality. The policy of the United States government is that such sites should quickly be made nonpolluting and safe for unrestricted use. That is, the policy of the United States is prompt cleanup. Orphaned commercial hazardous waste sites are addressed by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Superfund program. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Cleanup Verification Package for the 600-47 Waste Site

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Cutlip

    2005-08-26

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of interim remedial action for the 600-47 waste site. This site consisted of several areas of surface debris and contamination near the banks of the Columbia River across from Johnson Island. Contaminated material identified in field surveys included four areas of soil, wood, nuts, bolts, and other metal debris.

  6. FLUOR HANFORD (FH) MAKES CLEANUP A REALITY IN NEARLY 11 YEARS AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER, M.S.

    2007-05-24

    For nearly 11 years, Fluor Hanford has been busy cleaning up the legacy of nuclear weapons production at one of the Department of Energy's (DOE'S) major sites in the United States. As prime nuclear waste cleanup contractor at the vast Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, Fluor Hanford has changed the face of cleanup. Fluor beginning on October 1, 1996, Hanford Site cleanup was primarily a ''paper exercise.'' The Tri-Party Agreement, officially called the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order - the edict governing cleanup among the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington state - was just seven years old. Milestones mandated in the agreement up until then had required mainly waste characterization, reporting, and planning, with actual waste remediation activities off in the future. Real work, accessing waste ''in the field'' - or more literally in huge underground tanks, decaying spent fuel POO{approx}{approx}S, groundwater, hundreds of contaminated facilities, solid waste burial grounds, and liquid waste disposal sites -began in earnest under Fluor Hanford. The fruits of labors initiated, completed and/or underway by Fluor Hanford can today be seen across the site. Spent nuclear fuel is buttoned up in secure, dry containers stored away from regional water resources, reactive plutonium scraps are packaged in approved containers, transuranic (TRU) solid waste is being retrieved from burial trenches and shipped offsite for permanent disposal, contaminated facilities are being demolished, contaminated groundwater is being pumped out of aquifers at record rates, and many other inventive solutions are being applied to Hanford's most intransigent nuclear wastes. (TRU) waste contains more than 100 nanocuries per gram, and contains isotopes higher than uranium on the Periodic Table of the Elements. (A nanocurie is one-billionth of a curie.) At the same time, Fluor Hanford has dramatically improved safety records, and cost

  7. Comments on Hanford 2012 Accelerating Clean Up and Shrinking the Site

    SciTech Connect

    SHERMAN, Y.T.

    2001-01-01

    In the late summer of 2000, the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) Manager, Keith Klein, announced his approach to cleanup of the Hanford Site in a document called ''Done in a Decade.'' He asked for comments and suggestions to improve the plan from employees and stakeholders. We received over 300 individual comments. Several of the comments and the Hanford Advisory Board objected to the title of the plan, leading us to change it to ''Hanford 2012 Accelerating Cleanup and Shrinking the Site.'' We addressed virtually all substantive comments, i.e. those that recommended a change in the text, better understanding of an Issue, or consideration of a new Mea, and incorporated editorial comments where appropriate. We thank all those who took time to comment. The new plan, ''Hanford 2012'', is a much better document because you did so. You will notice some things about the table: Comments are not quoted verbatim--most were paraphrased to conserve space; Comments were separated into one of four sections: general, the River, the Plateau, the Future; Commenters are not identified by name or organization; Comments are generally listed in the order in which they were received, several comments were repetitive, but differed slightly so we made an effort to respond to each one, despite apparent repetition; There are many acronyms used at the Hanford Site, most of which can be found on the Web at http:/Ewww.hanford.gov/acronyml. We have attempted to spell out each acronym the first time it's used in a comment/response with the following exceptions: DOE--Department of Energy; RL--Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office; and ORP--Department of Energy, Office of River Protection.

  8. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  9. Novel fracture technology proves marginal Viking prospect economic, part II: Well clean-up, flowback and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, S.; Rylance, M.; Tybero, G.

    1996-12-31

    Having completed both fracture treatments as discussed in a companion paper, this paper continues on to describe the post fracture shut-in, clean-up and well testing operations that took place on the Viking Wx exploration well 49/17-12. These operations involved the removal of Resin Coated Proppant (RCP) from the wellbore, via Coiled Tubing (CT), through the use of a specially designed jetting nozzle. The RCP pack stability at a concentration of 3.0 lb/ft{sup 2} (as per planned design) had already been tested in a flowback cell. The use of a Surface Read-Out (SRO) gauge, combined with gas, water and proppant flow rates as well as the viscosity of fracturing fluids returns, enabled real time calculation of the drag forces, on the proppant pack, during clean-up. The flow rate, in the field, was controlled such that the calculated drag forces remained below those observed in the laboratory. Following the clean-up a flow and build-up test was conducted, to evaluate the fracture half length and fracture conductivity, from which a Pseudo-radial skin was calculated. The Non-Darcy effects in the fracture were also evaluated, and finally the short term and long term well deliverabilities were assessed.

  10. Accelerating to New Aviation Horizons

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA has a 10-year plan to accelerate aviation research that includes the design, build and flight of a series of piloted X-planes -- experimental aircraft -- which will test advanced technologies ...

  11. Final proposed plan, Army Materials Technology Laboratory, task order 1, remedial investigation/feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Army is proposing a cleanup plan, referred to as a preferred alternative, to address outdoor contamination at the MTL Superfund site in Watertown, Massachusetts. The Proposed Plan recommends one of the cleanup options from among those that were evaluated during the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) performed for the site. The Army is publishing this Proposed Plan to provide opportunity for public review and comment on the cleanup alternatives, known as remedial alternatives, under consideration for the site. The Army is soliciting comments on the proposed level of cleanup and will consider public comments as part of the final decision-making process for selecting the cleanup remedy for the site.

  12. Development of the integrated programme for the cleanup of the Sellafield (site)

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, P.

    2007-07-01

    The Sellafield site in the United Kingdom is highly complex and integrated site. It has two operating reprocessing plants, a fuel fabrication facility and significant processing facilities for the conditioning of high level, intermediate level and low level wastes. It plays a major role in supporting the UK nuclear generation and dealing with the legacy from the early nuclear programmes. Sellafield also supports a number of international nuclear programmes. The UK nuclear industry is undergoing an intense programme of change with many nuclear facilities coming to the end of their lives, new reactors being discussed and a different organisational structure for running the UK nuclear programme. Common to all of this is increased determination to decommission and cleanup historic nuclear wastes. The challenge for the site has been how to put together a cleanup programme for the site whilst recognising the ongoing international strategic value of many of the facilities on the site. The work to produce an integrated plan for Sellafield is now complete and extends from the detailed consideration of facilities and processes through to socio economic impact on the local community. Extensive use has been made of operational research tools and strategic models that cover costs, resources and technical aspects for over 300 active facilities, and over 1000 waste streams. Key strategic decisions facing the site have been analysed and decision calendars produced. These illustrate the options available for each strategic decision and the latest date by which decisions can be taken. Many of the most significant decisions affecting the site need to be progressed within the next few years. The paper describes the process by which the integrated plan for Sellafield has been produced, some of the tools and techniques used in analysing them and the key decisions facing the site. (authors)

  13. Site Cleanup Report for Sites PBF-33 and PBF-34

    SciTech Connect

    W. L. Jolley

    2007-01-16

    This document summaries the actions taken to remove asbestos-reinforced-concrete (transite) pipe and miscellaneous debris from Power Purst Facility (PBF)-33 and PBF-34 sites. Removal of pipe and debris were performed in November 2006 in accordance with the requirements discussed in notice of soil disturbance NSD-PBF-07-01. Debris at these two sites were classified as industrial waste that could be disposed at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) landfill at the Idaho National Laboratory. Asbestos removal was performed as Class IV asbestos cleanup work. All transite pipe was double bagged and dispositioned in the INL Landfill Complex at CFA. The remaining miscellaneous debris was loaded into dump trucks and taken to the INL Landfill Complex at CFA for final disposition. Cleanup actions are complete for both sites, and no debris or hazardous constituents remain. Therefore, both sites will be classified as No action sites.

  14. Combining innovative technology demonstrations with dense nonaqueous phase liquids cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Hagood, M.C.; Koegler, K.J.; Rohay, V.J.; Trent, S.J.; Stein, S.L.; Brouns, T.M.; McCabe, G.H.; Tomich, S.

    1993-05-01

    Radioactively contaminated acidic aqueous wastes and organic liquids were discharged to the soil column at three disposal sites within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, Washington. As a result, a portion of the underlying groundwater is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride several orders of magnitude above the maximum contaminant level accepted for a drinking water supply. Treatability testing and cleanup actions have been initiated to remove the contamination from both the unsaturated soils to minimize further groundwater contamination and the groundwater itself. To expedite cleanup, innovative technologies for (1) drilling, (2) site characterization, (3) monitoring, (4) well field development, and (5) contaminant treatment are being demonstrated and subsequently used where possible to improve the rates and cost savings associated with the removal of carbon tetrachloride from the soils and groundwater.

  15. CERCLA reauthorization 1994: Insuring the cleanup of hazardous substance pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Eubank, K.T.

    1993-12-31

    Authorizing legislation for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 ({open_quotes}CERCLA{close_quotes} or, more popularly, {open_quotes}Superfund{close_quotes}) will expire September 30, 1994. Enacted more than a decade ago, the CERCLA program is ripe for scrutiny prior to reauthorization. The following questions deserve consideration: has the CERCLA program accomplished its goals, do the benefits of the CERCLA program justify the costs involved, and what administrative or legislative changes will maximize the benefits of the CERCLA program as compared to its costs. Definitive answers to these questions may be impossible to ascertain, but by focusing on basic risk management principles and the issue of insurance coverage for CERCLA cleanups, this article illustrates that inefficiencies and unnecessary costs will plague the cleanup program until CERCLA`s site-specific, strict, retroactive, and joint and several liability scheme is discarded. 78 refs.

  16. Training implications of skills needed for environmental cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.; Hensley, J.; Lehr, J.

    1995-03-01

    Well-trained staff are needed to perform the diverse tasks associated with environmental cleanup. Although educational and training programs are intended to help professionals learn relevant environmental skills, these programs may or may not be teaching the most appropriate skills. This project investigated the skills needed to carry out environmental activities at a headquarters office of a federal agency. The primary skills needed for environmental cleanup activities emphasize program management, problem solving/critical thinking, and communications. Furthermore, using Bloom`s taxonomy of educational objectives, most of these skills fell into the areas of {open_quotes}application{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}evaluation.{close_quotes} The results of this investigation suggest that rather than focusing on discipline-specific activities, such as helping improve people`s knowledge about regulatory requirements, training and education should emphasize complex problem-solving skills.

  17. Oil spill cleanup from sea water by carbon nanotube sponges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ke; Shang, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Peng-Zhan; Li, Zhen; Li, Xin-Ming; Wei, Jin-Quan; Wang, Kun-Lin; Wu, De-Hai; Cao, An-Yuan; Zhu, Hong-Wei

    2013-06-01

    Oil spills in the sea have caused many serious environmental problems worldwide. In this study, carbon nanotube (CNT) sponges were used to cleanup oil slicks on sea waters. This method was compared with two traditional representative sorbents, including polypropylene fiber fabric and woolen felt. The CNT sponges had a larger oil sorption capacity than the other two sorbents. The maximum oil sorption capacity ( Q m) of the CNT sponge was 92.30 g/g, which was 12 to 13.5 times larger than the Q m of the other two sorbents (the Q m of the polypropylene fiber fabric and woolen felt were 7.45 and 6.74 g/g, respectively). In addition, unlike the other two sorbents, the CNT sponge was superhydrophobic and did not adsorb any water during oil spill cleanup. CNT sponges are potentially very useful for cleaning up oil spills from sea water.

  18. Military Base Closures: Cleanup of Contaminated Properties for Civilian Reuse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-19

    Liability Act ( CERCLA , commonly referred to as Superfund ) generally requires the United States to clean up contaminated federal property prior to...administering agency generally must complete the cleanup prior to transfer out of federal ownership, CERCLA authorizes early transfer under certain conditions...and Emergency Response. Land Use in the CERCLA Remedy Selection Process. OSWER Directive No. 9355.7-04. May 25, 1995. Early transfer also may offer

  19. Environmental Cleanup Issues Associated with Closing Military Bases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    34 Superfund " site--about 12 years to progress from identification to completed L;\\.v-iKu,\\;l\\iEi~TAi CLEANUP ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH CLOSING MILITARY...standards are stiffened, it will probably cost more to meet them. If the experience of remediation at Superfund sites is a reliable guide, costs could...grow significantly above the initial baseline estimates. At the lower end of the range of estimates, a General Accounting Office study of Superfund

  20. LUST update: Petroleum cleanup standards may be eased

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.L.

    1996-10-01

    The California STate Water Resources Control Board recently announced a significant policy shift in cleanup of petroleum pollution from leaking underground storage tanks (LUSTs). This change may indicate a change nationwide toward cost effectiveness in environmental remediation. Specific recommendations from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories triggered this change. This article discusses the recommendations and the follow up: California response, EPA response, other state programs, and recommended individual response.

  1. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-8 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2006-08-10

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-8 Burial Ground, also referred to as the Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 8, 318-8, and the Early Solid Waste Burial Ground. During its period of operation, the 618-8 site is speculated to have been used to bury uranium-contaminated waste derived from fuel manufacturing, and construction debris from the remodeling of the 313 Building.

  2. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-3 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2006-09-12

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-3 Solid Waste Burial Ground, also referred to as Burial Ground Number 3 and the Dry Waste Burial Ground Number 3. During its period of operation, the 618-3 site was used to dispose of uranium-contaminated construction debris from the 311 Building and construction/demolition debris from remodeling of the 313, 303-J and 303-K Buildings.

  3. "Hanford: A Conversation About Nuclear Waste and Cleanup"

    SciTech Connect

    Gephart, Roy E.

    2003-05-10

    In ''Hanford: A Conversation about Nuclear Waste and Cleanup'', Roy Gephart takes us on a journey through a world of facts, values, conflicts, and choices facing the most complex environmental cleanup project in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Starting with the top-secret Manhattan Project, Hanford was used to create tons of plutonium for nuclear weapons. Hundreds of tons of waste remain. In an easy-to-read, illustrated text, Gephart crafts the story of Hanford becoming the world's first nuclear weapons site to release large amounts of contaminants into the environment. This was at a time when radiation biology was in its infancy, industry practiced unbridled waste dumping, and the public trusted what it was told. The plutonium market stalled with the end of the Cold War. Public accountability and environmental compliance ushered in a new cleanup mission. Today, Hanford is driven by remediation choices whose outcomes remain uncertain. It's a story whose epilogue will be written by future generations. This book is an information resource, written for the general reader as well as the technically trained person wanting an overview of Hanford and cleanup issues facing the nuclear weapons complex. Each chapter is a topical mini-series. It's an idea guide that encourages readers to be informed consumers of Hanford news, to recognize that knowledge, high ethical standards, and social values are at the heart of coping with Hanford's past and charting its future. Hanford history is a window into many environmental conflicts facing our nation; it's about building upon success and learning from failure. And therein lies a key lesson, when powerful interests are involved, no generation is above pretense. Roy E. Gephart is a geohydrologist and senior program manager at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. He has 30 years experience in environmental studies and the nuclear waste industry.

  4. Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Challenges and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-13

    produced from digesters ─ Animal manure (dairy cows, swine) ─ Waste water treatment facilities > Methane from Landfills > RNG produced from...AGR used in process • Two stage + trim methanation reactor • Dehydration to achieve gas pipeline specifications ~ 70% conversion efficiency 21... digestion of agricultural waste for on-site electricity generation ─Altamont Landfill—Landfill gas (LFG) cleanup for production of liquefied natural gas

  5. Experimental evaluation of a small fusion fuel cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holtslander, W.J.; Johnson, R.E.; Gravelle, F.B.; Schultz, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Small tritium-burning experimental tokamaks will require some means of handling and purifying the deuterium-tritium fuel. A simple purification system would allow reinjection of fuel, minimize tritium inventory on site, and reduce the number of shipments of tritium to and from the tokamak site. This could simplify the licensing and safety aspects for sites unsuited to large inventories of tritium. At the request of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, a number of conceptual designs of fusion fuel cleanup systems were prepared. The preferred design consisted of a gas circulation loop comprising an expansion tank, a pump, and a number of purification units, a uranium bed, a zirconium-aluminum getter bed, and two catalyst beds, Pt/Pd and CuO/MnO/sub 2/. This paper summarizes an experimental evaluation of this system using hydrogen and nontriated impurities. Using the information generated in the first part of the study, a simplified cleanup system containing two alternative purification paths was built and tested. The first path was through two uranium beds in series operating at 25 and 400/sup 0/C. In the second path, a zirconium-aluminum getter bed at 700/sup 0/C replaced the hot uranium bed. Both systems were demonstrated to be effective in the cleanup of a multicomponent gas mixture. These results show it is possible to have a simple cleanup system that is effective for purification of hydrogen that is typical of a fusion fuel mixture. This system provides for tritium recovery from the impurities, as well as purification.

  6. Military Ordnance: Cleanup Activities at the Former Raritan Arsenal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Appendix I Cleanup Activities at the Former Raritan Arsenal Areas suspected to be contaminated with ordnance can be surveyed with,. metal detector . According...to the Corps, surveying all of Raritan with a metal detector is not feasible because the site is too large and much of the area now contains...since these locations pose the greatcst concern for the public hc"alth and the environment. Areas 1 and 17 were surveyed with a metal detector , and no

  7. State Summary of Soil and Groundwater Cleanup Standards for Hydrocarbons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    821096-01 November 15, 1993 19970425 057 !DISTfRIBUTI STýA-TEM,_ Approved for public release; Distribution Unlbfited Product - Paranmeter/ Lab Test...Env-mmenal Mantagemen, 20-270-5613 Product Parameter/ Lab Test Protocol Detection Notification Action Clean-up Level Constituent & Number Level Level...Envi-mnentai Managament, 205-270-.5613 Su m r of Alsk Clanu Sadr s fo Hyrcro Cotmiae Groundwater Product- - Parameter/ Lab Test Protocol ’Detection

  8. Myelodysplastic syndromes in Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, Daniil F; Sklyarenko, Lilia M; Koval, Stella V; Rodionova, Nataliia K; Zavelevich, Michael P; Ivanivskaya, Tetiana S; Poludnenko, Liudmyla Yu; Ukrainskaya, Nataliia I

    2015-10-01

    The studies of the recent decades posed the question of the association between radiation exposure and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). This association has been proved in secondary MDS originating upon exposure to chemotherapeutics and/or radiation therapy. The long-term study in Japanese atomic (A)-bomb survivors demonstrated the significant linear dose-response for MDS confirming the link between radiation exposure and this form of hematopoietic malignancies. All these findings provide the strong basis for studying MDS in the persons exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl disaster, especially those in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers of 1986-1987. The data on MDS among Chernobyl clean-up workers (1986-1987) diagnosed in 1996-2012 at the reference laboratory of RE Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology are summarized. MDS cases were diagnosed in 23 persons (21 males and 2 females) having been exposed to radiation as clean-up workers of 1986-1987. Refractory anemia (RA) has been detected in 13, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS)-in 2, and refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-in 8 patients. The median age of those MDS patients was 62.0 years. In addition, 5 cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were recorded in the group of Chernobyl clean-up workers with the median time of 14.8 years from 1986-1987 to diagnosis. The association between radiation exposure and MDS is discussed. The suggested life-long risk for myelodysplastic syndromes among A-bomb survivors in Japan highlights the importance of the continuing follow-up studies in the affected populations in the post-Chernobyl period.

  9. Cleanup Verification Package for the 600-259 Waste Site

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2006-02-09

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 600-259 waste site. The site was the former site of the Special Waste Form Lysimeter, consisting of commercial reactor isotope waste forms in contact with soils within engineered caissons, and was used by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to collect data regarding leaching behavior for target analytes. A Grout Waste Test Facility also operated at the site, designed to test leaching rates of grout-solidified low-level radioactive waste.

  10. Cleanup of contaminated soil -- Unreal risk assumptions: Contaminant degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffman, A.

    1995-12-31

    Exposure assessments for development of risk-based soil cleanup standards or criteria assume that contaminant mass in soil is infinite and conservative (constant concentration). This assumption is not real for most organic chemicals. Contaminant mass is lost from soil and ground water when organic chemicals degrade. Factors to correct for chemical mass lost by degradation are derived from first-order kinetics for 85 organic chemicals commonly listed by USEPA and state agencies. Soil cleanup criteria, based on constant concentration, are then corrected for contaminant mass lost. For many chemicals, accounting for mass lost yields large correction factors to risk-based soil concentrations. For degradation in ground water and soil, correction factors range from greater than one to several orders of magnitude. The long exposure durations normally used in exposure assessments (25 to 70 years) result in large correction factors to standards even for carcinogenic chemicals with long half-lives. For the ground water pathway, a typical soil criterion for TCE of 1 mg/kg would be corrected to 11 mg/kg. For noncarcinogens, correcting for mass lost means that risk algorithms used to set soil cleanup requirements are inapplicable for many chemicals, especially for long periods of exposure.

  11. Clean-up of Nuclear Licensed Facility 57

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanjacques, Michel; Bremond, Marie Pierre; Marchand, Carole; Poyau, Cecile; Viallefont, Cecile; Gautier, Laurent; Masure, Frederic

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In the early sixties a radiochemistry laboratory dedicated to Research and Development was built at the French Atomic Energy Commission's centre at Fontenay aux Roses (CEA-FAR); it was named Building 18. More buildings were added during the decade: Building 54, storehouses and offices and Building 91, a hall and laboratories for chemical engineering research into natural and depleted uranium. These three buildings together constitute NLF57. Construction work took place between 1959 and 1962 and the buildings entered operation in 1961. The research and development programs performed in NLF57 involved spent fuel reprocessing studies, waste treatment processes and studies and production of transuranic elements with the related analytical methods development. The research and development program ended on 30 June 1995. The NLF57 clean-up program was launched to reduce the nuclear and conventional hazards and minimise HLW and MLW production during the dismantling work. The clean-up work was divided into categories by type to facilitate its organisation: treatment and removal of nuclear material, removal of radioactive sources, treatment and removal of organic and aqueous effluents, treatment and removal of solid waste, pumping out of the PETRUS tank, flushing and decontamination of the tanks and clean-up of buildings. (authors)

  12. Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement implementation successes and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    On July 19, 1996 the US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Colorado (CDPHE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) entered into an agreement called the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) for the cleanup and closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Rocky Flats). Major elements of the agreement include: an Integrated Site-Wide Baseline; up to twelve significant enforceable milestones per year; agreed upon soil and water action levels and standards for cleanup; open space as the likely foreseeable land use; the plutonium and TRU waste removed by 2015; streamlined regulatory process; agreement with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to coordinate activities; and a risk reduction focus. Successful implementation of RFCA requires a substantial effort by the parties to change their way of thinking about RFETS and meet the deliverables and commitments. Substantial progress toward Site closure through the implementation of RFCA has been accomplished in the short time since the signing, yet much remains to be done. Much can be learned from the Rocky Flats experience by other facilities in similar situations.

  13. Oak Ridge Reservation site management plan for the environmental restoration program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the overall approach for addressing environmental contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) National Priorities List site located in east Tennessee. The cleanup strategy reflected in this site management plan (SMP) has been developed to accelerate the transition of areas of concern (AOCs) from characterization to remediation by making decisions at the watershed scale based on recommended land uses. Project scoping involves the use of defined remedial action objectives, which are based in part on the land uses selected for the project sites. To provide a consistent land use approach that accommodates the needs of all stakeholders responsible for the remediation and reutilization of the ORR, a reservation-wide strategy has been developed. The Common Ground process is a stakeholder-driven process to determine preferred land use options for the ORR so that clean-up operations will be based on the most likely and acceptable land uses. DOE utilized the information gathered in the Common Ground process to recommend desired land uses for the ORR. The land uses recommended by DOE as a result of the Common Ground process are being used for planning land and facility use/reuse for the next 25 years. Land uses recommended for the ORR in conducting CERCLA remedial activities are conservation, industrial use, and waste management.

  14. Disposition of Nuclear Waste Using Subcritical Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doolen, G.D.; Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.A.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-06-27

    ATW destroys virtually all the plutonium and higher actinides without reprocessing the spent fuel in a way that could lead to weapons material diversion. An ATW facility consists of three major elements: (1) a high-power proton linear accelerator; (2) a pyrochemical spent fuel treatment i waste cleanup system; (3) a liquid lead-bismuth cooled burner that produces and utilizes an intense source-driven neutron flux for transmutation in a heterogeneous (solid fuel) core. The concept is the result of many years of development at LANL as well as other major international research centers. Once demonstrated and developed, ATW could be an essential part of a global non-proliferation strategy for countries that could build up large quantities of plutonium from their commercial reactor waste. ATW technology, initially proposed in the US, has received wide and rapidly increasing attention abroad, especially in Europe and the Far East with major programs now being planned, organized and tided. Substantial convergence presently exists on the technology choices among the programs, opening the possibility of a strong and effective international collaboration on the phased development of the ATW technology.

  15. The DOE Office of Environmental Management International Cooperative Program: Current Status and Plans for Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Han, Ana M.; Marra, James C.; Fox, Kevin M.; Peeler, David K.; Smith, Michael E.; Jannik, Gerald T.; Farfan, Eduardo B.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Roach, Jay; Aloy, A. S.; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Lopukh, D. P.; Kim, Chenwoo

    2009-01-15

    The DOE-EM Office of Engineering and Technology is responsible for implementing EM’s international cooperative program. The Office of Engineering and Technology’s international efforts are aimed at supporting EM’s mission of risk reduction and accelerated cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. To do this, EM pursues collaborations with government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify and develop technologies that can address the site cleanup needs of DOE. Currently, DOE-EM is performing collaborative work with researchers at the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and the SIA Radon Institute in Russia and the Ukraine’s International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL). Additionally, a task was recently completed with the Nuclear Engineering Technology Institute (NETEC) in South Korea. The objectives of these collaborations were to explore issues relating to high-level waste and to investigate technologies that could be leveraged to support EM site cleanup needs. In FY09, continued collaboration with the current partners is planned. Additionally, new research projects are being planned to expand the International Program. A collaborative project with Russian Electrotechnical University is underway to evaluate CCIM control and monitoring technologies. A Statement of Intent was recently signed between DOE-EM and the U.K. Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) to work cooperatively on areas of mutual interest. Under this umbrella, discussions were held with NDA representatives to identify potential areas for collaboration. Information and technical exchanges were identified as near-term actions to help meet the objectives of the Statement of Intent. Technical exchanges in identified areas are being pursued in FY09

  16. A treatment planning comparison between modulated tri-cobalt-60 teletherapy and linear accelerator-based stereotactic body radiotherapy for central early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Merna, Catherine; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Cao, Minsong; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kishan, Amar U; Michailian, Argin; Lamb, James; Sheng, Ke; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael L; Lee, Percy

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of planning stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for large central early-stage non-small cell lung cancer with a tri-cobalt-60 (tri-(60)Co) system equipped with real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance, as compared to linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SBRT. In all, 20 patients with large central early-stage non-small cell lung cancer who were treated between 2010 and 2015 with LINAC-based SBRT were replanned using a tri-(60)Co system for a prescription dose of 50Gy in 4 fractions. Doses to organs at risk were evaluated based on established MD Anderson constraints for central lung SBRT. R100 values were calculated as the total tissue volume receiving 100% of the dose (V100) divided by the planning target volume and compared to assess dose conformity. Dosimetric comparisons between LINAC-based and tri-(60)Co SBRT plans were performed using Student׳s t-test and Wilcoxon Ranks test. Blinded reviews by radiation oncologists were performed to assess the suitability of both plans for clinical delivery. The mean planning target volume was 48.3cc (range: 12.1 to 139.4cc). Of the tri-(60)Co SBRT plans, a mean 97.4% of dosimetric parameters per patient met MD Anderson dose constraints, whereas a mean 98.8% of dosimetric parameters per patient were met with LINAC-based SBRT planning (p = 0.056). R100 values were similar between both plans (1.20 vs 1.21, p = 0.79). Upon blinded review by 4 radiation oncologists, an average of 90% of the tri-(60)Co SBRT plans were considered acceptable for clinical delivery compared with 100% of the corresponding LINAC-based SBRT plans (p = 0.17). SBRT planning using the tri-(60)Co system with built-in MRI is feasible and achieves clinically acceptable plans for most central lung patients, with similar target dose conformity and organ at risk dosimetry. The added benefit of real-time MRI-guided therapy may further optimize tumor targeting while improving normal tissue sparing, which warrants further

  17. EPA Report to Congress: Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is Accelerating Great Lakes Cleanup and Protection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chicago (July 28, 2015) - During its first five years, the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative implemented more than 2500 projects to improve water quality, clean up contaminated shoreline, protect and restore native habitat and species and prevent and cont

  18. Accelerated cleanup of mixed waste units on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.K.; Johnson, W.L.; Downey, H.D.

    1993-09-01

    This report provides a status of the expedited response action (ERA) projects currently being implemented at the Hanford Site. A detailed review of the accomplishments to date, the technologies employed, the problems encountered, and an analysis of the lessons learned are included. A total of nine ERAs have been initiated at the Hanford Site and are presented in a case study format with emphasis on the progress being made and the challenges ahead.

  19. ADS Based on Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weimin; Dai, Jianping

    An accelerator-driven system (ADS), which combines a particle accelerator with a subcritical core, is commonly regarded as a promising device for the transmutation of nuclear waste, as well as a potential scheme for thorium-based energy production. So far the predominant choice of the accelerator for ADS is a superconducting linear accelerator (linac). This article gives a brief overview of ADS based on linacs, including the motivation, principle, challenges and research activities around the world. The status and future plan of the Chinease ADS (C-ADS) project will be highlighted and discussed in depth as an example.

  20. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2007-03-19

    The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

  1. Thyroid nodularity and cancer among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Tekkel, M.

    1997-02-01

    Thyroid examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, were conducted on nearly 2,000 Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia to evaluate the occurrence of thyroid cancer and nodular thyroid disease among men with protracted exposure to ionizing radiation. The examinations were conducted in four cities in Estonia during March-April 1995, 9 years after the reactor accident. The study population was selected from a predefined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia under surveillance for cancer incidence. These men had been sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1991 to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris and perform related cleanup activities. A total of 2,997 men were invited for thyroid screening and 1,984 (66%) were examined. Estimates of radiation dose from external sources were obtained from military or other institutional records, and details about service dates and types of work performed while at Chernobyl were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for assay of chromosomal translocations in circulating lymphocytes and loss of expression of the glycophorin A (GPA) gene in erythrocytes. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of thyroid nodules as determined by the ultrasound examination. Of the screened workers, 1,247 (63%) were sent to Chernobyl in 1986, including 603 (30%) sent in April or May, soon after the accident. Workers served at Chernobyl for an average of 3 months. The average age was 32 years at the time of arrival at Chernobyl and 40 years at the time of thyroid examination. The mean documented radiation dose from external sources was 10.8 cGy. Biological indicators of exposure showed low correlations with documented dose, but did not indicate that the mean dose for the population was higher than the average documented dose. 47 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  2. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

    2008-01-10

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2006-04-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

  4. Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M. ); Miller, K. )

    1994-09-01

    Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

  5. Union job fight boiling at DOE cleanup sites

    SciTech Connect

    Setzer, S.W.

    1993-11-15

    The US DOE is facing a growing jurisdictional dispute over which unions will perform the majority of clean-up work at its facilities. Unions affiliated with the AFL-CIO Metal Trades Council representing operations employees at the sites believe they have a fundamental right to work. Unions in the AFL-CIO's Building and Construction Trades Dept. insist that they have a clear mandate under federal labor law and the Davis-Bacon Act. The issue has heated up in recent weeks at the policy level and is boiling in a contentious dispute at DOE's Fernald site in Ohio.

  6. Memorandum of the Establishment of Cleanup Levels for CERCLA Sites with Radioactive Contamination

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This memorandum presents clarifying guidance for establishing protective cleanup levels for radioactive contamination at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) sites.

  7. Hot gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells: A zinc reactor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinfeld, G.

    1980-09-01

    Of the two near term options available for desulfurization of gasifier effluent, namely low temperature cleanup utilizing absorber/stripper technology, and hot gas cleanup utilizing metal oxides, there is a clear advantage to using hot gas cleanup. Since the MCFC will operate at 1200 F, and the gasifier effluent could be between 1200 to 1900 F, a hot gas cleanup system will require little or no change in process gas temperature, thereby contributing to a high overall system efficiency. Simulated operating characteristics to aid in system design and system simulations of gasifier/MCFC systems are described. The modeling of the ZnO reactor is presented.

  8. Improving Sampling, Analysis, and Data Management for Site Investigation and Cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) supports the adoption of streamlined approaches to sampling, analysis, and data management activities conducted during site assessment, characterization, and cleanup.

  9. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  10. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  11. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  12. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  13. 2010 Five-Year Plan: Assessment of Health and Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining and Milling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The five-year plan is intended to compile all activities contributing to the identification and cleanup of legacy uranium milling and mining activities in the Grants Mining District in the State of New Mexico.

  14. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  15. Solvent cleanup using base-treated silica gel solid adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Tallent, O.K.; Mailen, J.C.; Pannell, K.D.

    1984-06-01

    A solvent cleanup method using silica gel columns treated with either sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or lithium hydroxide (LiOH) has been investigated. Its effectiveness compares favorably with that of traditional wash methods. After treatment with NaOH solution, the gels adsorb HNO/sub 3/, dibutyl phosphate (DBP), UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, Pu/sup 4 +/, various metal-ion fission products, and other species from the solvent. Adsorption mechanisms include neutralization, hydrolysis, polymerization, and precipitation, depending on the species adsorbed. Sodium dibutyl phosphate, which partially distributes to the solvent from the gels, can be stripped with water; the stripping coefficient ranges from 280 to 540. Adsorption rates are diffusion controlled such that temperature effects are relatively small. Recycle of the gels is achieved either by an aqueous elution and recycle sequence or by a thermal treatment method, which may be preferable. Potential advantages of this solvent cleanup method are that (1) some operational problems are avoided and (2) the amount of NaNO/sub 3/ waste generated per metric ton of nuclear fuel reprocessed would be reduced significantly. 19 references, 6 figures, 12 tables.

  16. Cleanup of fractured rock aquifers: Implications of matrix diffusion.

    PubMed

    Mutch, R D; Scott, J I; Wilson, D J

    1993-01-01

    As contamination moves through a fractured rock aquifer, it tends to diffuse from the flowing fracture water into the rock's essentially stagnant pore water. This process tends both to retard a contamination plume's advance through a fractured rock aquifer and to substantially increase the difficulty of purging contamination from the aquifer. A mathematical model has been developed to evaluate the potential impact of this phenomenon upon water quality restoration in fractured rock aquifers. The numerical modeling reveals that cleanup of fractured rock aquifers will, in many cases, require many decades, even centuries, to achieve, particularly where substantial improvements in water quality are sought. The parameters which most strongly govern the degree to which matrix diffusion prolongs the aquifer restoration process are the rock's matrix porosity, fracture spacing, and matrix diffusivity, the chemical identity of the contaminant(s), and the length of time the aquifer has been contaminated.Since sedimentary rocks tend to have both relatively high matrix porosities and matrix diffusivities, it can be particularly difficult to purge contamination from sedimentary rock aquifers. Crystalline rocks, in contrast, typically have lower matrix porosities and matrix diffusivities, and therefore undergo more rapid cleanup. However, even in crystalline rocks, attainment of very high degrees of water quality improvement may be problematic. Numerical modeling also indicates that conventional groundwater 'pump and treat' programs are not likely to be very effective in speeding up aquifer restoration if the rate limiting step in the process is diffusion of contaminants from the rock matrix.

  17. Hazardous waste cleanup: A case study for developing efficient programs

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Puder, M.G.

    1995-06-01

    As officials in Pacific Basin Countries develop laws and policies for cleaning up hazardous wastes, experiences of countries with such instruments in place may be instructive. The United States has addressed cleanups of abandoned hazardous waste sites through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The US Congress enacted CERCLA in 1980. The task of cleaning up waste sites became larger and more costly than originally envisioned and as a result, Congress strengthened and expanded CERCLA in 1986. Today, many industry representatives, environmentalists, and other interested parties say the program is still costly and ineffective, and Congress is responding through a reauthorization process to change the law once again. Because the law and modifications to it can affect company operations and revenues, industries want to know the potential consequences of such changes. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently developed a baseline for one economic sector -- the US energy industry -- against which impacts of proposed changes to CERCLA could be measured. Difficulties encountered in locating and interpreting the data for developing that baseline suggest that legislation should not only provide for meeting its stated goals (e.g., protection of human health and the environment) but also allow for its efficient evaluation over time. This lesson can be applied to any nation contemplating hazardous waste cleanup laws and policies.

  18. Support for selection of a methamphetamine cleanup standard in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Tracy L; Griffin, Susan

    2007-06-01

    Methamphetamine production for illicit use occurs in makeshift labs and is associated with the release of numerous chemicals, including methamphetamine residues. These methamphetamine residues may pose a health risk to residents who reoccupy these structures after property seizures. Several states have established technology-based cleanup standards for methamphetamine, but none have examined the health-protectiveness of these standards. In response to Colorado House Bill 04-1182, exposure intakes correlated with three technology-based standards were calculated for various groups of individuals. Intakes were assessed for a 1-year-old infant, 6-year-old child, and a female of childbearing age. Exposure intakes were compared to toxicity reference values developed from developmental endpoints following methamphetamine exposure from the available literature. Uncertainty factors were applied to the lowest adverse effect levels observed in these studies to arrive at the toxicity reference values. These reference values were greater than the calculated intakes from each proposed technology standard, suggesting that all of the proposed standards would be protective of human health exposure. The cost and practicality of attaining each of the proposed standards was also factored into the decision making process. In their final regulation (6 CCR 1014-3), the CDPHE selected 0.5 microg/100 cm(2) as the final cleanup standard for methamphetamine residues.

  19. Summary report on large HVEC accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.

    1981-01-01

    The main features are described of the ten presently operating large HVEC tandem accelerators and of four additional HVEC accelerators which are in different stages of testing, construction or planning. Present performance characteristics are discussed as well as available information about long term reliability. Some recent improvements are mentioned and comparisons are drawn for acceleration tube gradients in various different configurations and accelerators. Finally, some possible future developments are indicated.

  20. Soil water and vegetation management for cleanup of selenium contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    Over the past year scientists have initiatived a new effort aimed at developing a soil water and vegetation management plan for Kesterson Reservoir. The plan is intended to result in a gradual depletion of the inventory of soluble selenium at the Reservoir through a combination agriculturally oriented practices that enhance dissipation of selenium from near surface soils. Agriculturally oriented processes that will contribute to depletion include microbial volatilization from the soils, direct volatilization by living plants, decomposition and volatilization of selenium-bearing vegetation, harvest and removal of seleniferous vegetation, and leaching. The benefits of using this integrated approach are that (1) no single mechanism needs to be relied upon to detoxify the soils, (2) a stable plant community can be established during this period so that impacts to wildlife can be more easily evaluated and controlled, (3) cleanup and management of the site can be carried out in a cost-effective manner. The management plan is also intended to facilitate control over wildlife exposure to selenium contaminated biota by creating a well managed environment. The majority of research associated with this new effort is being carried out at a 200 m by 50 m test plot in Pond 7. A two-line irrigation system , providing local groundwater as an irrigation supply, has been installed. Through an intensive program of soil water sampling, soil gas sampling, vegetation sampling, groundwater monitoring, and soil moisture monitoring, the mass balance for selenium under irrigated conditions is being evaluated. These studies, in conjunction with supplementary laboratory experiments will provide the information needed to develop an optimal management plan for the site. 23 refs., 38 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-5 PNL Sawdust Pit

    SciTech Connect

    L. D. Habel

    2008-05-20

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-5 Burial Ground, the PNL (Pacific Northwest Laboratory) Sawdust Pit. The 118-F-5 Burial Ground was an unlined trench that received radioactive sawdust from the floors of animal pens in the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm.

  2. Soils and groundwater cleanup at Fernald: A status update on Operable Unit No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Yerace, P.J.; Bomberger, A.K.; Brettschneider, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses a status update on the cleanup operations at FERNALD. Discussed is the regulatory framework for FERNALD cleanup; overview of the FERNALD site; description of operable unit 5;remedial investigation; pattern of contamination; feasibility studies; and tangible progress to date.

  3. Risk averse` DOE is wasting time, money in cleanup effort-GAO

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, P.

    1994-09-01

    According to an August 1994 GAO report, internal strife, poor decisionmaking and conflicting stakeholder interests have plague the cleanup effort and prevented DOE from taking advantages of what its won technology program call the best hope for ensuring a substantive waste reduction. This article details the problems effecting radioactive waste cleanup at DOE facilities, and lists the five technology priorities which have been established.

  4. Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford Site cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Hesser, W.A.; Daling, P.M.; Baynes, P.A.

    1995-06-01

    In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a conceptual set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within an expected annual funding profile of 1.05 billion dollars. These strategies were developed because (1) the US Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the US Congress and the US Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and riskreduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars annually. The risk-based strategies described herein were developed through a systems analysis approach that (1) analyzed the cleanup mission; (2) identified cleanup objectives, including risk reduction, land use, and mortgage reduction; (3) analyzed the existing baseline cleanup strategy from a cost and risk perspective; (4) developed alternatives for accomplishing the cleanup mission; (5) compared those alternatives against cleanup objectives; and (6) produced conclusions and recommendations regarding the current strategy and potential risk-based strategies.

  5. 78 FR 50447 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Cleanup...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ...; Cleanup Program for Accumulations of Coal and Float Coal Dusts, Loose Coal, and Other Combustibles ACTION... Accumulations of Coal and Float Coal Dusts, Loose Coal, and Other Combustibles,'' to the Office of Management... establish and to maintain a program for the regular cleanup and removal of accumulations of coal and...

  6. Dumping pump and treat: rapid cleanups using thermal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R.L.; Aines, R.D.

    1997-03-11

    Underground spills of volatile hydrocarbons are often difficult to clean up, especially if the contaminants are present in or below the water table as a separate liquid-organic phase. Excavating and treating the contaminated soil may not be practical or even possible if the affected zone is relatively deep. Merely pumping groundwater has proven to be ineffective because huge amounts of water must be flushed through the contaminated area to clean it; even then the contaminants may not be completely removed. Due to the low solubility of most common contaminants, such pump and treat systems can be expected to take decades to centuries to actually clean a site. Today, many sites are required to pump and treat contaminated groundwater even though there is no expectation that the site will be cleaned. In these cases, the pumps simply control the spread of the contaminant, while requiring a continuous flow of money, paperwork, and management attention. Although pump and treat systems are relatively inexpensive to operate, they represent along term cost. Most importantly, they rarely remove enough contaminant to change the property`s status. Although a pump and treat system can offer compliance in a regulatory sense, it doesn`t solve the site`s liability problem. Thermal methods promise to solve this dilemma by actually cleaning a property in a short time period, thus limiting the period of liability. This may involve cleaning a site to closure during the initial contaminant-removal phase, or removal of the majority of the contaminant so that natural processes such as bioremediation can return the site to pristine condition over a period of years, without further owner intervention. Today`s regulatory environment encourages this approach through efforts such as the brownfields initiatives. In either case, this requires a strong commitment on the part of the site owner. Most if not all the cleanup occurs within the first year or so, and nearly all the cost. In our

  7. Hanford Integrated Planning Process: 1993 Hanford Site-specific science and technology plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This document is the FY 1993 report on Hanford Site-specific science and technology (S&T) needs for cleanup of the Site as developed via the Hanford Integrated Planning Process (HIPP). It identifies cleanup problems that lack demonstrated technology solutions and technologies that require additional development. Recommendations are provided regarding allocation of funding to address Hanford`s highest-priority technology improvement needs, technology development needs, and scientific research needs, all compiled from a Sitewide perspective. In the past, the S&T agenda for Hanford Site cleanup was sometimes driven by scientists and technologists, with minimal input from the ``problem owners`` (i.e., Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC] staff who are responsible for cleanup activities). At other times, the problem-owners made decisions to proceed with cleanup without adequate scientific and technological inputs. Under both of these scenarios, there was no significant stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process. One of the key objectives of HIPP is to develop an understanding of the integrated S&T requirements to support the cleanup mission, (a) as defined by the needs of the problem owners, the values of the stakeholders, and the technology development expertise that exists at Hanford and elsewhere. This requires a periodic, systematic assessment of these needs and values to appropriately define a comprehensive technology development program and a complementary scientific research program. Basic to our success is a methodology that is defensible from a technical perspective and acceptable to the stakeholders.

  8. Green Remediation Best Management Practices: Overview of EPA's Methodology to Address the Environmental Footprint of Site Cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contaminated site cleanups involving complex activities may benefit from a detailed environmental footprint analysis to inform decision-making about application of suitable best management practices for greener cleanups.

  9. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  10. Hot Chili Peppers: Extraction, Cleanup, and Measurement of Capsaicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiping; Mabury, Scott A.; Sagebiel, John C.

    2000-12-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the red pepper or Capsicum annuum, is widely used in food preparation. The purpose of this experiment was to acquaint students with the active ingredients of hot chili pepper (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin), the extraction, cleanup, and analysis of these chemicals, as a fun and informative analytical exercise. Fresh peppers were prepared and extracted with acetonitrile, removing plant co-extractives by addition to a C-18 solid-phase extraction cartridge. Elution of the capsaicinoids was accomplished with a methanol-acetic acid solution. Analysis was completed by reverse-phase HPLC with diode-array or variable wavelength detection and calibration with external standards. Levels of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin were typically found to correlate with literature values for a specific hot pepper variety. Students particularly enjoyed relating concentrations of capsaicinoids to their perceived valuation of "hotness".

  11. Enhancement of mercury control in flue-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C.D.; Huang, Hann S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, Jiann M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper summarizes research at Argonne National Laboratory which is focused on techniques to enhance the capture of elemental mercury and integrate its control into existing flue-gas cleanup (FGC) systems. Both laboratory and field tests have shown that very little elemental mercury is captured in a wet scrubber system due to the low solubility of that species. To enhance the ability of wet scrubbers to capture mercury, Argonne has studied improved mass transfer through both mechanical and chemical means, as well as the conversion of elemental mercury into a more soluble species that can be easily absorbed. Current research is investigating the roles of several halogen species either alone or in combination with typical flue-gas components such as sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide in the oxidation of mercury to form compounds that are easily scrubbed from the flue gas.

  12. Statistical methods for evaluating the attainment of cleanup standards

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    This document is the third volume in a series of volumes sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Statistical Policy Branch, that provide statistical methods for evaluating the attainment of cleanup Standards at Superfund sites. Volume 1 (USEPA 1989a) provides sampling designs and tests for evaluating attainment of risk-based standards for soils and solid media. Volume 2 (USEPA 1992) provides designs and tests for evaluating attainment of risk-based standards for groundwater. The purpose of this third volume is to provide statistical procedures for designing sampling programs and conducting statistical tests to determine whether pollution parameters in remediated soils and solid media at Superfund sites attain site-specific reference-based standards. This.document is written for individuals who may not have extensive training or experience with statistical methods. The intended audience includes EPA regional remedial project managers, Superfund-site potentially responsible parties, state environmental protection agencies, and contractors for these groups.

  13. Adapting sensory data for multiple robots performing spill cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Storjohann, K.; Saltzen, E.

    1990-09-01

    This paper describes a possible method of converting a single performing robot algorithm into a multiple performing robot algorithm without the need to modify previously written codes. The algorithm to be converted involves spill detection and clean up by the HERMIES-III mobile robot. In order to achieve the goal of multiple performing robots with this algorithm, two steps are taken. First, the task is formally divided into two sub-tasks, spill detection and spill clean-up, the former of which is allocated to the added performing robot, HERMIES-IIB. Second, a inverse perspective mapping, is applied to the data acquired by the new performing robot (HERMIES-IIB), allowing the data to be processed by the previously written algorithm without re-writing the code. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1993-12-01

    This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

  15. Ten-year cleanup of U.S. Department of Energy weapon sites: The changing roles for technology development in an era of privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.H.

    1996-12-31

    In its beginning, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) viewed private industry as lacking adequate technology know-how to meet demands of hazardous and radioactive waste problems at the DOE`s laboratories and nuclear weapons production facilities. In November 1989, EM`s Office of Technology Development (recently renamed the Office of Science and Technology) embarked on a bold program of developing and demonstrating {open_quotes}innovative{close_quotes} waste cleanup technologies that would be safer, faster, more effective, and less expensive than the {open_quotes}baseline{close_quotes} commercial methods. This program has engaged DOE sites, national laboratories, and universities to produce preferred solutions to the problems of handling and treating DOE wastes. More recently, much of this work has shifted to joint efforts with private industry partners to accelerate the use of newly developed technologies and to enhance existing commercial methods. To date, the total funding allocation to the Office of Science and Technology program has been about $2.8 billion. If the technology applications` projects of the EM Offices of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management are included, the total funding is closer to $4 billion. Yet, the environmental industry generally has not been very receptive to EM`s innovative technology offerings. And, essentially the same can be said for DOE sites. According to the U.S. General Accounting Office in an August 1994 report, {open_quotes}Although DOE has spent a substantial amount to develop waste cleanup technologies, little new technology finds its way into the agency`s cleanup actions{close_quotes}. The DOE Baseline Environmental Management Report estimated cleanups of DOE`s Cold War legacy of wastes to require the considerable cost of $226 billion over a period of 75 years. 1 tab.

  16. Critical Issues in Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Hosokai, T.

    2004-10-01

    Updated achievements and critical issues in plasma accelerators are summarized. As to laser plasma accelerators, we cover the results of plasma cathodes by U.Michigan, LBNL, LOA and U.Tokyo. Although many new results of accelerated electrons have been reported, the electrons do not yet form a bunch with narrow energy spread. Several injection schemes and measurements to verify ultrashort bunch (tens fs) with narrow energy spread, low emittance and many charges are planned. E-162 experiments by UCLA / USC / SLAC and a newly proposed experiment on density transition trapping are introduced for electron beam driven plasma accelerators. Their main purpose is realization of GeV plasma accelerator, but application to pump-and-probe analysis for investigation of ultrafast quantum phenomena is also promising.

  17. Accelerated dynamics simulations of nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, B. P.; Stuart, S. J.; Voter, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the application of accelerated dynamics techniques to the study of carbon nanotubes. We have used the parallel replica method and temperature accelerated dynamics simulations are currently in progress. In the parallel replica study, we have stretched tubes at a rate significantly lower than that used in previous studies. In these preliminary results, we find that there are qualitative differences in the rupture of the nanotubes at different temperatures. We plan on extending this investigation to include nanotubes of various chiralities. We also plan on exploring unique geometries of nanotubes.

  18. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  19. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  20. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  1. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  2. SU-E-T-797: Variations of Cardiac Dose at Different Respiratory Status in CyberKnife M6â„¢ Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Long, S; Shang, C; Evans, G; Leventouri, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cyberknife robotic assisted radiation delivery has become a choice for accelerated breast RT, while a slightly increased cardiac dose has been reported. The dose dynamics throughout the respiration cycle has scarcely been explored. This study was designed to investigate the dose changes at each respiratory phase or status during respiration cycle. Methods: Six patients with 4DCT studies and six patients with a pair of free-breathing and deep breath-hold CT sets were used for dosimetry comparisons. 4DCT sets were obtained by Siemens™ CT and its respiratory gating system, comprising of 8 phases. Standard APBI plan at 340 cGy was done per fraction per NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 and modulated with Cyberknife M6™ on MultiPlan™5.1.2. For the purpose of this study, the tumor volume was outlined in the media-lower quadrant of the left breast. Results: Except for D5cc in plans with 4DCT, cardiac doses are significantly different between respiratory phases in well inhaled breathing phases, and more significantly in plans with BH CT. Mean cardiac doses in 100% inhalation phase were often found to be 5–15% (p< 0.02) less than those in other phases. Conclusion: Although ineligible cardiac doses are noted in APBI plans using 4D free-breathing CT and instantaneous free breathing CT series, a reduction in cardiac dose was seen for the well-inhaled phases. This provides practical guidance for cardiac dose reduction applicable with CK M6 APBR.

  3. 33 CFR 165.1329 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA. 165.1329... Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA... Waterways EPA superfund cleanup site. Vessels may otherwise transit or navigate within this area...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1329 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA. 165.1329... Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA... Waterways EPA superfund cleanup site. Vessels may otherwise transit or navigate within this area...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1329 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA. 165.1329... Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA... Waterways EPA superfund cleanup site. Vessels may otherwise transit or navigate within this area...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1329 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA. 165.1329... Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA... Waterways EPA superfund cleanup site. Vessels may otherwise transit or navigate within this area...

  7. Air quality monitoring data could help lower emissions during Superfund cleanups

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, L.O. )

    1994-05-01

    Many Superfund projects include extensive air quality monitoring efforts. However, even when large volumes of air quality and meteorological data are collected, they often are used mainly for documentation, rather than as interactive tools to protect the public. This need not be so. If remedial actions were designed to include routine data evaluations and contingency plans to reduce emissions when action levels are exceeded, air quality monitoring could help minimize public exposure to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) during cleanups. This article describes ambient air quality and meteorological monitoring programs conducted by URS Consultants Inc. (Denver) at the Sand Creek Industrial Superfund site in Commerce City, Colo., and the Vertac Chemical Co. Superfund site in Jacksonville, Ark. The Sand Creek project includes structure demolition, excavation and removal of soils and demolition debris, soil-vapor extraction of HAPs, and soil thermal treatment to remove pesticides and other hazardous organics. A rotary-kiln incinerator is used on the Vertac project to destroy solvents, pesticides, and other dioxin- and furan-contaminated materials.

  8. Hot gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells. A zinc oxide reactor model, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1980-09-16

    Utilization of coal gasifiers to power MCFC requires a cleanup system to remove sulfur and particulates. Of the two near term options available for desulfurization of gasifier effluent, namely low temperature cleanup utilizing absorber/stripper technology, and hot gas cleanup utilizing metal oxides, there is a clear advantage to using hot gas cleanup. Since the MCFC will operate at 1200/sup 0/F, and the gasifier effluent could be between 1200 to 1900/sup 0/F, a hot gas cleanup system will require little or no change in process gas temperature, thereby contributing to a high overall system efficiency. A hot gas cleanup system will consist of FeO for bulk H/sub 2/S removal and ZnO for reduction of H/sub 2/S to sub ppM levels. Hot gas cleanup systems at present are not available commercially, and therefore it is the objective of this project to model the components of the system in order to help bring this technology closer to commercialization, by providing simulated operating characteristics to aid in system design, and system simulations of gasifier/MCFC systems. The modeling of the ZnO reactor is presented.

  9. A case study of lead contamination cleanup effectiveness at Bunker Hill.

    PubMed

    Sheldrake, Sean; Stifelman, Marc

    2003-02-15

    A review of cleanup effectiveness at Bunker Hill Superfund Site (BHSS) has shown that yard soil cleanup is an effective tool for reducing house dust lead concentrations, thereby reducing children's blood lead levels. This review has also shown that contiguous cleanup of residences has a three-fold greater reduction of children's blood lead levels compared with cleaning only those homes where children currently reside by reducing exposures attributable to neighboring properties. This review underscores the importance of a community-wide, preventative approach to controlling lead contamination in soil and house dust. This review has further characterized the need for careful design, implementation, and perpetual maintenance of a community-wide lead cleanup. Several key areas of importance to maintain large scale mining/smelting remedies in the Bunker Hill area were analyzed and noted for further action, including: infrastructure, institutional controls for homeowner projects (post cleanup), erosion control for undeveloped hillsides with potential to impact the developed valley floor, drainage improvements and flood control, waste piles, and increasing the rate at which cleanup proceeds. Focusing on these areas is crucial to minimizing recontamination at a large scale lead cleanup.

  10. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 112 - Determination and Evaluation of Required Response Resources for Facility Response Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... available storage capacity. 4.7The following is an example of a medium discharge volume planning calculation... as the planning volume. The effective daily recovery capacity is 50 percent of the planning volume... planning volume for identifying shoreline cleanup capacity (for Group 1 through Group 4 oils)....

  12. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  13. Compliance Sampling Applications in MEC Clean-Up at Military Training Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, J.; Gilbert, Richard O.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.

    2008-01-31

    Millions of acres of Department of Defense (DoD) closed, transferred and transferring ranges may contain munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) (General Accounting Office, 2001). It is usually necessary to conduct geophysical surveys to search for MEC at these ranges before they can be released from DoD control for other uses. The process of searching for and removing MEC should be carefully planned to follow a quality control process to achieve cleanup goals. After detected MEC have been removed, a confirmation survey of the cleaned areas may be conducted to increase confidence in the cleanup process. These confirmation surveys are the focus of this paper. One possible statistically-based approach for conducting a confirmation survey is to use “accept-on-zero” attribute compliance sampling (AOZ ACS) (Schilling 1978, 1982; Squeglia, 1994). This approach involves conducting an inspection or sampling of a random selection of n “units” from among the total number of units (N) for a site. For example, the site may be divided into N non-overlapping 200ft x 200ft land areas (grids), n of which are randomly selected and inspected for MEC (n < N). The number n is statistically determined by specifying N and the confidence required that no more than Y% of the 200ft x 200ft units contain MEC. An example is provided by Williams (2003) for a site near Denver, Colorado. He describes the use of process quality control and AOZ ACS as it is laid out in Military-Standard-1916 (DoD 1996, 1999). The purpose of this paper is to (i) provide the mathematical foundation of AOZ ACS and an equation that can be used to compute n, (ii) discuss the pros and cons of AOZ ACS when units are defined to be either individual transects or anomalies, and (iii) present the results of simulation studies conducted to investigate the performance of AOZ ACS when individual transects are not randomly selected and there is a non-random spatial pattern of MEC. Goals (ii) and (iii) are of

  14. 303-K Storage facility sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes the cleanup, sampling, and analysis activities associated with the closure of the 303-K Storage Facility under the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations.`` this document is a supplement to the 303-K Storage Facility Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1995a) (Closure Plan). The objective of these activities is to support clean closure of the 303 K Storage Facility. This document defines the information and activities needed to meet this objective, including: constituents of concern, cleanup performance standards, cleanup activities, sampling locations and methods, field screening locations and methods, field quality control requirements, laboratory analytical methods, and data validation methodology. This document supersedes the Closure Plan if the two conflict

  15. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  16. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  17. Accelerated Innovation Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities: I. Engage NASA team (examples) a) Research and technology calls . provide suggestions to AES, HRP, OCT. b) Use NASA@Work to solicit other ideas; (possibly before R+D calls). II. Stimulate collaboration (examples) a) NHHPC. b) Wharton Mack Center for Technological Innovation (Feb 2013). c) International ] DLR ] :envihab (July 2013). d) Accelerated research models . NSF, Myelin Repair Foundation. III. Engage public Prizes (open platform: InnoCentive, yet2.com, NTL; Rice Business Plan, etc.) IV. Use same methods to engage STEM.

  18. Acute Health Effects Among Military Personnel Participating in the Cleanup of the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill, 2007, in Taean County, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Gwack, Jin; Lee, Ju Hyung; Kang, Young Ah; Chang, Kyu-jin; Lee, Moo Sik; Hong, Jee Young

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to investigate acute health effects and its related factors among military personnel participating in the cleanup of the 2007 Hebei Spirit oil spill accident in Taean county, Korea. Methods We collected data on acute symptoms during the cleanup and their predictors using a self-administered questionnaire to 2624 military personnel. Selfreported symptoms included six neurologic symptoms, five respiratory symptoms, two dermatologic symptoms, three ophthalmic symptoms, and three general symptoms. Independent variables were demographic factors (gender, age, education level, and rank), health behavioral factors (smoking history and usage of the personal protective equipment such as masks and gloves), and occupational history such as where and for how long individuals participated in cleanup. Results The duration of work days was significantly associated with 17 acute symptoms except for itchiness and red skin.Working in Taean county also increased the risk of most acute symptoms except headache and back pain. In regard to personal protective equipment, wearing masks was mainly related to the development of respiratory symptoms such as sore throat and wearing other protective equipment was related to the development of sore throat, back pain, headache, and cough. Military personnel younger than 25 years reported 4.66 times more hot flushing and 5.39 times more itchiness than those older than 25 years. Conclusion It should be emphasized that for early-stage cleanup the number of workers should be minimized, sufficient personal protective equipment with approved quality for blocking noxious gas should be supplied, and systematic health care for the workers should be provided. Health effects could be diminished by providing adequate education regarding the appropriate use of protective equipment, especially to nonprofessionals such as residents and volunteers. To make disaster response expeditious, a national and regional preparedness

  19. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  20. Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

  1. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  2. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.; Basset, R.; Bellodi, G.; Benedetto, E.; Dorda, U.; Giovannozzi, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pieloni, T.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Schmidt, F.; Todesco, E.; Zotter, B.W.; Payet, J.; Bartolini, R.; Farvacque, L.; Sen, T.; Chin, Y.H.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /SLAC /TRIUMF /Tech-X, Boulder /UC, San Diego /Darmstadt, GSI /Rutherford /Brookhaven

    2006-10-24

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  3. Accelerating the CERCLA process using plug-in records of decision

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, E.G.; Smallbeck, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    The inefficiencies of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund) process are well recognized. Years of study and oftentimes millions of dollars are expended at Superfund sites before any cleanup begins. An accelerated approach to the CERCLA process was designed and implemented at the Fort Ord Superfund site in Monterey County, California. The approach, developed at the same time as and in concert with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Superfund Accelerated Clean-Up Model (SACM), included the preparation of two ``plug-in`` records of decision (RODs). These RODs and the process to utilize them, were carefully designed to meet specific project objectives. Implementation of this accelerated program has allowed for a no further action designation or remediation of many areas of concern at the site up to 6 years ahead of schedule and at savings in excess of a million dollars.

  4. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  5. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  6. Forecasting staffing requirements for hazardous-waste cleanup. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Salthouse, R.W.

    1991-02-01

    This report addresses a need to be able to forecast the staffing levels required to supervise cleanups of hazardous waste sites in support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A Civil Works' Superfund staffing requirements model based on statistical analysis of historic workload data. It is based on the assumption that the size and complexity of future programs will be related to the size and complexity of past programs. A wide variety of factors affect staffing levels, but it was found that the two most important ones are total cost and project type or complexity. The three types of work used in the model are remedial design, supervision of remedial construction, and additional technical assistance to the Environmental Protection Agency. Historical data was used to determine the relationship between dollars spent and man hours expended for various types of work: the distribution of project sizes, durations, and start dates; and the functional relationship between time spent and work accomplished. Prototype models for prediction of staffing needs have been developed from this data.

  7. Thermal cleanups using dynamic underground stripping and hydrous pyrolysis oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R D; Knauss, K; Leif, R; Newmark, R L

    1999-05-01

    In the early 1990s, in collaboration with the School of Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed dynamic underground stripping (DUS), a method for treating subsurface contaminants with heat that is much faster and more effective than traditional treatment methods. more recently, Livermore scientists developed hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO), which introduces both heat and oxygen to the subsurface to convert contaminants in the ground to such benign products as carbon dioxide, chloride ion, and water. This process has effectively destroyed all contaminants it encountered in laboratory tests. With dynamic underground stripping, the contaminants are vaporized and vacuumed out of the ground, leaving them still to be destroyed elsewhere. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation technology takes the cleanup process one step further by eliminating the treatment, handling, and disposal requirements and destroying the contamination in the ground. When used in combination, HPO is especially useful in the final polishing of a site containing significant free-product contaminant, once the majority of the contaminant has been removed.

  8. Technologies for in situ cleanup of contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Udell, K S; Grubb, D G; Sitar, N

    1995-05-01

    Groundwater contamination by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and denser than water non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) poses one of the greatest remedial challenges in the field of environmental engineering. Due to low water solubilities and aqueous diffusivities, conventional pump-and-treat technologies have a poor record of success in remediation of DNAPL contaminated aquifers. Better success has been found with the removal of volatile LNAPLs due to higher gaseous diffusivities, propensity for aerobic biodegradation, and ease of pumping and handling large quantities of gas. An evaluation of in situ cleanup technologies on the basis of their applicability to in situ treatment of NAPL contaminated aquifers is presented. Emphasis is placed on treatment of the separate phase occurring in the saturated zone. Soil washing, air sparging, biodegradation, electro-osmosis, enhanced steam extraction, stabilization/solidification, treatment walls, radio frequency heating, and containment systems and barriers are among the in situ technologies reviewed. In the context of the governing contaminant fate and transport processes, the relative merits of each technology are assessed on the basis of its theoretical background, field implementability, level of demonstration and performance, waste, technical and site applicability/limitations, commercial availability, and cost and residuals management.

  9. How the K(d) Approach Undermines Groundwater Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Bethke, Craig M.; Brady, Patrick V.

    1999-07-19

    Environmental scientists have long appreciated that the distribution coefficient (the ''K{sub d}'' or ''constant K{sub d}'') approach predicts the partitioning of heavy metals between sediment and groundwater inaccurately; nonetheless, transport models applied to problems of environmental protection and groundwater remediation almost invariably employ this technique. To examine the consequences of this practice, we consider transport in one dimension of Pb and other heavy metals through an aquifer containing hydrous ferric oxide, onto which heavy metals sorb strongly. We compare the predictions of models calculated using the K{sub d} approach to those given by surface complexation theory, which is more realistic physically and chemically. The two modeling techniques give qualitatively differing results that lead to divergent cleanup strategies. The results for surface complexation theory show that water flushing is ineffective at displacing significant amounts of Pb from the sorbing surface. The effluent from such treatment contains a ''tail'' of small but significant levels of contamination that persists indefinitely. Subsurface zones of Pb contamination, furthermore, are largely immobile in flowing groundwater. These results stand in sharp contrast to the predictions of models constructed using the k{sub d} approach, yet are consistent with experience in the laboratory and field.

  10. A new hot gas cleanup filter design methodology

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, J.G.; Dennis, R.A.; Shaffer, F.D.

    1996-12-31

    The fluid dynamics of Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) systems having complex geometrical configurations are typically analyzed using computational fluid dynamics codes (CFD) or bench-scale laboratory test facilities called cold-flow models (CFM). At the present time, both CFD and CFM can be effectively used for simple flows limited to one or two characteristic length scales with well defined boundary conditions. This is not the situation with HGCU devices. These devices have very complex geometries, low Reynolds number, multi-phase flows that operate on multiple-length scales. For this reason, both CFD and CFM analysis cannot yet be considered as a practical engineering analysis tool for modeling the entire flow field inside HGCU systems. The thrust of this work is to provide an aerodynamic analysis methodology that can be easily applied to the complex geometries characteristic of HGCU filter vessels, but would not require the tedious numerical solution to the entire set of transport equations. The analysis methodology performs the following tasks: Predicts problem areas where ash deposition will most likely occur; Predicts residence times for particles at various locations inside the filter vessel; Lends itself quickly to major design changes; Provides a sound technical basis for more appropriate use of CFD and CFM analysis; and Provides CFD and CFM analysis in a more focused way where if is needed.

  11. Rapid cleanup of bacterial DNA from samples containing aerosol contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, Darrell E.; Kracke, Suzanne K.; Emanuel, Peter A.; Valdes, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is an in vitro enzymatic, synthetic method used to amplify specific DNA sequences from organisms. Detection of DNA using gene probes allows for absolute identification not only of specific organisms, but also of genetic material in recombinant organisms. PCR is an exquisite biological method for detecting bacteria in aerosol samples. A major challenge facing detection of DNA from field samples is that they are almost sure to contain impurities, especially impurities that inhibit amplification through PCR. DNA is being extracted from air, sewage/stool samples, food, sputum, a water and sediment; however, multi- step, time consuming methods are required to isolate the DNA from the surrounding contamination. This research focuses on developing a method for rapid cleanup of DNA which combines extraction and purification of DNA while, at the same time, removing inhibitors from 'dirty samples' to produce purified, PCR-ready DNA. GeneReleaser produces PCR-ready DNA in a rapid five-minute protocol. GeneReleaser resin was able to clean up sample contain micrograms of typical aerosol and water contaminants. The advantages of using GR are that it is rapid, inexpensive, requires one-step, uses no hazardous material and produces PCR-ready DNA.

  12. Active-to-Passive Environmental Cleanup Transition Strategies - 13220

    SciTech Connect

    Gaughan, Thomas F.; Aylward, Robert S.; Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B.; Whitaker, Wade C.; Mills, Gary L.

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site uses a graded approach to environmental cleanup. The selection of groundwater and vadose zone remediation technologies for a specific contamination area is based on the size, contaminant type, contaminant concentration, and configuration of the plume. These attributes are the result of the nature and mass of the source of contamination and the subsurface characteristics in the area of the plume. Many large plumes consist of several zones that are most efficiently addressed with separate complementary corrective action/remedial technologies. The highest concentrations of contaminants are found in the source zone. The most robust, high mass removal technologies are often best suited for remediation of the source zone. In the primary plume zone, active remedies, such as pump-and-treat, may be necessary to remove contaminants and exert hydraulic control of the plume. In the dilute fringe zone, contaminants are generally lower in concentration and can often be treated with passive techniques. A key determination in achieving an acceptable and cost-effective end state for a given waste unit is when to transition from an active treatment system to a more passive or natural approach (e.g., monitored natural attenuation or enhanced attenuation). This paper will discuss the considerations for such a transition as well as provide examples of successful transitions at the Savannah River Site. (authors)

  13. Impact accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Brinkley, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The degree to which impact acceleration is an important factor in space flight environments depends primarily upon the technology of capsule landing deceleration and the weight permissible for the associated hardware: parachutes or deceleration rockets, inflatable air bags, or other impact attenuation systems. The problem most specific to space medicine is the potential change of impact tolerance due to reduced bone mass and muscle strength caused by prolonged weightlessness and physical inactivity. Impact hazards, tolerance limits, and human impact tolerance related to space missions are described.

  14. EPA adds Old American Zinc in Fairmont City to Superfund cleanup list

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For Immediate Release No. 16-OPA009 EPA adds Old American Zinc in Fairmont City to Superfund cleanup list CHICAGO (April 6, 2016) - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced that the Old American Zinc

  15. Risk-Based Decision Making Case Study: Application at a Superfund Cleanup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacker, Stanley; Goodman, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Describes a case study comparing an integrated approach to Superfund cleanup with traditional approaches at a particular Superfund site. Emphasizes ways to save time and money while still achieving the desired risk reduction level. (LZ)

  16. Using the Triad Approach to Streamline Brownfields Site Assessment and Cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Brownfields Technology Support Center (BTSC) has prepared this document to provide an educational tool for site owners, project managers, and regulators to help streamline assessment and cleanup activities at brownfields sites.

  17. TOMORROW: Information Session to Discuss Cleanup Activities at the Smokey Mountain Smelters Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (05/25/15)- ATLANTA - The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) will host an Open House to answer questions regarding cleanup activities at the Smokey Mountain Smelter

  18. EPA Reaches $55 Million Settlement for Soil Clean-up at South-Bay Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These funds are key to advancing our cleanup actions at this site, said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA's Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. EPA looks forward to working with local residents as we clean up and revitalize their neighborhood, which h

  19. Superfund expenditures and cleanup priorities: Distributive politics or the public interest

    SciTech Connect

    Hird, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Using data on all final National Priorities List (NPL) sites, this study employs an integrated model of distributive and public interest politics to determine whether the overall pace of cleanup efforts and funding of the $8.5 billion Superfund program over the past eight years reflects self-interested congressional influence or public interest objectives. Despite the fact that both EPA and Congress have substantial incentives to promote the Superfund program, the results indicate that once a site is on the final NPL, there is lettle committee-based congressional influence over the distribution of site cleanup or funding, although evidence exists that legislators can hasten a site's transition from proposed to final status on the NPL. The chief determinants of cleanup pace and level of funding are the site's Hazard Ranking System (HRS) scores, whether federal funds are financing the cleanup, and whether the site is designated as a state priority.

  20. Dynamics of the Genetic Diversity of Subsurface Microbial Communities and Their Applications to Contaminated Site Cleanups

    EPA Science Inventory

    When compared to traditional approaches, the utilization of molecular and genomic techniques to soil and groundwater cleanup investigations can reduce inherent parameter variability when conducting bench and pilot-scale investigations or carrying out full-scale field applications...

  1. Effort to earn public support and confidence in Hanford Site cleanup work

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.C.; Edwards, C. ); Beers, A.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Public involvement is needed for Hanford Site cleanup to succeed. If people do not know about, understand, and support cleanup, it will be more difficult and expensive. The Tri-Party Agreement calls for public involvement in decisions about cleanup options and schedules. This paper defines what public involvement means and how the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and US Department of Energy (DOE) have conducted it. Experience and survey research have shown ways to improve our performance. While we have improved our conduct of public meetings, we must identify other ways to involve the public. Efforts continue to open decision making earlier in the decision process, to share information that is clear and understandable, and to open the channels of communication. We have made good progress. We have many opportunities to continue to improve. This paper describes some of the highlights and lessons learned in public involvement in Hanford Site cleanup. 4 refs.

  2. Report: Some States Cannot Address Assessment Needs and Face Limitations in Meeting Future Superfund Cleanup Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2004-P-00027, September 1, 2004. The five States have established hazardous waste site cleanup programs that address contaminated sites posing human health and environmental risks ranging from low to high.

  3. EPA Science Matters Newsletter: Greener Cleanups at Hazardous Waste Sites (Published August 2013)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Read about the EPA’s Smart Energy Resources Guide (SERG). The guide covers techniques for superfund managers to reduce cleanup emissions in a process called green remediation, and can be used by any site remediation and redevelopment manager.

  4. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    This question-and-answer report provides answers in nontechnical language to frequently asked questions about the status of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The answers update information first prepared in 1981, shortly after the cleanup got under way. Since then, a variety of important developments in the cleanup has occurred. The information in the report should be read in conjunction with NUREG 1060, a discussion of increased occupational exposure estimates for the cleanup. The questions and answers in this report cover purpose and community involvement, decontamination of water and reactor, fuel removal, radwaste transport, environmental impact, social and economic effects, worker exposures and safety, radiation monitoring, potential for accidents, and schedule and funding.

  5. Green Remediation Best Management Practices: Integrating Renewable Energy into Site Cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Principles for Greener Cleanups outline the Agency's policy for evaluating and minimizing the environmental 'footprint' of activities undertaken when cleaning up a contaminated site.

  6. Exxon officials rate Valdez waste management plan a success

    SciTech Connect

    Fahys, J. )

    1990-02-01

    There was a time last spring when the Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup drifted to a halt as officials wondered how to dispose skimmers filled with oil water collected from Prince William Sound. Barges were full; off-loading gear was failing; and there was no place to dump the cargo. The disposal delay was a brief episode in what many call a successful waste management operation. Houston-based Exxon USA designed its cleanup program and achieved its goals despite such setbacks as public outcry over incineration plans. This paper reports on what Exxon officials had to say about the waste management plan.

  7. Dedicated Linear Accelerator Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Single-Center Experience in 179 Patients With Varied Dose Prescriptions and Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Zachary A.; Gorgulho, Alessandra A.; Bezrukiy, Nikita; McArthur, David; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael T.; De Salles, Antonio A.F.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Dedicated linear accelerator radiosurgery (D-LINAC) has become an important treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Although the use of gamma knife continues to be established, few large series exist using D-LINAC. The authors describe their results, comparing the effects of varied target and dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Between August 1995 and January 2008, 179 patients were treated with D-LINAC radiosurgery. Ten patients (5.58%) had no clinical follow-up. The median age was 74.0 years (range, 32-90 years). A total of 39 patients had secondary or atypical pain, and 130 had idiopathic TN. Initially, 28 patients received doses between 70 and 85 Gy, with the 30% isodose line (IDL) touching the brainstem. Then, using 90 Gy, 82 consecutive patients were treated with a 30% IDL and 59 patients with a 50% IDL tangential to the pons. Results: Of 169 patients, 134 (79.3%) experienced significant relief at a mean of 28.8 months (range, 5-142 months). Average time to relief was 1.92 months (range, immediate to 6 months). A total of 31 patients (19.0%) had recurrent pain at 13.5 months. Of 87 patients with idiopathic TN without prior procedures, 79 (90.8%) had initial relief. Among 28 patients treated with 70 Gy and 30% IDL, 18 patients (64.3%) had significant relief, and 10 (35.7%) had numbness. Of the patients with 90 Gy and 30% IDL at the brainstem, 59 (79.0%) had significant relief and 48.9% had numbness. Among 59 consecutive patients with similar dose but the 50% isodoseline at the brainstem, 49 patients (88.0%) had excellent/good relief. Numbness, averaging 2.49 on a subjective scale of 1 to 5, was experienced by 49.7% of the patients, Conclusions: Increased radiation dose and volume of brainstem irradiation may improve clinical outcomes with the trade-off of trigeminal dysfunction. Further study of the implications of dose and target are needed to optimize outcomes and to minimize complications.

  8. RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-08-01

    One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  9. Improving the Department of Defense’s Hazardous Waste Cleanup Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-02-01

    Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act ( CERCLA ) of 1980 and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. However, it...with one another and with CERCLA and SARA as written? RAND researchers explored this question by evaluating cleanup projects at nine closing bases...difficult to divide a base according to cleanup priorities. Under CERCLA , bases are divided into groups of contaminated sites, known as "operable units

  10. Environmental Cleanup: Too Many High Priority Sites Impede DoD’s Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    requirements, limited technical knowledge and expertise, cleanup standards and goals, and restricted funding. CERCLA The Superfund remedial process is...National Priorities IAA where DOD is the lead agency. Page I GAOMAD-94MIIS Ewl•mioamntI cleanup B-25ඔ The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization...Response, Compensation and Liability Act (cEwcLA), as amended, commonly referred to as Superfund (42 U.S.C. 9620). cEBaA requires federal entities to

  11. Cost-Aware Design of a Discrimination Strategy for Unexploded Ordnance Cleanup

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-25

    FINAL REPORT Cost-Aware Design of a Discrimination Strategy for Unexploded Ordnance Cleanup SERDP SEED Project MR-1715 FEBRUARY 2010...Aware Design of a Discrimination Strategy for Unexploded Ordnance Cleanup W912HQ-10-C-0002 MR-1715Dr. Jeremiah Remus Dr. Leslie Collins Dr. Stacy Tantum...performance criterion (100% UXO detection) in each stage of the UXO discrimination processing strategy . This project consisted of several large-scale

  12. Cost-Aware Design of a Discrimination Strategy for Unexploded Ordnance Cleanup

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-25

    FINAL REPORT Cost-Aware Design of a Discrimination Strategy for Unexploded Ordnance Cleanup SERDP SEED Project MR-1715 FEBRUARY 2011...Aware Design of a Discrimination Strategy for Unexploded Ordnance Cleanup W912HQ-10-C-0002 MR-1715Dr. Jeremiah Remus Dr. Leslie Collins Dr. Stacy Tantum...performance criterion (100% UXO detection) in each stage of the UXO discrimination processing strategy . This project consisted of several large-scale

  13. Waste is a Terrible Thing to Mind: Perspectives on the Cleanup of the United States Nuclear Weapons Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodde, David

    1997-03-01

    For the 50 years of the Cold War, the United States nuclear arsenal was the cornerstone of our national security. These weapons were designed, manufactured, and armed with fissionable materials in an industrial complex that, at its peak, included about 16 major facilities and vast tracts of land in Nevada, Idaho, Washington, and South Carolina. Included among these are such well-known sites as the Savannah River Plant, the Hanford, Oak Ridge, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Cold War, that "long twilight struggle" in the evocative phrase of John Kennedy, left little time and few resources for understanding and managing the environmental consequences of nuclear weapons production. At the same time, perceptions of the special nature of the atom led to a concentration of governance in the Atomic Energy Commission and the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. Thus, external feedback for the managers of the complex was heavily filtered. But the imperatives of the Cold War have waned, and our understanding of the implications for the environment and the health and safety of workers has grown. By 1995 the Department of Energy (DoE) had spent about 23 billion in identifying and characterizing its waste, managing it, and assessing the actions needed to clean up the 120 sites in 36 states. Yet the majority of the task appeared ahead. Estimates made in 1995 suggested a total cost ranging from 200-350 billion and a time to complete of 75 years. If these were true, the cleanup of the weapons complex would become the largest civil works project in the history of humankind. Over the past year or so, the DoE program has shifted its focus from studies to actual cleanup. A strategic plan has been proposed that would accomplish most of the needed work over ten years at a cost of about $85 billion. At the same time, the Department is proposing to transfer oversight to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the states. This Invited

  14. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics of a generic hypersonic accelerator configuration at Mach numbers 1.5 and 2.0. [conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Ira J.; Covell, Peter F.; Forrest, Dana K.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of a generic hypersonic research vehicle was conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). A parametric study was performed to determine the interference effects of various model components. Configuration variables included delta and trapezoidal canards; large and small centerline-mounted vertical tails, along with a set of wing-mounted vertical tails; and a set of model noses with different degrees of bluntness. Wing position was varied by changing the longitudinal location and the incidence angle. The test Mach numbers were 1.5 and 2.0 at Reynolds numbers of 1 x 10(exp 6) per foot, 2 x 10(exp 6) per foot, and 4 x 10(exp 6) per foot. Angle of attack was varied from -4 degrees to 27 degrees, and sideslip angle was varied from -8 degrees to 8 degrees. Generally, the effect of Reynolds number did not deviate from conventional trends. The longitudinal stability and lift-curve slope decreased with increasing Mach number. As the wing was shifted rearward, the lift-curve slope decreased and the longitudinal stability increased. Also, the wing-mounted vertical tails resulted in a more longitudinally stable configuration. In general, the lift-drag ratio was not significantly affected by vertical-tail arrangement. The best lateral-directional stability was achieved with the large centerline-mounted tail, although the wing-mounted vertical tails exhibited the most favorable characteristics at the higher angles of attack.

  15. Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

  16. Cleanup under Airlock of an Old Uranium Foundry - 13273

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, Daniel; Houee, Jean-Marie; Chambon, Frederic

    2013-07-01

    Since 2004, AREVA's subsidiary SICN has been conducting the cleanup and dismantling of an old uranium foundry located in the town of Annecy (France). The first operations consisted in the removal of the foundry's production equipment, producing more than 300 metric tons (MT) of waste. The second step consisted in performing the radiological characterization of the 1,600 m{sup 2} (17,200 ft{sup 2}) building, including underground trenches and galleries. The building was precisely inventoried, based on operations records and direct measurements. All sub-surfaces, which needed to be cleaned up were characterized, and a determination of the contamination migration was established, in particular with trenches and galleries. The wall thicknesses to be treated were empirically justified, knowing that the maximal migration depth inside concrete is 5 mm for a liquid transfer vector. All singularities such as cracks, anchoring points, etc. were spotted for a complete and systematic treatment. Building structures not laying directly on the soil, such as floor slabs, were not cleaned up but directly deconstructed and disposed of as waste. The facility was located within the town of Annecy. Therefore, in order to avoid the risk of dusts dispersion and public exposure during the building deconstruction and the soil treatment, a third of the building's surface was confined in a sliding airlock built from a metal structure capable of resisting to wind and snow, which are frequent in this area. This particular structure provided a static confinement over the half of the building which was covered and a dynamic confinement using a ventilation and high efficiency air filtration system, sized to provide 2.5 air changes per hour. The enclosure and its metallic structure is 33 m long (108 feet), 25 m wide (82 feet), and 13 m high (42 feet), for a volume of 10,000 m{sup 3} (353,000 ft{sup 3}). It was made up of a double skin envelope, allowing the recycling of its structure and outside

  17. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  18. An experimental evaluation of a small fusion fuel cleanup system

    SciTech Connect

    Holtslander, W.J.; Johnson, R.E.; Gravelle, F.B.; Schultz, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Small tritium-burning experimental tokamaks will require some means of handling and purifying the deuterium-tritium fuel. A simple purification system would allow reinjection of fuel, minimize tritium inventory on site, and reduce the number of shipments of tritium to and from the tokamak site. This could simplify the licensing and safety aspects for sites unsuited to large inventories of tritium. At the request of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, a number of conceptual designs of fusion fuel cleanup systems were prepared. These designs were based on handling 5000-Ci batches of fuel containing helium (2%), water (0.4%), oxygen and nitrogen (0.1% each), and carbon oxides and methane (0.5% each). The purified fuel was to have impurity concentrations no greater than 1% helium and 0.1% total for the remainder. Six conceptual designs were prepared and evaluated. In each of these, the fuel from the tokamak was diluted to {approximately}25% in helium prior to processing. The basis of the purification cycle was to dilute the fuel with helium as a carrier gas, remove all of the hydrogen and impurities, and regenerate pure fuel for reuse. The preferred design consisted of a gas circulation loop comprising an expansion tank, a pump, and a number of purification units, a uranium bed, a zirconium-aluminum getter bed, and two catalyst beds, Pt/Pd and CuO/MnO{sub 2}. This paper summarizes an experimental evaluation of this system using hydrogen and nontriated impurities. 1 ref.

  19. New technologies aid DOE in site characterization, cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy is using what reportedly is the world`s largest remotely operated mobile-work system to excavate a landfill contaminated with radioactive materials at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The 1,500-ton, self-propelled machine made by Sonsub Inc. (Houston) will span and excavate landfills up to 120 feet wide. As the unit digs, it will separate waste from the soil, package the waste for transport, then backfill the pit. DOE will use the machine to excavate Pit 9, a 400-foot-long, 120-foot-wide landfill that was used as a waste-disposal site in the 1960s. Using computer modeling applications to identify hazardous and radioactive wastes can protect workers from exposure and, in some cases, reduce remediation costs. Canberra Industries (Meridien, Conn.) in November was awarded a contract by EG and G Mound Applied Technologies to perform gamma spectroscopy radiological waste characterization on waste containers that have been stored since 1978 at the Mound site in Ohio. The 55-gallon drums and boxes at the site reportedly contain transuranic waste; however, officials say they anticipate that, once characterization is performed, about 25% of the waste will be downgraded to low-level waste (below 100nCI/gm). In another application involving landfill cleanup, Komar Industries Inc. (Groveport, Ohio) in late 1995 was contracted to design and construct a system for processing radioactive waste from an unnamed DOE landfill. The company says it will design a triauger with injector configuration to serve as a fully contained size-reduction, blending and feeding system that will allow engineers to blend a variety of wastes found at the site. Machined, O-ring, sealed surfaces will maintain a negative water column under normal operations. The system will be designed to handle pressures up to 10 bar, while the processor will have a 6-cubic-yard charge capacity and the ability to accept 15 to 20 charges per hour.

  20. Incident trends for a hazardous waste cleanup company.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, F; Rejent, G M

    1999-01-01

    Published reports to assess incidents in hazardous waste operations are scarce. This study was designed to evaluate incident trends in a relatively large hazardous waste cleanup company. The data for 6.5 years, winter 1990 through spring 1996, provided 1848 incident reports with 87% involving injury/illness cases. Over 75% of injury/illness incidents were due to mechanical agents, 10% occurred because of chemical exposure, 5% involved poisonous plants and insect bites, 2% resulted from temperature extremes, 1% were from cumulative injuries/illnesses, and in 7% the agent was not recorded. Almost 31% of injuries were related to the upper extremities, with the fingers most often injured, followed by the hands. Lower back strain cases constituted 11% of injuries, ankle/foot/toe cases 9%, and knee cases 5%. Recovery technicians (laborers) had the highest frequency of injury/illness incidents (52%), followed by supervisors (15%) and heavy machinery operators (10%). The incidence rates (IRs) for all recordable incidents ranged from 11.9 for the second quarter of 1990 down to 1.2 for the fourth quarter of 1995 with a mean (SD) and median of 6.3 (3.0) and 6.1, respectively. For the time period studied, IRs decreased significantly (p < 0.01). It was concluded that hands-on experience in the field and improvements in the health and safety program of the company--including expanding its focus (originally the prevention of chemical exposure) to include construction safety--reduced the incidents considerably. Introduction of new regulations has also contributed to this trend.

  1. Partnerships in cleanup at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hula, G.A.; Nearmen, M.J.; Koch, D.

    1995-12-31

    Environmental Restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are currently being conducted under a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO). The FFA/CO was signed by the US Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), the Environmental Protection Agency-Region 10 (EPA), and the state of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) in December 1991. The INEL FFA/CO has been successfully implemented due to the coordination, integration and communication among the DOE-ID, IDHW and EPA Project and WAG Managers. Successful implementation of this Tri-party Agreement hinges on one key concept: ownership of the agreement, including the routine and unexpected problems and conflicting schedules typically associated with three separate agencies. Other factors, such as (1) open and frequent communication, (2) trust among all players, (3) ``giving`` in order to ``get,`` (4) clear, concise documentation surrounding key decisions during implementation and (5) little turnover among the implementers of the Agreement, i.e., good institutional knowledge, will enhance implementation of the Agreement, but without ownership, successful implementation of the agreement may be jeopardized. This sense of ownership, as well as a sound professional working relationship between the Project and WAG Managers from each agency, has resulted in avoidance of the need for invoking the formal ``dispute resolution`` process outlined in the INEL Agreement. This facilitates timely decision-making (10 Record of Decisions have been signed to date at the INEL) which has quickly progressed the program from an ``assessment`` phase to a ``cleanup`` phase.

  2. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and Environmental Management Science Program research award abstracts. Volume 2 of 3 -- Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix B provides details about each of the 202 research awards funded by the EMSP. This information may prove useful to researchers who are attempting to address the Department`s environmental management challenges in their work, program managers who are planning, integrating, and prioritizing Environmental Management projects, and stakeholders and regulators who are interested in the Department`s environmental challenges. The research award information is organized by the state and institution in which the lead principal investigator is located. In many cases, the lead principal investigator is one of several investigators at a number of different institutions. In these cases, the lead investigator (major collaborator) at each of the additional institutions is listed. Each research award abstract is followed by a list of high cost projects that can potentially be impacted by the research results. High cost projects are Environmental Management projects that have total costs greater than $50 million from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and have costs or quantities of material associated with an Environmental Management problem area. High cost projects which must remain active in the year 2007 and beyond to manage high risk are also identified. Descriptions of these potentially related high cost Environmental Management projects can be found in Appendix C. Additional projects in the same problem area as a research award can be located using the Index of High Cost Environmental Management Projects by Problem Area, at the end of Appendices B and C.

  3. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The SNRB{trademark} Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project was cooperatively funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B&W, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ohio Edison, Norton Chemical Process Products Company and the 3M Company. The SNRB{trademark} technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. Development of the SNRB{trademark} process at B&W began with pilot testing of high-temperature dry sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} removal in the 1960`s. Integration of NO{sub x} reduction was evaluated in the 1970`s. Pilot work in the 1980`s focused on evaluation of various NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, SO{sub 2} sorbents and integration of the catalyst with the baghouse. This early development work led to the issuance of two US process patents to B&W - No. 4,309,386 and No. 4,793,981. An additional patent application for improvements to the process is pending. The OCDO was instrumental in working with B&W to develop the process to the point where a larger scale demonstration of the technology was feasible. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B&W tested the SNRB{trademark} pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB{trademark} process. The SNRB{trademark} facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993.

  4. Post-Cleanup Communication and Records Plan for Project Chariot, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    2005-01-01

    The Project Chariot Site resides in a remote and isolated area in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska (Figure 1-1). The Project Chariot Site was a proposed test location for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Plowshare Program in 1958. In 1962, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) conducted environmental studies using less than 30 mCi of short-lived mixed fission products. The location of the studies was about 0.75 mile (1.2 km) north of the Project Chariot Site base camp. Radioactive material was spread over the 12 test plots: 10 were used for overland transport tracer tests, one for a sediment transport experiment, and one for an 18-hour percolation test. The 11 test plots constituted an area less than 0.9 percent of an acre. At the conclusion of the August 1962 tracer test, USGS scraped the ground surface of the test plots and the percolation test location. The scraped soil and vegetation were mixed with native soil, deposited in a mound on two of the plots, and covered with 4 ft (1.22 m) of uncontaminated soil (DOE 1993).

  5. Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Cleanup Plan for Fort Devens, Fort Devens, Massachusetts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-07

    training areas. Camp Devens was created as a temporary cantonment in 1917 for training soldiers from the New England area. It was named after Charles Devens...Baker School, and a basic training center for Army nurses. A prisoner of war (POW) camp for 5,000 German and Italian soldiers was operated from 1944 to...Date 17 Allen, C.F. 7,00 292 Benedict, G.W. 8.25 187 Blood, S.A. 42.12 182.01 Boston & Main RR 102.92 59 Brewer , D.G. 9.00 58 Brewer , G.A. 18.00 124

  6. Base Closure and Realignment Act (BRAC) Cleanup Plan, Sacramento Army Depot, Sacramento, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    RCRA Facilities (SW M Us) ................................ 3-13 3.2.8 N PD ES Permits ......................................... 3-13 3.2.9 Oil /W ater...Version 2 October 1995 111 Table of Contents (Continued) Chapter Page 4.2.8 N PD E S Perm its .......................................... 4-5 4.2.9 Oil /W...for the Groundwater Treatment Plant Review / 20% Oil /Water Separators Complete Maintain use until closure None Completed Survey/disposal of separators

  7. Fort Holabird Defense Investigative Service (DIS), Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Cleanup Plan (BCP), Version II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    Vendor Fee 9/13/41 C-3-3 74 Oliver J. Pecher et al 0.28 Vendor Fee 9/13/41 C-3-4 75 1 Lawrence Moh DeHaven et al 0.18 Vendor Fee 9/13/41 DACA31-94-D...Portal Street Gascoyne Laboratories 2101 Van Deman Street Thrasher Group 2201 Van Deman Street Red Star Yeast 2100 Van Deman Street Riggs Distler & Co...commercial purposes such as corporate centers, offices, and service centers with the exception of Red Star Yeast which maintains manufacturing operations

  8. UCLA Neptune Facility for Advanced Accelerator Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, Sergei Ya.; Clayton, Christopher E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Rosenzweig, James B.; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2004-12-07

    The Neptune Laboratory at UCLA is being used for exploring concepts useful for advanced accelerators. This facility hosts a TW-class CO2 laser system and a high-brightness photoinjector producing a 14 MeV electron beam. The goal for the laboratory is to carry out experiments on high-gradient acceleration of externally injected electrons in both laser-driven relativistic plasma waves and EM laser field in vacuum. Experiments on plasma beat-wave acceleration using a prebunched electron beam, a high-energy gain 10-{mu}m inverse free electron laser accelerator, longitudinal electron beam shaping and laser based light-sources are planned.

  9. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  10. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

  11. Evaluation of containment failure and cleanup time for Pu shots on the Z machine.

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01

    Between November 30 and December 11, 2009 an evaluation was performed of the probability of containment failure and the time for cleanup of contamination of the Z machine given failure, for plutonium (Pu) experiments on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Due to the unique nature of the problem, there is little quantitative information available for the likelihood of failure of containment components or for the time to cleanup. Information for the evaluation was obtained from Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) at the Z machine facility. The SMEs provided the State of Knowledge (SOK) for the evaluation. There is significant epistemic- or state of knowledge- uncertainty associated with the events that comprise both failure of containment and cleanup. To capture epistemic uncertainty and to allow the SMEs to reason at the fidelity of the SOK, we used the belief/plausibility measure of uncertainty for this evaluation. We quantified two variables: the probability that the Pu containment system fails given a shot on the Z machine, and the time to cleanup Pu contamination in the Z machine given failure of containment. We identified dominant contributors for both the time to cleanup and the probability of containment failure. These results will be used by SNL management to decide the course of action for conducting the Pu experiments on the Z machine.

  12. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  13. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Cary, J.; McInnes, L.C.; Mori, W.; Ng, C.; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization

  14. 2020 Vision for Tank Waste Cleanup (One System Integration) - 12506

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Benton; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. The millions of gallons of waste are a by-product of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. The Cleanup of Hanford's 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 large underground tanks represents the Department's largest and most complex environmental remediation project. Sixty percent by volume of the nation's high-level radioactive waste is stored in the underground tanks grouped into 18 'tank farms' on Hanford's central plateau. Hanford's mission to safely remove, treat and dispose of this waste includes the construction of a first-of-its-kind Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), ongoing retrieval of waste from single-shell tanks, and building or upgrading the waste feed delivery infrastructure that will deliver the waste to and support operations of the WTP beginning in 2019. Our discussion of the 2020 Vision for Hanford tank waste cleanup will address the significant progress made to date and ongoing activities to manage the operations of the tank farms and WTP as a single system capable of retrieving, delivering, treating and disposing Hanford's tank waste. The initiation of hot operations and subsequent full operations of the WTP are not only dependent upon the successful

  15. Fermilab Program and Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    This article is a short summary of the talk presented at 2014 Instrumentation Conference in Novosibirsk about Fermilab's experimental program and future plans. It includes brief description of the P5 long term planning progressing in US as well as discussion of the future accelerators considered at Fermilab.

  16. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  17. Precision Dual-Aquifer Dewatering at a Low Level Radiological Cleanup in New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Gosnell, A. S.; Langman, J. W. Jr.; Zahl, H. A.; Miller, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    Cleanup of low-level radioactive wastes at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), Wayne, New Jersey during the period October, 2000 through November, 2001 required the design, installation and operation of a dual-aquifer dewatering system to support excavation of contaminated soils. Waste disposal pits from a former rare-earth processing facility at the WISS had been in contact with the water table aquifer, resulting in moderate levels of radionuclides being present in the upper aquifer groundwater. An uncontaminated artesian aquifer underlies the water table aquifer, and is a localized drinking water supply source. The lower aquifer, confined by a silty clay unit, is flowing artesian and exhibits potentiometric heads of up to 4.5 meters above grade. This high potentiometric head presented a strong possibility that unloading due to excavation would result in a ''blowout'', particularly in areas where the confining unit was < 1 meter thick. Excavation of contaminated materials w as required down to the surface of the confining unit, potentially resulting in an artesian aquifer head of greater than 8 meters above the excavation surface. Consequently, it was determined that a dual-aquifer dewatering system would be required to permit excavation of contaminated material, with the water table aquifer dewatered to facilitate excavation, and the deep aquifer depressurized to prevent a ''blowout''. An additional concern was the potential for vertical migration of contamination present in the water table aquifer that could result from a vertical gradient reversal caused by excessive pumping in the confined system. With these considerations in mind, a conceptual dewatering plan was developed with three major goals: (1) dewater the water table aquifer to control radionuclide migration and allow excavation to proceed; (2) depressurize the lower, artesian aquifer to reduce the potential for a ''blowout''; and (3) develop a precise dewatering level control mechanism to insure a

  18. Linac-accelerator-radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sturm, V; Schlegel, W; Pastyr, O; Treuer, H; Voges, J; Müller, R P; Lorenz, W J

    1993-01-01

    A survey is given of the actual possibilities and limitations of the use of linear accelerators (Linac radiosurgery systems) for intra = cranial radiosurgery. Depending on the collimator size, spherical fields from 5-54 mm in diameter can be irradiated with dose gradients from 10% (large fields) to 20% (small fields) per millimeter distance between surface and treatment volume. This is comparable to the possibilities of Gamma-Knife and Proton-irradiation. Optimal mechanical adjustment of gantry and linac table are necessary for the required stability of the isocenter. Mechanical inaccuracy should be smaller than 0.8 mm. Advanced computerized 3D-treatment planning systems are indispensable prerequisites for accurate treatment and use of the flexibility of the linac system. Future developments are outlined.

  19. Accelerator Availability and Reliability Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Suhring

    2003-05-01

    Maintaining reliable machine operations for existing machines as well as planning for future machines' operability present significant challenges to those responsible for system performance and improvement. Changes to machine requirements and beam specifications often reduce overall machine availability in an effort to meet user needs. Accelerator reliability issues from around the world will be presented, followed by a discussion of the major factors influencing machine availability.

  20. Mechanism Involved in Trichloroethylene-Induced Liver Cancer: Importance to Environmental Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Richard J.; Thrall, Brian D.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop critical data for improving risk-based cleanup standards for trichloroethylene (TCE). Importance to DOE. Cleanup costs for chlorinated solvents found on DOE sites are most frequently driven by TCE because it is the most widespread contaminant and is generally present at the highest concentrations. Data that would permit increases in risk-based standards for TCE would reduce complex wide cleanup costs by hundreds of millions of dollars. Current Regulatory Actions that Research will Impact. EPA is currently reviewing its risk assessment for TCE. Richard J. Bull has worked with EPA on this review by writing the mode of action section of their determination. A presentation by James Cogliano of EPA at the 1999 Annual Society of Toxicology Meeting indicates that they have accepted the concept of nonlinear extrapolation for liver tumor induction by TCE. This project will end in FY 1999 with its major technical and policy objectives satisfied.

  1. An accelerated fusion power development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.; Baker, Charles C.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Kinkead, Susan D.

    1991-06-01

    Energy for electricity and transportation is a national issue with worldwide environmental and political implications. The world must have energy options for the next century that are not vulnerable to possible disruption for technical, environmental, public confidence, or other reasons. Growing concerns about the greenhouse effect and the safety of transporting oil may lead to reduced burning of coal and other fossil fuels, and the incidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, as well as nuclear waste storage problems, have eroded public acceptance of nuclear fission. Meeting future world energy needs will require improvements in energy efficiency and conservation. However, the world will soon need new central station power plants and increasing amounts of fuel for the transportation sector. The use of fossil fuels, and possibly even fission power, will very likely be restricted because of environmental, safety, and, eventually, supply considerations. Time is running out for policymakers. New energy technologies cannot be brought to the marketplace overnight. Decades are required to bring a new energy production technology from conception to full market penetration. With the added urgency to mitigate deleterious environmental effects of energy use, policymakers must act decisively now to establish and support vigorous energy technology development programs. The U.S. has invested 8 billion over the past 40 years in fusion research and development. If the U.S. fusion program proceeds according to its present strategy, an additional 40 years, and more money, will be expended before fusion will provide commercial electricity. Such an extended schedule is neither cost-effective nor technically necessary. It is time to launch a national venture to construct and operate a fusion power pilot plant. Such a plant could be operational within 15 years of a national commitment to proceed.

  2. Long-Term Materials Test Program: materials exposure test plan

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    The Long Term Materials Test Program is designed to identify promising corrosion resistant materials for coal-fired gas turbine applications. Resistance of materials to long term accelerated corrosion will be determined through realistic PFB environmental exposure of candidate turbine materials for up to 14,000 hours. Selected materials also will be evaluated for their ability to withstand the combined erosive and corrosive aspects of the PFB effluent. A pressurized fluidized bed combustor facility has been constructed at the General Electric Coal Utilization Research Laboratory at Malta, New York. The 12-inch diameter combustor will burn high sulfur coal with moderate-to-high chlorine and alkali levels and utilize dolomite as the sulfur sorbent. Hot gas cleanup is achieved using three stages of cyclone separators. Downstream of the cylone separators, a low velocity test section (approx. 30 ft/s) capable of housing 180 pin specimens 1/4'' diameter has been installed to assess the corrosion resistance of the various materials at three different temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1600/sup 0/F. Following the low velocity test section is a high velocity test section consisting of four cascades of airfoil shaped specimens, six specimens per cascade. This high velocity test section is being used to evaluate the combined effects of erosion and corrosion on the degradation of gas turbine materials at gas velocities of 800 to 1400 ft/s. This report summarizes the materials selection and materials exposure test plan for the Long Term Materials Test.

  3. Summary of Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Potential Impacts Related to Hanford Cleanup and the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA)

    SciTech Connect

    IWATATE, D.F.

    2000-07-14

    This white paper provides an initial assessment of the potential impacts of the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) regulations (and proposed revisions) on the Hanford site cleanup and addresses concerns that MTCA might impose inappropriate or unachievable clean-up levels and drive clean-up costs higher. The white paper and supporting documentation (Appendices A and B) provide DOE with a concise and up-to-date review of potential MTCA impacts to cost and schedule for the Hanford site activities. MTCA, Chapter 70.105D RCW, is the State of Washington's risk based law governing clean-up of contaminated sites and is implemented by The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) under the MTCA Clean-up Regulations, Chapter 173-340 WAC. Hanford cleanup is subject to the MTCA requirements as Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for those areas of Hanford being managed under the authority of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the state Dangerous Waste Regulations. MTCA provides Ecology with authority to implement site clean-up actions under both the federal RCRA and CERCLA regulations as well as the state regulations. Most of the Hanford clean-up actions are being implemented under the CERCLA program, however, there is a trend is toward increased use of MTCA procedures and standards. The application of MTCA to the Hanford clean-up has been an evolving process with some of the Hanford clean-up actions considering MTCA standards as an ARAR and using MTCA procedures for remedy selection. The increased use and application of MTCA standards and procedures could potentially impact both cost and schedule for the Hanford cleanup.

  4. DOE Hanford Network Upgrades and Disaster Recovery Exercise Support the Cleanup Mission Now and into the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Eckman, Todd J.; Hertzel, Ali K.; Lane, James J.

    2013-11-07

    and data. The primary objective of the exercise was to test COOP around the emergency operations at Hanford to provide information on capabilities and dependencies of the current system to insure improved focus of emergency, safety and security capacity in a disaster situation. The integration of the DR test into the ET-50 project allowed the testing of COOP at Hanford and allowed the lessons learned to be defined. These lessons learned have helped improve the understanding of Hanford's COOP capabilities and will be critical for future planning. With the completion of the Hanford Federal Cloud network upgrades and the disaster recovery exercise, the MSA has a clearer path forward for future technology implementations as well as network improvements to help shape the usability and reliability of the Hanford network in support of the cleanup mission.

  5. EPA Helps Two New England Communities Plan New Uses for Former Brownfield Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S.EPA has selected the City of Providence, RI & the Eastern Maine Development Corp. to receive funding to assist with planning for cleanup & reuse of Brownfield sites as part of the Brownfields Area-Wide Planning (AWP) program.

  6. Cleanup/stimulation of a horizontal wellbore using propellants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rougeot, J.E.; Lauterbach, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the stimulation/cleanup of a horizontal well bore (Wilson 25) using propellants. The Wilson 25 is a Bartlesville Sand well located in the Flatrock Field, Osage County, Oklahoma. The Wilson 25 was drilled to determine if horizontal drilling could be used as a means to economically recover primary oil that had been left in place in a mostly abandoned oil field because of the adverse effects of water coning. Pump testing of the Wilson 25 horizontal well bore before cleanup or stimulation produced 6 barrels of oil and .84 barrels of water per day. The high percentage of daily oil production to total daily fluid production indicated that the horizontal well bore had accessed potentially economical oil reserves if the fluid production rate could be increased by performing a cleanup/stimulation treatment. Propellants were selected as an inexpensive means to stimulate and cleanup the near well bore area in a uniform manner. The ignition of a propellant creates a large volume of gas which penetrates the formation, creating numerous short cracks through which hydrocarbons can travel into the well bore. More conventional stimulation/cleanup techniques were either significantly more expensive, less likely to treat uniformly, or could not be confined to the near well bore area. Three different propellant torpedo designs were tested with a total of 304` of horizontal well bore being shot and producible. The initial test shot caused 400` of the horizontal well bore to become plugged off, and subsequently it could not be production tested. The second and third test shots were production tested, with the oil production being increased 458% and 349%, respectively, on a per foot basis. The Wilson 25 results indicate that a propellant shot treatment is an economically viable means to cleanup/stimulate a horizontal well bore.

  7. DECOMMISSIONING AND ENVRIONMENTAL CLEANUP OF SMALL ARMS TRAINING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetz, T.

    2012-12-04

    constituents posed a migration risk to groundwater. The NTCR action involved removal of approximately 12,092 m3 (15,816 yd3) of spent bullets and lead-impacted soil and off-site disposal. The removal action included soils from the berm area, a fill area that received scraped soils from the berm, and soil from a drainage ditch located on the edge of the berm area. Also included in the removal action was a mixture of soil, concrete, and asphalt from the other three range areas. Under this action, 11,796 m3 (15,429 yd3) of hazardous waste and impacted soil were removed from the SATA and transported to a permitted hazardous waste disposal facility (Lone Mountain Facility in Oklahoma) and 296 m3 (387 yd3) of nonhazardous waste (primarily concrete debris) were removed and transported to a local solid waste landfill for disposal. During the excavation process, the extent was continuously assessed through the use of a hand-held, field-portable X-ray fluorescence unit with results verified using confirmation sampling with certified laboratory analysis. Following the completion of the excavation and confirmation sampling, final contouring, grading, and establishment of vegetative cover was performed to stabilize the affected areas. The NTCR action began on August 17, 2010, and mechanical completion was achieved on April 27, 2011. The selected removal action met the removal action objectives (RAOs), is protective of human health and the environment both in the short- and long-term, was successful in removing potential ecological risks, and is protective of surface water and groundwater. Furthermore, the selected NTCR action met residential cleanup goals and resulted in the release of the SEA from restricted use contributing to the overall footprint reduction at SRS.

  8. ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K.P. Constant

    2003-09-01

    The overall purpose of this project was to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas with the sorbent being in the form of small pellets made with a layered structure such that each pellet consists of a highly reactive lime core enclosed within a porous protective shell of strong but relatively inert material. The sorbent can be very useful for hot gas cleanup in advanced power generation systems where problems have been encountered with presently available materials. An economical method of preparing the desired material was demonstrated with a laboratory-scale revolving drum pelletizer. Core-in-shell pellets were produced by first pelletizing powdered limestone or other calcium-bearing material to make the pellet cores, and then the cores were coated with a mixture of powdered alumina and limestone to make the shells. The core-in-shell pellets were subsequently calcined at 1373 K (1100 C) to sinter the shell material and convert CaCO{sub 3} to CaO. The resulting product was shown to be highly reactive and a very good sorbent for H{sub 2}S at temperatures in the range of 1113 to 1193 K (840 to 920 C) which corresponds well with the outlet temperatures of some coal gasifiers. The product was also shown to be both strong and attrition resistant, and that it can be regenerated by a cyclic oxidation and reduction process. A preliminary evaluation of the material showed that while it was capable of withstanding repeated sulfidation and regeneration, the reactivity of the sorbent tended to decline with usage due to CaO sintering. Also it was found that the compressive strength of the shell material depends on the relative proportions of alumina and limestone as well as their particle size distributions. Therefore, an extensive study of formulation and preparation conditions was conducted to improve the performance of both the core and shell materials. It was subsequently determined that MgO tends to stabilize the high

  9. Dyscirculatory encephalopathy in Chernobyl disaster clean-up workers (a 20-year study).

    PubMed

    Podsonnaya, I V; Shumakher, G I; Golovin, V A

    2010-05-01

    Results obtained over 20-years of following 536 Chernobyl clean-up workers and 436 control subjects are presented. Dyscirculatory encephalopathy developed more frequently in persons exposed to radiation at age 30 years. As compared with the control group, workers were characterized by early onset of disease, faster progression, stable symptomatology for 5-6 years, and further progression of disease in the form of autonomic dysfunction, psycho-organic syndrome, and epilepsy. Major strokes were also more common in clean-up workers.

  10. Fuel cleanup system for the tritium systems test assembly: design and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, E.C.; Bartlit, J.R.; Sherman, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A major subsystem of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly is the Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) whose functons are to: (1) remove impurities in the form of argon and tritiated methane, water, and ammonia from the reactor exhaust stream and (2) recover tritium for reuse from the tritiated impurities. To do this, a hybrid cleanup system has been designed which utilizes and will test concurrently two differing technologies - one based on disposable, hot metal (U and Ti) getter beds and a second based on regenerable cryogenic asdorption beds followed by catalytic oxidation of impurities to DTO and stackable gases and freezout of the resultant DTO to recover essentially all tritium for reuse.

  11. Comparing contaminated property redevelopment for mandatory and Voluntary Cleanup Programs in California.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Peter M; Depken, Craig A; Hanning, Alex; Peterson, Kristen

    2009-09-01

    This study uses California data to compare redevelopment for properties subject to mandatory and voluntary cleanup. CalSites are subject to the CERCLA liability approach, while properties in the Voluntary Cleanup Program (VCP) are subject to a risk-based approach (RBA) that allows some contamination to remain for non-residential redevelopment. The expectation is that VCPs will show a greater proportion of industrial redevelopment, which has the least stringent standard, and a smaller proportion of residential redevelopment. The results show an overall trend toward more residential redevelopment of contaminated properties, but consistent with expectations, the trend is weaker for VCP properties than CalSites.

  12. Glufosinate ammonium clean-up procedure from water samples using SPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayeb M., A.; Ismail B., S.; Mardiana-Jansar, K.; Ta, Goh Choo; Agustar, Hani Kartini

    2015-09-01

    For the determination of glufosinate ammonium residue in soil and water samples, different solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent efficiency was studied. Four different SPE sorbents i.e.: CROMABOND PS-H+, CROMABOND PS-OH-, ISOLUTE ENV+, Water Sep-Pak and OASIS HLB were used. Sample clean-up performance was evaluated using high performance liquid chromatography (Agilent 1220 infinity LC) with fluorescence detector. Detection of FMO-derivatives was done at λ ex = 260 nm and λ em= 310 nm. OASIS HLB column was the most suitable for the clean-up in view of the overall feasibility of the analysis.

  13. Recommendations to improve the cleanup process for California`s leaking underground fuel tanks (LUFTs)

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.W.; Dooher, B.P.; Cullen, S.J.; Everett, L.G.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Grose, R.D.; Marino, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes the findings, conclusions, and recommendations resulting from an 18 month review of the regulatory framework and cleanup process currently applied to California`s leaking underground fuel tanks (LUFT). This review was conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California at Berkeley, Davis, Los Angeles, and Santa Barbara at the request of the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), Underground Storage Tank Program. The recommendations are made to improve and streamline the LUFT cleanup decision-making process.

  14. Mechanism involved in trichloroethylene-induced liver cancer: Importance to environmental cleanup. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, R.J.

    1997-06-01

    'The Pacific Northwest National Lab. was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This section gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas-Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.'

  15. Fixed-bed gasifier and cleanup system engineering summary report through Test Run No. 100

    SciTech Connect

    Pater, K. Jr.; Headley, L.; Kovach, J.; Stopek, D.

    1984-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of high-pressure, fixed-bed gasification has been advanced by the many refinements developed over the last 5 years. A novel full-flow gas cleanup system has been installed and tested to clean coal-derived gases. This report summarizes the results of tests conducted on the gasifier and cleanup system from its inception through 1982. Selected process summary data are presented along with results from complementary programs in the areas of environmental research, process simulation, analytical methods development, and component testing. 20 references, 32 figures, 42 tables.

  16. Systems engineering functions and requirements for the Hanford cleanup mission. First issue, Addendum 2

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    This addendum provides the technical detail of a systems engineering functional analysis for the Hanford cleanup mission. Details of the mission analysis including mission statement, scope, problem statement, initial state definition, and final state definition are provided in the parent document. The functional analysis consists of Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams an definitions, which will be understood by systems engineers, but which may be difficult for others to comprehend. For a more complete explanation of this work, refer to the parent document. The analysis covers the total Hanford cleanup mission including the decomposition levels at which the various Hanford programs or integrated activities are encountered.

  17. Integrated sample cleanup and microchip capillary array electrophoresis for high-performance forensic STR profiling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Greenspoon, Susan A; Yeung, Stephanie Hi; Scherer, James R; Mathies, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidics has the potential to significantly improve the speed, throughput, and cost performance of electrophoretic short tandem repeat (STR) analysis by translating the process into a miniaturized and integrated format. Current STR analysis bypasses the post-PCR sample cleanup step in order to save time and cost, resulting in poor injection efficiency, bias against larger loci, and delicate injection timing controls. Here we describe the operation of an integrated high-throughput sample cleanup and capillary array electrophoresis microsystem that employs a streptavidin capture gel chemistry coupled to a simple direct-injection geometry for simultaneously analyzing 12 STR samples in less than 30 min with >10-fold improved sensitivity.

  18. Hanford Site Cleanup Challenges and Opportunities for Science and Technology--A Strategic Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Kreid, Dennis K.; Walton, Terry L.

    2001-02-01

    The sheer expanse of the Hanford Site, the inherent hazards associated with the significant inventory of nuclear materials and wastes, the large number of aging contaminated facilities, the diverse nature and extent of environmental contamination, and the proximity to the Columbia River make Hanford perhaps the world's largest and most complex environmental cleanup project. It is not possible to address the more complex elements of this enormous challenge in a cost-effective manner without strategic investments in science and technology. Success requires vigorous and sustained efforts to enhance the science and technology basis, develop and deploy innovative solutions, and provide firm scientific bases to support site cleanup and closure decisions at Hanford.

  19. EPA Finalizes Cleanup Plan for Removal of PCBs From Bound Brook in South Plainfield, NJ, $422 million dollar cleanup underway at site of defunct electronics facility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PCBs are chemicals that persist in the environment and can affect the immune, reproductive, nervous and endocrine systems and are potentially cancer-causing. PCBs had been widely used in hundreds of industrial and commercial applications until they were ba

  20. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  1. Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2002-04-01

    Among all the advanced accelerator concepts that use lasers as the power source, most of the effort to date has been with the idea of using a laser pulse to excite a accelerating mode in a plasma. Within this area, there are a variety of approaches for creating the accelerating mode, as indicated by the other talks in this session. What is common to these approaches is the physics of how a laser pulse pushes on plasma electrons to organize electron-density perturbations, the sources of the ultra-high (> GeV/M) accelerating gradients. It is the "ponderomotive force", proportional to the local gradient of the of the laser intensity, that pushes plasma electrons forward (on the leading edge of the pulse) and backwards (on the trailing edge) which leads to harmonic motion of the electrons. As the laser pulse moves through the plasma at group velocity Vg c, the oscillating electrons show up macroscopically as a plasma mode or wave with frequency w equal to the plasma frequency and k = w/Vg. For short laser pulses, this is the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) concept. Closely related is the Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration (PBWA) concept. Here, the laser pulse that perturbs the plasma is composed of two closely-spaced frequencies that "beat", i.e., periodically constructively and destructively interfere, forming an electromagnetic beat wave. One can visualize this as a train of short pulses. If this beating frequency is set to the plasma frequency, then each pulse in the train will reinforce the density perturbation caused by the previous pulse. The principal advantage of multiple pulses driving up the plasma wave as opposed to a single pulse is in efficiency, allowing for the production of relatively large diameter (more 1-D like) accelerating modes. In this talk I will discuss past, current and planned PBWA experiments which are taking place at UCLA, RAL in England, and LULI in France.

  2. High performance solid-phase extraction cleanup method coupled with gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for analysis of polychlorinated naphthalenes and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Jin, Jing; Tan, Dongqin; Xu, Jiazhi; Dhanjai; Ni, Yuwen; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Jiping

    2016-05-27

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup method was developed to purify the sample extracts for the analysis of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs). Monodisperse magnesium oxide (MgO) microspheres and basic alumina were used as SPE adsorbents. Important parameters of the SPE procedure were optimized, including the amount of basic alumina and the type and volume of the washing and elution solvents. The optimized SPE cleanup method exhibited excellent purification performance for the removal of organochlorinated compounds, lipid compounds, sulfur, and pigments. Additionally, it was found that the retention activities of congeners differed with the number and position of the chlorine substituents in PCNs. In this study, an analytical method based on a combination of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) coupled with SPE cleanup and gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) is proposed for the analysis of PCNs and dl-PCBs in complex samples (sediment, pine needle, and scallop samples). The analytical method demonstrates good linearity, acceptable recovery (63-148%) and precision (relative standard deviations less than 26%). The limits of detection (LODs) of PCN and dl-PCB congeners were in the range of 0.6-19.1pgg(-1) and 0.4-8.6pgg(-1), respectively. The PCNs and dl-PCBs levels in these samples ranged from 0.16 to 3.07ngg(-1) dry weight (dw) and from undetectable to 0.07ngg(-1) dw, respectively.

  3. $438 Million in Funds Headed for Contaminated Site Cleanups in New Jersey from Major Bankruptcy Court Settlement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y. - Feb. 2, 2015) Money from a historic settlement reached with Anadarko and Kerr-McGee has now been disbursed for cleanups across the country, including $438 million that will go toward paying for past and future cleanup work at two New Jers

  4. Clean Slate 1 revegetation and monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.

    1997-07-01

    This document constitutes a reclamation plan for the short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with the cleanup of radionuclide contaminated surface soil at the Clean Slate 1 site. This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. The results of reclamation trials at Area 11, Area 19 and more recently the reclamation demonstration plots at the Double Tracks cleanup site, have been summarized and incorporated into this reclamation and monitoring plan. The plan also contains procedures for monitoring both the effectiveness and success of short-term and long-term soil stabilization. The Clean Slate 1 site is located on the Tonopah Test Range. The surface soils were contaminated as a result of the detonation of a device containing plutonium and depleted uranium using chemical explosives. Short-term stabilization consists of the application of a chemical soil stabilizer that is applied immediately following excavation of the contaminated soils to minimize Pu resuspension. Long-term stabilization is accomplished by the establishment of a permanent vegetation.

  5. Future accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1986-05-01

    A general discussion is presented of the acceleration of particles. Upon this foundation is built a categorization scheme into which all accelerators can be placed. Special attention is devoted to accelerators which employ a wake-field mechanism and a restricting theorem is examined. It is shown how the theorem may be circumvented. Comments are made on various acceleration schemes.

  6. ACCELERATION AND THE GIFTED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GIBSON, ARTHUR R.; STEPHANS, THOMAS M.

    ACCELERATION OF PUPILS AND SUBJECTS IS CONSIDERED A MEANS OF EDUCATING THE ACADEMICALLY GIFTED STUDENT. FIVE INTRODUCTORY ARTICLES PROVIDE A FRAMEWORK FOR THINKING ABOUT ACCELERATION. FIVE PROJECT REPORTS OF ACCELERATED PROGRAMS IN OHIO ARE INCLUDED. ACCELERATION IS NOW BEING REGARDED MORE FAVORABLY THAN FORMERLY, BECAUSE METHODS HAVE BEEN…

  7. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  8. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  9. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Proctor

    2006-06-13

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground. The 118-B-6 site consisted of 2 concrete pipes buried vertically in the ground and capped by a concrete pad with steel lids. The site was used for the disposal of wastes from the "metal line" of the P-10 Tritium Separation Project.

  10. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

    2007-07-25

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

  11. Material and methods for oil spill control and cleanup and extinguishing petroleum fires

    SciTech Connect

    States, J. B.

    1981-02-03

    A dispersal medium is described for cleaning of oil spills and the like and extinguishing petroleum fires. Its major quantitative part consists of a household liquid detergent and also contains eucalyptus oil, bovine urine, alfalfa and vitamin b-6. Methods of oil spill clean-up and fire extinguishing are also described.

  12. Public Notice: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Reviews Cleanup at Reynolds Metals Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting its third five-year review of the Reynolds Metals Superfund Site, located in the town of Massena, St. Lawrence County, New York. This review seeks to confirm that the implemented cleanup continue

  13. Fact Sheet on Avoiding Indoor Air Quality Problems During Flood Cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet discusses problems caused by microbial growth, and other effects of flooding, on indoor air quality and the steps you can take to lessen these effects. This focuses on residential flood cleanup, but it applies to other building types.

  14. 40 CFR 312.25 - Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Searches for recorded environmental... CONDUCTING ALL APPROPRIATE INQUIRIES Standards and Practices § 312.25 Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens. (a) All appropriate inquiries must include a search for the existence of...

  15. 40 CFR 312.25 - Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Searches for recorded environmental... CONDUCTING ALL APPROPRIATE INQUIRIES Standards and Practices § 312.25 Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens. (a) All appropriate inquiries must include a search for the existence of...

  16. Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Exposure and Subjective Symptoms in Residents Participating in Clean-Up Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Lee, Jong Seong; Kwon, Hojang; Ha, Eun-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Choi, Yeyong; Jeong, Woo-Chul; Hur, Jongil; Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Eun-Jung; Im, Hosub

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to examine the relationship between crude oil exposure and physical symptoms among residents participating in clean-up work associated with the Hebei Spirit oil spill, 2007 in Korea. Methods A total of 288 residents responded to a questionnaire regarding subjective physical symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics and clean-up activities that occurred between two and eight weeks after the accident. Additionally, the urine of 154 of the respondents was analyzed for metabolites of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals. To compare the urinary levels of exposure biomarkers, the urine of 39 inland residents who were not directly exposed to the oil spill were analyzed. Results Residents exposed to oil remnants through clean-up work showed associations between physical symptoms and the exposure levels defined in various ways, including days of work, degree of skin contamination, and levels of some urinary exposure biomarkers of VOCs, metabolites and metals, although no major abnormalities in urinary exposure biomarkers were observed. Conclusions This study provides evidence of a relationship between crude oil exposure and acute human health effects and suggests the need for follow-up to evaluate the exposure status and long-term health effects of clean-up participants. PMID:22125768

  17. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-7, 100-F Miscellaneous Hardware Storage Vault

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2006-11-02

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-7, 100-F Miscellaneous Hardware Storage Vault. The site consisted of an inactive solid waste storage vault used for temporary storage of slightly contaminated reactor parts that could be recovered and reused for the 100-F Area reactor operations.

  18. Cleanup Verification Package for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2007-01-22

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits waste site. This waste site consisted of two earthen trenches thought to have received both radioactive and nonradioactive material related to the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm.

  19. Mental disorders among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia: A clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Laidra, Kaia; Rahu, Kaja; Kalaus, Katri-Evelin; Tekkel, Mare; Leinsalu, Mall

    2016-09-26

    Objective: To assess, at a clinical level, the mental health of former Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia by comparing them with same-age controls. Method: The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was administered during 2011-2012 to 99 cleanup workers and 100 population-based controls previously screened for mental health symptoms. Results: Logistic regression analysis showed that cleanup workers had higher odds of current depressive disorder (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI: 1.34, 7.01]), alcohol dependence (OR = 3.47, 95% CI [1.29, 9.34]), and suicide ideation (OR = 3.44, 95% CI [1.28, 9.21]) than did controls. Except for suicide ideation, associations with Chernobyl exposure became statistically nonsignificant when adjusted for education and ethnicity. Conclusion: A quarter of a century after the Chernobyl accident, Estonian cleanup workers were still at increased risk of mental disorders, which was partly attributable to sociodemographic factors. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  1. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  2. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  3. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  4. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  5. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

    2007-09-26

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  6. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

    2007-10-31

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  7. EPA Initiates Second Review of Hudson River PCB Cleanup, Public Encouraged to Participate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Albany, NY) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has initiated its second review of the cleanup of the Hudson River PCBs Superfund site. The purpose of this review, which is called a five year review and is legally required under the Superfund law eve

  8. 33 CFR 137.55 - Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens. 137.55 Section 137.55 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL...

  9. 33 CFR 137.55 - Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens. 137.55 Section 137.55 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL...

  10. 33 CFR 137.55 - Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens. 137.55 Section 137.55 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL...

  11. 33 CFR 137.55 - Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens. 137.55 Section 137.55 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL...

  12. 33 CFR 137.55 - Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Searches for recorded environmental cleanup liens. 137.55 Section 137.55 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL...

  13. United States issues cleanup order to owner of ruptured Refugio Beach oil pipeline

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Coast Guard issued a joint federal Clean Water Act order to ensure the cleanup of heavy crude oil leaked from a pipeline near Refugio State Beach, Santa Barbara County, Calif. The order requir

  14. Chromosome aberrations and rogue cells in lymphocytes of Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Lazutka, J R

    1996-03-09

    A cytogenetic analysis was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from 183 Chernobyl clean-up workers and 27 control individuals. Increased frequencies of chromosome aberrations were associated with exposure to radiation at Chernobyl, alcohol abuse and a history of recent influenza infection. However, only approximately 20% of Chernobyl clean-up workers had an increased frequency of dicentric and ring chromosomes. At the same time, an increased frequency of acentric fragments in lymphocytes of clean-up workers was characteristic. The use of multivitamins as dietary supplement significantly decreased the frequency of chromosome aberrations, especially of chromatid breaks. Rogue cells were found in lymphocytes of 28 clean-up workers and 3 control individuals. The appearance of rogue cells was associated with a recent history of acute respiratory disease (presumably caused by adenoviral infection) and, probably, alcohol abuse. Dicentric chromosomes in rogue cells were distributed according to a negative binomial distribution. Occurrence of rogue cells due to a perturbation of cell cycle control and abnormal apoptosis is suggested.

  15. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 16: Debris Hazard Control and Cleanup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 16 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) concentrates on debris hazard control and cleanup. The purpose and objectives of such a program are outlined. Federal authority in the area of highway safety and policies regarding a debris control…

  16. Determination of fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted SPE clean-up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new liquid chromatography method to detect fusaric acid in maize is reported based on molecularly imprinted polymer solid phase extraction clean-up (MISPE) using mimic-templated molecularly-imprinted polymers. Picolinic acid was used as a toxin analog for imprinting polymers during a thermolytic s...

  17. PERFORMANCE OF MTBE CLEAN-UP TECHNOLOGIES IN NEW YORK STATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficiency of cleanup technologies, based on MTBE concentration reduction, was evaluated for 1,012 UST sites from the State of New York. MTBE concentration reduction was calculated by dividing the maximum BTBE concentration by the current MTBE concentrations and the resul...

  18. UTILIZING INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CLEAN-UP, SAVAHHAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Bergren, C

    2009-01-07

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina. During operations, which started in 1951, hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) were released to the environment. The releases occurred as a result of inadvertent spills and waste disposal in unlined pits and basins which was common practice before environmental regulations existed. The hazardous substances have migrated to the vadose zone and groundwater in many areas of the SRS, resulting in 515 waste units and facilities that are required by environmental regulations, to undergo characterization and, if needed, remediation. In the initial years of the SRS environmental cleanup program (early 1990s), the focus was to use common technologies (such as pump and treat, air stripping, excavation and removal) that actively and tangibly removed contamination. Exclusive use of these technologies required continued and significant funding while often failing to meet acceptable clean-up goals and objectives. Recognizing that a more cost-effective approach was needed, SRS implemented new and complementary remediation methods focused on active and passive technologies targeted to solve specific remediation problems. Today, SRS uses technologies such as chemical/pH-adjusting injection, phytoremediation, underground cutoff walls, dynamic underground stripping, soil fracturing, microbial degradation, baroballs, electrical resistance heating, soil vapor extraction, and microblowers to more effectively treat contamination at lower costs. Additionally, SRS's remediation approach cost effectively maximizes cleanup as SRS works proactively with multiple regulatory agencies. Using GIS, video, animation, and graphics, SRS is able to provide an accurate depiction of the evolution of SRS groundwater and vadose zone cleanup activities to convince stakeholders and regulators of the effectiveness of various cleanup

  19. Schedule optimization study implementation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This Implementation Plan is intended to provide a basis for improvements in the conduct of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Hanford. The Plan is based on the findings of the Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) team which was convened for two weeks in September 1992 at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL). The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit (OU) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan. The SOS team was comprised of independent professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration within the federal system. The objective of the team was to examine reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process and recommend ways to expedite it. The SOS team issued their Final Report in December 1992. The report found the most serious impediments to cleanup relate to a series of management and policy issues which are within the control of the three parties managing and monitoring Hanford -- the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology). The SOS Report identified the following eight cross-cutting issues as the root of major impediments to the Hanford Site cleanup. Each of these eight issues is quoted from the SOS Report followed by a brief, general description of the proposed approach being developed.

  20. Future HEP Accelerators: The US Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-11-02

    Accelerator technology has advanced tremendously since the introduction of accelerators in the 1930s, and particle accelerators have become indispensable instruments in high energy physics (HEP) research to probe Nature at smaller and smaller distances. At present, accelerator facilities can be classified into Energy Frontier colliders that enable direct discoveries and studies of high mass scale particles and Intensity Frontier accelerators for exploration of extremely rare processes, usually at relatively low energies. The near term strategies of the global energy frontier particle physics community are centered on fully exploiting the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), while the intensity frontier HEP research is focused on studies of neutrinos at the MW-scale beam power accelerator facilities, such as Fermilab Main Injector with the planned PIP-II SRF linac project. A number of next generation accelerator facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and long-term future programs of accelerator-based HEP research. In this paper, we briefly review the post-LHC energy frontier options, both for lepton and hadron colliders in various regions of the world, as well as possible future intensity frontier accelerator facilities.

  1. Is Africa a 'Graveyard' for Linear Accelerators?

    PubMed

    Reichenvater, H; Matias, L Dos S

    2016-12-01

    Linear accelerator downtimes are common and problematic in many African countries and may jeopardise the outcome of affected radiation treatments. The predicted increase in cancer incidence and prevalence on the African continent will require, inter alia, improved response with regard to a reduction in linear accelerator downtimes. Here we discuss the problems associated with the maintenance and repair of linear accelerators and propose alternative solutions relevant for local conditions in African countries. The paper is based on about four decades of experience in capacity building, installing, commissioning, calibrating, servicing and repairing linear accelerators in Africa, where about 40% of the low and middle income countries in the world are geographically located. Linear accelerators can successfully be operated, maintained and repaired in African countries provided proper maintenance and repair plans are put in place and executed.

  2. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  4. Prospects For and Progress Towards Laser-Driven Particle Therapy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T. E.; Schramm, U.; Burris-Mog, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kraft, S. D.; Zeil, K.; Bussmann, M.; Gaillard, S.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Kluge, T.; Schmidt, B.; Sobiella, M.; Sauerbrey, R.; Baumann, M.; Enghardt, W.; Pawelke, J.; Flippo, K.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.

    2010-11-04

    Recent advances in laser-ion acceleration have motivated research towards laser-driven compact accelerators for medical therapy. Realizing laser-ion acceleration for medical therapy will require adapting the medical requirements to the foreseeable laser constraints, as well as advances in laser-acceleration physics, beam manipulation and delivery, real-time dosimetry, treatment planning and translational research into a clinical setting.

  5. Hudson River PCB clean-up to begin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christie Whitman signed the Record of Decision on 1 February to clean up a stretch of the Hudson River that has been contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The decision calls for dredging 2 million cubic meters of PCB-contaminated sediment from a 64-kilometer stretch of the upper Hudson to remove about 68,000 kilograms of PCBs.The plan follows years of scientific study about whether the PCBs were safely encased in the sediment or posed a continuing hazard, and concern over whether the PCBs can be safely removed without stirring up a larger pollution problem along the river. The EPA found that PCBs in the sediment are not safely buried because erosion and river flows can redistribute river sediment. The agency also found that although PCBs break down naturally over time, this degradation does not render them harmless.

  6. Acceleration Environment of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Kelly, Eric; Keller, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment on the International Space Station has been accomplished by two accelerometer systems since 2001. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System records the quasi-steady microgravity environment, including the influences of aerodynamic drag, vehicle rotation, and venting effects. Measurement of the vibratory/transient regime, comprised of vehicle, crew, and equipment disturbances, has been accomplished by the Space Acceleration Measurement System-II. Until the arrival of the Columbus Orbital Facility and the Japanese Experiment Module, the location of these sensors, and therefore, the measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment, has been limited to within the United States Laboratory. Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency has developed a vibratory acceleration measurement system called the Microgravity Measurement Apparatus which will be deployed within the Japanese Experiment Module to make distributed measurements of the Japanese Experiment Module's vibratory acceleration environment. Two Space Acceleration Measurement System sensors from the United States Laboratory will be re-deployed to support vibratory acceleration data measurement within the Columbus Orbital Facility. The additional measurement opportunities resulting from the arrival of these new laboratories allows Principal Investigators with facilities located in these International Space Station research laboratories to obtain microgravity acceleration data in support of their sensitive experiments. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project, at NASA Glenn Research Center, in Cleveland, Ohio, has supported acceleration measurement systems and the microgravity scientific community through the processing, characterization, distribution, and archival of the microgravity acceleration data obtained from the International Space Station acceleration measurement systems. This paper summarizes the PIMS capabilities available

  7. GEND planning report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 accident on March 28, 1979 was and is of great concern to the nuclear industry; electric power generating companies and their customers, regulatory and other government agencies, the entire nuclear community, and to the country as a whole. While the accident resulted in only limited external plant radiation exposure, the plant itself suffered extensive damage with high radiation contamination within the reactor and auxiliary system facilities. The GEND Planning Report for cleanup activities at TMI-2 covers the areas of: instrumentation and electrical equipment survivability; fission product transport; decontamination/radiation dose reduction technology; data bank organization and sample archive facility; characterization of primary system pressure boundary and mechanical components; core damage assessment; and fuel handling, removal, examination and disposal.

  8. Development and piloting of an exposure database and surveillance system for DOE cleanup operations. Department of Energy.

    PubMed

    LaMontagne, Anthony D; Van Dyke, Michael V; Martyny, John W; Simpson, Mark W; Holwager, Lee Ann; Clausen, Bret M; Ruttenber, A James

    2002-01-01

    An industrial hygiene exposure database and surveillance system was developed in partnership between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-funded independent investigators and practicing industrial hygienists at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colo. RFETS is a former U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons plant that is now in cleanup phase. This project is presented as a case study in the development of an exposure database and surveillance system in terms that are generalizable to most other industries and work contexts. Steps include gaining organizational support; defining system purpose and scope; defining database elements and coding; planning practical and efficient analysis strategies; incorporating reporting capabilities; and anticipating communication strategies that maximize the probability that surveillance findings will feed back to preventive applications. For each of these topics, the authors describe both general considerations as well as the specific choices made for this system. An important feature of the system is a two-tier task-coding scheme comprising 33 categories of task groups. Examples of grouped analyses of exposure data captured during the system pilot period demonstrate applications to exposure control, medical surveillance, and other preventive measures.

  9. Hanford Site cleanup and transition: Risk data needs for decision making (Hanford risk data gap analysis decision guide)

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, S.; Glantz, C.; Harper, B.; Bilyard, G.; Miller, P.

    1995-10-01

    Given the broad array of environmental problems, technical alternatives, and outcomes desired by different stakeholders at Hanford, DOE will have to make difficult resource allocations over the next few decades. Although some of these allocations will be driven purely by legal requirements, almost all of the major objectives of the cleanup and economic transition missions involve choices among alternative pathways. This study examined the following questions: what risk information is needed to make good decisions at Hanford; how do those data needs compare to the set(s) of risk data that will be generated by regulatory compliance activities and various non-compliance studies that are also concerned with risk? This analysis examined the Hanford Site missions, the Hanford Strategic Plan, known stakeholder values, and the most important decisions that have to be made at Hanford to determine a minimum domain of risk information required to make good decisions that will withstand legal, political, and technical scrutiny. The primary risk categories include (1) public health, (2) occupational health and safety, (3) ecological integrity, (4) cultural-religious welfare, and (5) socio-economic welfare.

  10. A portable accelerator control toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.A. III

    1997-06-01

    In recent years, the expense of creating good control software has led to a number of collaborative efforts among laboratories to share this cost. The EPICS collaboration is a particularly successful example of this trend. More recently another collaborative effort has addressed the need for sophisticated high level software, including model driven accelerator controls. This work builds upon the CDEV (Common DEVice) software framework, which provides a generic abstraction of a control system, and maps that abstraction onto a number of site-specific control systems including EPICS, the SLAC control system, CERN/PS and others. In principle, it is now possible to create portable accelerator control applications which have no knowledge of the underlying and site-specific control system. Applications based on CDEV now provide a growing suite of tools for accelerator operations, including general purpose displays, an on-line accelerator model, beamline steering, machine status displays incorporating both hardware and model information (such as beam positions overlaid with beta functions) and more. A survey of CDEV compatible portable applications will be presented, as well as plans for future development.

  11. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  12. The effect of IGFC warm gas cleanup system conditions on the gas–solid partitioning and form of trace species in coal syngas and their interactions with SOFC anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Trembly, J.P.; Gemmen, R.S.; Bayless, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is currently working on coupling coal gasification and high temperature fuel cell to produce electrical power in a highly efficient manner while being emissions free. Many investigations have already investigated the effects of major coal syngas species such as CO and H2S. However coal contains many trace species and the effect of these species on solid oxide fuel cell anode is not presently known.Warm gas cleanup systems are planned to be used with these advanced power generation systems for the removal of major constituents such as H2S and HCl but the operational parameters of such systems is not well defined at this point in time. This paper focuses on the effect of anticipated warm gas cleanup conditions has on trace specie partitioning between the vapor and condensed phase and the effects the trace vapor species have on the SOFC anode. Results show that Be, Cr, K, Na, V, and Z trace species will form condensed phases and should not effect SOFC anode performance since it is anticipated that the warm gas cleanup systems will have a high removal efficiency of particulate matter. Also the results show that Sb, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, P, and Se trace species form vapor phases and the Sb, As, and P vapor phase species show the ability to form secondary Ni phases in the SOFC anode.

  13. Planning a School Physics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasiak, Wladyslaw

    1986-01-01

    Presents a model for planning the measurement of physical quantities. Provides two examples of optimizing the conditions of indirect measurement for laboratory experiments which involve measurements of acceleration due to gravity and of viscosity by means of Stokes' formula. (ML)

  14. Investigation of post hydraulic fracturing well cleanup physics in the Cana Woodford Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rong

    Hydraulic fracturing was first carried out in the 1940s and has gained popularity in current development of unconventional resources. Flowing back the fracturing fluids is critical to a frac job, and determining well cleanup characteristics using the flowback data can help improve frac design. It has become increasingly important as a result of the unique flowback profiles observed in some shale gas plays due to the unconventional formation characteristics. Computer simulation is an efficient and effective way to tackle the problem. History matching can help reveal some mechanisms existent in the cleanup process. The Fracturing, Acidizing, Stimulation Technology (FAST) Consortium at Colorado School of Mines previously developed a numerical model for investigating the hydraulic fracturing process, cleanup, and relevant physics. It is a three-dimensional, gas-water, coupled fracture propagation-fluid flow simulator, which has the capability to handle commonly present damage mechanisms. The overall goal of this research effort is to validate the model on real data and to investigate the dominant physics in well cleanup for the Cana Field, which produces from the Woodford Shale in Oklahoma. To achieve this goal, first the early time delayed gas production was explained and modeled, and a simulation framework was established that included all three relevant damage mechanisms for a slickwater fractured well. Next, a series of sensitivity analysis of well cleanup to major reservoir, fracture, and operational variables was conducted; five of the Cana wells' initial flowback data were history matched, specifically the first thirty days' gas and water producing rates. Reservoir matrix permeability, net pressure, Young's modulus, and formation pressure gradient were found to have an impact on the gas producing curve's shape, in different ways. Some moderately good matches were achieved, with the outcome of some unknown reservoir information being proposed using the

  15. Double Tracks revegetation and monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This document is a reclamation plan for short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with interim clean-up of radionuclide-contaminated surface soil at the Double Tracks site. This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. Reclamation demonstration plots were established near the site in the fall of 1994 to evaluate the performance of several native species and to evaluate different irrigation strategies. Results of the study at Double Tracks, as well as the results from numerous studies conducted at other sites (Area 11 and Area 19 of the Nevada Test Site), have been summarized and incorporated into this final reclamation plan for the interim cleanup of the Double Tracks site, located northwest of the Nevada Test Site on the Nellis Air Force Range. Surface soils at Double Tracks were contaminated as a result of the detonation of a device containing plutonium and depleted uranium using chemical explosives. The total amount of Pu deposited on the site was between 980 and 1,600 grams and was scattered downwind south of the detonation site. Short-term stabilization consists of the application of a chemical soil stabilizer that is applied immediately following excavation of the contaminated soils to minimize Pu resuspension. Long-term stabilization is accomplished by the establishment of a permanent vegetation.

  16. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  17. Peak acceleration limiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.

    1972-01-01

    Device is described that limits accelerations by shutting off shaker table power very rapidly in acceleration tests. Absolute value of accelerometer signal is used to trigger electronic switch which terminates test and sounds alarm.

  18. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the ... Therapy (SBRT) . top of page How does the equipment work? The linear accelerator uses microwave technology (similar ...

  19. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  20. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  1. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  2. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  3. Accelerators, Colliders, and Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, Ernest D.

    2003-12-01

    The author traces his involvement in the evolution of particle accelerators over the past 50 years. He participated in building the first billion-volt accelerator, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, which led to the introduction of the "strong-focusing" method that has in turn led to the very large accelerators and colliders of the present day. The problems of acceleration of spin-polarized protons are also addressed, with discussions of depolarizing resonances and "Siberian snakes" as a technique for mitigating these resonances.

  4. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  5. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  6. Accelerated test design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    The design of an accelerated life test program for electric batteries is discussed. A number of observations and suggestions on the procedures and objectives for conducting an accelerated life test program are presented. Equations based on nonlinear regression analysis for predicting the accelerated life test parameters are discussed.

  7. A worldly approach to a new accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Taubes, G.

    1993-02-19

    Particle physicists are learning to their discomfiture that for one country to plan a multibillion-dollar accelerator, then ask other countries to help build it, is a recipe for frustration. That's the lesson emerging from the struggles to build the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the mammoth accelerator that is now in limbo as officials wait to see whether Japan and other nations will pitch in. But a group of laboratory directors who are already planning the next-generation accelerator - a large linear collider that will address physics the SSC can't probe - is taking steps to ensure that it will be an international collaboration from day one. The machine would be a linear accelerator tens of kilometers long with an energy limit of 1 TeV, and would collide electrons and positrons. Two international collaborations are studying designs for radiofreqency cavities that would generate powerful accelerating gradients. A third international group is working on learning how to focus electron and positron beams down to 60 nm in diameter. The proposed accelerator would likely cost $2 to $3 billion, and one possible location is the big island of Hawaii.

  8. Technical support for the EPA cleanup rule on radioactively contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, H.B.; Newman, A.; Wolbarst, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a radiation site cleanup regulation for the protection of the public from radionuclide contamination at sites that are to be cleaned up and released for public use. The regulation will apply to sites under the control of Federal agencies, and to sites licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or NRC Agreement States. The agency is therefore conducting a comprehensive technical analysis aimed at developing information that will be used to support the rule. This presentation describes the regulation and the approach developed to determine how radiological health impacts and volumes of soil requiring remediation vary as functions of the possible cleanup dose or risk level.

  9. A functionally integrated device for effective and facile oil spill cleanup.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mengjiao; Gao, Yongfeng; Guo, Xianpeng; Shi, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Jian-feng; Shi, Feng

    2011-06-21

    In this Letter, we have fabricated a multifunctional device for highly efficient and inexpensive oil spill cleanup by combining electroless metal deposition with self-assembled monolayers, which has integrated the functions of oil containment booms, oil-sorption materials, oil skimmers, and water-oil separating devices. This functionally integrated device has a lower density than that of water, which leads to a potential application as oil containment booms; it can take up oil that is 3.5 times its own weight, which shows excellent oil-sorption properties, with the water-oil separating yield of the as-prepared device being up to 92%. The device has the advantages of high efficiency, capacity of antiwave, and reproducibility, which is suitable for many types of organic solvents or oils, even for emulsion of petroleum and water, and thus is a proof-of-principle idea to be applied in marine spilt oil cleanup and other water-oil separating systems.

  10. Computer models used to support cleanup decision-making at hazardous and radioactive waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Pardi, R.; DePhillips, M.P.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1992-07-01

    Massive efforts are underway to cleanup hazardous and radioactive waste sites located throughout the US To help determine cleanup priorities, computer models are being used to characterize the source, transport, fate and effects of hazardous chemicals and radioactive materials found at these sites. Although, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have provided preliminary guidance to promote the use of computer models for remediation purposes, no Agency has produced directed guidance on models that must be used in these efforts. To identify what models are actually being used to support decision-making at hazardous and radioactive waste sites, a project jointly funded by EPA, DOE and NRC was initiated. The purpose of this project was to: (1) Identify models being used for hazardous and radioactive waste site assessment purposes; and (2) describe and classify these models. This report presents the results of this study.

  11. Multiple rate digital command detection system with range clean-up capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.; Butman, S. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A multi-rate digital command system is disclosed which uses the composite signal of a mu-type ranging system as a subcarrier to transmit range codes and data from a station to a receiver where the range codes are sequentially phase modulated on a subcarrier of frequency by one of its own subharmonics and data is phase modulated on a selected ranging component. A range cleanup loop in a spacecraft locks the phase of a locally generated reference component to a received ranging component and retransmits the component to a ground station. When the inverse phase of a ranging component is received and detected, the cleanup loop is modified to demodulate phase modulated command symbols while continuing tracking the same ranging component. The command symbol rate is coherently related to the ranging signal component bit rate.

  12. Stockpiles of obsolete pesticides and cleanup priorities: A methodology and application for Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Susmita; Meisner, Craig; Wheeler, David

    2010-01-01

    Obsolete pesticides have accumulated in almost every developing country or economy in transition over the past several decades. Concerned about the risks these chemicals pose to nearby residents, public health and environmental authorities are eager to reduce health threats by removing and decontaminating stockpile sites. However, there are many sites, cleanup can be costly, and public resources are scarce, so decision makers need to set priorities. Under these conditions, it seems sensible to develop a methodology for prioritizing sites and treating them sequentially, as budgetary resources permit. This paper presents a new methodology that develops a cleanup priority index for 1915 metric tons of obsolete pesticide formulations at 197 stockpile sites in Tunisia. The approach integrates information on populations at risk, their proximity to stockpiles, and the relative toxic hazards of the stockpiles. What emerges from the Tunisia results is a strategy for sequentially addressing all 197 sites to rapidly reduce potential health damage in a cost-effective way.

  13. Evaluation of electrospun polyvinyl chloride/polystyrene fibers as sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haitao; Qiu, Shanshan; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Daxiong; Zhang, Canying

    2011-05-15

    A novel, high-capacity oil sorbent consisting of polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/polystyrene (PS) fiber was prepared by an electrospinning process. The sorption capacity, oil/water selectivity, and sorption mechanism of the PVC/PS sorbent were studied. The results showed that the sorption capacities of the PVC/PS sorbent for motor oil, peanut oil, diesel, and ethylene glycol were 146, 119, 38, and 81 g/g, respectively. It was about 5-9 times that of a commercial polypropylene (PP) sorbent. The PVC/PS sorbent also had excellent oil/water selectivity (about 1000 times) and high buoyancy in the cleanup of oil over water. The SEM analysis indicated that voids among fibers were the key for the high capacity. The electrospun PVC/PS sorbent is a better alternative to the widely used PP sorbent for oil spill cleanup.

  14. Evaluation of a soil contaminated site and clean-up criteria: A geostatistical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Leonte, D.; Schofield, N.

    1996-12-31

    A case study of soil contamination assessment and clean-up in a site proposed for residential development is presented in this paper. The contamination consists mainly of heavy metals of which lead is the most important contaminant. The site has been sampled on an approximately 25 x 25 square meter grid to between 1 and 3 meters depth to evaluate the extent of the contamination. Three hotspots were identified based on eyeballing the lead sample values and a crude contouring. A geostatistical approach is proposed to map the lead contamination and provide an alternate evaluation. The results suggest a significantly different evaluation of the area for clean-up based on the probability of the lead concentration exceeding allowable levels.

  15. US Department of Energy Environmental Cleanup Technology Development program: Business and research opportunities guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is charged with overseeing a multi-billion dollar environmental cleanup effort. EM leads an aggressive national research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program to provide environmental restoration and waste management technologies to DOE sites, and to manage DOE-generated waste. DOE is firmly committed to working with industry to effectuate this cleanup effort. We recognize that private industry, university, and other research and development programs are valuable sources of technology innovation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide you with information on potential business opportunities in the following technical program areas: Remediation of High-Level Waste Tanks; Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal of Mixed Waste; Migration of Contaminants; Containment of Existing Landfills; Decommissioning and Final Disposition, and Robotics.

  16. Risk assessment applications for determining cleanup limits for uranium in treated and untreated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, A.Q.; Layton, D.W.; Rutz, E.E.

    1994-06-01

    Uranium-contaminated soils are present at various locations across the US where uranium was processed for nuclear fuels or atomic weapons. Important issues relative to such contamination include the assessment of potential health risks associated with human exposures to the residual uranium and the determination of safe levels of uranium in soils that have been treated by a given technology. This paper discusses various risk assessment considerations that must be dealt with when developing cleanup limits for uranium in treated and untreated soils. Key issues addressed include alternative land use scenarios, potential exposure pathways, characterization of the bioavailability of uranium compounds in food and water, a brief overview of health risks associated with uranium and its daughter products as well as a summary of considerations for development of risk-based cleanup limits for uranium in soils.

  17. Hot particulate removal and desulfurization results from the METC integrated gasification and hot gas cleanup facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rockey, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is conducting experimental testing using a 10-inch diameter fluid-bed gasifier (FBG) and modular hot gas cleanup rig (MGCR) to develop advanced methods for removing contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas streams for commercial development of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The program focus is on hot gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The purpose of this poster is to present the program objectives and results of the work conducted in cooperation with industrial users and vendors to meet the vision for IGCC of reducing the capital cost per kilowatt to $1050 and increasing the plant efficiency to 52% by the year 2010.

  18. Science To Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Camaioni, Donald M. ); Felmy, Andrew R. ); Grate, Jay W. ); Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J. ); Meyer, Philip D. ); Murray, Christopher J. ); Pfund, David M. ); Su, Yali ); Thornton, Edward C. ); Weber, William J. ); Zachara, John M. )

    2001-06-19

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, nine in fiscal year 1998, seven in fiscal year 1999, and five in fiscal year 2000. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have published final reports. The 1997 and 1998 award projects have been completed or are nearing completion. Final reports for these awards will be published, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the 1999 and 2000 grants address significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. The 1999 and 2000 EMSP awards at PNNL are focused primarily in two areas: Tank Waste Remediation, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  19. Accelerated Leadership Development: Fast Tracking School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter; Jones, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    "Accelerated Leadership Development" captures and communicates the lessons learned from successful fast-track leadership programmes in the private and public sector, and provides a model which schools can follow and customize as they plan their own leadership development strategies. As large numbers of headteachers and other senior staff…

  20. CHEF: an Interactive program for accelerator optics

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, Leo; Ostiguy, Jean-Francois; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    We report the current status and our plans for the completion of CHEF, an interactive application for performing optics calculations in accelerator physics. CHEF uses high level graphical user interfaces to facilitate the exploitation of lower level tools incorporated into a hierarchy of C++ class libraries, making them usable by those not familiar with C++ programming.