Science.gov

Sample records for accelerated corrosion test

  1. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  2. Development of an artificial climatic complex accelerated corrosion tester and investigation of complex accelerated corrosion test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Li, M.; Sun, Z. )

    1999-05-01

    During recent decades, accelerated corrosion test equipment and methods simulating atmospheric corrosion have been developed to incorporate the many factors involved in complex accelerated corrosion. A new accelerated corrosion tester was developed to simulate various kinds of atmospheric corrosion environments. The equipment can be used to simulate various types of atmospheric corrosion environments with up to eight factors and can be used to carry out 18 kinds of standard corrosion and environmental tasks.

  3. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  4. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  5. Accelerated corrosion test for aluminum-zinc alloy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, T.C. . Homer Research Labs.)

    1993-07-01

    An electrochemically monitored etching method has been developed to enable accelerated service life testing of aluminum/zinc alloy coatings with a dendritic microstructure. The method involved pre-exposure of materials to the etching solution to remove the most active phases from the coatings. This process simulated the early phases of atmospheric corrosion. The method significantly shortened the time required for an atmospheric exposure test. Historical performance data and data collected using the accelerated test method agreed.

  6. Accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing of electroplated gold mirror coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C.-T.; Alaan, D. R.; Taylor, D. P.

    2010-08-01

    Gold-coated mirrors are widely used in infrared optics for industrial, space, and military applications. These mirrors are often made of aluminum or beryllium substrates with polished nickel plating. Gold is deposited on the nickel layer by either electroplating or vacuum deposition processes. Atmospheric corrosion of gold-coated electrical connectors and contacts was a well-known problem in the electronic industry and studied extensively. However, there is limited literature data that correlates atmospheric corrosion to the optical properties of gold mirror coatings. In this paper, the atmospheric corrosion of different electroplated gold mirror coatings were investigated with an accelerated mixed flowing gas (MFG) test for up to 50 days. The MFG test utilizes a combination of low-level air pollutants, humidity, and temperatures to achieve a simulated indoor environment. Depending on the gold coating thickness, pore corrosion started to appear on samples after about 10 days of the MFG exposure. The corrosion behavior of the gold mirror coatings demonstrated the porous nature of the electroplated gold coatings as well as the variation of porosity to the coating thickness. The changes of optical properties of the gold mirrors were correlated to the morphology of corrosion features on the mirror surface.

  7. Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-05-01

    Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

  8. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin II Accelerated Corrosion Tests and the Behavior of High-Strength Aluminum Alloys of Different Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    The permanence, with respect to corrosion, of light aluminum alloy sheets of the duralumin type, that is, heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si is discussed. Alloys of this type are subject to surface corrosion and corrosion of the interior by intercrystalline paths. Results are given of accelerated corrosion tests, tensile tests, the effect on corrosion of various alloying elements and heat treatments, electrical resistance measurements, and X-ray examinations.

  9. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  10. Corrosion characterization of durable silver coatings by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and accelerated environmental testing.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chung-Tse; Fuqua, Peter D; Barrie, James D

    2006-03-01

    Highly reflective front-surface silver mirrors are needed for many optical applications. While various protective dielectric coating schemes have been developed, the long-term durability of Ag mirrors is still of great concern in the optics community for a variety of applications under harsh environments. The corrosion protection behavior of a SiNx-coated silver-mirror coating scheme was tested with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and accelerated environmental testing, including humidity and salt fog tests. The EIS data obtained were fitted with different equivalent circuit models. The results suggested that the 100A thick SiNx coating produced by rf magnetron sputtering was porous and acted as a leaky capacitor on the Ag film, whereas the addition of a NiCrNx interlayer as thin as 3A between SiNx and Ag films resulted in a much denser SiNx coating with a low-frequency impedance value of 2 orders of magnitude higher than that without the interlayer. Humidity and salt fog testing of different silver coatings showed similar results. The 100A SiNx/3A-NiCrNx/Ag coating exhibited excellent corrosion resistance against the corrosive environments used in this study. PMID:16539267

  11. Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical rationale is presented for use of a repetitive cyclic current reversal voltammetric technique for characterization of localized corrosion processes, including atmospheric corrosion. Applicability of this proposed experimental protocol is applied to characterization of susceptibility to crevice and pitting corrosion, atmospheric corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Criteria upon which relative susceptibility is based were determined and tested using two iron based alloys commonly in use at NASA-Kennedy; A36 (a low carbon steel) and 4130 (a low alloy steel). Practicality of the procedure was demonstrated by measuring changes in anodic polarization behavior during high frequency current reversal cycles of 25 cycles per second with 1 mA/sq cm current density amplitude in solutions containing Cl anions. The results demonstrated that, due to excessive polarization which affects conductivity of barrier corrosion product layers, A36 was less resistant to atmospheric corrosion than its 4130 counterpart; behavior which was also demonstrated during exposure tests.

  12. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  13. Application of gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements after accelerated corrosion tests of steel embedded in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Duffó, Gustavo; Gaillard, Natalia; Mariscotti, Mario; Ruffolo, Marcelo

    2015-08-15

    The accelerated corrosion by the impressed current technique is widely used in studies of concrete durability since it has the advantage that tests can be carried out within reasonable periods of time. In the present work the relationship between the applied current density and the resulting damage on the reinforcing steel, by applying optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements, was studied by means of the implementation of accelerated corrosion tests on reinforced mortar. The results show that the efficiency of the applied current is between 1 and 77%, regardless of the applied current density, the water/cement ratio and the mortar cover depth of the specimens. The results show the applicability of the gamma-ray radiography technique to detect localized corrosion of steel rebars in laboratory specimens.

  14. Cosmetic corrosion of painted aluminum and steel automotive body sheet: Results from outdoor and accelerated laboratory test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.P.; Ziman, P.R.; Egbert, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been given to the need to develop an accelerated laboratory test method(s) for cosmetic corrosion of painted panels that realistically simulate in-service exposure. Much of that work has focused on steel substrates. The purpose of this research is to compare the corrosion performance of painted aluminum and steel sheet as determined om various laboratory methods and in-service exposure, and to develop a realistic accelerated test method for evaluation of the cosmetic corrosion of painted aluminum. Several aluminum sheet products from the 2xxx, 5xxx, and 6xxx alloy series have been tested. The steel substrates are similar to those used in other programs. The test methods chosen represent a cross-section of methods common to the automotive and aluminum industries for evaluation of painted sheet metal products. The results indicate that there is considerable difference in the relative correlation of various test methods to in-service exposure. In addition, there is considerable difference in the relative magnitudes and morphologies of corrosion, and occasionally in the relative rankings, as a function of test method. The influence of alloy composition and zinc phosphate coating weight are also discussed.

  15. Accelerated corrosion testing, evaluation and durability design of bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Pereira, Ruben Mario

    2003-06-01

    In the last few years, the effectiveness of cement grout in galvanized or polyethylene ducts, the most widely used corrosion protection system for multistrand bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons, has been under debate, due to significant tendon corrosion damage, several reported failures of individual tendons as well as a few collapses of non-typical structures. While experience in the USA has been generally good, some foreign experience has been less than satisfactory. This dissertation is part of a comprehensive research program started in 1993, which has the objectives to examine the use of post-tensioning in bridge substructures, identify durability concerns and existing technology, develop and carry out an experimental testing program, and conclude with durability design guidelines. Three experimental programs were developed: A long term macrocell corrosion test series, to investigate corrosion protection for internal tendons in precast segmental construction; a long term beam corrosion test series, to examine the effects of post-tensioning on corrosion protection as affected by crack width; and, a long term column corrosion test series, to examine corrosion protection in vertical elements. Preliminary design guidelines were developed previously in the overall study by the initial researchers, after an extensive literature review. This dissertation scope includes continuation of exposure testing of the macrocell, beam and column specimens, performing comprehensive autopsies of selected specimens and updating the durability design guidelines based on the exposure testing and autopsy results. After autopsies were performed, overall findings indicate negative durability effects due to the use of mixed reinforcement, small concrete covers, galvanized steel ducts, and industry standard or heat-shrink galvanized duct splices. The width of cracks was shown to have a direct negative effect on specimen performance. Grout voids were found to be detrimental to the

  16. Microbiologically influenced corrosion testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, J.R.; Little, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    This symposium was held November 16--17, 1992 in Miami, Florida. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for state-of-the-art information on the effects of microorganisms on the corrosion of metals. Many industrial needs in the area of microbial influenced corrosion testing are identified in the presentations along with latest laboratory and field testing techniques. Strategies to monitor and control corrosion and biofouling in water distribution systems, underground pipelines, buildings, and marine vessels are discussed. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  17. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1995-12-05

    A method is described for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness. 3 figs.

  18. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, Frederick A.

    1995-12-05

    A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

  19. Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced testing of structural materials was developed by Lewis Research Center and Langley Research Center working with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Under contract, Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) conducted a study for evaluating stress corrosion cracking, and recommended the "breaking load" method which determines fracture strengths as well as measuring environmental degradation. Alcoa and Langley plan to submit the procedure to ASTM as a new testing method.

  20. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  1. Continuous acoustic emission monitoring of reinforced concrete under accelerated corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetti, M.; Loreto, G.; Nanni, A.; Matta, F.; Gonzalez-Nunez, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    The development of techniques capable of evaluating deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is instrumental to the advancement of techniques for the structural health monitoring (SHM) and service life estimate for constructed facilities. One of the main causes leading to degradation of RC is the corrosion of the steel reinforcement. This process can be modeled phenomenologically, while laboratory tests aimed at studying durability responses are typically accelerated in order to provide useful results within a realistic period of time. To assess the condition of damage in RC, a number of nondestructive methods have been recently studied. Acoustic emission (AE) is emerging as a nondestructive tool to detect the onset and progression of deterioration mechanisms. In this paper, the development of accelerated corrosion and continuous AE monitoring test set-up for RC specimens are presented. Relevant information are provided with regard to the characteristics of the corrosion circuit, continuous measurement and acquisition of corrosion potential, selection of AE sensors and AE parameter setting. The effectiveness of the setup in detecting and characterizing the initiation and progression of the corrosion phenomenon is discussed on the basis of preliminary results from small-scale, pre-cracked RC specimens, which are representative of areas near the clear cover in typical RC bridge members.

  2. Atlas 5013 tank corrosion test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, W. M.; Girton, L. D.; Treadway, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    The type and cause of corrosion in spot welded joints were determined by X-ray and chemical analysis. Fatigue and static tests showed the degree of degradation of mechanical properties. The corrosion inhibiting effectiveness of WD-40 compound and required renewal period by exposing typical joint specimens were examined.

  3. In-situ corrosion sensor for coating, testing and screening

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.D.; Dacres, C.M.; Krebs, L.A.

    2000-02-01

    An in-situ corrosion censor facilitates coating development and screening by detecting the early stages of corrosion well before degradation is visible. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), the sensor extends the use of this established laboratory technique from immersion only to different accelerated test conditions (such as salt fog or humidity) and ambient service environments. By enabling a direct quantitative comparison of the early stages of coating deterioration and substrate corrosion that occur in laboratory accelerated tests and service or field conditions, the laboratory tests can be validated and coatings screened more quickly.

  4. Disturbed flow and flow accelerated corrosion in oil and gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Efird, K.D.

    1998-12-31

    The effect of fluid flow on corrosion of steel in oil and gas environments involves a complex interaction of physical and chemical parameters. The basic requirement for any corrosion to occur is the existence of liquid water contacting the pipe wall, which is primarily controlled by the flow regime. The effect of flow on corrosion, or flow accelerated corrosion, is defined by the mass transfer and wall shear stress parameters existing in the water phase that contacts the pipe wall. While existing fluid flow equations for mass transfer and wall shear stress relate to equilibrium conditions, disturbed flow introduces non-equilibrium, steady state conditions not addressed by these equations, and corrosion testing in equilibrium conditions cannot be effectively related to corrosion in disturbed flow. The problem in relating flow effects to corrosion is that steel corrosion failures in oil and gas environments are normally associated with disturbed flow conditions as a result of weld beads, preexisting pits, bends, flanges, valves, tubing connections, etc. Steady state mass transfer and wall shear stress relationships to steel corrosion and corrosion testing are required for their application to corrosion of steel under disturbed flow conditions. A procedure is described to relate the results of a corrosion test directly to corrosion in an operation system where disturbed flow conditions are expected, or must be considered.

  5. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    DOEpatents

    Ohi, James; De La Cruz, Jose L.; Lacey, Paul I.

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  6. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  7. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: HD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  8. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  9. Evaluation of corrosion testing techniques for selection of corrosion resistant alloys for sour gas service

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B.; Hibner, E.L.

    1996-08-01

    Slow strain rate (SSR) and C-ring stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests have historically been used to screen alloys for sour gas environments. The relevance of these testing techniques in predicting actual field corrosion behavior was evaluated for age-hardenable nickel base alloy 925 (UNS N09925) and alloy 718 (UNS N07718). While SSR testing provides an acceptable accelerated screening tool for ranking alloys in sour oil field environments, C-ring SCC testing ranks alloys higher in sour environments than SSR testing.

  10. CORROSION TESTING IN SIMULATED TANK SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.

    2010-12-09

    Three simulated waste solutions representing wastes from tanks SY-102 (high nitrate, modified to exceed guidance limits), AN-107, and AY-102 were supplied by PNNL. Out of the three solutions tested, both optical and electrochemical results show that carbon steel samples corroded much faster in SY-102 (high nitrate) than in the other two solutions with lower ratios of nitrate to nitrite. The effect of the surface preparation was not as strong as the effect of solution chemistry. In areas with pristine mill-scale surface, no corrosion occurred even in the SY-102 (high nitrate) solution, however, corrosion occurred in the areas where the mill-scale was damaged or flaked off due to machining. Localized corrosion in the form of pitting in the vapor space of tank walls is an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of the liquid waste tanks at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. It has been shown that the liquid waste condensate chemistry influences the amount of corrosion that occurs along the walls of the storage tanks. To minimize pitting corrosion, an effort is underway to gain an understanding of the pitting response in various simulated waste solutions. Electrochemical testing has been used as an accelerated tool in the investigation of pitting corrosion. While significant effort has been undertaken to evaluate the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in various simulated waste solutions, additional effort is needed to evaluate the effect of liquid waste supernates from six Hanford Site tanks (AY-101, AY-102, AN-102, AN-107, SY-102 (high Cl{sup -}), and SY-102 (high nitrate)) on carbon steel. Solutions were formulated at PNNL to replicate tank conditions, and in the case of SY-102, exceed Cl{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} conditions, respectively, to provide a contrast between in and out of specification limits. The majority of previous testing has been performed on pristine polished samples. To evaluate the actual tank carbon steel

  11. A facility for studying irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Flick, Alexander; Toader, Ovidiu; Wang, Peng; Samad, Nassim A.; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.

    2014-08-01

    A facility for the study of irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water using in situ proton irradiation has been developed and validated. A specially designed beamline and flowing-water corrosion cell added to the 1.7 MV tandem accelerator at the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory provide the capability to study the simultaneous effects of displacement damage and radiolysis on corrosion. A thin sample serves as both a “window” into the corrosion cell through which the proton beam passes completely, and the sample for assessing irradiation accelerated corrosion. The facility was tested by irradiating stainless steel samples at beam current densities between 0.5 and 10 μA/cm2 in 130 °C and 320 °C deaerated water, and 320 °C water with 3 wppm H2. Increases in the conductivity and dissolved oxygen content of the water varied with the proton beam current, suggesting that proton irradiation was accelerating the corrosion of the sample. Conductivity increases were greatest at 320 °C, while DO increases were highest at 130 °C. The addition of 3 wppm H2 suppressed DO below detectable levels. The facility will enable future studies into the effect of irradiation on corrosion in high temperature water with in situ proton irradiation.

  12. In-situ electrochemical study of corrosion of steel and aluminum/steel couples during cyclic corrosion test

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, G.

    1998-12-31

    Use of aluminum alloys for automotive applications is growing steadily. Galvanic corrosion is a major concern for those alloys. Because of the predominate use of steels in the automotive industry, the majority of accelerated test procedures commonly accepted by the industry are designed for cosmetic corrosion and perforation of steels. SAE 52334 and Ford Arizona Proving Ground (Ford APG) tests are two examples. Adopting those tests for galvanic corrosion of Al alloys without any fundamental understanding of the process may lead to misleading results. In this paper, electrochemical studies were conducted to examine the acceleration effects of several parameters on different types of corrosion. Galvanic corrosion of aluminum 6111 alloy and cold rolled steel (Al/ CRS) couples and general corrosion of cold rolled steel substrates were studied.

  13. Accelerated Testing Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; James, Greg; Davey, John; Langlois, David; Torraco, Dennis; Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z; Borup, Rodney L.

    2011-07-01

    The DOE Fuel Cell technical team recommended ASTs were performed on 2 different MEAs (designated P5 and HD6) from Ballard Power Systems. These MEAs were also incorporated into stacks and operated in fuel cell bus modules that were either operated in the field (three P5 buses) in Hamburg, or on an Orange county transit authority drive cycle in the laboratory (HD6 bus module). Qualitative agreement was found in the degradation mechanisms and rates observed in the AST and in the field. The HD6 based MEAs exhibited lower voltage degradation rates (due to catalyst corrosion) and slower membrane degradation rates in the field as reflected by their superior performance in the high potential hold and open-circuit potential AST tests. The quantitative correlation of the degradation rates will have to take into account the various stressors in the field including temperature, relative humidity, start/stops and voltage cycles.

  14. Corrosion testing of urea-formaldehyde foam insulating material

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, R.; Graviano, A.; Sheppard, K.

    1980-09-01

    Two tests of the corrosiveness of urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam insulating materials were compared. One test, the Timm test, had test coupons foamed in place. In the second, the Canadian test, blocks of foam already set were placed in contact with test coupons. The Timm test uses 10 gage thick coupons, while the Canadian test specifies 3 mil thick ones. Two samples of UF foam were tested by the Timm and the Canadian tests. The electrical-resistance probes showed that the corrosion rate against steel was initially quite high, of the order of 12 to 20 mpy (mils per year). After about 20 days, the rate was almost zero. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates of steel coupons were of the order to 0.5 to 2 mpy when averaged over the 28 or 56 day test period. The greater corrosion rate of the thick coupons in the Canadian test as well as poor reproducibility of the corrosion rates was attributed primarily to variations in the contact areas between the sample and the UF foam. The corrosion rates of galvanized steel coupons in the Canadian test in several cases exceeded the failure value. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates averaged over the whole test period were quite low. The corrosion rates of copper and aluminum in both tests were quite low. On the basis of the results of this study the following recommendations for a corrosion-test procedure for UF foam were made: two corrosion tests should be conducted, one for foam while curing and one after it has stabilized; the Timm test for corrosiveness while curing should be used, but for only 1 to 2 days; the test for corrosiveness after stabilizing should be of the accelerated type such as the Canadian one. To insure a constant-contact area, thicker coupons should be used; and the coupons for both tests should have a controlled part of the area not in contact with the foam to simulate field conditions.

  15. Failure Prevention by Short Time Corrosion Tests

    SciTech Connect

    MICKALONIS, JOHN

    2005-05-01

    Short time corrosion testing of perforated sheets and wire meshes fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel, Alloy 600 and C276 showed that 304L stainless steel perforated sheet should perform well as the material of construction for dissolver baskets. The baskets will be exposed to hot nitric acid solutions and are limited life components. The corrosion rates of the other alloys and of wire meshes were too high for useful extended service. Test results also indicated that corrosion of the dissolver should drop quickly during the dissolutions due to the inhibiting effects of the corrosion products produced by the dissolution processes.

  16. Accelerated degradation testing of a photovoltaic module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charki, Abdérafi; Laronde, Rémi; Bigaud, David

    2013-01-01

    There are a great many photovoltaic (PV) modules installed around the world. Despite this, not enough is known about the reliability of these modules. Their electrical power output decreases with time mainly as a result of the effects of corrosion, encapsulation discoloration, and solder bond failure. The failure of a PV module is defined as the point where the electrical power degradation reaches a given threshold value. Accelerated life tests (ALTs) are commonly used to assess the reliability of a PV module. However, ALTs provide limited data on the failure of a module and these tests are expensive to carry out. One possible solution is to conduct accelerated degradation tests. The Wiener process in conjunction with the accelerated failure time model makes it possible to carry out numerous simulations and thus to determine the failure time distribution based on the aforementioned threshold value. By this means, the failure time distribution and the lifetime (mean and uncertainty) can be evaluated.

  17. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-12-14

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys.

  18. A corrosion database system for exposure tests

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kato, Chuichi; Nogami, Atsushi; Matsuoka, Ai

    1997-12-31

    A computerized corrosion database system for exposure tests has been designed and developed. This system was developed to help researchers carry out each experimental procedure in exposure tests. The system includes a function to manage not only the experimental data but also the timetable of exposure tests and the environmental factors of exposure sites. An easily used graphical user interface (GUI) and graph plot software are provided for users to help analyze exposure test results from various viewpoints. The data accumulated in this system are measurements of past exposure tests and exposure tests in progress. The analyses of past exposure tests using the present database system resulted in several ideas on atmospheric corrosion different from the conventional ideas on atmospheric corrosion. If the data of exposure tests in progress are compared with past data, the relationships between atmospheric corrosion and environmental factors will be more clarified.

  19. Fabrication and testing of corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Riester, L.

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub n} to sodium corrosion mandates that corrosion resistant coatings be developed to protect silicon-based turbine engine components. Materials with good corrosion resistance and thermal expansions that nearly match SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been identified. Corrosion testing of hot-pressed pellets of these compounds has identified the most promising materials. Development of chemical vapor deposition system to apply these materials has been initiated. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  20. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  1. Corrosion testing in flash tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-07-01

    As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  2. Electrochemical corrosion testing: An effective tool for corrosion inhibitor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Van de Ven, P.; Mowlem, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    Corrosivity of an Antifreeze/Coolant can lead to localized attacks which are a major cause for metal failure. To prevent this phenomenon, specific corrosion inhibitors are used to protect the different metals in service. This paper will discuss the electrochemical principles behind corrosion, Realized corrosion and corrosion inhibition. It will also discuss electrochemical techniques which allow for the evaluation of these inhibitors.

  3. Assessing corrosion problems in photovoltaic cells via electrochemical stress testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalaby, H.

    1985-01-01

    A series of accelerated electrochemical experiments to study the degradation properties of polyvinylbutyral-encapsulated silicon solar cells has been carried out. The cells' electrical performance with silk screen-silver and nickel-solder contacts was evaluated. The degradation mechanism was shown to be electrochemical corrosion of the cell contacts; metallization elements migrate into the encapsulating material, which acts as an ionic conducting medium. The corrosion products form a conductive path which results in a gradual loss of the insulation characteristics of the encapsulant. The precipitation of corrosion products in the encapsulant also contributes to its discoloration which in turn leads to a reduction in its transparency and the consequent optical loss. Delamination of the encapsulating layers could be attributed to electrochemical gas evolution reactions. The usefulness of the testing technique in qualitatively establishing a reliability difference between metallizations and antireflection coating types is demonstrated.

  4. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin V : Results of Weather-Exposure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1929-01-01

    In a series of weather exposure tests of sheet duralumin, upon which accelerated corrosion tests in the laboratory by the wet-and-dry corrosion method in a sodium chloride solution has already been carried out, a close parallelism between the results of the two kinds of tests was found to exist. The exposure tests showed that the lack of permanence of sheet duralumin is largely, if not entirely, due to corrosion. A corrosion attack of an intercrystalline nature is very largely responsible for the degree of embrittlement produced. The rate of embrittlement was greatly accelerated by a marine atmosphere and by the tropical climate. Variations in corrosion and embrittlement are noted in relation to heat treatment, cold working, and types of protective coatings.

  5. Accelerated testing of space batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J.; Thomas, R. E.; Waite, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated life test program for space batteries is presented that fully satisfies empirical, statistical, and physical criteria for validity. The program includes thermal and other nonmechanical stress analyses as well as mechanical stress, strain, and rate of strain measurements.

  6. Correlation of steel corrosion in pipe flow with jet impingement and rotating cylinder tests

    SciTech Connect

    Efird, K.D.; Wright, E.J.; Boros, J.A.; Hailey, T.G.

    1993-12-01

    The relationship of laboratory fluid flow corrosion test techniques to flow-accelerated corrosion in field applications and the parameters required to apply laboratory data effectively in the field were studied. Single-phase, aqueous, sweet corrosion of steel in turbulent pipe flow was correlated to corrosion in jet impingement and rotating cylinder tests. All tests were conducted simultaneously, using the same test fluid to minimize environmental variables and to allow a direct, realistic comparison of test methods. Rotating cylinder electrode corrosion rates did not correlate with pipe flow based on wall shear stress or mass transfer for flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon (C) steel in the environment studied. Jet impingement corrosion rates for the test ring at r/r{sub 0} = 3 correlated with pipe flow based on wall shear stress. The general equation for flow-accelerated corrosion of C steel under turbulent flow conditions in this environment was expressed as: R = a{tau}{sub w}{sup b} where R was the C steel corrosion rate in mm/y and {tau}{sub w} was the wall shear stress in N/m{sup 2}. Effects of solution chemistry were contained in the equation coefficient and exponent and require further experimental definition. The physical fluid and hydrodynamic parameters were included in {tau}{sub w}. Use of wall shear stress as the correlating factor did not imply a shear mechanism for corrosion acceleration. Wall shear stress was found to be a hydrodynamic factor that can be used effectively to relate fluid flow in different geometries, allowing valid comparison of laboratory tests and field operations.

  7. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  8. Experimental test accelerator (ETA) II

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1981-03-06

    The Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) is designed to produce a 10 kAmp electron beam at an energy of 4.5 MeV in 40 nsec pulses at an average rate of 2 pps. The accelerator also operates in bursts of 5 pulses spaced by as little as one millisec at an average rate of 5 pps. The machine is currently operating near 80% of its design values and has accumulated over 2.5 million pulses - mostly at a rate of one pps. The plasma cathode electron source, the remainder of the accelerator, and the operating characteristics of the machine are discussed.

  9. Corrosion tests in Hawaiian geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen-Basse, J.; Lam, Kam-Fai

    1984-01-01

    Exposure tests were conductd in binary geothermal brine on the island of Hawaii. The steam which flashes from the high pressure, high temperature water as it is brought to ambient pressure contains substantial amounts of H{sub 2}S. In the absence of oxygen this steam is only moderately aggressive but in the aerated state it is highly aggressive to carbon steels and copper alloys. The liquid after flasing is intermediately aggressive. The Hawaiian fluid is unique in chemistry and corrosion behavior; its corrosiveness is relatively mild for a geothermal fluid falling close to the Iceland-type resources. 24 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Durability Tests of a Fiber Optic Corrosion Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Kai Tai; Leung, Christopher K.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively. PMID:22737030

  11. Durability tests of a fiber optic corrosion sensor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kai Tai; Leung, Christopher K Y

    2012-01-01

    Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively. PMID:22737030

  12. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  13. Corrosion tests in the Marchwood geothermal borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, P. F.

    1982-03-01

    Corrosion tests in the high salinity brine produced during a production test at the Marchwood borehole. These tests were intended to obtain preliminary information on the corrosion of a range of metals and alloys most likely to be used for downhole service, heat exchangers and associated equipment, if hot water from this aquifer is used to provide a long-term energy source. Specimens of appropriate candidate materials were exposed to flowing brine in the surface pipework and also downhole at a depth of 663 m. The brine was pumped to the surface by a multi-stage electric submersible pump. The downhole specimens, which were installed with the pump, were exposed for a period of 83 days. The surface specimens were exposed during the well production test for 33.3 days. The product brine was around three times sea water concentration, at a temperature of 72 C and pH 6.2.

  14. Accelerated leach test development program

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    In FY 1989, a draft accelerated leach test for solidified waste was written. Combined test conditions that accelerate leaching were validated through experimental and modeling efforts. A computer program was developed that calculates test results and models leaching mechanisms. This program allows the user to determine if diffusion controls leaching and, if this is the case, to make projections of releases. Leaching mechanisms other than diffusion (diffusion plus source term partitioning and solubility limited leaching) are included in the program is indicators of other processes that may control leaching. Leach test data are presented and modeling results are discussed for laboratory scale waste forms composed of portland cement containing sodium sulfate salt, portland cement containing incinerator ash, and vinyl ester-styrene containing sodium sulfate. 16 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Predicting the impact of chromium on flow-accelerated corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chexal, B.; Goyette, L.F.; Horowitz, J.S.; Ruscak, M.

    1996-12-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) continues to cause problems in nuclear and fossil power plants. Many experiments have been performed to understand the mechanism of FAC. For approximately twenty years, it has ben widely recognized that the presence of small amounts of chromium will reduce the rate of FAC. This effect was quantified in the eighties by research performed in France, Germany and the Netherlands. The results of this research has been incorporated into the computer-based tools used by utility engineers to deal with this issue. For some time, plant data from Diablo Canyon has suggested that the existing correlations relating the concentration of chromium to the rate of FAC are conservative. Laboratory examinations have supported this observation. It appears that the existing correlations fail to capture a change in mechanism from a FAC process with linear kinetics to a general corrosion process with parabolic kinetics. This change in mechanism occurs at a chromium level of approximately 0.1%, within the allowable alloy range of typical carbon steel (ASTM/ASME A106 Grade B) used in power piping in most domestic plants. It has been difficult to obtain plant data that has sufficient chromium to develop a new correlation. Data from Diablo Canyon and the Dukovany Power Plant in the Czech Republic will be used to develop a new chromium correlation for predicting FAC rate.

  16. Sequential and combined acceleration tests for crystalline Si photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Chizuko; Uchiyama, Naomi; Ueno, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Toshiharu; Mitsuhashi, Kazunari; Tsutsumida, Akihiro; Watanabe, Jyunichi; Shirataki, Jyunko; Matsuda, Keiko

    2016-04-01

    The sequential combination test for photovoltaic modules is effective for accelerating degradation to shorten the test time and for reproducing degradation phenomena observed in modules exposed outdoors for a long time. The damp-heat (DH) test, thermal-cycle (TC) test, humidity-freeze (HF) test or dynamic mechanical load (DML) test is combined for the test modules. It was confirmed that chemical corrosion degradation or physical mechanical degradation is reproduced by the combination of the above tests. Cracks on the back sheet and delamination, often observed upon outdoor exposure, were well reproduced by the combination of DH and TC tests and TC and HF tests, respectively. Sequential DH and TC tests and DML and TC tests accelerated the degradation. These sequential tests are expected to be effective in reducing the required time of indoor testing for ensuring long-term reliability.

  17. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  18. Long-term corrosion testing pan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2008-08-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

  19. Testing of biomaterials, accelerated ageing.

    PubMed

    Prodinger, A; Krausler, S; Schima, H; Thoma, H; Wolner, E; Schneider, W

    1985-01-01

    The residual elongation is a critical property of materials used for manufacturing diaphragms of artificial hearts. It is therefore important to check goods received or to control manufactured diaphragms, whether their creep properties are within the required limits. Ordinary creep tests take at least several months, while the release of goods received or diaphragms manufactured should be possible within a few days. Acceleration of the creep test by increasing the test temperature permits an estimation whether the creep properties of a material are within the required limits within a week. PMID:3870605

  20. Long-term corrosion testing plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2009-02-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

  1. 49 CFR 192.469 - External corrosion control: Test stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test stations. 192.469... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.469 External corrosion control: Test stations. Each pipeline under cathodic...

  2. 49 CFR 192.469 - External corrosion control: Test stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test stations. 192.469... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.469 External corrosion control: Test stations. Each pipeline under cathodic...

  3. 49 CFR 192.469 - External corrosion control: Test stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test stations. 192.469... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.469 External corrosion control: Test stations. Each pipeline under cathodic...

  4. 49 CFR 192.469 - External corrosion control: Test stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test stations. 192.469... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.469 External corrosion control: Test stations. Each pipeline under cathodic...

  5. 49 CFR 192.469 - External corrosion control: Test stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test stations. 192.469... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.469 External corrosion control: Test stations. Each pipeline under cathodic...

  6. Comparative study of the corrosion behavior of peripheral stents in an accelerated corrosion model: experimental in vitro study of 28 metallic vascular endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Paprottka, Karolin J.; Paprottka, Philipp M.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Waggershauser, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Clinical cases of stent-fractures show that corrosion behavior might play a role in these fractures. Implanted in vivo, especially in combination with other implanted foreign materials, these metallic products are exposed to special conditions, which can cause a process of corrosion. Here, we aimed to test the corrosion potential of stents made of different materials in an in vitro setting. METHODS A total of 28 peripheral stents of different materials (nitinol, cobalt-chromium-nickel, tantalum, V4A) and surface treatments (electropolish, mechanical polish, no polish) were tested in vitro. Corrosion was accelerated by applying a constant voltage of 3.5 V and amperage of 1.16 mA in 0.9% NaCl. RESULTS Nitinol stents showed the lowest susceptibility to corrosion and the longest period without damage. The Memotherm II® (BARD Angiomed®) was the only stent that showed neither macroscopic nor microscopic damages. The worst performing material was cobalt-chromium-nickel, which showed corrosion damages about ten times earlier compared to nitinol. Considering the reasons for termination of the test, nitinol stents primarily showed length deficits, while V4A and tantalum stents showed fractures. Cobalt-chromium-nickel stents had multiple fractures or a complete lysis in equal proportions. When placed in direct contact, nitinol stents showed best corrosion resistance, regardless of what material they were combined with. In terms of polishing treatments, electropolished stents performed the best, mechanical-polished stents and those without polishing treatment followed. CONCLUSION The analysis of corrosion behavior may be useful to select the right stent fulfilling the individual needs of the patient within a large number of different stents. PMID:26268301

  7. Corrosion test cell for bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Weisbrod, Kirk R.

    2002-01-01

    A corrosion test cell for evaluating corrosion resistance in fuel cell bipolar plates is described. The cell has a transparent or translucent cell body having a pair of identical cell body members that seal against opposite sides of a bipolar plate. The cell includes an anode chamber and an cathode chamber, each on opposite sides of the plate. Each chamber contains a pair of mesh platinum current collectors and a catalyst layer pressed between current collectors and the plate. Each chamber is filled with an electrolyte solution that is replenished with fluid from a much larger electrolyte reservoir. The cell includes gas inlets to each chamber for hydrogen gas and air. As the gases flow into a chamber, they pass along the platinum mesh, through the catalyst layer, and to the bipolar plate. The gas exits the chamber through passageways that provide fluid communication between the anode and cathode chambers and the reservoir, and exits the test cell through an exit port in the reservoir. The flow of gas into the cell produces a constant flow of fresh electrolyte into each chamber. Openings in each cell body is member allow electrodes to enter the cell body and contact the electrolyte in the reservoir therein. During operation, while hydrogen gas is passed into one chamber and air into the other chamber, the cell resistance is measured, which is used to evaluate the corrosion properties of the bipolar plate.

  8. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  9. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  10. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D K

    2003-04-22

    The "Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program" is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100°F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles' Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

  11. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  12. Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) injector

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, C.H.; Bubp, D.G.; Fessenden, T.J.; Hester, R.E.; Neil, V.K.; Paul, A.C.; Prono, D.S.

    1983-03-09

    The ATA injector, developed from experience gained from the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) linac, has recently been completed. The injector consists of ten 0.25 MV cells that are used to develop 2.5 MV across a single diode gap. The 10 kA beam is extracted from a 500 cm/sup 2/ plasma cathode at average rates of up to 5 Hz and burst rates to 1 kHz. Pulsed power from 20 water filled blumleins is divided and introduced symmetrically through four ports on each cell. All major insulators are fabricated from filled epoxy castings. With these improvements, the ATA injector is smaller than the ETA injector; has a faster pulse response; has lower voltage stress on insulators and higher ultimate performance. Injector characterization tests began in October 1982. These tests include beam current, energy, and emittance measurements.

  13. A study on corrosion test methods for automotive steel sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Y.; Kitayama, M.; Ito, Y.; Koyahara, H.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of an automobile body caused by de-icing salt was classified into various corrosion phenomena, of which paint exfoliation and perforation were studied fundamentally. There are 2 types of paint exfoliation. One is paint adhesion, where underfilm corrosion plays a decisive role. Another is wet adhesion, where water immersion through the paint film into the paint/substrate interface is important. Perforation corrosion can be simulated by corrosion test using lapped panel specimens. CCT conditions which should be applied for all exposure tests were determined on the basis of experimental data.

  14. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471... Control § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as to remain mechanically secure and electrically conductive. (b) Each test lead wire must...

  15. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471... Control § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as to remain mechanically secure and electrically conductive. (b) Each test lead wire must...

  16. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471... Control § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as to remain mechanically secure and electrically conductive. (b) Each test lead wire must...

  17. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471... Control § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as to remain mechanically secure and electrically conductive. (b) Each test lead wire must...

  18. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471... Control § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as to remain mechanically secure and electrically conductive. (b) Each test lead wire must...

  19. Accelerated testing of space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. Frank; Heshmat, Hooshang

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of various existing life prediction techniques used for a wide range of space mechanisms. Life prediction techniques utilized in other non-space fields such as turbine engine design are also reviewed for applicability to many space mechanism issues. The development of new concepts on how various tribological processes are involved in the life of the complex mechanisms used for space applications are examined. A 'roadmap' for the complete implementation of a tribological prediction approach for complex mechanical systems including standard procedures for test planning, analytical models for life prediction and experimental verification of the life prediction and accelerated testing techniques are discussed. A plan is presented to demonstrate a method for predicting the life and/or performance of a selected space mechanism mechanical component.

  20. CFD Application to Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Feeder Bends

    SciTech Connect

    Pietralik, John M.; Smith, Bruce A.W.

    2006-07-01

    Feeder piping in CANDU{sup R} plants experiences a thinning degradation mechanism called Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). The piping is made of carbon steel and has high water flow speeds. Although the water chemistry is highly alkaline with room-temperature pH in a range of 10.0-10.5, the piping has FAC rates exceeding 0.1 mm/year in some locations, e.g., in bends. One of the most important parameters affecting the FAC rate is the mass transfer coefficient for convective mass transport of ferrous ions. The ions are created at the pipe wall as a result of corrosion, diffuse through the oxide layer, and are transported from the oxide-layer/water interface to the bulk water by mass transport. Consequently, the local flow characteristics contribute to the highly turbulent convective mass transfer. Plant data and laboratory experiments indicate that the mass transfer step dominates FAC under feeder conditions. In this study, the flow and mass transfer in a feeder bend under operating conditions were simulated using the Fluent{sup TM} computer code. Because the flow speed is very high, with the Reynolds numbers in a range of several millions, and because the geometry is complex, experiments in a 1:1 scale were conducted with the main objective to validate flow simulations. The experiments measured pressure at several key locations and visualized the flow. The flow and mass transfer models were validated using available friction-factor and mass transfer correlations and literature experiments on mass transfer in a bend. The validation showed that the turbulence model that best predicts the experiments is the realizable k-{epsilon} model. Other two-equation turbulence models, as well as one-equation models and Reynolds stress models were tried. The near-wall treatment used the non-equilibrium wall functions. The wall functions were modified for surface roughness when necessary. A comparison of the local mass transfer coefficient with measured FAC rate in plant specimens

  1. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  2. NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF CORROSION UNDER COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface corrosion on aluminum aircraft skins, nears joints and around fasteners is often an indicator of buried structural corrosion and cracking. Aircraft paints are routinely removed to reveal the presence of corrosion on the surface of metal structures, and the aircraft is su...

  3. Flow-accelerated corrosion in power plants. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chexal, B.; Horowitz, J.; Dooley, B.

    1998-07-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) is a phenomenon that results in metal loss from piping, vessels, and equipment made of carbon steel. FAC occurs only under certain conditions of flow, chemistry, geometry, and material. Unfortunately, those conditions are common in much of the high-energy piping in nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. Undetected, FAC will cause leaks and ruptures. Consequently, FAC has become a major issue, particularly for nuclear plants. Although major failures are rare, the consequences can be severe. In 1986, four men in the area of an FAC-induced pipe rupture were killed. Fossil plants too, are subject to FAC. In 1995, a failure at a fossil-fired plant caused two fatalities. In addition to concerns about personnel safety, FAC failures can pose challenges to plant safety. Regulatory agencies have therefore required nuclear utilities to institute formal programs to address FAC. Finally, a major FAC failure (like the one that happened in 1997 at a US nuclear power plant) can force a plant to shutdown and purchase replacement power at a price approaching a million dollars per day depending upon the MWe rating of the plant. A great deal of time and money has been spent to develop the technology to predict, detect, and mitigate FAC in order to prevent catastrophic failures. Over time, substantial progress has been made towards understanding and preventing FAC. The results of these efforts include dozens of papers, reports, calculations, and manuals, as well as computer programs and other tools. This book is written to provide a detailed treatment of the entire subject in a single document. Any complex issue requires balancing know-how, the risk of decision making, and a pragmatic engineering solution. This book addresses these by carrying out the necessary R and D and engineering along with plant knowledge to cover all quadrants of Chexal`s four quadrant known-unknown diagram, as seen in Figure i.

  4. Design considerations and test facilities for accelerated radiation effects testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Miller, C. G.; Parker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Test design parameters for accelerated dose rate radiation effects tests for spacecraft parts and subsystems used in long term mission (years) are detailed. A facility for use in long term accelerated and unaccelerated testing is described.

  5. The iron powder test for naphthenic acid corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, J.L.; Yepez, O.; Specht, M.I.; Lorenzo, R.

    1999-11-01

    In the course of an ongoing investigation into the phenomenon of naphthenic acid corrosion, a new test method has evolved and is currently being further developed to substitute the total acid number (TAN or neutralization number) as an indicator for naphthenic acid corrosion potential. It can also be used to complement conventional autoclave corrosion tests in high temperature environments, which are based on weight loss of steel coupons. In this new method an oil sample reacts with pure iron powder within an autoclave heated to the testing temperature. The result is based on the amount of dissolved iron found in the oil sample. The oil sample can dissolve an amount of iron for a given time at a given temperature, depending on the naphthenic acid corrosion, since these acids react with iron to produce oil soluble iron naphthenates. This paper describes the method, compares it with conventional crude corrosiveness testing, and proposes it as a new way of measuring naphthenic acid corrosion potential.

  6. Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-10-23

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation.

  7. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Croson, M.L.

    1994-11-01

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented.

  8. Mechanism of accelerated corrosion in Zircaloy-4 laser and electron-beam welds

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.G.; Sabol, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of a series of Zircaloy-4 laser, electron-beam (EB), and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds was evaluated in high-temperature water and steam. Corrosion exposures carried out in 633 K water revealed that all welds had excellent corrosion resistance at this temperature. However, corrosion exposures carried out in 673 K steam indicated that the laser and EB welds were susceptible to accelerated corrosion, whereas the TIG welds were not. It is believed that alloy depletion and the resultant loss of high-temperature corrosion resistance can be eliminated or minimized by performing welding operations at a power density such that the metal surface is heated above the melting point, but below the boiling point. 23 refs.

  9. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehm, F.; Müller-Meskamp, L.; Klumbies, H.; Leo, K.

    2015-12-01

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10-5 g(H2O)/m2/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity.

  10. Synthetic seawater as stress-corrosion test medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Seawater minimizes pitting corrosion of aluminum-alloy test samples. Of three corrosion-inhibiting methods evaluated using (a) chromate inhibitors in saltwater, (b) surface treating sample via anodizing or alodine treatment, and (c) synthetic seawater, synthetic seawater was most effective test medium, since it is more uniform than fresh seawater.

  11. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  12. Selectable-Tip Corrosion-Testing Electrochemical Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomness, Janice; Hintze, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The figure depicts aspects of an electrochemical cell for pitting- corrosion tests of material specimens. The cell is designed to generate a region of corrosion having a pit diameter determined by the diameter of a selectable tip. The average depth of corrosion is controlled by controlling the total electric charge passing through the cell in a test. The cell is also designed to produce minimal artifacts associated with crevice corrosion. There are three selectable tips, having diameters of 0.1 in. (0.254 cm), 0.3 in. (0.762 cm), and 0.6 in. (1.524 cm), respectively.

  13. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  14. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes > 1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa ("displacement-per-atom", the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  15. Fabrication of Test Tubes for Coal Ash Corrosion Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wright, I.G.

    1999-05-11

    This paper deals with the fabrication of tube sections of four alloys for incorporating into test sections to be assembled by Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) for installation at Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant. The primary purpose of the installation was to determine the corrosion behavior of ten different alloys for flue gas corrosion. Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant is burning an Ohio coal containing approximately 3.4% S (dry basis) and approximately 0.4% alkali which causes chronic coal ash corrosion of the unit�s superheater tubing. The 2.5-in.-OD x 0.4in.-wall x 6-in-long sections of four alloys {type 304H coated with Fe3Al alloy FAS [developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)], 310 + Ta, modified 800H, and Thermie alloy} were fabricated at ORNL. Each alloy tubing was characterized in terms of chemical analysis and microstructure. The machined tubes of each of the alloys were inspected and shipped on time for incorporation into the test loop fabricated at B&W. Among the alloys fabricated, Thermie was the hardest to extrude and machine.

  16. Accelerated Stress Testing of Thin-Film Modules with SnO2:F Transparent Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.; McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J. A.; Adelstein, J.; Puett, J.

    2003-05-01

    This paper reviews a testing program conducted at NREL for the past two years that applied voltage, water vapor, and light stresses to thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules with SnO2:F transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) deposited on soda-lime glass superstrates. Electrochemical corrosion at the glass-TCO interface was observed to result in delamination of the thin-film layers. Experimental testing was directed toward accelerating the corrosion and understanding the nature of the resulting damage.

  17. Investigation of Accelerated Casing Corrosion in Two Wells at Waste Management Area A-AX

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2005-08-29

    The sidewall core samples from well 299-E24-19, which were comprised of a mixture of bentonite and silt lens material, had an average porewater chloride concentration of 376 mg/L. The sidewall core samples collected from well 299-E25-46 had calculated porewater chloride concentrations ranging from 1,200 to more than 10,000 mg/L. Clearly, the sidewall core samples tested were capable of generating porewaters with sufficient chloride concentrations to cause corrosion of the stainless steel well casing. Furthermore, analysis of the sidewall core samples yielded a clear relationship between chloride concentration and well casing corrosion. The sidewall core samples containing the greatest amount of chloride, 3000 {micro}g/g of sediment, came from the well that experienced the longest length of casing failure (4.2 feet in well 299-E25-46). All of the sidewall core samples tested from both decommissioned wells contained more chloride than the Wyoming bentonite test material. However, since chloride was present as a trace constituent in all of the sidewall core samples (less than 0.4 weight percent), it is possible that it could have been introduced to the system as a ''contaminant'' contained in the bentonite backfill material. Therefore, it is likely that chloride leached from the bentonite material and/or chloride carried by/as a constituent of the liquid waste stream caused the advanced well casing corrosion found at wells 299-E24-19 and 299-E25-46 via crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The sample of Enviroplug{trademark} No.8 high swelling Wyoming bentonite was characterized for its potential to generate porewaters of sufficient chlorinity to lead to accelerated corrosion of type 304L stainless steel. Overall, the bentonite sample had considerably high water extractable concentrations of sodium, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, and alkalinity (measured as calcium carbonate). Interpretation of the laboratory data indicated that the Wyoming bentonite test

  18. Atmospheric corrosion testing. (Latest citations from the Metadex (Metals Abstracts/Alloys Index) database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the results of both long term atmospheric testing and accelerated testing in artificial environments for a wide variety of materials. The effects of atmospheric pollution, specifically, sulfur dioxide, are included. Applications include use in testing for corrosion of aluminum, steel, magnesium, automotive parts, and metal roofing materials. (Contains a minimum of 203 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Electron mediators accelerate the microbiologically influenced corrosion of 304 stainless steel by the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiyu; Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Yang, Ke; Gu, Tingyue

    2015-02-01

    In the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) caused by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), iron oxidation happens outside sessile cells while the utilization of the electrons released by the oxidation process for sulfate reduction occurs in the SRB cytoplasm. Thus, cross-cell wall electron transfer is needed. It can only be achieved by electrogenic biofilms. This work hypothesized that the electron transfer is a bottleneck in MIC by SRB. To prove this, MIC tests were carried out using 304 stainless steel coupons covered with the Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757) biofilm in the ATCC 1249 medium. It was found that both riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), two common electron mediators that enhance electron transfer, accelerated pitting corrosion and weight loss on the coupons when 10ppm (w/w) of either of them was added to the culture medium in 7-day anaerobic lab tests. This finding has important implications in MIC forensics and biofilm synergy in MIC that causes billions of dollars of damages to the US industry each year. PMID:25023048

  20. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  1. Influence of Local Flow Field on Flow Accelerated Corrosion Downstream from an Orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utanohara, Yoichi; Nagaya, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) rate downstream from an orifice was measured in a high-temperature water test loop to evaluate the effects of flow field on FAC. Orifice flow was also measured using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and simulated by steady RANS simulation and large eddy simulation (LES). The LDV measurements indicated the flow structure did not depend on the flow velocity in the range of Re = 2.3×104 to 1.2×105. Flow fields predicted by RANS and LES agreed well with LDV data. Measured FAC rate was higher downstream than upstream from the orifice and the maximum appeared at 2D (D: pipe diameter) downstream. The shape of the profile of the root mean square (RMS) wall shear stress predicted by LES had relatively good agreement with the shape of the profile of FAC rate. This result indicates that the effects of flow field on FAC can be evaluated using the calculated wall shear stress.

  2. Double shell slurry low-temperature corrosion tests

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Elmore, R.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of year-long tests have been completed on potential double shell slurry (DSS) compositions at temperatures up to 100/sup 0/C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress-corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion were observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below the 1 mpy (25 ..mu..m/y) design limit. By the end of twelve months all results were below this limit and, except for very concentrated mixtures, all were below 0.5 mpy. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for proposed DSS compositions.

  3. Acceptance Test Report for Fourth Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-10-23

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe cabinets destined for installation on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. This ATR will be performed by the manufacturer on each cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinets to be installed on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. One cabinet will be installed on each tank. Each cabinet will contain corrosion monitoring hardware to be connected to existing corrosion probes already installed in each tank. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation (input a known signal and see if the instrumentation records the proper value).

  4. Acceptance test plan for fourth generation Hanford corrosion monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-07-27

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe cabinets destined for installation on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer on each cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinets to be installed on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. One cabinet will be installed on each tank. Each cabinet will contain corrosion monitoring hardware to be connected to existing corrosion probes already installed in each tank. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation (input a known signal and see if the instrumentation records the proper value).

  5. Effect of mechanical cleaning on seawater corrosion of candidate OTEC heat exchanger materials. Part 1. Tests with M. A. N. brushes

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, D G

    1980-09-01

    Corrosion evaluations were conducted on 3003 Alclad, 5052 aluminum, C7 0600 copper-nickel, AL-6X stainless steel, and commercially-pure titanium in natural seawater under simulated OTEC heat exchanger conditions to investigate the erosion-corrosion effects of mechanical tube cleaning. Test conditions of M.A.N. brush cleaning and M.A.N. brush cleaning + chlorination were compared with no mechanical cleaning over a seven month period. M.A.N. brushing significantly accelerated corrosion of 5052 aluminum and C7 0600 copper-nickel. Chlorination significantly accelerated erosion-corrosion of 3003 Alclad and 5052 aluminium. Chlorination somewhat decreased erosion-corrosion of C7 0600 copper-nickel. There was no detectable effect of M.A.N. brushing or chlorination on AL-6X stainless steel or titanium, although AL-6X exhibited crevice corrosion at tubing connections. 3003 Alclad and 5052 aluminum exhibited piting corrosion in all 3 test environments.

  6. Influence of Cl- Deposition Content on Corrosion of LY12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Desheng; Li, Di; Zheng, Tianliang

    A series of accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in the simulated marine atmosphere environment to study the corrosion of LY12 aluminum alloy under different Cl- deposition content. The change of corrosion morphology, weight gain and electrochemical parameters (Corrosion Electric Potential, AC Impedance) were inspected in the corrosion course. The different corrosion behaviors caused by the variation of Cl- deposition content were also discussed.

  7. Corrosion behavior of modified nano carbon black/epoxy coating in accelerated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior and anticorrosion properties of modified carbon black (CB) nanoparticles in epoxy coatings were investigated in accelerated conditions. Nanoparticles of CB were modified by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant. Dispersion of nanoparticles into epoxy was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The accelerated condition was prepared at 65 °C. CB nanoparticles improved corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. The optimum concentration of CB in the epoxy coating was 0.75 wt%. Results showed that the CB hinder the corrosion due to its barrier properties. CB can decrease the diffusion coefficient of water in the coating with filling the micropores.

  8. An accelerated carbonation procedure for studies of corrosion in reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kadhimi, T.K.H.; Banfill, P.F.G.; Millard, S.G.; Bungey, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    Carbonation of the concrete leading to reduced alkalinity around the steel is one of the main reasons for the corrosion of reinforced concrete. Studies of carbonation induced corrosion and of rehabilitation methods, such as electrochemical realkalization, require the convenient preparation of realistically large specimens of carbonated concrete in a sufficiently short time. This paper describes a rapid method of preparing carbonated concrete by exposing concrete, which has been dried to an internal relative humidity of 60%, to a pure atmosphere of carbon dioxide gas at 15 bar pressure (1,500 kPa). The pressure chamber used can accommodate specimens up to 150mm diameter or 100 x 100 mm section and such specimens can be fully carbonated in 2 weeks, much more quickly than by other methods. Carbonation increases the electrical resistivity and strength of the concrete and reduces the water absorption. Optical and electron microscopical investigations on the carbonated concrete confirm that the microstructure is no different from that produced in concrete by carbonation under natural exposure. The accelerated carbonation method can be used for development work on materials and repair methods and has been used by the authors in preparing carbonated concrete specimens for re-alkalization tests.

  9. Undervehicle corrosion testing of zinc and zinc alloy coated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, R.J.; de Souza, K.M.

    1986-12-01

    Undervehicle and on-vehicle coupon corrosion test programs are initiated by Dofasco Inc. in 1981, using two commercial trucks operated in the deicing salt/snow belt area of Southern Ontario, Canada. The purpose was to investigate the relative corrosion performance of numerous zinc and zinc alloy coated steels. Seventeen coated steels were tested. Results to date indicate that the hot dip coated steels with the thicker coatings are outperforming the electrolytic coated steels in both the unpainted and phosphated/cathodic primed conditions. Fully painted on-vehicle test coupons show minimal corrosion and little difference to date.

  10. Accelerator Test of an Imaging Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Binns, R. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Kippen, R. M.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) utilizes a thin sampling calorimeter concept for direct measurements of high-energy cosmic rays. The ICA design uses arrays of small scintillating fibers to measure the energy and trajectory of the produced cascades. A test instrument has been developed to study the performance of this concept at accelerator energies and for comparison with simulations. Two test exposures have been completed using a CERN test beam. Some results from the accelerator tests are presented.

  11. Corrosion Testing of Brazed Space Station IATCS Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohlman, Matthew J.; Varisik, Jerry; Steele, John W.; Golden, Johnny L.; Boyce, William E.; Pedley, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Increased nickel concentrations in the IATCS coolant prompted a study of the corrosion rates of nickel-brazed heat exchangers in the system. The testing has shown that corrosion is occurring in a silicon-rich intermetallic phase in the braze filler of coldplates and heat exchangers as the result of a decrease in the coolant pH brought about by cabin carbon dioxide permeation through polymeric flexhoses. Similar corrosion is occurring in the EMU de-ionized water loop. Certain heat exchangers and coldplates have more silicon-rich phase because of their manufacturing method, and those units produce more nickel corrosion product. Silver biocide additions did not induce pitting corrosion at silver precipitate sites.

  12. Evaluation of annual corrosion tests for aggressive water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubová, V.; Ilavský, J.; Barloková, D.

    2011-12-01

    Internal corrosion has a significant effect on the useful life of pipes, the hydraulic conditions of a distribution system and the quality of the water transported. All water is corrosive under some conditions, and the level of this corrosion depends on the physical and chemical properties of the water and properties of the pipe material. Galvanic treatment is an innovation for protecting against corrosion, and this method is also suitable for removal of water stone too. This method consists of the electrogalvanic principle, which is generated by the flowing of water between a zinc anode and the cupro-alloy cover of a column. This article presents experimental corrosion tests at water resource Pernek (This water resource-well marked as HL-1 is close to the Pernek of village), where the device is operating based on this principle.

  13. [Stress-corrosion test of TIG welded CP-Ti].

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, Y; Zhou, Z; Meng, X; Liang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, Y

    2000-12-01

    In this study TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welded CP-Ti were subjected to stress-corrosion test under 261 MPa in artificial saliva of 37 degrees C for 3 months. No significant difference was noted on mechanical test (P > 0.05). No color-changed and no micro-crack on the sample's surface yet. These results indicate that TIG welded CP-Ti offers excellent resistance to stress corrosion. PMID:11211846

  14. A Milder Solution for Stress-Corrosion Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    In search for mild corrosive, 14 different salt solutions screened in alternate-immersion tests on 3 aluminum alloys. Best results were obtained with NaCl/MgCl2 solution and with synthetic seawater (contains nearly same proportions of NaCl and MgCl2 along with precise, minute amounts of eight other salts). Because solution is less expensive than artificial seawater, it is probably preferred for future stress-corrosion-cracking (SCC) testing.

  15. RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-08-01

    One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  16. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hawkins, D. C.; Prince, J. L.; Walker, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an accelerated test schedule for terrestrial solar cells is described. This schedule, based on anticipated failure modes deduced from a consideration of IC failure mechanisms, involves bias-temperature testing, humidity testing (including both 85-85 and pressure cooker stress), and thermal-cycle thermal-shock testing. Results are described for 12 different unencapsulated cell types. Both gradual electrical degradation and sudden catastrophic mechanical change were observed. These effects can be used to discriminate between cell types and technologies relative to their reliability attributes. Consideration is given to identifying laboratory failure modes which might lead to severe degradation in the field through second quadrant operation. Test results indicate that the ability of most cell types to withstand accelerated stress testing depends more on the manufacturer's design, processing, and worksmanship than on the particular metallization system. Preliminary tests comparing accelerated test results on encapsulated and unencapsulated cells are described.

  17. DARHT II Scaled Accelerator Tests on the ETA II Accelerator*

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J T; Anaya Jr, E M; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Chen, Y; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Paul, A C; Raymond, B A; Richardson, R A; Watson, J A; Chan, D; Davis, H A; Day, L A; Scarpetti, R D; Schultze, M E; Hughes, T P

    2005-05-26

    The DARHT II accelerator at LANL is preparing a series of preliminary tests at the reduced voltage of 7.8 MeV. The transport hardware between the end of the accelerator and the final target magnet was shipped to LLNL and installed on ETA II. Using the ETA II beam at 5.2 MeV we completed a set of experiments designed reduce start up time on the DARHT II experiments and run the equipment in a configuration adapted to the reduced energy. Results of the beam transport using a reduced energy beam, including the kicker and kicker pulser system will be presented.

  18. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-11-01

    Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyze experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable - maximal energy of the scattered photons - would experience a significant shift in the ambient gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of resolution and expect our work to be a starting point of further high-precision studies on current and future accelerators, such as PETRA, European XFEL and ILC.

  19. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  20. A Statistical Perspective on Highly Accelerated Testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward V.

    2015-02-01

    Highly accelerated life testing has been heavily promoted at Sandia (and elsewhere) as a means to rapidly identify product weaknesses caused by flaws in the product's design or manufacturing process. During product development, a small number of units are forced to fail at high stress. The failed units are then examined to determine the root causes of failure. The identification of the root causes of product failures exposed by highly accelerated life testing can instigate changes to the product's design and/or manufacturing process that result in a product with increased reliability. It is widely viewed that this qualitative use of highly accelerated life testing (often associated with the acronym HALT) can be useful. However, highly accelerated life testing has also been proposed as a quantitative means for "demonstrating" the reliability of a product where unreliability is associated with loss of margin via an identified and dominating failure mechanism. It is assumed that the dominant failure mechanism can be accelerated by changing the level of a stress factor that is assumed to be related to the dominant failure mode. In extreme cases, a minimal number of units (often from a pre-production lot) are subjected to a single highly accelerated stress relative to normal use. If no (or, sufficiently few) units fail at this high stress level, some might claim that a certain level of reliability has been demonstrated (relative to normal use conditions). Underlying this claim are assumptions regarding the level of knowledge associated with the relationship between the stress level and the probability of failure. The primary purpose of this document is to discuss (from a statistical perspective) the efficacy of using accelerated life testing protocols (and, in particular, "highly accelerated" protocols) to make quantitative inferences concerning the performance of a product (e.g., reliability) when in fact there is lack-of-knowledge and uncertainty concerning the

  1. Accelerated Testing Of Photothermal Degradation Of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty Hing; Tsay, Fun-Dow

    1989-01-01

    Electron-spin-resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Arrhenius plots used to determine maximum safe temperature for accelerated testing of photothermal degradation of polymers. Aging accelerated by increasing illumination, temperature, or both. Results of aging tests at temperatures higher than those encountered in normal use valid as long as mechanism of degradation same throughout range of temperatures. Transition between different mechanisms at some temperature identified via transition between activation energies, manifesting itself as change in slope of Arrhenius plot at that temperature.

  2. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  4. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Current/voltage data have been obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consist of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to evaluate fully this approach to corrosion screening.

  5. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, J. L.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A program to investigate the reliability characteristics of unencapsulated low-cost terrestrial solar cells using accelerated stress testing is described. Reliability (or parametric degradation) factors appropriate to the cell technologies and use conditions were studied and a series of accelerated stress tests was synthesized. An electrical measurement procedure and a data analysis and management system was derived, and stress test fixturing and material flow procedures were set up after consideration was given to the number of cells to be stress tested and measured and the nature of the information to be obtained from the process. Selected results and conclusions are presented.

  6. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  7. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  8. Replaceable blade turbine and stationary specimen corrosion testing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Calfo, F. D.

    1985-01-01

    A facility was constructed to provide relatively low cost testing of hot section turbine blade and vane materials under hot corrosion conditions more akin to service environments. The facility consists of a small combustor whose pressurized gas flow can be directed to either a test section consisting of three small cascaded specimens or to a partial admittance single-stage axial flow turbine. The turbine rotor contains 28 replaceable turbine blades. The combustion gases resulting from the burning of Jet A-l fuel can be seeded with measured amounts of alkali salts. This facility is described here along with preliminary corrosion test results obtained during the final checkout of the facility.

  9. The accelerated testing of cements in brines

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    Cementitious materials may be employed in settings where they face prolonged exposure to Mg-rich brines. This study evaluated the possibility of using high temperatures to accelerate brine-cement reaction rates. Class-H cement coupons were tested in Mg-K-Na-C1- SO{sub 4} brines to 100{degrees}C. MgC1{sub 2}-NaC1 solutions were also employed in a test sequence that extended to 200{degrees}C. It was found that accelerated testing could be used successfully to evaluate the compatability of cementitious materials with such brines.

  10. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    DOEpatents

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-12-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston.

  11. The effects of trace impurities in coal-derived liquid fuels on deposition and accelerated high temperature corrosion of cast superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. J.; Santoro, G. J.; Kohl, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of trace metal impurities in coal-derived liquids on deposition, high temperature corrosion and fouling were examined. Alloys were burner rig tested from 800 to 1100 C and corrosion was evaluated as a function of potential impurities. Actual and doped fuel test were used to define an empirical life prediction equation. An evaluation of inhibitors to reduce or eliminate accelerated corrosion was made. Barium and strontium were found to limit attack. Intermittent application of the inhibitors or silicon additions were found to be effective techniques for controlling deposition without losing the inhibitor benefits. A computer program was used to predict the dew points and compositions of deposits. These predictions were confirmed in deposition test. The potential for such deposits to plug cooling holes of turbine airfoils was evaluated. Tests indicated that, while a potential problem exists, it strongly depended on minor impurity variations.

  12. 16 CFR 1209.5 - Test procedures for corrosiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... water film should become gradually thinner at the top and heavier at the bottom.) Hot air dry the... level using the bottom of a clean suitably sized glass beaker. Place a metal coupon onto the... Evaluating Corrosion Test Specimens,” published by American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916...

  13. Construction and testing of a flue-gas corrosion probe

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.; McEvers, J.A.

    1990-08-01

    The selection of suitable materials for industrial, waste-heat- recovery systems requires assessment of corrosion of materials in various flue-gas environments. Such assessments involve exposing candidate materials to high-temperature flue gases and analyzing the effects of the exposure conditions. Because corrosion is related to flue-gas chemical composition and temperature, variations in temperature complicate the determination of corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. Conversely, a relatively constant temperature allows a more accurate determination of the effects of exposure conditions. For this reason, controlled-temperature flue-gas corrosion probes were constructed and tested for exposure tests of materials. A prototype probe consisted of a silicon carbide tube specimen, supporting hardware, and instrumentation for controlling temperature by internal heating and cooling. An advanced probe included other tubular specimens. Testing of the probes in an industrial-type furnace at a nominal flue-gas temperature of 1200{degree}C revealed that temperature control was inadequate. The cooling mode imposed a substantial axial-temperature gradient on the specimens; while the heating mode imposed a smaller gradient, the heating capacity was very limited. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Summary of the WIPP materials interface interactions test: Metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Molecke, M.A.

    1992-12-31

    Several series of in situ, high-level and transuranic waste form-leaching and waste form-engineered barrier materials interactions tests were conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the USA. This multi-national effort, the WIPP Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), involves the underground testing of about 2000 (nonradioactive) waste form, metal, and geologic samples in the bedded salt at the WIPP. This test program started on July 22, 1986 and has achieved its projected five-year lifetime. All in situ samples have been retrieved and sent to multiple laboratories for posttest analyses. Most of the analyses on metal samples have been completed and the results are summarized in this paper. The tested metal alloys proposed for waste canister or overpack use included titanium alloys (grade-2 and grade-12), Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, austenitic stainless steels (304L, 316, and NS 24/AISI 309), carbon steels (Belgian C and ASTM A216/WCA), copper, and lead. After five-years of test exposure immersed in WIPP brine A and/or salt at about 90{degree}C, the corrosion-resistant materials (Ti; Inconel, Hastelloy) exhibited very little corrosion. The austenitic stainless steels suffered pitting, crevice corrosion, and some evidence of stress corrosion cracking. The carbon steels, copper, and lead exhibited both extensive general and localized attack. Details of the test, analyses, and results obtained will be discussed.

  15. Summary of the WIPP materials interface interactions test: Metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Molecke, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Several series of in situ, high-level and transuranic waste form-leaching and waste form-engineered barrier materials interactions tests were conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the USA. This multi-national effort, the WIPP Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), involves the underground testing of about 2000 (nonradioactive) waste form, metal, and geologic samples in the bedded salt at the WIPP. This test program started on July 22, 1986 and has achieved its projected five-year lifetime. All in situ samples have been retrieved and sent to multiple laboratories for posttest analyses. Most of the analyses on metal samples have been completed and the results are summarized in this paper. The tested metal alloys proposed for waste canister or overpack use included titanium alloys (grade-2 and grade-12), Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, austenitic stainless steels (304L, 316, and NS 24/AISI 309), carbon steels (Belgian C and ASTM A216/WCA), copper, and lead. After five-years of test exposure immersed in WIPP brine A and/or salt at about 90[degree]C, the corrosion-resistant materials (Ti; Inconel, Hastelloy) exhibited very little corrosion. The austenitic stainless steels suffered pitting, crevice corrosion, and some evidence of stress corrosion cracking. The carbon steels, copper, and lead exhibited both extensive general and localized attack. Details of the test, analyses, and results obtained will be discussed.

  16. TESTING VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID-AIR INTERFACE CORROSION IN SIMULATED ENVIRONMENTS OF HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELLED TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.

    2013-05-30

    Electrochemical coupon testing were performed on 6 Hanford tank solution simulants and corresponding condensate simulants to evaluate the susceptibility of vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion. Additionally, partial-immersion coupon testing were performed on the 6 tank solution simulants to compliment the accelerated electrochemical testing. Overall, the testing suggests that the SY-102 high nitrate solution is the most aggressive of the six solution simulants evaluated. Alternatively, the most passive solution, based on both electrochemical testing and coupon testing, was AY-102 solution. The presence of ammonium nitrate in the simulants at the lowest concentration tested (0.001 M) had no significant effect. At higher concentrations (0.5 M), ammonium nitrate appears to deter localized corrosion, suggesting a beneficial effect of the presence of the ammonium ion. The results of this research suggest that there is a threshold concentration of ammonium ions leading to inhibition of corrosion, thereby suggesting the need for further experimentation to identify the threshold.

  17. Atmospheric corrosion of coated steel; Relationship between laboratory and field testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambier, Severine Marie Noelle

    The lifetime prediction for corrosion-protective coatings on metals is a challenge that has been studied for several decades. Accelerated tests are used in the hope to reproduce in few days the damage that would develop during several years of field exposure. Field exposures are also used because accelerated tests are not always reliable. Several approaches have been taken to reduce the duration of field exposures. One of them is the use of sensitive techniques to assess the coating degradation before visual inspection indicates any damage. Cathodic delamination measured by the scanning Kelvin probe (CD-SKP) was introduced here as a sensitive technique to assess the degradation at the coating/metal interface after weathering exposure. This technique was shown to predict the failure of the coating/steel interface. Several climates were tested in the US continent and on the islands of Hawaii. PVB coated steel environmental degradation was characterized in the field and reproduced in the laboratory. A second approach to shorten coated metal field exposure is to accelerate the degradation using intentionally added through-film scribes. In service, most corrosion mechanism for painted metals, such as filiform corrosion and cathodic delamination, initiate from a mechanical defect. The iron oxides formed under PVB and Eponol were identified with Raman spectroscopy to determine the environment factors that participated in their formation. This investigation was complemented by laboratory exposure. An accelerated test for PVB coated steel was designed to reproduce the environmental degradation observed in the field. The CD-SKP technique to assess interface degradation after weathering exposure was also applied to other coating systems. E-coated, sprayed epoxy primers with a conversion coating or grit blasting treatment, and one full coating system were tested.

  18. RHIC Sextant Test - Accelerator Systems and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Connolly, R.; dell, G. F.; Fischer, W.; Kewisch, J.; Mackay, W.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wei, J.

    1997-05-01

    One sextant of the RHIC collider and the full AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line have been commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the design and performance of the accelerator systems during the test, such as the magnet and power supply systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. After reviewing the main milestones of the commissioning we describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems preformance and their impact on the plannig for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  19. License plate cosmetic corrosion test of automotive coated steel sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, H.E.; Simpson, M.W.; McCune, D.C.

    1999-04-01

    A new standard laboratory test (SAE J2334) for evaluation of the cosmetic corrosion resistance of autobody steel sheet has been developed through the joint efforts of the Society of Automotive Engineers Automotive Corrosion Prevention Committee (SAE/ACAP) and the Auto/Steel Partnership (A/SP) Corrosion Task Force. Results from this test gave an excellent correlation with those of on-vehicle tests conducted for 5 years in Canada at St. John`s, Newfoundland, and Montreal, Quebec. To determine how results of the Canadian tests related to environments in the United States, racks of identical materials were mounted on the front license plate brackets of cars driven in various locations in the US snowbelt, including Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; Detroit, Michigan, and Chardon, Ohio. After 4 years to 5 years, these tests showed the US environments produced less scribe creep and more red rust than those conducted in Canada. Similar rankings were obtained for the scribe creep resistance of the various coated steel sheet products when compared at equivalent amounts of corrosion. However, the ranking of materials changed at longer exposure times in Canada, and for that reason, it was concluded that the 5-year Canadian results used in the development of the SAE J2334 test provided a better real-world performance standard.

  20. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy; Motupally, Sathya

    2012-06-01

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  1. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.; Bottke, I.; Fernow, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package.

  2. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  3. Effect of mechanical cleaning on seawater corrosion of candidate OTEC heat exchanger materials. Part 2. Tests with Amertap sponge rubber balls

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, D.G.

    1981-06-01

    Corrosion evaluations were conducted on 3003 Alclad, C70600 copper-nickel, and commercially-pure titanium in natural seawater under simulated OTEC heat exchanger conditions to investigate the erosion-corrosion effects of mechanical tube cleaning under aggressive over-cleaning conditions. Test conditions for 3003 Alclad included Amertap soft sponge ball cleaning with and without chlorination. Amertap abrasive sponge ball cleaning with and without chlorination, and no mechanical cleaning as a control. C70600 was exposed to Amertap soft sponge ball cleaning with and without chlorination and with no mechanical cleaning as a control. Titanium was cleaned by abrasive Amertap sponge balls with and without chlorination and compared to no mechanical cleaning as a control. Test exposures of 8, 16, 30, 60, 90 and 180 days were made. The sequence of Amertap sponge ball cleaning utilized in the present tests significantly accelerated corrosion of 3003 Alclad. Chlorination brought about a further acceleration of erosion-corrosion of Alclad. Amertap soft sponge ball cleaning of C70600 caused significant acceleration of corrosion under these over-cleaning conditions. Chlorination somewhat decreased erosion corrosion of C70600. Titanium showed no substantial effect of Amertap abrasive sponge ball cleaning on corrosion, although measurable weight losses were incurred. Chlorination had no measurable effect on erosion-corrosion of titanium.

  4. 16 CFR 1209.5 - Test procedures for corrosiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... determined using the following formula: ml distilled water = 46 / (settled density, Kg/m 3) × 75 or ml distilled water = 2.9 / (settled density, lb/ft 3) × 75 (4) Presaturate each 10g (0.35 oz) portion with the.... Cellulose insulation shall be tested for corrosiveness using the measured settled density, obtained...

  5. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nehm, F. Müller-Meskamp, L.; Klumbies, H.; Leo, K.

    2015-12-15

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10{sup −5} g(H{sub 2}O)/m{sup 2}/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity.

  6. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  7. Internal corrosion testing of aluminum radiator tube alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.; Hindin, B.S.

    1998-12-31

    Aluminum radiator tubes must have several demanding properties to be successful including good heat transfer, high strength to withstand internal pressures, brazeability for attaching external fins and headers, corrosion resistance to cooling fluids, and long service life. Tubes having a wall thickness of approximately 320 microns (11.8 mils) must meet all these properties. A modified simulated service test (SST) of various aluminum radiator tube alloys was conducted to determine how well coolant-side alloys of eight different composite materials resisted corrosion. Both coupons and actual radiator tubes were used in these tests. Coolant-side alloys that were examined included 1145, low-copper 7072, low-iron 3003, 3003 plus zinc, and 3005. The results of these tests indicate that corrosion will tend to proceed laterally along the tube surface when it is anodic to the core alloy. A coolant-side alloy consisting of 3003 plus zinc exhibited advantages over 7072 because its pit density was lower. The role of microstructure in the corrosion behavior of composite brazing sheets is discussed.

  8. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  9. Status of coal ash corrosion resistant materials test program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.K.; Meisenhelter, D.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1999-07-01

    In November of 1998, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) began development of a system to permit testing of several advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam conditions of 1100 F and higher in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B and W, and First Energy's Ohio Edison jointly fund the project. CONSOL Energy Company is also participating as an advisor. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. The coal-ash corrosion resistant materials test program will provide full scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater and reheater tube materials. These newer materials may be capable of operating at higher steam temperatures while resisting external/fire-side corrosion. For high sulfur coal applications, this is a key issue for advanced cycle pulverized coal-fired plants. Fireside corrosion is also a critical issue for many existing plants. Previous testing of high temperature materials in the United States has been based primarily on using laboratory test coupons. The test coupons did not operate at conditions representative of a high sulfur coal-fired boiler. Testing outside of the United States has been with low sulfur coal or natural gas firing and has not addressed corrosion issues. This test program takes place in an actual operating boiler and is expected to confirm the performance of these materials with high sulfur coal. The system consists of three identical sections, each containing multiple pieces of twelve different materials. They are cooled by reheater steam, and are located just above the furnace exit in Ohio Edison's Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. After one year of operation, the first section will be removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation. The second and third sections will operate for three and

  10. Localized corrosion resistance of automotive exhaust alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sabata, A.; Brossia, C.S.; Behling, M.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion in automotive exhaust systems can be broadly classified as (a) cold end corrosion and (b) hot end corrosion. For the cold end, the requirements include inside-out perforation corrosion resistance and cosmetic corrosion resistance. Perforation corrosion causes noticeable degradation in noise quality and may even affect the back pressure. For the hot end, the key concern has been perforation corrosion resistance. With the use of oxygen sensors in catalytic converters, the failure criteria will become more stringent. Numerous accelerated corrosion tests have been used to rank materials for the Hot End and the Cold End. These include (a) Continuous Test, (b) Cyclic Tests -- Hot End, (c) Cyclic Tests -- Cold End, (d) Electrochemical Ranking. In this paper the authors evaluate some of the commonly used exhaust materials in these accelerated tests. These accelerated tests are easy to use, inexpensive to run as compared to proving ground testing or trailer testing and can provide information in a relatively short time. Here they report lab work to date on some of the accelerated corrosion testing for perforation corrosion resistance. Note that these tests are useful for ranking materials only. Life expectancy of the material can be given only after a correlation is established between the accelerated tests and field performance. The electrochemical tests were designed to gain insight into pit growth kinetics in the accelerated tests.

  11. [Corrosion testing of high level radioactive waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Alloys under consideration as candidates for the high level nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain were exposed to a range of corrosion conditions and their performance measured. The alloys tested were Incoloy 825, 70/30 Copper-Nickel, Monel 400, Hastelloy C- 22, and low carbon steel. The test conditions varied were: temperature, concentration, agitation, and crevice simulation. Only in the case of carbon steel was significant attack noted. This attack appeared to be transport limited.

  12. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  13. Testing a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2005-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  14. Accelerated test plan for nickel cadmium spacecraft batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated test matrix is outlined that includes acceptance, baseline and post-cycling tests, chemical and physical analyses, and the data analysis procedures to be used in determining the feasibility of an accelerated test for sealed, nickel cadmium cells.

  15. Vacuum system for Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Denhoy, B.S.

    1981-09-03

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear electron beam accelerator designed to study charged particle beam propagation. ATA is designed to produce a 10,000 amp 50 MeV, 70 ns electron beam. The electron beam acceleration is accomplished in ferrite loaded cells. Each cell is capable of maintaining a 70 ns 250 kV voltage pulse across a 1 inch gap. The electron beam is contained in a 5 inch diameter, 300 foot long tube. Cryopumps turbomolecular pumps, and mechanical pumps are used to maintain a base pressure of 2 x 10/sup -6/ torr in the beam tube. The accelerator will be installed in an underground tunnel. Due to the radiation environment in the tunnel, the controlling and monitoring of the vacuum equipment, pressures and temperatures will be done from the control room through a computer interface. This paper describes the vacuum system design, the type of vacuum pumps specified, the reasons behind the selection of the pumps and the techniques used for computer interfacing.

  16. Testing of a Plasmadynamic Hypervelocity Dust Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticos, Catalin M.; Wang, Zhehui; Dorf, Leonid A.; Wurden, G. A.

    2006-10-01

    A plasmadynamic accelerator for microparticles (or dust grains) has been designed, built and tested at Los Alamos National laboratory. The dust grains are expected to be accelerated to hypervelocities on the order of 1-30 km/s, depending on their size. The key components of the plasmadynamic accelerator are a coaxial plasma gun operated at 10 kV, a dust dispenser activated by a piezoelectric transducer, and power and remote-control systems. The coaxial plasma gun produces a high density (10^18 cm-3) and low temperature (˜ 1 eV) plasma in deuterium ejected by J x B forces, which provides drag on the dust particles in its path. Carbon dust particles will be used, with diameters from 1 to 50 μm. The plasma parameters produced in the coaxial gun are presented and their implication to dust acceleration is discussed. High speed dust will be injected in the National Spherical Torus Experiment to measure the pitch angle of magnetic field lines.

  17. Predicting edge seal performance from accelerated testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardikar, Kedar; Vitkavage, Dan; Saproo, Ajay; Krajewski, Todd

    2014-10-01

    Degradation in performance of a PV module attributable to moisture ingress has received significant attention in PV reliability research. Assessment of field performance of PV modules against moisture ingress through product-level testing in temperature-humidity control chambers poses challenges. Development of a meaningful acceleration factor model is challenging due to different rates of degradation of components embedded in a PV module, when exposed to moisture. Test results are typically a convolution of moisture barrier performance of the edge seal and degradation of laminated components when exposed to moisture. It is desirable to have an alternate method by which moisture barrier performance of the edge seal in its end product form can be assessed in any given field conditions, independent of particular cell design. In this work, a relatively inexpensive test technique was developed to test the edge seal in its end product form in a manner that is decoupled from other components of the PV module. A theoretical framework was developed to assess moisture barrier performance of edge seal with desiccants subjected to different conditions. This framework enables the analysis of test results from accelerated tests and prediction of the field performance of the edge seal. Results from this study lead to the conclusion that the edge seal on certain Miasole glass-glass modules studied is effective for the most aggressive weather conditions examined, beyond the intended service.

  18. Quantitative Accelerated Life Testing of MEMS Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Bâzu, Marius; Gălăţeanu, Lucian; Ilian, Virgil Emil; Loicq, Jerome; Habraken, Serge; Collette, Jean-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative Accelerated Life Testing (QALT) is a solution for assessing the reliability of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). A procedure for QALT is shown in this paper and an attempt to assess the reliability level for a batch of MEMS accelerometers is reported. The testing plan is application-driven and contains combined tests: thermal (high temperature) and mechanical stress. Two variants of mechanical stress are used: vibration (at a fixed frequency) and tilting. Original equipment for testing at tilting and high temperature is used. Tilting is appropriate as application-driven stress, because the tilt movement is a natural environment for devices used for automotive and aerospace applications. Also, tilting is used by MEMS accelerometers for anti-theft systems. The test results demonstrated the excellent reliability of the studied devices, the failure rate in the “worst case” being smaller than 10-7h-1.

  19. Beam alignment tests for therapy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, W.R.; Larsen, R.D.; Bjarngard, B.E.

    1981-12-01

    Beam spot displacement, collimator asymmetry, and movement of either collimator or gantry rotational axis can cause misalignment of the X ray beam from a therapy accelerator. A test method, sensitive to all the above problems, consists of double-exposing a film, located at the isocenter, for two gantry positions, 180/sup 0/ apart. Opposite halves of the field are blocked for each exposure. A lateral shift of one half with respect to the other indicates the presence of one of the problems mentioned above. Additional tests are described, each of which is sensitive to only one of the problems and capable of quantifying the error.

  20. Mechanical Component Lifetime Estimation Based on Accelerated Life Testing with Singularity Extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Chuckpaiwong, I.; Liang, S. Y.; Seth, B. B.

    2002-07-01

    Life testing under nominal operating conditions of mechanical parts with high mean lifetime between failure (MTBF) often consumes a significant amount of time and resources, rendering such procedures expensive and impractical. As a result, the technology of accelerated life testing (ALT) has been developed for testing at high stress levels (e.g. temperature, voltage, pressure, corrosive media, load, vibration amplitude, etc.) so that it can be extrapolated—through a physically reasonable statistical model—to obtain estimations of life at lower, normal stress levels or even limit stress levels. However, the issue of prediction accuracy associated with extrapolating data outside the range of testing, or even to a singularity level (no stress), has not yet been fully addressed. In this research, an accelerator factor is introduced into an inverse power law model to estimate the life distribution in terms of time and stresses. Also, a generalized Eyring model is set up for singularity extrapolation in handling limit stress level conditions. The procedure to calibrate the associated shape factors based on the maximum likelihood principle is also formulated. The methodology implementation, based on a one-main-step, multiple-step-stress test scheme, is experimentally illustrated with tapered roller bearing under the stress of environmental corrosion as a case study. The experimental results show that the developed accelerated life test model can effectively evaluate the life probability of a bearing based on accelerated testing data when extrapolating to the stress levels within or outside the range of testing.

  1. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1989-01-01

    It is desirable to employ a corrosion screening test for catalyst or support candidates for the fuel cell cathode before entering upon optimization of the candidate or of the catalytic electrode. To this end, corrosion test electrodes, intended for complete immersion and maximum wetting, have been made with 30 to 40 vol. pct Teflon; with perovskites this is about 10 to 15 pct. The candidates were synthesized by methods intended for single-phase product without special emphasis on high surface area, although the substances tested were no coarser than 2 m squared/g. A typical loading was 25 mg/cm sq of the pure substance, usually on gold screen, a few mm squared of which were left bare for contacting. Contact to the gold lead wire was made by welding with a micro-torch or a spot-welder. Corrosion testing consisted of obtaining current-voltage data under flowing inert gas in the potential region for reduction of O2. The electrode was immersed in 30 pct KOH. Observations were made at 20 C and 80 C, and the results compared with data from gold standards. Results with some perovskites, pyrochlores, spinels, and interstitial compounds will be discussed.

  2. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Current/voltage data was obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consists of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to fully evaluate this approach to corrosion screening. Corrosion test screening of candidates for the oxygen reduction electrode of the alkaline fuel cell was applied to two substances, the pyrochlore Pb2Ru2O6.5 and the spinel NiCo2O4. The substrate gold screen and a sample of the IFC Orbiter Pt-Au performance electrode were included as blanks. The pyrochlore data indicate relative stability, although nothing yet can be said about long term stability. The spinel was plainly unstable. For this type of testing to be validated, comparisons will have to be made with long term performance tests.

  3. Corrosion testing of welds in austenitic stainless steel tubing using ASTM A 249 boiling HCl weld decay test (Supplementary requirement S7)

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, J.J.; Blessman, E.R.; Lovejoy, P.T.

    1997-06-01

    Welded stainless steel tubing manufactured to ASTM A 249 specification, Welded Austenitic Steel Boiler, Superheater, Heat-Exchanger, and Condenser Tubes, can exhibit substantial differences in its S7 Weld Decay Test performance. Manufacturing conditions are the major contributors to the variation in S7 results. The method of measuring the S7 samples can also contribute to nonrepresentative results. The S7 boiling HCl test is a good indication of weld homogenization. To ensure that the tubing will have no tendency toward selective or accelerated weld corrosion, a maximum corrosion ratio of 1.0 must be achieved across the entire weld.

  4. Corrosion resistance tests on NiTi shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, G

    1996-10-01

    The corrosion performances of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) in human body simulating fluids were evaluated in comparison with other implant materials. As for the passivity current in potentiostatic conditions, taken as an index of ion release, the values are about three times higher for NiTi than for Ti6Al4V and austenitic stainless steels. Regarding the localized corrosion, while plain potentiodynamic scans indicated for NiTi alloy good resistance to pitting attack similar to Ti6Al4V, tests in which the passive film is abruptly damaged (i.e. potentiostatic scratch test and modified ASTM F746) pointed out that the characteristics of the passive film formed on NiTi alloy (whose strength can be related to the alloy's biocompatibility) are not as good as those on Ti6Al4V but are comparable or inferior to those on austenitic stainless steels. PMID:8894095

  5. An Accelerated Method for Soldering Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qingyou; Xu, Hanbing; Ried, Paul; Olson, Paul

    2007-01-01

    An accelerated method for testing die soldering has been developed. High intensity ultrasonic vibrations have been applied to simulate the die casting conditions such as high pressure and high molten metal velocity on the pin. The soldering tendency of steels and coated pins has been examined. The results suggest that in the low carbon steel/Al system, the onset of soldering is 60 times faster with ultrasonic vibration than that without ultrasonic vibration. In the H13/A380 system, the onset of soldering reaction is accelerated to between 30-60 times. Coatings significantly reduce the soldering tendency. For purposes of this study, several commercial coatings from Balzers demonstrated the potential for increasing the service life of core pins between 15 and 180 times.

  6. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Brown, S.; Connolly, R.; Garnett, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Little, C.; Lohson, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Saadatmand, K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 key H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the RFQ beam experiments will be presented along with comparisons to simulations.

  7. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Brown, S.; Connolly, R.; Garnett, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Little, C.; Lohson, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Saadatmand, K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 key H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the RFQ beam experiments will be presented along with comparisons to simulations.

  8. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Gary J.; Bingham, Carl; Goggin, Rita; Lewandowski, Allan A.; Netter, Judy C.

    2000-06-13

    Process and apparatus for providing ultra accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing of samples under controlled weathering without introducing unrealistic failure mechanisms in exposed materials and without breaking reciprocity relationships between flux exposure levels and cumulative dose that includes multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity at high levels of natural sunlight comprising: a) concentrating solar flux uniformly; b) directing the controlled uniform sunlight onto sample materials in a chamber enclosing multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity to allow the sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a sufficient period of time in days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth of representative weathering of the sample materials.

  9. Corrosion Tests of LWR Fuels - Nuclide Release

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Finn; Y. Tsai; J.C. Cunnane

    2001-12-14

    Two BWR fuels [64 and 71 (MWd)/kgU], one of which contained 2% Gd, and two PWR fuels [30 and 45 (MWd)/kgU], are tested by dripping groundwater on the fuels under oxidizing and hydrologically unsaturated conditions for times ranging from 2.4 to 8.2 yr at 90 C. The {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 97}Mo, and {sup 90}Sr releases are presented to show the effects of long reaction times and of gadolinium on nuclide release. This investigation showed that the five nuclides at long reaction times have similar fractional release rates and that the presence of 2% Gd reduced the {sup 99}Tc cumulative release fraction by about an order of magnitude over that of a fuel with a similar burnup.

  10. Corrosion erosion test of SS316 in flowing Pb Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Kurata, Y.; Saito, S.; Futakawa, M.; Sasa, T.; Oigawa, H.; Wakai, E.; Miura, K.

    2003-05-01

    Corrosion tests of austenitic stainless tube were done under flowing Pb-Bi conditions for 3000 h at 450 °C. Specimens were 316SS produced as a tubing form with 13.8 mm outer diameter, 2 mm thickness and 40 cm length. During operation, maximum temperature, temperature difference and flow velocity of Pb-Bi at the specimen were kept at 450, 50 °C, and 1 m/s, respectively. After the test, specimen and components of the loop were cut and examined by optical microscope, SEM, EDX, WDX and X-ray diffraction. Pb-Bi adhered on the surface of the specimen even after Pb-Bi was drained out to the storage tank from the circulating loop. Results differed from a stagnant corrosion test in that the specimen surface became rough and the corrosion rate was maximally 0.1 mm/3000 h. Mass transfer from the high temperature to the lower temperature area was observed: crystals of Fe-Cr were found on the tube surface in the low-temperature region. The sizes of crystals varied from 0.1 to 0.2 mm. The depositing crystals were ferrite grains and the chemical composition ratio (mass%) of Fe to Cr was 9:1.

  11. Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1986-09-01

    A computerized data base of LLW leaching data has been developed. Long-term tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms containing simulated wastes are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms.

  12. Degradation mechanisms and accelerated aging test design

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, R L; Gillen, K T

    1985-01-01

    The fundamental mechanisms underlying the chemical degradation of polymers can change as a function of environmental stress level. When this occurs, it greatly complicates any attempt to use accelerated tests for predicting long-term material degradation behaviors. Understanding how degradation mechanisms can change at different stress levels facilitates both the design and the interpretation of aging tests. Oxidative degradation is a predominant mechanism for many polymers exposed to a variety of different environments in the presence of air, and there are two mechanistic considerations which are widely applicable to material oxidation. One involves a physical process, oxygen diffusion, as a rate-limiting step. This mechanism can predominate at high stress levels. The second is a chemical process, the time-dependent decomposition of peroxide species. This leads to chain branching and can become a rate-controlling factor at lower stress levels involving time-scales applicable to use environments. The authors describe methods for identifying the operation of these mechanisms and illustrate the dramatic influence they can have on the degradation behaviors of a number of polymer types. Several commonly used approaches to accelerated aging tests are discussed in light of the behaviors which result from changes in degradation mechanisms. 9 references, 4 figures.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits or accelerates biomedical titanium corrosion depending on environmental acidity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Addison, Owen; Baker, Stephen J; Davenport, Alison J

    2015-09-01

    Titanium and its alloys are routinely used as biomedical implants and are usually considered to be corrosion resistant under physiological conditions. However, during inflammation, chemical modifications of the peri-implant environment including acidification occur. In addition certain biomolecules including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls and driver of inflammation have been shown to interact strongly with Ti and modify its corrosion resistance. Gram-negative microbes are abundant in biofilms which form on dental implants. The objective was to investigate the influence of LPS on the corrosion properties of relevant biomedical Ti substrates as a function of environmental acidity. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify Ti dissolution following immersion testing in physiological saline for three common biomedical grades of Ti (ASTM Grade 2, Grade 4 and Grade 5). Complementary electrochemical tests including anodic and cathodic polarisation experiments and potentiostatic measurements were also conducted. All three Ti alloys were observed to behave similarly and ion release was sensitive to pH of the immersion solution. However, LPS significantly inhibited Ti release under the most acidic conditions (pH 2), which may develop in localized corrosion sites, but promoted dissolution at pH 4-7, which would be more commonly encountered physiologically. The observed pattern of sensitivity to environmental acidity of the effect of LPS on Ti corrosion has not previously been reported. LPS is found extensively on the surfaces of skin and mucosal penetrating Ti implants and the findings are therefore relevant when considering the chemical stability of Ti implant surfaces in vivo. PMID:25634122

  14. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits or accelerates biomedical titanium corrosion depending on environmental acidity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Addison, Owen; Baker, Stephen J; Davenport, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are routinely used as biomedical implants and are usually considered to be corrosion resistant under physiological conditions. However, during inflammation, chemical modifications of the peri-implant environment including acidification occur. In addition certain biomolecules including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls and driver of inflammation have been shown to interact strongly with Ti and modify its corrosion resistance. Gram-negative microbes are abundant in biofilms which form on dental implants. The objective was to investigate the influence of LPS on the corrosion properties of relevant biomedical Ti substrates as a function of environmental acidity. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify Ti dissolution following immersion testing in physiological saline for three common biomedical grades of Ti (ASTM Grade 2, Grade 4 and Grade 5). Complementary electrochemical tests including anodic and cathodic polarisation experiments and potentiostatic measurements were also conducted. All three Ti alloys were observed to behave similarly and ion release was sensitive to pH of the immersion solution. However, LPS significantly inhibited Ti release under the most acidic conditions (pH 2), which may develop in localized corrosion sites, but promoted dissolution at pH 4–7, which would be more commonly encountered physiologically. The observed pattern of sensitivity to environmental acidity of the effect of LPS on Ti corrosion has not previously been reported. LPS is found extensively on the surfaces of skin and mucosal penetrating Ti implants and the findings are therefore relevant when considering the chemical stability of Ti implant surfaces in vivo. PMID:25634122

  15. Role of failure-mechanism identification in accelerated testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. M.; Barker, D.; Dasgupta, A.; Arora, A.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerated life testing techniques provide a short-cut method to investigate the reliability of electronic devices with respect to certain dominant failure mechanisms that occur under normal operating conditions. However, accelerated tests have often been conducted without knowledge of the failure mechanisms and without ensuring that the test accelerated the same mechanism as that observed under normal operating conditions. This paper summarizes common failure mechanisms in electronic devices and packages and investigates possible failure mechanism shifting during accelerated testing.

  16. Laboratory test of Newton's second law for small accelerations.

    PubMed

    Gundlach, J H; Schlamminger, S; Spitzer, C D; Choi, K-Y; Woodahl, B A; Coy, J J; Fischbach, E

    2007-04-13

    We have tested the proportionality of force and acceleration in Newton's second law, F=ma, in the limit of small forces and accelerations. Our tests reach well below the acceleration scales relevant to understanding several current astrophysical puzzles such as the flatness of galactic rotation curves, the Pioneer anomaly, and the Hubble acceleration. We find good agreement with Newton's second law at accelerations as small as 5 x 10(-14) m/s(2). PMID:17501332

  17. Laboratory Test of Newton's Second Law for Small Accelerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach, J. H.; Schlamminger, S.; Spitzer, C. D.; Choi, K.-Y.; Woodahl, B. A.; Coy, J. J.; Fischbach, E.

    2007-04-13

    We have tested the proportionality of force and acceleration in Newton's second law, F=ma, in the limit of small forces and accelerations. Our tests reach well below the acceleration scales relevant to understanding several current astrophysical puzzles such as the flatness of galactic rotation curves, the Pioneer anomaly, and the Hubble acceleration. We find good agreement with Newton's second law at accelerations as small as 5x10{sup -14} m/s{sup 2}.

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad aluminum 2024-T3 and characterization of effects of corrosion on AE source events and material tensile properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Natarajan, Shridhar

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion damage affects structural integrity and deteriorates material properties of aluminum alloys in aircraft structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) is an effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique for monitoring such damages and predicting failure in large structures of an aircraft. For successful interpretation of data from AE monitoring, sources of AE and factors affecting it need to be identified. This paper presents results of AE monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad Aluminum 2024-T3 test specimens, and characterization of the effects of strain-rate and corrosion damage on material tensile properties and AE source events. Effect of corrosion was studied by inducing corrosion in the test specimens by accelerated corrosion testing in a Q-Fog accelerated corrosion chamber for 12 weeks. Eight (8) masked dog-bone shaped specimens were placed in the accelerated corrosion chamber at the beginning of the test. Two (2) dog-bone shaped specimens were removed from the corrosion chamber after exposure time of 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks respectively, and subjected to tension testing till specimen failure along with AE monitoring, as well as two (2) reference samples not exposed to corrosion. Material tensile properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, toughness, and elongation) obtained from tension test and AE parameters obtained from AE monitoring were analyzed and characterized. AE parameters increase with increase in exposure period of the specimens in the corrosive environment. Aluminum 2024-T3 is an acoustically silent material during tensile deformation without any damage. Acoustic emission events increase with increase of corrosion damage and with increase in strain rate above a certain value. Thus AE is suitable for structural health monitoring of corrosion damage. Ultimate tensile strength, toughness and elongation values decrease with increase of exposure period in corrosion chamber.

  19. LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.

    2010-12-16

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development

  20. Rapid electrochemical screening of engine coolants. Correlation of electrochemical potentiometric measurements with ASTM D 1384 glassware corrosion test

    SciTech Connect

    Doucet, G.P.; Jackson, J.M.; Kriegel, O.A.; Passwater, D.K.; Prieto, N.E.

    1999-08-01

    Engine coolants are typically subjected to comprehensive performance evaluations that involve multiple laboratory and field tests. These tests can take several weeks to conduct and can be expensive. The tests can involve everything from preliminary chemical screening to long term fleet tests. An important test conducted at the beginning of coolant formula development to screen the corrosion performance of engine coolants is described in ASTM D 1384. If the coolant formula passes the test, it is then subjected to more rigorous testing. Conducting the test described in ASTM D 1384 takes two weeks, and determining the coolant corrosion performance under several test parameters can takes resources and time that users seldom have. Therefore, it is very desirable to have tests that can be used for rapid screening and quality assurance of coolants. The purpose of this study was to conduct electrochemical tests that can ultimately be used for quick initial screening of engine coolants. The specific intent of the electrochemical tests is to use ASTM D 1384 as a model and to attempt to duplicate its results. Implementation of the electrochemical tests could accelerate the process of selecting promising coolant formulas and reduce coolant evaluation time and cost. Various electrochemical tests were conducted to determine the corrosion performance of several engine coolant formulas. The test results were compared to those obtained from the ASTM D 1384 test. These tests were conducted on the same metal specimens and under similar conditions as those used in the ASTM D 1384 test. The electrochemical tests included the determination of open circuit potential (OCP) for the various metal specimens, anodic and cathodic polarization curves for the various metal specimens, corrosion rate for metal specimens involved in a galvanic triad, and critical pitting potential (CPP) for aluminum (pitting of aluminum engine components and cooling systems is a cause for concern). The details for

  1. Accelerated Strength Testing of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Constant ramp strength tests on unidirectional thermoplastic composite specimens oriented in the 90 deg. direction were conducted at constant temperatures ranging from 149 C to 232 C. Ramp rates spanning 5 orders of magnitude were tested so that failures occurred in the range from 0.5 sec. to 24 hrs. (0.5 to 100,000 MPa/sec). Below 204 C, time-temperature superposition held allowing strength at longer times to be estimated from strength tests at shorter times but higher temperatures. The data indicated that a 50% drop in strength might be expected for this material when the test time is increased by 9 orders of magnitude. The shift factors derived from compliance data applied well to the strength results. To explain the link between compliance and strength, a viscoelastic fracture model was investigated. The model, which used compliance as input, was found to fit the strength data only if the critical fracture energy was allowed to vary with temperature reduced stress rate. This variation in the critical parameter severely limits its use in developing a robust time-dependent strength model. The significance of this research is therefore seen as providing both the indication that a more versatile acceleration method for strength can be developed and the evidence that such a method is needed.

  2. Hurricane Isabel gives accelerators a severe test

    SciTech Connect

    Swapan Chattopadhyay

    2004-01-01

    Hurricane Isabel was at category five--the most violent on the Saffir-Simpson scale of hurricane strength--when it began threatening the central Atlantic seaboard of the US. Over the course of several days, precautions against the extreme weather conditions were taken across the Jefferson Lab site in south-east Virginia. On 18 September 2003, when Isabel struck North Carolina's Outer Banks and moved northward, directly across the region around the laboratory, the storm was still quite destructive, albeit considerably reduced in strength. The flood surge and trees felled by wind substantially damaged or even devastated buildings and homes, including many belonging to Jefferson Lab staff members. For the laboratory itself, Isabel delivered an unplanned and severe challenge in another form: a power outage that lasted nearly three-and-a-half days, and which severely tested the robustness of Jefferson Lab's two superconducting machines, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the superconducting radiofrequency ''driver'' accelerator of the laboratory's free-electron laser. Robustness matters greatly for science at a time when microwave superconducting linear accelerators (linacs) are not only being considered, but in some cases already being built for projects such as neutron sources, rare-isotope accelerators, innovative light sources and TeV-scale electron-positron linear colliders. Hurricane Isabel interrupted a several-week-long maintenance shutdown of CEBAF, which serves nuclear and particle physics and represents the world's pioneering large-scale implementation of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology. The racetrack-shaped machine is actually a pair of 500-600 MeV SRF linacs interconnected by recirculation arc beamlines. CEBAF delivers simultaneous beams at up to 6 GeV to three experimental halls. An imminent upgrade will double the energy to 12 GeV and add an extra hall for ''quark confinement'' studies. On a smaller scale

  3. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  4. Electrode holder useful in a corrosion testing device

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J.; Jamison, Dale E.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for holding one or more test electrodes of precisely known exposed surface area. The present invention is particularly useful in a device for determining the corrosion properties of the materials from which the test electrodes have been formed. The present invention relates to a device and method for holding the described electrodes wherein the exposed surface area of the electrodes is only infinitesimally decreased. Further, in the present invention the exposed, electrically conductive surface area of the contact devices is small relative to the test electrode surface area. The holder of the present invention conveniently comprises a device for contacting and engaging each test electrode at two point contacts infinitesimally small in relation to the exposed surface area of the electrodes.

  5. Electrode holder useful in a corrosion testing device

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, R.J. Jr.; Jamison, D.E.

    1986-08-19

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for holding one or more test electrodes of precisely known exposed surface area. The present invention is particularly useful in a device for determining the corrosion properties of the materials from which the test electrodes have been formed. The present invention relates to a device and method for holding the described electrodes wherein the exposed surface area of the electrodes is only infinitesimally decreased. Further, in the present invention the exposed, electrically conductive surface area of the contact devices is small relative to the test electrode surface area. The holder of the present invention conveniently comprises a device for contacting and engaging each test electrode at two point contacts infinitesimally small in relation to the exposed surface area of the electrodes. 4 figs.

  6. Operational experience on the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1994-09-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is a laser-electron linear accelerator complex designed to provide high brightness beams for testing of advanced acceleration concepts and high power pulsed photon sources. Results of electron beam parameters attained during the commissioning of the nominally 45 MeV energy machine are presented.

  7. Chexal-Horowitz flow-accelerated corrosion model -- Parameters and influences

    SciTech Connect

    Chexal, V.K.; Horowitz, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) continues to cause problems in nuclear and fossil power plants. Thinning caused by FAC has lead to many leaks and complete ruptures. These failures have required costly repairs and occasionally have caused lengthy shutdowns. To deal with FAC, utilities have instituted costly inspection and piping replacement programs. Typically, a nuclear unit will inspect about 100 large bore piping components plus additional small bore components during every refueling outage. To cope with FAC, there has been a great deal of research and development performed to obtain a greater understanding of the phenomenon. Currently, there is general agreement on the mechanism of FAC. This understanding has lead to the development of computer based tools to assist utility engineers in dealing with this issue. In the United States, the most commonly used computer program to predict and control is CHECWORKS{trademark}. This paper presents a description of the mechanism of FAC, and introduces the predictive algorithms used in CHECWORKS{trademark}. The parametric effects of water chemistry, materials, flow and geometry as predicted by CHECWORKS{trademark} will then be discussed. These trends will be described and explained by reference to the corrosion mechanism. The remedial actions possible to reduce the rate of damage caused by FAC will also be discussed.

  8. Advanced Beamline Design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  9. Development of an accelerated leach test(s) for low-level waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.R.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1985-01-01

    An accelerated leach test(s) is being developed to predict long-term leaching behavior of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) forms in their disposal environments. As necessary background, a literature survey of reported leaching mechanisms, available mathematical models and factors that affect leaching of LLW forms has been compiled. Mechanisms which have been identified include diffusion, dissolution, ion exchange, corrosion and surface effects. A computerized data base of LLW leaching data and mathematical models is being developed. The data is being used for model evaluation by curve fitting and statistical analysis according to standard procedures of statistical quality control. Long-term leach tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms. Initial results on the effect of temperature on leachability indicate that the leach rates of cement and VES waste forms increase with increasing temperature, whereas, the leach rate of bitumen is little affected. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  10. A rapid stress-corrosion test for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfrich, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Stressed alloy specimens are immersed in a salt-dichromate solution at 60 degrees C. Because of the minimal general corrosion of these alloys in this solution, stress corrosion failures are detected by low-power microscopic examination.

  11. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings was exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy are being exposed for 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after approximately 4,400 hours of exposure.

  12. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  13. Relationships between stress corrosion cracking tests and utility operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Allen

    1999-10-22

    Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking databases are synthesized with the view of identifying the crevice chemistry that is most consistent with the plant cracking data. Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be inconsistent with the large variations in the observed SCC between different plants, different support plates within a plant, and different crevice locations. While the eddy current response of laboratory tests performed with caustic chemistries approximates the response of the most extensively affected steam generator tubes, the crack propagation kinetics in these tests differ horn plant experience. The observations suggest that there is a gradual conversion of the environment responsible for most steam generator ODSCC from a concentrated, alkaline-forming solution to a progressively more steam-enriched environment.

  14. Acceptance Test Report for Fourth-Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-10-23

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation.

  15. Preliminary tests of the electrostatic plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.; Acker, T.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the results of a program to verify an electrostatic plasma acceleration concept and to identify those parameters most important in optimizing an Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) thruster based upon this thrust mechanism. Preliminary performance measurements of thrust, specific impulse and efficiency were obtained using a unique plasma exhaust momentum probe. Reliable EPA thruster operation was achieved using one power supply.

  16. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Ambrosek, James W.; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark H.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Gray, Joshua; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion inmore » graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.« less

  17. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Ambrosek, James W.; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark H.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Gray, Joshua; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion in graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.

  18. Behavior of painted steel and aluminum sheet in laboratory corrosion tests

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, H.E.

    1995-11-01

    Cold rolled steel, electrogalvanized steel (60 g/m{sup 2} coating), and three aluminum-alloy (2036, 5182, and 6111) sheet products were painted with a full automotive paint system. These materials were tested in two laboratory cyclic corrosion test environments, namely, GM9540Ps(B) and CCT-4. Resistance to cosmetic corrosion was measured in terms of underfilm paint delamination on scribed, flat panels. Crevice corrosion resistance was determined in terms of pitting on lapped panels of like materials, and galvanic corrosion resistance in terms of pitting on lapped panels of unlike materials. Cosmetic corrosion of the aluminum alloys was found to be much better than that of cold rolled, and slightly better than that of electrogalvanized steel. The CCT-IV test was found to be more severe than GM9540P(B) for cosmetic corrosion, but GM9540P(B) was more severe for galvanic corrosion. Galvanic current measurements indicate that the difference is related to the salt solutions used in each test. Aluminum alloys were found to be prone to crevice corrosion and to galvanic corrosion when coupled to steel. These results indicate that comparative evaluations of the corrosion resistance of these materials must take into account the possibility of crevice and galvanic effects.

  19. Corrosion test on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curtis, P.G.

    1996-01-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials in order to assist in selecting materials for package design and to help in designing longer-term corrosion tests. The corrosion solution was buffered near pH4, was in contact with air, and contained chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron absorber elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron absorber elements were studied.

  20. Effect of Ultrasonic Peening and Accelerated Corrosion Exposure on the Residual Stress Distribution in Welded Marine Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    Specimens of DH36 marine steel were prepared with welded attachments. Residual stress measurements were made on the samples as-welded, following an ultrasonic peening treatment, and following accelerated corrosion exposure after ultrasonic peening. Neutron diffraction and the contour method were used for determining the residual stress profiles. The welding introduces tensile near-surface residual stress, approaching the material yield strength, and the ultrasonic peening overlays this with a compressive residual stress. Material removal by corrosion decreases the peak surface compressive stress slightly, by removal of a layer of stressed material, but does not cause significant redistribution of the residual stress profile.

  1. Attachment of Listeria monocytogenes to an austenitic stainless steel after welding and accelerated corrosion treatments.

    PubMed

    Mai, Tam L; Sofyan, Nofrijon I; Fergus, Jeffrey W; Gale, William F; Conner, Donald E

    2006-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels, widely used in food processing, undergo microstructural changes during welding, resulting in three distinctive zones: weld metal, heat-affected zone, and base metal. This research was conducted to determine the attachment of Listeria monocytogenes in these three zones before and after exposure to a corrosive environment. All experiments were done with tungsten inert gas welding of type 304 stainless steel. The four welding treatments were large or small beads with high or low heat. After welding, all surfaces were polished to an equivalent surface finish. A 10-microl droplet of an L. monocytogenes suspension was placed on the test surfaces. After 3 h at 23 degrees C, the surfaces were washed and prepared for scanning electron microscopy, which was used to determine attachment of L. monocytogenes by counting cells remaining on each test surface. In general, bacteria were randomly distributed on each surface type. However, differences in surface area of inoculum due to differences in interfacial energy (as manifested by the contact angle) were apparent and required normalization of bacterial count data. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in numbers of bacteria on the three surface zones. However, after exposure to the corrosive medium, numbers of bacteria on the three zones were higher (P < 0.05) than those on the corresponding zones of noncorroded surfaces. For the corroded surfaces, bacterial counts on the base metal were lower (P < 0.05) than those on heat-affected and weld zones. PMID:16865881

  2. Letter report on PCT/Monolith glass ceramic corrosion tests

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Charles L.

    2015-09-24

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is collaborating with personnel from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to study advanced waste form glass ceramics for immobilization of waste from Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) separations processes. The glass ceramic waste forms take advantage of both crystalline and glassy phases where ‘troublesome’ elements (e.g., low solubility in glass or very long-lived) partition to highly durable ceramic phases with the remainder of elements residing in the glassy phase. The ceramic phases are tailored to create certain minerals or unique crystalline structures that can host the radionuclides by binding them in their specific crystalline network while not adversely impacting the residual glass network (Crum et al., 2011). Glass ceramics have been demonstrated using a scaled melter test performed in a pilot scale (1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) (Crum et al., 2014; Maio et al., 2015). This report summarizes recent results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving crucible fabrication and corrosion testing of glass ceramics using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Preliminary results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving statistically designed matrices have previously been reported (Crawford, 2013; Crawford, 2014).

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium cladding tubes: I. Proximate local SCC testing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhnov, A. B.; Belov, V. A.; Nikulin, S. A.; Khanzhin, V. G.

    2010-10-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) methods of testing zirconium cladding tubes are analyzed. A proximate method is proposed for estimating SCC of fuel claddings claddings in a iodine-containing environment with a limited contact zone between a metal and corrosive medium and simultaneous measurement of acoustic emission (AE) from forming corrosion defects. Criteria of estimating the SCC resistance of the tubes are proposed from measured AE and corrosion damage of the tube material. The results of local SCC tests of cladding tubes of E110 and E635 zirconium alloys are presented.

  4. Corrosion testing of Type 304L stainless steel for waste tank applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1991-12-31

    AISI Type 304L stainless steel will be the material of construction for hazardous waste storage tanks. The corrosion behavior of 304L was characterized in simulated waste solutions using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and long term immersion tests. The results were correlated to assess the use of corrosion characteristics determined by electrochemical techniques for predicting long term corrosion behavior. The corrosion behaviors of Type A537 carbon steel and Incoloy 825 were also evaluated. A good correlation was found between the results from the electrochemical techniques and the immersion tests.

  5. Corrosion testing of Type 304L stainless steel for waste tank applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    AISI Type 304L stainless steel will be the material of construction for hazardous waste storage tanks. The corrosion behavior of 304L was characterized in simulated waste solutions using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and long term immersion tests. The results were correlated to assess the use of corrosion characteristics determined by electrochemical techniques for predicting long term corrosion behavior. The corrosion behaviors of Type A537 carbon steel and Incoloy 825 were also evaluated. A good correlation was found between the results from the electrochemical techniques and the immersion tests.

  6. Corrosion tests in brine and steam from the Salton Sea KGRA

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.P.; McCawley, F.X.

    1982-03-01

    The Bureau of Mines tested 13 alloys for resistance to general corrosion, pitting corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking in the brine and steam environments produced from geothermal well Magmamax 1 in the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resources Area in California. The tests provided seven process environments. The alloys most resistant to corrosion in all environments were Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, and stainless steel alloy 29-4. Hastelloys G and S were highly resistant to all types of corrosion decreases with time. The stainless steel alloys 430, E-Brite 26-1, and 6X had good resistance to general corrosion but were susceptible to pitting. Unstressed type 316 L stainless steel exhibited severe cracking. The 1020 carbon and 4130 alloy steels were the least resistant.

  7. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  8. Process Test Plan for 4TH Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-06-20

    Instrumentation and cabinets for the 241-AN-107 and 241-AN-102 corrosion monitoring systems will be upgraded in FY 2000. The bulk of the field work involved in this task will involve placement of the corrosion monitoring data collection hardware closer to the risers that house the existing corrosion probes. This will be accomplished by placing a new climate controlled cabinet by the risers containing corrosion probes on these two tanks (one cabinet per tank). Once installed the systems will feed data back to a centralized corrosion monitoring station in the 241-AN-271 instrument building. The upgraded systems will be operated under the bounds of this Process Test Plan (PTP) for six principle reasons. These reasons were established prior to installing the original systems in 1997 (241-AN-107) and 1998 (241-AN-102). They are as follows: (1) Acquire corrosion data on the waste in 241-AN-107 and 241-AN-102. (2) Provide supporting data to the site's Integrity Assessment program. (3) Demonstrate that corrosion monitoring by evaluation of electrochemical noise data is possible in waste tank systems, particularly with regard to the detection of general corrosion and (if present) pitting and stress corrosion cracking. (4) Demonstrate the durability of the design of the corrosion monitoring equipment. (5) Extend tank life and reduce annual operations cost. (6) Provide basis to control corrosion in double shell tanks though the use of direct corrosion monitoring rather than waste sampling and analysis. The designs of the existing corrosion probes in 241-AN-107 and 241-AN-102 were reviewed and documented prior to the original installation activities in 1997 and 1998. Initial programmatic documentation for Hanford's corrosion monitoring program was also established prior to the original installation activities.

  9. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  10. Radiation Protection in the NLC Test Accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Theodore L.; Vylet, Vaclav

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the elements of the design of the NLC Test Accelerator pertaining to ionizing radiation protection and safety. The NLC Test Accelerator is an accelerator physics research facility at SLAC designed to validate 2.6-cm microwave linear accelerator technology for a future high-energy linear collider (the "Next Linear Collider"). The NLC Test Accelerator is designed for average beam power levels up to 1.5 kW, at energies up to 1 GeV (roughly equivalent to 1/500 of an NLC linac). The design for radiation protection incorporates shielding, configuration controls, safety interlock systems for personnel protection and beam containment, and operations procedures. The design was guided by the DOE Accelerator Safety Order, internal Laboratory policy, and the general principle of keeping radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable.

  11. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The 250 C, 200C and 125C accelerated tests are described. The wear-out distributions from the 250 and 200 C tests were used to estimate the activation energy between the two test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear-out region. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three devices types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment is assessed. Guidlines for the development of accelerated life-test conditions are proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life-test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits is described.

  12. Terrestrial Photovoltaic Module Accelerated Test-To-Failure Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.

    2008-03-01

    This technical report documents a test-to-failure protocol that may be used to obtain quantitative information about the reliability of photovoltaic modules using accelerated testing in environmental temperature-humidity chambers.

  13. Pipe degradation investigations for optimization of flow-accelerated corrosion inspection location selection

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Habicht, P.; Chexal, B.; Mahini, R.; McBrine, W.; Esselman, T.; Horowitz, J.

    1995-12-01

    A large amount of piping in a typical nuclear power plant is susceptible to Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) wall thinning to varying degrees. A typical PAC monitoring program includes the wall thickness measurement of a select number of components in order to judge the structural integrity of entire systems. In order to appropriately allocate resources and maintain an adequate FAC program, it is necessary to optimize the selection of components for inspection by focusing on those components which provide the best indication of system susceptibility to FAC. A better understanding of system FAC predictability and the types of FAC damage encountered can provide some of the insight needed to better focus and optimize the inspection plan for an upcoming refueling outage. Laboratory examination of FAC damaged components removed from service at Northeast Utilities` (NU) nuclear power plants provides a better understanding of the damage mechanisms involved and contributing causes. Selected results of this ongoing study are presented with specific conclusions which will help NU to better focus inspections and thus optimize the ongoing FAC inspection program.

  14. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The types and quantities of wear particles generated during accelerated ball rolling contact fatigue tests were determined. Ball specimens were made of AMS 5749, a corrosion resistant, high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a super-refined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.215 times 10 to the 9th power Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear particles were observed; normal rubbing wear particles, fatigue spall particles, spheres, and friction polymer.

  15. ACCELERATED TESTING OF NEUTRON-ABSORBING ALLOYS FOR NUCLEAR CRITICALITY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald E. Mizia

    2011-10-01

    The US Department of Energy requires nuclear criticality control materials be used for storage of highly enriched spent nuclear fuel used in government programs and the storage of commercial spent nuclear fuel at the proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Geological Repository located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Two different metallic alloys (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd and borated stainless steel) have been chosen for this service. An accelerated corrosion test program to validate these materials for this application is described and a performance comparison is made.

  16. Field Test of High Temperature Corrosion Sensors in a Waste to Energy Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Williamson, K.M.

    2008-03-16

    A field trial of electrochemical corrosion rate sensors was conducted over a five month period to monitor fireside corrosion in a waste to energy (WTE) plant. The unique 3-electrode air-cooled corrosion sensors, each including a thermocouple to monitor sensor temperature, were installed in four different ports at approximately the same level of the WTE boiler. A total of twelve sensors were tested, six with electrodes using the carbon steel boiler tube material, and six using the nickel-chromium weld overlay alloy for the electrodes. Corrosion rates and temperatures of the sensors were monitored continuously through the trial. Measurements of sensor thickness loss were used to calibrate the electrochemical corrosion rates. Air cooling of the sensors was found to be necessary in order to bring the sensors to the temperature of the boiler tubes, to better match the corrosion rate of the tubes, and to increase survivability of the sensors and thermocouples. Varying the temperature of the sensors simulated corrosion rates of boiler tubes with steam temperatures above and below that in the actual WTE plant. Temperatures of two of the sensors were successfully held at various controlled temperatures close to the steam temperature for a three hour test period. Corrosion rates of the two materials tested were similar although of different magnitude. An expression relating the corrosion rate of the boiler tube material to the corrosion rate of weld overlay was determined for a 7 day period in the middle of the field trial. Results from the field trial suggest that corrosion rate sensors controlled to the outer waterwall temperature can successfully monitor fireside corrosion in WTE plants and be used as a process control variable by plant operators.

  17. Characterization of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling-element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A ferrographic analysis was used to determine the types and quantities of wear debris generated during accelerated rolling contact fatigue tests. The five-ball rolling contact fatigue tester was used. Ball specimens were made of a corrosion resistant, high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a superrefined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.52 10 to the 9th power Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear debris were observed: (1) normal rubbing wear particles, (2) fatigue microspall particles, (3) spheres, and (4) friction polymer deposits. The characterization of wear debris as a function of time was of limited use in predicting fatigue failures in these accelerated tests.

  18. Field tests of corrosion and chemical sensors for geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Sullivan, R.G.; Mackey, D.B.; Koski, O.H.; McBarron, F.O.; Duce, J.L.; Pierce, D.D.

    1986-03-01

    This report summarizes approximately two years of continuous monitoring of corrosion (and other variables that affect corrosion) in a 10-megawatt binary cycle geothermal power plant. The project goal was to develop methods for detecting adverse plant conditions soon enough to prevent equipment failures. The instruments tested were: (1) resistance-type corrosion probes; (2) linear polarization corrosion probes; (3) oxidation/reduction potential (ORP) probes for oxygen detection; (4) high-temperature pH electrodes; and (5) electrodeless conductivity cells for gas bubble detection.

  19. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy

  20. Acceleration of fatigue tests for built-up titanium components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    A study was made of the feasibility of a room-temperature scheme of accelerating fatigue tests for Mach 3 advanced supersonic transport aircraft. The test scheme used equivalent room-temperature cycles calculated for supersonic flight conditions. Verification tests were conducted using specimens representing titanium wing lower surface structure. Test-acceleration parameters were developed for the test with an auxiliary test set. Five specimens were tested with a flight-by-flight load and temperature spectrum to simulate typical Mach 3 operation. Two additional sets of five specimens were tested at room temperature to evaluate the test-acceleration scheme. The fatigue behavior of the specimens generally correlated well with the proposed correction method.

  1. Beam Physics of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; Danilov, V.V.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    Fermilab's Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron storage ring designed for testing advanced accelerator physics concepts, including implementation of nonlinear integrable beam optics and experiments on optical stochastic cooling. The machine is currently under construction at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. In this report we present the goals and the current status of the project, and describe the details of machine design. In particular, we concentrate on numerical simulations setting the requirements on the design and supporting the choice of machine parameters.

  2. Microencapsulation of Corrosion Indicators for Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.; Calle, Luz M.; Hanna,Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous detection, indication, and control of corrosion is been developed based on microencapsulation technology. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed for early detection and indication of corrosion when incorporated into a smart coating. Results from experiments designed to test the ability of the microcapsules to detect and indicate corrosion, when blended into several paint systems, show that these experimental coatings generate a color change, indicative of spot specific corrosion events, that can be observed with the naked eye within hours rather than the hundreds of hours or months typical of the standard accelerated corrosion test protocols.. Key words: smart coating, corrosion detection, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH-sensitive microcapsule, corrosion indicator, corrosion sensing paint

  3. Thermal barrier coatings: Burner rig hot corrosion test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Stecura, S.; Gedwill, M. A.; Zaplatynsky, I.; Levine, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    A Mach 0.3 burner rig test program was conducted to examine the sensitivity of thermal barrier coatings to Na and V contaminated combustion gases simulating potential utility gas turbine environments. Coating life of the standard ZrO2-12Y2O3/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y NASA thermal barrier coating system which was developed for aircraft gas turbines was significantly reduced in such environments. Two thermal barrier coating systems, Ca2SiO4/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y and ZrO2-8Y2O3/Ni-16.4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y and a less insulative cermet coating system, 50 volume percent MgO-50 volume percent Ni-19.6Cr-17.1Al-0.97Y/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y, were identified as having much improved corrosion resistance compared to the standard coating.

  4. Corrosion testing in flash tanks of kraft pulp mills

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-11-01

    The corrosion observed in the first flash tanks in kraft pulp mills with modified cooking practices was characterized. Coupons of carbon steel (CS), several stainless steels (SS), and Ti were exposed at two mills. At one mill, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the No. 1 and No. 2 flash tank. At the other mill, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank No. 1. The results of the exposures showed that both CS and Ti suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the SS suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the corrosion resistance in the flash tank was the same that would be expected in a reducing acid environment. Attack by organic acids was concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  5. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Corrosion Test Report (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, W. C.; Fritz, R. L.

    1993-12-27

    This report documents the results of the corrosion tests that were performed to aid in the selection of the construction materials for multi-function waste tanks to be built in the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Two alloys were tested: 304L and Alloy 20 austenitic stainless steel. The test media were aqueous solutions formulated to represent the extreme of the chemical compositions of waste to be stored in the tanks. The results summerized by alloy are as follows: For 304L the tests showed no stress-corrosion cracking in any of the nine test solutions. The tests showed pitting in on of the solutions. There were no indications of any weld heat-tint corrosion, nor any sign of preferential corrosion in the welded areas. For Alloy 20 the tests showed no general, pitting, or stress-corrosion cracking. One crevice corrosion coupon cracked at the web between a hole and the edge of the coupon in one of the solutions. Mechanical tests showed some possible crack extension in the same solution. Because of the failure of both alloys to meet test acceptance criteria, the tank waste chemistry will have to be restricted or an alternative alloy tested.

  6. Behavior of painted steel and aluminum sheet in laboratory automotive corrosion tests

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    Because of environmental concern and government pressure, automakers are exploring ways to increase the fuel economy of vehicles. Mass reduction can be achieved by substituting plastics, aluminum, or high-strength steel for ordinary grades of steel in the autobody. Estimates of fuel economy increases range from 3% to 7% for each 10% reduction in mass. The use of aluminum for mass reduction currently is receiving considerable attention. Cold-rolled steel, electrogalvanized steel (60 g/m{sup 2} coating), and three aluminum alloy sheet products (Al 2036, Al 5182, and Al 6111) were painted with a full automotive paint system. These materials were tested in two laboratory cyclic corrosion test environments, GM9540P(B) and CCT-IV. Resistance to cosmetic corrosion was measured in terms of underfilm paint delamination on scribed, flat panels. Crevice corrosion resistance was determined in terms of pitting on lapped panels of like materials, and galvanic corrosion resistance was determined in terms of pitting on lapped panels of unlike materials. Cosmetic corrosion of the aluminum alloys was found to be much better than that of cold-rolled steel and slightly better than that of electrogalvanized steel. The CCT-IV test was found to be more severe than GM9540P(B) for cosmetic corrosion, but GM9540P(B) was more severe for galvanic corrosion. Galvanic current measurements indicated the difference was related to the salt solutions used in each test. The aluminum alloys were prone to crevice corrosion and to galvanic corrosion when coupled to steel. Results indicated that comparative evaluations of the corrosion resistance of these materials must take into account the possibility of crevice and galvanic effects.

  7. Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

    1998-02-01

    Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

  8. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A.

    1998-06-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

  9. Evaluating the effects of test methods and fluids compositions on the performance of corrosion inhibitors electrochemically

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.J.

    1999-11-01

    In an attempt to answer the question ``can carbon steel be adequately protected from corrosion by use of corrosion inhibitors due to the high CO{sub 2} concentration``, the authors initiated a project to identify the best commercial corrosion inhibitor by conducting a series of performance evaluation tests. They solicited the inhibitors from various chemical suppliers and evaluated their performance using various test methods in test fluid compositions simulating field conditions. Inhibitor performance was evaluated using electrochemical techniques including EIS and DC in the Rotating Cylinder Electrode (RCE) system and the conventional weight loss methods. Various tests were conducted for the purpose of determining the effect of velocity, chemical partition, and dispersibility on inhibitor performance in various test fluids. Physical characteristics testing including emulsion tendency and brine dispersibility were also conducted. Results show that some commercial corrosion inhibitors can be used to protect carbon steel in high CO{sub 2} concentration. There are significant performance differences among commercial products in various test methods and fluid compositions. Results show the importance of multiple performance evaluations when selecting corrosion inhibitors for particular field applications. An inhibitor that out performs others under various testing conditions would have a much greater chance to protect against corrosion in the field.

  10. Corrosion coupon testing in natural waters: A case history dealing with reverse osmosis desalination of seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, R.M.; Adamson, W.L.; Weber, B.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes a series of corrosion tests performed to determine the general and localized corrosion behavior of two stainless alloys (UNS S31603 and UNS N08367) and 70/30 CuNi (UNS C71500) in three aqueous environments associated with advanced reverse osmosis (TO) desalination of natural seawater. In addition to seawater (the RO feed stock), the other environments included a 2nd-pass RO brine with lower chloride content and total dissolved solids than raw seawater, and an ultrapure 3rd-pass permeate. Two ASTM standards were reviewed for guidance in the design of the experiment. Since testing could be conducted in an operating prototype RO system, the test program followed the general procedures for an in-plant corrosion tests described by ASTM G4-95: Standard Guide for Conducting Corrosion Coupon Tests in Field Applications. This standard, along with G78-95: Standard Guide for Crevice Corrosion Testing of Iron-Base and Nickel-Base Alloys in Seawater and Other Chloride-Containing Environments, provided guidance in the selection of test specimens and mounting fixtures as well as crevice formers utilized. The G78-95 standard guide also provided considerations associated with the interpretation of the crevice corrosion test results.

  11. Testing pulse forming networks with DARHT accelerator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, E. A.; Dalmas, D. A.; Downing, J. N. , Jr.; Temple, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility [DARHT] at Los Alamos will use two induction linacs to produce high-energy electron beams. The electron beams will be used to generate x-rays from bremsstrahlung targets. The x-rays will be used to produce radiographs. The first accelerator is operational now, generating a 60-nanosecond electron beam. The second accelerator is under construction. It will generate a 2-microsecond electron beam. The 78 induction cells of the second axis accelerator will be driven by an equal number of pulse forming networks. Each pulse forming network [PFN] generates a nominal 200-kV, 2-microsecond pulse to drive an accelerator cell. Each pulse forming network consists of a set of four equal-capacitance sub-PFN's, stacked in a Marx configuration. The PFN Test Stand was configured to test newly constructed accelerator cells under conditions of full voltage and pulse duration. The PFN Test Stand also explored jitter, prefire and reliability issues for a pulse forming network operated into a purely resistive load. The PFN Test Stand provided experience operating a simple subsystem of the DARHT accelerator. This subsystem involved controls, diagnostics, data acquisition and archival, power supplies, trigger systems, core reset and a gas flow system for the spark gaps. Issues for the DARHT accelerator were investigated in this small-scale facility.

  12. TESTING PULSE FORMING NETWORKS WITH DARHT ACCELERATOR CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. ROSE; D.A. DALMAS; J.N. DOWNING; R.D. TEMPLE

    2001-06-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility [DARHT] at Los Alamos will use two induction linacs to produce high-energy electron beams. The electron beams will be used to generate x-rays from bremsstrahlung targets. The x-rays will be used to produce radiographs. The first accelerator is operational now, generating a 60- nanosecond electron beam. The second accelerator is under construction. It will generate a 2-microsecond electron beam. The 78 induction cells of the second axis accelerator will be driven by an equal number of pulse forming networks. Each pulse forming network [PFN] generates a nominal 200-kV, 2-microsecond pulse to drive an accelerator cell. Each pulse forming network consists of a set of four equal-capacitance sub-PFN's, stacked in a Marx configuration. The PFN Test Stand was configured to test newly constructed accelerator cells under conditions of full voltage and pulse duration. The PFN Test Stand also explored jitter, prefire and reliability issues for a pulse forming network operated into a purely resistive load. The PFN Test Stand provided experience operating a simple subsystem of the DARHT accelerator. This subsystem involved controls, diagnostics, data acquisition and archival, power supplies, trigger systems, core reset and a gas flow system for the spark gaps. Issues for the DARHT accelerator were investigated in this small-scale facility.

  13. Accelerated battery-life testing - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J.; Thomas, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Test program, employing empirical, statistical and physical methods, determines service life and failure probabilities of electrochemical cells and batteries, and is applicable to testing mechanical, electrical, and chemical devices. Data obtained aids long-term performance prediction of battery or cell.

  14. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerated life tests were performed on CMOS microcircuits to predict their long term reliability. The consistency of the CMOS microcircuit activation energy between the range of 125 C to 200 C and the range 200 C to 250 C was determined. Results indicate CMOS complexity and the amount of moisture detected inside the devices after testing influences time to failure of tested CMOS devices.

  15. Accelerator Tests of the KLEM Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, P.; Baranova, N.; Christl, M.; Chilingarian, A.; Chupin, I.; Derrickson, J.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.

    2003-01-01

    The Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter (KLEM) device is planned for direct measurement of the elemental energy spectra of high-energy (10(exp 11)-10(exp 16) eV) cosmic rays. The first KLEM prototype has been tested at CERN with 180 GeV pion beam in 2001. A modified KLEM prototype will be tested in proton and heavy ion beams to give more experimental data on energy resolution and charge resolution with KLEM method. The first test results are presented and compared with simulations.

  16. Development and testing of a low toxicity acid corrosion inhibitor for industrial cleaning applications

    SciTech Connect

    Frenier, W.W.

    1997-02-01

    A low toxicity corrosion inhibitor used in hydrochloric acid cleaning formulations has been developed. This formulation does not contain formaldehyde. It contains cinnamaldehyde, quaternary nitrogen salts, and a nonionic surfactant, none of which are currently known or suspected to be carcinogens. In laboratory tests, corrosion protection values were equivalent to those provided by current commercial acid inhibitors. Field tests using the low toxicity inhibitor were conducted.

  17. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  18. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This report covers the time period from May 1976 to December 1979 and encompasses the three phases of accelerated testing: Phase 1, the 250 C testing; Phase 2, the 200 C testing; and Phase 3, the 125 C testing. The duration of the test in Phase 1 and Phase 2 was sufficient to take the devices into the wear out region. The wear out distributions were used to estimate the activation energy between the 250 C and the 200 C test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test, 20,000 hours, was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear out region; consequently the third data point at 125 C for determining the consistency of activation energy could not be obtained. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three device types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment was assessed. Guidelines for the development of accelerated life test conditions were proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits was explored in Phase 4 of this study and is attached as an appendix to this report.

  19. Multisystem corrosion monitoring in a cyclic reheat test facility: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, D.M.; Cox, W.M.; Gearey, D.

    1988-04-01

    The work described in this report was the first stage of an EPRI-sponsored corrosion investigation utilizing the CAPCIS electrochemical monitoring system installed in a cyclic reheat test facility on a flue gas slipstream at the Scholz Steam Plant of Gulf Power Company. The primary reasons for incorporating the continuous corrosion monitoring system in the cyclic reheat investigation were that unexpectedly high corrosion rates had been observed in earlier tests at certain locations within the test exchanger and the precise reasons for these high rates of attack were not well understood. The corrosion behavior was not typical of the limited service experience on full scale units and the reasons for this required clarification. Controlled temperature weight loss and electrochemical probes were installed in the unit in place of three of the 1-inch diameter heat exchanger tubes. The corrosion behavior of Inconel Alloy 625 over the temperature range 260/degree/ to 120/degree/F (127/degree/ to 49/degree/C) was evaluated at mid-stream and sidewall locations. The efects on corrosion of operational variables and cleaning procedures were also evaluated. The severe corrosion attack sustained on the Inconel Alloy 625 was proved to result from a combination of effects which included the flue gas flow pattern, local cool-spots within the unit and preferential locations at which ash deposits could accumulate. 5 refs., 50 figs., 17 tabs.

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TEST RESULTS FOR TANK 241-SY-102 SUPERNATE GRAB SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-04-09

    This report describes the electrochemical corrosion scans and conditions for testing of SY-102 supernatant samples taken December 2004. The testing was performed because the tank was under a Justification for Continued Operation allowing the supernatant composition to be outside the chemistry limits of Administrative Control 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation program'. A new electrochemical working electrode of A516 Grade 60 carbon steel was used for each scan; all scans were measured against a saturated calomel electrode, with carbon counter electrodes, and all scans were carried out at 50 C. The samples were scanned twice, once as received and once sparged with argon to deoxygenate the sample. For those scans conducted after argon purging, the corrosion rates ranged from 0.012 to 0.019 mpy. A test for stress corrosion cracking was carried out on one sample (2SY-04-07) with negative results.

  1. Method for the Accelerated Testing of the Durability of a Construction Binder using the Arrhenius Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrichová, Marcela; Dvořák, Karel; Gazdič, Dominik

    2016-03-01

    The single most reliable indicator of a material's durability is its performance in long-term tests, which cannot always be carried out due to a limited time budget. The second option is to perform some kind of accelerated durability tests. The aim of the work described in this article was to develop a method for the accelerated durability testing of binders. It was decided that the Arrhenius equation approach and the theory of chemical reaction kinetics would be applied in this case. The degradation process has been simplified to a single quantifiable parameter, which became compressive strength. A model hydraulic binder based on fluidised bed combustion ash (FBC ash) was chosen as the test subject for the development of the method. The model binder and its hydration products were tested by high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis. The main hydration product of this binder was ettringite. Due to the thermodynamic instability of this mineral, it was possible to verify the proposed method via long term testing. In order to accelerate the chemical reactions in the binder, four combinations of two temperatures (65 and 85°C) and two different relative humidities (14 and 100%) were used. The upper temperature limit was chosen because of the results of the high-temperature x-ray testing of the ettringite's decomposition. The calculation formulae for the accelerated durability tests were derived on the basis of data regarding the decrease in compressive strength under the conditions imposed by the four above-mentioned combinations. The mineralogical composition of the binder after degradation was also described. The final degradation product was gypsum under dry conditions and monosulphate under wet conditions. The validity of the method and formula was subsequently verified by means of long-term testing. A very good correspondence between the calculated and real values was achieved. The deviation of these values did not exceed 5 %. The designed and verified method

  2. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  3. Earth Scanner Bearing Accelerated Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Brian J.; VanDyk, Steven G.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2000-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) optical instrument for NASA Goddard will measure biological and physical processes on the Earth's surface and in the lower atmosphere. A key component of the instrument is an extremely accurate scan mirror motor/encoder assembly. Of prime concern in the performance and reliability of the scan motor/encoder is bearing selection and lubrication. This paper describes life testing of the bearings and lubrication selected for the program.

  4. Preliminary description of the ground test accelerator cryogenic cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) under construction at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is part of the Neutral Particle Beam Program supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office. The GTA is a full-sized test facility to evaluate the feasibility of using a negative ion accelerator to produce a neutral particle beam (NPB). The NPB would ultimately be used outside the earth's atmosphere as a target discriminator or as a directed energy weapon. The operation of the GTA at cryogenic temperature is advantageous for two reasons: first, the decrease of temperature caused a corresponding decrease in the rf heating of the copper in the various units of the accelerator, and second, at the lower temperature the decrease in the thermal expansion coefficient also provides greater thermal stability and consequently, better operating stability for the accelerator. This paper discusses the cryogenic cooling system needed to achieve these advantages. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Accelerated Durability Testing of Electrochromic Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C. E.; Zhang, J. G.; Benson, D. K.; Czanderna, A. W.; Deb, S. K.

    1998-12-29

    Prototype electrochromic windows made by several different U.S. companies have been tested in our laboratory for their long-term durability. Samples were subjected to alternate coloring and bleaching voltage cycles while exposed to simulated on 1-sun irradiance in a temperature-controlled environmental chamber with low relative humidity. The samples inside the chamber were tested under a matrix of different conditions. These conditions include: cycling at different temperatures (65 C, 85 C, and 107 C) under the irradiance, cycling versus no-cycling under the same irradiance and temperature, testing with different voltage waveforms and duty cycles with the same irradiance and temperature, cycling under various filtered irradiance intensities, and simple thermal exposure with no irradiance or cycling. The electro-optical characteristics of the samples were measured between 350 and 1,100 nm every 4,000 cycles for up to 20,000 cycles. Photographs of the samples were taken periodically wi th a digital camera to record cosmetic defects, the extent of residual coloration, and overall coloration and bleaching uniformity of the samples. Our results indicate that the most important cause of degradation is the combination of continuous cycling, elevated temperature, and irradiance. The relative importance of these variables, when considered synergistically or separately, depends on the particular device materials and design.

  6. The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab: Science Program

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe; Harms, Elvin; Henderson, Stuart; Leibfritz, Jerry; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Valishev, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) currently in commissioning phase at Fermilab is foreseen to support a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop novel approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation. ASTA incorporates a superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) linac coupled to a flexible high-brightness photoinjector. The facility also includes a small-circumference storage ring capable of storing electrons or protons. This report summarizes the facility capabilities, and provide an overview of the accelerator-science researches to be enabled.

  7. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D

  8. Evaluation of an Accelerated ELDRS Test Using Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, Ronald L.; Adell, Philippe C.; Rax, Bernard; McClure, Steven; Barnaby, Hugh J.; Kruckmeyer, Kirby; Triggs, B.

    2011-01-01

    An accelerated total ionizing dose (TID) hardness assurance test for enhanced low dose rate sensitive (ELDRS) bipolar linear circuits, using high dose rate tests on parts that have been exposed to molecular hydrogen, has been proposed and demonstrated on several ELDRS part types. In this study several radiation-hardened "ELDRS-free" part types have been tested using this same approach to see if the test is overly conservative.

  9. Corrosion tests of canister and overpack materials in simulated basalt groundwater. [Hastelloy G and C-276

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results indicate that the environment expected in a repository in basalt is not highly corrosive to the materials tested. Comparisons of weight change data between two simulated basalt groundwater compositions indicate that variations in oxygen fugacity had a minor effect on corrosion of nickel, titanium, and zirconium alloys. The corrosion of cupronickel alloy, however, was drastically reduced when a lower oxygen fugacity was maintained. Effectiveness of a hydrogen/argon sparge to maintain a low oxygen fugacity in a simulated groundwater was demonstrated. 5 tables.

  10. Preparation and Testing of Corrosion and Spallation-Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2015-11-01

    with the Rene 80. One-inch-diameter buttons were machined from each of the bonded blocks and sent to Siemens for standard oxidation, spallation, and corrosion testing, which should be complete in the spring of 2016.

  11. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING OF TANKS 241-AN-102 & 241-AP-107 & 241-AP-108 IN SUPPORT OF ULTRASONIC TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

    2008-11-20

    This report presents the results of the corrosion rates that were measured using electrochemical methods for tanks 241-AN-102 (AN-102), 241-AP-107 (AP 107), and 241-AP-108 (AP-108) performed under test plant RPP-PLAN-38215. The steel used as materials of construction for AN and AP tank farms was A537 Class 1. Test coupons of A537 Class 1 carbon steel were used for corrosion testing in the AN-107, AP-107, and AP-108 tank waste. Supernate will be tested from AN-102, AP-107, and Ap-108. Saltcake testing was performed on AP-108 only.

  12. Acceptance test plan for the 241-AN-105 multi-function corrosion monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    1999-06-24

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe tree assembly destined for installation into tank 241-AN-105. This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion probe tree assembly to be installed into tank 241-AN-105. The test will consist of a pressure test to verify leak tightness of the probe tree body, a continuity test of the probe tree wiring, a test of the high level detector wiring, a test of the operation of the Type K thermocouples along the probe body, and verification of operation of corrosion monitoring computer and instrumentation.

  13. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W.

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  14. Effects of UV on power degradation of photovoltaic modules in combined acceleration tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Trang; Heta, Yushi; Doi, Takuya; Masuda, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    UV exposure and other factors such as high/low temperature, humidity and mechanical stress have been reported to degrade photovoltaic (PV) module materials. By focusing on the combined effects of UV stress and moisture on PV modules, two new acceleration tests of light irradiation and damp heat (DH) were designed and conducted. The effects of UV exposure were validated through a change in irradiation time (UV dosage) and a change of the light irradiation side (glass side vs backsheet side) in the UV-preconditioned DH and cyclic sequential tests, respectively. The chemical corrosion of finger electrodes in the presence of acetic acid generated from ethylene vinyl acetate used as an encapsulant was considered to be the main origin of degradation. The module performance characterized by electroluminescence images was confirmed to correlate with the measured acetic acid concentration and Ag finger electrode resistance.

  15. Accelerated Testing of Polymeric Composites Using the Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Magid, Becky M.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2000-01-01

    Creep properties of IM7/K3B composite material were obtained using three accelerated test methods at elevated temperatures. Results of flexural creep tests using the dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) were compared with results of conventional tensile and compression creep tests. The procedures of the three test methods are described and the results are presented. Despite minor differences in the time shift factor of the creep compliance curves, the DMA results compared favorably with the results from the tensile and compressive creep tests. Some insight is given into establishing correlations between creep compliance in flexure and creep compliance in tension and compression. It is shown that with careful consideration of the limitations of flexure creep, a viable and reliable accelerated test procedure can be developed using the DMA to obtain the viscoelastic properties of composites in extreme environments.

  16. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1990-01-01

    The design of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is presented including the design goals and computational results. The heart of the system is a radiofrequency electron gun utilizing a photo-excited metal cathode followed by a conventional electron linac. The Nd:YAG laser used to drive the cathode with 6 ps long pulses can be synchronized to a high peak power CO{sub 2} laser in order to study laser acceleration of electrons. Current operational status of the project will be presented along with early beam tests.

  17. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximow, B.

    1976-01-01

    An accelerated life test of sufficient duration to generate a minimum of 50% cumulative failures in lots of CMOS devices was conducted to provide a basis for determining the consistency of activation energy at 250 C. An investigation was made to determine whether any thresholds were exceeded during the high temperature testing, which could trigger failure mechanisms unique to that temperature. The usefulness of the 250 C temperature test as a predictor of long term reliability was evaluated.

  18. Laboratory corrosion tests for simulating fireside wastage of superheater materials in waste incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, N.; Kawahara, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Hosoda, T.

    1999-11-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were performed to clarify the effects of relative amounts of fused salts in tube deposits on corrosion rates of superheater materials in WTE plants. All test exposures were at 550 C and of 100 hour duration. The nine synthetic ashes used as corrodents consisted of mixtures of chlorides, sulfates and oxides. The test materials were alloy steel T22, stainless steels TP347H, TP310HCbN, and alloys HR11N and 625. The gas atmosphere consisted of 500 to 3000 ppm HCl-30ppm SO{sub 2}-10%O{sub 2}-10%CO{sub 2}-20%H{sub 2}O-bal.N{sub 2}. Generally, the relative amount of fused salts in non-fused ash constituents at 550 C increased with increasing the chlorine content of the ashes. The corrosion rate of T22 steel did not depend directly on ash chlorine content, but for ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rate depended on the calculated amount of fused salt at 500 C. The corrosion rates of TP347H steel and alloy 625 were maximum for ashes of 6--8 wt%Cl. For ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rates of T22 steel, stainless steels, and alloys increased with ashes having higher amounts of fused salts. Increased HCl content of the gas caused higher corrosion of the stainless steels and high-nickel alloys, but there was no clear corrosion-exacerbating effect with T22 steel.

  19. Quick setup of unit test for accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; D'Ottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Nemesure, S.; Morris, J.

    2011-03-28

    Testing a single hardware unit of an accelerator control system often requires the setup of a program with graphical user interface. Developing a dedicated application for a specific hardware unit test could be time consuming and the application may become obsolete after the unit tests. This paper documents a methodology for quick design and setup of an interface focused on performing unit tests of accelerator equipment with minimum programming work. The method has three components. The first is a generic accelerator device object (ADO) manager which can be used to setup, store, and log testing controls parameters for any unit testing system. The second involves the design of a TAPE (Tool for Automated Procedure Execution) sequence file that specifies and implements all te testing and control logic. The sting third is the design of a PET (parameter editing tool) page that provides the unit tester with all the necessary control parameters required for testing. This approach has been used for testing the horizontal plane of the Stochastic Cooling Motion Control System at RHIC.

  20. TESTING METGLAS FOR USE IN DARHT ACCELERATOR CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. ROSE; D.A. DALMAS; J.N. DOWNING; R.D. TEMPLE

    2001-06-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility [DARHT] at Los Alamos will use two induction linacs to produce high-energy electron beams. The electron beams will be used to generate x-rays from bremsstrahlung targets. The x-rays will be used to produce radiographs. The first accelerator is operational now, producing a 60-nanosecond electron beam. The second accelerator is under construction. It will produce a 2-microsecond electron beam. The 78 induction cells of the second axis accelerator require a total Metglas capacity of approximately 40 volt seconds of flux. Four Metglas cores are used in each of the 5-foot diameter accelerator cells. Each Metglas core weighs approximately 3000 pounds. This paper presents the measurement techniques and results of the Metglas tests. Routine automated analysis and archival of the pulse data provided hysteresis curves, energy loss curves and total flux swing in the operating regime. Results of the tests were used to help the manufacturer improve quality control and increase the average flux swing of the cores. Results of the tests were used to match Metglas cores and to assemble accelerator cells with equal volt-second ratings.

  1. Investigation of Accelerated Casing Corrosion in Two Wells at Waste Management Area A-AX

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Legore, Virginia L.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 3.13 and 3.14. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in August 2005. An overall goal of the Groundwater Performance Assessment Project, led by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and per guidance in DOE Order 5400.1, includes characterizing and defining trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of the environment. To meet these goals, numerous Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) monitoring wells have been installed throughout the Hanford Site. In 2003, it was determined that two RCRA monitoring wells (299-E24-19 and 299-E25-46) in Waste Management Area (WMA) A-AX failed due to rapid corrosion of the stainless steel casing over a significant length of the wells. Complete casing corrosion occurred between 276.6 and 277.7 feet below ground surface (bgs) in well 299- E24-19 and from 274.4 to 278.6 feet bgs in well 299-E25-46. CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from PNNL to perform detailed analyses of vadose zone sediment samples collected in the vicinity of the WMA A-AX from depths comparable to those where the rapid corrosion occurred in hopes of ascertaining the cause of the rapid corrosion.

  2. Field tests of probes for detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Cayard, Michael S.; Kane, Russell D.; Meidinger, Brian

    2005-01-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. Results and interpretation will be reported from four different field tests. Flange and flush-mount probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different orientations at a natural gas plant. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions in a gas transmission pipeline. The environments consisted of 2 different levels of humidified natural gas/organic/water mixtures removed from natural gas, and the environments at the 6 and 12 o'clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

  3. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect.

  4. Fatigue-test acceleration with flight-by-flight loading and heating to simulate supersonic-transport operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imig, L. A.; Garrett, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Possibilities for reducing fatigue-test time for supersonic-transport materials and structures were studied in tests with simulated flight-by-flight loading. In order to determine whether short-time tests were feasible, the results of accelerated tests (2 sec per flight) were compared with the results of real-time tests (96 min per flight). The effects of design mean stress, the stress range for ground-air-ground cycles, simulated thermal stress, the number of stress cycles in each flight, and salt corrosion were studied. The flight-by-flight stress sequences were applied to notched sheet specimens of Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V and Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloys. A linear cumulative-damage analysis accounted for large changes in stress range of the simulated flights but did not account for the differences between real-time and accelerated tests. The fatigue lives from accelerated tests were generally within a factor of two of the lives from real-time tests; thus, within the scope of the investigation, accelerated testing seems feasible.

  5. Corrosion Testing of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid that Contains Dissolved Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, Bruce J.; Mickalonis, John I.; Subramanian, Karthik H.

    2012-10-11

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid (OA) will be used to chemically clean the tanks after waste retrieval is completed. The waste tanks at SRS were constructed from carbon steel materials and thus are vulnerable to corrosion in acidic media. In addition to structural impacts, the impact of corrosion on the hydrogen generated during the process must be assessed. Electrochemical and coupon immersion tests were used to investigate the corrosion mechanism at anticipated process conditions. The testing showed that the corrosion rates were dependent upon the reduction of the iron species that had dissolved in solution. Initial corrosion rates were elevated due to the reduction of the ferric species to ferrous species. At later times, as the ferric species depleted, the corrosion rate decreased. On the other hand, the hydrogen evolution reaction became more dominant.

  6. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. |

    1992-09-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users` facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF`s experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  7. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  8. Closeout Report for the Refractory Metal Accelerated Heat Pipe Life Test Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J.; Reid, R.; Stewart, E.; Hickman, R.; Mireles, O.

    2013-01-01

    With the selection of a gas-cooled reactor, this heat pipe accelerated life test activity was closed out and its resources redirected. The scope of this project was to establish the long-term aging effects on Mo-44.5%Re sodium heat pipes when subjected to space reactor temperature and mass fluences. To date, investigators have demonstrated heat pipe life tests of alkali metal systems up to .50,000 hours. Unfortunately, resources have not been available to examine the effect of temperature, mass fluence, or impurity level on corrosion or to conduct post-test forensic examination of heat pipes. The key objective of this effort was to establish a cost/time effective method to systematically test alkali metal heat pipes with both practical and theoretical benefits. During execution of the project, a heat pipe design was established, a majority of the laboratory test equipment systems specified, and operating and test procedures developed. Procurements for the heat pipe units and all major test components were underway at the time the stop work order was issued. An extremely important outcome was the successful fabrication of an annular wick from Mo-5%Re screen (the single, most difficult component to manufacture) using a hot isostatic pressing technique. This Technical Publication (TP) includes specifics regarding the heat pipe calorimeter water-cooling system, vendor design for the radio frequency heating system, possible alternative calorimeter designs, and progress on the vanadium equilibration technique. The methods provided in this TP and preceding project documentation would serve as a good starting point to rapidly implement an accelerated life test. Relevant test data can become available within months, not years, and destructive examination of the first life test heat pipe might begin within 6 months of test initiation. Final conclusions could be drawn in less than a quarter of the mission duration for a long-lived, fission-powered, deep space probe.

  9. Aluminum alloy welding and stress-corrosion testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.; Jimenez, E.

    1981-04-01

    The weldability, strength, and corrosion resistance of four 5XXX aluminum alloys electron beam welded to 6061-T6 aluminum alloy without a filler metal were evaluated. Adding filler metal raises weld energy requirements and makes the process more difficult to control. In this study, instead of using a filler metal, a high-magnesium 5XXX alloy was welded to the 6061 alloy. The four 5XXX alloys used (5456-H321, 5052-H34, 5086-H323, and 5083-H32) were selected for their high magnesium content which reduces weld crack sensitivity.

  10. Status and results from the next linear collider test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.

    1996-08-01

    The design for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) at SLAC is based on two 11.4 GHz linacs operating at an unloaded acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m increasing to 85 MV/m as the energy is increased from {1/2} TeV to 1 TeV in the center of mass. During the past several years there has been tremendous progress on the development of 11.4 GHz (X-band) RF systems. These developments include klystrons which operate at the required power and pulse length, pulse compression systems that achieve a factor of four power multiplication and structures that are specially designed to reduce long-range wakefields. Together with these developments, we have constructed a {1/2} GeV test accelerator, the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA). The NLCTA will serve as a test bed as the design of the NLC is refined. In addition to testing the RF system, the NLCTA is designed to address many questions related to the dynamics of the beam during acceleration, in particular the study of multibunch beam loading compensation and transverse beam break-up. In this paper we present the status of the NLCTA and the results of initial commissioning.

  11. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing for Solar Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.; Elmore, R.; Lee, J.; Kennedy, C.

    2011-09-01

    To meet the challenge to reduce the cost of electricity generated with concentrating solar power (CSP) new low-cost reflector materials are being developed including metalized polymer reflectors and must be tested and validated against appropriate failure mechanisms. We explore the application of testing methods and statistical inference techniques for quantifying estimates and improving lifetimes of concentrating solar power (CSP) reflectors associated with failure mechanisms initiated by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum. In general, a suite of durability and reliability tests are available for testing a variety of failure mechanisms where the results of a set are required to understand overall lifetime of a CSP reflector. We will focus on the use of the Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) as a testing device for assessing various degradation patterns attributable to accelerated UV exposure. Depending on number of samples, test conditions, degradation and failure patterns, test results may be used to derive insight into failure mechanisms, associated physical parameters, lifetimes and uncertainties. In the most complicated case warranting advanced planning and statistical inference, step-stress accelerated degradation (SSADT) methods may be applied.

  12. High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Materials Degradation: Preliminary Results of Corrosion Tests on Ceramatec Electrolysis Cell Components

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Prateek Sachdev; Kevin DeWall; Pavel Medvedev

    2007-06-01

    Corrosion tests were performed on stainless steel and nickel alloy coupons in H2O/H2 mixtures and dry air to simulate conditions experienced in high temperature steam electrolysis systems. The stainless steel coupons were tested bare and with one of three different proprietary coatings applied. Specimens were corroded at 850°C for 500 h with weight gain data recorded at periodic intervals. Post-test characterization of the samples included surface and cross-section scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and area-specific resistance measurements. The uncoated nickel alloy outperformed the ferritic stainless steel under all test conditions based on weight gain data. Parabolic rate constants for corrosion of these two uncoated alloys were consistent with values presented in the literature under similar conditions. The steel coatings reduced corrosion rates in H2O/H2 mixtures by as much as 50% compared to the untreated steel, but in most cases showed negligible corrosion improvement in air. The use of a rare-earth-based coating on stainless steel did not result in a significantly different area specific resistance values after corrosion compared to the untreated alloy. Characterization of the samples is still in progress and the findings will be revised when the complete data set is available.

  13. Accelerated aging tests of liners for uranium mill tailings disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, S.M.; Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.

    1981-11-01

    This document describes the results of accelerated aging tests to determine the long-term effectiveness of selected impoundment liner materials in a uranium mill tailings environment. The study was sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The study was designed to evaluate the need for, and the performance of, several candidate liners for isolating mill tailings leachate in conformance with proposed Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. The liners were subjected to conditions known to accelerate the degradation mechanisms of the various liners. Also, a test environment was maintained that modeled the expected conditions at a mill tailings impoundment, including ground subsidence and the weight loading of tailings on the liners. A comparison of installation costs was also performed for the candidate liners. The laboratory testing and cost information prompted the selection of a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane and a sodium bentonite-amended soil for fiscal year 1981 field testing.

  14. Field Testing of Rapid Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Control of Steel in Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E.; Alexander, Joshua B.; Kupwade-Patil,Kunal; Calle, Luz Marina

    2009-01-01

    This work field tested the use of electrokinetics for delivery of concrete sealing nanoparticles concurrent with the extraction of chlorides. Several cylinders of concrete were batched and placed in immersion at the Kennedy Space Center Beach Corrosion Test Site. The specimens were batched with steel reinforcement and a 4.5 wt.% (weight percent) content of sodium chloride. Upon arrival at Kennedy Space Center, the specimens were placed in the saltwater immersion pool at the Beach Corrosion Test Site. Following 30 days of saltwater exposure, the specimens were subjected to rapid chloride extraction concurrent with electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment. The treatments were operated at up to eight times the typical current density in order to complete the treatment in 7 days. The findings indicated that the short-term corrosion resistance of the concrete specimens was significantly enhanced as was the strength of the concrete.

  15. An Accelerated Method for Testing Soldering Tendency of Core Pins

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qingyou; Xu, Hanbing; Ried, Paul; Olson, Paul

    2010-01-01

    An accelerated method for testing die soldering has been developed. High intensity ultrasonic vibrations has been used to simulate the die casting conditions such as high pressure and high impingement speed of molten metal on the pin. Soldering tendency of steels and coated pins has been examined. The results indicate that in the low carbon steel/Al system, the onset of soldering is 60 times faster with ultrasonic vibration than that without ultrasonic vibration. In the H13/A380 system, the onset of soldering reaction is accelerated to 30-60 times. Coating significantly reduces the soldering tendency of the core pins.

  16. Vapor Space Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    As part of an integrated program to better understand corrosion in the high level waste tanks, Hanford has been investigating corrosion at the liquid/air interface (LAI) and at higher areas in the tank vapor space. This current research evaluated localized corrosion in the vapor space over Hanford double shell tank simulants to assess the impact of ammonia and new minimum nitrite concentration limits, which are part of the broader corrosion chemistry limits. The findings from this study showed that the presence of ammonia gas (550 ppm) in the vapor space is sufficient to reduce corrosion over the short-term (i.e. four months) for a Hanford waste chemistry (SY102 High Nitrate). These findings are in agreement with previous studies at both Hanford and SRS which showed ammonia gas in the vapor space to be inhibitive. The presence of ammonia in electrochemical test solution, however, was insufficient to inhibit against pitting corrosion. The effect of the ammonia appears to be a function of the waste chemistry and may have more significant effects in waste with low nitrite concentrations. Since high levels of ammonia were found beneficial in previous studies, additional testing is recommended to assess the necessary minimum concentration for protection of carbon steel. The new minimum R value of 0.15 was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion in the vapor space. The pitting that occurred, however, did not progress over the four-month test. Pits appeared to stop growing, which would indicate that pitting might not progress through wall.

  17. Cryogenic cooling system for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F.; Spulgis, I.

    1993-06-01

    A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH{sub 2} run tank containing an LH{sub 2}/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

  18. Cryogenic cooling system for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F. ); Spulgis, I. )

    1993-01-01

    A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH[sub 2]) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH[sub 2] run tank containing an LH[sub 2]/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

  19. Cryogenic cooling system for the Ground Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F.; Spulgis, I.

    1994-12-31

    A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH{sub 2} run tank containing an LH{sub 2}/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

  20. An investigation of the typical corrosion parameters used to test polymer electrolyte fuel cell bipolar plate coatings, with titanium nitride coated stainless steel as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, A.; Kongstein, O. E.; Hamilton, P. J.; Oedegaard, A.; Svenum, I. H.; Cooke, K.

    2015-07-01

    Stainless steel bipolar plates (BPP) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have good manufacturability, durability and low costs, but inadequate corrosion resistance and elevated interfacial contact resistance (ICR) in the fuel cell environment. Thin film coatings of titanium nitride (TiN) of 1 μm in thickness, were deposited by means of physical vapour deposition (PVD) process on to stainless steel (SS) 316L substrates and were evaluated, in a series of tests, for their level of corrosion protection and ICR. In the ex-situ corrosion tests, variables such as applied potential, experimental duration and pH of the sulphate electrolyte at 80 °C were altered. The ICR values were found to increase after exposure to greater applied potentials and electrolytes of a higher pH. In terms of experimental duration, the ICR increased most rapidly at the beginning of each experiment. It was also found that the oxidation of TiN was accelerated after exposure to electrolytes of a higher pH. When coated BPPs were incorporated into an accelerated fuel cell test, the degradation of the fuel cell cathode resembled the plates that were tested at the highest anodic potential (1.4 VSHE).

  1. Characterizing Corrosion Effects of Weak Organic Acids Using a Modified Bono Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuqin; Turbini, Laura J.; Ramjattan, Deepchand; Christian, Bev; Pritzker, Mark

    2013-12-01

    To meet environmental requirements and achieve benefits of cost-effective manufacturing, no-clean fluxes (NCFs) or low-solids fluxes have become popular in present electronic manufacturing processes. Weak organic acids (WOAs) as the activation ingredients in NCFs play an important role, especially in the current lead-free and halogen-free soldering technology era. However, no standard or uniform method exists to characterize the corrosion effects of WOAs on actual metallic circuits of printed wiring boards (PWBs). Hence, the development of an effective quantitative test method for evaluating the corrosion effects of WOAs on the PWB's metallic circuits is imperative. In this paper, the modified Bono test, which was developed to quantitatively examine the corrosion properties of flux residues, is used to characterize the corrosion effects of five WOAs (i.e., abietic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and malic acid) on PWB metallic circuits. Experiments were performed under three temperature/humidity conditions (85°C/85% RH, 60°C/93% RH, and 40°C/93% RH) using two WOA solution concentrations. The different corrosion effects among the various WOAs were best reflected in the testing results at 40°C and 60°C. Optical microscopy was used to observe the morphology of the corroded copper tracks, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) characterization was performed to determine the dendrite composition.

  2. Time-dependent diffusive acceleration of test particles at shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, L. O'C.

    1991-07-01

    A theoretical description is developed for the acceleration of test particles at a steady plane nonrelativistic shock. The mean and the variance of the acceleration-time distribution are expressed analytically for the condition under which the diffusion coefficient is arbitrarily dependent on position and momentum. The formula for an acceleration rate with arbitrary spatial variation in the diffusion coefficient developed by Drury (1987) is supplemented by a general theory of time dependence. An approximation scheme is developed by means of the analysis which permits the description of the spectral cutoff resulting from the finite shock age. The formulas developed in the analysis are also of interest for analyzing the observations of heliospheric shocks made from spacecraft.

  3. Corrosion tests of 316L and Hastelloy C-22 in simulated tank waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Danielson; SG Pitman

    2000-02-23

    Both the 316L stainless steel and Hastelloy{reg_sign} C-22 gave satisfactory corrosion performance in the simulated test environments. They were subjected to 100 day weight loss corrosion tests and electrochemical potentiodynamic evaluation. This activity supports confirmation of the design basis for the materials of construction of process vessels and equipment used to handle the feed to the LAW-melter evaporator. BNFL process and mechanical engineering will use the information derived from this task to select material of construction for process vessels and equipment.

  4. Corrosion inhibitor testing and selection for exploration and production: A user's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kapusta, S.D.

    1999-06-01

    Inhibitor users need simple, reliable, and representative tests to select the best product from a number of candidates. This article describes a procedure that can help users test and select inhibitors for carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide (CO[sub 2]/H[sub 2]S) corrosion in oil and gas production, in a fast and cost-effective manner. The selection is based on two criteria: performance (effectiveness) against corrosion, and compatibility with other chemicals. The compatibility of the inhibitor with the injection and production systems must be confirmed.

  5. Polarization Losses under Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Supported Pt Catalyst in PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh K.; Shao, Yuyan; Kou, Rong; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior for Pt catalysts supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Vulcan XC-72 in proton exchange membrane fuel cells under accelerated stress test was examined by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and polarization technique. Pt catalyst supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes exhibited highly stable electrochemical surface area, oxygen reduction kinetics, and fuel cell performance at a highly oxidizing condition, indicating multiwalled carbon nanotubes show high corrosion resistance and strong interaction with Pt nanoparticles. The Tafel slope, ohmic resistances, and limiting current density determined were used to differentiate kinetic, ohmic, mass-transfer polarization losses from the actual polarization curve. Kinetic contribution to the total overpotential was larger throughout the stress test. However, the fraction of kinetic overpotential decreased and mass-transfer overpotential portion remained quite constant during accelerated stress test, whereas the fraction of ohmic overpotential primarily originating from severe proton transport limitation in the catalyst layer increased under the anodic potential hold.

  6. An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments. Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsden, Jesse

    1999-01-01

    OAK-B135 An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments. Technical Progress Report. This program focuses on understanding the mechanisms causing corrosion damage to steam generator tubes in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and the effects of the proposed remedial measures. The crevice formed by the tube/tube support plate (T/TSP) intersection in a PWR steam generator is a concentration site for nonvolatile impurities (referred to as hideout) in the steam generator water. The restricted mass transport in the small crevice volume prevents the species, which concentrate during the generation of steam, from quickly dispersing into the bulk water. The concentrated solutions in crevices have been a contributing cause of several forms of corrosion of steam generator tubes including intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC), pitting, and wastage.

  7. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  8. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    In Phase I a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase II (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA-8511, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, 800HT, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy will be exposed for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The results will be presented for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 4000 hours of exposure.

  9. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J.

    1997-08-01

    In Phase 1 a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA-85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, 800HT, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy will be exposed for 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The results will be presented for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 4,000 hours of exposure.

  10. Preloading To Accelerate Slow-Crack-Growth Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John P.; Choi, Sung R.; Pawlik, Ralph J.

    2004-01-01

    An accelerated-testing methodology has been developed for measuring the slow-crack-growth (SCG) behavior of brittle materials. Like the prior methodology, the accelerated-testing methodology involves dynamic fatigue ( constant stress-rate) testing, in which a load or a displacement is applied to a specimen at a constant rate. SCG parameters or life prediction parameters needed for designing components made of the same material as that of the specimen are calculated from the relationship between (1) the strength of the material as measured in the test and (2) the applied stress rate used in the test. Despite its simplicity and convenience, dynamic fatigue testing as practiced heretofore has one major drawback: it is extremely time-consuming, especially at low stress rates. The present accelerated methodology reduces the time needed to test a specimen at a given rate of applied load, stress, or displacement. Instead of starting the test from zero applied load or displacement as in the prior methodology, one preloads the specimen and increases the applied load at the specified rate (see Figure 1). One might expect the preload to alter the results of the test and indeed it does, but fortunately, it is possible to account for the effect of the preload in interpreting the results. The accounting is done by calculating the normalized strength (defined as the strength in the presence of preload the strength in the absence of preload) as a function of (1) the preloading factor (defined as the preload stress the strength in the absence of preload) and (2) a SCG parameter, denoted n, that is used in a power-law crack-speed formulation. Figure 2 presents numerical results from this theoretical calculation.

  11. Corrosion Testing of Ni Alloy HVOF Coatings in High Temperature Environments for Biomass Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the corrosion behavior of Ni alloy coatings deposited by high velocity oxyfuel spraying, and representative boiler substrate alloys in simulated high temperature biomass combustion conditions. Four commercially available oxidation resistant Ni alloy coating materials were selected: NiCrBSiFe, alloy 718, alloy 625, and alloy C-276. These were sprayed onto P91 substrates using a JP5000 spray system. The corrosion performance of the coatings varied when tested at ~525, 625, and 725 °C in K2SO4-KCl mixture and gaseous HCl-H2O-O2 containing environments. Alloy 625, NiCrBSiFe, and alloy 718 coatings performed better than alloy C-276 coating at 725 °C, which had very little corrosion resistance resulting in degradation similar to uncoated P91. Alloy 625 coatings provided good protection from corrosion at 725 °C, with the performance being comparable to wrought alloy 625, with significantly less attack of the substrate than uncoated P91. Alloy 625 performs best of these coating materials, with an overall ranking at 725 °C as follows: alloy 625 > NiCrBSiFe > alloy 718 ≫ alloy C-276. Although alloy C-276 coatings performed poorly in the corrosion test environment at 725 °C, at lower temperatures (i.e., below the eutectic temperature of the salt mixture) it outperformed the other coating types studied.

  12. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curits, P.C.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90{degrees}C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron- absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. the stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on it chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high- chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. the results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  13. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  14. Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90{degrees}C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys.

  15. Localized corrosion testing of CRA materials in elevated temperature sour gas environments

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, P.; Oldfield, J.W.; Al-Maslamani, M.

    1999-11-01

    An exposure test program has been undertaken to investigate the localized corrosion resistance of Alloys 28, 825, G3 and 625 in two simulated sour gas environments at 150 C. The chloride levels in these test environments, containing 30 psi (0.21 MPa) H{sub 2}S and 101 psi (0.70 MPa) CO{sub 2}, were 150 ppm and 30,000 ppm. The general corrosion rate of each material was found to be negligible in each test. Alloy 825 alone was susceptible to minor pitting and crevice initiation in the 150 ppm chloride environment. Increasing the chloride level to 30,000 ppm resulted in more severe crevice attack of Alloy 825 and crevice corrosion of Alloy 28. Alloys G3 and 625 were not susceptible to localized corrosion in either test environment. The exposure tests were supported by complementary electrochemical polarization curves in the low chloride environment. The curves did not exhibit clearly defined passive regions, which were masked by additional anodic current from the oxidation of H{sub 2}S.

  16. An artifical corrosion protocol for lap-splices in aircraft skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Bevil J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress to date to formulate an artificial corrosion protocol for the Tinker AFB C/KC-135 Corrosion Fatigue Round Robin Test Program. The project has provided new test methods to faithfully reproduce the corrosion damage within a lap-splice by accelerated means, the rationale for a new laboratory test environment, and a means for corrosion damage quantification. The approach is pragmatic and the resulting artificial corrosion protocol lays the foundation for future research in the assessment of aerospace alloys. The general means for quantification of corrosion damage has been presented in a form which can be directly applied to structural integrity calculations.

  17. Accelerated aging test results for aerospace wire insulation constructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, William G.

    1995-01-01

    Several wire insulation constructions were evaluated with and without continuous glow discharges at low pressure and high temperature to determine the aging characteristics of acceptable wire insulation constructions. It was known at the beginning of the test program that insulation aging takes several years when operated at normal ambient temperature and pressure of 20 C and 760 torr. Likewise, it was known that the accelerated aging process decreases insulation life by approximately 50% for each 10 C temperature rise. Therefore, the first phases of the program, not reported in these test results, were to select wire insulation constructions that could operate at high temperature and low pressure for over 10,000 hours with negligible shrinkage and little materials' deterioration.The final phase of the program was to determine accelerated aging characteristics. When an insulation construction is subjected to partial discharges the insulation is locally heated by the bombardment of the discharges, the insulation is also subjected to ozone and other deteriorating gas particles that may significantly increase the aging process. Several insulation systems using either a single material or combinations of teflon, kapton, and glass insulation constructions were tested. All constructions were rated to be partial discharge and/or corona-free at 240 volts, 400 Hz and 260 C (500 F) for 50, 000 hours at altitudes equivalent to the Paschen law. Minimum partial discharge aging tests were preceded by screening tests lasting 20 hours at 260 C. The aging process was accelerated by subjecting the test articles to temperatures up to 370 C (700 F) with and without partial discharges. After one month operation with continuous glow discharges surrounding the test articles, most insulation systems were either destroyed or became brittle, cracked, and unsafe for use. Time with space radiation as with partial discharges is accumulative.

  18. Testing in a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2004-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  19. Accelerated Creep Testing of High Strength Aramid Webbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Stnfield, Clarence E.; Valverde, Omar

    2012-01-01

    A series of preliminary accelerated creep tests were performed on four variants of 12K and 24K lbf rated Vectran webbing to help develop an accelerated creep test methodology and analysis capability for high strength aramid webbings. The variants included pristine, aged, folded and stitched samples. This class of webbings is used in the restraint layer of habitable, inflatable space structures, for which the lifetime properties are currently not well characterized. The Stepped Isothermal Method was used to accelerate the creep life of the webbings and a novel stereo photogrammetry system was used to measure the full-field strains. A custom MATLAB code is described, and used to reduce the strain data to produce master creep curves for the test samples. Initial results show good correlation between replicates; however, it is clear that a larger number of samples are needed to build confidence in the consistency of the results. It is noted that local fiber breaks affect the creep response in a similar manner to increasing the load, thus raising the creep rate and reducing the time to creep failure. The stitched webbings produced the highest variance between replicates, due to the combination of higher local stresses and thread-on-fiber damage. Large variability in the strength of the webbings is also shown to have an impact on the range of predicted creep life.

  20. Sub-categorisation of skin corrosive chemicals by the EpiSkin™ reconstructed human epidermis skin corrosion test method according to UN GHS: revision of OECD Test Guideline 431.

    PubMed

    Alépée, N; Grandidier, M H; Cotovio, J

    2014-03-01

    The EpiSkin™ skin corrosion test method was formally validated and adopted within the context of OECD TG 431 for identifying corrosive and non-corrosive chemicals. The EU Classification, Labelling and Packaging Regulation (EU CLP) system requires the sub-categorisation of corrosive chemicals into the three UN GHS optional subcategories 1A, 1B and 1C. The present study was undertaken to investigate the usefulness of the validated EpiSkin™ test method to identify skin corrosive UN GHS Categories 1A, 1B and 1C using the original and validated prediction model and adapted controls for direct MTT reduction. In total, 85 chemicals selected by the OECD expert group on skin corrosion were tested in three independent runs. The results obtained were highly reproducible both within (>80%) and between (>78%) laboratories when compared with historical data. Moreover the results obtained showed that the EpiSkin™ test method is highly sensitive (99%) and specific (80%) in discriminating corrosive from non-corrosive chemicals and allows reliable and relevant identification of the different skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories, with high accuracies being obtained for both UN GHS Categories 1A (83%) and 1B/1C (76%) chemicals. The overall accuracy of the test method to subcategorise corrosive chemicals into three or two UN GHS subcategories ranged from 75% to 79%. Considering those results, the revised OECD Test Guideline 431 permit the use of EpiSkin™ for subcategorising corrosive chemicals into at least two classes (Category 1A and Category 1B/1C). PMID:24211528

  1. The usefulness of the validated SkinEthic™ RHE test method to identify skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories.

    PubMed

    Alépée, Nathalie; Robert, Clément; Tornier, Carine; Cotovio, José

    2014-06-01

    The SkinEthic™ Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) test method has been adopted within the context of OECD TG 431 for distinguishing corrosive and non-corrosive chemicals. The EU CLP classification system requires subcategorising of corrosive chemicals into the three UN GHS subcategories 1A, 1B and 1C. Since the SkinEthic™ RHE method was originally validated to discriminate corrosives from non-corrosives, the present study was undertaken to investigate its usefulness to discriminate skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories. In total 84 substances were tested in three independent runs and two prediction models (PM) were assessed, representing a pre-defined validated prediction model (PM-A) and an alternative one defined post-hoc (PM-B). The results obtained with both PM were reproducible, as shown by the ⩾92.9% concordance of classification between runs for discriminating corrosives versus non-corrosives, and the ⩾85% concordance for discriminating the GHS subcategories versus non-corrosives. Moreover results confirmed a high sensitivity of the SkinEthic™ RHE method to predict corrosives (94.9%) and good specificity (⩾73.7%) independent of the PM applied. Regarding the identification of UN GHS corrosive subcategories, PM-A resulted in 86.1% correct classifications of the GHS subcategory 1A. When using the PM-B, the identification of GHS subcategory 1B-and-1C substances improved, with 63.4% correct sub-categorisation. If considering the 30 reference chemicals as recommended in the recently revised OECD TG 431 (2013), PM-A and PM-B achieved 78.9% and 83.3% accuracy respectively for the identification of GHS subcategories and non-corrosives. They correctly predicted 90% of GHS subcategory 1A and 80% of GHS non-corrosive substances independent of the PM used. In conclusion, the SkinEthic™ RHE test method is highly reproducible and sensitive for discriminating corrosive from non-corrosive substances. Furthermore it allows reliable identification of skin

  2. CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

    2011-10-14

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

  3. GTA (ground test accelerator) Phase 1: Baseline design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program has two objectives: to provide the necessary basis for a discriminator/weapon decision by 1992, and to develop the technology in stages that lead ultimately to a neutral particle beam weapon. The ground test accelerator (GTA) is the test bed that permits the advancement of the state-of-the-art under experimental conditions in an integrated automated system mode. An intermediate goal of the GTA program is to support the Integrated Space Experiments, while the ultimate goal is to support the 1992 decision. The GTA system and each of its major subsystems are described, and project schedules and resource requirements are provided. (LEW)

  4. Highly accelerated life testing for the 1210 Digital Ruggedized Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Bruce; Phillips, Ruth

    1998-09-01

    The 1210 Digital Ruggedized Display (1210 DRD) was designed and built for a harsh military environment. The 1210 DRD uses a single 1280 X 1024 Digital Micromirror Device (DMDTM) as a reflective image source. Through the use of Highly Accelerated Life Testing we have verified and validated the 1210 DRD through rigorous thermal, vibration, and combined environment testing. The results prove the DMD-based 1210 DRD to be a very rugged display that can meet and exceed the requirements of displays used in military applications.

  5. Application of the thin electrolyte layer technique to corrosion testing of dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, Martin

    Proper simulation of the oral environment for the corrosion testing of dental materials is crucial for determining corrosion rates and mechanisms correctly. In this study, the thin electrolyte layer technique (TET) was characterized and employed to investigate the importance of the chemical composition of the testing environment on the outcome of electrochemical tests. The thickness of the electrolyte layer in TET is only 0.5 mm and contains only 20 muL of electrolyte. This arrangement simulates the physical characteristics of the oral environment and facilitates testing in human saliva. Oxygen availability for reduction on the sample surface was determined, using cathodic polarization of Pt in borate buffer, to be lower in TET than in traditional (bulk electrolyte) techniques. Appreciable differences were found during polarization experiments on 316 L SS in saline and artificial saliva. Oxygen content was found to play a significant role in the corrosivity of various species contained in artificial saliva. Potentiodynamic polarization employing human saliva in TET on 316L SS proved to be very different from tests performed in artificial saliva. This was believed to be due to the presence of organic species, specifically proteins, contained in human saliva. This was further confirmed by cyclic polarization and corrosion current measurements of four commercial nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloys with varying amounts of Be. For this phase of the experiment, artificial saliva (AS), AS with 1% albumin, AS with 1% of mucin and parotid human saliva were employed as electrolytes. The results obtained in the various electrolytes depended on the composition, microstructure, stability of passive film, and the presence of casting porosity of the alloys tested. Proteins had insignificant effect on alloys with highly stable passive films, whereas, corrosion rates increased substantially in those alloys with compromised passive film formation. Proteins, especially mucin, lowered the

  6. Effects of impurities in coal-derived liquids on accelerated hot corrosion of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    A Mach 0.3 burner rig was used to determine the effects of potential coal derived liquid fuel impurity combustion of products on hot corrosion in IN-100, IN-792, IN_738, U-700, Mar M-509, and 304 stainless steel. The impurities, added as aqueous solutions to the combustor, were salts of sodium, potassium, vanadium, molybdenum, tungsten, phosphorus, and lead. Extent of attack was determined by metal consumption and compared to the effects of sodium alone. Vanadium, molybdenum, tungsten, phosphorous, and lead in combination with sodium all resulted in increased attack as compared with sodium alone at some temperatures, apparently due in large part to the extension of the formation of liquid deposits. Varying the sodium-potassium ratio had little effect for ratios less than 1:3 for which reduced, but measurable, attack was observed.

  7. Database requirements for the Advanced Test Accelerator project

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F.W.

    1984-11-05

    The database requirements for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) project are outlined. ATA is a state-of-the-art electron accelerator capable of producing energetic (50 million electron volt), high current (10,000 ampere), short pulse (70 billionths of a second) beams of electrons for a wide variety of applications. Databasing is required for two applications. First, the description of the configuration of facility itself requires an extended database. Second, experimental data gathered from the facility must be organized and managed to insure its full utilization. The two applications are intimately related since the acquisition and analysis of experimental data requires knowledge of the system configuration. This report reviews the needs of the ATA program and current implementation, intentions, and desires. These database applications have several unique aspects which are of interest and will be highlighted. The features desired in an ultimate database system are outlined. 3 references, 5 figures.

  8. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator Intertank Matching Section

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Cole, R.; Connolly, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Ingalls, W.B.; Kersteins, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 keV H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the IMS beam experiments will be presented.

  9. Beam loading and cavity compensation for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jachim, S.P.; Natter, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) will be a heavily beam-loaded H/sup minus/ linac with tight tolerances on accelerating field parameters. The methods used in modeling the effects of beam loading in this machine are described. The response of the cavity to both beam and radio-frequency (RF) drive stimulus is derived, including the effects of cavity detuning. This derivation is not restricted to a small-signal approximation. An analytical method for synthesizing a predistortion network that decouples the amplitude and phase responses of the cavity is also outlined. Simulation of performance, including beam loading, is achieved through use of a control system analysis software package. A straightforward method is presented for extrapolating this work to model large coupled structures with closely spaced parasitic modes. Results to date have enabled the RF control system designs for GTA to be optimized and have given insight into their operation. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator Intertank Matching Section

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Cole, R.; Connolly, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Ingalls, W.B.; Kersteins, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 keV H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the IMS beam experiments will be presented.

  11. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  12. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing facilities

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Jorgensen, Gary J.

    2003-08-12

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS to deliver a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in chamber means that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  13. Ultra-Accelerated Natural Sunlight Exposure Testing Facilities

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Jorgensen, Gary J.

    2004-11-23

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS onto a secondary reflector that delivers a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in a chamber that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  14. Acceleration of degradation by highly accelerated stress test and air-included highly accelerated stress test in crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Soh; Tanahashi, Tadanori; Doi, Takuya; Masuda, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effects of hyper-hygrothermal stresses with or without air on the degradation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules, to shorten the required duration of a conventional hygrothermal-stress test [i.e., the “damp heat (DH) stress test”, which is conducted at 85 °C/85% relative humidity for 1,000 h]. Interestingly, the encapsulant within a PV module becomes discolored under the air-included hygrothermal conditions achieved using DH stress test equipment and an air-included highly accelerated stress test (air-HAST) apparatus, but not under the air-excluded hygrothermal conditions realized using a highly accelerated stress test (HAST) machine. In contrast, the reduction in the output power of the PV module is accelerated irrespective of air inclusion in hyper-hygrothermal test atmosphere. From these findings, we conclude that the required duration of the DH stress test will at least be significantly shortened using air-HAST, but not HAST.

  15. Accelerated stress testing of amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoddard, W. G.; Davis, C. W.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for performing accelerated stress tests of large-area thin a-Si solar cells is presented. A computer-controlled short-interval test system employing low-cost ac-powered ELH illumination and a simulated a-Si reference cell (seven individually bandpass-filtered zero-biased crystalline PIN photodiodes) calibrated to the response of an a-Si control cell is described and illustrated with flow diagrams, drawings, and graphs. Preliminary results indicate that while most tests of a program developed for c-Si cells are applicable to a-Si cells, spurious degradation may appear in a-Si cells tested at temperatures above 130 C.

  16. Structural analysis and intergranular corrosion tests of AISI 316L steel.

    PubMed

    Stonawská, Z; Svoboda, M; Sozańska, M; Krístková, M; Sojka, J; Dagbert, C; Hyspecká, L

    2006-10-01

    Pure AISI 316L steel is investigated after solution heat treatment (1050 degrees C/H(2)O) and structural sensitization (650 degrees C). Two quite different intergranular corrosion tests are used to determine the degree of structural sensitization due to the precipitation of secondary phases along the grain boundaries (mainly the M(23)C(6) and sigma-phase): the oxalic acid etch test and the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation test. Generally, the dissolution of chromium-rich carbides (M(23)C(6)) is provoked by oxalic acid etch tests, whereas the chromium-depleted zones, in the vicinity of chromium-rich carbides (M(23)C(6)), are attacked by electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation tests. Both intergranular corrosion tests are used to determine the maximum degree of structural sensitization. Thus structural analysis by carbon replicas reveals the Laves phase, and both the M(23)C(6) and (Cr,Mo)(x)(Fe,Ni)(y) phases. The results of intergranular corrosion tests are related to the findings of the structural analysis. PMID:17100908

  17. Some important considerations in the development of stress corrosion cracking test methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Novak, S. R.; Williams, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of some of the precaution needs the development of fracture-mechanics based test methods for studying stress corrosion cracking involves. Following a review of pertinent analytical fracture mechanics considerations and of basic test methods, the implications for test corrosion cracking studies of the time-to-failure determining kinetics of crack growth and life are examined. It is shown that the basic assumption of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics analyses must be clearly recognized and satisfied in experimentation and that the effects of incubation and nonsteady-state crack growth must also be properly taken into account in determining the crack growth kinetics, if valid data are to be obtained from fracture-mechanics based test methods.

  18. Performance of laser glazed Zr02 TBCs in cyclic oxidation and corrosion burner test rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of laser glazed zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was evaluated in cyclic oxidation and cyclic corrosion tests. Plasma sprayed zirconia coatings of two thicknesses were partially melted with a CO2 laser. The power density of the focused laser beam was varied from 35 to 75 W/sq mm, while the scanning speed was about 80 cm per minute. In cyclic oxidation tests, the specimens were heated in a burner rig for 6 minutes and cooled for 3 minutes. It is indicated that the laser treated samples have the same life as the untreated ones. However, in corrosion tests, in which the burner rig flame contained 100 PPM sodium fuel equivalent, the laser treated samples exhibit nearly a fourfold life improvement over that of the reference samples vary. In both tests, the lives of the samples inversely with the thickness of the laser melted layer of zirconia.

  19. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    ScienceCinema

    Andrei Seryi

    2010-01-08

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  20. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Seryi

    2009-09-09

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  1. Corrosion of aluminum and copper thin films under simulated atmospheric conditions in laboratory tests

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Raman, A.; Diwan, R.; Bhattacharya, P.K.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion characteristics of Al and Cu thin films have been studied in cyclic fog tests using tap water fog and fog created with 0.1% NaCl solution in tap water. Likewise, their corrosion features have been analyzed in continuous immersion testing in the laboratory in distilled water, tap water, in 0.1% NaCl and 3.5% NaCl solutions in distilled water. The corrosion potentials and the corrosion currents of these thin films change and reach steady state values after some time. However, steady state is not realized in 3.5% NaCl solutions. The corrosion current density data have been used to calculate lifetime of 1 {mu}m thick thin films of Al and Cu in the various tests, and assuming that the fog test data would hold under normal exposure conditions, life spans for these thin film sensor elements in actual exterior exposure have also been calculated. According to estimates, an Al-TF of about 1 {mu}m would last about 9 months in exterior exposure in chloride containing atmospheres, such as in the coastal regions, but would survive nearly 2 years in normal atmospheres not having acidic or chloride pollutants. On the contrary, 1 {mu}m thick Cu-TF would last only for about 2.5 months in chloride-laden environments, but would last for about 2 years in normal atmospheres. However, Cu-TF would be corroded off faster in slightly alkaline atmospheric condensate under total immersion situation. Lifetime estimates are presented and discussed.

  2. Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development.

  3. Instrumentation for accelerated life tests of concentrator solar cells.

    PubMed

    Núñez, N; Vázquez, M; González, J R; Jiménez, F J; Bautista, J

    2011-02-01

    Concentrator photovoltaic is an emergent technology that may be a good economical and efficient alternative for the generation of electricity at a competitive cost. However, the reliability of these new solar cells and systems is still an open issue due to the high-irradiation level they are subjected to as well as the electrical and thermal stresses that they are expected to endure. To evaluate the reliability in a short period of time, accelerated aging tests are essential. Thermal aging tests for concentrator photovoltaic solar cells and systems under illumination are not available because no technical solution to the problem of reaching the working concentration inside a climatic chamber has been available. This work presents an automatic instrumentation system that overcomes the aforementioned limitation. Working conditions have been simulated by forward biasing the solar cells to the current they would handle at the working concentration (in this case, 700 and 1050 times the irradiance at one standard sun). The instrumentation system has been deployed for more than 10 000 h in a thermal aging test for III-V concentrator solar cells, in which the generated power evolution at different temperatures has been monitored. As a result of this test, the acceleration factor has been calculated, thus allowing for the degradation evolution at any temperature in addition to normal working conditions to be obtained. PMID:21361622

  4. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  5. Single-Crystal NiAl-X Alloys Tested for Hot Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Single-crystal nickel aluminide (NiAl) has been investigated extensively throughout the last several years as a potential structural material in aero-gas turbine engines. The attractive features of NiAl in comparison to Ni-base superalloys include a higher melting point, lower density, higher thermal conductivity, and excellent oxidation resistance. However, NiAl suffers from a lack of ductility and fracture toughness at low temperatures and a low creep strength at high temperatures. Alloying additions of hafnium (Hf), gallium (Ga), titanium (Ti), and chromium (Cr) have each shown some benefit to the mechanical properties over that of the binary alloy. However, the collective effect of these alloying additions on the environmental resistance of NiAl-X was unclear. Hence, the present study was undertaken to examine the hot corrosion behavior of these alloys. A companion study examined the cyclic oxidation resistance of these alloys. Several single-crystal NiAl-X alloys (where X is Hf, Ti, Cr, or Ga) underwent hot corrosion testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Samples were tested for up to 300 1-hr cycles at a temperature of 900 C. It was found that increasing the Ti content from 1 to 5 at.% degraded the hot corrosion behavior. This decline in the behavior was reflected in high weight gains and large corrosion mound formation during testing (see the figures). However, the addition of 1 to 2 at.% Cr to alloys containing 4 to 5 at.% Ti appeared to greatly reduce the susceptibility of these alloys to hot corrosion attack and negated the deleterious effect of the increased Ti addition.

  6. Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion. PMID:24099841

  7. T-111 Rankine system corrosion test loop, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, R. W.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of a program whose objective was to determine the performance of refractory metal alloys in a two loop Rankine test system. The test system consisted of a circulating lithium circuit heated to 1230 C maximum transferring heat to a boiling potassium circuit with a 1170 C superheated vapor temperature. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected refractory alloys to perform from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

    1986-06-01

    Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented.

  9. Results of accelerated thermal cycle tests of solar cells modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P.; Mueller, R.; Salama, M.; Yasui, R.

    1976-01-01

    Various candidate solar panel designs were evaluated, both theoretically and experimentally, with respect to their thermal cycling survival capability, and in particular with respect to an accelerated simulation of thermal cycles representative of Viking '75 mission requirements. The experimental results were obtained on 'mini-panels' thermally cycled in a newly installed automated test facility herein described. The resulting damage was analyzed physically and theoretically, and on the basis of these analyses the panel design was suitably modified to significantly improve its ability to withstand the thermal environment. These successful modifications demonstrate the value of the complementary theoretical-experimental approach adopted, and discussed in detail in this paper.

  10. On-line corrosion monitoring at the High Sulfur Test Center. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, W.Y.; Moore, D.C.A.; Cox, W.M.; Farrell, D.M.; Gearey, D.

    1993-06-01

    The corrosion performance of alloys used in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) outlet ducting and stacks was assessed over two years period in a 4MW pilot wet FGD system. Twelve sensor assemblies were installed in the post-absorber duct section, one sensor for each material tested. Candidate materials included austenitic stainless steels, nickel alloys and titanium alloys. In the first of the tests, the sensor assemblies were exposed under the same environmental conditions as the adjacent duct wall. In subsequent tests, other FGD operating conditions were simulated, including changes in degree of reheat and cycling of the gas temperature. Finally, the sensors were exposed when chemical additive tests were in progress in the absorber. Results showed that Alloy C276, Alloy C22, titanium grades 2 and 7 were the most corrosion-resistant alloys tested, though less expensive austenitic stainless steel could provide adequate service in FGD environments subjected to continuous condensation. Scrubber additives, such as thiosulfate, could adversely affect the corrosion rate of certain alloys. Other work has demonstrated that unlined carbon steel can be made to operate satisfactorily provided that the environment within the outlet duct is controlled within target parameters. It was concluded that opportunities exist for cost reductions and improved cost-effectiveness of materials selection in many new and existing FGD installations.

  11. Accelerated stress testing of thin film solar cells: Development of test methods and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    If thin film cells are to be considered a viable option for terrestrial power generation their reliability attributes will need to be explored and confidence in their stability obtained through accelerated testing. Development of a thin film accelerated test program will be more difficult than was the case for crystalline cells because of the monolithic construction nature of the cells. Specially constructed test samples will need to be fabricated, requiring committment to the concept of accelerated testing by the manufacturers. A new test schedule appropriate to thin film cells will need to be developed which will be different from that used in connection with crystalline cells. Preliminary work has been started to seek thin film schedule variations to two of the simplest tests: unbiased temperature and unbiased temperature humidity. Still to be examined are tests which involve the passage of current during temperature and/or humidity stress, either by biasing in the forward (or reverse) directions or by the application of light during stress. Investigation of these current (voltage) accelerated tests will involve development of methods of reliably contacting the thin conductive films during stress.

  12. Test-to-Failure of a Two-Grid, 30-cm-dia. Ion Accelerator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R.; Polk, J. E.; Pless, L. C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the failure mechanism and erosion characteristics of an ion accelerator system due to erosion by charge-exchange ions a test was performed in which a 30-cm-diameter, 2-grid ion accelerator system was tested to failure. The erosion charcteristics observed in this test, however, imply significantly shorter accelerator grid life times than typically stated in the literature. Finally, the test suggests that structural failure is probably not the most likely first failure mechanism for the accelerator grid.

  13. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Krawchuk, M.T.; Van Weele, S.F.

    1995-08-01

    A number of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings have previously been exposed in Phase I to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. This program is exposing samples of TP 347, RA-85H, HR-3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF-709, 690 clad, and 671 clad, which showed good corrosion resistance from Phase 1, to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and are being controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The exposure will continue for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. After the three exposure times, the samples will be metallurgically examined to determine the wastage rates and mode of attack. The probes were commissioned November 16, 1994. The temperatures are being recorded every 15 minutes, and the weighted average temperature calculated for each sample. Each of the alloys is being exposed to a temperature in each of two temperature bands-1150 to 1260{degrees}F and 1260 to 1325{degrees}F. After 2000 hours of exposure, one of the corrosion probes was cleaned and the wall thicknesses were ultrasonically measured. The alloy performance from the field probes will be discussed.

  14. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  15. Hot Corrosion Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The Hot Corrosion Test Facility (HCTF) at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory (SPL) is a high-velocity, pressurized burner rig currently used to evaluate the environmental durability of advanced ceramic materials such as SiC and Si3N4. The HCTF uses laboratory service air which is preheated, mixed with jet fuel, and ignited to simulate the conditions of a gas turbine engine. Air, fuel, and water systems are computer-controlled to maintain test conditions which include maximum air flows of 250 kg/hr (550 lbm/hr), pressures of 100-600 kPa (1-6 atm), and gas temperatures exceeding 1500 C (2732 F). The HCTF provides a relatively inexpensive, yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials, and the injection of a salt solution provides the added capability of conducting hot corrosion studies.

  16. Using Uncertainty Analysis to Guide the Development of Accelerated Stress Tests (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2014-03-01

    Extrapolation of accelerated testing to the long-term results expected in the field has uncertainty associated with the acceleration factors and the range of possible stresses in the field. When multiple stresses (such as temperature and humidity) can be used to increase the acceleration, the uncertainty may be reduced according to which stress factors are used to accelerate the degradation.

  17. Mir Cooperative Solar Array Project Accelerated Life Thermal Cycling Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint U.S./Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA will be used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station. The MCSA was brought to Mir by space shuttle Atlantis in November 1995. This report describes an accelerated thermal life cycle test which was performed on two samples of the MCSA. In eight months time, two MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles. There was no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early and removed from consideration. The nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell is briefly discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the U.S. solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit). This was considered a successful development test.

  18. Using Accelerated Testing To Predict Module Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-07-01

    Long-term reliability is critical to the cost effectiveness and commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) products. Today most PV modules are warranted for 25 years, but there is no accepted test protocol to validate a 25-year lifetime. The qualification tests do an excellent job of identifying design, materials, and process flaws that are likely to lead to premature failure (infant mortality), but they are not designed to test for wear-out mechanisms that limit lifetime. This paper presents a method for evaluating the ability of a new PV module technology to survive long-term exposure to specific stresses. The authors propose the use of baseline technologies with proven long-term field performance as controls in the accelerated stress tests. The performance of new-technology modules can then be evaluated versus that of proven-technology modules. If the new-technology demonstrates equivalent or superior performance to the proven one, there is a high likelihood that they will survive versus the tested stress in the real world.

  19. Simulation of natural corrosion by vapor hydration test: seven-year results

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    We have investigated the alteration behavior of synthetic basalt and SRL 165 borosilicate waste glasses that had been reacted in water vapor at 70 {degrees}C for time periods up to seven years. The nature and extent of corrosion of glasses have been determined by characterizing the reacted glass surface with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Alteration in 70 {degrees}C laboratory tests was compared to that which occurs at 150-200 {degrees}C and also with Hawaiian basaltic glasses of 480 to 750 year old subaerially altered in nature. Synthetic basalt and waste glasses, both containing about 50 percent wt SiO{sub 2} were found to react with water vapor to form an amorphous hydrated gel that contained small amounts of clay, nearly identical to palagonite layers formed on naturally altered basaltic glass. This result implies that the corrosion reaction in nature can be simulated with a vapor hydration test. These tests also provide a means for measuring the corrosion kinetics, which are difficult to determine by studying natural samples because alteration layers have often spelled off the samples and we have only limited knowledge of the conditions under which alteration occurred.

  20. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2012-09-30

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding. It involves placing a thin foil of zinc (Zn) between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the Zn melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The Zn then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. Laboratory testing has shown that the diffusion rate of Zn through the FeCrAl alloy is much faster than through the nickel superalloys. This means that the FeCrAl will serve as a sink for the Zn bonding alloy during the evaporative metal bonding process. Also, the testing has shown that the Zn diffusion mechanism is bulk diffusion, and not intergranular. This is a surprise. However, it means that quantification of the Zn diffusivities in these samples will be significantly simpler than would have been the case if grain boundary diffusion dominated. In addition to the laboratory testing, gas impinger and particulate samples are being collected from a combustor firing syngas and natural gas to determine what types of microcontaminants may reach a turbine firing syngas. The syngas is created in one of two different pilot-scale pressurized coal gasifiers. The initial analysis of the impinger solutions was for standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 29 determination of hazardous metals and did not include major element analysis. When syngas is fired, the amount of Mn in the combustor gas increases substantially. Halogens (Br2 and Cl2) and hydrogen

  1. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wady, P. T.; Draude, A.; Shubeita, S. M.; Smith, A. D.; Mason, N.; Pimblott, S. M.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5-6 cm2, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  2. Corrosion-erosion test of SS316L grain boundary engineering material (GBEM) in lead bismuth flowing loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Kenji; Hamaguchi, Dai; Tezuka, Masao; Miyagi, Masanori; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the lifetime of structural materials utilized in a spallation neutron source, corrosion tests in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) have been done at JAEA. Austenitic steels are preferable as the structural material for ADS. However, previous studies have revealed that austenitic steel SS316 shows severe corrosion-erosion in LBE because of LBE penetration through grain boundaries and separation of grains. So it was considered that GBE (grain-boundary engineered) materials may be effective to improve the corrosion resistance of austenitic steels in LBE. In this study, the results of corrosion tests on austenitic steel SS316L-BM (base metal) and SS316L-GBEM (grain-boundary-engineered material) under flowing LBE conditions will be reported. The corrosion test was performed using the JAEA lead-bismuth material corrosion loop (JLBL-1). The experimental conditions were as follows: The high and low temperature parts of the loop were 450 °C and 350 °C, respectively. The flow velocity at the test specimens was about 0.7 m/s. The oxygen concentration in LBE was not controlled and was estimated to have been very low. After the 3600 h of operation, macroscopic, SEM, and SIM observations and EDX analysis were carried out. The results showed that the corrosion depth and LBE penetration through the grain boundaries of the 316SS-GBEM were smaller than those of the 316SS-BM.

  3. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  4. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  5. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, J.A.S.; Graef, L.L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros E-mail: leilagraef@usp.br E-mail: svasil@academyofathens.gr

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons–Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current 'quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  6. Power-conditioning system for the Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.A.; Smith, M.E.; Birx, D.L.; Branum, D.R.; Cook, E.G.; Copp, R.L.; Lee, F.D.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D.; Speckert, G.C.

    1982-06-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed, linear induction, electron accelerator currently under construction and nearing completion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 near Livermore, California. The ATA is a 50 MeV, 10 kA machine capable of generating electron beam pulses at a 1 kHz rate in a 10 pulse burst, 5 pps average, with a pulse width of 70 ns FWHM. Ten 18 kV power supplies are used to charge 25 capacitor banks with a total energy storage of 8 megajoules. Energy is transferred from the capacitor banks in 500 microsecond pulses through 25 Command Resonant Charge units (CRC) to 233 Thyratron Switch Chassis. Each Thyratron Switch Chassis contains a 2.5 microfarad capacitor and is charged to 25 kV (780 joules) with voltage regulation of +- .05%. These capacitors are switched into 10:1 step-up resonant transformers to charge 233 Blumleins to 250 kV in 20 microseconds. A magnetic modulator is used instead of a Blumlein to drive the grid of the injector.

  7. Lessons learned on the Ground Test Accelerator control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, A.J.; Weiss, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    When we initiated the control system design for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), we envisioned a system that would be flexible enough to handle the changing requirements of an experimental project. This control system would use a developers` toolkit to reduce the cost and time to develop applications for GTA, and through the use of open standards, the system would accommodate unforeseen requirements as they arose. Furthermore, we would attempt to demonstrate on GTA a level of automation far beyond that achieved by existing accelerator control systems. How well did we achieve these goals? What were the stumbling blocks to deploying the control system, and what assumptions did we make about requirements that turned out to be incorrect? In this paper we look at the process of developing a control system that evolved into what is now the ``Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System`` (EPICS). Also, we assess the impact of this system on the GTA project, as well as the impact of GTA on EPICS. The lessons learned on GTA will be valuable for future projects.

  8. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Graef, L. L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current `quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  9. Research on a new type of fiber Bragg grating based corrosion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Song, Shide; Wang, Xiaona; Zhou, Weijie; Zhang, Zuocai

    2015-08-01

    Investigations of the corrosion of rebars in concrete structures are widely studied because of the serious damage to concrete caused by rebar corrosion. The rebar corrosion products in reinforced concrete take up 2~6 times the volume of the rebar. Based on this principle, a new type of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) corrosion sensor is proposed in this paper, which consists of two sensors, an FBG corrosion measurement sensor to measure the expansion strain caused by rebar corrosion, and a temperature compensation sensor to eliminate the cross-sensitivity of FBG corrosion sensor. The corrosion rate is derived by the wavelength shift of FBG corrosion sensor, so rebar corrosion can be monitored and assessed by the FBG wavelength shift. A customized rebar with epoxy fixing groove is designed to install a corrosion sensor on its surface and an embedded temperature compensation sensor. The corrosion sensor is embedded in cement mortar and subsequently casted in concrete. The performance of the corrosion sensor is studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that the new type of corrosion sensor has advantage of relatively large measurement range of corrosion rate. The corrosion sensor is suitable to monitor slightly and moderately corroded rebars.

  10. Integration Test of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a 4 kilowatt-class Hall propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. NASA science mission performance analysis was completed using the latest high voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAc) and Aerojet-Rocketdyne's state-of-the-art BPT-4000 Hall thruster performance curves. Mission analysis results indicated that the HiVHAc thruster out performs the BPT-4000 thruster for all but one of the missions studied. Tests of the HiVHAc system major components were performed. Performance evaluation of the HiVHAc thruster at NASA Glenn's vacuum facility 5 indicated that thruster performance was lower than performance levels attained during tests in vacuum facility 12 due to the lower background pressures attained during vacuum facility 5 tests when compared to vacuum facility 12. Voltage-Current characterization of the HiVHAc thruster in vacuum facility 5 showed that the HiVHAc thruster can operate stably for a wide range of anode flow rates for discharge voltages between 250 and 600 volts. A Colorado Power Electronics enhanced brassboard power processing unit was tested in vacuum for 1,500 hours and the unit demonstrated discharge module efficiency of 96.3% at 3.9 kilowatts and 650 volts. Stand-alone open and closed loop tests of a VACCO TRL 6 xenon flow control module were also performed. An integrated test of the HiVHAc thruster, brassboard power processing unit, and xenon flow control module was performed and confirmed that integrated operation of the HiVHAc system major components. Future plans include continuing the maturation of the HiVHAc system major components and the performance of a single-string integration test.

  11. Improved PFB operations: 400-hour turbine test results. [coal combustion products and hot corrosion in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.; Benford, S. M.; Zellars, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    A pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) coal-burning reactor was used to provide hot effluent gases for operation of a small gas turbine. Preliminary tests determined the optimum operating conditions that would result in minimum bed particle carryover in the combustion gases. Solids were removed from the gases before they could be transported into the test turbine by use of a modified two stage cyclone separator. Design changes and refined operation procedures resulted in a significant decrease in particle carryover, from 2800 to 93 ppm (1.5 to 0.05 grains/std cu ft), with minimal drop in gas temperature and pressure. The achievement of stable burn conditions and low solids loadings made possible a 400 hr test of small superalloy rotor, 15 cm (6 in.) in diameter, operating in the effluent. Blades removed and examined metallographically after 200 hr exhibited accelerated oxidation over most of the blade surface, with subsurface alumina penetration to 20 micron m. After 400 hours, average erosion loss was about 25 micron m (1 mil). Sulfide particles, indicating hot corrosion, were present in depletion zones, and their presence corresponded in general to the areas of adherent solids deposit. Sulfidation appears to be a materials problem equal in importance to erosion.

  12. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.

    1997-12-01

    In Phase 1 a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347 RA-85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 Ta modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for approximately 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were assembled on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, the probe was installed in the reheater activity of the boiler and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The results will be presented for the preliminary metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 16,000 hours of exposure. Continued metallurgical and interpretive analysis is still on going.

  13. A flexible and configurable system to test accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzy M. Nogiec et al.

    2001-07-20

    Fermilab's accelerator magnet R and D programs, including production of superconducting high gradient quadrupoles for the LHC insertion regions, require rigorous yet flexible magnetic measurement systems. Measurement systems must be capable of handling various types of hardware and extensible to all measurement technologies and analysis algorithms. A tailorable software system that satisfies these requirements is discussed. This single system, capable of distributed parallel signal processing, is built on top of a flexible component-based framework that allows for easy reconfiguration and run-time modification. Both core and domain-specific components can be assembled into various magnet test or analysis systems. The system configured to comprise a rotating coil harmonics measurement is presented. Technologies as Java, OODB, XML, JavaBeans, software bus and component-based architectures are used.

  14. The Status of Turkish Accelerator Center Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yavas, Oe.

    2007-04-23

    Recently, conceptual design of Turkic Accelerator Center (TAC) proposal was completed. Main goal of this proposal is a charm factory that consists of a linac-ring type electron-positron collider. In addition, synchrotron radiation from the positron ring and free electron laser from the electron linac are proposed. The project related with this proposal has been accepted by Turkish government. It is planned that the Technical Design Report of TAC will have been written in next three years. In this period, an infrared oscillator free electron laser (IR FEL) will be constructed as a test facility for TAC. 20 and 50 MeV electron energies will be used to obtain infra red free electron laser. The main parameters of the electron linac, the optical cavities and the free electron laser were determined. The possible use of obtained laser beam in basic and applied research areas such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, semiconductors and photo chemistry were stated.

  15. The use of accelerated radiation testing for avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Heather

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for military and national security applications has been increasing. One possible use of these vehicles is as remote sensing platforms, where the UAV carries several sensors to provide real-time information about biological, chemical or radiological agents that might have been released into the environment. One such UAV, the Global Hawk, has a payload space that can carry nearly one ton of sensing equipment, which makes these platforms significantly larger than many satellites. Given the size of the potential payload and the heightened radiation environment at high altitudes, these systems could be affected by the radiation-induced failure mechanisms from the naturally occurring terrestrial environment. In this paper, we will explore the use of accelerated radiation testing to prepare UAV payloads for deployment.

  16. Vibrational Stability of SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Recently developed, the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facilities at Fermilab support the International Linear Collider (ILC), High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These facilities; Meson Detector Building (MDB) and New Muon Lab (NML) have very different foundations, structures, relative elevations with respect to grade level and surrounding soil composition. Also, there are differences in the operating equipment and their proximity to the primary machine. All the future machines have stringent operational stability requirements. The present study examines both near-field and ambient vibration in order to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of near-field sources (e.g. compressors, ultra-high and standard vacuum equipment, klystrons, modulators, utility fans and pumps) and distant noise sources to the overall system displacements. Facility vibration measurement results and methods of possible isolation from noise sources are presented and discussed.

  17. The chloride stress-corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steels under different test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L. Z.

    1994-12-01

    Chloride-induced stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the failure modes of stainless steels. Highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels S32654, S31254, and N08028, and duplex grades S32750 and S31803 possess much improved resistance to SCC compared with S30400 and S31600 steels. With the development of a database, SSData, experimental data collected from calcium chloride tests, autoclave tests, and drop evaporation tests were evaluated. Stress-corrosion cracking data generated by autoclave tests agreed well with the practical service conditions and can be used to discriminate alloys for SCC resistance in sodium chloride solution. Drop evaporation test data can be used in situations where evaporation may occur and cyclic loading may be involved. The SCC resistance of alloys under each method increased with increasing molybdenum equivalent Mo + 0.25Cr + 0.1Ni. For a given alloy, the testing result depends on the stress state and environment; different test methods can give different ranking orders concerning SCC resistance. The performance of duplex stainless steels in a chloride-containing environment at higher temperatures was not as good as expected when dynamic loading was involved.

  18. Material Corrosion and Plate-Out Test of Types 304L and 316L Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    2001-02-06

    Corrosion and plate-out tests were performed on 304L and 316L stainless steel in pretreated Envelope B and Envelope C solutions. Flat coupons of the two stainless steels were exposed to 100 degrees C liquid and to 74 degrees C and 88 degrees C vapor above the solutions for 61 days. No significant corrosion was observed either by weight-loss measurements or by microscopic examination. Most coupons had small weight gains due to plate-out of solids, which remained to some extent even after 24-hour immersion in 1 N nitric acid at room temperature. Plate-out was more significant in the Envelope B coupons, with film thickness from less than 0.001 in. to 0.003-inches.

  19. An integrated testing strategy for in vitro skin corrosion and irritation assessment using SkinEthic™ Reconstructed Human Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Alépée, Nathalie; Grandidier, Marie-Hélène; Tornier, Carine; Cotovio, José

    2015-10-01

    The SkinEthic™ Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) method has been formally adopted for the regulatory assessment of skin irritation (OECD TG 439) and corrosion (OECD TG 431). Recently, the OECD adopted an Integrated Approach on Testing and Assessment (IATA) for skin corrosion and skin irritation (OECD GD 203), which provides guidance on the integration of existing and new information in a modular approach for classification and labelling. The present study aimed to evaluate the use of the SkinEthic™ RHE model within the proposed OECD IATA. Data on 86 substances were integrated in a bottom-up and top-down testing strategy to assess their capacity for EU CLP and UN GHS classifications. For EU CLP, strategies showed an accuracy of 84.8% to discriminate non-classified from classified substances, 94.4% to discriminate corrosive from non-corrosive substances, and 68.5% to discriminate the four (sub)-categories. For UN GHS, strategies showed an accuracy of 89.5% to discriminate non-classified from classified substances, 93.4% to discriminate corrosive from non-corrosive substances, and 74.2% to discriminate four GHS (sub)-categories (excluding Category 3). In conclusion, the integration of SkinEthic™ RHE irritation and corrosion data in a bottom-up and top-down testing strategy allows the classification of substances according to EU CLP and UN GHS. PMID:26187475

  20. Users' guide for the Accelerated Leach Test Computer Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.H.; Pietrzak, R.; Franz, Eena-Mai; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    This report is a step-by-step guide for the Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) Computer Program developed to accompany a new leach test for solidified waste forms. The program is designed to be used as a tool for performing the calculations necessary to analyze leach test data, a modeling program to determine if diffusion is the operating leaching mechanism (and, if not, to indicate other possible mechanisms), and a means to make extrapolations using the diffusion models. The ALT program contains four mathematical models that can be used to represent the data. The leaching mechanisms described by these models are: (1) diffusion through a semi-infinite medium (for low fractional releases), (2) diffusion through a finite cylinder (for high fractional releases), (3) diffusion plus partitioning of the source term, (4) solubility limited leaching. Results are presented as a graph containing the experimental data and the best-fit model curve. Results can also be output as LOTUS 1-2-3 files. 2 refs.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    SciTech Connect

    Bulischeck, T.S.; Van Rooyen, D.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear grade production tubing of Alloy 600 was evaluated for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in high purity water at 365, 345, 325, and 290 C. Reverse tube U-bend specimens provided crack initiation data and constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in th crack propagation stage. Initial results indicate that a linear extrapolation of data received from high temperature tests can be used to predict the service life of steam generator tubing that has been plastically deformed or is continually deforming by ''denting.''

  2. Hot corrosion of S-57, 1 cobalt-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    A cobalt base alloy, S-57, was hot corrosion tested in Mach 0.3 burner rig combustion gases at maximum alloy temperatures of 900 and 1000 C. Various salt concentrations were injected into the burner: 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 ppm synthetic sea salt and 4 ppm sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). S-57 underwent accelerated corrosion only under the most severe test conditions, for example, 4 ppm Na2SO4 at 900 C. The process of the accelerated corrosion was primarily sulfidation.

  3. Monitoring accelerated carbonation on standard Portland cement mortar by nonlinear resonance acoustic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Borrachero, M. V.; Payá, J.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonation is an important deleterious process for concrete structures. Carbonation begins when carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the atmosphere reacts with portlandite producing calcium carbonate (CaCO3). In severe carbonation conditions, C-S-H gel is decomposed into silica gel (SiO2.nH2O) and CaCO3. As a result, concrete pore water pH decreases (usually below 10) and eventually steel reinforcing bars become unprotected from corrosion agents. Usually, the carbonation of the cementing matrix reduces the porosity, because CaCO3 crystals (calcite and vaterite) occupy more volume than portlandite. In this study, an accelerated carbonation-ageing process is conducted on Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5. The evolution of the carbonation process on mortar is monitored at different levels of ageing until the mortar is almost fully carbonated. A nondestructive technique based on nonlinear acoustic resonance is used to monitor the variation of the constitutive properties upon carbonation. At selected levels of ageing, the compressive strength is obtained. From fractured surfaces the depth of carbonation is determined with phenolphthalein solution. An image analysis of the fractured surfaces is used to quantify the depth of carbonation. The results from resonant acoustic tests revealed a progressive increase of stiffness and a decrease of material nonlinearity.

  4. Degradation mechanisms and accelerated testing in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2010-01-01

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Although there has been recent progress in improving durability, further improvements are needed to meet the commercialization targets. Past improvements have largely been made possible because of the fundamental understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms. By investigating component and cell degradation modes; defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions new materials can be designed to improve durability. Various factors have been shown to affect the useful life of PEM fuel cells. Other issues arise from component optimization. Operational conditions (such as impurities in either the fuel and oxidant stream), cell environment, temperature (including subfreezing exposure), pressure, current, voltage, etc.; or transient versus continuous operation, including start-up and shutdown procedures, represent other factors that can affect cell performance and durability. The need for Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) can be quickly understood given the target lives for fuel cell systems: 5000 hours ({approx} 7 months) for automotive, and 40,000 hrs ({approx} 4.6 years) for stationary systems. Thus testing methods that enable more rapid screening of individual components to determine their durability characteristics, such as off-line environmental testing, are needed for evaluating new component durability in a reasonable turn-around time. This allows proposed improvements in a component to be evaluated rapidly and independently, subsequently allowing rapid advancement in PEM fuel cell durability. These tests are also crucial to developers in order to make sure that they do not sacrifice durability while making improvements in costs (e.g. lower platinum group metal [PGM] loading) and performance (e.g. thinner membrane or a GDL with better water management properties). To

  5. Voltage stress effects on microcircuit accelerated life test failure rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of Arrhenius and Eyring reaction rate models for describing microcircuit aging characteristics as a function of junction temperature and applied voltage was evaluated. The results of a matrix of accelerated life tests with a single metal oxide semiconductor microcircuit operated at six different combinations of temperature and voltage were used to evaluate the models. A total of 450 devices from two different lots were tested at ambient temperatures between 200 C and 250 C and applied voltages between 5 Vdc and 15 Vdc. A statistical analysis of the surface related failure data resulted in bimodal failure distributions comprising two lognormal distributions; a 'freak' distribution observed early in time, and a 'main' distribution observed later in time. The Arrhenius model was shown to provide a good description of device aging as a function of temperature at a fixed voltage. The Eyring model also appeared to provide a reasonable description of main distribution device aging as a function of temperature and voltage. Circuit diagrams are shown.

  6. Corrosion testing of a plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate glass made with Frit B.

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-09-30

    releases of Gd, Hf, and Pu from the glass were also measured. The release of Pu was significantly less than Si at all temperatures and pH values (on a normalized basis). More Gd than Pu or Hf was released from the glass in acidic solutions, but more Pu than Gd or Hf was released in alkaline solutions. Almost all of the released Gd remained in solution in tests conducted in Teflon vessels, whereas about half of the released Pu and Hf became fixed to the Teflon. In tests conducted in Type 304L stainless steel vessels, most of the released Gd, Hf, and Pu became fixed to the steel. The aqueous concentrations of Gd, Hf, and Pu decreased from about 2 x 10{sup -5}, 2 x 10{sup -8}, and 1 x 10{sup -7} M in tests solutions near pH 3.7 to about 1 x 10{sup -9}, 8 x 10{sup -10}, and 1 x 10{sup -8} M in test solutions near pH 10.8, respectively, in the 90 C tests in Teflon vessels (the solutions were not filtered prior to analysis). Vapor hydration tests (VHTs) were conducted at 120 and 200 C with Pu LaBS-B glass and SRL 418 glass, which was made to represent the HLW glass that will be used to macro-encapsulate LaBS glass within the waste form. Some VHTs were conducted with specimens of Pu LaBS-B and SRL 418 glasses that were in contact to study the effect of the solution generated as HLW glass dissolves on the corrosion behavior of Pu LaBS-B glass. Other VHTs were conducted in which the glasses were not in contact. The Pu LaBS-B glass is more durable than the HLW glass under these accelerating test conditions, even when the glasses are in contact. The presence of the SRL 418 glass did not promote the dissolution of the Pu LaBS-B glass significantly. However, Gd, Hf, and Pu were detected in alteration phases formed on the Pu LaBS-B glass surface and in (or on) phases formed by SRL 418 glass degradation, such as analcime. This indicates that Gd, Hf, and Pu were transported from the LaBS glass, through the water film formed on the specimens, and to the SRL 418 glass during the test. The

  7. OTEC biofouling-control and corrosion-protection study at the Seacoast Test Facility: 1981-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Larsen-Basse, J.; Berger, L.R.; Berger, J.A.; Little, B.J.; Stevens, H.C.; Darby, J.B.; Genens, L.E.; Hillis, D.L.

    1985-07-01

    Results from the first two years of operation of the OTEC Seacoast Test Facility in Hawaii are presented. No detectable biofouling from cold water in smooth tubes has been observed. Intermittent, low-level chlorination appears to control biofouling from warm water in smooth tubes. Uniform corrosion of all aluminum alloys is low in warm water, with no pitting observed. In cold water, preliminary data indicate pitting of all alloys, but corrosion is considerably less uniform than in warm water.

  8. The sky is falling: chemical characterization and corrosion evaluation of deposition produced during the static testing of solid rocket motors.

    PubMed

    Doucette, William J; McNeill, Laurie S; Mendenhall, Scout; Hancock, Paul V; Wells, Jason E; Thackeray, Kevin J; Gosen, David P

    2013-03-01

    Static tests of horizontally restrained rocket motors at the ATK facility in Promontory UT, USA result in the deposition of entrained soil and fuel combustion products, referred to as Test Fire Soil (TFS), over areas as large as 30-50 mile (80-130 km) and at distances up to 10-12 miles (16-20 km) from the test site. Chloride is the main combustion product generated from the ammonium perchlorate-aluminum based composite propellant. Deposition sampling/characterization and a 6-month field corrosivity study using mild steel coupons were conducted in conjunction with the February 25th 2010 FSM-17 static test. The TFS deposition rates at the three study sites ranged from 1 to 5 g/min/m. TFS contained significantly more chloride than the surface soil collected from the test site. The TFS collected during two subsequent tests had similarly elevated chloride, suggesting that the results obtained in this study are applicable to other tests assuming that the rocket fuel composition remains similar. The field-deployed coupons exposed to the TFS had higher corrosion rates (3.6-5.0 mpy) than paired non-exposed coupons (1.6-1.8 mpy). Corrosion rates for all coupons decreased over time, but coupons exposed to the TFS always had a higher rate than the non-exposed. Differences in corrosion rates between the three study sites were also observed, with sites receiving more TFS deposition having higher corrosion rates. PMID:23410860

  9. Superheater/intermediate temperature airheater tube corrosion tests in the MHD Coal Fired Flow Facility (Eastern Coal Phase)

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.K.

    1993-11-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained for tub is exposed for 1500--2000 hours in a proof-of-concept magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation test facility to conditions representative of superheater and intermediate temperature air heater (ITAH) components. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-rich deposits, were corroded more than in most pulverized coal fired superheater service, but much less than the highly aggressive liquid phase attack encountered in conventional plants with certain coals and temperatures. Results indicated that, with parabolic corrosion kinetics, type 310 and 253MA stainless steels should be usable to 1400F at hot end of ITAH. At final superheater temperatures, 2.25 and 5 Cr steels were indicated to have parabolic corrosion rates generally below a 0.5 mm/yr criterion, based on corrosion scale thickness. However, unknown amounts of scale loss from spallation made this determination uncertain. Stainless steels 304H, 316H, and 321H had parabolic rates variably above the criterion, but may be servicable under less cyclic conditions. Corrosion rates derived from scale thickness and intergranular corrosion depth measurements are reported, along with scale morphologies and compositions. Implications of results on commercial MHD utilization of the alloys are discussed, as well as the indicated need for more corrosion resistant alloys or coatings under the most severe exposure conditions.

  10. 2000-hour stress-corrosion cracking tests on 90-10 cupronickel in simulated Hanford groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.

    1987-02-01

    Self-loaded fracture mechanics specimens were tested in simulated groundwater at 150/degree/C to evaluate the susceptibility of 90-10 cupronickel to environmentally enhanced cracking. The test duration was 2000 hours. Electron fractographic evidence indicated that no stress corrosion cracking occurred during the test. Compliance methods demonstrated that a substantial amount of crack extension did not occur during the 2000-hour exposure, but this method was insensitive to detecting crack growth increments less than 0.030 inch. Conventional macroscopic examination of fracture surfaces could not be used to determine if any crack extension occurred during the test because stains were observed beyond the original precrack. The stains were attributed to artifacts associated with postcracking procedures. 7 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate. PMID:24084117

  12. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  13. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  14. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and its daughters), {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 {times} 10{sup 8} ft{sup 2}or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling.

  15. LeRC rail accelerators - Test designs and diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, L. M.; Kerslake, W. R.; Sturman, J. C.; Wang, S. Y.; Terdan, F. F.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using rail accelerators for various in-space and to-space propulsion applications was investigated. A 1 meter, 24 sq mm bore accelerator was designed with the goal of demonstrating projectile velocities of 15 km/sec using a peak current of 200 kA. A second rail accelerator, 1 meter long with a 156.25 sq mm bore, was designed with clear polycarbonate sidewalls to permit visual observation of the plasma arc. A study of available diagnostic techniques and their application to the rail accelerator is presented. Specific topics of discussion include the use of interferometry and spectroscopy to examine the plasma armature as well as the use of optical sensors to measure rail displacement during acceleration. Standard diagnostics such as current and voltage measurements are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35053

  16. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  17. In vitro corrosion testing of PVD coatings applied to a surgical grade Co-Cr-Mo alloy.

    PubMed

    Bolton, J; Hu, X

    2002-06-01

    Toxic effects and biological reaction of metallic corrosion and wear products are an important concern for metal on metal artificial joints. Corrosion tests were conducted to study the susceptibility to pitting and localized corrosion, with three coatings, CrN, TiN and DLC, applied to a wrought high carbon Co-Cr-Mo alloy substrate material. Corrosion testing involved the measurement of potential time transients during immersion in a physiological solution and cyclic polarization of specimen potentials into the transpassive range followed by reversal of the potential to scan in the cathodic direction to regain the rest potential E(rest). Resistance to pitting and localized corrosion was assessed by determining the transpassive breakdown potential E(bd) and if any hysteresis generated during the reverse cyclic scan may have caused crossover with the original anodic scan. Three different surface coating conditions were tested namely: (1) as-coated, (2) polished, and (3) indented to penetrate the coating by diamond pyramid hardness indentor. Results showed that all three coatings produced significant improvements in corrosion resistance compared to performance of the wrought cobalt alloy but that some corrosive attack to both the CrN and TiN coatings occurred and some risk of attack to the cobalt alloy substrate existed due to coating defects or when damage to the coating occurred. TiN coatings were highly effective in preventing corrosion provided they were thick enough to produce complete coverage. Thin TiN coatings displayed some tendency to encourage localized attack of the cobalt alloy at coating defects or where the coating suffered mechanical damage. CrN coatings underwent transpassive breakdown more easily and some degree of pitting at defects within the coating was observed, especially when the CrN coating was polished before the test. No corrosive attack of the cobalt alloy substrate was observed when the CrN coating was mechanically damaged by indentation

  18. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  19. Laboratory testing on welded duplex stainless steel line pipe internal corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Condanni, D.; Barteri, M.

    1996-12-01

    Duplex 22% Cr stainless steel (ss) was recommended, at the basic design stage, as the most cost-performing material for intrafield flowlines conveying multiphase sour production from subsea well-heads to production platform. Due to aggressiveness of the production environment [H{sub 2}S partial pressure (pH{sub 2}S) = 14 mbar, CO{sub 2} partial pressure (pCO{sub 2}) = 40 bar, NaCl = 100 g/l, T = 135 C], and partially to the lack of definitive information on the corrosion resistance of welded duplex, some laboratory testing was deemed necessary and performed. The paper presents testing results dealing with localized corrosion and sulfide stress cracking (SSC) resistance of base material and girth-welded seamless tubes 22% Cr duplex, both wrought and centrifugally cast. The last one was considered because of possible procurement difficulties of the first one when required in small quantities and large diameters as in the case of production manifolds. It is concluded that the material can be used in the test environment as girth weld line pipe provided suitable welding technique is adopted.

  20. Dust accelerator tests of the LDEX laboratory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. W.; Bugiel, S.; Hofmann, B.; Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Srama, R.

    2015-10-01

    The LDEX (Lunar Dust EXperiment) sensor onboard lunar orbiter LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) was designed to characterize the size and spatial distributions of micron and sub-micron sized dust grains. Recent results of the data analysis showed strong evidence for the existence of a dust cloud around the moon. LDEX performs in situ measurements of dust impacts along the LADEE or-bit. The impact speed of the observed dust grains is close to 1.7 km/s (the speed of the spacecraft), since the dust grains are considered on bound orbits close to the maximum height of their ballistic motion. LDEX is an impact ionization dust detector for in situ measurements. The detection of a dust grains is based on measuring the charge generated by high speed impacts (>1km/s) on a rhodium coated target. The impact charge Q is a function of both the speed v and the mass m of the impacting dust particle. The characteristic values are dependent on the instrument geometry, the impact surface properties (material), the impact geometry (impact angle) and the particle properties (material, density, speed, mass, shape). In our tests we used PPy-coated olivine and PPy-coated ortho-pyroxene with impact speeds around 1.7 km/s. A LDEX laboratory model was designed and manufactured by the University of Stuttgart. The model is used to support calibration activities of the Univ. of Colorado and to perform special tests (impact angle and impact location variations) at the dust accelerator facility at MPI-K (Heidelberg) which is operated by the IRS of the University of Stuttgart.

  1. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjected to Variable Accelerating Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Kaya, Tarik; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of the functionality of a loop heat pipe that was subjected to variable accelerating forces. The topics include: 1) Summary of LHP (Loop Heat Pipe) Design Parameters; 2) Picture of the LHP; 3) Schematic of Test Setup; 4) Test Configurations; 5) Test Profiles; 6) Overview of Test Results; 7) Start-up; 8) Typical Start-up without Temperature Overshoot; 9) Start-up with a Large Temperature Overshoot; 10) LHP Operation Under Stationary Condition; 11) LHP Operation Under Continuous Acceleration; 12) LHP Operation Under Periodic Acceleration; 13) Effects of Acceleration on Temperature Oscillation and Hysteresis; 14) Temperature Oscillation/Hysteresis vs Spin Rate; and 15) Summary.

  2. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  3. Novel methods for aircraft corrosion monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Richard H.; Criswell, Thomas L.; Ikegami, Roy; Nelson, James; Normand, Eugene; Rutherford, Paul S.; Shrader, John E.

    1995-07-01

    Monitoring aging aircraft for hidden corrosion is a significant problem for both military and civilian aircraft. Under a Wright Laboratory sponsored program, Boeing Defense & Space Group is investigating three novel methods for detecting and monitoring hidden corrosion: (1) atmospheric neutron radiography, (2) 14 MeV neutron activation analysis and (3) fiber optic corrosion sensors. Atmospheric neutron radiography utilizes the presence of neutrons in the upper atmosphere as a source for interrogation of the aircraft structure. Passive track-etch neutron detectors, which have been previously placed on the aircraft, are evaluated during maintenance checks to assess the presence of corrosion. Neutrons generated by an accelerator are used via activation analysis to assess the presence of distinctive elements in corrosion products, particularly oxygen. By using fast (14 MeV) neutrons for the activation, portable, high intensity sources can be employed for field testing of aircraft. The third novel method uses fiber optics as part of a smart structure technology for corrosion detection and monitoring. Fiber optic corrosion sensors are placed in the aircraft at locations known to be susceptible to corrosion. Periodic monitoring of the sensors is used to alert maintenance personnel to the presence and degree of corrosion at specific locations on the aircraft. During the atmospheric neutron experimentation, we identified a fourth method referred to as secondary emission radiography (SER). This paper discusses the development of these methods.

  4. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasscer, D. S.; Morgan, T. O.; Rivera, C.; Ernst, R.; Scott, A. C.; Summerson, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes, and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr). Pitting did not occur in bare 3003 and 3004 samples during the six month test. Pitting did occur to varying degrees in the Alclad and zinc diffusion treated material, but did not penetrate to the base metal. Biofouling countermeasures (intermittent chlorination and brushing) did not affect the corrosion rates to any significant extent. Intermittent chlorination at a level of 0.5 ppm for 28 minutes daily controlled microbiofouling of the samples but did not prevent the development of a macrobiofouling community in areas of the plumbing with low flow.

  5. Optical system for measurement of pyrotechnic test accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Paul; Czajkowski, John; Rehard, John

    1992-12-01

    This effort was directed at comparing the response of several different accelerometer and amplifier combinations to the pyrotechnic pulse simulating the ordnance separation of stages of multistage missiles. These pyrotechnic events can contain peak accelerations in excess of 100,000 G and a frequency content exceeding 100,000 Hz. The main thrust of this work was to compare the several accelerometer systems with each other and with a very accurate laser Doppler displacement meter in order to establish the frequency bands and acceleration amplitudes where the accelerometer systems are in error. The comparisons were made in simple sine-wave and low-acceleration amplitude environments, as well as in very severe pyroshock environments. An optical laser Doppler displacement meter (LDDM) was used to obtain the displacement velocity and acceleration histories, as well as the corresponding shock spectrum.

  6. Corrosion Test Results for Inconel 600 vs Inconel-Stainless UG Bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    The Conversion Project (CP) of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involves converting slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U to a stable form for safe storage. The operation is performed within a few vessels interconnected by valves and 1/2-in. metal tubing. During this conversion, a particularly toxic and corrosive by-product is formed, namely aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF). The production of HF is a result of the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6} and subsequent steam treatments of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. For each mole of UF{sub 6} converted, 6 mol of HF are produced. The HF that forms during conversion combines with water to produce approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt % HF. As this mixture is transferred within the process system, the tubing and valves are exposed to high concentrations of HF in liquid and vapor form. Of particular concern in the system are the almost 30 valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. For these valves, a vendor-supplied UG valve was installed. UG valves consist of an Alloy 400 (Monel) body and stem tip and Alloy 600 (Inconel) bellows. These valves have been used under experimental conditions that simulate the CP. It has been established that they have a finite life when exposed to a HF and air environment. Most failures were seen around the flange at the bottom of the bellows, and it was suspected that this flange and the weld material were not Inconel. In December 2001, the vendor confirmed that this flange was not Inconel but instead was stainless steel 316. After discussions between the vendor and ORNL staff involved with the CP effort, it was decided that the entire wetted area of the bellows would be fabricated from Alloy 600. In March 2002, four newly fabricated bellows assemblies were received from the vendor for the purposes of corrosion testing in HF. This report presents results from the corrosion tests conducted to determine if the new design of the bellows would enhance their corrosion resistance.

  7. Durability analysis of composite structures using the accelerated testing methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraishi, Akira

    The applications of composite materials are increasing significantly due to their excellent properties and design flexibility, and composite materials have completely replaced conventional metals in several applications. However, much larger opportunities will be likely to occur when physical bases for durability characterization become established. Polymeric composite materials are in general viscoelastic, and their stiffness and strength depend on temperature and loading rate. These effects play an important role in the long-term durability of the composite materials, and therefore it is important to develop a durability analysis method for composite structures that considers these effects. The present approach is based on three components, a new accelerated material characterization methodology, statistical analysis of this methodology, and conventional design tools tailored for the temperature and loading rate dependence. The material characterization methodology uses series of short-term tests at elevated temperatures to predict life for wide ranges of temperature and loading conditions. This methodology is based on the empirical relation between the effects of temperature and loading rate on the stiffness and strength of polymeric composite materials. The statistical analysis allows us to create the confidence interval of the prediction, which is essential in generating the design allowables. Common design tools such as failure criteria and cumulative damage laws can be tailored to consider the temperature and loading rate dependence. These components are integrated into the proposed durability analysis and design method for composite structures. The durability design of a composite rotor for the flywheel energy storage system is shown as an example. This example demonstrates that the proposed design method is not significantly different from conventional designs in terms of complexity and required effort.

  8. Report on Electrochemcial Corrosion Testing of 241-SY-102 Grab Samples from the 2012 Grab Sampling Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrwas, Richard B.; Lamothe, Margaret E.

    2013-05-30

    This report describes the results of the electrochemical testing performed on tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples that were collected in support of corrosion mitigation. The objective of the work presented here was to determine corrosion resistance of tank SY-102 to the grab samples collected using electrochemical methods up to 50°C as well as to satisfy data quality objectives. Grab samples were collected at multiple elevations from Riser 003. The electrochemical corrosion testing was planned to consist of linear polarization resistance testing (LPR) and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) testing at 50°C. The temperature would be lowered to 40 °C and the test repeated if the CPP curve indicated pitting corrosion at 50°C. Ifno pitting was indicated by the CPP curve, then a duplicate scan would be repeated at 50°C to confirm the first result. The testing would be complete if the duplicate CPP scan was consistent with the first. This report contains the CPP results of the testing of grab sample 2SY-12-03 and 2SY-12-03DUP composite sample tested under these conditions. There was no indication of pitting at 50°C, and the duplicate scan was in agreement with the first scan. Since no further testing was required, a third scan with a shorter rest time was performed and is present in this report.

  9. Framework for a Comparative Accelerated Testing Standard for PV Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Yamamichi, M.; Sample, T.; Miller, D.; Meakin, D.; Monokroussos, C.; TamizhMani, M.; Kempe, M.; Jordan, D.; Bosco, N.; Hacke, P.; Bermudez, V.; Kondo, M.

    2013-08-01

    As the photovoltaic industry has grown, the interest in comparative accelerated testing has also grown. Private test labs offer testing services that apply greater stress than the standard qualification tests as tools for differentiating products and for gaining increased confidence in long-term PV investments. While the value of a single international standard for comparative accelerated testing is widely acknowledged, the development of a consensus is difficult. This paper strives to identify a technical basis for a comparative standard.

  10. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Form Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Damage tolerance testing development was required to help qualify a new spin forming dome fabrication process for the Ares 1 program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). One challenge of the testing was due to the compound curvature of the dome. The testing was developed on a sub-scale dome with a diameter of approximately 40 inches. The simulated service testing performed was based on the EQTP1102 Rev L 2195 Aluminum Lot Acceptance Simulated Service Test and Analysis Procedure generated by Lockheed Martin for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. This testing is performed on a specimen with an induced flaw of elliptical shape generated by Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) and subsequent fatigue cycling for crack propagation to a predetermined length and depth. The specimen is then loaded in tension at a constant rate of displacement at room temperature until fracture occurs while recording load and strain. An identical specimen with a similar flaw is then proof tested at room temperature to imminent failure based on the critical offset strain achieved by the previous fracture test. If the specimen survives the proof, it is then subjected to cryogenic cycling with loads that are a percentage of the proof load performed at room temperature. If all cryogenic cycles are successful, the specimen is loaded in tension to failure at the end of the test. This standard was generated for flat plate, so a method of translating this to a specimen of compound curvature was required. This was accomplished by fabricating a fixture that maintained the curvature of the specimen rigidly with the exception of approximately one-half inch in the center of the specimen containing the induced flaw. This in conjunction with placing the center of the specimen in the center of the load train allowed for successful testing with a minimal amount of bending introduced into the system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed using the typical double beam assembly and with 4

  11. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  12. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  13. Stability and corrosion testing of a high temperature phase change material for CSP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Bell, Stuart; Tay, Steven; Will, Geoffrey; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the stability and corrosion testing results of a candidate high temperature phase change material (PCM) for potential use in concentrating solar power applications. The investigated PCM is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and Na2CO3 and both are low cost materials. This PCM has a melting temperature of 635 °C and a relatively high latent heat of fusion of 308.1 J/g. The testing was performed by means of an electric furnace subjected to 150 melt-freeze cycles between 600 °C and 650 °C. The results showed that this PCM candidate has no obvious decomposition up to 650 °C after 150 cycles and stainless steel 316 potentially can be used as the containment material under the minimized oxygen atmosphere.

  14. Development of a 20-MeV Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.G.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, R.W.; Bruce, R.L.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lewis, D.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /LET Corp., Washington /Argonne /SLAC /Tsinghua U., Beijing

    2005-06-22

    This paper describes a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by a high-power 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier. The magnicon can presently produce 25 MW of output power in a 250-ns pulse at 10 Hz, and efforts are in progress to increase this to 50 MW. The facility will include a 5 MeV electron inector being developed by the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The DLA test structures are being developed by ANL, and some have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx} 8 MV/m. SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive an injector and accelerator with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRl, is developing a means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by ceramic brazing using an intense millimeter-wave beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year. The facility will be used for testing DLA structures using a variety of materials and configurations, and also for testing other X-band accelerator concepts. The initial goal is to produce a compact 20 MeV dielectric-loaded test accelerator.

  15. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrwas, R. B.

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  16. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Alexander, Joshua B.; Cardenas, Henry E.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2008-01-01

    This work examines field performance of nanoscale pozzolan treatments delivered el ctrokinetically to suppress chloride induced corrosion of concrete reinforcement. The particles are 20 nm silica spheres coated with 2 nm alumina particles that carry a net positive charge. Earlier work demonstrated that the alumina particles were stripped from the silica carriers and formed a dense phase with an interparticle spacing that is small enough to inhibit the transport of solvated chlorides. A D.C. field was used to inject the particles into the pores of concrete specimens, directly toward the mild steel bars that were embedded within each 3 inch diameter by 6 inch length concrete specimen. The voltage was held constant at 25 v per inch of concrete cover for a period of 7 days. These voltages permitted current densities as high as 3 A/sq m. During the final 3 days, a 1 molar solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate was used to provide a source of calcium to facilitate stronger and more densified phase formation within the pores. In a departure from prior work the particle treatments were started concurrent with chloride extraction in order to determine if particle delivery would inhibit chloride transport. Following treatment the specimens were immersed in seawater for 4 weeks. After this posttreatment exposure, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and the steel reinforcement was examined for evidence of corrosion. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted to assess impact on microstructure.

  17. Examination of the 1970 National Bureau of Standards Underground Corrosion Test Welded Stainless STeel Coupons from Site D

    SciTech Connect

    L. R. Zirker; M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder; T. L. Trowbridge

    2008-01-01

    A 1970 study initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), buried over 6000 corrosion coupons or specimens of stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434. The coupons were configured as sheet metal plates, coated plates, cross-welded plates, U-bend samples, sandwiched materials, and welded tubes. All coupons were of various heat-treatments and cold worked conditions and were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. The NBS scientists dug five sets of two trenches at each of the six sites. In each pair of trenches, they buried duplicate sets of stainless steel coupons. The NBS study was designed to retrieve coupons after one year, two years, four years, eight years, and x years in the soil. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed. After the fourth retrieval, the NBS study was abandoned, and the fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 33 years. In 2003, an interdisciplinary research team of industrial, university, and national laboratory investigators were funded under the United States Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP; Project Number 86803) to extract part of the remaining set of coupons at one of the test sites, characterize the stainless steel underground corrosion rates, and examine the fate and transport of metal ions into the soil. Extraction of one trench at one of the test sites occurred in April 2004. This report details only the characterization of corrosion found on the 14 welded coupons–two cross welded plates, six U-bends, and six welded tubes–that were retrieved from Site D, located near Wildwood, NJ. The welded coupons included Type 301, 304, 316, and 409 stainless steels. After 33 years in the soil, corrosion on the coupons varied according to alloy. This report discusses the stress corrosion cracking and

  18. Experimental evaluation of the Battelle accelerated test design for the solar array at Mead, Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frickland, P. O.; Repar, J.

    1982-01-01

    A previously developed test design for accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules was experimentally evaluated. The studies included a review of relevant field experience, environmental chamber cycling of full size modules, and electrical and physical evaluation of the effects of accelerated aging during and after the tests. The test results indicated that thermally induced fatigue of the interconnects was the primary mode of module failure as measured by normalized power output. No chemical change in the silicone encapsulant was detectable after 360 test cycles.

  19. Experimental evaluation of the Battelle accelerated test design for the solar array at Mead, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frickland, P. O.; Repar, J.

    1982-04-01

    A previously developed test design for accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules was experimentally evaluated. The studies included a review of relevant field experience, environmental chamber cycling of full size modules, and electrical and physical evaluation of the effects of accelerated aging during and after the tests. The test results indicated that thermally induced fatigue of the interconnects was the primary mode of module failure as measured by normalized power output. No chemical change in the silicone encapsulant was detectable after 360 test cycles.

  20. The stress-corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys: A comparison of test methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    Two powder metallurgy processed (Al-Li-Cu) alloys with and without Mg addition were studied in aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution during the alternate immersion testing of tuning fork specimens, slow crack growth tests using fracture mechanics specimens, and the slow strain rate testing of straining electrode specimens. Scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography were used to demonstrate the character of the interaction between the Al-Li-Cu alloys and the selected environment. Both alloys are susceptible to SC in an aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution under the right electrochemical and microstructural conditions. Each test method yields important information on the character of the SC behavior. Under all conditions investigated, second phase particles strung out in rows along the extrusion direction in the alloys were rapidly attacked, and played principal role in the SC process. With time, larger pits developed from these rows of smaller pits and under certain electrochemical conditions surface cracks initiated from the larger pits and contributed directly to the fracture process. Evidence to support slow crack growth was observed in both the slow strain rate tests and the sustained immersion tests of precracked fracture mechanics specimens. The possible role of H2 in the stress corrosion cracking process is suggested.

  1. Model boiler testing to evaluate inhibitors for caustic induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Daret, J.; Paine, J.P.N.; Partridge, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A series of model boiler tests, using a mixture of precracked and non-precracked (virgin) tube-to-tube support plate intersections was performed. The testing supported the qualification of inhibitors for mitigating the secondary side corrosion of alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Many utilities suspect that the caustic impurities come from the feedwater. Candidate inhibitors included boric acid (as a reference), cerous acetate, and two forms of titanium dioxide: a laboratory produced titania-silica sol-gel, and manometer sized anatase The latter was combined with a 150 C pre-soaking with a titanium lactate, and was tested with and without a zeta potential treatment by sodium aluminate. Effectiveness of boric acid to prevent and retard caustic induced intergranular corrosion was confirmed in all crevice configurations (open and packed). The cerous acetate treatment multiplied by two to four the time necessary to detect a primary-to-secondary leak on virgin tubes, and reduced the propagation rate on precracked tubes. Cerium was found intimately mixed, as cerianite, with the free span and crevice deposits, when the crevices were sufficiently accessible. Due to its very low solubility and large particle size, the titania-silica sol-gel was unable to penetrate the crevices and had no effect on the degradation process. The nanometric particle size titania treatment and/or the preceding soaking with soluble titanium lactate drastically increased the titanium concentration in free span and open crevice deposit (with no added sodium aluminate, titania reacted with magnetite to form ilmenite) and showed undeniable capacity to prevent tubing degradation. Its effectiveness, in the case of packed crevices and for arresting cracks, was not so conclusive.

  2. Corrosion of high-temperature materials in AFBC environments. Part 2: 4500-h tests

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, T.G.; DeVan, J.H.

    1981-08-01

    Candidate heat exchanger tube materials were tested for times to 4500 h in a small atmospheric-pressure fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) operated by the FluiDyne Engineering Corporation of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The materialso included alloy 800H; types 304, 310, and 316 stainless steel; and aluminized alloy 800H and type 310 stainless steel. These air-cooled tubes were exposed to the AFBC environment with wall temperatures ranging from 820 to 875/sup 0/C, a Ca/S molar ratio of 3.3 to 5.3, 2.5 to 3.5% excess O/sub 2/, and a fluidizing velocity of 0.7 m/s (2.3 fps). A set of low-temperature tubes was also included in the test for the final 3000-h period. These tubes were composites of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel and type 304 stainless steel and were air-cooled to temperatures in the range 480 to 590/sup 0/C. Tubes were removed at intermediate times for metallographic examination. In general, the materials performed well. With one exception, metal wastage was at the lower limit of detection and intergranular corrosion was not severe. Most of the high-temperature samples, however, contained subsurface specks of metal sulfides, primarily of manganese, extending to depths of about 50 ..mu..m. The exception to the good performance noted above was a type 316 stainless steel high-temperature tube exposed for the final 3000-h portion of the 4500-h test. This tube suffered severe sulfidation-oxidation over most of its surface. The absence of such attack on eight other type 316 stainless steel tubes indicated that the position of the affected tube in the bed may have been a more significant corrosion factor than the steel composition per se.

  3. Design and Simulation of IOTA - a Novel Concept of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; Danilov, V.V.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    The use of nonlinear lattices with large betatron tune spreads can increase instability and space charge thresholds due to improved Landau damping. Unfortunately, the majority of nonlinear accelerator lattices turn out to be nonintegrable, producing chaotic motion and a complex network of stable and unstable resonances. Recent advances in finding the integrable nonlinear accelerator lattices have led to a proposal to construct at Fermilab a test accelerator with strong nonlinear focusing which avoids resonances and chaotic particle motion. This presentation will outline the main challenges, theoretical design solutions and construction status of the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) underway at Fermilab.

  4. Comparison of online and offline tests in LED accelerated reliability tests under temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hong-Liang; Jing, Lei; Gao, Qun; Wang, Yao; Hao, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-20

    Accelerated aging tests are the main method used in the evaluation of LED reliability, and can be performed in either online or offline modes. The goal of this study is to provide the difference between the two test modes. In the experiments, the sample is attached to different heat sinks to acquire the optical parameters under different junction temperatures of LEDs. By measuring the junction temperature in the aging process (Tj1), and the junction temperature in the testing process (Tj2), we achieve consistency with an online test of Tj1 and Tj2 and a difference with an offline test of Tj1 and Tj2. Experimental results show that the degradation rate of the luminous flux rises as Tj2 increases, which yields a difference of projected life L(70%) of 8% to 13%. For color shifts over 5000 h of aging, the online test shows a larger variation of the distance from the Planckian locus, about 40% to 50% more than the normal test at an ambient temperature of 25°C. PMID:26836556

  5. Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Program - Elliptical Twin Cavity for Accelerator Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, Andrew; Areti, Hari

    2015-08-01

    Funding is being requested pursuant to the proposals entitled Elliptical Twin Cavity for Accelerator Applications that was submitted and reviewed through the Portfolio Analysis and Management System (PAMS). The PAMS proposal identifier number is 0000219731. The proposed new type of superconducting cavity, the Elliptical Twin Cavity, is capable of accelerating or decelerating beams in two separate beam pipes. This configuration is particularly effective for high-current, low energy electron beams that will be used for bunched beam cooling of high-energy protons or ions. Having the accelerated beam physically separated from the decelerated beam, but interacting with the same RF mode, means that the low energy beam from the gun can be injected into to the superconducting cavity without bends enabling a small beam emittance to be maintained. A staff engineer who has been working with non-standard complicated cavity structures replaces the senior engineer (in the original budget) who is moving on to be a project leader. This is reflected in a slightly increased engineer time and in reduced costs. The Indirect costs for FY16 are lower than the previous projection. As a result, there is no scope reduction.

  6. Monitoring corrosion in prestressed concrete beams using acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Mangual, Jesé; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul H.; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Early detection of corrosion can help reduce the cost of maintenance and extend the service life of structures. Acoustic emission (AE) sensing has proven to be a promising method for early detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete members. A test program is presented composed of four medium-scale prestressed concrete T-beams. Three of the beams have a length of 16 ft. 4 in. (4.98 m), and one is 9 ft. 8 in. (2.95 m). In order to corrode the specimens a 3% NaCl solution was prepared, which is representative of sea salt concentration. The beams were subjected to wet-dry cycles to accelerate the corrosion process. Two of the specimens were pre-cracked prior to conditioning in order to examine the effect of crack presence. AE data was recorded continuously while half-cell potential measurements and corrosion rate by Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) were measured daily. Corrosion current was also being acquired constantly to monitor any change in the concrete resistivity. Results indicate that the onset of corrosion may be identified using AE features, and were corroborated with measurements obtained from electrochemical techniques. Corroded areas were located using source triangulation. The results indicate that cracked specimens showed corrosion activity prior to un-cracked specimens and experienced higher corrosion rates. The level of corrosion was determined using corrosion rate results. Intensity analysis was used to link the corrosion rate and level to AE data.

  7. Rebar corrosion monitoring in concrete structure under salt water enviroment using fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuheng; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Liu, Kun; Wang, Shuang; He, Pan; Yan, Jinlin

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring corrosion of steel reinforcing bars is critical for the durability and safety of reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion sensors based on fiber optic have proved to exhibit meaningful benefits compared with the conventional electric ones. In recent years, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) has been used as a new kind of sensing element in an attempt to directly monitor the corrosion in concrete structure due to its remarkable advantages. In this paper, we present a novel kind of FBG based rebar corrosion monitoring sensor. The rebar corrosion is detected by volume expansion of the corroded rebar by transferring it to the axial strain of FBG when concrete structure is soaked in salt water. An accelerated salt water corrosion test was performed. The experiment results showed the corrosion can be monitored effectively and the corrosion rate is obtained by volume loss rate of rebar.

  8. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  9. Optimized planning of in-service inspections of local flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based units at the Novovoronezh NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Budanov, V. A.; Golubeva, T. N.

    2015-03-01

    Matters concerned with making efficient use of the information-analytical system on the flow-accelerated corrosion problem in setting up in-service examination of the metal of pipeline elements operating in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered. The principles used to select samples of pipeline elements in planning ultrasonic thickness measurements for timely revealing metal thinning due to flow-accelerated corrosion along with reducing the total amount of measurements in the condensate-feedwater path are discussed.

  10. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Zhang, Xuejun; Surma, Jan; Fitzpatrick, Lilly; Montgomery, Eliza; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts are under way to replace current corrosion inhibitors with more environmentally friendly alternatives. However, problems with corrosion inhibition efficiency, coating compatibility and solubility have hindered the use of many of these materials as simple pigment additives.This paper will present technical details on how the Corrosion Technology Lab at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has addressed these issues by encapsulating environmentally friendly inhibitors into organic and inorganic microparticles and microcapsules. The synthetic process for polymer particles was characterized and post-synthesis analysis was performed to determine the interactions between the inhibitors and the encapsulation material. The pH-controlled release of inhibitors from various particle formulations in aqueous base was monitored and compared to both electrochemical and salt immersion accelerated corrosion experiment. Furthermore, synergistic corrosion inhibition effects observed during the corrosion testing of several inhibitor combinations will be presented.

  11. Corrosion test plan to guide canister material selection and design for a tuff repository

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.; van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ballou, L.B.

    1983-11-01

    Corrosion rates and the mode of corrosion attack form a most important basis for selection of canister materials and design of a nuclear waste package. Type 304L stainless steel was selected as the reference material for canister fabrication because of its generally excellent corrosion resistance in water, steam and air. However, 304L may be susceptible to localized and stress-assisted forms of corrosion under certain conditions. Alternative alloys are also investigated; these alloys were chosen because of their improved resistance to these forms of corrosion. The fabrication and welding processes, as well as the glass pouring operation for defense and commercial high-level wastes, may influence the susceptibility of the canister to localized and stress forms of corrosion. 12 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Application of accelerated tool life tests to machining of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Stagner, R.T.

    1980-09-01

    The tool life of several commercial C-2 grade cutting tools used in machining titanium was estimated using two experimental techniques, the quick facing test and the multipass facing test. Comparisons among the tools tested were made statistically by analyzing differences in regression equations derived from test data. Tool life end points were determined by operator judgement, tool force analysis, and tool wear measurement. Of the ten tools tested, nine had the same life under the test conditions.

  13. Fighting Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures such as bridges, parking decks, and balconies are designed to have a service life of over 50 years. All too often, however, many structures fall short of this goal, requiring expensive repairs and protection work earlier than anticipated. The corrosion of reinforced steel within the concrete infrastructure is a major cause for this premature deterioration. Such corrosion is a particularly dangerous problem for the facilities at NASA s Kennedy Space Center. Located near the Atlantic Ocean in Florida, Kennedy is based in one of the most corrosive-prone areas in the world. In order to protect its launch support structures, highways, pipelines, and other steel-reinforced concrete structures, Kennedy engineers developed the Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System. The system utilizes an inorganic coating material that slows or stops the corrosion of reinforced steel members inside concrete structures. Early tests determined that the coating meets the criteria of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for complete protection of steel rebar embedded in concrete. Testing is being continued at the Kennedy's Materials Science Beach Corrosion Test Site.

  14. Corrosion in MDEA sour gas treating plants: Correlation between laboratory testing and field experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bich, N.N.; Vacha, F.; Schubert, R.

    1996-08-01

    Corrosion in MDEA sour gas treating systems operating in severely loaded conditions is investigated using both laboratory data and actual gas plant experience. Effects of acid gas loading, flow turbulence, solution quality, temperature, etc. on corrosion are being studied. Preliminary results indicated severe corrosion of several mm/y would occur if acid gas loading, circulation rate and level of suspended solids are all high. A mitigation strategy based on operating envelopes is formulated.

  15. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing.

    PubMed

    de Alcantara, Naasson P; da Silva, Felipe M; Guimarães, Mateus T; Pereira, Matheus D

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works. PMID:26712754

  16. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    de Alcantara, Naasson P.; da Silva, Felipe M.; Guimarães, Mateus T.; Pereira, Matheus D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works. PMID:26712754

  17. Corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel and anti-corrosion materials in a high acidified chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z. H.; Ge, H. H.; Lin, W. W.; Zong, Y. W.; Liu, S. J.; Shi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of a type 316L (UNS S31603) stainless steel (SS) expansion joint in a simulated leaching solution of sediment on blast furnace gas pipeline in a power plant is investigated by using dynamic potential polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM) and Scan Kelvin Probe (SKP). Severe general corrosion accompanied by pitting corrosion occurs on the type 316L SS surface in this solution. As the immersion period increases, the charge transfer resistance Rct decreases, the dissolution rate accelerates, the surface roughness increases and the surface potential difference enhances significantly. Then eight corrosion-resistant materials are tested, the corrosion rates of type 254SMo SS, type 2507 SS and TA2 are relatively minor in the solution. The corrosion resistance properties of TA2 is most excellent, indicating it would be the superior material choice for blast furnace gas pipeline.

  18. 49 CFR 192.455 - External corrosion control: Buried or submerged pipelines installed after July 31, 1971.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... meters), and soil resistivity measurements at potential profile peak locations, to adequately evaluate... minimum, soil resistivity measurements and tests for corrosion accelerating bacteria, that a corrosive... sentence, the operator shall conduct tests, including pipe-to-soil potential measurements with respect...

  19. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  20. Corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 in heated surface test conditions in simulated Yucca Mountain Nuclear Repository environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badwe, Sunil

    In the nuclear repository conditions, the nuclear waste package wall surfaces will be at elevated temperatures because of the heat generated by fission reactions within the waste. It is anticipated that the ground water may contain varying levels of anions such as chloride, nitrate, sulfate picked up from the rocks. The ground waters could seep through the rock faults and drip on to the waste packages. The dripped water will evaporate due to the heat from the nuclear waste leaving behind concentrated brine which eventually becomes dry salt deposit. The multi-ionic salts in the ground water are expected to be hygroscopic in nature. The next drop of water falling at the same place or the humidity in the repository will transform the hygroscopic salt deposit into a more concentrated brine. This cycle will continue for years and eventually a potentially corrosive brine will be formed on the waste package surface. Hence the waste package surface goes through the alternate wet-dry cycles. These conditions indicate that the concentration and pH of the environment in the repository vary considerably. The conventional corrosion tests hardly simulate these varying environmental conditions. Hence there has been a need to develop an electrochemical test that could closely simulate the anticipated repository conditions stated above. In this research, a new electrochemical method, called as Heated Surface Corrosion testing (HSCT) has been devised and tested. In the conventional testing the electrolyte is heated and in HSCT the working electrode is heated. The present study employs the temperature of 80°C which may be one of the temperatures of the waste package surface. The new HSCT was validated by testing stainless steel type 304. The HSCT was observed to be more aggressive than the conventional tests. Initiation of pitting of SS 304 in chloride solution (pH 3) occurred at much shorter exposure times in the HSCT condition than the exposure time required for pitting in

  1. Design, fabrication and first beam tests of the C-band RF acceleration unit at SINAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wencheng; Gu, Qiang; Sheng, Xing; Wang, Chaopeng; Tong, Dechun; Chen, Lifang; Zhong, Shaopeng; Tan, Jianhao; Lin, Guoqiang; Chen, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhentang

    2016-07-01

    C-band RF acceleration is a crucial technology for the compact Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. A project focusing on C-band RF acceleration technology was launched in 2008, based on high-gradient accelerating structures powered by klystron and pulse compressor units. The target accelerating gradient is 40 MV/m or higher. Recently one prototype of C-band RF unit, consisting of a 1.8 m accelerating structure and a klystron with a TE0115 mode pulse compressor, has been tested with high-power and electron beam. Stable operation at 40 MV/m was demonstrated and, 50 MV/m approached by the end of the test. This paper introduces the C-band R&D program at SINAP and presents the experiment results of high-power and beam tests.

  2. TEST PLAN AND PROCEDURE FOR THE EXAMINATION OF TANK 241-AY-101 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    WYRWAS RB; PAGE JS; COOKE GS

    2012-04-19

    This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

  3. Mechanism of mark deformation in phase-change media tested in an accelerated environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsune, Akemi; Terao, Motoyasu; Miyauchi, Yasushi; Tokushuku, Nobuhiro; Tamura, Reiji

    2007-04-01

    Increased jitter caused by recording marks becoming deformed in an accelerated environmental test was investigated and a model where the change in the speed of crystallization is affected by passive oxidation on the amorphous surface of the recording layer was devised. The model clarified the mechanism by which deformation in the marks caused increased jitter in the accelerated environmental test. Adding nitrogen into the gas when sputtering the protective layer adjacent to the recording film was investigated. It was confirmed that a prototype disk with this protective layer has decreased jitter after a 500 h accelerated test and superior power margins.

  4. Development of a 20 MeV Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.; Long, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lombardi, M.; Lewis, D.; Bruce, R.W.; /Unlisted

    2007-04-13

    This paper presents a progress report on a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the magnicon facility at NRL. The accelerator will be powered by an experimental 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier that presently produces 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator will include a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate DLA structures up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by ANL, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. SLAC has developed components to distribute the power from the two magnicon output arms to the injector and to the DLA accelerating structure with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRL, has investigated means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by a brazing process using an intense 83-GHz beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  5. Development of a 20 MeV Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.; Lombardi, Marcie; Kinkead, Allen K.; Gai, Wei; Power, John G.; Konecny, Richard; Long, Jidong; Jing, Chunguang; Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.; Bruce, Ralph W.; Lewis, David III

    2006-11-27

    This paper presents a progress report on a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the magnicon facility at NRL. The accelerator will be powered by an experimental 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier that presently produces 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator will include a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate DLA structures up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by ANL, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. SLAC has developed components to distribute the power from the two magnicon output arms to the injector and to the DLA accelerating structure with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRL, has investigated means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by a brazing process using an intense 83-GHz beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  6. History of Accelerated and Qualification Testing of Terrestrial Photovoltaic Modules: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.; McMahon, T. J.

    2009-01-01

    We review published literature from 1975 to the present for accelerated stress testing of flat-plate terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) modules. An important facet of this subject is the standard module test sequences that have been adopted by national and international standards organizations, especially those of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The intent and history of these qualification tests, provided in this review, shows that standard module qualification test results cannot be used to obtain or infer a product lifetime. Closely related subjects also discussed include: other limitations of qualification testing, definitions of module lifetime, module product certification, and accelerated life testing.

  7. Testing of Composite Fan Vanes With Erosion-Resistant Coating Accelerated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Sutter, James K.; Otten, Kim D.; Samorezov, Sergey; Perusek, Gail P.

    2004-01-01

    The high-cycle fatigue of composite stator vanes provided an accelerated life-state prior to insertion in a test stand engine. The accelerated testing was performed in the Structural Dynamics Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center under the guidance of Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch personnel. Previous research on fixturing and test procedures developed at Glenn determined that engine vibratory conditions could be simulated for polymer matrix composite vanes by using the excitation of a combined slip table and electrodynamic shaker in Glenn's Structural Dynamics Laboratory. Bench-top testing gave researchers the confidence to test the coated vanes in a full-scale engine test.

  8. Critical assessment of precracked specimen configuration and experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to critically assess the effects of precracked specimen configuration, stress intensity solutions, compliance relationships and other experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Modified compact and double beam wedge-loaded specimens were tested and analyzed to determine the threshold stress intensity factor and stress corrosion crack growth rate. Stress intensity solutions and experimentally determined compliance relationships were developed and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Crack growth data suggests that more effective crack length measurement techniques are necessary to better characterize stress corrosion crack growth. Final load determined by specimen reloading and by compliance did not correlate well, and was considered a major source of interlaboratory variability. Test duration must be determined systematically, accounting for crack length measurement resolution, time for crack arrest, and experimental interferences. This work was conducted as part of a round robin program sponsored by ASTM committees G1.06 and E24.04 to develop a standard test method for stress corrosion testing using precracked specimens.

  9. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  10. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Weele, S.

    1991-08-01

    Fireside corrosion, caused by liquid alkali-iron trisulfates, has been an obstacle to higher steam temperatures and to efficient utilization of high-sulfur coals. Tests simulating the environment in the superheater bank of a pulverized-coal-fired boiler were conducted on several promising new alloys and claddings. Alloys were exposed to a variety of synthetic ash and simulated flue gas compositions at 650 and 700{degrees}C for times ranging up to 800 hours. Included in the testing program were new high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, modified commercial alloys, lean stainless steels (modified Type 316) clad with high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, and intermetallic aluminides. Thickness loss measurements indicated that resistance to attach improved with increasing chromium level. Silicon and aluminum were also helpful in resisting attack, while molybdenum was detrimental to the resistance of the alloys to attack. Three different attack modes were observed on the alloys tested. Alloys with low resistance to attack exhibited uniform wastage, while pitting was observed in more resistant alloys. In addition to surface fluxing by molten alkali-iron trisulfates, subsurface sulfur penetration and intergranular attack also occurred.

  11. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Van Weele, S. )

    1991-08-01

    Fireside corrosion, caused by liquid alkali-iron trisulfates, has been an obstacle to higher steam temperatures and to efficient utilization of high-sulfur coals. Tests simulating the environment in the superheater bank of a pulverized-coal-fired boiler were conducted on several promising new alloys and claddings. Alloys were exposed to a variety of synthetic ash and simulated flue gas compositions at 650 and 700{degrees}C for times ranging up to 800 hours. Included in the testing program were new high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, modified commercial alloys, lean stainless steels (modified Type 316) clad with high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, and intermetallic aluminides. Thickness loss measurements indicated that resistance to attach improved with increasing chromium level. Silicon and aluminum were also helpful in resisting attack, while molybdenum was detrimental to the resistance of the alloys to attack. Three different attack modes were observed on the alloys tested. Alloys with low resistance to attack exhibited uniform wastage, while pitting was observed in more resistant alloys. In addition to surface fluxing by molten alkali-iron trisulfates, subsurface sulfur penetration and intergranular attack also occurred.

  12. Liquefaction corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Baylor, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    The goal of this program is to provide screening data on the susceptibility to corrosion of commercial base metals and welds that are candidate materials of construction for large coal liquefaction plants. Specimens are exposed in operating environments of liquefaction pilot plants and under controlled laboratory conditions to establish acceptable conditions of stress, temperature, time, and environment for candidate alloys. Chemical analyses have been carried out to identify the corrosion-causing constituents of the liquids. The behavior of potential containment materials is being assessed on the basis of results from both in-plant exposure of test specimens as well as results from laboratory tests at ORNL. One portion of the in-plant tests includes exposing stress corrosion cracking specimens in critical areas of liquefaction plants. The critical areas include the dissolver vessel, the pressure letdown vessels, and the factionation columns. Other in-plant tests consist of exposure of corrosion coupons in areas where general corrosion has been severe. These areas include the fractionation columns used for recovery of process and wash solvents. Laboratory tests are being conducted using selected liquid process streams from the pilot plants to simulate SRC environments. Sample materials include the full range of austenitic stainless steels, most of the Inconel, Incoloy and Hastelloy high-nickel alloys, ferritic stainless steels, and Cr-Mo steels, as well as pure materials such as titanium, aluminum and nickel.

  13. Development of a Compact Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator at 11.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    This paper presents a progress report on the development of a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the Magnicon Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The accelerator will be powered by an 11.4-GHz magnicon amplifier that provides up to 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator includes a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures of up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Euclid Techlabs, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone rf testing at NRL at accelerating gradients up to 15 MV/m. The first stage of the accelerator, including the 5-MeV injector, has recently begun operation, and initial operation of the complete dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  14. Analysis of Transmitted Optical Spectrum Enabling Accelerated Testing of CPV Designs: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Kempe, M. D.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2009-07-01

    Reliability of CPV systems' materials is not well known; methods for accelerated UV testing have not been developed. UV and IR spectra transmitted through representative optical systems are evaluated.

  15. Accelerated life testing and temperature dependence of device characteristics in GaAs CHFET devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, M.; Leon, R.; Vu, D. T.; Okuno, J.; Johnson, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerated life testing of GaAs complementary heterojunction field effect transistors (CHFET) was carried out. Temperature dependence of single and synchronous rectifier CHFET device characteristics were also obtained.

  16. Microbial biofilm studies of the Environmental Control and Life Support System water recovery test for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenhuber, D. C.; Huff, T. L.; Rodgers, E. B.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of biofilm accumulation, studies of iodine disinfection of biofilm, and the potential for microbially influenced corrosion in the water recovery test (WRT) are presented. The analysis of WRT components showed the presence of biofilms and organic deposits in selected tubing. Water samples from the WRT contained sulfate-reducing and acid-producing organisms implicated in corrosion processes. Corrosion of an aluminum alloy was accelerated in the presence of these water samples, but stainless steel corrosion rates were not accelerated.

  17. Verification of force and acceleration specifications for random vibration tests of Cassini spacecraft equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kurng Y.; Scharton, Terry D.

    1996-01-01

    The use of force limiting in the random vibration testing of the Cassini spacecraft's subsystems is reported on. A verification of the Cassini equipment random vibration test acceleration and force specifications is provided by interface acceleration and force data measured in acoustic tests of the Cassini spacecraft development test model (DTM). Acoustic tests were performed on the DTM structure with different structural and equipment configurations. The acceleration and force spectra at the interface between the equipment items and the spacecraft DTM structure were measured in the acoustic tests and compared with the equipment random vibration test specifications. The spacecraft's apparent masses were measured at the equipment mounting points and used in force limit predictions.

  18. Development of an accelerated reliability test schedule for terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Prince, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    An accelerated test schedule using a minimum amount of tests and a minimum number of cells has been developed on the basis of stress test results obtained from more than 1500 cells of seven different cell types. The proposed tests, which include bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, power cycle, thermal cycle, and thermal shock tests, use as little as 10 and up to 25 cells, depending on the test type.

  19. Enhancement of the glass corrosion in the presence of clay minerals: Testing experimental results with an integrated glass dissolution model

    SciTech Connect

    Curti, E.; Godon, N.; Vernaz, E.Y.

    1993-12-31

    Recent glass dissolution experiments, conducted at 90{degrees}C in the presence of potential backfill materials, indicate remarkably faster glass corrosion in the presence of clay, compared to tests where the glass is leached either alone or with alternative backfill materials. This effect correlates with the clay content in the backfill, and may be attributed to the removal of silica from solution. Sorption, or dissolution with reprecipitation of a silica-rich clay, have been proposed as possible mechanisms for the silica consumption. The results of some experiments have been tested against a glass dissolution model, in which a widely used kinetic equation for glass corrosion is coupled with diffusive silica transport through a single porosity, linearly sorbing medium, which represents the backfilling. Because the glass corrosion rates imposed by the kinetic equation are inversely proportional to the silicic acid concentration of the leachant contacting the glass, the model predicts enhanced glass dissolution if silica is sorbed by the porous medium. The experimental data proved to be consistent with the predicted enhancement of the glass dissolution. Moreover, the model-estimated distribution coefficients for silica sorption (K{sub d}) fall within the range of values extracted from available literature data, thus supporting the hypothesis that the observed high corrosion rates are due to sorption of silica on the clay mineral surfaces.

  20. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Liao, Leng; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Zhou, Jianting; Yang, Mao; Xia, Runchuan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obtained from magnetic sensor-based measurement and numerical calculation, it is shown that the curves of tangential magnetic field at different lift-off height all intersect near the edge of the steel corrosion zone. The result indicates that the intersection of magnetic field curves can be used to detect and evaluate the range of the inner steel corrosion in engineering structures. The findings of this work propose a new and effective non-destructive test method for steel corrosion, and therefore enlarge the application of the micro-magnetic sensor. PMID:27608029

  1. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  2. Accelerated Fatigue Testing of Stent-Like Diamond Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipse, A.; Schlun, M.; Dreher, G.; Zum Gahr, J.; Rebelo, N.

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the fatigue behavior of stent-like diamond specimens with particular attention paid to the nature of the test specimen, the constitutive model for the finite element analyses and the displacement condition. A newly designed test rig did enhance the investigation and results with respect to the simulation of the expected in vivo displacement conditions. The excellent performance of the new test method presented within our study provides a good basis for future tests without risk of compromised results due to differing characteristics between test specimens and finished stents, inappropriate displacement conditions or constitutive material model and provides a high reliability and applicability of the results to actual stents.

  3. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjective to Variable Accelerations. Part 1; Start-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of accelerating forces on the performance of loop heat pipes (LHP) is of interest and importance to terrestrial and space applications. They are being considered for cooling of military combat vehicles and for spinning spacecraft. In order to investigate the effect of an accelerating force on LHP operation, a miniature LHP was installed on a spin table. Variable accelerating forces were imposed on the LHP by spinning the table at different angular speeds. Several patterns of accelerating forces were applied, i.e. continuous spin at different speeds and periodic spin at different speeds and frequencies. The resulting accelerations ranged from 1.17 g's to 4.7 g's. This paper presents the first part of the experimental study, i.e. the effects of a centrifugal force on the LHP start-up. Tests were conducted by varying the heat load to the evaporator, sink temperature, magnitude and frequency of centrifugal force, and LHP orientation relative to the direction of the accelerating force. The accelerating force seems to have little effect on the loop start-up in terms of temperature overshoot and superheat at boiling incipience. Changes in these parameters seem to be stochastic with or without centrifugal accelerating forces. The LHP started successfully in all tests.

  4. Prototype of a test bench for applied research on Extracted beams of the nuclotron accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Bradnova, V.; Butenko, A. V.; Fedorov, A. N.; Kudashkin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    The results of the development and testing of elements of a test bench for investigating the impact of accelerated particle beams on biological objects, electronics, and other targets are presented. The systems for beam monitoring and target positioning were tested on extracted argon beams in the framework of experiments on studying the radiation hardness of electronic components.

  5. Accelerated Desensitization and Adaptive Attitudes Interventions and Test Gains with Academic Probation Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Richard; Holt, Bruce; Hunter, Lori

    2005-01-01

    The study evaluates the test-gain benefits of an accelerated desensitization and adaptive attitudes intervention for test-anxious students. College students were screened for high test anxiety. Twenty anxious students, half of them on academic probation, were assigned to an Intervention or to a minimal treatment Control group. The Intervention was…

  6. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  7. Design and test of a superconducting magnet in a linear accelerator for an Accelerator Driven Subcritical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanling; Xu, Fengyu; Wang, Ting; Yang, Xiangchen; Chen, Anbin; Wei, Xiaotao; Gao, Yao; Hou, Zhenhua; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Haoshu

    2014-11-01

    A batch superconducting solenoid magnet for the ADS proton linear accelerator has been designed, fabricated, and tested in a vertical dewar in Sept. 2013. A total of ten superconducting magnets will be installed into two separate cryomodules. Each cryomodule contains six superconducting spoke RF cavities for beam acceleration and five solenoid magnets for beam focusing. The multifunction superconducting magnet contains a solenoid for beam focusing and two correctors for orbit correction. The design current for the solenoid magnet is 182 A. A quench performance test shows that the operating current of the solenoid magnet can reach above 300 A after natural quenching on three occasions during current ramping (260 A, 268 A, 308 A). The integrated field strength and leakage field at the nearby superconducting spoke cavities all meet the design requirements. The vertical test checked the reliability of the test dewar and the quench detection system. This paper presents the physical and mechanical design of the batch magnets, the quench detection technique, field measurements, and a discussion of the residual field resulting from persistent current effects.

  8. Status and Plans for an SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-29

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is currently under construction at Fermilab. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, 40 MeV injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and performing beam experiments. With 3 cryomodules installed this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. The facility can accommodate up to 6 cryomodules for a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. This facility will be used to test SRF cryomodules under high intensity beam conditions, RF power equipment, instrumentation, and LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  9. High brightness photocathode injector for BNL Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.; Young, L.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the BNL photocathode (1-1/2 cell) Gun'' operating at 2856 MHZ, is presented. The beam parameters including beam energy, and emittance are calculated. A review of the Gun parameters and full input and output of our analysis with program PARMELA, is given in Section 2, some of our results, are tabulated. The phase plots and the beam parameters, at downstream ends of the elements, from cathode through the cavity, first cell is labeled as element 2; and second cell is labeled as element to the exit of the GUN. The analysis was made for 3 cases, using three different initial values (EO) for the average accelerating gradient (MV/m), for comparison with previous works. For illustration, the field obtained with program SUPERFISH is given, and conclusion including shunt impedances obtained for the cells and the cavity are given in Section 6. PARMELA is used as a standard design program at ATF. At the request of some of the users of program PARMELA, this request of some of the users of program PARMELA, this report include and illustrates some of our data, in the input and output format of the program PARMELA. 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. A modified ASTM G-75 abrasion test helps select candidate alloys for service in a corrosive and abrasive slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, R.A.; Morrison, W.S.; Jenkins, C.F.; Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC )

    1989-01-01

    The design of a hazardous waste immobilization facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) set material requirements for both abrasion resistance and corrosion resistance in process equipment. Standard ASTM slurry wear test G75 was modified to permit evaluation and comparison of abrasive resistance of candidate materials of construction in the laboratory. However, corrosion was found to contribute significantly to overall metal loss during the testing. Consequently, the abrasive slurry used for the testing was modified by adjusting its chemistry to include appropriate corrosive species. The Miller numbers obtained in the modified G75 Miller abrasion test are described. Pilot plant observations for Type 304L austenitic stainless steel were available. These data were used to generate a Morrison-Miller Ratio'' in order to determine anticipated field abrasion properties for other alloys. Hardness for many of the alloys fell in a narrow range about Rockwell B90, but performance varied significantly in response to slurry chemistry. This effect if synergistic may often be overlooked in the selection process, and it needs to be addressed. Some pilot plant testing of other alloys is essential to confirm the calculated abrasion rates and the approach of using the Morrison-Miller ratio. 6 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjective to Variable Accelerations. Part 2; Temperature Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Kaya, Taril; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of accelerating forces on the performance of loop heat pipes (LHP) is of interest and importance to terrestrial and space applications. LHP's are being considered for cooling of military combat vehicles and for spinning spacecraft. In order to investigate the effect of an accelerating force on LHP operation, a miniature LHP was installed on a spin table. Variable accelerating forces were imposed on the LHP by spinning the table at different angular speeds. Several patterns of accelerating forces were applied, i.e. continuous spin at different speeds and periodic spin at different speeds and frequencies. The resulting accelerations ranged from 1.17 g's to 4.7 g's. This paper presents the second part of the experimental study, i.e. the effect of an accelerating force on the LHP operating temperature. It has been known that in stationary tests the LHP operating temperature is a function of the evaporator power and the condenser sink temperature when the compensation temperature is not actively controlled. Results of this test program indicate that any change in the accelerating force will result in a chance in the LHP operating temperature through its influence on the fluid distribution in the evaporator, condenser and compensation chamber. However, the effect is not universal, rather it is a function of other test conditions. A steady, constant acceleration may result in an increase or decrease of the operating temperature, while a periodic spin will lead to a quasi-steady operating temperature over a sufficient time interval. In addition, an accelerating force may lead to temperature hysteresis and changes in the temperature oscillation. In spite of all these effects, the LHP continued to operate without any problems in all tests.

  12. Corrosion of a-Si cells and modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Wen, L.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report on corrosion/erosion phonemena observed in exposing a-Si cells, modules, and specially designed test structures to natural and accelerated test environments. Relevant cell and module I-V curve data used for monitoring degradation are presented. The causes of the observed degradation, methods of mitigation, and consequences for fielded modules are discussed.

  13. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Testing on Unplated and Electroless Gold-Plated Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.

    2000-08-03

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) remediation requires that almost 40 kg of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) be converted to uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). In the process of this conversion, six moles of hydrofluoric acid (HF) are produced for each mole of UF{sub 6} converted. The entire conversion process can be summarized by the following reaction: UF{sub 6} + 3H{sub 2}O {yields} UO{sub 3} + 6HF. (The UO{sub 3} is not stable at high temperatures and therefore decomposes to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). HF is well known for its ability to attack most metals and silica-containing compounds. It reacts rapidly to destroy protective films and can be fatal in very small quantities (e.g., 2% exposure of the body or 50 ppm in air). Because most of the conversion system is made of various metals, the sections that come in contact with HF must be able to withstand corrosion, high temperatures, elevated pressures, and radiation. Consequently, most of these sections will be plated with gold for increased protection of the metal. This report summarizes the results from the tests that were performed on the metal samples. Section 2 covers the approach to the tests, gives a general background of the sample preparation, and then reports the data from the tests. The final section presents a discussion of what was learned from the data and recommendations for uses of these metals in the MSRE conversion process.

  14. Utilizing various test methods to study the stress corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to aluminum-lithium alloys because of rather substantial specific-strength and specific-stiffness advantages offered over commercial 2000and 7000-series aluminum alloys. An obstacle to Al-Li alloy development has been inherent limited ductility. In order to obtain a more refined microstructure, powder metallurgy (P/M) has been employed in alloy development programs. As stress corrosion (SC) of high-strength aluminum alloys has been a major problem in the aircraft industry, the possibility of an employment of Al-Li alloys has been considered, taking into account a use of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Attention is given to a research program concerned with the evaluation of the relative SC resistance of two P/M processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. The behavior of the alloys, with and without an addition of magnesium, was studied with the aid of three test methods. The susceptibility to SC was found to depend on the microstructure of the alloys.

  15. Enabling More than Moore: Accelerated Reliability Testing and Risk Analysis for Advanced Electronics Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza; Evans, John W.

    2014-01-01

    For five decades, the semiconductor industry has distinguished itself by the rapid pace of improvement in miniaturization of electronics products-Moore's Law. Now, scaling hits a brick wall, a paradigm shift. The industry roadmaps recognized the scaling limitation and project that packaging technologies will meet further miniaturization needs or ak.a "More than Moore". This paper presents packaging technology trends and accelerated reliability testing methods currently being practiced. Then, it presents industry status on key advanced electronic packages, factors affecting accelerated solder joint reliability of area array packages, and IPC/JEDEC/Mil specifications for characterizations of assemblies under accelerated thermal and mechanical loading. Finally, it presents an examples demonstrating how Accelerated Testing and Analysis have been effectively employed in the development of complex spacecraft thereby reducing risk. Quantitative assessments necessarily involve the mathematics of probability and statistics. In addition, accelerated tests need to be designed which consider the desired risk posture and schedule for particular project. Such assessments relieve risks without imposing additional costs. and constraints that are not value added for a particular mission. Furthermore, in the course of development of complex systems, variances and defects will inevitably present themselves and require a decision concerning their disposition, necessitating quantitative assessments. In summary, this paper presents a comprehensive view point, from technology to systems, including the benefits and impact of accelerated testing in offsetting risk.

  16. Investigating the feasibility of temperature-controlled accelerated drug release testing for an intravaginal ring.

    PubMed

    Externbrink, Anna; Clark, Meredith R; Friend, David R; Klein, Sandra

    2013-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if temperature can be utilized to accelerate drug release from Nuvaring®, a reservoir type intravaginal ring based on polyethylene vinyl acetate copolymer that releases a constant dose of contraceptive steroids over a duration of 3 weeks. The reciprocating holder apparatus (USP 7) was utilized to determine real-time and accelerated etonogestrel release from ring segments. It was demonstrated that drug release increased with increasing temperature which can be attributed to enhanced drug diffusion. An Arrhenius relationship of the zero-order release constants was established, indicating that temperature is a valid parameter to accelerate drug release from this dosage form and that the release mechanism is maintained under these accelerated test conditions. Accelerated release tests are particularly useful for routine quality control to assist during batch release of extended release formulations that typically release the active over several weeks, months or even years, since they can increase the product shelf life. The accelerated method should therefore be able to discriminate between formulations with different release characteristics that can result from normal manufacturing variance. In the case of Nuvaring®, it is well known that the process parameters during the extrusion process strongly influence the polymeric structure. These changes in the polymeric structure can affect the permeability which, in turn, is reflected in the release properties. Results from this study indicate that changes in the polymeric structure can lead to a different temperature dependence of the release rate, and as a consequence, the accelerated method can become less sensitive to detect changes in the release properties. When the accelerated method is utilized during batch release, it is therefore important to take this possible restriction into account and to evaluate the accelerated method with samples from non

  17. High gas velocity oxidation and hot corrosion testing of oxide dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) nickel-base alloys were tested in high velocity gases for cyclic oxidation resistance at temperatures to 1200 C and times to 500 hours and for hot corrosion resistance at 900 C for 200 hours. Nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS alloys were found to have superior resistance to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to bare and coated nickel-chromium ODS alloys. The best of the alloys tested had compositions of nickel - 15.5 to 16 weight percent chromium with aluminum weight percents between 4.5 and 5.0. All of the nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS materials experienced small weight losses (less than 16 mg/sq cm).

  18. A facility to test short superconducting accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Hess, C.; Lewis, D.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J.; Butteris, J.; McInturff, A.D.; Coulter, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    During the past four years the Superconducting Magnet R&D facility at Fermilab (Lab 2) has successfully tested superconducting dipole, quadrupole, and correction coil magnets less than 2 meters in length for the SSC project and the Tevatron D0/B0 Low-{beta} Insertion. During this time several improvements have been made to the facility that have greatly enhanced its magnet testing capabilities. Among the upgrades have been a new rotating coil and data acquisition system for measuring magnetic fields, a controlled flow liquid helium transfer line using an electronically actuated cryo valve, and stand-alone systems for measuring AC loss and training low current Tevatron correction coil packages. A description of the Lab 2 facilities is presented.

  19. A facility to test short superconducting accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Hess, C.; Lewis, D.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J. ); Butteris, J.; McInturff, A.D. ); Coulter, K.J. )

    1992-10-01

    During the past four years the Superconducting Magnet R D facility at Fermilab (Lab 2) has successfully tested superconducting dipole, quadrupole, and correction coil magnets less than 2 meters in length for the SSC project and the Tevatron D0/B0 Low-[beta] Insertion. During this time several improvements have been made to the facility that have greatly enhanced its magnet testing capabilities. Among the upgrades have been a new rotating coil and data acquisition system for measuring magnetic fields, a controlled flow liquid helium transfer line using an electronically actuated cryo valve, and stand-alone systems for measuring AC loss and training low current Tevatron correction coil packages. A description of the Lab 2 facilities is presented.

  20. Developing an accelerated test of coking tendencies of alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, M.D.; Bagby, M.O.; Schwab, A.W.; Goering, C.E.; Savage, L.D.

    1988-07-01

    Burning vegetable oils in direct-injected diesel engines leads to nozzle and combustion chamber coking and eventually to engine damage. Because typical durability tests to detect coking tendencies of fuels are expensive, a one-cylinder diesel engine was instrumented and automated to enable external detection of engine coking in only 5 h. The heat release pattern revealed shifts to later burning as coke accumulated in the engine, but exhaust emissions showed little correlation with coke accumulation.

  1. Design and Factory Test of the E /E- Frascati Linear Accelerator for DAFNE

    SciTech Connect

    Anamkath, H.; Lyons, S.; Nett, D.; Treas, P.; Whitham, K.; Zante, T.; Miller, R.; Boni, R.; Hsieh, H.; Sannibale, F.; Vescovi, M.; Vignola, G.; /Frascati

    2011-11-28

    The electron-positron accelerator for the DAFNE project has been built and is in test at Titan Beta in Dublin, CA. This S-Band RF linac system utilizes four 45 MW sledded klystrons and 16-3 m accelerating structures to achieve the required performance. It delivers a 4 ampere electron beam to the positron converter and accelerates the resulting positrons to 550 MeV. The converter design uses a 4.3T pulsed tapered flux compressor along with a pseudo-adiabatic tapered field to a 5 KG solenoid over the first two positron accelerating sections. Quadrupole focusing is used after 100 MeV. The system performance is given in Table 1. This paper briefly describes the design and development of the various subassemblies in this system and gives the initial factory test data.

  2. Isolation of a piezoresistive accelerometer used in high acceleration tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, V. I.; Brown, F. A.; Davie, N. T.

    Both uniaxial and triaxial shock isolation techniques for a piezoresistive accelerometer have been developed for pyroshock and impact tests. The uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of -50 to +186 F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. The triaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable results for a temperature range of -50 to 70 F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These temperature ranges, that are beyond the accelerometer manufacturer's operational limits of -30 and +150 F, required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of -50 and +160 F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Since there is no NIST-traceable (National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable) calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000 - 15,000 g for the temperature extremes of -50 and +160 F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The NIST-traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is +\\-5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified by the Sandia Secondary Standards Division with an uncertainty of 6%.

  3. Using Globular Clusters to Test Gravity in the Weak Acceleration Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Marconi, Gianni; Gilmozzi, Roberto; Carraro, Giovanni

    2007-06-01

    We report on the results from an ongoing programme aimed at testing Newton's law of gravity in the low acceleration regime using globular clusters. We find that all clusters studied so far behave like galaxies, that is, their velocity dispersion profiles flatten out at large radii where the acceleration of gravity goes below 10 8 cm s 2, instead of following the expected Keplerian fall-off. In galaxies this behaviour is ascribed to the existence of a dark matter halo. Globular clusters, however, are not supposed to contain dark matter, hence this result might indicate that our present understanding of gravity in the weak regime of accelerations is incomplete and possibly incorrect.

  4. A Qualitative Comparison of the C-Ring Test and the Jones Test as Standard Practice Test Methods for Studying Stress Corrosion Cracking in Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jeffery K; Pawel, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Creep-strength-enhanced-ferritic (CSEF) steels have been widely implemented as water wall alloy materials in the coal-fired power industry for many years. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of this class of materials is currently of significant interest to the industry due to recent failures. To better understand the test methods used to characterize SCC behavior in the laboratory, three representative CSEF alloys (T23, T24, and T92) were subjected to two SCC test protocols: the Jones Test set forth in DIN 50915, and the C-ring SCC test set forth in ASTM G38-01. Samples were tested in either the as-received (normalized + tempered) condition or in the normalized condition (quenched from 1065 C). Samples were exposed to aerated water in one test case and de-aerated water in a second test case for a period of 7 days at 200 C. It was found that for both test protocols, the normalized condition with aerated water led to severe cracking for all three alloys, whereas no evidence of cracking was found for the other conditions.

  5. Technological Issues and High Gradient Test Results on X-Band Molybdenum Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Spataro, B.; Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V.; Dolgashev, V.; Haase, A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Marrelli, C.; Mostacci, A.; Parodi, R.; Yeremian, A.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-24

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK (Ko Enerugi Kasokuki Kenkyu Kiko). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  6. High irradiance UV/condensation testers allow faster accelerated weathering test results

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, P.J.; Fedor, G.R.

    1993-12-31

    Because outdoor exposures are so time consuming, accelerated laboratory testing is used extensively by industry. One of the more popular laboratory weathering testers is the ASTM G53 UV/Condensation device, also known as the QUV. This paper examines an enhancement to the G53 weather tester that allows precise control of light output and higher than previous light intensity levels. Data is presented on the accelerating effect of higher irradiance on several common polymers.

  7. Susceptibility of stainless steel weldments to microbiologically influenced corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, S.W.

    1993-12-31

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is the term used for the phenomenon where corrosion is initiated or accelerated by microorganisms. Biofilms of bacteria form on metal surfaces when exposed to natural waters. The activity of these biofilms and how they attach themselves to metal surfaces directly influence corrosion mechanisms. This paper describes the mechanisms for MIC and the factors which influence the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weldments to MIC. The metallurgical, microbiological and electrochemical factors that influence MIC are discussed. Case histories of MIC-related failures and field test results of austenitic stainless steel weldments in various welded conditions are presented.

  8. Isolation of a piezoresistive accelerometer used in high acceleration tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1992-12-31

    Both uniaxial and triaxial shock isolation techniques for a piezoresistive accelerometer have been developed for pyroshock and impact tests. The uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to +186{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. The triaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable results for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to 70{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These temperature ranges, that are beyond the accelerometer manufacturer`s operational limits of {minus}30{degree}F and +150{degree}F, required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degree}F and +160{degree}F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Since there is no NIST-traceable (National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable) calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000 g - 15,000 g for the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degree}F and +160{degree}F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The NIST-traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is {plus_minus}5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified by the Sandia Secondary Standards Division with an uncertainty of 6%.

  9. ACCELERATORS Control system for the CSNS ion source test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan-Hua; Li, Gang; Ouyang, Hua-Fu

    2010-12-01

    A penning plasma surface H- ion source test stand for the CSNS has just been constructed at the IHEP. In order to achieve a safe and reliable system, nearly all devices of the ion source are designed to have the capability of both local and remote operation function. The control system consists of PLCs and EPICS real-time software tools separately serving device control and monitoring, PLC integration and OPI support. This paper summarizes the hardware and software implementation satisfying the requirements of the ion source control system.

  10. Accelerated test program for sealed nickel-cadmium spacecraft batteries/cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was examined of inducing an accelerated test on sealed Nickel-Cadmium batteries or cells as a tool for spacecraft projects and battery users to determine: (1) the prediction of life capability; (2) a method of evaluating the effect of design and component changes in cells; and (3) a means of reducing time and cost of cell testing.

  11. Kerr black holes as accelerators of spinning test particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Minyong; Gao, Sijie

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown that ultraenergetic collisions can occur near the horizon of an extremal Kerr black hole. Previous studies mainly focused on geodesic motions of particles. In this paper, we consider spinning test particles whose orbits are nongeodesic. By employing the Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equation, we find the critical angular momentum satisfies J =2 E for extremal Kerr black holes. Although the conserved angular momentum J and energy E have been redefined in the presence of spin, the critical condition remains the same form. If a particle with this angular momentum collides with another particle arbitrarily close to the horizon of the black hole, the center-of-mass energy can be arbitrarily high. We also prove that arbitrarily high energies cannot be obtained for spinning particles near the horizons of nonextremal Kerr black holes.

  12. Accelerated/abbreviated test methods for predicting life of solar cell encapsulants to Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology for the encapsulation task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolyer, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    An important principle is that encapsulants should be tested in a total array system allowing realistic interaction of components. Therefore, micromodule test specimens were fabricated with a variety of encapsulants, substrates, and types of circuitry. One common failure mode was corrosion of circuitry and solar cell metallization due to moisture penetration. Another was darkening and/or opacification of encapsulant. A test program plan was proposed. It includes multicondition accelerated exposure. Another method was hyperaccelerated photochemical exposure using a solar concentrator. It simulates 20 year of sunlight exposure in a short period of one to two weeks. The study was beneficial in identifying some cost effective encapsulants and array designs.

  13. Comparison of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Laser Machined and Milled 304 L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, Aniruddha; Nagpure, D. C.; Rai, S. K.; Singh, M. K.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Amrendra; Tiwari, M. K.; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-07-01

    Machining of austenitic stainless steel components is known to introduce significant enhancement in their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The paper compares stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined 304 L stainless steel specimens with conventionally milled counterpart in chloride environment. With respect to conventionally milled specimens, laser machined specimens displayed more than 12 times longer crack initiation time in accelerated stress corrosion cracking test in boiling magnesium chloride as per ASTM G36. Reduced stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined surface is attributed to its predominantly ferritic duplex microstructure in which anodic ferrite phase was under compressive stress with respect to cathodic austenite.

  14. Space Mechanisms Lessons Learned and Accelerated Testing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    A number of mechanism (mechanical moving component) failures and anomalies have recently occurred on satellites. In addition, more demanding operating and life requirements have caused mechanism failures or anomalies to occur even before some satellites were launched (e.g., during the qualification testing of GOES-NEXT, CERES, and the Space Station Freedom Beta Joint Gimbal). For these reasons, it is imperative to determine which mechanisms worked in the past and which have failed so that the best selection of mechanically moving components can be made for future satellites. It is also important to know where the problem areas are so that timely decisions can be made on the initiation of research to develop future needed technology. To chronicle the life and performance characteristics of mechanisms operating in a space environment, a Space Mechanisms Lessons Learned Study was conducted. The work was conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and by Mechanical Technologies Inc. (MTI) under contract NAS3-27086. The expectation of the study was to capture and retrieve information relating to the life and performance of mechanisms operating in the space environment to determine what components had operated successfully and what components had produced anomalies.

  15. An accelerated stress testing program for determining the reliability sensitivity of silicon solar cells to encapsulation and metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Davis, C. W.; Royal, E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of accelerated testing methods in a program to determine the reliability attributes of terrestrial silicon solar cells is discussed. Different failure modes are to be expected when cells with and without encapsulation are subjected to accelerated testing and separate test schedules for each are described. Unencapsulated test cells having slight variations in metallization are used to illustrate how accelerated testing can highlight different diffusion related failure mechanisms. The usefulness of accelerated testing when applied to encapsulated cells is illustrated by results showing that moisture related degradation may be many times worse with some forms of encapsulation than with no encapsulation at all.

  16. Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Francfort; J. Argueta; M. Wehrey; D. Karner; L. Tyree

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

  17. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    SciTech Connect

    Böckmann, Torsten A.; Korth, Olaf; Clausen, Matthias; Schoeneburg, Bernd

    2014-01-29

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning.

  18. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böckmann, Torsten A.; Korth, Olaf; Clausen, Matthias; Schoeneburg, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning.

  19. 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating 9-cell cavity vertical test results

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Timergali; Cooper, Charles; Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Edwards, Helen; Foley, Mike; Harms, Elvin; Mitchell, Donald; Rowe, Allan; Solyak, Nikolay; Moeller, Wolf-Dietrich; /DESY

    2007-06-01

    The 3rd harmonic 3.9GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam performance of the FLASH (TTF/DESY) facility [1]. In the frame of a collaborative agreement, Fermilab will provide DESY with a cryomodule containing a string of four cavities. In addition, a second cryomodule with one cavity will be fabricated for installation in the Fermilab photo-injector, which will be upgraded for the ILC accelerator test facility. The first 9-cell Nb cavities were tested in a vertical setup and they didn't reach the designed accelerating gradient [2]. The main problem was a multipactor in the HOM couplers, which lead to overheating and quenching of the HOM couplers. New HOM couplers with improved design are integrated in the next 9-cell cavities. In this paper we present all results of the vertical tests.

  20. Cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. II - Accelerated cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A cycle life test of nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered-type nickel electrode were carried out at 23 C using a 45-min accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. Ten cells containing 21 to 36 percent KOH were tested. Since this accelerated test regime accelerated the cycle life roughly twice as fast as a typical LEO regime, the present results indicate that the cells with 26 percent KOH may last over 5 years in an 80 percent depth-of-discharge cycling in an LEO regime. Cells with lower KOH concentrations (21 to 23.5 percent) also showed longer cycle life than those with KOH concentrations of 31 percent or higher, although the life was shorter than those with 26 percent KOH.

  1. Atmospheric corrosion model and monitor for low cost solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.; Mansfeld, F. B.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M.

    1981-01-01

    An atmospheric corrosion model and corrosion monitoring system has been developed for low cost solar arrays (LSA). The corrosion model predicts that corrosion rate is the product of the surface condensation probability of water vapor and the diffusion controlled corrosion current. This corrosion model is verified by simultaneous monitoring of weather conditions and corrosion rates at the solar array test site at Mead, Nebraska.

  2. Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Prelas

    2009-06-25

    This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

  3. Globular Clusters as a Test for Gravity in the Weak Acceleration Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Marconi, Gianni; Gilmozzi, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    Non-baryonic Dark Matter (DM) appears in galaxies and other cosmic structures when and only when the acceleration of gravity, as computed considering only baryons, goes below a well defined value a0 = 1.2 × 10-8 cm s-2. This fact is extremely important and suggestive of the possibility of a breakdown of Newton's law of gravity (or inertia) below a0. It is therefore important to verify whether Newton's law of gravity holds in this regime of accelerations. In order to do this, one has to study the dynamics of objects that do not contain significant amounts of DM and therefore should follow Newton's prediction for whatever small accelerations. Globular clusters are believed, even by strong supporters of DM, to contain negligible amounts of DM and therefore are ideal for testing Newtonian dynamics in the low acceleration limit. Here, we discuss the status of an ongoing program aimed to do this test. Compared to other studies of globular clsuters, the novelty is that we trace the velocity dispersion profile of globular clusters far enough from the center to probe gravitational accelerations well below a0. In all three clusters studied so far the velocity dispersion is found to remain constant at large radii rather than follow the Keplerian falloff. On average, the flattening occurs at the radius where the cluster internal acceleration of gravity is 1.8 +/- 0.4 × 10-8 cm s-2, fully consistent with MOND predictions.

  4. Production and test results of SC 3.9-GHz accelerating cavity at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Timergali; Cooper, Charlie; Edwards, Helen; Foley, Mike; Gonin, Ivan; Mitchell, Donald; Olis, D.; Rowe, Allan; Salman, Tariq; Solyak, Nikolay; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The 3rd harmonic 3.9GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve beam performances for TTF-FEL facility. In the frame of collaboration Fermilab will provide DESY with a cryomodule containing a string of four cavities. In addition, a second cryomodule with one cavity will be fabricated for installation in the Fermilab photo-injector, which will be upgraded for the ILC accelerator test facility. In this paper we discuss the status of the cavity and coupler production and the first result of cavity tests. It is hoped that this project will be completed during the first half of 2007 and the cryomodule delivered to DESY in this time span.

  5. Development of a photovoltaic module qualification test based on combined-environment accelerated stress data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchard, S. E.; Royal, E.; Anderson, R. T.

    The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a qualification test to screen photovoltaic modules for utilization on marine aids to navigation. The test is based on a combined-environment of hot and cold saltwater immersion and air pressurization. The test has demonstrated a very high acceleration factor and excellent correlation of electrical failures with modules in a concurrent real-time marine exposure.

  6. Development of a photovoltaic module qualification test based on combined-environment accelerated stress data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, S. E.; Royal, E.; Anderson, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a qualification test to screen photovoltaic modules for utilization on marine aids to navigation. The test is based on a combined-environment of hot and cold saltwater immersion and air pressurization. The test has demonstrated a very high acceleration factor and excellent correlation of electrical failures with modules in a concurrent real-time marine exposure.

  7. Effect of Waterproofing Admixtures on the Flexural Strength and Corrosion Resistance of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, A.; Perumal, P.

    2012-02-01

    This paper deals about the flexural strength and corrosion behaviour of concrete using waterproofing admixtures. The effect of waterproofing admixtures on the corrosion behaviour of RCC specimen has been studied by conducting accelerated corrosion test. To identify the effect of corrosion in pull out strength, corrosion process was induced by means of accelerated corrosion procedure. To accelerate the reinforcement corrosion, direct electric current was impressed on the rebar embedded in the specimen using a DC power supply system that has a facility to adjust voltage. The addition of waterproofing admixtures also shows the improvement in the flexural strength of concrete has been studied by conducting flexural strength tests on the concrete prism specimen of size 100 × 100 × 500 mm with and without admixtures for various dosages and various curing periods of 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the presence of waterproofing admixtures always improves the corrosion resistance and thus increases the strength of concrete due to the hydrophobic action of waterproofing admixtures.

  8. Two novel prediction models improve predictions of skin corrosive sub-categories by test methods of OECD Test Guideline No. 431.

    PubMed

    Desprez, Bertrand; Barroso, João; Griesinger, Claudius; Kandárová, Helena; Alépée, Nathalie; Fuchs, Horst W

    2015-12-01

    Alternative test methods often use prediction models (PMs) for converting endpoint measurements into predictions. Two PMs are used for the skin corrosion tests (SCTs) of the OECD Test Guideline No. 431 (TG 431). One is specific to EpiSkin™ test method, whereas EpiDerm™, SkinEthic™ RHE and epiCS® share a common PM. These methods are based on reconstructed human epidermis models wherein cell viability values are measured. Their PMs allow translating those values into sub-categories of corrosive chemicals, Category 1A (Cat1A) and a combination of Categories 1B/1C (Cat1BC), and identifying non-corrosive (NC) chemicals. EpiSkin™'s PM already results in sufficiently accurate predictions. The common PM of the three others accurately identifies all corrosive chemicals but, for sub-categorization, an important fraction of Cat1BC chemicals (40-50%) is over-predicted as Cat1A. This paper presents a post-hoc analysis of validation data on a set of n=80 chemicals. It investigates: why this common PM causes these over-predictions and how two novel PMs that we developed (PMvar1 and PMvar2) improve the predictive capacity of these methods. PMvar1 is based on a two-step approach; PMvar2 is based on a single composite indicator of cell viability. Both showed a greater capacity to predict Cat1BC, while Cat1A correct predictions remaining at least at the same level of EpiSkin™. We suggest revising TG 431, to include the novel PMs in view of improving the predictive capacity of its SCTs. PMID:26320836

  9. Testing of vacuum pumps for the Accelerator Production of Tritium/Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kishiyama, K.; Shen, S.; Behne, D.; Wilson, N.G.; Schrage, D.; Valdiviez, R.

    1998-12-31

    Two vacuum systems were designed and built for the RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) cavity in the APT/LEDA (Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator) linac. The gas load from the proton beam required very high hydrogen pump speed and capacity. The gas load from the high power RF windows also required very high hydrogen pump speed for the RF window vacuum system. Cryopumps were chosen for the RFQ vacuum system and ST185 sintered non-evaporable getter (NEG) cartridges were chosen for the RF window vacuum system. Hydrogen pump speed and capacity measurements were carried out for a commercial cryopump and a NEG pump. This paper will discuss the test procedures and the results of the measurements.

  10. Do sediment type and test durations affect results of laboratory-based, accelerated testing studies of permeable pavement clogging?

    PubMed

    Nichols, Peter W B; White, Richard; Lucke, Terry

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have attempted to quantify the clogging processes of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers (PICPs) using accelerated testing methods. However, the results have been variable. This study investigated the effects that three different sediment types (natural and silica), and different simulated rainfall intensities, and testing durations had on the observed clogging processes (and measured surface infiltration rates) of laboratory-based, accelerated PICP testing studies. Results showed that accelerated simulated laboratory testing results are highly dependent on the type, and size of sediment used in the experiments. For example, when using real stormwater sediment up to 1.18 mm in size, the results showed that neither testing duration, nor stormwater application rate had any significant effect on PICP clogging. However, the study clearly showed that shorter testing durations generally increased clogging and reduced the surface infiltration rates of the models when artificial silica sediment was used. Longer testing durations also generally increased clogging of the models when using fine sediment (<300 μm). Results from this study will help researchers and designers better anticipate when and why PICPs are susceptible to clogging, reduce maintenance and extend the useful life of these increasingly common stormwater best management practices. PMID:25618819

  11. Real-time and accelerated outdoor endurance testing of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Anagnostou, E.

    1977-01-01

    Real-time and accelerated outdoor endurance testing was performed on a variety of samples of interest to the National Photovoltaic Conversion Program. The real-time tests were performed at seven different sites and the accelerated tests were performed at one of those sites in the southwestern United States. The purpose of the tests were to help evaluate the lifetime of photovoltaic systems. Three types of samples were tested; transmission samples of possible cover materials, sub-modules constructed using these materials attached to solar cells, and solar cell modules produced by the manufacturers for the ERDA program. Results indicate that suitable cover materials are glass, FEP-A and PFA. Dirt accumulation and cleanability are important factors in the selection of solar cell module covers and encapsulants.

  12. A self-injection acceleration test experiment for the FLAME laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labate, L.; Anelli, F.; Bacci, A.; Batani, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Benedetti, C.; Benocci, R.; Cacciotti, L.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Ciricosta, O.; Clozza, A.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Drenska, N.; Faccini, R.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Gallo, S.; Fioravanti, S.; Gamucci, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Köster, P.; Levato, T.; Lollo, V.; Pace, E.; Pathak, N.; Rossi, A.; Serafini, L.; Turchetti, G.; Vaccarezza, C.; Valente, P.; Vicario, C.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2010-10-01

    A 250-TW laser system (FLAME - Frascati laser for acceleration and multidisciplinary experiments) is now in its commissioning phase in a new laboratory at LNF-INFN in the framework of the PLASMONX (Plasma acceleration and monochromatic X-ray generation) project. The laser will deliver<25 fs duration pulses with an energy up to 6 J, at a 10 Hz repetition rate. An ad hoc target area has also been designed and is currently being set up, allowing the first test experiments of electron laser wakefield acceleration to be carried out over the next few months in a safe, radiation-protected environment. An overview of the main features of the laser system and target area is given, along with a survey of the design and set-up of the self-injection test experiment, which is expected to reach the production of sub-GeV electron bunches.

  13. Experimental Testing of a Micron-Scale Laser-Powered Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Travish, G.; Arab, E.; Lacroix, U. H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Vartanian, N.; Yoder, R. B.

    2009-01-22

    An experimental program to develop, perfect, and demonstrate a micron-scale dielectric-based slab-symmetric accelerator is underway at UCLA. The effort includes parallel development of a particle source to be integrated with the accelerator, forming a monolithic radiation source. We present results from first-round cold tests of the structure resonance on a simplified metal-walled device, containing >100 structure periods in an area of 100x20 {mu}m. The resonance frequency and strength can be observed via reflection and transmission measurements on the drive laser. Initial measurements may be consistent with simulation. We also report on the status of the electron source development and on work toward an acceleration test in an all-dielectric structure.

  14. Flow Accelerated Erosion-Corrosion (FAC) considerations for secondary side piping in the AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhoff, J. F.; Rao, G. V.; Stein, A.

    2012-07-01

    The issue of Flow Accelerated Erosion-Corrosion (FAC) in power plant piping is a known phenomenon that has resulted in material replacements and plant accidents in operating power plants. Therefore, it is important for FAC resistance to be considered in the design of new nuclear power plants. This paper describes the design considerations related to FAC that were used to develop a safe and robust AP1000{sup R} plant secondary side piping design. The primary FAC influencing factors include: - Fluid Temperature - Pipe Geometry/layout - Fluid Chemistry - Fluid Velocity - Pipe Material Composition - Moisture Content (in steam lines) Due to the unknowns related to the relative impact of the influencing factors and the complexities of the interactions between these factors, it is difficult to accurately predict the expected wear rate in a given piping segment in a new plant. This paper provides: - a description of FAC and the factors that influence the FAC degradation rate, - an assessment of the level of FAC resistance of AP1000{sup R} secondary side system piping, - an explanation of options to increase FAC resistance and associated benefits/cost, - discussion of development of a tool for predicting FAC degradation rate in new nuclear power plants. (authors)

  15. Ion leaching from dental ceramics during static in vitro corrosion testing.

    PubMed

    Milleding, Percy; Haraldsson, Conny; Karlsson, Stig

    2002-09-15

    Dental ceramics are often called inert materials. It can be hypothesized, however, that differences in the composition, microstructure, and environmental conditions will affect the degree of corrosion degradation in an aqueous environment. The aims of the study were, therefore, to study the ion dissolution from glass-phase ceramics, with or without crystalline inclusions, and from all-crystalline ceramics and to compare the effects of different corrosion media. Ceramic specimens were produced from glass-phase and oxide ceramics and given an equivalent surface smoothness, after which they were subjected to in vitro corrosion (Milli-Q water at 37 +/- 2 degrees C for 18 h and 4% acetic acid solution at 80 +/- 2 degrees C for 18 h, respectively). The temperature of the corrosion solution was slowly increased until it reached 80 +/- 2 degrees C to reduce the risk of microcrack formation at the surface. The analyses of ion leakage were performed with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. A large number of inorganic elements leached out from the various dental ceramics. The major leaching elements were sodium and potassium; in the acid-corrosion experiments, there were also magnesium, silicon, and aluminum and, on a lower scale, yttrium, calcium, and chromium. The various glass-phase ceramics displayed significant differences in ion leakage and significantly higher leakage values than all-crystalline alumina and zirconia ceramics. No significant difference in dissolution was found between high and low-sintering glass-phase ceramics or between glass-phase ceramics with high volume fractions of crystallites in the glass phase in comparison with those with lower crystalline content. It can be concluded, therefore, that none of the dental ceramics studied are chemically inert in an aqueous environment. PMID:12115444

  16. Test-particle acceleration in a hierarchical three-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Dalena, S.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Dmitruk, P.; Greco, A.

    2014-03-10

    The acceleration of charged particles is relevant to the solar corona over a broad range of scales and energies. High-energy particles are usually detected in concomitance with large energy release events like solar eruptions and flares. Nevertheless, acceleration can occur at smaller scales, characterized by dynamical activity near current sheets. To gain insight into the complex scenario of coronal charged particle acceleration, we investigate the properties of acceleration with a test-particle approach using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. These are obtained from direct solutions of the reduced MHD equations, well suited for a plasma embedded in a strong axial magnetic field, relevant to the inner heliosphere. A multi-box, multiscale technique is used to solve the equations of motion for protons. This method allows us to resolve an extended range of scales present in the system, namely, from the ion inertial scale of the order of a meter up to macroscopic scales of the order of 10 km (1/100th of the outer scale of the system). This new technique is useful to identify the mechanisms that, acting at different scales, are responsible for acceleration to high energies of a small fraction of the particles in the coronal plasma. We report results that describe acceleration at different stages over a broad range of time, length, and energy scales.

  17. Design and test results of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.; Bradley, J. III; Cummings, K.; Lynch, M.; Regan, A.; Rohlev, T.; Roybal, W.; Wang, Y.M.

    1998-12-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The APT accelerator requires over 200 RF systems each with a continuous wave output power of 1 MW. The reliability and availability of these RF systems is critical to the successful operation of the APT plant and prototypes of these systems are being developed and demonstrated on LEDA. The RF system design for LEDA includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz continuous wave (CW), RF systems driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and one, 1.0 MW, CW, RF system driving a coupled-cavity drift tube linac (CCDTL). This paper presents the design and test results for these RF systems including the klystrons, cathode power supply, circulators, RF vacuum windows, accelerator field and resonance control system, and RF transmission components. The three RF systems driving the RFQ use the accelerating structure as a power combiner, and this places some unique requirements on the RF system. These requirements and corresponding operational implications will be discussed.

  18. The conversion of CESR to operate as the Test Accelerator, CesrTA. Part 1: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billing, M. G.

    2015-07-01

    Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it ideal for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper outlines the motivation, design and conversion of CESR to a test accelerator, CESRTA, enhanced to study such subjects as low emittance tuning methods, electron cloud (EC) effects, intra-beam scattering, fast ion instabilities as well as general improvements to beam instrumentation. While the initial studies of CESRTA focussed on questions related to the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring design, CESRTA is a very flexible storage ring, capable of studying a wide range of accelerator physics and instrumentation questions. This paper contains the outline and the basis for a set of papers documenting the reconfiguration of the storage ring and the associated instrumentation required for the studies described above. Further details may be found in these papers.

  19. Lifetime Prediction for Degradation of Solar Mirrors using Step-Stress Accelerated Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Kennedy, C.; Gray, M.; Jones, W.

    2011-09-01

    This research is to illustrate the use of statistical inference techniques in order to quantify the uncertainty surrounding reliability estimates in a step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) scenario. SSADT can be used when a researcher is faced with a resource-constrained environment, e.g., limits on chamber time or on the number of units to test. We apply the SSADT methodology to a degradation experiment involving concentrated solar power (CSP) mirrors and compare the results to a more traditional multiple accelerated testing paradigm. Specifically, our work includes: (1) designing a durability testing plan for solar mirrors (3M's new improved silvered acrylic "Solar Reflector Film (SFM) 1100") through the ultra-accelerated weathering system (UAWS), (2) defining degradation paths of optical performance based on the SSADT model which is accelerated by high UV-radiant exposure, and (3) developing service lifetime prediction models for solar mirrors using advanced statistical inference. We use the method of least squares to estimate the model parameters and this serves as the basis for the statistical inference in SSADT. Several quantities of interest can be estimated from this procedure, e.g., mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) and warranty time. The methods allow for the estimation of quantities that may be of interest to the domain scientists.

  20. Results of metallographical diagnostic examination of Navy half-watt thermoelectric converters degraded by accelerated tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosell, F. E., Jr.; Rouklove, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    To verify the 15-year reliability of the Navy half-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG), bismuth-telluride thermoelectric converters were submitted to testing at high temperatures which accelerated the degradation and caused failure of the converters. Metallographic diagnostic examination of failed units verified failure mechanisms. Results of diagnostic examinations are presented.